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Sample records for population-based lifetime modeling

  1. Universal Screening for Emotional and Behavioral Problems: Fitting a Population-Based Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schanding, G. Thomas, Jr.; Nowell, Kerri P.

    2013-01-01

    Schools have begun to adopt a population-based method to conceptualizing assessment and intervention of students; however, little empirical evidence has been gathered to support this shift in service delivery. The present study examined the fit of a population-based model in identifying students' behavioral and emotional functioning using a…

  2. Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-03-01

    Models describing battery degradation physics are needed to more accurately understand how battery usage and next-generation battery designs can be optimized for performance and lifetime. Such lifetime models may also reduce the cost of battery aging experiments and shorten the time required to validate battery lifetime. Models for chemical degradation and mechanical stress are reviewed. Experimental analysis of aging data from a commercial iron-phosphate lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell elucidates the relative importance of several mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms.

  3. POPULATION-BASED EXPOSURE MODELING FOR AIR POLLUTANTS AT EPA'S NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been developing, applying, and evaluating population-based exposure models to improve our understanding of the variability in personal exposure to air pollutants. Estimates of population variability are needed for E...

  4. Population based models of cortical drug response: insights from anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bojak, Ingo; Liley, David T. J.

    2008-01-01

    A great explanatory gap lies between the molecular pharmacology of psychoactive agents and the neurophysiological changes they induce, as recorded by neuroimaging modalities. Causally relating the cellular actions of psychoactive compounds to their influence on population activity is experimentally challenging. Recent developments in the dynamical modelling of neural tissue have attempted to span this explanatory gap between microscopic targets and their macroscopic neurophysiological effects via a range of biologically plausible dynamical models of cortical tissue. Such theoretical models allow exploration of neural dynamics, in particular their modification by drug action. The ability to theoretically bridge scales is due to a biologically plausible averaging of cortical tissue properties. In the resulting macroscopic neural field, individual neurons need not be explicitly represented (as in neural networks). The following paper aims to provide a non-technical introduction to the mean field population modelling of drug action and its recent successes in modelling anaesthesia. PMID:19003456

  5. The association between a lifetime history of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and future neck pain: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Pierre; Cassidy, J. David; Carroll, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this population-based cohort study was to investigate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury from a motor vehicle collision and the development of troublesome neck pain. The current evidence suggests that individuals with a history of neck injury in a traffic collision are more likely to experience future neck pain. However, these results may suffer from residual confounding. Therefore, there is a need to test this association in a large population-based cohort with adequate control of known confounders. We formed a cohort of 919 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild neck pain in September 1995. At baseline, participants were asked if they ever injured their neck in a motor vehicle collision. Six and twelve months later, we asked about the presence of troublesome neck pain (grade II–IV) on the chronic pain grade questionnaire. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain while controlling for known confounders. The follow-up rate was 73.5% (676/919) at 6 months and 63.1% (580/919) at 1 year. We found a positive association between a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain after controlling for bodily pain and body mass index (adjusted HRR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.12–4.10). Our analysis suggests that a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision is a risk factor for developing future troublesome neck pain. The consequences of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision can have long lasting effects and predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of neck pain. PMID:20213298

  6. Aging behavior and lifetime modeling for polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.

    2010-05-15

    In this paper, polycarbonate (PC) as a material candidate for solar absorber applications is investigated as to the aging behavior at different temperatures in air and water. The aging conditioning was performed in air in the temperature range from 120 to 140 C and in water between 70 and 95 C. Tensile tests were performed on unaged and aged PC film specimens at ambient temperature using strain-to-break values as a performance indicator for the degree of aging. For PC the effect of aging was found to strongly depend on the aging conditions. Activation energy based lifetime prediction models according to various methods described in the literature were applied. The activation energies and corresponding lifetime predictions for the temperature range from 40 to 60 C in water and from 90 to 110 C in air derived from these models are compared and interpreted as to their practical relevance. (author)

  7. Validation of population-based disease simulation models: a review of concepts and methods

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Computer simulation models are used increasingly to support public health research and policy, but questions about their quality persist. The purpose of this article is to review the principles and methods for validation of population-based disease simulation models. Methods We developed a comprehensive framework for validating population-based chronic disease simulation models and used this framework in a review of published model validation guidelines. Based on the review, we formulated a set of recommendations for gathering evidence of model credibility. Results Evidence of model credibility derives from examining: 1) the process of model development, 2) the performance of a model, and 3) the quality of decisions based on the model. Many important issues in model validation are insufficiently addressed by current guidelines. These issues include a detailed evaluation of different data sources, graphical representation of models, computer programming, model calibration, between-model comparisons, sensitivity analysis, and predictive validity. The role of external data in model validation depends on the purpose of the model (e.g., decision analysis versus prediction). More research is needed on the methods of comparing the quality of decisions based on different models. Conclusion As the role of simulation modeling in population health is increasing and models are becoming more complex, there is a need for further improvements in model validation methodology and common standards for evaluating model credibility. PMID:21087466

  8. Heuristic Modeling for TRMM Lifetime Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, P. S.; Sharer, P. J.; DeFazio, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis time for computing the expected mission lifetimes of proposed frequently maneuvering, tightly altitude constrained, Earth orbiting spacecraft have been significantly reduced by means of a heuristic modeling method implemented in a commercial-off-the-shelf spreadsheet product (QuattroPro) running on a personal computer (PC). The method uses a look-up table to estimate the maneuver frequency per month as a function of the spacecraft ballistic coefficient and the solar flux index, then computes the associated fuel use by a simple engine model. Maneuver frequency data points are produced by means of a single 1-month run of traditional mission analysis software for each of the 12 to 25 data points required for the table. As the data point computations are required only a mission design start-up and on the occasion of significant mission redesigns, the dependence on time consuming traditional modeling methods is dramatically reduced. Results to date have agreed with traditional methods to within 1 to 1.5 percent. The spreadsheet approach is applicable to a wide variety of Earth orbiting spacecraft with tight altitude constraints. It will be particularly useful to such missions as the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission scheduled for launch in 1997, whose mission lifetime calculations are heavily dependent on frequently revised solar flux predictions.

  9. Models of population-based analyses for data collected from large extended families

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Devereux, Richard B.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Laston, Sandra; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Shara, Nawar M.; Welty, Thomas K.

    2014-01-01

    Large studies of extended families usually collect valuable phenotypic data that may have scientific value for purposes other than testing genetic hypotheses if the families were not selected in a biased manner. These purposes include assessing population-based associations of diseases with risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics such as disease prevalence and incidence. Relatedness among participants however, violates the traditional assumption of independent observations in these classic analyses. The commonly used adjustment method for relatedness in population-based analyses is to use marginal models, in which clusters (families) are assumed to be independent (unrelated) with a simple and identical covariance (family) structure such as those called independent, exchangeable and unstructured covariance structures. However, using these simple covariance structures may not be optimally appropriate for outcomes collected from large extended families, and may under- or over-estimate the variances of estimators and thus lead to uncertainty in inferences. Moreover, the assumption that families are unrelated with an identical family structure in a marginal model may not be satisfied for family studies with large extended families. The aim of this paper is to propose models incorporating marginal models approaches with a covariance structure for assessing population-based associations of diseases with their risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics for epidemiological studies while adjusting for the complicated relatedness among outcomes (continuous/categorical, normally/non-normally distributed) collected from large extended families. We also discuss theoretical issues of the proposed models and show that the proposed models and covariance structure are appropriate for and capable of achieving the aim. PMID:20882324

  10. Socioeconomic Status During Lifetime and Cognitive Impairment No-Dementia in Late Life: The Population-Based Aging in the Chianti Area (InCHIANTI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Fratiglioni, Laura; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Thousand and twelve dementia-free elderly (60–98 years old) enrolled in the In Chianti Study (Italy) were evaluated at baseline (1998–2000) and at 3-year follow-up (2001–2003) with the aim of analyzing the association of lifetime socioeconomic status (SES) with prevalent and incident cognitive impairment no-dementia (CIND). SES was defined from information on formal education, longest held occupation, and financial conditions through life. CIND was defined as age-adjusted Mini-Mental State Examination score one standard deviation below the baseline mean score of participants without dementia. Logistic regression and Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the association of SES with CIND. Demographics, occupation characteristics (i.e., job stress and physical demand), cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, smoking, alcohol consumption, depressive symptoms, and C-reactive protein were considered potential confounders. Prevalence of CIND was 17.7%. In the fully adjusted model, low education (OR = 2.1; 95% confidence intervals, CI = 1.4 to 3.2) was associated with prevalent CIND. Incidence rate of CIND was 66.0 per 1000 person-years. Low education (HR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.6) and manual occupation (HR = 1.9; 95% CI =1.0 to 3.6) were associated with incident CIND. Among covariates, high job-related physical demand was associated with both prevalent and incident CIND (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1 to 2.4 and HR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.0 to 2.3). After stratification for education, manual occupation was still associated with CIND among participants with high education (HR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.2 to 4.3 versus HR = 1.4; 95% CI = 0.2 to 10.4 among those with low education). Proxy markers of lifetime SES (low education, manual occupation and high physical demand) are cross-sectional correlates of CIND and predict incident CIND over a three-year follow-up. PMID:21297261

  11. Scalable Entity-Based Modeling of Population-Based Systems, Final LDRD Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, A J; Smith, S G; Vassilevska, T K; Jefferson, D R

    2005-01-27

    The goal of this project has been to develop tools, capabilities and expertise in the modeling of complex population-based systems via scalable entity-based modeling (EBM). Our initial focal application domain has been the dynamics of large populations exposed to disease-causing agents, a topic of interest to the Department of Homeland Security in the context of bioterrorism. In the academic community, discrete simulation technology based on individual entities has shown initial success, but the technology has not been scaled to the problem sizes or computational resources of LLNL. Our developmental emphasis has been on the extension of this technology to parallel computers and maturation of the technology from an academic to a lab setting.

  12. Comprehensive, Population-Based Sensitivity Analysis of a Two-Mass Vocal Fold Model.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Daniel; Zañartu, Matías; Cook, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Previous vocal fold modeling studies have generally focused on generating detailed data regarding a narrow subset of possible model configurations. These studies can be interpreted to be the investigation of a single subject under one or more vocal conditions. In this study, a broad population-based sensitivity analysis is employed to examine the behavior of a virtual population of subjects and to identify trends between virtual individuals as opposed to investigating a single subject or model instance. Four different sensitivity analysis techniques were used in accomplishing this task. Influential relationships between model input parameters and model outputs were identified, and an exploration of the model's parameter space was conducted. Results indicate that the behavior of the selected two-mass model is largely dominated by complex interactions, and that few input-output pairs have a consistent effect on the model. Results from the analysis can be used to increase the efficiency of optimization routines of reduced-order models used to investigate voice abnormalities. Results also demonstrate the types of challenges and difficulties to be expected when applying sensitivity analyses to more complex vocal fold models. Such challenges are discussed and recommendations are made for future studies. PMID:26845452

  13. Comprehensive, Population-Based Sensitivity Analysis of a Two-Mass Vocal Fold Model

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Daniel; Zañartu, Matías; Cook, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Previous vocal fold modeling studies have generally focused on generating detailed data regarding a narrow subset of possible model configurations. These studies can be interpreted to be the investigation of a single subject under one or more vocal conditions. In this study, a broad population-based sensitivity analysis is employed to examine the behavior of a virtual population of subjects and to identify trends between virtual individuals as opposed to investigating a single subject or model instance. Four different sensitivity analysis techniques were used in accomplishing this task. Influential relationships between model input parameters and model outputs were identified, and an exploration of the model’s parameter space was conducted. Results indicate that the behavior of the selected two-mass model is largely dominated by complex interactions, and that few input-output pairs have a consistent effect on the model. Results from the analysis can be used to increase the efficiency of optimization routines of reduced-order models used to investigate voice abnormalities. Results also demonstrate the types of challenges and difficulties to be expected when applying sensitivity analyses to more complex vocal fold models. Such challenges are discussed and recommendations are made for future studies. PMID:26845452

  14. Toxicogenetics: population-based testing of drug and chemical safety in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Rusyn, Ivan; Gatti, Daniel M; Wiltshire, Timothy; Wilshire, Timothy; Kleeberger, Steven R; Threadgill, David W

    2010-08-01

    The rapid decline in the cost of dense genotyping is paving the way for new DNA sequence-based laboratory tests to move quickly into clinical practice, and to ultimately help realize the promise of 'personalized' therapies. These advances are based on the growing appreciation of genetics as an important dimension in science and the practice of investigative pharmacology and toxicology. On the clinical side, both the regulators and the pharmaceutical industry hope that the early identification of individuals prone to adverse drug effects will keep advantageous medicines on the market for the benefit of the vast majority of prospective patients. On the environmental health protection side, there is a clear need for better science to define the range and causes of susceptibility to adverse effects of chemicals in the population, so that the appropriate regulatory limits are established. In both cases, most of the research effort is focused on genome-wide association studies in humans where de novo genotyping of each subject is required. At the same time, the power of population-based preclinical safety testing in rodent models (e.g., mouse) remains to be fully exploited. Here, we highlight the approaches available to utilize the knowledge of DNA sequence and genetic diversity of the mouse as a species in mechanistic toxicology research. We posit that appropriate genetically defined mouse models may be combined with the limited data from human studies to not only discover the genetic determinants of susceptibility, but to also understand the molecular underpinnings of toxicity. PMID:20704464

  15. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kandler; Wood, Eric; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Kim, Gi-heon; Shi, Ying; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-06-15

    It remains an open question how best to predict real-world battery lifetime based on accelerated calendar and cycle aging data from the laboratory. Multiple degradation mechanisms due to (electro)chemical, thermal, and mechanical coupled phenomena influence Li-ion battery lifetime, each with different dependence on time, cycling and thermal environment. The standardization of life predictive models would benefit the industry by reducing test time and streamlining development of system controls.

  16. Progress towards a PETN Lifetime Prediction Model

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Overturf III, G E; Gee, R; Lewis, P; Qiu, R; Phillips, D; Weeks, B; Pitchimani, R; Maiti, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Hrousis, C

    2006-09-11

    Dinegar (1) showed that decreases in PETN surface area causes EBW detonator function times to increase. Thermal aging causes PETN to agglomerate, shrink, and densify indicating a ''sintering'' process. It has long been a concern that the formation of a gap between the PETN and the bridgewire may lead to EBW detonator failure. These concerns have led us to develop a model to predict the rate of coarsening that occurs with age for thermally driven PETN powder (50% TMD). To understand PETN contributions to detonator aging we need three things: (1) Curves describing function time dependence on specific surface area, density, and gap. (2) A measurement of the critical gap distance for no fire as a function of density and surface area for various wire configurations. (3) A model describing how specific surface area, density and gap change with time and temperature. We've had good success modeling high temperature surface area reduction and function time increase using a phenomenological deceleratory kinetic model based on a distribution of parallel nth-order reactions having evenly spaced activation energies where weighing factors of the reactions follows a Gaussian distribution about the reaction with the mean activation energy (Figure 1). Unfortunately, the mean activation energy derived from this approach is high (typically {approx}75 kcal/mol) so that negligible sintering is predicted for temperatures below 40 C. To make more reliable predictions, we've established a three-part effort to understand PETN mobility. First, we've measured the rates of step movement and pit nucleation as a function of temperature from 30 to 50 C for single crystals. Second, we've measured the evaporation rate from single crystals and powders from 105 to 135 C to obtain an activation energy for evaporation. Third, we've pursued mechanistic kinetic modeling of surface mobility, evaporation, and ripening.

  17. Model selection and inference for censored lifetime medical expenditures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brent A; Long, Qi; Huang, Yijian; Chansky, Kari; Redman, Mary

    2016-09-01

    Identifying factors associated with increased medical cost is important for many micro- and macro-institutions, including the national economy and public health, insurers and the insured. However, assembling comprehensive national databases that include both the cost and individual-level predictors can prove challenging. Alternatively, one can use data from smaller studies with the understanding that conclusions drawn from such analyses may be limited to the participant population. At the same time, smaller clinical studies have limited follow-up and lifetime medical cost may not be fully observed for all study participants. In this context, we develop new model selection methods and inference procedures for secondary analyses of clinical trial data when lifetime medical cost is subject to induced censoring. Our model selection methods extend a theory of penalized estimating function to a calibration regression estimator tailored for this data type. Next, we develop a novel inference procedure for the unpenalized regression estimator using perturbation and resampling theory. Then, we extend this resampling plan to accommodate regularized coefficient estimation of censored lifetime medical cost and develop postselection inference procedures for the final model. Our methods are motivated by data from Southwest Oncology Group Protocol 9509, a clinical trial of patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer, and our models of lifetime medical cost are specific to this population. But the methods presented in this article are built on rather general techniques and could be applied to larger databases as those data become available. PMID:26689300

  18. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-09-01

    Predictive models of Li-ion battery reliability must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. Complicating matters, Li-ion batteries can experience several path dependent degradation trajectories dependent on storage and cycling history of the application environment. Rates of degradation are controlled by factors such as temperature history, electrochemical operating window, and charge/discharge rate. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must be absorbed by overdesign and warranty costs. Degradation models are needed that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. Models should also provide engineering feedback for next generation battery designs. This presentation reviews both multi-dimensional physical models and simpler, lumped surrogate models of battery electrochemical and mechanical degradation. Models are compared with cell- and pack-level aging data from commercial Li-ion chemistries. The analysis elucidates the relative importance of electrochemical and mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms in real-world operating environments. Opportunities for extending the lifetime of commercial battery systems are explored.

  19. Implications of model bias in carbon monoxide for methane lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strode, S. A.; Duncan, B. N.; Yegorova, E. A.; Kouatchou, J.; Ziemke, J. R.; Douglass, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    A low bias in carbon monoxide (CO) at high northern latitudes is a common feature of chemistry climate models (CCMs) that may indicate or contribute to a high bias in simulated OH and corresponding low bias in methane lifetime. We use simulations with CO tagged by source type to investigate the sensitivity of the CO bias to CO emissions, global mean OH, and the hemispheric asymmetry of OH. Our results show that reducing the hemispheric asymmetry of OH improves the agreement of simulated CO with observations. We use simulations with parameterized OH to quantify the impact of known model biases on simulated OH. Removing biases in ozone and water vapor as well as reducing Northern Hemisphere NOx does not remove the hemispheric asymmetry in OH, but brings the simulated methyl chloroform lifetime into agreement with observation-based estimates.

  20. Simulation of Population-Based Commuter Exposure to NO2 Using Different Air Pollution Models

    PubMed Central

    Ragettli, Martina S.; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; de Nazelle, Audrey; Schindler, Christian; Ineichen, Alex; Ducret-Stich, Regina E.; Perez, Laura; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Künzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C.

    2014-01-01

    We simulated commuter routes and long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution during commute in a representative population sample in Basel (Switzerland), and evaluated three air pollution models with different spatial resolution for estimating commute exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Our approach includes spatially and temporally resolved data on actual commuter routes, travel modes and three air pollution models. Annual mean NO2 commuter exposures were similar between models. However, we found more within-city and within-subject variability in annual mean (±SD) NO2 commuter exposure with a high resolution dispersion model (40 ± 7 µg m−3, range: 21–61) than with a dispersion model with a lower resolution (39 ± 5 µg m−3; range: 24–51), and a land use regression model (41 ± 5 µg m−3; range: 24–54). Highest median cumulative exposures were calculated along motorized transport and bicycle routes, and the lowest for walking. For estimating commuter exposure within a city and being interested also in small-scale variability between roads, a model with a high resolution is recommended. For larger scale epidemiological health assessment studies, models with a coarser spatial resolution are likely sufficient, especially when study areas include suburban and rural areas. PMID:24823664

  1. Simulation of population-based commuter exposure to NO₂ using different air pollution models.

    PubMed

    Ragettli, Martina S; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; de Nazelle, Audrey; Schindler, Christian; Ineichen, Alex; Ducret-Stich, Regina E; Perez, Laura; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Künzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C

    2014-05-01

    We simulated commuter routes and long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution during commute in a representative population sample in Basel (Switzerland), and evaluated three air pollution models with different spatial resolution for estimating commute exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Our approach includes spatially and temporally resolved data on actual commuter routes, travel modes and three air pollution models. Annual mean NO2 commuter exposures were similar between models. However, we found more within-city and within-subject variability in annual mean (±SD) NO2 commuter exposure with a high resolution dispersion model (40 ± 7 µg m(-3), range: 21-61) than with a dispersion model with a lower resolution (39 ± 5 µg m(-3); range: 24-51), and a land use regression model (41 ± 5 µg m(-3); range: 24-54). Highest median cumulative exposures were calculated along motorized transport and bicycle routes, and the lowest for walking. For estimating commuter exposure within a city and being interested also in small-scale variability between roads, a model with a high resolution is recommended. For larger scale epidemiological health assessment studies, models with a coarser spatial resolution are likely sufficient, especially when study areas include suburban and rural areas. PMID:24823664

  2. Evaluation of a spatially resolved forest fire smoke model for population-based epidemiologic exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiayun; Eyamie, Jeff; Henderson, Sarah B

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to forest fire smoke (FFS) is associated with multiple adverse health effects, mostly respiratory. Findings for cardiovascular effects have been inconsistent, possibly related to the limitations of conventional methods to assess FFS exposure. In previous work, we developed an empirical model to estimate smoke-related fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for all populated areas in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Here, we evaluate the utility of our model by comparing epidemiologic associations between modeled and measured PM2.5. For each local health area (LHA), we used Poisson regression to estimate the effects of PM2.5 estimates and measurements on counts of medication dispensations and outpatient physician visits. We then used meta-regression to estimate the overall effects. A 10 μg/m(3) increase in modeled PM2.5 was associated with increased sabutamol dispensations (RR=1.04, 95% CI 1.03-1.06), and physician visits for asthma (1.06, 1.04-1.08), COPD (1.02, 1.00-1.03), lower respiratory infections (1.03, 1.00-1.05), and otitis media (1.05, 1.03-1.07), all comparable to measured PM2.5. Effects on cardiovascular outcomes were only significant using model estimates in all LHAs during extreme fire days. This suggests that the exposure model is a promising tool for increasing the power of epidemiologic studies to detect the health effects of FFS via improved spatial coverage and resolution. PMID:25294305

  3. The adverse effect of spasticity on 3-month poststroke outcome using a population-based model.

    PubMed

    Belagaje, S R; Lindsell, C; Moomaw, C J; Alwell, K; Flaherty, M L; Woo, D; Dunning, K; Khatri, P; Adeoye, O; Kleindorfer, D; Broderick, J; Kissela, B

    2014-01-01

    Several devices and medications have been used to address poststroke spasticity. Yet, spasticity's impact on outcomes remains controversial. Using data from a cohort of 460 ischemic stroke patients, we previously published a validated multivariable regression model for predicting 3-month modified Rankin Score (mRS) as an indicator of functional outcome. Here, we tested whether including spasticity improved model fit and estimated the effect spasticity had on the outcome. Spasticity was defined by a positive response to the question "Did you have spasticity following your stroke?" on direct interview at 3 months from stroke onset. Patients who had expired by 90 days (n = 30) or did not have spasticity data available (n = 102) were excluded. Spasticity affected the 3-month functional status (β = 0.420, 95 CI = 0.194 to 0.645) after accounting for age, diabetes, leukoaraiosis, and retrospective NIHSS. Using spasticity as a covariable, the model's R (2) changed from 0.599 to 0.622. In our model, the presence of spasticity in the cohort was associated with a worsened 3-month mRS by an average of 0.4 after adjusting for known covariables. This significant adverse effect on functional outcomes adds predictive value beyond previously established factors. PMID:25147752

  4. The Adverse Effect of Spasticity on 3-Month Poststroke Outcome Using a Population-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Belagaje, S. R.; Lindsell, C.; Moomaw, C. J.; Alwell, K.; Flaherty, M. L.; Woo, D.; Dunning, K.; Khatri, P.; Adeoye, O.; Kleindorfer, D.; Broderick, J.; Kissela, B.

    2014-01-01

    Several devices and medications have been used to address poststroke spasticity. Yet, spasticity's impact on outcomes remains controversial. Using data from a cohort of 460 ischemic stroke patients, we previously published a validated multivariable regression model for predicting 3-month modified Rankin Score (mRS) as an indicator of functional outcome. Here, we tested whether including spasticity improved model fit and estimated the effect spasticity had on the outcome. Spasticity was defined by a positive response to the question “Did you have spasticity following your stroke?” on direct interview at 3 months from stroke onset. Patients who had expired by 90 days (n = 30) or did not have spasticity data available (n = 102) were excluded. Spasticity affected the 3-month functional status (β = 0.420, 95 CI = 0.194 to 0.645) after accounting for age, diabetes, leukoaraiosis, and retrospective NIHSS. Using spasticity as a covariable, the model's R2 changed from 0.599 to 0.622. In our model, the presence of spasticity in the cohort was associated with a worsened 3-month mRS by an average of 0.4 after adjusting for known covariables. This significant adverse effect on functional outcomes adds predictive value beyond previously established factors. PMID:25147752

  5. Validation and extension of the PREMM1,2 model in a population-based cohort of colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer, Francesc; Balmaña, Judith; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Andreu, Montserrat; Llor, Xavier; Jover, Rodrigo; Syngal, Sapna; Castells, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background and aims Early recognition of patients at risk for Lynch syndrome is critical but often difficult. Recently, a predictive algorithm -the PREMM1,2 model- has been developed to quantify the risk of carrying a germline mutation in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1 and MSH2. However, its performance in an unselected, population-based colorectal cancer population as well as its performance in combination with tumor MMR testing are unknown. Methods We included all colorectal cancer cases from the EPICOLON study, a prospective, multicenter, population-based cohort (n=1,222). All patients underwent tumor microsatellite instability analysis and immunostaining for MLH1 and MSH2, and those with MMR deficiency (n=91) underwent tumor BRAF V600E mutation analysis and MLH1/MSH2 germline testing. Results The PREMM1,2 model with a ≥5% cut-off had a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of 100%, 68% and 2%, respectively. The use of a higher PREMM1,2 cut-off provided a higher specificity and PPV, at expense of a lower sensitivity. The combination of a ≥5% cut-off with tumor MMR testing maintained 100% sensitivity with an increased specificity (97%) and PPV (21%). The PPV of a PREMM1,2 score ≥20% alone (16%) approached the PPV obtained with PREMM1,2 score ≥5% combined with tumor MMR testing. In addition, a PREMM1,2 score of <5% was associated with a high likelihood of a BRAF V600E mutation. Conclusions The PREMM1,2 model is useful to identify MLH1/MSH2 mutation carriers among unselected colorectal cancer patients. Quantitative assessment of the genetic risk might be useful to decide on subsequent tumor MMR and germline testing. PMID:18061181

  6. Mathematical model for adaptive evolution of populations based on a complex domain

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Rabha W.; Ahmad, M.Z.; Al-Janaby, Hiba F.

    2015-01-01

    A mutation is ultimately essential for adaptive evolution in all populations. It arises all the time, but is mostly fixed by enzymes. Further, most do consider that the evolution mechanism is by a natural assortment of variations in organisms in line for random variations in their DNA, and the suggestions for this are overwhelming. The altering of the construction of a gene, causing a different form that may be communicated to succeeding generations, produced by the modification of single base units in DNA, or the deletion, insertion, or rearrangement of larger units of chromosomes or genes. This altering is called a mutation. In this paper, a mathematical model is introduced to this reality. The model describes the time and space for the evolution. The tool is based on a complex domain for the space. We show that the evolution is distributed with the hypergeometric function. The Boundedness of the evolution is imposed by utilizing the Koebe function. PMID:26858564

  7. Peristomal Skin Complications Are Common, Expensive, and Difficult to Manage: A Population Based Cost Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Søren; Lehur, Paul-Antoine; Moran, Brendan; Martins, Lina; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst

    2012-01-01

    Background Peristomal skin complications (PSCs) are the most common post-operative complications following creation of a stoma. Living with a stoma is a challenge, not only for the patient and their carers, but also for society as a whole. Due to methodological problems of PSC assessment, the associated health-economic burden of medium to longterm complications has been poorly described. Aim The aim of the present study was to create a model to estimate treatment costs of PSCs using the standardized assessment Ostomy Skin Tool as a reference. The resultant model was applied to a real-life global data set of stoma patients (n = 3017) to determine the prevalence and financial burden of PSCs. Methods Eleven experienced stoma care nurses were interviewed to get a global understanding of a treatment algorithm that formed the basis of the cost analysis. The estimated costs were based on a seven week treatment period. PSC costs were estimated for five underlying diagnostic categories and three levels of severity. The estimated treatment costs of severe cases of PSCs were increased 2–5 fold for the different diagnostic categories of PSCs compared with mild cases. French unit costs were applied to the global data set. Results The estimated total average cost for a seven week treatment period (including appliances and accessories) was 263€ for those with PSCs (n = 1742) compared to 215€ for those without PSCs (n = 1172). A co-variance analysis showed that leakage level had a significant impact on PSC cost from ‘rarely/never’ to ‘always/often’ p<0.00001 and from ‘rarely/never’ to ‘sometimes’ p = 0.0115. Conclusion PSCs are common and troublesome and the consequences are substantial, both for the patient and from a health economic viewpoint. PSCs should be diagnosed and treated at an early stage to prevent long term, debilitating and expensive complications. PMID:22679479

  8. Lifetime pharmacokinetic model for hydrophobic contaminants in marine mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Hickie, B.E.; Mackay, D.; Koning, J. de

    1999-11-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model is developed that describes the uptake and release of a hydrophobic organic chemical by a marine mammal over its entire lifetime, i.e., from birth to death. This model is applied to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). The processes treated are growth; uptake from food, milk, and air; disposition of the chemical among arterial and venous blood, liver, muscle, blubber, and rapidly perfused tissues; and losses by metabolism, release in exhaled air; and by egestion. A separate model is developed for females, which includes pregnancy, birth, and lactation. Food consumption is deduced from size, growth, and from activity-dependent bioenergetic data. The results obtained by simulating continuous PCB exposure over a 30-year period are in accordance with reported concentrations and show the importance of milk transfer to both mother and progeny and the tendency for continued accumulation over the animal's lifetime. Implications of the results are discussed, especially the need for improved data on diets, gut absorption characteristics, and various physiological parameters used in the model.

  9. Analysis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as a multistep process: a population-based modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Calvo, Andrea; Chio, Adriano; Colville, Shuna; Ellis, Cathy M; Hardiman, Orla; Heverin, Mark; Howard, Robin S; Huisman, Mark H B; Keren, Noa; Leigh, P Nigel; Mazzini, Letizia; Mora, Gabriele; Orrell, Richard W; Rooney, James; Scott, Kirsten M; Scotton, William J; Seelen, Meinie; Shaw, Christopher E; Sidle, Katie S; Swingler, Robert; Tsuda, Miho; Veldink, Jan H; Visser, Anne E; van den Berg, Leonard H; Pearce, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis shares characteristics with some cancers, such as onset being more common in later life, progression usually being rapid, the disease affecting a particular cell type, and showing complex inheritance. We used a model originally applied to cancer epidemiology to investigate the hypothesis that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a multistep process. Methods We generated incidence data by age and sex from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis population registers in Ireland (registration dates 1995–2012), the Netherlands (2006–12), Italy (1995–2004), Scotland (1989–98), and England (2002–09), and calculated age and sex-adjusted incidences for each register. We regressed the log of age-specific incidence against the log of age with least squares regression. We did the analyses within each register, and also did a combined analysis, adjusting for register. Findings We identified 6274 cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from a catchment population of about 34 million people. We noted a linear relationship between log incidence and log age in all five registers: England r2=0·95, Ireland r2=0·99, Italy r2=0·95, the Netherlands r2=0·99, and Scotland r2=0·97; overall r2=0·99. All five registers gave similar estimates of the linear slope ranging from 4·5 to 5·1, with overlapping confidence intervals. The combination of all five registers gave an overall slope of 4·8 (95% CI 4·5–5·0), with similar estimates for men (4·6, 4·3–4·9) and women (5·0, 4·5–5·5). Interpretation A linear relationship between the log incidence and log age of onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is consistent with a multistage model of disease. The slope estimate suggests that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a six-step process. Identification of these steps could lead to preventive and therapeutic avenues. Funding UK Medical Research Council; UK Economic and Social Research Council; Ireland Health Research Board; The

  10. A Results-Based Logic Model for Primary Healthcare: A Conceptual Foundation for Population-Based Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Diane E.; Broemeling, Anne-Marie; Wong, Sabrina T.

    2009-01-01

    A conceptual framework for population-based information systems is needed if these data are to be created and used to generate information to support healthcare policy, management and practice communities that seek to improve quality and account for progress in primary healthcare (PHC) renewal. This paper describes work conducted in British Columbia since 2003 to (1) create a Results-Based Logic Model for PHC using the approach of the Treasury Board of Canada in designing management and accountability frameworks, together with a literature review, policy analysis and broad consultation with approximately 650 people, (2) identify priorities for information within that logic model, (3) use the logic model and priorities within it to implement performance measurement and research and (4) identify how information systems need to be structured to assess the impact of variation or change in PHC inputs, activities and outputs on patient, population and healthcare system outcomes. The resulting logic model distinguishes among outcomes for which the PHC sector should be held more or less accountable. PMID:21037902

  11. LCP- LIFETIME COST AND PERFORMANCE MODEL FOR DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Lifetime Cost and Performance (LCP) Model was developed to assist in the assessment of Photovoltaic (PV) system design options. LCP is a simulation of the performance, cost, and revenue streams associated with distributed PV power systems. LCP provides the user with substantial flexibility in specifying the technical and economic environment of the PV application. User-specified input parameters are available to describe PV system characteristics, site climatic conditions, utility purchase and sellback rate structures, discount and escalation rates, construction timing, and lifetime of the system. Such details as PV array orientation and tilt angle, PV module and balance-of-system performance attributes, and the mode of utility interconnection are user-specified. LCP assumes that the distributed PV system is utility grid interactive without dedicated electrical storage. In combination with a suitable economic model, LCP can provide an estimate of the expected net present worth of a PV system to the owner, as compared to electricity purchased from a utility grid. Similarly, LCP might be used to perform sensitivity analyses to identify those PV system parameters having significant impact on net worth. The user describes the PV system configuration to LCP via the basic electrical components. The module is the smallest entity in the PV system which is modeled. A PV module is defined in the simulation by its short circuit current, which varies over the system lifetime due to degradation and failure. Modules are wired in series to form a branch circuit. Bypass diodes are allowed between modules in the branch circuits. Branch circuits are then connected in parallel to form a bus. A collection of buses is connected in parallel to form an increment to capacity of the system. By choosing the appropriate series-parallel wiring design, the user can specify the current, voltage, and reliability characteristics of the system. LCP simulation of system performance is site

  12. Atmospheric drag model calibrations for spacecraft lifetime prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binebrink, A. L.; Radomski, M. S.; Samii, M. V.

    1989-01-01

    Although solar activity prediction uncertainty normally dominates decay prediction error budget for near-Earth spacecraft, the effect of drag force modeling errors for given levels of solar activity needs to be considered. Two atmospheric density models, the modified Harris-Priester model and the Jacchia-Roberts model, to reproduce the decay histories of the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) and Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft in the 490- to 540-kilometer altitude range were analyzed. Historical solar activity data were used in the input to the density computations. For each spacecraft and atmospheric model, a drag scaling adjustment factor was determined for a high-solar-activity year, such that the observed annual decay in the mean semimajor axis was reproduced by an averaged variation-of-parameters (VOP) orbit propagation. The SME (SMM) calibration was performed using calendar year 1983 (1982). The resulting calibration factors differ by 20 to 40 percent from the predictions of the prelaunch ballistic coefficients. The orbit propagations for each spacecraft were extended to the middle of 1988 using the calibrated drag models. For the Jaccia-Roberts density model, the observed decay in the mean semimajor axis of SME (SMM) over the 4.5-year (5.5-year) predictive period was reproduced to within 1.5 (4.4) percent. The corresponding figure for the Harris-Priester model was 8.6 (20.6) percent. Detailed results and conclusions regarding the importance of accurate drag force modeling for lifetime predictions are presented.

  13. LIFETIME PREDICTION FOR MODEL 9975 O-RINGS IN KAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.

    2009-11-24

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently storing plutonium materials in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility. The materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and transported and stored in KAMS in Model 9975 shipping packages, which include double containment vessels sealed with dual O-rings made of Parker Seals compound V0835-75 (based on Viton{reg_sign} GLT). The outer O-ring of each containment vessel is credited for leaktight containment per ANSI N14.5. O-ring service life depends on many factors, including the failure criterion, environmental conditions, overall design, fabrication quality and assembly practices. A preliminary life prediction model has been developed for the V0835-75 O-rings in KAMS. The conservative model is based primarily on long-term compression stress relaxation (CSR) experiments and Arrhenius accelerated-aging methodology. For model development purposes, seal lifetime is defined as a 90% loss of measurable sealing force. Thus far, CSR experiments have only reached this target level of degradation at temperatures {ge} 300 F. At lower temperatures, relaxation values are more tolerable. Using time-temperature superposition principles, the conservative model predicts a service life of approximately 20-25 years at a constant seal temperature of 175 F. This represents a maximum payload package at a constant ambient temperature of 104 F, the highest recorded in KAMS to date. This is considered a highly conservative value as such ambient temperatures are only reached on occasion and for short durations. The presence of fiberboard in the package minimizes the impact of such temperature swings, with many hours to several days required for seal temperatures to respond proportionately. At 85 F ambient, a more realistic but still conservative value, bounding seal temperatures are reduced to {approx}158 F, with an estimated seal lifetime of {approx}35-45 years. The actual service life for O-rings in a maximum wattage package likely lies

  14. Personalized Prediction of Lifetime Benefits with Statin Therapy for Asymptomatic Individuals: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferket, Bart S.; van Kempen, Bob J. H.; Heeringa, Jan; Spronk, Sandra; Fleischmann, Kirsten E.; Nijhuis, Rogier L. G.; Hofman, Albert; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Hunink, M. G. Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Background Physicians need to inform asymptomatic individuals about personalized outcomes of statin therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, current prediction models focus on short-term outcomes and ignore the competing risk of death due to other causes. We aimed to predict the potential lifetime benefits with statin therapy, taking into account competing risks. Methods and Findings A microsimulation model based on 5-y follow-up data from the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort of individuals aged 55 y and older living in the Ommoord district of Rotterdam, the Netherlands, was used to estimate lifetime outcomes with and without statin therapy. The model was validated in-sample using 10-y follow-up data. We used baseline variables and model output to construct (1) a web-based calculator for gains in total and CVD-free life expectancy and (2) color charts for comparing these gains to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) charts. In 2,428 participants (mean age 67.7 y, 35.5% men), statin therapy increased total life expectancy by 0.3 y (SD 0.2) and CVD-free life expectancy by 0.7 y (SD 0.4). Age, sex, smoking, blood pressure, hypertension, lipids, diabetes, glucose, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and creatinine were included in the calculator. Gains in total and CVD-free life expectancy increased with blood pressure, unfavorable lipid levels, and body mass index after multivariable adjustment. Gains decreased considerably with advancing age, while SCORE 10-y CVD mortality risk increased with age. Twenty-five percent of participants with a low SCORE risk achieved equal or larger gains in CVD-free life expectancy than the median gain in participants with a high SCORE risk. Conclusions We developed tools to predict personalized increases in total and CVD-free life expectancy with statin therapy. The predicted gains we found are small. If the underlying model is validated in an independent cohort, the tools may be

  15. A Simple Population-Based Finite Element Model Eliminates the Need for Patient-Specific Models to Predict Instability of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Morgan H.; Walia, Piyush; Fening, Stephen D.; Miniaci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Recurrent shoulder instability can significantly increase in the presence of bony Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes in shoulder biomechanics due to bony defects. Limitations of using cadaveric model to investigate the effects of combined bony defects on shoulder instability is inability to test all combination in a single specimen. Utilizing the flexibility of computational methodology like finite element (FE) model provides the advantage of testing all combinations at multiple arm positions. The aim of this study was to develop a simple FE model of combined bony lesions and its effect on anterior shoulder instability. In addition, we wanted to determine the need for patient (specimen) specific modeling. We hypothesized that the shoulder instability would be similar for all three models (population-based model, specimen-specific model, and cadaveric model). Methods: Three specimens were randomly selected from specimens tested in our previous study and Computed Tomography (CT) arthrogram images were taken before and after experimentation to develop FE models. We also developed a simple population-based model representing a spherical humeral head, which was developed using the radii values for cartilage and bone from literature. The sizes of humeral head lesions chosen were: 6%, 19%, 31%, and 44% of humeral head diameter and glenoid defect sizes were 10%, 20% and 30% of the glenoid width. All simulations were performed at glenohumeral abduction angles (ABD) of 20°, 40°, and 60° and external rotation of 0°, 40°, and 80°. Each simulation comprised of translating the humeral head leading to an anterior dislocation under a constant 50 N medial load. This compressive load simulated the static load of soft tissue. The percent intact translation (%IT) was computed by normalizing the distance to dislocation value for each defect condition w.r.t intact condition of each specimen. Stability Ratio (SR) was

  16. Recording Lifetime Behavior and Movement in an Invertebrate Model

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Sige; Liedo, Pablo; Altamirano-Robles, Leopoldo; Cruz-Enriquez, Janeth; Morice, Amy; Ingram, Donald K.; Kaub, Kevin; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Carey, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of lifetime behavioral changes is essential for understanding aging and aging-related diseases. However, such studies are scarce partly due to the lack of efficient tools. Here we describe and provide proof of concept for a stereo vision system that classifies and sequentially records at an extremely fine scale six different behaviors (resting, micro-movement, walking, flying, feeding and drinking) and the within-cage (3D) location of individual tephritid fruit flies by time-of-day throughout their lives. Using flies fed on two different diets, full sugar-yeast and sugar-only diets, we report for the first time their behavioral changes throughout their lives at a high resolution. We have found that the daily activity peaks at the age of 15–20 days and then gradually declines with age for flies on both diets. However, the overall daily activity is higher for flies on sugar-only diet than those on the full diet. Flies on sugar-only diet show a stronger diurnal localization pattern with higher preference to staying on the top of the cage during the period of light-off when compared to flies on the full diet. Clustering analyses of age-specific behavior patterns reveal three distinct young, middle-aged and old clusters for flies on each of the two diets. The middle-aged groups for flies on sugar-only diet consist of much younger age groups when compared to flies on full diet. This technology provides research opportunities for using a behavioral informatics approach for understanding different ways in which behavior, movement, and aging in model organisms are mutually affecting. PMID:21559058

  17. Stratospheric lifetime ratio of CFC-11 and CFC-12 from satellite and model climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, L.; Hoppe, C. M.; Müller, R.; Dutton, G. S.; Gille, J. C.; Griessbach, S.; Jones, A.; Meyer, C. I.; Spang, R.; Volk, C. M.; Walker, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone loss and are strong infrared absorbers that contribute to global warming. The stratospheric lifetimes of CFCs are a measure of their stratospheric loss rates that are needed to determine global warming and ozone depletion potentials. We applied the tracer-tracer correlation approach to zonal mean climatologies from satellite measurements and model data to assess the lifetimes of CFCl3 (CFC-11) and CF2Cl2 (CFC-12). We present estimates of the CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of CFC-12, based on a reference lifetime of 52 years for CFC-11. We analyzed climatologies from three satellite missions, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). We found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.47±0.08 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 112(96-133) years for ACE-FTS, a ratio of 0.46±0.07 and a lifetime of 113(97-134) years for HIRDLS, and a ratio of 0.46±0.08 and a lifetime of 114(98-136) years for MIPAS. The error-weighted, combined CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio is 0.46±0.04 and the CFC-12 lifetime estimate is 113(103-124) years. These results agree with the recent Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) reassessment, which recommends lifetimes of 52(43-67) years and 102(88-122) years, respectively. Having smaller uncertainties than the results from other recent studies, our estimates can help to better constrain CFC-11 and CFC-12 lifetime recommendations in future scientific studies and assessments. Furthermore, the satellite observations were used to validate first simulation results from a new coupled model system, which integrates a Lagrangian chemistry transport model into a climate model. For the coupled model we found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.48±0.07 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 110(95-129) years

  18. Stratospheric lifetime ratio of CFC-11 and CFC-12 from satellite and model climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, L.; Hoppe, C. M.; Müller, R.; Dutton, G. S.; Gille, J. C.; Griessbach, S.; Jones, A.; Meyer, C. I.; Spang, R.; Volk, C. M.; Walker, K. A.

    2014-06-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone loss and are strong infrared absorbers that contribute to global warming. The stratospheric lifetimes of CFCs are a measure of their global loss rates that are needed to determine global warming and ozone depletion potentials. We applied the tracer-tracer correlation approach to zonal mean climatologies from satellite measurements and model data to assess the lifetimes of CFCl3 (CFC-11) and CF2Cl2 (CFC-12). We present estimates of the CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of CFC-12, based on a reference lifetime of 52 yr for CFC-11. We analyzed climatologies from three satellite missions, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). We found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.47±0.08 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 111(96-132) yr for ACE-FTS, a ratio of 0.46±0.07 and a lifetime of 112(97-133) yr for HIRDLS, and a ratio of 0.46±0.08 and a lifetime of 112(96-135) yr for MIPAS. The error-weighted, combined CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio is 0.47±0.04 and the CFC-12 lifetime estimate is 112(102-123) yr. These results agree with the recent Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) reassessment, which recommends lifetimes of 52(43-67) yr and 102(88-122) yr, respectively. Having smaller uncertainties than the results from other recent studies, our estimates can help to better constrain CFC-11 and CFC-12 lifetime recommendations in future scientific studies and assessments. Furthermore, the satellite observations were used to validate first simulation results from a new coupled model system, which integrates a Lagrangian chemistry transport model into a climate model. For the coupled model we found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.48±0.07 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 110(95-129) yr, based on a ten-year perpetual

  19. Semiautomatic bladder segmentation on CBCT using a population-based model for multiple-plan ART of bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a novel semiautomatic bladder segmentation approach for selecting the appropriate plan from the library of plans for a multiple-plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) procedure. A population-based statistical bladder model was first built from a training data set (95 bladder contours from 8 patients). This model was then used as constraint to segment the bladder in an independent validation data set (233 CBCT scans from the remaining 22 patients). All 3D bladder contours were converted into parametric surface representations using spherical harmonic expansion. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied in the spherical harmonic-based shape parameter space to calculate the major variation of bladder shapes. The number of dominating PCA modes was chosen such that 95% of the total shape variation of the training data set was described. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder contour of the planning CT of each patient, which was modified by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to best fit the bladder boundary in the localization CBCT image. A cost function was defined to measure the goodness of fit of the segmentation on the localization CBCT image. The segmentation was obtained by minimizing this cost function using a simplex optimizer. After automatic segmentation, a fast manual correction method was provided to correct those bladders (parts) that were poorly segmented. Volume- and distance-based metrics and the accuracy of plan selection from multiple plans were evaluated to quantify the performance of the automatic and semiautomatic segmentation methods. For the training data set, only seven PCA modes were needed to represent 95% of the bladder shape variation. The mean CI overlap and residual error (SD) of automatic bladder segmentation over all of the validation data were 70.5% and 0.39 cm, respectively. The agreement of plan

  20. Advanced Models and Controls for Prediction and Extension of Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-01

    Predictive models of capacity and power fade must consider a multiplicity of degradation modes experienced by Li-ion batteries in the automotive environment. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must presently be absorbed by overdesign and excess warranty costs. To reduce these costs and extend life, degradation models are under development that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. The lifetime models provide engineering feedback for cell, pack and system designs and are being incorporated into real-time control strategies.

  1. Lifetime of double occupancies in the Fermi-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Sensarma, Rajdeep; Pekker, David; Demler, Eugene; Altman, Ehud; Strohmaier, Niels; Moritz, Henning; Greif, Daniel; Joerdens, Robert; Tarruell, Leticia; Esslinger, Tilman

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the decay of artificially created double occupancies in a repulsive Fermi-Hubbard system in the strongly interacting limit using diagrammatic many-body theory and experiments with ultracold fermions in optical lattices. The lifetime of the doublons is found to scale exponentially with the ratio of the on-site repulsion to the bandwidth. We show that the dominant decay process in presence of background holes is the excitation of a large number of particle-hole pairs to absorb the energy of the doublon. We also show that the strongly interacting nature of the background state is crucial in obtaining the correct estimate of the doublon lifetime in these systems. The theoretical estimates and the experimental data are in agreement.

  2. Population-based local search for protein folding simulation in the MJ energy model and cubic lattices.

    PubMed

    Kapsokalivas, L; Gan, X; Albrecht, A A; Steinhöfel, K

    2009-08-01

    We present experimental results on benchmark problems in 3D cubic lattice structures with the Miyazawa-Jernigan energy function for two local search procedures that utilise the pull-move set: (i) population-based local search (PLS) that traverses the energy landscape with greedy steps towards (potential) local minima followed by upward steps up to a certain level of the objective function; (ii) simulated annealing with a logarithmic cooling schedule (LSA). The parameter settings for PLS are derived from short LSA-runs executed in pre-processing and the procedure utilises tabu lists generated for each member of the population. In terms of the total number of energy function evaluations both methods perform equally well, however, PLS has the potential of being parallelised with an expected speed-up in the region of the population size. Furthermore, both methods require a significant smaller number of function evaluations when compared to Monte Carlo simulations with kink-jump moves. PMID:19647489

  3. Maternal lifetime history of depression and depressive symptoms in the prenatal and early postnatal period do not predict infant-mother attachment quality in a large, population-based Dutch cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tharner, Anne; Luijk, Maartje P C M; van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of maternal history of depressive disorder and the effects of depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the early postpartum period on attachment insecurity and disorganization. A total of 627 mother-infant dyads from the Generation R Study participated in a population-based cohort from fetal life onwards. Maternal history of depression was assessed by diagnostic interviews during pregnancy; maternal peri- and postnatal depressive symptoms were assessed with questionnaires in 506 of these women at 20 weeks pregnancy and two months postpartum; and infant-mother attachment security was observed when infants were aged 14 months. A history of maternal depressive disorder, regardless of severity or psychiatric comorbidity, was not associated with an increased risk of infant attachment insecurity or disorganization. Likewise, maternal peri- and postnatal depressive symptoms were not related to attachment insecurity or disorganization at 14 months. These results are important because mothers from otherwise low risk backgrounds often have previously been depressed or are struggling with non-clinical depressive symptoms during pregnancy and after giving birth. Our findings are discussed in terms of protective factors that may limit the potentially negative effects of maternal depressive symptoms on the infant-mother attachment relationship in the general population. The role of selective attrition and lack of information about the mothers' attachment status for the current null-findings are also discussed. PMID:22191607

  4. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  5. Stratospheric lifetime ratio of CFC-11 and CFC-12 from satellite and model climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Hoppe, Charlotte; Müller, Rolf; Dutton, Geoffrey S.; Gille, John C.; Griessbach, Sabine; Jones, Ashley; Meyer, Catrin I.; Spang, Reinhold; Volk, C. Michael; Walker, Kaley A.

    2015-04-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone loss and are strong infrared absorbers that contribute to global warming. The stratospheric lifetimes of CFCs are a measure of their stratospheric loss rates that are needed to determine global warming and ozone depletion potentials. We applied the tracer-tracer correlation approach to zonal mean climatologies from satellite measurements and model data to assess the lifetimes of CFCl3 (CFC-11) and CF2Cl2 (CFC-12). We present new estimates of the CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of CFC-12, based on a reference lifetime of 52 yr for CFC-11. We analyzed climatologies from three satellite missions, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). We found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.47 ± 0.08 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 112(96 - 133) yr for ACE-FTS, a ratio of 0.46 ± 0.07 and a lifetime of 113(97 - 134) yr for HIRDLS, and a ratio of 0.46 ± 0.08 and a lifetime of 114(98 - 136) yr for MIPAS. The error-weighted, combined CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio is 0.46 ± 0.04 and the CFC-12 lifetime estimate is 113(103 - 124) yr. These results are in excellent agreement with the recent Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) reassessment, which recommends lifetimes of 52(43 - 67) yr for CFC-11 and 102(88 - 122) yr for CFC-12, respectively. Having smaller uncertainties than the results from other recent studies, our estimates can help to better constrain CFC-11 and CFC-12 lifetime recommendations in future scientific studies and assessments. Furthermore, the satellite observations were used to validate first simulation results from a new coupled model system, which integrates a Lagrangian chemistry transport model into a climate model. For the coupled EMAC/CLaMS model we found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio

  6. Deployment-based lifetime optimization model for homogeneous Wireless Sensor Network under retransmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruiying; Liu, Xiaoxi; Xie, Wei; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Sensor-deployment-based lifetime optimization is one of the most effective methods used to prolong the lifetime of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) by reducing the distance-sensitive energy consumption. In this paper, data retransmission, a major consumption factor that is usually neglected in the previous work, is considered. For a homogeneous WSN, monitoring a circular target area with a centered base station, a sensor deployment model based on regular hexagonal grids is analyzed. To maximize the WSN lifetime, optimization models for both uniform and non-uniform deployment schemes are proposed by constraining on coverage, connectivity and success transmission rate. Based on the data transmission analysis in a data gathering cycle, the WSN lifetime in the model can be obtained through quantifying the energy consumption at each sensor location. The results of case studies show that it is meaningful to consider data retransmission in the lifetime optimization. In particular, our investigations indicate that, with the same lifetime requirement, the number of sensors needed in a non-uniform topology is much less than that in a uniform one. Finally, compared with a random scheme, simulation results further verify the advantage of our deployment model. PMID:25513822

  7. There and back again: Iterating between population-based modeling and experiments reveals surprising regulation of calcium transients in rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Devenyi, Ryan A; Sobie, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    While many ion channels and transporters involved in cardiac cellular physiology have been identified and described, the relative importance of each in determining emergent cellular behaviors remains unclear. Here we address this issue with a novel approach that combines population-based mathematical modeling with experimental tests to systematically quantify the relative contributions of different ion channels and transporters to the amplitude of the cellular Ca(2+) transient. Sensitivity analysis of a mathematical model of the rat ventricular cardiomyocyte quantified the response of cell behaviors to changes in the level of each ion channel and transporter, and experimental tests of these predictions were performed to validate or invalidate the predictions. The model analysis found that partial inhibition of the transient outward current in rat ventricular epicardial myocytes was predicted to have a greater impact on Ca(2+) transient amplitude than either: (1) inhibition of the same current in endocardial myocytes, or (2) comparable inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA). Experimental tests confirmed the model predictions qualitatively but showed some quantitative disagreement. This guided us to recalibrate the model by adjusting the relative importance of several Ca(2+) fluxes, thereby improving the consistency with experimental data and producing a more predictive model. Analysis of human cardiomyocyte models suggests that the relative importance of outward currents to Ca(2+) transporters is generalizable to human atrial cardiomyocytes, but not ventricular cardiomyocytes. Overall, our novel approach of combining population-based mathematical modeling with experimental tests has yielded new insight into the relative importance of different determinants of cell behavior. PMID:26235057

  8. Cost effectiveness analysis of population-based serology screening and 13C-Urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori to prevent gastric cancer: A markov model

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Feng; Luo, Nan; Lee, Hin-Peng

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the costs and effectiveness of no screening and no eradication therapy, the population-based Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) serology screening with eradication therapy and 13C-Urea breath test (UBT) with eradication therapy. METHODS: A Markov model simulation was carried out in all 237 900 Chinese males with age between 35 and 44 from the perspective of the public healthcare provider in Singapore. The main outcome measures were the costs, number of gastric cancer cases prevented, life years saved, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained from screening age to death. The uncertainty surrounding the cost-effectiveness ratio was addressed by one-way sensitivity analyses. RESULTS: Compared to no screening, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $16 166 per life year saved or $13 571 per QALY gained for the serology screening, and $38 792 per life year saved and $32 525 per QALY gained for the UBT. The ICER was $477 079 per life year saved or $390 337 per QALY gained for the UBT compared to the serology screening. The cost-effectiveness of serology screening over the UBT was robust to most parameters in the model. CONCLUSION: The population-based serology screening for H pylori was more cost-effective than the UBT in prevention of gastric cancer in Singapore Chinese males. PMID:18494053

  9. Development of a simplified gravitational model for lifetime studies of lunar satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kurt W.

    1992-01-01

    Future lunar missions will involve long stay times in orbit about the moon. The moon's nonspherical gravitational field is the primary perturbation on a low altitude parking orbit. The objective of this study is to determine the orbital lifetime of a nearly circular low altitude parking orbit. In the present analysis, a simplified gravitational model of the moon is introduced which will enable mission designers to easily predict long term changes in lunar parking orbits at the preliminary design level. The development of a simplified gravitational model with sufficient accuracy is necessary to investigate orbital lifetimes for the large number of orbital parameters possible. Utilization of a simplified model will significantly reduce the required computational time needed to perform this analysis. By investigating the effects of the lunar gravity model on the various parking orbits, the parameters which are important in determining lifetime predictions are identified.

  10. Power law distribution of wealth in population based on a modified Equíluz-Zimmermann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yan-Bo; Wang, Bing-Hong; Hu, Bo; Zhou, Tao

    2005-04-01

    We propose a money-based model for the power law distribution (PLD) of wealth in an economically interacting population. It is introduced as a modification of the Equíluz and Zimmermann (EZ) model for crowding and information transmission in financial markets. Still, it must be stressed that in the EZ model a PLD without exponential correction is obtained only for a particular parameter, while our pattern will give the exact PLD within a wide range. The PLD exponent depends on the model parameters in a nontrivial way and is exactly calculated in this paper. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with the analytic prediction, and also comparable with empirical data of wealth distribution.

  11. Application of a dynamic population-based model for evaluation of exposure reduction strategies in the baking industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijster, Tim; Warren, Nick; Heederik, Dick; Tielemans, Erik

    2009-02-01

    Recently a dynamic population model was developed that simulates a population of bakery workers longitudinally through time and tracks the development of work-related sensitisation and respiratory symptoms in each worker. Input for this model comes from cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiological studies which allowed estimation of exposure response relationships and disease transition probabilities This model allows us to study the development of diseases and transitions between disease states over time in relation to determinants of disease including flour dust and/or allergen exposure. Furthermore it enables more realistic modelling of the health impact of different intervention strategies at the workplace (e.g. changes in exposure may take several years to impact on ill-health and often occur as a gradual trend). A large dataset of individual full-shift exposure measurements and real-time exposure measurements were used to obtain detailed insight into the effectiveness of control measures and other determinants of exposure. Given this information a population wide reduction of the median exposure with 50% was evaluated in this paper.

  12. Interpreting aerosol lifetimes using the GEOS-Chem model and constraints from radionuclide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Pierce, J. R.; Martin, R. V.

    2014-04-01

    Aerosol removal processes control global aerosol abundance, but the rate of that removal remains uncertain. A recent study of aerosol-bound radionuclide measurements after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident documents 137Cs removal (e-folding) times of 10.0-13.9 days, suggesting that mean aerosol lifetimes in the range of 3-7 days in global models might be too short by a factor of two. In this study, we attribute this discrepancy to differences between the e-folding and mean aerosol lifetimes. We implement a simulation of 137Cs and 133Xe into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and examine the removal rates for the Fukushima case. We find a general consistency between modelled and measured e-folding times. The simulated 137Cs global burden e-folding time is about 14 days. However, the simulated mean lifetime of aerosol-bound 137Cs over a 6-month post-accident period is only 1.8 days. We find that the mean lifetime depends strongly on the removal rates in the first few days after emissions, before the aerosols leave the boundary layer and are transported to altitudes and latitudes where lifetimes with respect to wet removal are longer by a few orders of magnitude. We present sensitivity simulations that demonstrate the influence of differences in altitude and location of the radionuclides on the mean lifetime. Global mean lifetimes are shown to strongly depend on the altitude of injection. The global mean 137Cs lifetime is more than one order of magnitude greater for the injection at 7 km than into the boundary layer above the Fukushima site. Instantaneous removal rates are slower during the first few days after the emissions for a free tropospheric versus boundary layer injection and this strongly controls the mean lifetimes. Global mean aerosol lifetimes for the GEOS-Chem model are 3-6 days, which is longer than that for the 137Cs injected at the Fukushima site (likely due to precipitation shortly after Fukushima emissions), but similar to the

  13. Clinical effectiveness of orthogeriatric and fracture liaison service models of care for hip fracture patients: population-based longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Samuel; Javaid, M. Kassim; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Lippett, Janet; Sheard, Sally; Arden, Nigel K.; Cooper, Cyrus; Judge, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to evaluate orthogeriatric and nurse-led fracture liaison service (FLS) models of post-hip fracture care in terms of impact on mortality (30 days and 1 year) and second hip fracture (2 years). Setting: Hospital Episode Statistics database linked to Office for National Statistics mortality records for 11 acute hospitals in a region of England. Population: patients aged over 60 years admitted for a primary hip fracture from 2003 to 2013. Methods: each hospital was analysed separately and acted as its own control in a before–after time-series design in which the appointment of an orthogeriatrician or set-up/expansion of an FLS was evaluated. Multivariable Cox regression (mortality) and competing risk survival models (second hip fracture) were used. Fixed effects meta-analysis was used to pool estimates of impact for interventions of the same type. Results: of 33,152 primary hip fracture patients, 1,288 sustained a second hip fracture within 2 years (age and sex standardised proportion of 4.2%). 3,033 primary hip fracture patients died within 30 days and 9,662 died within 1 year (age and sex standardised proportion of 9.5% and 29.8%, respectively). The estimated impact of introducing an orthogeriatrician on 30-day and 1-year mortality was hazard ratio (HR) = 0.73 (95% CI: 0.65–0.82) and HR = 0.81 (CI: 0.75–0.87), respectively. Following an FLS, these associations were as follows: HR = 0.80 (95% CI: 0.71–0.91) and HR = 0.84 (0.77–0.93). There was no significant impact on time to second hip fracture. Conclusions: the introduction and/or expansion of orthogeriatric and FLS models of post-hip fracture care has a beneficial effect on subsequent mortality. No evidence for a reduction in second hip fracture rate was found. PMID:26802076

  14. Associations of iron metabolism genes with blood manganese levels: a population-based study with validation data from animal models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Given mounting evidence for adverse effects from excess manganese exposure, it is critical to understand host factors, such as genetics, that affect manganese metabolism. Methods Archived blood samples, collected from 332 Mexican women at delivery, were analyzed for manganese. We evaluated associations of manganese with functional variants in three candidate iron metabolism genes: HFE [hemochromatosis], TF [transferrin], and ALAD [δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase]. We used a knockout mouse model to parallel our significant results as a novel method of validating the observed associations between genotype and blood manganese in our epidemiologic data. Results Percentage of participants carrying at least one copy of HFE C282Y, HFE H63D, TF P570S, and ALAD K59N variant alleles was 2.4%, 17.7%, 20.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Percentage carrying at least one copy of either C282Y or H63D allele in HFE gene was 19.6%. Geometric mean (geometric standard deviation) manganese concentrations were 17.0 (1.5) μg/l. Women with any HFE variant allele had 12% lower blood manganese concentrations than women with no variant alleles (β = -0.12 [95% CI = -0.23 to -0.01]). TF and ALAD variants were not significant predictors of blood manganese. In animal models, Hfe-/- mice displayed a significant reduction in blood manganese compared with Hfe+/+ mice, replicating the altered manganese metabolism found in our human research. Conclusions Our study suggests that genetic variants in iron metabolism genes may contribute to variability in manganese exposure by affecting manganese absorption, distribution, or excretion. Genetic background may be critical to consider in studies that rely on environmental manganese measurements. PMID:22074419

  15. Interpreting aerosol lifetimes using the GEOS-Chem model and constraints from radionuclide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Pierce, J. R.; Martin, R. V.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol removal processes control global aerosol abundance, but the rate of that removal remains uncertain. A recent study of aerosol-bound radionuclide measurements after the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident documents 137Cs removal (e-folding) times of 10.0 to 13.9 days, suggesting that mean aerosol lifetimes in the range of 3-7 days in global models might be too short by a factor of two. In this study, we attribute this discrepancy to differences between the e-folding and mean aerosol lifetimes. We implement a~simulation of 137Cs and 133Xe into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and examine the removal rates for the Fukushima case. We find a~general consistency between modelled and measured e-folding times. The simulated 137Cs global burden e-folding time is about 14 days. However, the simulated mean lifetime of aerosol-bound 137Cs over a 6 month post-accident period is only 1.8 days. We find that the mean lifetime depends strongly on the removal rates in the first few days after emissions, before the aerosols leave the boundary layer and are transported to altitudes and latitudes where lifetimes with respect to wet removal are longer by a few orders of magnitude. We present sensitivity simulations that demonstrate the influence of differences in altitude and location of the radionuclides on the mean lifetime. Global mean lifetimes are shown to strongly depend on the altitude of injection. The global mean 137Cs lifetime is more than one order of magnitude greater for the injection at 7 km than into the boundary layer above the Fukushima site. Instantaneous removal rates are slower during the first few days after the emissions for a free tropospheric vs. boundary layer injection and this strongly controls the mean lifetimes. Global mean aerosol lifetimes for the GEOS-Chem model are 3-6 days, which is longer than for the 137Cs injected at the Fukushima site (likely due to precipitation shortly after Fukushima emissions), but about the same as the

  16. Budget Impact Analysis of Switching to Digital Mammography in a Population-Based Breast Cancer Screening Program: A Discrete Event Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Comas, Mercè; Arrospide, Arantzazu; Mar, Javier; Sala, Maria; Vilaprinyó, Ester; Hernández, Cristina; Cots, Francesc; Martínez, Juan; Castells, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the budgetary impact of switching from screen-film mammography to full-field digital mammography in a population-based breast cancer screening program. Methods A discrete-event simulation model was built to reproduce the breast cancer screening process (biennial mammographic screening of women aged 50 to 69 years) combined with the natural history of breast cancer. The simulation started with 100,000 women and, during a 20-year simulation horizon, new women were dynamically entered according to the aging of the Spanish population. Data on screening were obtained from Spanish breast cancer screening programs. Data on the natural history of breast cancer were based on US data adapted to our population. A budget impact analysis comparing digital with screen-film screening mammography was performed in a sample of 2,000 simulation runs. A sensitivity analysis was performed for crucial screening-related parameters. Distinct scenarios for recall and detection rates were compared. Results Statistically significant savings were found for overall costs, treatment costs and the costs of additional tests in the long term. The overall cost saving was 1,115,857€ (95%CI from 932,147 to 1,299,567) in the 10th year and 2,866,124€ (95%CI from 2,492,610 to 3,239,638) in the 20th year, representing 4.5% and 8.1% of the overall cost associated with screen-film mammography. The sensitivity analysis showed net savings in the long term. Conclusions Switching to digital mammography in a population-based breast cancer screening program saves long-term budget expense, in addition to providing technical advantages. Our results were consistent across distinct scenarios representing the different results obtained in European breast cancer screening programs. PMID:24832200

  17. Simple Derivation of the Lifetime and the Distribution of Faces for a Binary Subdivision Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yukio

    The iterative random subdivision of rectangles is used as a generation model of networks in physics, computer science, and urban planning. However, these researches were independent. We consider some relations in them, and derive fundamental properties for the average lifetime depending on birth-time and the balanced distribution of rectangle faces.

  18. Comparison of Accelerated Testing with Modeling to Predict Lifetime of CPV Solder Layers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, T. J.; Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-03-01

    Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cell assemblies can fail due to thermomechanical fatigue in the die-attach layer. In this presentation, we show the latest results from our computational model of thermomechanical fatigue. The model is used to estimate the relative lifetime of cell assemblies exposed to various temperature histories consistent with service and with accelerated testing. We also present early results from thermal cycling experiments designed to help validate the computational model.

  19. A Comprehensive Multistate Model Analyzing Associations of Various Risk Factors With the Course of Breast Cancer in a Population-Based Cohort of Breast Cancer Cases.

    PubMed

    Eulenburg, Christine; Schroeder, Jennifer; Obi, Nadia; Heinz, Judith; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter

    2016-02-15

    We employed a semi-Markov multistate model for the simultaneous analysis of various endpoints describing the course of breast cancer. Results were compared with those from standard analyses using a Cox proportional hazards model. We included 3,012 patients with invasive breast cancer newly diagnosed between 2001 and 2005 who were recruited in Germany for a population-based study, the Mamma Carcinoma Risk Factor Investigation (MARIE Study), and prospectively followed up until the end of 2009. Locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis were included as intermediate states, and deaths from breast cancer, secondary cancer, and other causes were included as competing absorbing states. Tumor characteristics were significantly associated with all breast cancer-related endpoints. Nodal involvement was significantly related to local recurrence but more strongly related to distant metastases. Smoking was significantly associated with mortality from second cancers and other causes, whereas menopausal hormone use was significantly associated with reduced distant metastasis and death from causes other than cancer. The presence of cardiovascular disease at diagnosis was solely associated with mortality from other causes. Compared with separate Cox models, multistate models allow for dissection of prognostic factors and intermediate events in the analysis of cause-specific mortality and can yield new insights into disease progression and associated pathways. PMID:26823437

  20. A generic model for creep rupture lifetime estimation on fibrous ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Tze-Jer

    1992-01-01

    Because of their high strength and toughness at elevated temperatures, fiber reinforced ceramic composites such as SiC(f)/SiC and SiC(f)/Si3N4 have become candidates for next-generation turbine engine materials. A generic model is proposed for assessing the lifetime of this class of materials when subjected to long-term creep rupture conditions. This 2D model consists of interfacial cracks growing between square grains and rectangular fibers in the direction normal to the principal tensile stress axis. Neglecting transient effects, the total lifetime is derived based on the criterion that rupture is due to coalescence of adjacent cracks. Lifetime is inversely proportional to crack growth rate, volume fraction, and aspect ratio of the fibers; but extremely sensitive to the applied stress, due to the high power of the V-K(I) law. This lifetime estimation seems to be in fair agreement with the creep rupture data of SiC(w)/Si3N4 composite with 0 and 30 vol percent reinforcement tested at 1250 C in air. TEM performed on the postcrept specimens revealed that creep damage is predominantly in the form of microcracks at matrix/matrix as well as fiber/matrix interfaces, approximately in accord with the model simulation.

  1. Prediction of liver disease in patients whose liver function tests have been checked in primary care: model development and validation using population-based observational cohorts

    PubMed Central

    McLernon, David J; Donnan, Peter T; Sullivan, Frank M; Roderick, Paul; Rosenberg, William M; Ryder, Steve D; Dillon, John F

    2014-01-01

    Objective To derive and validate a clinical prediction model to estimate the risk of liver disease diagnosis following liver function tests (LFTs) and to convert the model to a simplified scoring tool for use in primary care. Design Population-based observational cohort study of patients in Tayside Scotland identified as having their LFTs performed in primary care and followed for 2 years. Biochemistry data were linked to secondary care, prescriptions and mortality data to ascertain baseline characteristics of the derivation cohort. A separate validation cohort was obtained from 19 general practices across the rest of Scotland to externally validate the final model. Setting Primary care, Tayside, Scotland. Participants Derivation cohort: LFT results from 310 511 patients. After exclusions (including: patients under 16 years, patients having initial LFTs measured in secondary care, bilirubin >35 μmol/L, liver complications within 6 weeks and history of a liver condition), the derivation cohort contained 95 977 patients with no clinically apparent liver condition. Validation cohort: after exclusions, this cohort contained 11 653 patients. Primary and secondary outcome measures Diagnosis of a liver condition within 2 years. Results From the derivation cohort (n=95 977), 481 (0.5%) were diagnosed with a liver disease. The model showed good discrimination (C-statistic=0.78). Given the low prevalence of liver disease, the negative predictive values were high. Positive predictive values were low but rose to 20–30% for high-risk patients. Conclusions This study successfully developed and validated a clinical prediction model and subsequent scoring tool, the Algorithm for Liver Function Investigations (ALFI), which can predict liver disease risk in patients with no clinically obvious liver disease who had their initial LFTs taken in primary care. ALFI can help general practitioners focus referral on a small subset of patients with higher predicted risk

  2. Beyond R0: Demographic Models for Variability of Lifetime Reproductive Output

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Hal

    2011-01-01

    The net reproductive rate measures the expected lifetime reproductive output of an individual, and plays an important role in demography, ecology, evolution, and epidemiology. Well-established methods exist to calculate it from age- or stage-classified demographic data. As an expectation, provides no information on variability; empirical measurements of lifetime reproduction universally show high levels of variability, and often positive skewness among individuals. This is often interpreted as evidence of heterogeneity, and thus of an opportunity for natural selection. However, variability provides evidence of heterogeneity only if it exceeds the level of variability to be expected in a cohort of identical individuals all experiencing the same vital rates. Such comparisons require a way to calculate the statistics of lifetime reproduction from demographic data. Here, a new approach is presented, using the theory of Markov chains with rewards, obtaining all the moments of the distribution of lifetime reproduction. The approach applies to age- or stage-classified models, to constant, periodic, or stochastic environments, and to any kind of reproductive schedule. As examples, I analyze data from six empirical studies, of a variety of animal and plant taxa (nematodes, polychaetes, humans, and several species of perennial plants). PMID:21738586

  3. The relationship between the Five-Factor Model personality traits and peptic ulcer disease in a large population-based adult sample.

    PubMed

    Realo, Anu; Teras, Andero; Kööts-Ausmees, Liisi; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Allik, Jüri

    2015-12-01

    The current study examined the relationship between the Five-Factor Model personality traits and physician-confirmed peptic ulcer disease (PUD) diagnosis in a large population-based adult sample, controlling for the relevant behavioral and sociodemographic factors. Personality traits were assessed by participants themselves and by knowledgeable informants using the NEO Personality Inventory-3 (NEO PI-3). When controlling for age, sex, education, and cigarette smoking, only one of the five NEO PI-3 domain scales - higher Neuroticism - and two facet scales - lower A1: Trust and higher C1: Competence - made a small, yet significant contribution (p < 0.01) to predicting PUD in logistic regression analyses. In the light of these relatively modest associations, our findings imply that it is certain behavior (such as smoking) and sociodemographic variables (such as age, gender, and education) rather than personality traits that are associated with the diagnosis of PUD at a particular point in time. Further prospective studies with a longitudinal design and multiple assessments would be needed to fully understand if the FFM personality traits serve as risk factors for the development of PUD. PMID:26437682

  4. Natural History of Dependency in the Elderly: A 24-Year Population-Based Study Using a Longitudinal Item Response Theory Model.

    PubMed

    Edjolo, Arlette; Proust-Lima, Cécile; Delva, Fleur; Dartigues, Jean-François; Pérès, Karine

    2016-02-15

    We aimed to describe the hierarchical structure of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and basic Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and trajectories of dependency before death in an elderly population using item response theory methodology. Data were obtained from a population-based French cohort study, the Personnes Agées QUID (PAQUID) Study, of persons aged ≥65 years at baseline in 1988 who were recruited from 75 randomly selected areas in Gironde and Dordogne. We evaluated IADL and ADL data collected at home every 2-3 years over a 24-year period (1988-2012) for 3,238 deceased participants (43.9% men). We used a longitudinal item response theory model to investigate the item sequence of 11 IADL and ADL combined into a single scale and functional trajectories adjusted for education, sex, and age at death. The findings confirmed the earliest losses in IADL (shopping, transporting, finances) at the partial limitation level, and then an overlapping of concomitant IADL and ADL, with bathing and dressing being the earliest ADL losses, and finally total losses for toileting, continence, eating, and transferring. Functional trajectories were sex-specific, with a benefit of high education that persisted until death in men but was only transient in women. An in-depth understanding of this sequence provides an early warning of functional decline for better adaptation of medical and social care in the elderly. PMID:26825927

  5. Evaluation of Observed and Modelled Aerosol Lifetimes Using Radioactive Tracers of Opportunity and an Ensemble of 19 Global Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivie, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Sovde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Shindell, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (Cs-137) and xenon-133 (Xe-133) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. Cs-137 size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation mode (AM) sulfate aerosols were the main carriers of cesium. Hence, Cs-137 can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulfate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas Xe-133 behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of Cs-137that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulfate, and Xe-133 emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulfate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled Cs-137and Xe-133 concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime e, calculated from station measurement data taken between 2 and 9 weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days (95

  6. Evaluation of observed and modelled aerosol lifetimes using radioactive tracers of opportunity and an ensemble of 19 global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivié, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Søvde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bergman, T.; Evangeliou, N.; Wang, H.; Ma, P.-L.; Easter, R. C.; Rasch, P. J.; Liu, X.; Pitari, G.; Di Genova, G.; Zhao, S. Y.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Kokkola, H.; Martin, R. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Tost, H.; Zhang, H.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (137Cs) and xenon-133 (133Xe) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. 137Cs size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation-mode (AM) sulphate aerosols were the main carriers for the cesium. Hence, 137Cs can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulphate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas 133Xe behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of 137Cs that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulphate, and 133Xe emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulphate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled 37Cs and 133Xe concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime τe, calculated from station measurement data taken between two and nine weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days

  7. Evaluation of observed and modelled aerosol lifetimes using radioactive tracers of opportunity and an ensemble of 19 global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivié, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Søvde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bergman, T.; Evangeliou, N.; Wang, H.; Ma, P.-L.; Easter, R. C.; Rasch, P. J.; Liu, X.; Pitari, G.; Di Genova, G.; Zhao, S. Y.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Kokkola, H.; Martin, R. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Tost, H.; Zhang, H.

    2016-03-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (137Cs) and xenon-133 (133Xe) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. 137Cs size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation-mode (AM) sulfate aerosols were the main carriers of cesium. Hence, 137Cs can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulfate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas 133Xe behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of 137Cs that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulfate, and 133Xe emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulfate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled 137Cs and 133Xe concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime τe, calculated from station measurement data taken between 2 and 9 weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days (95

  8. A new lifetime estimation model for a quicker LED reliability prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamon, B. H.; Mendizabal, L.; Feuillet, G.; Gasse, A.; Bataillou, B.

    2014-09-01

    LED reliability and lifetime prediction is a key point for Solid State Lighting adoption. For this purpose, one hundred and fifty LEDs have been aged for a reliability analysis. LEDs have been grouped following nine current-temperature stress conditions. Stress driving current was fixed between 350mA and 1A and ambient temperature between 85C and 120°C. Using integrating sphere and I(V) measurements, a cross study of the evolution of electrical and optical characteristics has been done. Results show two main failure mechanisms regarding lumen maintenance. The first one is the typically observed lumen depreciation and the second one is a much more quicker depreciation related to an increase of the leakage and non radiative currents. Models of the typical lumen depreciation and leakage resistance depreciation have been made using electrical and optical measurements during the aging tests. The combination of those models allows a new method toward a quicker LED lifetime prediction. These two models have been used for lifetime predictions for LEDs.

  9. Forecasting of electronic devices lifetime on the basis of activation models of functional parameters drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, I. N.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a model of functional parameters drift for electronic devices, allowing predicting their lifetime. The method of model parameters estimation is developed. The developed model allows optimizing the accelerated tests modes, taking into account the complex impact of stress factors. The results are applicable for modern electronic devices with a failure rate less than 1 FIT. The results are applicable if the physical and chemical processes leading to electronic devices degradation have an activation mechanism; the activation process is due to the temperature.

  10. Lifetime of Cosmic-Ray Muons and the Standard Model of Fundamental Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Sahansha; Shevde, Yash; Majewski, Walerian

    2015-04-01

    Muon is one of the twelve fundamental particles of matter, having the longest free-particle lifetime. It decays into three other leptons through an exchange of the weak vector bosons W+/W-. Muons are present in the secondary cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere, reaching the sea level. By detecting time delay between arrival of the muon and an appearance of the decay electron in our single scintillation detector (donated by the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA), we measured muon's lifetime at rest. It compares well with the value predicted by the Standard Model of Particles. From the lifetime we were able to calculate the ratio gw /MW of the weak coupling constant gw (an analog of the electric charge) to the mass of the W-boson MW. Using further Standard Model relations and an experimental value for MW, we calculated the weak coupling constant, the electric charge of the muon, and the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field. We determined the sea-level flux of cosmic muons.

  11. Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Dony; Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2014-03-01

    Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

  12. Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Dony; Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2014-03-24

    Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

  13. Medication Adherence Patterns after Hospitalization for Coronary Heart Disease. A Population-Based Study Using Electronic Records and Group-Based Trajectory Models

    PubMed Central

    Librero, Julián; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Peiró, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify adherence patterns over time and their predictors for evidence-based medications used after hospitalization for coronary heart disease (CHD). Patients and Methods We built a population-based retrospective cohort of all patients discharged after hospitalization for CHD from public hospitals in the Valencia region (Spain) during 2008 (n = 7462). From this initial cohort, we created 4 subcohorts with at least one prescription (filled or not) from each therapeutic group (antiplatelet, beta-blockers, ACEI/ARB, statins) within the first 3 months after discharge. Monthly adherence was defined as having ≥24 days covered out of 30, leading to a repeated binary outcome measure. We assessed the membership to trajectory groups of adherence using group-based trajectory models. We also analyzed predictors of the different adherence patterns using multinomial logistic regression. Results We identified a maximum of 5 different adherence patterns: 1) Nearly-always adherent patients; 2) An early gap in adherence with a later recovery; 3) Brief gaps in medication use or occasional users; 4) A slow decline in adherence; and 5) A fast decline. These patterns represented variable proportions of patients, the descending trajectories being more frequent for the beta-blocker and ACEI/ARB cohorts (16% and 17%, respectively) than the antiplatelet and statin cohorts (10% and 8%, respectively). Predictors of poor or intermediate adherence patterns were having a main diagnosis of unstable angina or other forms of CHD vs. AMI in the index hospitalization, being born outside Spain, requiring copayment or being older. Conclusion Distinct adherence patterns over time and their predictors were identified. This may be a useful approach for targeting improvement interventions in patients with poor adherence patterns. PMID:27551748

  14. School Performance and the Risk of Suicidal Thoughts in Young Adults: Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kosidou, Kyriaki; Dalman, Christina; Fredlund, Peeter; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Although low school performance is related to attempted and completed suicide, its relationship with suicidal thoughts has been less clear. We conducted a population-based study including 10081 individuals aged 18–29 years in Stockholm, Sweden, and found a clear positive gradient in the risk of lifetime suicidal thoughts with decreasing levels of compulsory school leaving grades. This relationship was somewhat attenuated but remained significant in multivariate models accounting for family background, severe adult psychopathology and adult socioeconomic conditions. School failure is associated with an increased risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts and may also increase the tendency of acting upon them. PMID:25347404

  15. A simplified generic cryostat thermal model for predicting cryogen mass and lifetime. [of cryogenic space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, G. C.; Tsuyuki, G. T.

    1992-01-01

    This study presents a simple generic cryostat thermal model developed for predicting cryogen mass and the lifetime of cryogenic space telescopes. The model is based on a lumped parameter representation of eight nodes and over 35 conductors. The major telescope Dewar components represented as nodes are the main cryogen tank, the three vapor-cooled shields, the outer shell, barrel baffle, and the barrel baffle heat exchanger. The input to the model consists of the vapor-cooled shield, support straps and instrument cable geometry, and the cryostat heat loads from the instrument and through the aperture. The predictions from the model were compared with those from the more detailed models of IRAS, COBE, and SIRTF. Correlation of the helium flow rates of the IRAS and COBE Dewars was 12 percent above the actual flight or ground test data and for SIRTF it was less than 2 percent of the prediction from the detailed model.

  16. Computational-experimental investigation of the lifetime of welded pipe joints based on the method of local modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokurov, V. N.; Pavlovskij, V. E.; Strel'Chenko, A. S.; Strel'Chenko, I. G.; Filatov, E. Ya.

    1994-06-01

    A conception of local modeling of fatigue lifetime for thin-walled structural elements of shell type is formulated. An experimental procedure to determine the lifetime of welded thin-walled pipe joints is given. The estimation of the structure lifetime is performed on the basis of testing its local models which provide the similarity of fatigue fracture process parameters. Fatigue test results for T-shaped pipe joints and their models are presented. A specific choice of the model geometry makes it possible to 'reproduce' the values of the lifetime close to those of a full-scale structure, with the magnitude of the repeated variable load being essentially lower than that on the structure.

  17. Bayesian framework for parametric bivariate accelerated lifetime modeling and its application to hospital acquired infections.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, D; Ryu, D; Ergönül, Ö; Ebrahimi, N

    2016-03-01

    Infectious diseases that can be spread directly or indirectly from one person to another are caused by pathogenic microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi. Infectious diseases remain one of the greatest threats to human health and the analysis of infectious disease data is among the most important application of statistics. In this article, we develop Bayesian methodology using parametric bivariate accelerated lifetime model to study dependency between the colonization and infection times for Acinetobacter baumannii bacteria which is leading cause of infection among the hospital infection agents. We also study their associations with covariates such as age, gender, apache score, antibiotics use 3 months before admission and invasive mechanical ventilation use. To account for singularity, we use Singular Bivariate Extreme Value distribution to model residuals in Bivariate Accelerated lifetime model under the fully Bayesian framework. We analyze a censored data related to the colonization and infection collected in five major hospitals in Turkey using our methodology. The data analysis done in this article is for illustration of our proposed method and can be applied to any situation that our model can be used. PMID:26394029

  18. Lifetime growth in wild meerkats: incorporating life history and environmental factors into a standard growth model.

    PubMed

    English, Sinéad; Bateman, Andrew W; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2012-05-01

    Lifetime records of changes in individual size or mass in wild animals are scarce and, as such, few studies have attempted to model variation in these traits across the lifespan or to assess the factors that affect them. However, quantifying lifetime growth is essential for understanding trade-offs between growth and other life history parameters, such as reproductive performance or survival. Here, we used model selection based on information theory to measure changes in body mass over the lifespan of wild meerkats, and compared the relative fits of several standard growth models (monomolecular, von Bertalanffy, Gompertz, logistic and Richards). We found that meerkats exhibit monomolecular growth, with the best model incorporating separate growth rates before and after nutritional independence, as well as effects of season and total rainfall in the previous nine months. Our study demonstrates how simple growth curves may be improved by considering life history and environmental factors, which may be particularly relevant when quantifying growth patterns in wild populations. PMID:22108854

  19. Theoretical effects of surface diffused region lifetime models on silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, P. M.; Hauser, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A computer simulation of silicon solar cells has indicated that the combination of band gap reduction due to heavy doping and certain spatial forms of lifetime dependence can combine to form severe limitations on the open-circuit voltage of such cells. The interaction of these effects tends to shift the active region of the diffused surface layer away from the injecting junction, resulting in an increase in the current density injected into the surface region. Reductions in open circuit voltage as great as 10% over models which do not include these effects can be seen.

  20. Hole injection SiO2 breakdown model for very low voltage lifetime extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuegraf, Klaus F.; Hu, Chenming

    1994-05-01

    In this paper, we present a model for silicon dioxide breakdown characterization, valid for a thickness range between 25 angstrom and 130 angstrom, which provides a method for predicting dielectric lifetime for reduced power supply voltages and aggressively scaled oxide thicknesses. This model, based on hole injection from the anode, accurately predicts Q(sub BD) and t(sub BD) behavior including a fluence in excess of 10(exp 7) C/cm(exp 2) at an oxide voltage of 2.4 V for a 25 angstrom oxide. Moreover, this model is a refinement of and fully complementary with the well known 1/E model, while offering the ability to predict oxide reliability for low voltages.

  1. Modeling of LaB6 hollow cathode performance and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrini, Daniela; Albertoni, Riccardo; Paganucci, Fabrizio; Andrenucci, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Thermionic hollow cathodes are currently used as sources of electrons in a variety of space applications, in particular as cathodes/neutralizers of electric thrusters (Hall effect and ion thrusters). Numerical tools are needed to guide the design of new devices before their manufacturing and testing, since multiple geometrical parameters influence the cathode performance. A reduced-order, numerical model was developed to assess the performance of orificed hollow cathodes, with a focus on the operational lifetime. The importance of the lifetime prediction is tied to its impact on the operational lifetime of the thruster to which the cathode is coupled. The cathode architecture consists of a refractory metal tube with an internal electron emitter made of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6). The choice of LaB6 accounts for the reduced evaporation rate, the low sensitivity to poisoning and the absence of an activation procedure with respect to oxide cathodes. A LaB6 emitter is thus a valuable option for long-lasting cathodes, despite its relatively high work-function and reactivity with many refractory metals at high temperatures. The suggested reduced-order model self-consistently predicts the key parameters of the cathode operation, shedding light on the power deposition processes as well as on the main erosion mechanisms. Preliminary results showed good agreement with both the experimental data collected by Alta and data available from the literature for different operating conditions and power levels. Next developments will include further comparisons between theoretical and experimental data, considering cathodes of various size and operating conditions.

  2. Using a combined population-based and kinetic modelling approach to assess timescales and durations of magma migration activities prior to the 1669 flank eruption of Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, M.; Morgan, D. J.; Viccaro, M.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The March-July eruption of Mt. Etna in 1669 is ranked as one of the most destructive and voluminous eruptions of Etna volcano in historical times. To assess threats from future eruptions, a better understanding of how and over what timescales magma moved underground prior to and during the 1669 eruption is required. We present a combined population based and kinetic modelling approach [1-2] applied to 185 olivine crystals that erupted during the 1669 eruption. By means of this approach we provide, for the first time, a dynamic picture of magma mixing and magma migration activity prior to and during the 1669 flank eruption of Etna volcano. Following the work of [3] we have studied 10 basaltic lava samples (five SET1 and five SET2 samples) that were erupted from different fissures that opened between 950 and 700 m a.s.l. Following previous work [1-2] we were able to classify different populations of olivine based on their overall core and rim compositional record and the prevalent zoning type (i.e. normal vs. reverse). The core plateau compositions of the SET1 and SET2 olivines range from Fo70 up to Fo83 with a single peak at Fo75-76. The rims differ significantly and can be distinguished into two different groups. Olivine rims from the SET1 samples are generally more evolved and range from Fo50 to Fo64 with a maximum at Fo55-57. SET2 olivine rims vary between Fo65-75 with a peak at Fo69. SET1 and SET2 olivines display normal zonation with cores at Fo75-76 and diverging rim records (Fo55-57 and Fo65-75). The diverging core and rim compositions recorded in the SET1 and SET2 olivines can be attributed to magma evolution possibly in three different magmatic environments (MEs): M1 (=Fo75-76), M2 (=Fo69) and M3 (=Fo55-57) with magma transfer and mixing amongst them. The MEs established in this study differ slightly from those identified in previous works [1-2]. We note the relative lack of olivines with Fo-rich core and rim compositions indicating a major mafic magma

  3. Improving Trust and Reputation Modeling in E-Commerce Using Agent Lifetime and Transaction Count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Catherine; Tran, Thomas T.

    Effective and reliable trust and reputation modeling systems are central to the success of decentralized e-commerce systems where autonomous agents are relied upon to conduct commercial transactions. However, the subjective and social-based qualities that are inherent to trust and reputation introduce many complexities into the development of a reliable model. Existing research has successfully demonstrated how trust systems can be decentralized and has illustrated the importance of sharing trust information, or rather, modeling reputation. Still, few models have provided a solution for developing an initial set of advisors from whom to solicit reputation rankings, or have taken into account all of the social criteria used to determine trustworthiness. To meet these objectives, we propose the use of two new parameters in trust and reputation modeling: agent lifetime and total transaction count. We describe a model that employs these parameters to calculate an agent’s seniority, then apply this information when selecting agents for soliciting and ranking reputation information. Experiments using this model are described. The results are then presented and discussed to evaluate the effect of using these parameters in reputation modeling. We also discuss the value of our particular model in contrast with related work and conclude with directions for future research.

  4. Validity of Various Approaches to Global Kinetic Modeling of Material Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Dinh, L N

    2006-09-11

    Chemical kinetic modeling has been used for many years in process optimization, estimating real-time material performance, and lifetime prediction. Chemists have tended towards developing detailed mechanistic models, while engineers have tended towards global or lumped models. Many, if not most, applications use global models by necessity, since it is impractical or impossible to develop a rigorous mechanistic model. Model fitting acquired a bad connotation in the thermal analysis community after that community realized a decade after other disciplines that deriving kinetic parameters for an assumed model from a single heating rate produced unreliable and sometimes nonsensical results. In its place, advanced isoconversional methods, which have their roots in the Friedman and Ozawa-Flynn-Wall methods of the 1960s, have become increasingly popular. In fact, as pointed out by the ICTAC kinetics project in 2000, valid kinetic parameters can be derived by both isoconversional and model fitting methods as long as a diverse set of thermal histories are used to derive the kinetic parameters. The current paper extends the understanding from that project to give a better appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of isoconversional and model-fitting approaches. Examples are given from a variety of data sets.

  5. Modeling motivation and habit in driving behavior under lifetime driver's license revocation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chien-Ming; Chang, Hsin-Li; Woo, T Hugh

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to verify the motivational factors underlying the theory of planned behavior (TPB) predicting the driving behavior of lifetime driving license revoked offenders. Of a total of 639 drivers whose licenses had been permanently revoked, 544 offenders completed a questionnaire constructed to measure attitudes toward behaviors, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, behavioral intentions (the key constructs of the TPB), and previous driving habit strength. The finding of the study revealed that an offenders' driving behavior after a lifetime license revocation was significantly correlated to behavioral intention (R=0.60, p<0.01), perceived behavioral control (R=0.61, p<0.01), previous driving habit (R=0.44, p<0.01), and attitude (R=0.41, p<0.01). There was no evidence that subjective norms including road regulation, society ethics, and people important to offenders had an influence on driving behavior (R=0.03). Low driving habit strength offenders are motivated to drive because of behavioral intention, whereas strong driving habit strength offenders are motivated to drive because of perceived behavioral control. Previous driving habit strength is a moderator in the intention-behavior relationship. The model appeared successful when previous habits were weak, but less successful when previous habits were strong. PMID:23287113

  6. EXPOSED LONG-LIFETIME FIRST CORE: A NEW MODEL OF FIRST CORES BASED ON RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.j E-mail: saigo.kazuya@nao.ac.j

    2010-12-20

    A first adiabatic core is a transient object formed in the early phase of star formation. The observation of a first core is believed to be difficult because of its short lifetime and low luminosity. On the basis of radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we propose a novel theoretical model of first cores, the Exposed Long-lifetime First core (ELF). In the very low-mass molecular core, the first core evolves slowly and lives longer than 10,000 years because the accretion rate is considerably low. The evolution of ELFs is different from that of ordinary first cores because radiation cooling has a significant effect there. We also carry out a radiation-transfer calculation of dust-continuum emission from ELFs to predict their observational properties. ELFs have slightly fainter but similar spectral energy distributions to ordinary first cores in radio wavelengths, therefore they can be observed. Although the probabilities that such low-mass cores become gravitationally unstable and start to collapse are low, we still can expect that a considerable number of ELFs can be formed because there are many low-mass molecular cloud cores in star-forming regions that could be progenitors of ELFs.

  7. Modeling of high homologous temperature deformation behavior for stress and life-time analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Krempl, E.

    1997-12-31

    Stress and lifetime analyses need realistic and accurate constitutive models for the inelastic deformation behavior of engineering alloys at low and high temperatures. Conventional creep and plasticity models have fundamental difficulties in reproducing high homologous temperature behavior. To improve the modeling capabilities {open_quotes}unified{close_quotes} state variable theories were conceived. They consider all inelastic deformation rate-dependent and do not have separate repositories for creep and plasticity. The viscoplasticity theory based on overstress (VBO), one of the unified theories, is introduced and its properties are delineated. At high homologous temperature where secondary and tertiary creep are observed modeling is primarily accomplished by a static recovery term and a softening isotropic stress. At low temperatures creep is merely a manifestation of rate dependence. The primary creep modeled at low homologous temperature is due to the rate dependence of the flow law. The model is unaltered in the transition from low to high temperature except that the softening of the isotropic stress and the influence of the static recovery term increase with an increase of the temperature.

  8. Multiphysics modelling, quantum chemistry and risk analysis for corrosion inhibitor design and lifetime prediction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C D; Chandra, A; Vera, J; Sridhar, N

    2015-01-01

    Organic corrosion inhibitors can provide an effective means to extend the life of equipment in aggressive environments, decrease the environmental, economic, health and safety risks associated with corrosion failures and enable the use of low cost steels in place of corrosion resistant alloys. To guide the construction of advanced models for the design and optimization of the chemical composition of organic inhibitors, and to develop predictive tools for inhibitor performance as a function of alloy and environment, a multiphysics model has been constructed following Staehle's principles of "domains and microprocesses". The multiphysics framework provides a way for science-based modelling of the various phenomena that impact inhibitor efficiency, including chemical thermodynamics and speciation, oil/water partitioning, effect of the inhibitor on multiphase flow, surface adsorption and self-assembled monolayer formation, and the effect of the inhibitor on cathodic and anodic reaction pathways. The fundamental tools required to solve the resulting modelling from a first-principles perspective are also described. Quantification of uncertainty is significant to the development of lifetime prediction models, due to their application for risk management. We therefore also discuss how uncertainty analysis can be coupled with the first-principles approach laid out in this paper. PMID:25912625

  9. Solving inverse problem for Markov chain model of customer lifetime value using flower pollination algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ma'shumah, Fathimah; Permana, Dony; Sidarto, Kuntjoro Adji

    2015-12-01

    Customer Lifetime Value is an important and useful concept in marketing. One of its benefits is to help a company for budgeting marketing expenditure for customer acquisition and customer retention. Many mathematical models have been introduced to calculate CLV considering the customer retention/migration classification scheme. A fairly new class of these models which will be described in this paper uses Markov Chain Models (MCM). This class of models has the major advantage for its flexibility to be modified to several different cases/classification schemes. In this model, the probabilities of customer retention and acquisition play an important role. From Pfeifer and Carraway, 2000, the final formula of CLV obtained from MCM usually contains nonlinear form of the transition probability matrix. This nonlinearity makes the inverse problem of CLV difficult to solve. This paper aims to solve this inverse problem, yielding the approximate transition probabilities for the customers, by applying metaheuristic optimization algorithm developed by Yang, 2013, Flower Pollination Algorithm. The major interpretation of obtaining the transition probabilities are to set goals for marketing teams in keeping the relative frequencies of customer acquisition and customer retention.

  10. Lifetime-based photoacoustic probe activation modeled by a dual methylene blue-lysine conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgounova, Ekaterina; Johnson, Sadie M.; Shao, Qi; Hackel, Benjamin; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Activatable photoacoustic probes have a promising future due to their ability to provide high-resolution, high-penetration depth information on enzyme activity in vivo. Spectral identification methods, however, suffer from heterogeneous optical properties and wavelength-dependent light attenuation in tissue, thereby limiting the effective suppression of background noise signal. Our approach is predicated on probing the excited-state lifetime of a dual-labeled methylene blue (MB) probe that changes its lifetime from short to long upon cleavage. Recently, we have reported on the ability of our system to probe the long triplet lifetime of free MB monomers in solution and to differentiate between monomers and dimers based on their lifetime contrast. Here we introduce an improvement to our system that significantly increases the system sensitivity to fast changes, and reduces the minimum resolvable lifetime down to a few nanoseconds. We applied this method to probe the excited-state lifetime of a covalently coupled dual methylene blue-lysine conjugate (MB2K) in a mixed MB/MB2K solution. Preliminary results show that a stable dimeric bond is formed between the chromophores within the conjugate, and that this conjugate is statically quenched. Examination of the transient absorption of MB2K reveals it does not exhibit a triplet excited-state lifetime, suggesting that it undergoes a fast deexcitation process directly from the singlet state. Finally, we demonstrate how the transient photoacoustic lifetime signal can be used to selectively detect the presence of MB monomers while improving background noise suppression by differentiating the lifetime of free MB dye with other absorbing structures.

  11. Lifetime effectiveness of mifamurtide addition to chemotherapy in nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma: a Markov process model analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Jin; Lee, Jun Ah; Han, Euna; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2015-09-01

    The mortality and progression rates in osteosarcoma differ depending on the presence of metastasis. A decision model would be useful for estimating long-term effectiveness of treatment with limited clinical trial data. The aim of this study was to explore the lifetime effectiveness of the addition of mifamurtide to chemotherapy for patients with metastatic and nonmetastatic osteosarcoma. The target population was osteosarcoma patients with or without metastasis. A Markov process model was used, whose time horizon was lifetime with a starting age of 13 years. There were five health states: disease-free (DF), recurrence, post-recurrence disease-free, post-recurrence disease-progression, and death. Transition probabilities of the starting state, DF, were calculated from the INT-0133 clinical trials for chemotherapy with and without mifamurtide. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) increased upon addition of mifamurtide to chemotherapy by 10.5 % (10.13 and 9.17 QALY with and without mifamurtide, respectively) and 45.2 % (7.23 and 4.98 QALY with and without mifamurtide, respectively) relative to the lifetime effectiveness of chemotherapy in nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma, respectively. Life-years gained (LYG) increased by 10.1 % (13.10 LYG with mifamurtide and 11.90 LYG without mifamurtide) in nonmetastatic patients and 42.2 % (9.43 LYG with mifamurtide and 6.63 LYG without mifamurtide) in metastatic osteosarcoma patients. The Markov model analysis showed that chemotherapy with mifamurtide improved the lifetime effectiveness compared to chemotherapy alone in both nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma. Relative effectiveness of the therapy was higher in metastatic than nonmetastatic osteosarcoma over lifetime. However, absolute lifetime effectiveness was higher in nonmetastatic than metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:25835978

  12. Quasiparticle energies and lifetimes in a metallic chain model of a tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Szepieniec, Mark; Yeriskin, Irene; Greer, J C

    2013-04-14

    As electronics devices scale to sub-10 nm lengths, the distinction between "device" and "electrodes" becomes blurred. Here, we study a simple model of a molecular tunnel junction, consisting of an atomic gold chain partitioned into left and right electrodes, and a central "molecule." Using a complex absorbing potential, we are able to reproduce the single-particle energy levels of the device region including a description of the effects of the semi-infinite electrodes. We then use the method of configuration interaction to explore the effect of correlations on the system's quasiparticle peaks. We find that when excitations on the leads are excluded, the device's highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital quasiparticle states when including correlation are bracketed by their respective values in the Hartree-Fock (Koopmans) and ΔSCF approximations. In contrast, when excitations on the leads are included, the bracketing property no longer holds, and both the positions and the lifetimes of the quasiparticle levels change considerably, indicating that the combined effect of coupling and correlation is to alter the quasiparticle spectrum significantly relative to an isolated molecule. PMID:24981526

  13. Pitch angle dependence of the charge exchange lifetime of ring current ions in a Mead-Fairfield magnetic field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, G. K.; Rajaram, R.

    1989-11-01

    This paper examines the necessity of using a realistic magnetospheric magnetic field geometry in the computation of the pitch-angle dependence of the charge exchange lifetime of ring current ions. The Chamberlain (1963) model is used for the atomic hydrogen density, and the pitch-angle dependence of the charge exchange lifetime, tau, has been computed for coefficients corresponding to different levels of geomagnetic activity in the Mead-Fairfield (1975) model of magnetic field. It is shown that using the correct model of the magnetic field is as important as adopting the proper exospheric temperature in the model for the neutral hydrogen model. A local time dependence of the pitch-angle dependence of tau also results from the adoption of a realistic description of the magnetic field.

  14. Modelling lifetime cost consequences of ReSTOR® in cataract surgery in four European countries

    PubMed Central

    Lafuma, Antoine; Berdeaux, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    Background To compare the lifetime costs of liberating patients from spectacles after cataract surgery by implanting the multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) 'ReSTOR®' versus monofocal IOLs in France, Italy, Germany and Spain. Methods A Markov model was created to follow patient cohorts from cataract surgery until death. Prevalence rates of patients not needing spectacles after cataract surgery were obtained from clinical trials. Resource utilisation included implant surgery, IOLs, spectacles, visits to ophthalmologists and eye centres, transport, and time lost by patients. Economic perspectives were those of Society and Sickness Funds (SFs). Results The mean number of spectacles purchased after ReSTOR® was 1.34–1.61 and after monofocal IOLs 6.05–7.27. From the societal perspective, total cost estimates discounted by 3% were between €3,551 and €4,052 with ReSTOR® compared to €3,989 and €5,548 with monofocal IOLs. Undiscounted savings related to ReSTOR® ranged from €815 to €2,164. From the SFs' perspective total cost estimates discounted by 3% were between €2,150 and €2,524 with ReSTOR® compared to €2,324 and €2,610 with monofocal IOLs. Savings related to ReSTOR®, once costs discounted, ranged from €61 to €219. Discount and spectacle freedom prevalence rates were the most sensitive parameters. Conclusion The bulk of the savings related to ReSTOR® were realized outside the SF. From both a societal and SF perspective, savings, after a 3% discounting, achieved by liberating patients from spectacles counterbalanced the initially higher cost of ReSTOR®. ReSTOR® is a cost saving alternative to spectacles for patients requiring cataract surgery. PMID:18627594

  15. Calculation of lifetime lung cancer risks associated with radon exposure, based on various models and exposure scenarios.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Nezahat; Muirhead, Colin R; Bochicchio, Francesco; Haylock, Richard G E

    2015-09-01

    The risk of lung cancer mortality up to 75 years of age due to radon exposure has been estimated for both male and female continuing, ex- and never-smokers, based on various radon risk models and exposure scenarios. We used risk models derived from (i) the BEIR VI analysis of cohorts of radon-exposed miners, (ii) cohort and nested case-control analyses of a European cohort of uranium miners and (iii) the joint analysis of European residential radon case-control studies. Estimates of the lifetime lung cancer risk due to radon varied between these models by just over a factor of 2 and risk estimates based on models from analyses of European uranium miners exposed at comparatively low rates and of people exposed to radon in homes were broadly compatible. For a given smoking category, there was not much difference in lifetime lung cancer risk between males and females. The estimated lifetime risk of radon-induced lung cancer for exposure to a concentration of 200 Bq m(-3) was in the range 2.98-6.55% for male continuing smokers and 0.19-0.42% for male never-smokers, depending on the model used and assuming a multiplicative relationship for the joint effect of radon and smoking. Stopping smoking at age 50 years decreases the lifetime risk due to radon by around a half relative to continuing smoking, but the risk for ex-smokers remains about a factor of 5-7 higher than that for never-smokers. Under a sub-multiplicative model for the joint effect of radon and smoking, the lifetime risk of radon-induced lung cancer was still estimated to be substantially higher for continuing smokers than for never smokers. Radon mitigation-used to reduce radon concentrations at homes-can also have a substantial impact on lung cancer risk, even for persons in their 50 s; for each of continuing smokers, ex-smokers and never-smokers, radon mitigation at age 50 would lower the lifetime risk of radon-induced lung cancer by about one-third. To maximise risk reductions, smokers in high

  16. Model of lifetimes of the outer radiation belt electrons in a realistic magnetic field using realistic chorus wave parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Ksenia; Shprits, Yuri

    2014-02-01

    The outer radiation belt electrons in the inner magnetosphere show high variability during the geomagnetically disturbed conditions. Quasi-linear diffusion theory provides both a framework for global prediction of particle loss at different energies and an understanding of the dynamics of different particle populations. It has been recently shown that the pitch angle scattering of electrons due to wave-particle interaction with chorus waves modeled in a realistic magnetic field may be significantly different from those estimated in a dipole model. In this work, we present the lifetimes of 1 keV-2 MeV electrons computed in the Tsyganenko 89 magnetic field model for the night, dawn, prenoon, and postnoon magnetic local time (MLT) sectors for different levels of geomagnetic activity and distances. The lifetimes in the realistic field are also compared to those computed in the dipole model. We develop a realistic chorus lower band and upper band wave models for each MLT sector using the recent statistical studies of wave amplitude, wave normal angle, and wave spectral density distributions as functions of magnetic latitude, distance, and Kp index. The increase of plasma trough density with increasing latitude is also included. The obtained in the Tsyganenko 89 field electron lifetimes are parameterized and can be used in 2-D/3-D/4-D convection and particle tracing codes.

  17. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  18. Modelled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long-range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present-day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparison. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modelled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  19. Chasing quicksilver: modeling the atmospheric lifetime of Hg(0)(g) in the marine boundary layer at various latitudes.

    PubMed

    Hedgecock, Ian M; Pirrone, Nicola

    2004-01-01

    The lifetime of elemental mercury in the marine boundary layer(MBL) has been studied using AMCOTS (Atmospheric Mercury Chemistry Over The Sea), a box model of MBL photochemistry including aerosols and detailed mercury chemistry. Recently measured Hg(0)(g) oxidation reactions have been included, and the studies were performed as a function of latitude, time of year, boundary layer liquid water content (LWC) and cloud optical depth. The results show that Hg has the shortest lifetime when air temperatures are low and sunlight and deliquescent aerosol particles are plentiful. Thus the modeled lifetime for clear-sky conditions is actually shorter at mid-latitudes and high latitudes than near the equator, and for a given latitude and time of year, cooler temperatures enhance the rate of Hg oxidation. Under typical summer conditions (for a given latitude) of temperature and cloudiness, the lifetime (tau) of Hg(0)(g) in the MBL is calculated to be around 10 days at all latitudes between the equator and 60 degrees N. This is much shorter than the generally accepted atmospheric residence time for Hg(0)(g) of a year or more. Given the relatively stable background concentrations of Hg(0)(g) which have been measured, continual replenishment of Hg(0)(g) must take place, suggesting a "multihop" mechanism for the distribution of Hg, rather than solely aeolian transport with little or no chemical transformation between source and receptor. Inclusion of an empirical Hg(0)(g) emission factor related to insolation was used to stabilize the Hg(0)(g) concentration in the model, and the emission rates necessarily agree well with estimated emission fluxes for the open ocean. PMID:14740719

  20. Lifetime Evaluation of Oil-immersed Power Capacitor using Conversion Factor between Model Sample and Practical Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiyama, Masakazu; Akiyama, Ken-Ichi; Maeda, Teruhiko; Nakamura, Shuhei; Umemura, Hiro; Hikita, Masayuki

    In this paper, the lifetime estimation method was discussed in view of Weibull distribution. For the case of power capacitor, the conversion factor between model specimen and practical equipment can be calculated by using the ratio of the electrode edge length of them and the Weibull shape parameter of the normalized V-t data obtained from the model samples. The actual failure rate of the power capacitor with PP film/capacitor-paper composite dielectric system was found to agree well with the estimated failure rate from the model samples.

  1. Evidence for an increase in the ozone photochemical lifetime in the eastern United States using a regional air quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Daniel L.; Vinciguerra, Timothy P.; Hosley, Kyle M.; Loughner, Christopher P.; Canty, Timothy P.; Salawitch, Ross J.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2015-12-01

    Measures to control surface ozone rely on quantifying production attributable to local versus regional (upwind) emissions. Here we simulate the relative contribution of local (i.e., within a particular state) and regional sources of surface ozone in the eastern United States (66-94°W longitude) for July 2002, 2011, and 2018 using the Comprehensive Air-quality Model with Extensions (CAMx). To determine how emissions and chemistry within the domain affect the production, loss, lifetime, and transport of trace gases, we initialize our model with identical boundary conditions in each simulation. We find that the photochemical lifetime of ozone has increased as emissions have decreased. The contribution of ozone from outside the domain (boundary condition ozone, BCO3) to local surface mixing ratios increases in an absolute sense by 1-2 ppbv between 2002 and 2018 due to the longer lifetime of ozone. The photochemical lifetime of ozone lengthens because the two primary gas phase sinks for odd oxygen (Ox ≈ NO2 + O3)—attack by hydroperoxyl radicals (HO2) on ozone and formation of nitrate—weaken with decreasing pollutant emissions. The relative role of BCO3 will also increase. For example, BCO3 represents 34.5%, 38.8%, and 43.6% of surface ozone in the Baltimore, MD, region during July 2002, 2011, and 2018 means, respectively. This unintended consequence of air quality regulation impacts attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for surface ozone because the spatial and temporal scales of photochemical smog increase; the influence of pollutants transported between states and into the eastern U.S. will likely play a greater role in the future.

  2. Monte Carlo mixture model of lifetime cancer incidence risk from radiation exposure on shuttle and international space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, L. E.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Estimating uncertainty in lifetime cancer risk for human exposure to space radiation is a unique challenge. Conventional risk assessment with low-linear-energy-transfer (LET)-based risk from Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies may be inappropriate for relativistic protons and nuclei in space due to track structure effects. This paper develops a Monte Carlo mixture model (MCMM) for transferring additive, National Institutes of Health multiplicative, and multiplicative excess cancer incidence risks based on Japanese atomic bomb survivor data to determine excess incidence risk for various US astronaut exposure profiles. The MCMM serves as an anchor point for future risk projection methods involving biophysical models of DNA damage from space radiation. Lifetime incidence risks of radiation-induced cancer for the MCMM based on low-LET Japanese data for nonleukemia (all cancers except leukemia) were 2.77 (90% confidence limit, 0.75-11.34) for males exposed to 1 Sv at age 45 and 2.20 (90% confidence limit, 0.59-10.12) for males exposed at age 55. For females, mixture model risks for nonleukemia exposed separately to 1 Sv at ages of 45 and 55 were 2.98 (90% confidence limit, 0.90-11.70) and 2.44 (90% confidence limit, 0.70-10.30), respectively. Risks for high-LET 200 MeV protons (LET=0.45 keV/micrometer), 1 MeV alpha-particles (LET=100 keV/micrometer), and 600 MeV iron particles (LET=180 keV/micrometer) were scored on a per particle basis by determining the particle fluence required for an average of one particle per cell nucleus of area 100 micrometer(2). Lifetime risk per proton was 2.68x10(-2)% (90% confidence limit, 0.79x10(-3)%-0. 514x10(-2)%). For alpha-particles, lifetime risk was 14.2% (90% confidence limit, 2.5%-31.2%). Conversely, lifetime risk per iron particle was 23.7% (90% confidence limit, 4.5%-53.0%). Uncertainty in the DDREF for high-LET particles may be less than that for low-LET radiation because typically there is very little dose-rate dependence

  3. Monte Carlo mixture model of lifetime cancer incidence risk from radiation exposure on shuttle and international space station.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L E; Cucinotta, F A

    1999-12-01

    Estimating uncertainty in lifetime cancer risk for human exposure to space radiation is a unique challenge. Conventional risk assessment with low-linear-energy-transfer (LET)-based risk from Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies may be inappropriate for relativistic protons and nuclei in space due to track structure effects. This paper develops a Monte Carlo mixture model (MCMM) for transferring additive, National Institutes of Health multiplicative, and multiplicative excess cancer incidence risks based on Japanese atomic bomb survivor data to determine excess incidence risk for various US astronaut exposure profiles. The MCMM serves as an anchor point for future risk projection methods involving biophysical models of DNA damage from space radiation. Lifetime incidence risks of radiation-induced cancer for the MCMM based on low-LET Japanese data for nonleukemia (all cancers except leukemia) were 2.77 (90% confidence limit, 0.75-11.34) for males exposed to 1 Sv at age 45 and 2.20 (90% confidence limit, 0.59-10.12) for males exposed at age 55. For females, mixture model risks for nonleukemia exposed separately to 1 Sv at ages of 45 and 55 were 2.98 (90% confidence limit, 0.90-11.70) and 2.44 (90% confidence limit, 0.70-10.30), respectively. Risks for high-LET 200 MeV protons (LET=0.45 keV/micrometer), 1 MeV alpha-particles (LET=100 keV/micrometer), and 600 MeV iron particles (LET=180 keV/micrometer) were scored on a per particle basis by determining the particle fluence required for an average of one particle per cell nucleus of area 100 micrometer(2). Lifetime risk per proton was 2.68x10(-2)% (90% confidence limit, 0.79x10(-3)%-0. 514x10(-2)%). For alpha-particles, lifetime risk was 14.2% (90% confidence limit, 2.5%-31.2%). Conversely, lifetime risk per iron particle was 23.7% (90% confidence limit, 4.5%-53.0%). Uncertainty in the DDREF for high-LET particles may be less than that for low-LET radiation because typically there is very little dose-rate dependence

  4. Effects of Orbital Lifetime Reduction on the Long-Term Earth Satellite Population as Modeled by EVOLVE 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Opiela, John N.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Anz-Meador, Phillip D.; Theall, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    The latest update of the NASA orbital debris environment model, EVOLVE 4.0, has been used to study the effect of various proposed debris mitigation measures, including the NASA 25-year guideline. EVOLVE 4.0, which includes updates of the NASA breakup, solar activity, and the orbit propagator models, a GEO analysis option, and non-fragmentation debris source models, allows for the statistical modeling and predicted growth of the particle population >1 mm in characteristic length in LEO and GEO orbits. The initial implementation of this &odel has been to study the sensitivity of the overall LEO debris environment to mitigation measures designed to limit the lifetime of intact objects in LEO orbits. The mitigation measures test matrix for this study included several commonly accepted testing schemes, i.e., the variance of the maximum LEO lifetime from 10 to 50 years, the date of the initial implementation of this policy, the shut off of all explosions at some specified date, and the inclusion of disposal orbits. All are timely studies in that all scenarios have been suggested by researchers and satellite operators as options for the removal of debris from LEO orbits.

  5. Neutron lifetimes behavior analysis considering the two-region kinetic model in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo

    2014-11-11

    This is a complementary work about the behavior analysis of the neutron lifetimes that was developed in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor facility. The macroscopic neutron noise technique was experimentally employed using pulse mode detectors for two stages of control rods insertion, where a total of twenty levels of subcriticality have been carried out. It was also considered that the neutron reflector density was treated as an additional group of delayed neutrons, being a sophisticated approach in the two-region kinetic theoretical model.

  6. A population-based Habitable Zone perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsom, Andras

    2015-08-01

    What can we tell about exoplanet habitability if currently only the stellar properties, planet radius, and the incoming stellar flux are known? The Habitable Zone (HZ) is the region around stars where planets can harbor liquid water on their surfaces. The HZ is traditionally conceived as a sharp region around the star because it is calculated for one planet with specific properties e.g., Earth-like or desert planets , or rocky planets with H2 atmospheres. Such planet-specific approach is limiting because the planets’ atmospheric and geophysical properties, which influence the surface climate and the presence of liquid water, are currently unknown but expected to be diverse.A statistical HZ description is outlined which does not select one specific planet type. Instead the atmospheric and surface properties of exoplanets are treated as random variables and a continuous range of planet scenarios are considered. Various probability density functions are assigned to each observationally unconstrained random variable, and a combination of Monte Carlo sampling and climate modeling is used to generate synthetic exoplanet populations with known surface climates. Then, the properties of the liquid water bearing subpopulation is analyzed.Given our current observational knowledge of small exoplanets, the HZ takes the form of a weakly-constrained but smooth probability function. The model shows that the HZ has an inner edge: it is unlikely that planets receiving two-three times more stellar radiation than Earth can harbor liquid water. But a clear outer edge is not seen: a planet that receives a fraction of Earth's stellar radiation (1-10%) can be habitable, if the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere is strong enough. The main benefit of the population-based approach is that it will be refined over time as new data on exoplanets and their atmospheres become available.

  7. Modeling the expected lifetime and evolution of a deme's principal genetic sequence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Brian

    2014-03-01

    The principal genetic sequence (PGS) is the most common genetic sequence in a deme. The PGS changes over time because new genetic sequences are created by inversions, compete with the current PGS, and a small fraction become PGSs. A set of coupled difference equations provides a description of the evolution of the PGS distribution function in an ensemble of demes. Solving the set of equations produces the survival probability of a new genetic sequence and the expected lifetime of an existing PGS as a function of inversion size and rate, recombination rate, and deme size. Additionally, the PGS distribution function is used to explain the transition pathway from old to new PGSs. We compare these results to a cellular automaton based representation of a deme and the drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. yakuba.

  8. Multi-stress factor model for cycle lifetime prediction of lithium ion batteries with shallow-depth discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yingzhi; Du, Chunyu; Yin, Geping; Gao, Yunzhi; Zhang, Lingling; Guan, Ting; Yang, Lijie; Wang, Fuping

    2015-04-01

    Accurate prediction of service life is a major challenge for the reliable application of lithium ion batteries in satellite and electric vehicle fields. This paper carries out systematic orthogonal experiments to extract key stress factor of capacity loss for commercial LiCoO2/MCMB (mesocarbon microbeads) lithium ion batteries cycled in shallow-depth discharge. Further, single stress factor and multi-stress factor models consisting of temperature, discharge rate, taper voltage and depth of discharge for cycle life prediction of lithium ion batteries are developed. The physicochemical significance of the life prediction model is interpreted by electrochemical analysis. The practical applicability of the models is validated by experimental data. Our multi-stress factor model is helpful to predicting the lifetime of LIBs with shallow-depth discharge, and to optimizing the operation regime of LIBs for electric vehicle or satellite use.

  9. A model for predicting the wearout lifetime of the LeRC/Hughes 30-cm mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of parameters that affect the erosion rates of 30-cm-diameter mercury-ion-thruster components is described. A sputter-erosion model is formulated in terms of the design, operational, and material characteristics of the thruster. The erosion model is applied to the screen electrode, which is assumed to be the life-limiting component of the 30-cm thruster, resulting in a model of wearout lifetime. Results of short-term erosion-rate tests are presented that illustrate the dependence of component wear rates on variables such as discharge voltage, accelerator-grid open-area fraction, ion energy, electrode material, and the partial pressure of facility residual gases such as nitrogen. Test results are compared with wearout rates predicted by the sputter-erosion model.

  10. Simulating star clusters with the AMUSE software framework. I. Dependence of cluster lifetimes on model assumptions and cluster dissolution modes

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, Alfred J.; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Vesperini, Enrico; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2013-12-01

    We perform a series of simulations of evolving star clusters using the Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment (AMUSE), a new community-based multi-physics simulation package, and compare our results to existing work. These simulations model a star cluster beginning with a King model distribution and a selection of power-law initial mass functions and contain a tidal cutoff. They are evolved using collisional stellar dynamics and include mass loss due to stellar evolution. After studying and understanding that the differences between AMUSE results and results from previous studies are understood, we explored the variation in cluster lifetimes due to the random realization noise introduced by transforming a King model to specific initial conditions. This random realization noise can affect the lifetime of a simulated star cluster by up to 30%. Two modes of star cluster dissolution were identified: a mass evolution curve that contains a runaway cluster dissolution with a sudden loss of mass, and a dissolution mode that does not contain this feature. We refer to these dissolution modes as 'dynamical' and 'relaxation' dominated, respectively. For Salpeter-like initial mass functions, we determined the boundary between these two modes in terms of the dynamical and relaxation timescales.

  11. Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime in AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, Andreas; Kondo, Yutaka; Li, Shao-Meng; Moteki, N.; Koike, Makoto; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, M.; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lin, Guang; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2014-11-27

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a positive radiative forcing1. However, the total contribution of BC to the ongoing changes in global climate is presently under debate2-8. Both anthropogenic BC emissions and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of BC concentration are highly uncertain2,9. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood, leading to large estimated uncertainty in BC concentration at high altitudes and far from emission sources10. These uncertainties limit our ability to quantify both the historical, present and future anthropogenic climate impact of BC. Here we compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns with 13 state of the art aerosol models, and show that recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing. Further, an atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in transport dominated remote regions. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in the multi-model median direct BC forcing from fossil fuel and biofuel burning over the industrial era.

  12. Robust Bayesian Fluorescence Lifetime Estimation, Decay Model Selection and Instrument Response Determination for Low-Intensity FLIM Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Mark I.; Coolen, Anthonius C. C.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Barber, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    We present novel Bayesian methods for the analysis of exponential decay data that exploit the evidence carried by every detected decay event and enables robust extension to advanced processing. Our algorithms are presented in the context of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and particular attention has been paid to model the time-domain system (based on time-correlated single photon counting) with unprecedented accuracy. We present estimates of decay parameters for mono- and bi-exponential systems, offering up to a factor of two improvement in accuracy compared to previous popular techniques. Results of the analysis of synthetic and experimental data are presented, and areas where the superior precision of our techniques can be exploited in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) experiments are described. Furthermore, we demonstrate two advanced processing methods: decay model selection to choose between differing models such as mono- and bi-exponential, and the simultaneous estimation of instrument and decay parameters. PMID:27355322

  13. Collisional lifetimes of meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, R. H.; Schwarzkopf, G. J.; Sommer, M.; Vaubaillon, J.; Albin, T.; Rodmann, J.; Grün, E.; Srama, R.

    2016-01-01

    Collisions of meteoroids with interplanetary dust grain fragments particles, dispersing larger particles amongst lower mass intervals. Here we use the method of Grün et al. (1985) and the IMEM interplanetary dust model to calculate the collisional lifetimes for different orbits, and for particles in different meteor showers. The timescales are usually long - of order 10^4 years for 1mm grains on Jupiter-family and Hally-type comet orbits. However, near-sun orbits particles suffer more frequent collisions and therefore have much shorter lifetimes. We discuss factors that affect the accuracy of these calculations.

  14. Lifetime PCB 153 bioaccumulation and pharmacokinetics in pilot whales: Bayesian population PBPK modeling and Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Roach, Anthony C; Yang, Raymond S H; McDougall, Robin; Lyons, Michael; Housand, Conrad; Tibax, Detlef; Manning, Therese; Chapman, John; Edge, Katelyn; Covaci, Adrian; Blust, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for wild animal populations such as marine mammals typically have a high degree of model uncertainty and variability due to the scarcity of information and the embryonic nature of this field. Parameters values used in marine mammals models are usually taken from other mammalian species (e.g. rats or mice) and might not be entirely suitable to properly explain the kinetics of pollutants in marine mammals. Therefore, several parameters for a PBPK model for the bioaccumulation and pharmacokinetics of PCB 153 in long-finned pilot whales were estimated in the present study using the Bayesian approach executed with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. This method uses 'prior' information of the parameters, either from the literature or from previous model runs. The advantage is that this method uses such 'prior' parameters to calculate probability distributions to determine 'posterior' values that best explain the field observations. Those field observations or datasets were PCB 153 concentrations in blubber of long-finned pilot whales from Sandy Cape and Stanley, Tasmania, Australia. The model predictions showed an overall decrease in PCB 153 levels in blubber over the lifetime of the pilot whales. All parameters from the Sandy Cape model were updated using the Stanley dataset, except for the concentration of PCB 153 in the milk. The model presented here is a promising and preliminary start to PBPK modeling in long-finned pilot whales that would provide a basis for non-invasive studies in these protected marine mammals. PMID:24080004

  15. On the Connectivity, Lifetime and Hop Count of Routes Determined Using the City Section and Manhattan Mobility Models for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghanathan, Natarajan

    The high-level contribution of this paper is a simulation based analysis of the network connectivity, hop count and lifetime of the routes determined for vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) using the City Section and Manhattan mobility models. The Random Waypoint mobility model is used as a benchmark in the simulation studies. Two kinds of paths are determined on the sequence of static graphs representing the topology over the duration of the network session: paths with the minimum hop count (using the Dijkstra algorithm) and stable paths with the longest lifetime (using our recently proposed OptPathTrans algorithm). Simulation results indicate that the City Section model provided higher network connectivity compared to the Manhattan model for all the network scenarios. Minimum hop paths and stable paths determined under the Manhattan model have a smaller lifetime and larger hop count compared to those determined using the City Section and Random Waypoint mobility models.

  16. BENEFITS AND COSTS OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT PROGRAMS FOR STATE PRISON INMATES: RESULTS FROM A LIFETIME SIMULATION MODEL

    PubMed Central

    ZARKIN, GARY A.; COWELL, ALEXANDER J.; HICKS, KATHERINE A.; MILLS, MICHAEL J.; BELENKO, STEVEN; DUNLAP, LAURA J.; HOUSER, KIMBERLY A.; KEYES, VINCE

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Reflecting drug use patterns and criminal justice policies throughout the 1990s and 2000s, prisons hold a disproportionate number of society’s drug abusers. Approximately 50% of state prisoners meet the criteria for a diagnosis of drug abuse or dependence, but only 10% receive medically based drug treatment. Because of the link between substance abuse and crime, treating substance abusing and dependent state prisoners while incarcerated has the potential to yield substantial economic benefits. In this paper, we simulate the lifetime costs and benefits of improving prison-based substance abuse treatment and post-release aftercare for a cohort of state prisoners. Our model captures the dynamics of substance abuse as a chronic disease; estimates the benefits of substance abuse treatment over individuals’ lifetimes; and tracks the costs of crime and criminal justice costs related to policing, adjudication, and incarceration. We estimate net societal benefits and cost savings to the criminal justice system of the current treatment system and five policy scenarios. We find that four of the five policy scenarios provide positive net societal benefits and cost savings to the criminal justice system relative to the current treatment system. Our study demonstrates the societal gains to improving the drug treatment system for state prisoners. PMID:21506193

  17. Predicting the lifetime of organic vapor cartridges exposed to volatile organic compound mixtures using a partial differential equations model.

    PubMed

    Vuong, François; Chauveau, Romain; Grevillot, Georges; Marsteau, Stéphanie; Silvente, Eric; Vallieres, Cécile

    2016-09-01

    In this study, equilibria, breakthrough curves, and breakthrough times were predicted for three binary mixtures of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a model based on partial differential equations of dynamic adsorption coupling a mass balance, a simple Linear Driving Force (LDF) hypothesis to describe the kinetics, and the well-known Extended-Langmuir (EL) equilibrium model. The model aims to predict with a limited complexity, the BTCs of respirator cartridges exposed to binary vapor mixtures from equilibria and kinetics data obtained from single component. In the model, multicomponent mass transfer was simplified to use only single dynamic adsorption data. The EL expression used in this study predicted equilibria with relatively good accuracy for acetone/ethanol and ethanol/cyclohexane mixtures, but the prediction of cyclohexane uptake when mixed with heptane is less satisfactory. The BTCs given by the model were compared to experimental BTCs to determine the accuracy of the model and the impact of the approximation on mass transfer coefficients. From BTCs, breakthrough times at 10% of the exposure concentration t10% were determined. All t10% were predicted within 20% of the experimental values, and 63% of the breakthrough times were predicted within a 10% error. This study demonstrated that a simple mass balance combined with kinetic approximations is sufficient to predict lifetime for respirator cartridges exposed to VOC mixtures. It also showed that a commonly adopted approach to describe multicomponent adsorption based on volatility of VOC rather than adsorption equilibrium greatly overestimated the breakthrough times. PMID:27028086

  18. Type-II seesaw dominance in nonsupersymmetric and split-supersymmetry SO(10) models and proton lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Mohapatra, R. N.; Parida, Mina K.

    2011-11-01

    Recently type-II seesaw in a supersymmetricSO(10) framework has been found useful in explaining large solar and atmospheric mixing angles as well as a larger value of {theta}{sub 13} while unifying quark and lepton masses. An important question in these models is whether there exists consistency between coupling unification and type-II seesaw dominance. Scenarios where this consistency can be demonstrated have been given in a SUSY framework. In this paper we give examples where type-II dominance occurs in SO(10) models without supersymmetry but with additional TeV-scale particles and also in models with split-supersymmetry. Grand unification is realized in a two step process via breaking of SO(10) to SU(5) and then to a TeV-scale standard model supplemented by extra fields and an SU(5) Higgs multiplet 15{sub H} at a scale of about 10{sup 12} GeV to give a type-II seesaw. The predictions for proton lifetime in these models are in the range {tau}{sub p}{sup 0}=2x10{sup 35} yrs. to 6x10{sup 35} yrs. A number of recent numerical fits to GUT-scale fermion masses can be accommodated within this model.

  19. Modelling impacts of performance on the probability of reproducing, and thereby on productive lifespan, allow prediction of lifetime efficiency in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Phuong, H N; Blavy, P; Martin, O; Schmidely, P; Friggens, N C

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive success is a key component of lifetime efficiency - which is the ratio of energy in milk (MJ) to energy intake (MJ) over the lifespan, of cows. At the animal level, breeding and feeding management can substantially impact milk yield, body condition and energy balance of cows, which are known as major contributors to reproductive failure in dairy cattle. This study extended an existing lifetime performance model to incorporate the impacts that performance changes due to changing breeding and feeding strategies have on the probability of reproducing and thereby on the productive lifespan, and thus allow the prediction of a cow's lifetime efficiency. The model is dynamic and stochastic, with an individual cow being the unit modelled and one day being the unit of time. To evaluate the model, data from a French study including Holstein and Normande cows fed high-concentrate diets and data from a Scottish study including Holstein cows selected for high and average genetic merit for fat plus protein that were fed high- v. low-concentrate diets were used. Generally, the model consistently simulated productive and reproductive performance of various genotypes of cows across feeding systems. In the French data, the model adequately simulated the reproductive performance of Holsteins but significantly under-predicted that of Normande cows. In the Scottish data, conception to first service was comparably simulated, whereas interval traits were slightly under-predicted. Selection for greater milk production impaired the reproductive performance and lifespan but not lifetime efficiency. The definition of lifetime efficiency used in this model did not include associated costs or herd-level effects. Further works should include such economic indicators to allow more accurate simulation of lifetime profitability in different production scenarios. PMID:26301951

  20. Time-dependent model of the Martian atmosphere for use in orbit lifetime and sustenance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culp, R. D.; Stewart, A. I.

    1984-01-01

    A time-dependent model of the Martian atmosphere suitable for calculation of long-term aerodynamic effects on low altitude satellites is presented. The atmospheric model is both position dependent, through latitude and longitude effects, and time dependent. The time dependency includes diurnal and seasonal effects, effects of annual motion, long and short term solar activity effects, and periodic dust storm effects. Nine constituent gases are included in the model. Uncertainties in exospheric temperature, turbidity, and turbopause altitude are used to produce bounds on the expected density. A computer model - a Fortran subroutine which, when given the Julian date, Cartesian position of the sun and the spacecraft in aerocentric coordinates, returns the local values of mass density, temperature, scale height, and upper and lower bounds on the mass density is presented.

  1. Bacterial ice nuclei impact cloud lifetime and radiative properties and reduce atmospheric heat loss in the BRAMS simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Tassio S.; Gonçalves, Fábio L. T.; Yamasoe, Marcia A.; Martins, Jorge A.; Morris, Cindy E.

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the effect of the bacterial species Pseudomonas syringae acting as ice nuclei (IN) on cloud properties to understand its impact on local radiative budget and heating rates. These bacteria may become active IN at temperatures as warm as -2 °C. Numerical simulations were developed using the Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Model System (BRAMS). To investigate the isolated effect of bacterial IN, four scenarios were created considering only homogeneous and bacterial ice nucleation, with 1, 10 and 100 IN per cubic meter of cloud volume and one with no bacteria. Moreover, two other scenarios were generated: the BRAMS default parameterization and its combination with bacterial IN. The model reproduced a strong convective cell over São Paulo on 3 March 2003. Results showed that bacterial IN may change cloud evolution as well as its microphysical properties, which in turn influence cloud radiative properties. For example, the reflected shortwave irradiance over an averaged domain in a scenario considering bacterial IN added to the BRAMS default parameterization was 14% lower than if bacteria were not considered. Heating rates can also be impacted, especially due to differences in cloud lifetime. Results suggest that the omission of bacterial IN in numerical models, including global cloud models, could neglect relevant ice nucleation processes that potentially influence cloud radiative properties.

  2. An upgraded drift-diffusion model for evaluating the carrier lifetimes in radiation-damaged semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Lopez, J.; Jimenez-Ramos, M. C.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Forneris, J.; Ceballos, J.

    2016-03-01

    The transport properties of a series of n- and p-type Si diodes have been studied by the ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique using a 4 MeV proton microbeam. The samples were irradiated with 17 MeV protons at fluences ranging from 1 × 1012 to 1 × 1013 p/cm2 in order to produce a uniform profile of defects with depth. The analysis of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) as a function of the reverse bias voltage has been carried out using an upgraded drift-diffusion (D-D) model which takes into account the possibility of carrier recombination not only in the neutral substrate, as the simple D-D model assumes, but also within the depletion region. This new approach for calculating the CCE is fundamental when the drift length of carriers cannot be considered as much greater that the thickness of the detector due to the ion induced damage. From our simulations, we have obtained the values of the carrier lifetimes for the pristine and irradiated diodes, which have allowed us to calculate the effective trapping cross sections using the one dimension Shockley-Read-Hall model. The results of our calculations have been compared to the data obtained using a recently developed Monte Carlo code for the simulation of IBIC analysis, based on the probabilistic interpretation of the excess carrier continuity equations.

  3. Microstructurally based thermomechanical fatigue lifetime model of solder joints for electronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Frear, D.R.; Rashid, M.M.; Burchett, S.N.

    1993-07-01

    We present a new methodology for predicting the fatigue life of solder joints for electronics applications. This approach involves integration of experimental and computational techniques. The first stage involves correlating the manufacturing and processing parameters with the starting microstructure of the solder joint. The second stage involves a series of experiments that characterize the evolution of the microstructure during thermal cycling. The third stage consists of a computer modeling and simulation effort that utilizes the starting microstructure and experimental data to produce a reliability prediction of the solder joint. This approach is an improvement over current methodologies because it incorporates the microstructure and properties of the solder directly into the model and allows these properties to evolve as the microstructure changes during fatigue.

  4. Autoregressive-model-based fluorescence-lifetime measurements by phase-modulation fluorometry using a pulsed-excitation light source and a high-gain photomultiplier tube.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Ito, Ritsuki; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2009-11-01

    We propose a novel method for measuring fluorescence lifetimes by use of a pulsed-excitation light source and an ordinary or a high-gain photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a high-load resistor. In order to obtain the values of fluorescence lifetimes, we adopt a normal data-processing procedure used in phase-modulation fluorometry. We apply an autoregressive (AR)-model-based data-analysis technique to fluorescence- and reference-response time-series data obtained from the PMT in order to derive plural values of phase differences at a repetition frequency of the pulsed-excitation light source and its harmonic ones. The connection of the high-load resistor enhances sensitivity in signal detection in a certain condition. Introduction of the AR-model-based data-analysis technique improves precision in estimating the values of fluorescence lifetimes. Depending on the value of the load resistor and that of the repetition frequency, plural values of fluorescence lifetimes are obtained at one time by utilizing the phase information of harmonic frequencies. Because the proposed measurement system is simple to construct, it might be effective when we need to know approximate values of fluorescence lifetimes readily, such as in the field of biochemistry for a screening purpose. PMID:19891834

  5. Lifetime-based tomographic multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Kumar, Anand T. N.

    2010-07-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence tomography of multiple fluorophores has previously been limited by the bandwidth of the NIR spectral regime and the broad emission spectra of most NIR fluorophores. We describe in vivo tomography of three spectrally overlapping fluorophores using fluorescence lifetime-based separation. Time-domain images are acquired using a voltage-gated, intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) in free-space transmission geometry with 750 nm Ti:sapphire laser excitation. Lifetime components are fit from the asymptotic portion of fluorescence decay curve and reconstructed separately with a lifetime-adjusted forward model. We use this system to test the in vivo lifetime multiplexing suitability of commercially available fluorophores, and demonstrate lifetime multiplexing in solution mixtures and in nude mice. All of the fluorophores tested exhibit nearly monoexponential decays, with narrow in vivo lifetime distributions suitable for lifetime multiplexing. Quantitative separation of two fluorophores with lifetimes of 1.1 and 1.37 ns is demonstrated for relative concentrations of 1:5. Finally, we demonstrate tomographic imaging of two and three fluorophores in nude mice with fluorophores that localize to distinct organ systems. This technique should be widely applicable to imaging multiple NIR fluorophores in 3-D.

  6. Model prediction for ranking lead-acid batteries according to expected lifetime in renewable energy systems and autonomous power-supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, Julia; Sauer, Dirk Uwe; Bindner, Henrik; Cronin, Tom; Lundsager, Per; Kaiser, Rudi

    Predicting the lifetime of lead-acid batteries in applications with irregular operating conditions such as partial state-of-charge cycling, varying depth-of-discharge and different times between full charging is known as a difficult task. Experimental investigations in the laboratory are difficult because each application has its own specific operation profile. Therefore, an experimental investigation is necessary for each application and, moreover, for each operation strategy. This paper presents a lifetime model that allows comparison of the impact of different operating conditions, different system sizing and different battery technologies on battery lifetime. It is a tool for system designers and system operators to select appropriate batteries, to do a proper system design (sizing of the battery, power generators and loads), and to implement an optimized operation strategy (end-of-charge voltage, frequency of full charging, gassing periods, maximum depth-of-discharge). The model is a weighted Ah throughput approach based on the assumption that operating conditions are typically more severe than those used in standard tests of cycling and float lifetime. The wear depends on the depth-of-discharge, the current rate, the existing acid stratification, and the time since the last full charging. The actual Ah throughput is continuously multiplied by a weight factor that represents the actual operating conditions. Even though the modelling approach is mainly heuristic, all of the effects that are taken into account are based on a detailed analysis and understanding of ageing processes in lead-acid batteries. The 'normal' user can adapt the model to different battery types simply from the data sheet information on cycle lifetime and float lifetime.

  7. Genetic parameters for various random regression models to describe total sperm cells per ejaculate over the reproductive lifetime of boars.

    PubMed

    Oh, S H; See, M T; Long, T E; Galvin, J M

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to model the variances and covariances of total sperm cells per ejaculate (TSC) over the reproductive lifetime of AI boars. Data from boars (n = 834) selected for AI were provided by Smithfield Premium Genetics. The total numbers of records and animals were 19,629 and 1,736, respectively. Parameters were estimated for TSC by age of boar classification with a random regression model using the Simplex method and DxMRR procedures. The model included breed, collector, and year-season as fixed effects. Random effects were additive genetic, permanent environmental effect of boar, and residual. Observations were removed when the number of data at a given age of boar classification was < 10 records. Preliminary evaluations showed the best fit with fifth-order polynomials, indicating that the best model would have fifth-order fixed regression and fifth-order random regressions for animal and permanent environmental effects. Random regression models were fitted to evaluate all combinations of first- through seventh-order polynomial covariance functions. Goodness of fit for the models was tested using Akaike's Information Criterion and the Schwarz Criterion. The maximum log likelihood value was observed for sixth-, fifth-, and seventh-order polynomials for fixed, additive genetic, and permanent environmental effects, respectively. However, the best fit as determined by Akaike's Information Criterion and the Schwarz Criterion was by fitting sixth-, fourth-, and seventh-order polynomials; and fourth-, second-, and seventh-order polynomials for fixed, additive genetic, and permanent environmental effects, respectively. Heritability estimates for TSC ranged from 0.27 to 0.48 across age of boar classifications. In addition, heritability for TSC tended to increase with age of boar classification. PMID:16478945

  8. Physical comorbidities in men with mood and anxiety disorders: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mind-body nexus has been a topic of growing interest. Further data are however required to understand the specific relationship between mood and anxiety disorders and individual physical health conditions, and to verify whether these psychiatric disorders are linked to overall medical burden. Methods This study examined data collected from 942 men, 20 to 97 years old, participating in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. A lifetime history of mood and anxiety disorders was identified using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Research Version, Non-patient edition (SCID-I/NP). The presence of medical conditions (lifetime) was self-reported and confirmed by medical records, medication use or clinical data. Anthropometric measurements and socioeconomic status (SES) were determined and information on medication use and lifestyle was obtained via questionnaire. Logistic regression models were used to test the associations. Results After adjustment for age, socioeconomic status, and health risk factors (body mass index, physical activity and smoking), mood disorders were associated with gastro oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), recurrent headaches, blackouts and/or epilepsy, liver disorders and pulmonary disease in older people, whilst anxiety disorders were significantly associated with thyroid, GORD and other gastrointestinal disorders, and psoriasis. Increased odds of high medical burden were associated with both mood and anxiety disorders. Conclusions Our study provides further population-based evidence supporting the link between mental and physical illness in men. Understanding these associations is not only necessary for individual management, but also to inform the delivery of health promotion messages and health care. PMID:23618390

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of population-based screening of hepatocellular carcinoma: Comparing ultrasonography with two-stage screening

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ming-Jeng; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi; Chen, Chi-Ling; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Lin, Yu-Min; Liao, Chao-Sheng; Chang, Hung-Chuen; Lin, Yueh-Shih; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the cost-effectiveness of two population-based hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) screening programs, two-stage biomarker-ultrasound method and mass screening using abdominal ultrasonography (AUS). METHODS: In this study, we applied a Markov decision model with a societal perspective and a lifetime horizon for the general population-based cohorts in an area with high HCC incidence, such as Taiwan. The accuracy of biomarkers and ultrasonography was estimated from published meta-analyses. The costs of surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment were based on a combination of published literature, Medicare payments, and medical expenditure at the National Taiwan University Hospital. The main outcome measure was cost per life-year gained with a 3% annual discount rate. RESULTS: The results show that the mass screening using AUS was associated with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of USD39825 per life-year gained, whereas two-stage screening was associated with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of USD49733 per life-year gained, as compared with no screening. Screening programs with an initial screening age of 50 years old and biennial screening interval were the most cost-effective. These findings were sensitive to the costs of screening tools and the specificity of biomarker screening. CONCLUSION: Mass screening using AUS is more cost effective than two-stage biomarker-ultrasound screening. The most optimal strategy is an initial screening age at 50 years old with a 2-year inter-screening interval. PMID:27022228

  10. The past and the future of chromogenic colour photographs: lifetime modelling using near-infrared spectroscopy & enhancement using hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenech, Ann; Strlič, Matija; Cassar, May

    2012-02-01

    Chromogenic colour prints are amongst the most unstable materials found in heritage collections as the information-carrying dyes fade appreciably even in the dark. However, image stability is just one of the numerous properties that photographic companies aspire for in their products, along with constant improvements in colour balance and image development. It is shown that these continuous changes can be exploited to model the date a print was developed, as well as dye stability. As a non-destructive analytical technique, near-infrared spectroscopy in conjunction with multivariate data analysis was used to derive models to predict the year of development of a photographic print (Root Mean Square Error of Cross-Validation, RMSECV = 5.4 years) and dye stability (RMSECV = 1.4 Δ E T , i.e. normalised annual colour change). To examine the possibility to extend the lifetime of the valuable objects during storage, the use of oxygen-depleted environments (hypoxia) was also investigated. The results obtained show that hypoxia should not be used as a blanket approach for all chromogenic prints, as some degraded faster in hypoxic conditions than the control samples degraded in air. However, for most samples hypoxic storage turned out to be beneficial.

  11. Modelling the lifetime of an observable BSR under static pressure-temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, R. R.; Westbrook, G. K.; Riley, M.

    2003-04-01

    Investigating the depletion of a free gas layer beneath sediments containing hydrate can shed light on the processes and conditions required to maintain an observable BSR. The free gas layer beneath a hydrate bearing sediment column is subject to depletion via advection-dispersion when the mechanisms for its replenishment are inactive. The depletion process was investigated with a one dimensional model based on the nature of the sub-BSR free gas zone observed in sediments on the Blake Ridge, by ODP leg 164, and offshore Svalbard by the Hydratech project. A uniform and static pressure-temperature (p-T) field was applied to the free gas layer, represented as a quasi-mixture of gas bubbles trapped in the rock matrix by surface tension effects. The behaviour of mass transport in solution was modelled via the Crank-Nicolson form of the advection-dispersion equation and solved by LU decomposition to quantify perturbations from equilibrium, defined by Duan's equation of states. Departures from equilibrium were restored at the expense of the free gas held in the quasi-mixture until full depletion occurred. A depletion time of about 33 ka was obtained for free gas contained in 4% pore volume of a typical 100-m thick gas layer. The accuracy of the result depends on the validity of input parameters, and differences in geological setting may allow this depletion time to lie within the range of 2-80 ka. This implies that where hydrate-bearing sediments are found without a BSR, water depth has not decreased and bottom water temperature has not increased for at least this period of time. To sustain an observable BSR, gaseous methane must occupy the region beneath the BSR with a thickness greater than one quarter of the dominant seismic wavelength. The gas must come from bubbles percolating from depth, or gas dissociated from hydrate by a change in ambient p-T conditions that moves the stability boundary upward relative to the rock matrix. Calculation shows that in the absence of

  12. Establishment of primary cultures for mouse ameloblasts as a model of their lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Suzawa, Tetsuo . E-mail: suzawa@dent.showa-u.ac.jp; Itoh, Nao; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Katagiri, Takenobu; Morimura, Naoko; Kobayashi, Yasuna; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2006-07-07

    To understand how the properties of ameloblasts are spatiotemporally regulated during amelogenesis, two primary cultures of ameloblasts in different stages of differentiation were established from mouse enamel epithelium. Mouse primary ameloblasts (MPAs) prepared from immature enamel epithelium (MPA-I) could proliferate, whereas those from mature enamel epithelium (MPA-M) could not. MPA-M but not MPA-I caused apoptosis during culture. The mRNA expression of amelogenin, a marker of immature ameloblasts, was down-regulated, and that of enamel matrix serine proteiase-1, a marker of mature ameloblasts, was induced in MPA-I during culture. Using green fluorescence protein as a reporter, a visualized reporter system was established to analyze the promoter activity of the amelogenin gene. The region between -1102 bp and -261 bp was required for the reporter expression in MPA-I. These results suggest that MPAs are valuable in vitro models for investigation of ameloblast biology, and that the visualized system is useful for promoter analysis in MPAs.

  13. Associations between lifetime PTSD symptoms and current substance use disorders using a five-factor model of PTSD.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, S; Schönfeld, S; Behrendt, S; Schäfer, J; Höfler, M; Zimmermann, P; Wittchen, H-U

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to extend the existing knowledge on the association between PTSD symptoms, alcohol use disorders (AUD) and nicotine dependence (ND) by distinguishing between anxious and dysphoric arousal PTSD symptoms and by considering the putative contribution of additional comorbidity. Data stem from a cross-sectional study in a stratified, representative sample of 1483 recently deployed soldiers using standardized diagnostic interviews. All lifetime PTSD symptom clusters (occurrence of any symptom and number of symptoms) were associated with current AUD and ND in crude models except that anxious arousal was not related to AUD. Associations were reduced in magnitude when controlling for comorbidity. Current ND was related to the occurrence of any emotional numbing and to the number of re-experiencing symptoms above the contribution of other symptom clusters and comorbidity. In conclusion, associations between PTSD symptoms, AUD and ND may be partially attributable to additional comorbidity. Findings also yield further evidence for a role of emotional numbing and re-experiencing symptoms in the comorbidity between PTSD and ND and for a distinction between dysphoric and anxious arousal PTSD symptoms. PMID:25527901

  14. Lifetimes of lunar satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kurt W.; Buglia, James J.; Desai, Prasun N.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative has generated a renewed interest in lunar mission planning. The lunar missions currently under study, unlike the Apollo missions, involve long stay times. Several lunar gravity models have been formulated, but mission planners do not have enough confidence in the proposed models to conduct detailed studies of missions with long stay times. In this report, a particular lunar gravitational model, the Ferrari 5 x 5 model, was chosen to determine the lifetimes for 100-km and 300-km perilune altitude, near-circular parking orbits. The need to analyze orbital lifetimes for a large number of initial orbital parameters was the motivation for the formulation of a simplified gravitational model from the original model. Using this model, orbital lifetimes were found to be heavily dependent on the initial conditions of the nearly circular orbits, particularly the initial inclination and argument of perilune. This selected model yielded lifetime predictions of less than 40 days for some orbits, and other orbits had lifetimes exceeding a year. Although inconsistencies and limitations are inherent in all existing lunar gravity models, primarily because of a lack of information about the far side of the moon, the methods presented in this analysis are suitable for incorporating the moon's nonspherical gravitational effects on the preliminary design level for future lunar mission planning.

  15. Endometrial cancer and antidepressants: A nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiao-Fan; Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Liang, Hsin-Yi; Chiu, Wei-Che; Huang, Kuo-You; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2016-07-01

    To our knowledge, the association between antidepressant exposure and endometrial cancer has not been previously explored. Herein, we aim to investigate the association between antidepressant prescription, including novel antidepressants, and the risk for endometrial cancer in a population-based study.Data for the analysis were derived from National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 8392 cases with a diagnosis of endometrial cancer and 82,432 matched controls. A conditional logistic regression model was used, with adjusting for potentially confounding variables (e.g., comorbid psychiatric diseases, comorbid physical diseases, and other medications). Risk for endometrial cancer in the population-based study sample was categorized by, and assessed as a function of, antidepressant prescription and cumulative dosage.We report no association between endometrial cancer incidence and antidepressant prescription, including those prescribed either selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.15) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (adjusted OR = 1.14; 95% CI, 0.76-1.71). We also did not identify an association between higher cumulative doses of antidepressant prescription and endometrial cancer.There was no association between antidepressant prescription and endometrial cancer. PMID:27442640

  16. Population-Based Study of Baseline Ethanol Consumption and Risk of Incident Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Benito-León, Julián; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent postmortem studies have demonstrated pathological changes, including Purkinje cell loss, in the cerebellum in essential tremor (ET). Toxic exposures that compromise cerebellar tissue could lower the threshold for developing ET. Ethanol is a well-established cerebellar toxin, resulting in Purkinje cell loss. Objective To test whether higher baseline ethanol consumption is a risk factor for the subsequent development of incident ET. Methods Lifetime ethanol consumption was assessed at baseline (1994-1995) in a prospective, population-based study in central Spain of 3,285 elderly participants, 76 of whom developed incident ET by follow-up (1997-1998). Results In a Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for cigarette pack-years, depressive symptoms and community, the baseline number of drink-years was marginally associated with higher risk of incident ET (relative risk, RR = 1.003, p = 0.059). In an adjusted Cox model, highest baseline drink-year quartile doubled the risk of incident ET (RR = 2.29, p = 0.018) while other quartiles were associated with more modest elevations in risk (RR3rd quartile = 1.82 [p = 0.10], RR2nd quartile = 1.75 [p = 0.10], RR1st quartile = 1.43 [p = 0.34] vs. non-drinkers [RR = 1.00]). With each higher drink-year quartile, risk of incident ET increased an average of 23% (p = 0.01, test for trend). Conclusions Higher levels of chronic ethanol consumption increased the risk of developing ET. Ethanol is often used for symptomatic relief; studies should explore whether higher consumption levels are a continued source of underlying cerebellar neurotoxicity in patients who already manifest this disease. PMID:19359288

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Surgically Induced Weight Loss for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: Modeled Lifetime Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Catherine L.; Dixon, John B.; Moodie, Marjory L.; Peeters, Anna; Bulfone, Liliana; Maglianno, Dianna J.; O'Brien, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the cost-effectiveness of surgically induced weight loss relative to conventional therapy for the management of recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes in class I/II obese patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study builds on a within-trial cost-efficacy analysis. The analysis compares the lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) between the two intervention groups. Intervention costs were extrapolated based on observed resource utilization during the trial. The proportion of patients in each intervention group with remission of diabetes at 2 years was the same as that observed in the trial. Health care costs for patients with type 2 diabetes and outcome variables required to derive estimates of QALYs were sourced from published literature. A health care system perspective was adopted. Costs and outcomes were discounted annually at 3%. Costs are presented in 2006 Australian dollars (AUD) (currency exchange: 1 AUD = 0.74 USD). RESULTS The mean number of years in diabetes remission over a lifetime was 11.4 for surgical therapy patients and 2.1 for conventional therapy patients. Over the remainder of their lifetime, surgical and conventional therapy patients lived 15.7 and 14.5 discounted QALYs, respectively. The mean discounted lifetime costs were 98,900 AUD per surgical therapy patient and 101,400 AUD per conventional therapy patient. Relative to conventional therapy, surgically induced weight loss was associated with a mean health care saving of 2,400 AUD and 1.2 additional QALYs per patient. CONCLUSIONS Surgically induced weight loss is a dominant intervention (it both saves health care costs and generates health benefits) for managing recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes in class I/II obese patients in Australia. PMID:19171720

  18. Quantification of the Metabolic State in Cell-Model of Parkinson’s Disease by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Nian, Fang-Shin; Tsai, Jin-Wu; Karmenyan, Artashes; Chiou, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular endogenous fluorescent co-enzymes, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), play a pivotal role in cellular metabolism; quantitative assessment of their presence in living cells can be exploited to monitor cellular energetics in Parkinson’s disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder. Here, we applied two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) to noninvasively measure the fluorescence lifetime components of NADH and FAD, and their relative contributions in MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium) treated neuronal cells, derived from PC12 cells treated with nerve growth factor (NGF), to mimic PD conditions. A systematic FLIM data analysis showed a statistically significant (p < 0.001) decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of both free and protein-bound NADH, as well as free and protein-bound FAD in MPP+ treated cells. On the relative contributions of the free and protein-bound NADH and FAD to the life time, however, both the free NADH contribution and the corresponding protein-bound FAD contribution increase significantly (p < 0.001) in MPP+ treated cells, compared to control cells. These results, which indicate a shift in energy production in the MPP+ treated cells from oxidative phosphorylation towards anaerobic glycolysis, can potentially be used as cellular metabolic metrics to assess the condition of PD at the cellular level. PMID:26758390

  19. Cost-effectiveness of primary care referral to a commercial provider for weight loss treatment, relative to standard care–a modelled lifetime analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Nicholas R; Carter, Hannah; Schofield, Deborah; Hauner, Hans; Jebb, Susan A; Colagiuri, Stephen; Caterson, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity there is a need to identify cost-effective approaches for weight loss in primary care and community settings. Objective To evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of a commercial weight loss programme (Weight Watchers) (CP) compared with standard care (SC), as defined by national guidelines. Methods A Markov model was developed to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), expressed as the cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) over the lifetime. The probabilities and quality-of-life utilities of outcomes were extrapolated from trial data using estimates from the published literature. A health sector perspective was adopted. Results Over a patient’s lifetime, the CP resulted in an incremental cost saving of AUD 70 per patient, and an incremental 0.03 QALYs gained per patient. As such, the CP was found to be the dominant treatment, being more effective and less costly than SC (95% confidence interval: dominant to 6 225 per QALY). Despite the CP delaying the onset of diabetes by approximately 10 months, there was no significant difference in the incidence of type 2 diabetes, with the CP achieving less than 0.1% fewer cases than SC over the lifetime. Conclusion The modelled results suggest that referral to community based interventions may provide a highly cost-effective approach for those at high risk of weight-related co-morbidities. PMID:24301133

  20. Expected lifetime numbers and costs of fractures in postmenopausal women with and without osteoporosis in Germany: a discrete event simulation model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoporotic fractures cause a large health burden and substantial costs. This study estimated the expected fracture numbers and costs for the remaining lifetime of postmenopausal women in Germany. Methods A discrete event simulation (DES) model which tracks changes in fracture risk due to osteoporosis, a previous fracture or institutionalization in a nursing home was developed. Expected lifetime fracture numbers and costs per capita were estimated for postmenopausal women (aged 50 and older) at average osteoporosis risk (AOR) and for those never suffering from osteoporosis. Direct and indirect costs were modeled. Deterministic univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results The expected fracture numbers over the remaining lifetime of a 50 year old woman with AOR for each fracture type (% attributable to osteoporosis) were: hip 0.282 (57.9%), wrist 0.229 (18.2%), clinical vertebral 0.206 (39.2%), humerus 0.147 (43.5%), pelvis 0.105 (47.5%), and other femur 0.033 (52.1%). Expected discounted fracture lifetime costs (excess cost attributable to osteoporosis) per 50 year old woman with AOR amounted to €4,479 (€1,995). Most costs were accrued in the hospital €1,743 (€751) and long-term care sectors €1,210 (€620). Univariate sensitivity analysis resulted in percentage changes between -48.4% (if fracture rates decreased by 2% per year) and +83.5% (if fracture rates increased by 2% per year) compared to base case excess costs. Costs for women with osteoporosis were about 3.3 times of those never getting osteoporosis (€7,463 vs. €2,247), and were markedly increased for women with a previous fracture. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that osteoporosis causes a substantial share of fracture costs in postmenopausal women, which strongly increase with age and previous fractures. PMID:24981316

  1. Predictors of ovarian cancer survival: a population-based prospective study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Klint, Asa; Lambe, Mats; Bellocco, Rino; Riman, Tomas; Bergfeldt, Kjell; Persson, Ingemar; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2008-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies among women worldwide. Little is known about reproductive factors or lifestyle determinants and ovarian cancer prognosis. The objective of this study was to examine whether ovarian cancer survival is influenced by reproductive history, anthropometric characteristics, prediagnostic life-style factors and family history of breast or ovarian cancer. The study population consisted of 635 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cases derived from a nationwide population-based case-control study conducted in Sweden between 1993 and 1995. Exposure data on prediagnostic factors of interest were collected through questionnaires at the beginning of the parent study. Clinical data were abstracted from medical records. Cases were followed-up by means of record linkage to nationwide registers until December 31, 2002. Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the prognostic effect of each factor in terms of hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), following adjustment for age at diagnosis, FIGO tumor stage and WHO grade of tumor differentiation. Tumor characteristics significantly influenced the risk of death from EOC. After adjustment for these, no clear associations were detected between reproductive history (parity, age at first or last birth, oral contraceptive use, age at menarche or menopause), anthropometric characteristics (body size and shape in different periods of life), lifestyle factors before diagnosis (alcohol consumption, smoking and physical activity over lifetime), nor family history of breast cancer or ovarian cancer and EOC survival. Our findings indicate that these prediagnostic factors do not influence the EOC survival. Nevertheless, among women with early stage disease (FIGO stage I and II), there was some indication that overweight in young adulthood or recent years increased the risk of death, while physical activity in young adult life appeared to reduce

  2. Use of satellite data to constrain the model-calculated atmospheric lifetime for N2O - Implications for other trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Weisenstein, Debra K.

    1991-01-01

    Model calculations of the zonal-mean concentrations of N2O in the upper stratosphere are presented showing that about 80 percent of N2O is removed in the stratosphere between 30 deg N and 30 deg S. A comparison of calculated N2O values with remote data on N2O concentrations obtained from Nimbus 7 SAMS instrument indicated that the two-dimensional model of Ko and Sze (1982) may have underestimated the concentration of N2O in the tropical lower stratosphere. It is concluded that the calculated lifetimes for N2O and chlorofluorocarbon-source gases could be 30 percent shorter than previously reported values.

  3. Molecular Model for the Radiative Dipole Strengths and Lifetimes of the Fluorescent Levels of Mn2+and Fe3+ in II-VI And III-V Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrot, R.; Boulanger, D.

    2005-06-01

    A molecular model is used to give an overall semi-phenomenological interpretation of the radiative transition probabilities (RTP) or radiative lifetimes (RL) of Mn2+ and Fe3+ in II-VI and III-V compounds. It is shown that the RTP's are primarily controlled by: (i) the mixing of the wavefunctions of the cation and of the ligands (ii) the molecular spin-orbit interaction which involves the spin-orbit coupling constants ζd of the d electrons of the cation and ζp of the p electrons of the ligands and (iii) the energies of the intermediate levels which appear in the perturbation model.

  4. Experimental insight into b-hadron lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, J. P.; Flores-Castillo, L. R.

    2016-01-01

    A review on the experimental status of the measurement of b-hadron lifetimes is presented. After a brief introduction to the Standard Model, the work done by theorists about b-hadron lifetimes is put in context. The core of the review is devoted to explain the ingredients that are necessary to make a lifetime measurement, from the detector infrastructure and requirements to the statistical treatment of the data. Finally, an overview of current experimental results and future prospects is presented.

  5. Population-based absolute risk estimation with survey data.

    PubMed

    Kovalchik, Stephanie A; Pfeiffer, Ruth M

    2014-04-01

    Absolute risk is the probability that a cause-specific event occurs in a given time interval in the presence of competing events. We present methods to estimate population-based absolute risk from a complex survey cohort that can accommodate multiple exposure-specific competing risks. The hazard function for each event type consists of an individualized relative risk multiplied by a baseline hazard function, which is modeled nonparametrically or parametrically with a piecewise exponential model. An influence method is used to derive a Taylor-linearized variance estimate for the absolute risk estimates. We introduce novel measures of the cause-specific influences that can guide modeling choices for the competing event components of the model. To illustrate our methodology, we build and validate cause-specific absolute risk models for cardiovascular and cancer deaths using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Our applications demonstrate the usefulness of survey-based risk prediction models for predicting health outcomes and quantifying the potential impact of disease prevention programs at the population level. PMID:23686614

  6. Creep Constitutive Model and Component Lifetime Estimation: The Case of Niobium-Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Gladius; Shaw, Kevin M.

    2011-10-01

    The θ-projection parametric method was used to analyze the creep strain versus time data, obtained in uniaxial tension, from weldments fabricated using a niobium-modified 9Cr-1Mo steel as the weld metal (Ellis, Private communication, 1991, provided the data). We used these data to illustrate a methodology whereby the θ-projection method may be used to obtain estimates of component design creep lifetimes, for specified sets of design stress, temperature, and strains. Furthermore, it is suggested that the creep strain results may be consistent with dislocation climb being the creep deformation mechanism in the alloy.

  7. Lifetime measurements in 180Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. M.; Wu, X. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Li, C. B.; Gao, Z. C.; Li, G. S.; Chen, F. Q.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Hu, S. P.; Zhong, J.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, H. W.; Luo, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Lifetimes of the yrast states in 180Pt have been measured from 4+ to 8+ using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique in the coincidence mode. These states were populated by the reaction 156Gd(28Si,4 n )180Pt at a beam energy of 144 MeV. The differential decay curve method was applied to determine the lifetimes from experimental coincidence data. The B (E 2 ) values extracted from lifetimes increase with increasing spin, implying rotor behavior, but do not show the typical shape coexistence where the B (E 2 ) values present a rapid increase at very low spins. Calculations based on the triaxial projected shell model were performed for the yrast states in 180Pt and the results of both energies and E 2 transition probabilities reproduce the experimental data very well. The result also shows that a better description of the yrast band in 180Pt requires consideration of the γ degree of freedom.

  8. Lifetime of heavy flavour particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1985-10-01

    Recent measurements of the lifetime of the tau leptons and charm and beauty hadrons are reviewed and their significance for the couplings of the charged weak current, flavour mixing, and models relating quarks to hadron decay are discussed. 70 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. The Lifetimes of Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2015-08-01

    For members of the American Astronomical Society, I collected data on their lifetimes from (1) 489 obituaries published in 1991-2015, (2) about 127 members listed as deceased but without published obituaries, and (3) a sample of AAS members without obituaries or not known to the AAS as being deceased. These show that the most frequent lifetimes is 85 years. Of 674 deceased members with known lifetimes, 11.0 ± 1.3% lived to be 90 or more years. In comparison to the astronomers, the most frequent lifetime for the general population is 77 years, showing that astronomers live an average of 8 years longer than the general population.

  10. Population-based register of stroke: manual of operations.

    PubMed

    Giampaoli, Simona; Hammar, Niklas; Adany, Roza; De Peretti, Christine

    2007-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and hospitalization in both sexes in nearly all countries of Europe. The main forms of cardiovascular disease are ischaemic heart disease and stroke. Stroke by itself is the second leading cause of death in the European Union, and the annual number of cases of stroke is expected to increase within the next few decades, mainly owing to a growth in the proportion of older people. Stroke is an expensive disease because of the large number of premature deaths, ongoing disability in survivors, and the impact on families or caregivers and on health services (treatment and rehabilitation). Therefore, there is a pressing need to make stroke prevention and treatment a priority, to reduce the growing health burden and lessen its socioeconomic impact. The magnitude of the problem contrasts with the shortage, weak quality, and comparability of data available in most European countries. A stepwise surveillance procedure based on standardized data collection, appropriate record linkage, and validation methods was set up by the EUROCISS project (EUROpean Cardiovascular Indicators Surveillance Set), to build up comparable and reliable indicators for the surveillance of stroke at the population level.This manual of operations is intended for health professionals and policy makers. It provides a standardized and simple model for the implementation of a population-based register, which can provide estimates of attack rate and case fatality. The manual recommends starting from a minimum data set. Before implementing a population-based register, it is important to identify the target population under surveillance, which should preferably cover a well defined geographical and administrative area or region representative of the whole country, where population data and vital statistics (mortality and hospital discharge records at least) are routinely collected and easily available each year. All cases among residents should be recorded

  11. Preindustrial to Present-Day Changes in Tropospheric Hydroxyl Radical and Methane Lifetime from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, V.; Voulgarakis, A.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, M.; Prather, M. J.; Young, P. J.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Cionni, I.; Collins, W. J.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Doherty, R.; Eyring, V.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G. A.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Nagashima, T.; vanNoije, T. P. C.; Plummer, D. A.; Righi, M.; Rumbold, S. T.; Skeie, R.; Shindell, D. T.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Zeng, G.

    2013-01-01

    We have analysed time-slice simulations from 17 global models, participating in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), to explore changes in present-day (2000) hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration and methane (CH4) lifetime relative to preindustrial times (1850) and to 1980. A comparison of modeled and observation-derived methane and methyl chloroform lifetimes suggests that the present-day global multi-model mean OH concentration is overestimated by 5 to 10% but is within the range of uncertainties. The models consistently simulate higher OH concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) compared with the Southern Hemisphere (SH) for the present-day (2000; inter-hemispheric ratios of 1.13 to 1.42), in contrast to observation-based approaches which generally indicate higher OH in the SH although uncertainties are large. Evaluation of simulated carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations, the primary sink for OH, against ground-based and satellite observations suggests low biases in the NH that may contribute to the high north–south OH asymmetry in the models. The models vary widely in their regional distribution of present-day OH concentrations (up to 34%). Despite large regional changes, the multi-model global mean (mass-weighted) OH concentration changes little over the past 150 yr, due to concurrent increases in factors that enhance OH (humidity, tropospheric ozone, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, and UV radiation due to decreases in stratospheric ozone), compensated by increases in OH sinks (methane abundance, carbon monoxide and non-methane volatile organic carbon (NMVOC) emissions). The large inter-model diversity in the sign and magnitude of preindustrial to present-day OH changes (ranging from a decrease of 12.7% to an increase of 14.6%) indicate that uncertainty remains in our understanding of the long-term trends in OH and methane lifetime. We show that this diversity is largely explained by the different ratio of the

  12. A reassessment of risk associated with dietary intake of ochratoxin A based on a lifetime exposure model

    PubMed Central

    Haighton, Lois A; Lynch, Barry S; Magnuson, Bernadene A; Nestmann, Earle R

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins, such as ochratoxin A (OTA), can occur from fungal growth on foods. OTA is considered a possible risk factor for adverse renal effects in humans based on renal tumors in male rats. For risk mitigation. Health Canada proposed maximum limits (MLs) for OTA based largely on a comparative risk assessment conducted by Health Canada (Kuiper-Goodman et al., 2010), in which analytical data of OTA in foods were used to determine the possible impact adopting MLs may have on OTA risks. The EU MLs were used for comparison and resultant risk was determined based on age–sex strata groups. These data were reevaluated here to determine comparative risk on a lifetime basis instead of age strata. Also, as there is scientific disagreement over the mechanism of OTA-induced renal tumors, mechanistic data were revisited. On a lifetime basis, risks associated with dietary exposure were found to be negligible, even without MLs, with dietary exposures to OTA three to four orders of magnitude below the pivotal animal LOAEL and the TD05. Our review of the mechanistic data supported a threshold-based mechanism as the most plausible. In particular, OTA was negative in genotoxicity assays with the highest specificity and levels of DNA adducts were very low and not typical of genotoxic carcinogens. In conclusion, OTA exposures from Canadian foods do not present a significant cancer risk. PMID:22276591

  13. On the reduced lifetime of nitrous oxide due to climate change induced acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation as simulated by the MPI Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracher, D.; Manzini, E.; Reick, C. H.; Schultz, M. G.; Stein, O.

    2014-12-01

    Greenhouse gas induced climate change will modify the physical conditions of the atmosphere. One of the projected changes is an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation in the stratosphere, as it has been shown in many model studies. This change in the stratospheric circulation consequently bears an effect on the transport and distribution of atmospheric components such as N2O. Since N2O is involved in ozone destruction, a modified distribution of N2O can be of importance for ozone chemistry. N2O is inert in the troposphere and decays only in the stratosphere. Thus, changes in the exchange between troposphere and stratosphere can also affect the stratospheric sink of N2O, and consequently its atmospheric lifetime. N2O is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential of currently approximately 300 CO2-equivalents in a 100-year perspective. A faster decay in atmospheric N2O mixing ratios, i.e. a decreased atmospheric lifetime of N2O, will also reduce its global warming potential. In order to assess the impact of climate change on atmospheric circulation and implied effects on the distribution and lifetime of atmospheric N2O, we apply the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model, MPI-ESM. MPI-ESM consists of the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM, the land surface model JSBACH, and MPIOM/HAMOCC representing ocean circulation and ocean biogeochemistry. Prognostic atmospheric N2O concentrations in MPI-ESM are determined by land N2O emissions, ocean-atmosphere N2O exchange and atmospheric tracer transport. As stratospheric chemistry is not explicitly represented in MPI-ESM, stratospheric decay rates of N2O are prescribed from a MACC MOZART simulation. Increasing surface temperatures and CO2 concentrations in the stratosphere impact atmospheric circulation differently. Thus, we conduct a series of transient runs with the atmospheric model of MPI-ESM to isolate different factors governing a shift in atmospheric circulation. From those transient

  14. The simcyp population based simulator: architecture, implementation, and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Jamei, Masoud; Marciniak, Steve; Edwards, Duncan; Wragg, Kris; Feng, Kairui; Barnett, Adrian; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Developing a user-friendly platform that can handle a vast number of complex physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models both for conventional small molecules and larger biologic drugs is a substantial challenge. Over the last decade the Simcyp Population Based Simulator has gained popularity in major pharmaceutical companies (70% of top 40 - in term of R&D spending). Under the Simcyp Consortium guidance, it has evolved from a simple drug-drug interaction tool to a sophisticated and comprehensive Model Based Drug Development (MBDD) platform that covers a broad range of applications spanning from early drug discovery to late drug development. This article provides an update on the latest architectural and implementation developments within the Simulator. Interconnection between peripheral modules, the dynamic model building process and compound and population data handling are all described. The Simcyp Data Management (SDM) system, which contains the system and drug databases, can help with implementing quality standards by seamless integration and tracking of any changes. This also helps with internal approval procedures, validation and auto-testing of the new implemented models and algorithms, an area of high interest to regulatory bodies. PMID:25505654

  15. Parenting and risk for mood, anxiety and substance use disorders: a study in population-based male twins

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Charles O.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Hettema, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies consistently identified a relationship between parenting behavior and psychopathology. In this study, we extended prior analyses performed in female twins to a large sample of twins from male–male pairs. Methods We used interview data on 2,609 adult male twins from a population-based twin registry. We examined the association between three retrospectively reported parenting dimensions (coldness, protectiveness, and authoritarianism) and lifetime history of seven common psychiatric and substance use disorders. Using univariate structural equation modeling, we also examined the influence of the genetic and environmental factors on parenting. Results Examined individually, coldness was consistently associated with risk for a broad range of adult psychopathology. Averaged odds of psychiatric disorders associated with parenting were increased between 26 and 36 %. When the three parenting dimensions were examined together, coldness remained significant for major depression, phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder. Controlling for other disorders, the associations between the parenting dimensions and psychopathology were non-specific. Twin fitting model demonstrated that modest heritability accounted for parenting, whereas most variance resulted from the non-shared environment. Conclusions Based on our current and prior findings, there is broad similarity in the impact of parenting on adult psychopathology between men and women. PMID:23344783

  16. Part I. A look at population-based medical care.

    PubMed

    Weiss, K

    1998-08-01

    Recent trends toward managed health care have generated interest in developing strategies to manage the health care of a population as a whole. Population-based medicine places the individual patient within the context of the larger community, which is composed of both sick and well individuals; when viewed in these terms, only a small proportion of the people who consult a primary care physician are at risk for substantial morbidity. However, the physician serves as the central figure for delivering population-based health care to the entire community. Many strategies for population-based care contain the following 4 basic elements: 1. Identifying the health and disease states that are likely to be responsive to population-based care, 2. Applying principles of epidemiology to define the population-of-interest, 3. Assembling a multidisciplinary team, and 4. Building information systems to support ongoing surveillance of population-based care. To date, most of the published examples of population-based management have been conducted in managed care environments, but population-based management may also be used by a single physician practice or a small group practice. Programs aimed at health promotion or disease prevention are among the easiest to implement. By examining the results of an entire population with a given condition, physicians and their teams may begin to identify ways to improve the overall delivery of care, either by establishing new procedures or improving old ones. PMID:9735940

  17. Polymer damage mitigation---predictive lifetime models of polymer insulation degradation and biorenewable thermosets through cationic polymerization for self-healing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondred, Peter Raymond

    Over the past 50 years, the industrial development and applications for polymers and polymer composites has become expansive. However, as with any young technology, the techniques for predicting material damage and resolving material failure are in need of continued development and refinement. This thesis work takes two approaches to polymer damage mitigation---material lifetime prediction and spontaneous damage repair through self-healing while incorporating bio-renewable feedstock. First, material lifetime prediction offers the benefit of identifying and isolating material failures before the effects of damage results in catastrophic failure. Second, self-healing provides a systematic approach to repairing damaged polymer composites, specifically in applications where a hands-on approach or removing the part from service are not feasible. With regard to lifetime prediction, we investigated three specific polymeric materials---polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), poly(ethylene-alt-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE), and Kapton. All three have been utilized extensively in the aerospace field as a wire insulation coating. Because of the vast amount of electrical wiring used in aerospace constructions and the potential for electrical and thermal failure, this work develops mathematical models for both the thermal degradation kinetics as well as a lifetime prediction model for electrothermal breakdown. Isoconversional kinetic methods, which plot activation energy as a function of the extent of degradation, present insight into the development each kinetic model. The models for PTFE, ETFE, and Kapton are one step, consecutive three-step, and competitive and consecutive five-step respectively. Statistical analysis shows that an nth order autocatalytic reaction best defined the reaction kinetics for each polymer's degradation. Self-healing polymers arrest crack propagation through the use of an imbedded adhesive that reacts when cracks form. This form of damage mitigation focuses on

  18. One in four people may develop symptomatic hip osteoarthritis in his or her lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Louise B; Helmick, Charles G.; Schwartz, Todd A; Renner, Jordan B; Tudor, Gail; Koch, Gary G; Dragomir, Anca D; Kalsbeek, William D; Luta, Gheorghe; Jordan, Joanne M

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To estimate the lifetime risk of symptomatic hip osteoarthritis (OA). Design We analyzed data from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (a longitudinal population-based study of OA in North Carolina, United States [n=3,068]). The weighted baseline sample comprised 18% blacks and 54% women, and the mean age was 63 years (range=45-93). Symptomatic hip OA was defined as a Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) radiographic score of ≥2 (anterior-posterior pelvis x-rays) and pain, aching or stiffness on most days, or groin pain, in the same hip. Lifetime risk, defined as the proportion who developed symptomatic hip OA in at least one hip by age 85, among people who live to age 85, was modeled using logistic regression with repeated measures (through generalized estimating equations). Results Lifetime risk of symptomatic hip OA was 25.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 21.3–29.3). Lifetime risk was similar by sex, race, highest educational attainment, and hip injury history. We studied lifetime risk by body mass index (BMI) in three forms: at age 18; at baseline and follow-up; and at age 18, baseline and follow-up and found no differences in estimates. Conclusion The burden of symptomatic hip OA is substantial with one in four people developing this condition by age 85. The similar race-specific estimates suggest that racial disparities in total hip replacements are not attributable to differences in disease occurrence. Despite increasing evidence that obesity predicts an increased risk of both hip OA and joint replacement, we found no association between BMI and lifetime risk. PMID:20713163

  19. The extended Touschek lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Bizek, H.M.

    1997-06-01

    Scattering of particles within the bunch is called Touschek scattering. If large enough, such an energy transfer may eject the particle out of the bunch. If a particle is scattered in the dispersive region, it will induce a horizontal betatron oscillation which will be coupled into vertical motion when it passes through skew components. The amount of coupling is expressed in terms of the coupling coefficient, {chi}. If the coupling coefficient is large enough, the resulting vertical oscillations may exceed the normally small vertical admittance of the ring. Thus the particles may be lost even though the energy loss is within the momentum acceptance. The lifetime associated with this loss mechanism is called the extended Touschek lifetime. In the usual touschek lifetime calculation, the lifetime increases as the coupling increases. Including the effect of the vertical oscillation results in a decrease of Touschek lifetime beyond some coupling value.

  20. Exploring Lifetime Effects in Femtoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D; Soltz, R; Newby, J; Kisiel, A

    2005-09-06

    We investigate the role of lifetime effects from resonances and emission duration tails in femtoscopy at RHIC in two Blast-Wave models. We find the non-Gaussian components compare well with published source imaged data, but the value of R{sub out} obtained from Gaussian fits is not insensitive to the non-Gaussian contributions when realistic acceptance cuts are applied to models.

  1. Tropospheric OH and the lifetimes of hydrochlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael; Spivakovsky, Clarisa M.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) may be used as alternatives for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Lifetimes for the HCFCs are predicted here in two ways: integrating their loss with a global model and scaling to another compound with a better known lifetime. Both approaches are shown to yield similar results. Three-dimensional fields of modeled tropospheric OH concentrations are used to calculate lifetimes against destruction by OH for the HCFCs and other hydrogenated halocarbons. The lifetimes of various hydro-halocarbons are shown to be insensitive to possible spatial variations and seasonal cycles. It is possible to scale the HCFC lifetimes to that of methyl chloroform or methane by using a ratio of the rate coefficients for reaction with OH at an appropriate temperature, about 277 K.

  2. PopTract: Population-Based Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Pew-Thian; Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili

    2016-01-01

    White matter fiber tractography plays a key role in the in vivo understanding of brain circuitry. For tract-based comparison of a population of images, a common approach is to first generate an atlas by averaging, after spatial normalization, all images in the population, and then perform tractography using the constructed atlas. The reconstructed fiber trajectories form a common geometry onto which diffusion properties of each individual subject can be projected based on the corresponding locations in the subject native space. However, in the case of high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), where modeling fiber crossings is an important goal, the above-mentioned averaging method for generating an atlas results in significant error in the estimation of local fiber orientations and causes a major loss of fiber crossings. These limitatitons have significant impact on the accuracy of the reconstructed fiber trajectories and jeopardize subsequent tract-based analysis. As a remedy, we present in this paper a more effective means of performing tractography at a population level. Our method entails determining a bipolar Watson distribution at each voxel location based on information given by all images in the population, giving us not only the local principal orientations of the fiber pathways, but also confidence levels of how reliable these orientations are across subjects. The distribution field is then fed as an input to a probabilistic tractography framework for reconstructing a set of fiber trajectories that are consistent across all images in the population. We observe that the proposed method, called PopTract, results in significantly better preservation of fiber crossings, and hence yields better trajectory reconstruction in the atlas space. PMID:21571607

  3. Adult Prevalence of Epilepsy in Spain: EPIBERIA, a Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Castro, Pedro J.; Mauri-Llerda, Jose Angel; Hernández-Ramos, Francisco José; Sánchez-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Parejo-Carbonell, Beatriz; Quiroga-Subirana, Pablo; Vázquez-Gutierrez, Fernando; Santos-Lasaosa, Sonia; Mendez-Lucena, Carolina; Redondo-Verge, Luis; Tejero-Juste, Carlos; Morandeira-Rivas, Clara; Sancho-Rieger, Jerónimo; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study assesses the lifetime and active prevalence of epilepsy in Spain in people older than 18 years. Methods. EPIBERIA is a population-based epidemiological study of epilepsy prevalence using data from three representative Spanish regions (health districts in Zaragoza, Almería, and Seville) between 2012 and 2013. The study consisted of two phases: screening and confirmation. Participants completed a previously validated questionnaire (EPIBERIA questionnaire) over the telephone. Results. A total of 1741 valid questionnaires were obtained, including 261 (14.99%) raising a suspicion of epilepsy. Of these suspected cases, 216 (82.75%) agreed to participate in phase 2. Of the phase 2 participants, 22 met the International League Against Epilepsy's diagnostic criteria for epilepsy. The estimated lifetime prevalence, adjusted by age and sex per 1,000 people, was 14.87 (95% CI: 9.8–21.9). Active prevalence was 5.79 (95% CI: 2.8–10.6). No significant age, sex, or regional differences in prevalence were detected. Conclusions. EPIBERIA provides the most accurate estimate of epilepsy prevalence in the Mediterranean region based on its original methodology and its adherence to ILAE recommendations. We highlight that the lifetime prevalence and inactive epilepsy prevalence figures observed here were compared to other epidemiological studies. PMID:26783554

  4. Stochastic Analysis of Orbital Lifetimes of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasamoto, Washito; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses (1) a Monte-Carlo-based methodology for probabilistic prediction and analysis of orbital lifetimes of spacecraft and (2) Orbital Lifetime Monte Carlo (OLMC)--a Fortran computer program, consisting of a previously developed long-term orbit-propagator integrated with a Monte Carlo engine. OLMC enables modeling of variances of key physical parameters that affect orbital lifetimes through the use of probability distributions. These parameters include altitude, speed, and flight-path angle at insertion into orbit; solar flux; and launch delays. The products of OLMC are predicted lifetimes (durations above specified minimum altitudes) for the number of user-specified cases. Histograms generated from such predictions can be used to determine the probabilities that spacecraft will satisfy lifetime requirements. The document discusses uncertainties that affect modeling of orbital lifetimes. Issues of repeatability, smoothness of distributions, and code run time are considered for the purpose of establishing values of code-specific parameters and number of Monte Carlo runs. Results from test cases are interpreted as demonstrating that solar-flux predictions are primary sources of variations in predicted lifetimes. Therefore, it is concluded, multiple sets of predictions should be utilized to fully characterize the lifetime range of a spacecraft.

  5. Thermo-mechanical and neutron lifetime modeling and design of Be pebbles in the neutron multiplier for the LIFE engine

    SciTech Connect

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; de Caro, M S; Caro, A

    2009-03-16

    Concept designs for the laser-initiated fusion/fission engine (LIFE) include a neutron multiplication blanket containing Be pebbles flowing in a molten salt coolant. These pebbles must be designed to withstand the extreme irradiation and temperature conditions in the blanket to enable a safe and cost-effective operation of LIFE. In this work, we develop design criteria for spherical Be pebbles on the basis of their thermomechanical behavior under continued neutron exposure. We consider the effects of high fluence/fast flux on the elastic, thermal and mechanical properties of nuclear-grade Be. Our results suggest a maximum pebble diameter of 30 mm to avoid tensile failure, coated with an anti-corrosive, high-strength metallic shell to avoid failure by pebble contact. Moreover, we find that the operation temperature must always be kept above 450 C to enable creep to relax the stresses induced by swelling, which we estimate to be at least 16 months if uncoated and up to six years when coated. We identify the sources of uncertainty on the properties used and discuss the advantages of new intermetallic beryllides and their use in LIFE's neutron multiplier. To establish Be-pebble lifetimes with improved confidence, reliable experiments to measure irradiation creep must be performed.

  6. Glycemic Change After Pancreaticoduodenectomy: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Ming; Ho, Te-Wei; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Yang, Ching-Yao; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Chiang, Pin-Yi; Hsieh, Su-Hua; Lai, Feipei; Tien, Yu-Wen

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this population-based study was to determine the change of glucose metabolism in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD).We conducted a nationwide cohort study using data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database collected between 2000 and 2010. Our sample included 861 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and 3914 subjects without DM.Of 861 subjects with type 2 diabetes, 174 patients (20.2%) experienced resolution of their diabetes after PD, including patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) (20.5%), and non-PDAC (20.1%). Using a multiple logistic regression model, we found that subjects with comorbid chronic pancreatitis (odds ratio, 0.356; 95% CI, 0.167-0.759; P = 0.007) and use of insulin (odds ratio, 0.265; 95% CI, 0.171-0.412; P < 0.001) had significantly lower rates of resolution of diabetes. In the 3914 subjects without diabetes, the only statistically significant comorbidity contributing to pancreatogenic diabetes was chronic pancreatitis (odds ratio, 1.446; 95% CI, 1.146-1.823; P = 0.002).Subjects with comorbid chronic pancreatitis and use of insulin had lower rates of resolution of DM after PD. In subjects without diabetes, chronic pancreatitis contributed significantly to the development of pancreatogenic DM. PMID:26166104

  7. SO2 Emissions and Lifetimes: Estimates from Inverse Modeling Using In Situ and Global, Space-Based (SCIAMACHY and OMI) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chulkyu; Martin Randall V.; vanDonkelaar, Aaron; Lee, Hanlim; Dickerson, RUssell R.; Hains, Jennifer C.; Krotkov, Nickolay; Richter, Andreas; Vinnikov, Konstantine; Schwab, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Top-down constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through inverse modeling using SO2 column observations from two satellite instruments (SCIAMACHY and OMI). We first evaluated the S02 column observations with surface SO2 measurements by applying local scaling factors from a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to SO2 columns retrieved from the satellite instruments. The resulting annual mean surface SO2 mixing ratios for 2006 exhibit a significant spatial correlation (r=0.86, slope=0.91 for SCIAMACHY and r=0.80, slope = 0.79 for OMI) with coincident in situ measurements from monitoring networks throughout the United States and Canada. We evaluate the GEOS-Chem simulation of the SO2 lifetime with that inferred from in situ measurements to verity the applicability of GEOS-Chem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS-Chem model over the eastern United States is 13 h in summer and 48 h in winter, compared to lifetimes inferred from in situ measurements of 19 +/- 7 h in summer and 58 +/- 20 h in winter. We apply SO2 columns from SCIAMACHY and OMI to derive a top-down anthropogenic SO2 emission inventory over land by using the local GEOS-Chem relationship between SO2 columns and emissions. There is little seasonal variation in the top-down emissions (<15%) over most major industrial regions providing some confidence in the method. Our global estimate for annual land surface anthropogenic SO2 emissions (52.4 Tg S/yr from SCIAMACHY and 49.9 Tg S / yr from OMI) closely agrees with the bottom-up emissions (54.6 Tg S/yr) in the GEOS-Chem model and exhibits consistency in global distributions with the bottom-up emissions (r = 0.78 for SCIAMACHY, and r = 0.77 for OMI). However, there are significant regional differences.

  8. Satellite lifetime routine user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, H. U.; Myler, T. R.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program which determines secular variations in mean orbital elements of earth satellites and the lifetime of the orbit is described. The dynamical model treats a point mass satellite subject to solar and lunar disturbing gravitational fields, second, third and fourth harmonics of the earth's oblate potential, earth's atmospheric drag, and solar radiation pressure. Each of these disturbing functions may be selectively simulated. Data preparation instructions, a sample problem, and definitions of output quantities are included.

  9. The extended Touschek lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Bizek, H.M.

    1996-02-01

    With the advent of synchrotron radiation sources, the issue of beam lifetime becomes increasingly important. Users of these machines need to perform experiments which seldom last 15 minutes, but require hours for their completion. Therefore, the beam should circulate stably for hours. The beam of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring at Argonne National Laboratory is assumed to circulate stably for a minimum of 10 hours. The main contributions to the total beam lifetime (which is the inverse of the loss rate) come from residual gas scattering and Touschek scattering. The residual gas scattering is comprised of single Coulomb scattering and bremsstrahlung. The single-Coulomb scattering involves elastic collisions, while bremsstrahlung involves inelastic collisions, between the bunch and the surrounding residual gas. In the calculation the authors take the gas to be nitrogen at a pressure of 1 nTorr. Touschek scattering involves scattering of particles within the bunch, transferring energy among themselves. Such an energy transfer, if large enough, may eject the particle out of the bunch, thus causing it to be lost. Let us not forget the residual-gas lifetime. As pointed out, the calculation of this lifetime is done for the very low pressure of 1 nTorr. If the pressure is higher, the residual-gas lifetime will be smaller. This will further reduce the total beam lifetime, causing it to slip deeper below the minimum lifetime for stable storage ring operation. They begin this article by reviewing the Touschek integral and the associated limits of integration. The program ZAP has been altered to take into account the possible loss due to induced betatron oscillations. At each lattice position the energy loss required to produce, by coupling, a vertical oscillation that exceeds the vertical aperture is calculated. When this energy loss is less than the rf bucket half-height, it replaces the rf bucket half-height in the Touschek integral.

  10. Guiding principles and checklist for population-based quality metrics.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Mahesh; Brunelli, Steven M; Maddux, Franklin W; Parker, Thomas F; Johnson, Douglas; Nissenson, Allen R; Collins, Allan; Lacson, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services oversees the ESRD Quality Incentive Program to ensure that the highest quality of health care is provided by outpatient dialysis facilities that treat patients with ESRD. To that end, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services uses clinical performance measures to evaluate quality of care under a pay-for-performance or value-based purchasing model. Now more than ever, the ESRD therapeutic area serves as the vanguard of health care delivery. By translating medical evidence into clinical performance measures, the ESRD Prospective Payment System became the first disease-specific sector using the pay-for-performance model. A major challenge for the creation and implementation of clinical performance measures is the adjustments that are necessary to transition from taking care of individual patients to managing the care of patient populations. The National Quality Forum and others have developed effective and appropriate population-based clinical performance measures quality metrics that can be aggregated at the physician, hospital, dialysis facility, nursing home, or surgery center level. Clinical performance measures considered for endorsement by the National Quality Forum are evaluated using five key criteria: evidence, performance gap, and priority (impact); reliability; validity; feasibility; and usability and use. We have developed a checklist of special considerations for clinical performance measure development according to these National Quality Forum criteria. Although the checklist is focused on ESRD, it could also have broad application to chronic disease states, where health care delivery organizations seek to enhance quality, safety, and efficiency of their services. Clinical performance measures are likely to become the norm for tracking performance for health care insurers. Thus, it is critical that the methodologies used to develop such metrics serve the payer and the provider and most importantly, reflect

  11. Population-based, Case-Control-Family Design to Investigate Genetic and Environmental Influences on Melanoma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cust, Anne E.; Schmid, Helen; Maskiell, Judith A.; Jetann, Jodie; Ferguson, Megan; Holland, Elizabeth A.; Agha-Hamilton, Chantelle; Jenkins, Mark A.; Kelly, John; Kefford, Richard F.; Giles, Graham G.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Aitken, Joanne F.; Hopper, John L.; Mann, Graham J.

    2009-01-01

    Discovering and understanding genetic risk factors for melanoma and their interactions with phenotype, sun exposure, and other risk factors could lead to new strategies for melanoma control. This paper describes the Australian Melanoma Family Study, which uses a multicenter, population-based, case-control-family design. From 2001 to 2005, the authors recruited 1,164 probands including 629 cases with histopathologically confirmed, first-primary cutaneous melanoma diagnosed before age 40 years, 240 population-based controls frequency matched for age, and 295 spouse/friend controls. Information on lifetime sun exposure, phenotype, and residence history was collected for probands and nearly 4,000 living relatives. More than 3,000 subjects donated a blood sample. Proxy-reported information was collected for childhood sun exposure and deceased relatives. Important features of this study include the population-based, family-based design; a focus on early onset disease; probands from 3 major cities differing substantially in solar ultraviolet exposure and melanoma incidence; a population at high risk because of high ultraviolet exposure and susceptible pigmentation phenotypes; population-based, spouse/friend, and sibling controls; systematic recruitment of relatives of case and control probands; self and parent reports of childhood sun exposure; and objective clinical skin examinations. The authors discuss methodological and analytical issues related to the study design and conduct, as well as the potentially novel insights the study can deliver. PMID:19887461

  12. Cycle ageing analysis of a LiFePO4/graphite cell with dynamic model validations: Towards realistic lifetime predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarasketa-Zabala, E.; Gandiaga, I.; Martinez-Laserna, E.; Rodriguez-Martinez, L. M.; Villarreal, I.

    2015-02-01

    The present investigation work compares cycling ageing behaviour upon constant operation conditions (static tests) with degradation under non-constant schemes (dynamic tests), through a novel methodology for ageing model dynamic validation. A LFP-based Li-ion cell performance loss is analysed using a DOD and C-rate stress factors Ah-throughput-domain characterisation method, and represented using a semi-empirical model. The proposed stepwise validation approach enables assessing the static ageing tests acceleration factor and systematically improving the ageing model. The result is a simple but comprehensive model. The predictions root-mean-square error, under dynamic cycling operation conditions, is just 1.75%.

  13. Computational toxicology: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models (PBPK) for lifetime exposure and bioaccumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Covaci, Adrian; Yang, Raymond S H; Das, Krishna; Blust, Ronny

    2012-04-01

    Due to migration of harbour porpoises towards more polluted areas like the North Sea and their sensitivity towards pollution, there is a need for proper conservation measures for this species. As a consequence, knowledge about the pollutant's kinetics is required. The present study is the first to investigate the kinetics of PBDEs in marine mammals using PBPK modeling as a non-destructive tool for describing the chemical's kinetics in a protected animal species. The models were developed and parameterized using data from the literature and Black Sea harbour porpoises through computer optimization. The predictability of these models in time was assessed by reverse dosimetry modeling using data from North Sea porpoises (1990-2008). From these predictions, PBDE 99 levels were found to decrease the fastest, followed by PBDE 153, 47 and 100. Results show that the PBPK models can be applied for harbour porpoises from different regions and also simulate time trends. PMID:22325441

  14. A model for a comprehensive assessment of exposure and lifetime cancer incidence risk from plutonium released from the Rocky Flats Plant, 1953-1989.

    PubMed

    Rood, Arthur S; Grogan, Helen A; Till, John E

    2002-02-01

    A model was developed to calculate ambient air concentrations, surface deposition, and lifetime carcinogenic risk with uncertainty from plutonium released to the air from the Rocky Flats Plant between the years 1953 and 1989. The model integrated airborne release estimates and atmospheric dispersion and deposition calculations from 37 years of routine plant operations and episodic releases. Episodic releases included two major fires in 1957 and 1969 that breached the building air filtration systems, and suspension of plutonium contaminated soil from the former 903 waste storage area during high winds. Predicted air concentrations included contributions from site releases and resuspension from contaminated soil. Inhalation was the only exposure pathway considered. Environmental measurements suitable for model validation were lacking for the period when major site releases occurred (1953 to 1970). However, environmental media, such as soil and lake sediment, are natural accumulators and provided evidence of past offsite releases. The geometric mean predicted-to-observed (P/O) ratio for soil was 0.93 with a geometric standard deviation of 1.6. The model systematically underpredicted concentrations near the 903 Area because large, nonrespirable particles that deposited close to the source were not included in release estimates. Plutonium soil inventories for the model domain had P/O ratios ranging from 0.22 to 4.2. The geometric mean P/O ratio for ambient air was 0.90 with a geometric standard deviation of 2.6. Age-dated sediment cores from Standley Lake had a geometric mean P/O ratio of 1.0 with a geometric standard deviation of 1.7. Predicted-to-observed ratios for plutonium inventories in Great Western Reservoir ranged from 0.36 to 1.7. Lifetime cancer incidence risks were calculated for a male laborer scenario who resided in the model domain for the entire assessment time. Maximum cancer risks ranged from 10-6 (5th percentile) to 10(-4) (95th percentile). Most of

  15. Potential for Adult-Based Epidemiological Studies to Characterize Overall Cancer Risks Associated with a Lifetime of CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Shuryak, Igor; Lubin, Jay H.; Brenner, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that radiation exposure from pediatric CT scanning is associated with small excess cancer risks. However, the majority of CT scans are performed on adults, and most radiation-induced cancers appear during middle or old age, in the same age range as background cancers. Consequently, a logical next step is to investigate the effects of CT scanning in adulthood on lifetime cancer risks by conducting adult-based, appropriately designed epidemiological studies. Here we estimate the sample size required for such studies to detect CT-associated risks. This was achieved by incorporating different age-, sex-, time- and cancer type-dependent models of radiation carcinogenesis into an in silico simulation of a population-based cohort study. This approach simulated individual histories of chest and abdominal CT exposures, deaths and cancer diagnoses. The resultant sample sizes suggest that epidemiological studies of realistically sized cohorts can detect excess lifetime cancer risks from adult CT exposures. For example, retrospective analysis of CT exposure and cancer incidence data from a population-based cohort of 0.4 to 1.3 million (depending on the carcinogenic model) CT-exposed UK adults, aged 25–65 in 1980 and followed until 2015, provides 80% power for detecting cancer risks from chest and abdominal CT scans. PMID:24828111

  16. Young adults' trajectories of Ecstasy use: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Andrew; Najman, Jake M; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Plotnikova, Maria; Wells, Helene; Legosz, Margot; Kemp, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Young adults' Ecstasy use trajectories have important implications for individual and population-level consequences of Ecstasy use, but little relevant research has been conducted. This study prospectively examines Ecstasy trajectories in a population-based sample. Data are from the Natural History Study of Drug Use, a retrospective/prospective cohort study conducted in Australia. Population screening identified a probability sample of Ecstasy users aged 19-23 years. Complete data for 30 months of follow-up, comprising 4 time intervals, were available for 297 participants (88.4% of sample). Trajectories were derived using cluster analysis based on recent Ecstasy use at each interval. Trajectory predictors were examined using a generalized ordered logit model and included Ecstasy dependence (World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Instrument), psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale), aggression (Young Adult Self Report) and contextual factors (e.g. attendance at electronic/dance music events). Three Ecstasy trajectories were identified (low, intermediate and high use). At its peak, the high-use trajectory involved 1-2 days Ecstasy use per week. Decreasing frequency of use was observed for intermediate and high-use trajectories from 12 months, independently of market factors. Intermediate and high-use trajectory membership was predicted by past Ecstasy consumption (>70 pills) and attendance at electronic/dance music events. High-use trajectory members were unlikely to have used Ecstasy for more than 3 years and tended to report consistently positive subjective effects at baseline. Given the social context and temporal course of Ecstasy use, Ecstasy trajectories might be better understood in terms of instrumental rather than addictive drug use patterns. PMID:23899430

  17. Calendar ageing analysis of a LiFePO4/graphite cell with dynamic model validations: Towards realistic lifetime predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarasketa-Zabala, E.; Gandiaga, I.; Rodriguez-Martinez, L. M.; Villarreal, I.

    2014-12-01

    The present study aims at establishing a methodology for a comprehensive calendar ageing predictive model development, focusing specially on validation procedures. A LFP-based Li-ion cell performance degradation was analysed under different temperature and SOC storage conditions. Five static calendar ageing conditions were used for understanding the ageing trends and modelling the dominant ageing phenomena (SEI growth and the resulting loss of active lithium). The validation process included an additional test under other constant operating conditions (static validation) and other four tests under non-constant impact factors operating schemes within the same experiment (dynamic validation), in response to battery stress conditions in real applications. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental results as the residuals are always below 1% for experiments run for 300-650 days. The model is able to predict dynamic behaviour close to real operating conditions and the level of accuracy corresponds to a root-mean-square error of 0.93%.

  18. Bleeding complications associated with warfarin treatment in ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Seet, Raymond CS; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Christianson, Teresa JH; Petty, George W; Brown, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    Background Bleeding events are the major obstacle to the widespread use of warfarin for secondary stroke prevention. Previous studies have not examined the use of risk stratification scores to estimate lifetime bleeding risk associated with warfarin treatment in a population-based setting. The purpose of this study is to determine the lifetime risk of bleeding events in ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing warfarin treatment in a population-based cohort and to evaluate the use of bleeding risk scores to identify patients at high-risk for lifetime bleeding events. Methods The resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project Medical Linkage System were used to identify acute ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing warfarin treatment for secondary stroke prevention from 1980 to 1994. Medical information for patients seen at Mayo Clinic and at Olmsted Medical Center were used to retrospectively risk-stratify stroke patients according to bleeding risk scores (including the HAS-BLED and HEMORR2HAGES scores) prior to warfarin initiation. These scores were reassessed one and five years later, and compared with lifetime bleeding events. Results One hundred patients (mean age, 79.3 years; 68% women) were studied. Ninety-nine patients were followed to death. Major bleeding events occurred in 41 patients at a median of 19 months following warfarin initiation. Patients with a history of hemorrhage before warfarin treatment were more likely to develop major hemorrhage (15% vs 3%, p=0.04). Patients with baseline HAS-BLED scores ≥2 had a higher lifetime risk of major bleeding events compared with those with scores ≤1 (53% vs 7%, p<0.01), while those with HEMORR2HAGES score ≥2 had a higher life-time risk of major bleeding events compared with those with scores ≤1 (52% vs 16%, p=0.03). Patients with an increase in the HAS-BLED and HEMORR2HAGES scores during follow-up had a higher remaining lifetime risk of major bleeding

  19. Our Allotted Lifetimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that measured by the internal clock of heartbeats or breathing, all mammals live a similar lifespan. This is based on the fact that mammals, regardless of size, breathe about 200 million times in their lifetime at a rate of 1 breath for every 4 heartbeats. (AJ)

  20. Colloquium: The neutron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Geoffrey L; Wietfeldt, F

    2011-01-01

    The decay of the free neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is the prototype semileptonic weak decay and is the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. It played a key role in the early Universe as it determined the ratio of neutrons to protons during the era of primordial light element nucleosynthesis. Neutron decay is physically related to important processes in solar physics and neutrino detection. The mean neutron lifetime has been the subject of more than 20 major experiments done, using a variety of methods, between 1950 and the present. The most precise recent measurements have stated accuracies approaching 0.1%, but are not in good agreement as they differ by as much as 5 sigma using quoted uncertainties. The history of neutron lifetime measurements is reviewed and the different methods used are described, giving important examples of each. The discrepancies and some systematic issues in the experiments that may be responsible are discussed, and it is shown by means of global averages that the neutron lifetime is likely to lie in the range of 880 884 s. Plans and prospects for future experiments are considered that will address these systematic issues and improve our knowledge of the neutron lifetime.

  1. Implementation of Remaining Useful Lifetime Transformer Models in the Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Lybeck, Nancy J.; Pham, Binh; Rusaw, Richard; Bickford, Randall

    2015-02-01

    Research and development efforts are required to address aging and reliability concerns of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants. As most plants continue to operate beyond the license life (i.e., towards 60 or 80 years), plant components are more likely to incur age-related degradation mechanisms. To assess and manage the health of aging plant assets across the nuclear industry, the Electric Power Research Institute has developed a web-based Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite for diagnosis and prognosis. FW-PHM is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases, comprised of the Diagnostic Advisor, the Asset Fault Signature Database, the Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and the Remaining Useful Life Database, that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The main focus of this paper is the implementation of prognostic models for generator step-up transformers in the FW-PHM Suite. One prognostic model discussed is based on the functional relationship between degree of polymerization, (the most commonly used metrics to assess the health of the winding insulation in a transformer) and furfural concentration in the insulating oil. The other model is based on thermal-induced degradation of the transformer insulation. By utilizing transformer loading information, established thermal models are used to estimate the hot spot temperature inside the transformer winding. Both models are implemented in the Remaining Useful Life Database of the FW-PHM Suite. The Remaining Useful Life Advisor utilizes the implemented prognostic models to estimate the remaining useful life of the paper winding insulation in the transformer based on actual oil testing and operational data.

  2. Debris shield survivability and lifetimes for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S; Duewer, T; Eder, D; Ertel, J; Horton, R; Latkowski, Brereton, S; MacGowan, B; Thomas, I; Tobin, M; Zaka, F

    1999-09-01

    The survivability and performance of the NIF debris shields on the National Ignition Facility are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. Estimates of debris shield lifetime in the presence of target emissions indicate severely shortened lifetimes. We have tested a new coating design that improves debris shield cleaning. A combination of modeling and continuous data collection on NIF is described/recommended to allow cost effective debris shield operation.

  3. Correlates of Weight Instability across the Lifespan in a Population-Based Sample

    PubMed Central

    Serdar, Kasey L.; Mazzeo, Suzanne E.; Mitchell, Karen S.; Aggen, Steven H.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research from overweight/obese clinical samples links weight instability to poor health. This study investigated whether negative health outcomes were associated with weight instability in a population-based sample. Method One thousand five hundred ten women and 1,111 men from the Mid-Atlantic Twin Registry completed questionnaires assessing demographics, body size in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, health satisfaction, and disordered eating. Noneating disorder psychiatric diagnoses were assessed via clinical interviews. Results Weight instability was related to lower health satisfaction and self-esteem, and higher body dissatisfaction, dieting, and binge eating for both sexes. Weight unstable women were more likely to meet criteria for lifetime major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and eating disorders. Weight stable women were more likely to abuse alcohol; however, two of these associations [e.g. weight instability and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and weight stability and alcohol abuse] became non-significant once lifetime binge eating was accounted for, indicating that these forms of psychopathology are more strongly related to binge eating than weight instability itself. No associations between weight stability and psychiatric diagnoses were found in men. Discussion Weight instability is related to mental and physical health concerns for both sexes. It was also specifically associated with depression and eating pathology in women. PMID:20957706

  4. Estimating the long-term effects of in vitro fertilization in Greece: an analysis based on a lifetime-investment model

    PubMed Central

    Fragoulakis, Vassilis; Maniadakis, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    Objective To quantify the economic effects of a child conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) in terms of net tax revenue from the state’s perspective in Greece. Methods Based on previous international experience, a mathematical model was developed to assess the lifetime productivity of a single individual and his/her lifetime transactions with governmental agencies. The model distinguished among three periods in the economic life cycle of an individual: (1) early life, when the government primarily contributes resources through child tax credits, health care, and educational expenses; (2) employment, when individuals begin returning resources through taxes; and (3) retirement, when the government expends additional resources on pensions and health care. The cost of a live birth with IVF was based on the modification of a previously published model developed by the authors. All outcomes were discounted at a 3% discount rate. The data inputs – namely, the economic or demographic variables – were derived from the National Statistical Secretariat of Greece and other relevant sources. To deal with uncertainty, bias-corrected uncertainty intervals (UIs) were calculated based on 5000 Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, to examine the robustness of our results, other one-way sensitivity analyses were also employed. Results The cost of IVF per birth was estimated at €17,015 (95% UI: €13,932–€20,200). The average projected income generated by an individual throughout his/her productive life was €258,070 (95% UI: €185,376–€339,831). In addition, his/her life tax contribution was estimated at €133,947 (95% UI: €100,126–€177,375), while the discounted governmental expenses for elderly and underage individuals were €67,624 (95% UI: €55,211–€83,930). Hence, the net present value of IVF was €60,435 (95% UI: €33,651–€94,330), representing a 182% net return on investment. Results remained constant under various assumptions for the

  5. POPULATION-BASED EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODELING FOR AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task will address EPA's need to better understand the variability in personal exposure to air pollutants for the purpose of assessing what populations are at risk for adverse health outcomes due to air pollutant exposures. To improve our understanding of exposures to air po...

  6. The atmospheric lifetime of black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cape, J. N.; Coyle, M.; Dumitrean, P.

    2012-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) in the atmosphere contributes to the human health effects of particulate matter and contributes to radiative forcing of climate. The lifetime of BC, particularly the smaller particle sizes (PM2.5) which can be transported over long distances, is therefore an important factor in determining the range of such effects, and the spatial footprint of emission controls. Theory and models suggest that the typical lifetime of BC is around one week. The frequency distributions of measurements of a range of hydrocarbons at a remote rural site in southern Scotland (Auchencorth Moss) between 2007 and 2010 have been used to quantify the relationship between atmospheric lifetime and the geometric standard deviation of observed concentration. The analysis relies on an assumed common major emission source for hydrocarbons and BC, namely diesel-engined vehicles. The logarithm of the standard deviation of the log-transformed concentration data is linearly related to hydrocarbon lifetime, and the same statistic for BC can be used to assess the lifetime of BC relative to the hydrocarbons. Annual average data show BC lifetimes in the range 4-12 days, for an assumed OH concentration of 7 × 105 cm-3. At this site there is little difference in BC lifetime between winter and summer, despite a 3-fold difference in relative hydrocarbon lifetimes. This observation confirms the role of wet deposition as an important removal process for BC, as there is no difference in precipitation between winter and summer at this site. BC lifetime was significantly greater in 2010, which had 23% less rainfall than the preceding 3 years.

  7. Discriminating famous from fictional names based on lifetime experience: evidence in support of a signal-detection model based on finite mixture distributions.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Ben; Harlow, Iain M; Meeking, Melissa M; Köhler, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that signal-detection mechanisms contribute to item-recognition memory decisions that involve discriminations between targets and lures based on a controlled laboratory study episode. Here, the authors employed mathematical modeling of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) to determine whether and how a signal-detection mechanism contributes to discriminations between moderately famous and fictional names based on lifetime experience. Unique to fame judgments is a lack of control over participants' previous exposure to the stimuli deemed "targets" by the experimenter; specifically, if they pertain to moderately famous individuals, participants may have had no prior exposure to a substantial proportion of the famous names presented. The authors adopted established models from the recognition-memory literature to examine the quantitative fit that could be obtained through the inclusion of signal-detection and threshold mechanisms for two data sets. They first established that a signal-detection process operating on graded evidence is critical to account for the fame judgment data they collected. They then determined whether the graded memory evidence for famous names would best be described with one distribution with greater variance than that for the fictional names, or with two finite mixture distributions for famous names that correspond to items with or without prior exposure, respectively. Analyses revealed that a model that included a d' parameter, as well as a mixture parameter, provided the best compromise between number of parameters and quantitative fit. Additional comparisons between this equal-variance signal-detection mixture model and a dual-process model, which included a high-threshold process in addition to a signal-detection process, also favored the former model. In support of the conjecture that the mixture parameter captures participants' prior experience, the authors found that it was increased when the analysis was

  8. Measurement of Beam Lifetime and Applications for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    Beam lifetime studies for the SPEAR3 storage ring are presented. The three lifetime components are separated with lifetime measurements under various combinations of beam currents and fill patterns and vertical scraper scans. Touschek lifetime is studied with rf voltage scans and with the horizontal or vertical scrapers inserted. The measurements are explained with calculations based on the calibrated lattice model. Quantum lifetime measurements are performed with reduced longitudinal and horizontal apertures, respectively, from which we deduce the radiation energy loss down to a few keV per revolution and the horizontal beam size.

  9. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    The GNC software onboard ISS utilizes TORS command loads, and a simplistic model of TORS orbital motion to generate onboard TORS state vectors. Each TORS command load contains five "invariant" orbital elements which serve as inputs to the onboard propagation algorithm. These elements include semi-major axis, inclination, time of last ascending node crossing, right ascension of ascending node, and mean motion. Running parallel to the onboard software is the TORS Command Builder Tool application, located in the JSC Mission Control Center. The TORS Command Builder Tool is responsible for building the TORS command loads using a ground TORS state vector, mirroring the onboard propagation algorithm, and assessing the fidelity of current TORS command loads onboard ISS. The tool works by extracting a ground state vector at a given time from a current TORS ephemeris, and then calculating the corresponding "onboard" TORS state vector at the same time using the current onboard TORS command load. The tool then performs a comparison between these two vectors and displays the relative differences in the command builder tool GUI. If the RSS position difference between these two vectors exceeds the tolerable lim its, a new command load is built using the ground state vector and uplinked to ISS. A command load's lifetime is therefore defined as the time from when a command load is built to the time the RSS position difference exceeds the tolerable limit. From the outset of TORS command load operations (STS-98), command load lifetime was limited to approximately one week due to the simplicity of both the onboard propagation algorithm, and the algorithm used by the command builder tool to generate the invariant orbital elements. It was soon desired to extend command load lifetime in order to minimize potential risk due to frequent ISS commanding. Initial studies indicated that command load lifetime was most sensitive to changes in mean motion. Finding a suitable value for mean motion

  10. Global three-dimensional model calculations of the budgets and present-day atmospheric lifetimes of CF2ClCFCl2 (CFC-113) and CHClF2 (CFC-22)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, Amram; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    The annual percentage increases in concentrations of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-113 (an industrial solvent) and CFC-22 (a refrigerant) are the highest among major chlorofluorocarbons in the atmosphere today. The present-day atmospheric lifetimes for these species are computed using a global three-dimensional dynamical-chemical model. The present-day lifetimes of both are long (15.5 years for CFC-22 and 136 or 195 years for CFC-113, depending on assumed O2 absorption cross sections), underscoring the need to decrease their emissions in order to minimize their future role in ozone destruction and greenhouse warming.

  11. Importance of population-based studies in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ronnie, George; Ve, Ramesh Sathyamangalam; Velumuri, Lokapavani; Asokan, Rashima; Vijaya, Lingam

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, there have been reports on the prevalence of glaucoma from the Vellore Eye Survey, Andhra Pradesh Eye Diseases Survey, Aravind Comprehensive Eye Survey, Chennai Glaucoma Study and West Bengal Glaucoma Study. Population-based studies provide important information regarding the prevalence and risk factors for glaucoma. They also highlight regional differences in the prevalence of various types of glaucoma. It is possible to gather important insights regarding the number of persons affected with glaucoma and the proportion with undiagnosed disease. We reviewed the different population-based studies from India and compare their findings. The lacunae in ophthalmic care that can be inferred from these studies are identified and possible reasons and solutions are discussed. We also discuss the clinical relevance of the various findings, and how it reflects on clinical practice in the country. Since India has a significantly high disease burden, we examine the possibility of population-based screening for disease in the Indian context. PMID:21150021

  12. Evolution of one-particle and double-occupied Green functions for the Hubbard model, with interaction, at half-filling with lifetime effects within the moment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafroth, S.; Rodríguez-Núñez, J. J.

    1999-08-01

    We evaluate the one-particle and double-occupied Green functions for the Hubbard model at half-filling using the moment approach of Nolting [Z. Phys. 255, 25 (1972); Grund Kurs: Theoretische Physik. 7 Viel-Teilchen-Theorie (Verlag Zimmermann-Neufang, Ulmen, 1992)]. Our starting point is a self-energy, Σ(k-->,ω), which has a single pole, Ω(k-->), with spectral weight, α(k-->), and quasiparticle lifetime, γ(k-->) [J. J. Rodríguez-Núñez and S. Schafroth, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 10, L391 (1998); J. J. Rodríguez-Núñez, S. Schafroth, and H. Beck, Physica B (to be published); (unpublished)]. In our approach, Σ(k-->,ω) becomes the central feature of the many-body problem and due to three unknown k--> parameters we have to satisfy only the first three sum rules instead of four as in the canonical formulation of Nolting [Z. Phys. 255, 25 (1972); Grund Kurs: Theoretische Physik. 7 Viel-Teilchen-Theorie (Verlag Zimmermann-Neufang, Ulmen, 1992)]. This self-energy choice forces our system to be a non-Fermi liquid for any value of the interaction, since it does not vanish at zero frequency. The one-particle Green function, G(k-->,ω), shows the fingerprint of a strongly correlated system, i.e., a double peak structure in the one-particle spectral density, A(k-->,ω), vs ω for intermediate values of the interaction. Close to the Mott insulator-transition, A(k-->,ω) becomes a wide single peak, signaling the absence of quasiparticles. Similar behavior is observed for the real and imaginary parts of the self-energy, Σ(k-->,ω). The double-occupied Green function, G2(q-->,ω), has been obtained from G(k-->,ω) by means of the equation of motion. The relation between G2(q-->,ω) and the self-energy, Σ(k-->,ω), is formally established and numerical results for the spectral function of G2(k-->,ω), χ(2)(k-->,ω)≡-(1/π)δ-->0+Im[G2(k-->,ω)], are given. Our approach represents the simplest way to include (1) lifetime effects in the moment approach of Nolting, as

  13. Experimental Tests on the Lifetime Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhi-Qiang; Ni, Guang-Jiong

    The experimental test problem of the left-right polarization-dependent lifetime asymmetry is discussed. It shows that the existing experiments cannot demonstrate the lifetime asymmetry to be right or wrong after analyzing the measurements on the neutron, the muon and the tau lifetime, as well as the g-2 experiment. However, it is pointed out emphatically that the SLD and the E158 experiments, the measurements of the left-right integrated cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by e+e- collisions and by electron-electron Møller scattering, can indirectly demonstrate the lifetime asymmetry. In order to directly demonstrate the lifetime asymmetry, we propose some possible experiments on the decays of polarized muons. The precise measurement of the lifetime asymmetry could have important significance for building a muon collider, also in cosmology and astrophysics. It would provide a sensitive test of the standard model in particle physics and allow for exploration of the possible V+A interactions.

  14. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau ..-->.. nu/sub tau/W and b ..-->.. cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  15. Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung cancer in men: evidence from a population-based case-control study in eight Canadian provinces

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Asbestos is classified as a human carcinogen, and studies have consistently demonstrated that workplace exposure to it increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Few studies have evaluated risks in population-based settings where there is a greater variety in the types of occupations, and exposures. Methods This was a population based case–control study with 1,681 incident cases of lung cancer, and 2,053 controls recruited from 8 Canadian provinces between 1994 and 1997. Self-reported questionnaires were used to elicit a lifetime occupational history, including general tasks, and information for other risk factors. Occupational hygienists, who were blinded to case–control status, assigned asbestos exposures to each job on the basis of (i) concentration (low, medium, high), (ii) frequency (<5%, 5-30%, and >30% of the time in a normal work week), and (iii) reliability (possible, probable, definite). Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Those occupationally exposed to (i) low, and (ii) medium or high concentrations of asbestos had ORs for lung cancer of 1.17 (95% CI=0.92 – 1.50) and 2.16 (95% CI=1.21-3.88), respectively, relative to those who were unexposed. Medium or high exposure to asbestos roughly doubled the risk for lung cancer across all three smoking pack-year categories. The joint relationship between smoking and asbestos was consistent with a multiplicative risk model. Conclusions Our findings provide further evidence that exposure to asbestos has contributed to an increased risk of lung cancer in Canadian workplaces, and suggests that nearly 3% of lung cancers among Canadian men are caused by occupational exposure to asbestos. PMID:23234401

  16. Cost-effectiveness of population-based screening for colorectal cancer: a comparison of guaiac-based faecal occult blood testing, faecal immunochemical testing and flexible sigmoidoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, L; Tilson, L; Whyte, S; O'Ceilleachair, A; Walsh, C; Usher, C; Tappenden, P; Chilcott, J; Staines, A; Barry, M; Comber, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several colorectal cancer-screening tests are available, but it is uncertain which provides the best balance of risks and benefits within a screening programme. We evaluated cost-effectiveness of a population-based screening programme in Ireland based on (i) biennial guaiac-based faecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) at ages 55–74, with reflex faecal immunochemical testing (FIT); (ii) biennial FIT at ages 55–74; and (iii) once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSIG) at age 60. Methods: A state-transition model was used to estimate costs and outcomes for each screening scenario vs no screening. A third party payer perspective was adopted. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken. Results: All scenarios would be considered highly cost-effective compared with no screening. The lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER vs no screening €589 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained) was found for FSIG, followed by FIT (€1696) and gFOBT (€4428); gFOBT was dominated. Compared with FSIG, FIT was associated with greater gains in QALYs and reductions in lifetime cancer incidence and mortality, but was more costly, required considerably more colonoscopies and resulted in more complications. Results were robust to variations in parameter estimates. Conclusion: Population-based screening based on FIT is expected to result in greater health gains than a policy of gFOBT (with reflex FIT) or once-only FSIG, but would require significantly more colonoscopy resources and result in more individuals experiencing adverse effects. Weighing these advantages and disadvantages presents a considerable challenge to policy makers. PMID:22343624

  17. Dependence of the charge exchange lifetimes on mirror latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of the charge exchange lifetimes on the mirror latitude for ions mirroring off the geomagnetic equator was re-computed using the improved hydrogen distribution models. The Chamberlain model was used to define the spatial distribution of the neutral hydrogen environment through which the ring current ions traverse. The resultant dependence of the charge exchange lifetime on mirror latitude is best fitted by the approximation that contains the charge exchange lifetime for equatorial particles.

  18. Measurement of the Ds lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermilab E791 Collaboration; Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1999-01-01

    We report the results of a precise measurement of the Ds meson lifetime based on 1662+/-56 fully reconstructed Ds-->φπ decays, from the charm hadroproduction experiment E791 at Fermilab. Using an unbinned maximum likelihood fit, we measure the Ds lifetime to be 0.518+/-0.014+/-0.007 ps. The ratio of the measured Ds lifetime to the world average D0 lifetime [1] is 1.25+/-0.04. This result differs from unity by six standard deviations, indicating significantly different lifetimes for the Ds and the D0.

  19. Influence of age, sex and calendar year on lifetime accumulated red bone marrow dose from diagnostic radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Meiboom, Merle Friederike; Weitmann, Kerstin; Terschüren, Claudia; von Boetticher, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to evaluate the relevance of different factors influencing lifetime accumulated red bone marrow dose, such as calendar year, age and sex. The lifetime dose was estimated for controls interviewed in person (N = 2811, 37.5% women) of the population-based representative Northern Germany Leukemia and Lymphoma Study. Data were assessed in standardized computer-assisted personal interviews. The calculation of doses is based on a comprehensive quantification model including calendar year, sex, kind of examination, and technical development. In multivariate regression models the annual red bone marrow dose was analyzed depending on age, sex and calendar year to consider simultaneously temporal changes in radiologic practice and individual risk factors. While the number of examinations continuously rises over time, the dose shows two peaks around 1950 and after 1980. Men are exposed to higher doses than woman. Until 1970 traditional examinations like conventional and mass screening examinations caused the main dose. They were then replaced by technically advanced examinations mainly computed tomography and cardiac catheter. The distribution of the red bone marrow dose over lifetime depends highly on the technical standards and radiation protection survey. To a lesser extent it is influenced by age and sex of the subjects. Thus epidemiological studies concerning the assessment of radiation exposure should consider the calendar year in which the examination was conducted. PMID:24244286

  20. A satellite mortality study to support space systems lifetime prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George; Salazar, Ronald; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Dubos, Gregory F.

    Estimating the operational lifetime of satellites and spacecraft is a complex process. Operational lifetime can differ from mission design lifetime for a variety of reasons. Unexpected mortality can occur due to human errors in design and fabrication, to human errors in launch and operations, to random anomalies of hardware and software or even satellite function degradation or technology change, leading to unrealized economic or mission return. This study focuses on data collection of public information using, for the first time, a large, publically available dataset, and preliminary analysis of satellite lifetimes, both operational lifetime and design lifetime. The objective of this study is the illustration of the relationship of design life to actual lifetime for some representative classes of satellites and spacecraft. First, a Weibull and Exponential lifetime analysis comparison is performed on the ratio of mission operating lifetime to design life, accounting for terminated and ongoing missions. Next a Kaplan-Meier survivor function, standard practice for clinical trials analysis, is estimated from operating lifetime. Bootstrap resampling is used to provide uncertainty estimates of selected survival probabilities. This study highlights the need for more detailed databases and engineering reliability models of satellite lifetime that include satellite systems and subsystems, operations procedures and environmental characteristics to support the design of complex, multi-generation, long-lived space systems in Earth orbit.

  1. A Satellite Mortality Study to Support Space Systems Lifetime Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, George; Salazar, Ronald; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Dubos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the operational lifetime of satellites and spacecraft is a complex process. Operational lifetime can differ from mission design lifetime for a variety of reasons. Unexpected mortality can occur due to human errors in design and fabrication, to human errors in launch and operations, to random anomalies of hardware and software or even satellite function degradation or technology change, leading to unrealized economic or mission return. This study focuses on data collection of public information using, for the first time, a large, publically available dataset, and preliminary analysis of satellite lifetimes, both operational lifetime and design lifetime. The objective of this study is the illustration of the relationship of design life to actual lifetime for some representative classes of satellites and spacecraft. First, a Weibull and Exponential lifetime analysis comparison is performed on the ratio of mission operating lifetime to design life, accounting for terminated and ongoing missions. Next a Kaplan-Meier survivor function, standard practice for clinical trials analysis, is estimated from operating lifetime. Bootstrap resampling is used to provide uncertainty estimates of selected survival probabilities. This study highlights the need for more detailed databases and engineering reliability models of satellite lifetime that include satellite systems and subsystems, operations procedures and environmental characteristics to support the design of complex, multi-generation, long-lived space systems in Earth orbit.

  2. Perinatal risk factors in offenders with severe personality disorder: a population-based investigation

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Bakiyeva, Liliya; Cnattingius, Sven; Grann, Martin; Hultman, Christina M.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Geddes, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Although perinatal factors are associated with the development of several psychiatric disorders, it is unknown whether these factors are linked with personality disorder. Cases of personality disorder were drawn from a national registry of all forensic psychiatric evaluations (n=150). Two control groups were used: 1. A sample of forensic evaluations without any psychiatric disorder (n=97) allowing for a nested case-control investigation; 2: A population-based sample matched by age and gender with no history of psychiatric hospitalization (n=1498). Prematurity (<37 weeks of completed gestation) was significantly associated with a diagnosis of personality disorder, both in the nested and the population-based case-control comparisons with adjusted odds ratios (OR) for this risk factors ranging from 2 to 4. Asphyxia (adjusted OR=2.4, 95% CI: 1.4-4.1) and complicated delivery (adjusted OR=1.5, 1.0-2.1) were associated with personality disorder in the population-based study, and the former remained significant in multivariate models. Overall, perinatal complications were found to be associated with a later diagnosis of personality disorder in this selected sample. As with other psychiatric disorders where such associations have been demonstrated, changes during the perinatal period may lead to abnormal brain development and function. PMID:23013342

  3. Fluorescence lifetime-based optical molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand T N

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime is a powerful contrast mechanism for in vivo molecular imaging. In this chapter, we describe instrumentation and methods to optimally exploit lifetime contrast using a time domain fluorescence tomography system. The key features of the system are the use of point excitation in free-space using ultrashort laser pulses and non-contact detection using a gated, intensified CCD camera. The surface boundaries of the imaging volume are acquired using a photogrammetric camera integrated with the imaging system, and implemented in theoretical models of light propagation in biological tissue. The time domain data are optimally analyzed using a lifetime-based tomography approach, which is based on extracting a tomographic set of lifetimes and decay amplitudes from the long time decay portion of the time domain data. This approach improves the ability to locate in vivo targets with a resolution better than conventional optical methods. The application of time domain lifetime multiplexing and tomography are illustrated using phantoms and tumor bearing mouse model of breast adenocarcinoma. In the latter application, the time domain approach allows an improved detection of fluorescent protein signals from intact nude mice in the presence of background autofluorescence. This feature has potential applications for longitudinal pre-clinical evaluation of drug treatment response as well as to address fundamental questions related to tumor physiology and metastasis. PMID:21153381

  4. Association of Lifetime Intellectual Enrichment with Cognitive Decline in the Older Population

    PubMed Central

    Vemuri, Prashanthi; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Machulda, Mary; Knopman, David S.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Geda, Yonas E.; Rocca, Walter A.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Intellectual lifestyle enrichment throughout life is increasingly viewed as a protective strategy against commonly observed cognitive decline in the elderly. OBJECTIVE To investigate the association of lifetime intellectual enrichment with baseline cognitive performance and rate of cognitive decline in a non-demented elderly population and to estimate difference (in years) associated with lifetime intellectual enrichment to the onset of cognitive impairment. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS Prospective analysis of subjects enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA), a longitudinal population-based study of cognitive aging in Olmsted County, Minnesota. We studied 1995 non-demented (1718 cognitively normal, 277 MCI) participants in MCSA who completed intellectual lifestyle measures at baseline and underwent at least one follow-up visit. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We studied the effect of lifetime intellectual enrichment by separating the variables into two non-overlapping principal components: education/occupation-score and mid/late-life cognitive activity measure based on self-report questionnaires. A global cognitive Z-score served as our summary cognition measure. We used linear mixed-effects models to investigate the associations of demographic and intellectual enrichment measures with global cognitive Z-score trajectories. RESULTS Baseline cognitive performance was lower in older subjects and in those with lower education/occupation, lower mid/late-life cognitive activity, apolipoprotein E4 (APOE) genotype, and in men. The interaction between the two intellectual enrichment measures was significant such that the beneficial effect of mid/late-life cognitive activity on baseline cognitive performance was reduced with increasing education/occupation. Only baseline age, mid/late-life cognitive activity, and APOE4 genotype were significantly associated with longitudinal change in cognitive performance from baseline. For APOE4 carriers with high

  5. Tropospheric hydroxyl concentrations and the lifetimes of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional fields of modeled tropospheric OH concentrations are used to calculate lifetimes against destruction by OH for many hydrogenated halocarbons, including the CFC alternatives. The OH fields were taken from a 3-D chemical transport model (Spivakovsky et al. 1989) that accurately simulates the global measurements of methyl chloroform (derived lifetime of 5.5 years). The lifetimes of various hydro-halocarbons are shown to be insensitive to possible spatial variations and seasonal cycles. It is possible to scale the HCFC lifetimes to that of methyl chloroform or methane by using the ratio of the rate coefficients for reaction with OH at an appropriate temperature, about 277 K.

  6. Protective effect of Aronia melanocarpa polyphenols against cadmium-induced disorders in bone metabolism: a study in a rat model of lifetime human exposure to this heavy metal.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Malgorzata M; Rogalska, Joanna; Galazyn-Sidorczuk, Malgorzata; Jurczuk, Maria; Roszczenko, Alicja; Tomczyk, Michal

    2015-03-01

    It was investigated, in a female rat model of low and moderate lifetime human exposure to cadmium (Cd), whether polyphenols from Aronia melanocarpa berries (chokeberry; AMP) may offer protection from this heavy metal-induced disorders in bone metabolism. For this purpose, numerous indices of bone formation (osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprotegerin) and resorption (carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptides of type I collagen, soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand) in the serum and/or distal femur epiphysis (trabecular bone region), as well as bone mineral status (volumetric bone mineral density of the femur and content of mineral components, including calcium, in the bone tissue at the distal femur epiphysis) were evaluated in female Wistar rats that received a 0.1% aqueous extract of AMP, as the only drinking fluid (prepared from lyophilized extract by Adamed Consumer Healthcare), and/or Cd in diet (1 and 5mg/kg) for 3, 10, 17, and 24 months. Examination of the phytochemical profile of the aronia extract revealed high content of polyphenols (612.40 ± 3.33 mg/g), including anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, phenolic acids, and flavonoids. Among detected compounds anthocyanins were identified as dominating. The exposure to Cd, dose- and duration-dependently, enhanced resorption and inhibited formation of the bone tissue resulting in its decreased mineralization. The administration of AMP under the exposure to 1 and 5 mgCd/kg diet provided important protection from this heavy metal-induced disturbances in the bone turnover and changes in the bone mineral status, and the beneficial impact of polyphenols resulted from their independent action and interaction with Cd. These findings suggest that consumption of Aronia melanocarpa polyphenols may play a role in prevention against female skeleton damage due to chronic exposure to Cd and that chokeberry represents the good natural plant candidate for further investigations of its prophylactic use

  7. Population based mortality surveillance in carbon products manufacturing plants.

    PubMed Central

    Teta, M J; Ott, M G; Schnatter, A R

    1987-01-01

    The utility of a population based, corporate wide mortality surveillance system was evaluated after a 10 year observation period of one of the company's divisions. The subject population, 2219 white male, long term employees from Union Carbide Corporation's carbon based electrode and specialty products operations, was followed up for mortality from 1974 to 1983. External comparisons with the United States male population were supplemented with internal comparisons among subgroups of the study population, defined by broad job categories and time related variables, adjusting for important correlates of the healthy worker effect. Significant deficits of deaths were observed for all causes and the major non-cancer causes of death. The numbers of deaths due to malignant neoplasms and respiratory cancer were less than, but not statistically different from, expected. There was a non-significant excess of deaths from lymphopoietic cancer, occurring predominantly among salaried employees. When specific locations were examined, operations with potential exposure to coal tar products exhibited a mortality pattern similar to that of the total cohort. The risk for lung cancer was significantly raised (five observed, 1.4 expected) in one small, but older, location which did not involve coal tar products during the period of employment of these individuals, but which historically used asbestos materials for several unique applications. Although these findings are limited by small numbers and a short observation period, the population based surveillance strategy has provided valuable information regarding the mortality experience of the population, directions for future research, and the allocation of epidemiological resources. PMID:3593661

  8. Population-based seroprevalence of HSV-2 and syphilis in Andhra Pradesh state of India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Understanding the prevalence and risk factors for common causes of ulcerative genital disease in the general population would inform current STI syndromic management and HIV testing strategies in high HIV prevalence regions of India. Methods Persons 15-49 years old from 32 rural and 34 urban clusters were sampled using a stratified random method to represent adults in the high HIV prevalence Guntur district in Andhra Pradesh state. Interviews were conducted and dry blood spots were collected on 12,617 study participants. Testing for HSV-2 and syphilis was performed. Results Adjusted HSV-2 and syphilis seroprevalence rates were 4.70% and 2.08% for men and 7.07% and 1.42% for women. For men, tattooing, >3 lifetime sex partners, tobacco use, and sex with men in the past 6 months were associated with HSV-2 or syphilis (ORs, 1.66-2.95, p < 0.05). Male circumcision was positively associated with HSV-2 infection (OR, 1.37, p = 0.028) though this could be due to residual confounding. In women, greater than one lifetime partner remained significantly associated with HSV-2 in multivariate analysis (OR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.39-4.87). Among all behavioral risk factors and other covariates in women and men, HIV infection exhibited the strongest association with HSV-2 and syphilis (ORs, 8.2-14.2, p < 0.001). The proportion of individuals with HSV-2 who were HIV infected was less than the proportion with syphilis who were HIV infected (11.8% vs. 22.7%; p = 0.001). Conclusions Nearly one in four persons surveyed in this population-based study that were seroprevalent for syphilis, were also HIV infected. Common population risk factors for syphilis, HSV-2 and HIV and high rates of co-seroprevalence suggest that HIV testing, STI testing and service strategies for these would benefit from direct linkage in India. PMID:20214795

  9. Population-based advanced practice nursing: where does oncology fit in?

    PubMed

    Lattimer, Jennie Greco

    2013-12-01

    A national work group met in 2004 to discuss the future of advanced practice nursing. The representatives were nursing education, certification, accreditation, and regulation experts, and the goal was to develop a consensus model for advanced practice nursing regulation (Nevidjon et al., 2010). As a result, a set of recommendations was published in an article that defined a new consensus model for advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) regulation (APRN Consensus Workgroup, 2008; Goudreau, 2009). The new model included six population-based focuses of practice (i.e., family and individual across the lifespan, adult and gerontology, neonatal, pediatrics, women's health- and gender-related, and psychiatric and mental health) (Johnson, Dawson, & Brassard, 2010). A goal of the new model was to standardize the licensure, certification, and regulation of nurse practitioners into specific focuses. State boards were facing an increasing number of requests to recognize nurse practitioner specialties (e.g., organ specific, body systems, diseases) (Johnson et al., 2010). The new model helped standardize education programs, which may help certifying agencies set up curriculum review processes to ensure appropriate credentials for APRNs (Johnson et al., 2010). It also supported the mission of nursing to meet future healthcare needs of the public and to protect the public (Johnson et al., 2010). Some advantages exist to delineating into population-based focuses, but the new model leaves out many specialties (e.g., oncology) that encompass the whole person as well as concentrate on certain diseases. PMID:24305476

  10. Lifetime measurement of high spin states in (75) Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, Javid; Trivedi, T.; Maurya, K.; Mehrotra, I.; Palit, R.; Naik, Z.; Jain, H. C.; Negi, D.; Mahanto, G.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S.; Pancholi, S.C.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Yang, Y-C; Sun, Y.; Dahl, A.; Raju, M.K.; Appannababu, S.; Kumar, S.; Choudhury, D.; Jain, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    The lifetimes of high spin states of {sup 75}Kr have been determined via {sup 50}Cr ({sup 28}Si, 2pn) {sup 75}Kr reaction in positive parity band using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The transition quadrupole moments Q deduced from lifetime measurements have been compared with {sup 75}Br. Experimental results obtained from lifetime measurement are interpreted in the framework of projected shell model.

  11. Limits to battery lifetime in photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Spiers, D.J.; Rasinkoski, A.A.

    1996-10-01

    Battery lifetime in a photovoltaic (PV) system is important in determining life-cycle costs and servicing requirements. We present a simple model for estimating PV battery lifetime which are application- and battery-specific, using data normally available (or easily estimated) at the time of system design. In a correctly designed and operated PV system, one of two properties will limit the ultimate lifetime of the battery: the cycle life or the battery`s resistance to internal corrosion. The cycle life is more or less independent of ambient temperature, but the resistance to internal corrosion falls rapidly at higher ambient temperatures. Whether the cycle life or the temperature-dependent corrosion is the limiting factor on battery life depends on the particular details of the photovoltaic system, especially the type of battery used, the daily depth of discharge and the average ambient temperature experienced. Illustrations are given of the particular circumstances for a variety of PV systems with open (vented) lead-acid batteries, ranging from rural lighting systems and vaccine refrigerators to large telecommunications systems. Where possible, the predicted lifetime is compared to actual field experience. In PV systems using tubular plate vented batteries, it is nearly always the temperature-dependent corrosion process that limits the battery lifetime, and not the cycle life. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Lifetime statistics in chaotic dielectric microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Schomerus, Henning; Wiersig, Jan; Main, Joerg

    2009-05-15

    We discuss the statistical properties of lifetimes of electromagnetic quasibound states in dielectric microresonators with fully chaotic ray dynamics. Using the example of a resonator of stadium geometry, we find that a recently proposed random-matrix model very well describes the lifetime statistics of long-lived resonances, provided that two effective parameters are appropriately renormalized. This renormalization is linked to the formation of short-lived resonances, a mechanism also known from the fractal Weyl law and the resonance-trapping phenomen0008.

  13. Touschek Lifetime Calculations for NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Nash,B.; Kramer, S.

    2009-05-04

    The Touschek effect limits the lifetime for NSLS-II. The basic mechanism is Coulomb scattering resulting in a longitudinal momentum outside the momentum aperture. The momentum aperture results from a combination of the initial betatron oscillations after the scatter and the non-linear properties determining the resultant stability. We find that higher order multipole errors may reduce the momentum aperture, particularly for scattered particles with energy loss. The resultant drop in Touschek lifetime is minimized, however, due to less scattering in the dispersive regions. We describe these mechanisms, and present calculations for NSLS-II using a realistic lattice model including damping wigglers and engineering tolerances.

  14. The impact of childhood parental loss on risk for mood, anxiety and substance use disorders in a population-based sample of male twins.

    PubMed

    Otowa, Takeshi; York, Timothy P; Gardner, Charles O; Kendler, Kenneth S; Hettema, John M

    2014-12-15

    Previous studies have identified the relationship between parental loss and psychopathology later in life. However, this relationship varied depending on the kind of loss, the parent involved, and the type of psychopathology. In the present study, we examined the association between parental loss (any loss, death, and separation) during childhood and lifetime risk for seven common psychiatric and substance use disorders in a sample of 2605 male twins from the Virginia population-based twin registry. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), we also examined the extent to which the influence of parental loss contributes to adult psychopathology. Parental separation was associated with a wide range of adult psychopathology, whereas parental death was specifically associated with phobia and alcohol dependence. Maternal and paternal separations were almost equally associated with most forms of psychopathology. SEM suggested that parental loss accounted for about 10% of the variance of adult psychopathology, of which parental separation had the strongest impacts on risk for depression and drug abuse/dependence (11% of the total variance). Our findings suggest that early parental separation has stronger and wider effects on adult psychopathology than parental death. PMID:25146695

  15. Prevalence of different forms of child maltreatment among Taiwanese adolescents: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jui-Ying; Chang, Yi-Ting; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Fetzer, Susan; Wang, Jung-Der

    2015-04-01

    Reported cases of child maltreatment are increasing in Taiwan. Yet, comprehensive epidemiological characteristics of adolescents' exposure over the wide spectrum of violence are still lacking. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence and magnitude of child maltreatment among Taiwanese adolescents. A population-based study was conducted with 5,276 adolescents aged 12-18 from 35 schools in 17 cities and townships to determine the prevalence of five forms of child maltreatment in Taiwan. A total of 5,236 adolescents completed anonymous, self-report, structured questionnaires. Most adolescents (91%, n=4,788) experienced at least one form of maltreatment with 83% (n=4,347) exposed during the previous year. Violence exposure was the most common type of child maltreatment experienced, followed by psychological abuse, physical abuse, neglect, and sexual abuse. Adolescents reported an average of 7.4 (SD=5.87) victimizations over their lifetime and 4.8 (SD=4.82) victimizations during the past year. Females reported a higher rate of neglect, while males reported a higher rate of sexual abuse. Most of the sexual abuse perpetrators were known by their victims. Adolescents' victimization and polyvictimization from child maltreatment in Taiwan deserves a review and modification of national control and prevention policies. PMID:25477233

  16. Lung Cancer and Occupation in a Population-based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Lubin, Jay H.; Wacholder, Sholom; Tucker, Margaret; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Caporaso, Neil E.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the relation between occupation and lung cancer in the large, population-based Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE) case-control study. In 2002–2005 in the Lombardy region of northern Italy, 2,100 incident lung cancer cases and 2,120 randomly selected population controls were enrolled. Lifetime occupational histories (industry and job title) were coded by using standard international classifications and were translated into occupations known (list A) or suspected (list B) to be associated with lung cancer. Smoking-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated with logistic regression. For men, an increased risk was found for list A (177 exposed cases and 100 controls; odds ratio = 1.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.27, 2.38) and most occupations therein. No overall excess was found for list B with the exception of filling station attendants and bus and truck drivers (men) and launderers and dry cleaners (women). The authors estimated that 4.9% (95% confidence interval: 2.0, 7.8) of lung cancers in men were attributable to occupation. Among those in other occupations, risk excesses were found for metal workers, barbers and hairdressers, and other motor vehicle drivers. These results indicate that past exposure to occupational carcinogens remains an important determinant of lung cancer occurrence. PMID:20047975

  17. Lifetimes of agents under external stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Claus O.; Martinetz, Thomas

    1999-03-01

    An exact formula for the distribution of lifetimes in coherent-noise models and related models is derived. For certain stress distributions, this formula can be analytically evaluated and yields simple closed expressions. For those types of stress for which a closed expression is not available, a numerical evaluation can be done in a straightforward way. All results obtained are in perfect agreement with numerical experiments. The implications for the coherent-noise models' application to macroevolution are discussed.

  18. Predictors of Childhood Anxiety: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have explored predictors of early childhood anxiety. Objective To determine the prenatal, postnatal, and early life predictors of childhood anxiety by age 5. Methods Population-based, provincial administrative data (N = 19,316) from Manitoba, Canada were used to determine the association between demographic, obstetrical, psychosocial, medical, behavioral, and infant factors on childhood anxiety. Results Risk factors for childhood anxiety by age 5 included maternal psychological distress from birth to 12 months and 13 months to 5 years post-delivery and an infant 5-minute Apgar score of ≤7. Factors associated with decreased risk included maternal age < 20 years, multiparity, and preterm birth. Conclusion Identifying predictors of childhood anxiety is a key step to early detection and prevention. Maternal psychological distress is an early, modifiable risk factor. Future research should aim to disentangle early life influences on childhood anxiety occurring in the prenatal, postnatal, and early childhood periods. PMID:26158268

  19. A population-based study of birth defects in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Thong, M K; Ho, J J; Khatijah, N N

    2005-01-01

    Birth defects are one of the leading causes of paediatric disability and mortality in developed and developing countries. Data on birth defects from population-based studies originating from developing countries are lacking. One of the objectives of this study was to determine the epidemiology of major birth defects in births during the perinatal period in Kinta district, Perak, Malaysia over a 14-month period, using a population-based birth defect register. There were 253 babies with major birth defects in 17,720 births, giving an incidence of 14.3/1000 births, a birth prevalence of 1 in 70. There were 80 babies with multiple birth defects and 173 with isolated birth defects. The exact syndromic diagnosis of the babies with multiple birth defects could not be identified in 18 (22.5%) babies. The main organ systems involved in the isolated birth defects were cardiovascular (13.8%), cleft lip and palate (11.9%), clubfeet (9.1%), central nervous system (CNS) (including neural tube defects) (7.9%), musculoskeletal (5.5%) and gastrointestinal systems (4.7%), and hydrops fetalis (4.3%). The babies with major birth defects were associated with lower birth weights, premature deliveries, higher Caesarean section rates, prolonged hospitalization and increased specialist care. Among the cohort of babies with major birth defects, the mortality rate was 25.2% during the perinatal period. Mothers with affected babies were associated with advanced maternal age, birth defects themselves or their relatives but not in their other offspring, and significantly higher rates of previous abortions. The consanguinity rate of 2.4% was twice that of the control population. It is concluded that a birth defects register is needed to monitor these developments and future interventional trials are needed to reduce birth defects in Malaysia. PMID:16096215

  20. Birth Prevalence of Cerebral Palsy: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Doernberg, Nancy; Schieve, Laura; Christensen, Deborah; Goodman, Alyson; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Population-based data in the United States on trends in cerebral palsy (CP) birth prevalence are limited. The objective of this study was to examine trends in the birth prevalence of congenital spastic CP by birth weight, gestational age, and race/ethnicity in a heterogeneous US metropolitan area. METHODS Children with CP were identified by a population-based surveillance system for developmental disabilities (DDs). Children with CP were included if they were born in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, from 1985 to 2002, resided there at age 8 years, and did not have a postneonatal etiology (n = 766). Birth weight, gestational age, and race/ethnicity subanalyses were restricted to children with spastic CP (n = 640). Trends were examined by CP subtype, gender, race/ethnicity, co-occurring DDs, birth weight, and gestational age. RESULTS Birth prevalence of spastic CP per 1000 1-year survivors was stable from 1985 to 2002 (1.9 in 1985 to 1.8 in 2002; 0.3% annual average prevalence; 95% confidence interval [CI] −1.1 to 1.8). Whereas no significant trends were observed by gender, subtype, birth weight, or gestational age overall, CP prevalence with co-occurring moderate to severe intellectual disability significantly decreased (−2.6% [95% CI −4.3 to −0.8]). Racial disparities persisted over time between non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white children (prevalence ratio 1.8 [95% CI 1.5 to 2.1]). Different patterns emerged for non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black children by birth weight and gestational age. CONCLUSIONS Given improvements in neonatal survival, evidence of stability of CP prevalence is encouraging. Yet lack of overall decreases supports continued monitoring of trends and increased research and prevention efforts. Racial/ethnic disparities, in particular, warrant further study. PMID:26659459

  1. Excessive daytime somnolence and cardiovascular health: A population-based study in rural Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Del Brutto, Oscar H.; Mera, Robertino M.; Zambrano, Mauricio; Castillo, Pablo R.

    2014-01-01

    In a population-based study conducted in rural Ecuador, 635 stroke-free persons aged ≥40 years were interviewed with the Epworth sleepiness scale and screened to assess their cardiovascular health (CVH) status. Excessive daytime somnolence was present in 22% persons and a poor CVH status in 69%. In a generalized linear model after adjusting for age and sex, excessive daytime somnolence was not associated with a poor CVH status or with any of the individual metrics in the poor range. Excessive daytime somnolence may not be linked to cardiovascular risk factors at the rural level. PMID:26483927

  2. Excessive daytime somnolence and cardiovascular health: A population-based study in rural Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Mera, Robertino M; Zambrano, Mauricio; Castillo, Pablo R

    2014-12-01

    In a population-based study conducted in rural Ecuador, 635 stroke-free persons aged ≥40 years were interviewed with the Epworth sleepiness scale and screened to assess their cardiovascular health (CVH) status. Excessive daytime somnolence was present in 22% persons and a poor CVH status in 69%. In a generalized linear model after adjusting for age and sex, excessive daytime somnolence was not associated with a poor CVH status or with any of the individual metrics in the poor range. Excessive daytime somnolence may not be linked to cardiovascular risk factors at the rural level. PMID:26483927

  3. Extended lifetime railgap switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, D.B.; Mendoza, P.J.

    1988-02-02

    In a railgap switch of the type having an elongate blade electrode made of conductive material, an elongate housing made of insulating material for supporting the blade electrode and plate electrode in opposed relation extending in the same direction with the blade centered over the plate and separated therefrom by a gap, and a gas filling the housing and the gap, the gas being selected to breakdown and switch from a highly insulative state to a highly conductive state upon application of a high voltage across the blade and plate electrodes, the improvement is described comprising: forming the blade with laterally extending transverse wing portions at the edge of the blade and adjacent the gap so as to extend in spaced parallel relation to the surface of the plate, the blade generally following the contour thereof to form an inverted T-shape structure with the wing portions extending transversely of the elongate dimension of the blade. The wing portions terminating in a pair of spaced parallel edges extending along the elongate direction of the blade to thereby create two spaced elongate edges along which arcs form serving to divide the erosion effects of discharge between them, the current through each edge being one-half of that in single-edge devices with ablation wear reduced accordingly to give significantly larger switch lifetime. The blade and wing portions limiting ablation erosion of the edges in a direction generally align with the plate contour so that the edge-to-plate separation remains substantially constant.

  4. Pinhole shifting lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramshesh, Venkat K; Lemasters, John J

    2008-01-01

    Lifetime imaging microscopy is a powerful tool to probe biological phenomena independent of luminescence intensity and fluorophore concentration. We describe time-resolved imaging of long-lifetime luminescence with an unmodified commercial laser scanning confocal/multiphoton microscope. The principle of the measurement is displacement of the detection pinhole to collect delayed luminescence from a position lagging the rasting laser beam. As proof of principle, luminescence from microspheres containing europium (Eu(3+)), a red emitting probe, was compared to that of short-lifetime green-fluorescing microspheres and/or fluorescein and rhodamine in solution. Using 720-nm two-photon excitation and a pinhole diameter of 1 Airy unit, the short-lifetime fluorescence of fluorescein, rhodamine and green microspheres disappeared much more rapidly than the long-lifetime phosphorescence of Eu(3+) microspheres as the pinhole was repositioned in the lagging direction. In contrast, repositioning of the pinhole in the leading and orthogonal directions caused equal loss of short- and long-lifetime luminescence. From measurements at different lag pinhole positions, a lifetime of 270 micros was estimated for the Eu(3+) microspheres, consistent with independent measurements. This simple adaptation is the basis for quantitative 3-D lifetime imaging microscopy. PMID:19123648

  5. Fluorescence lifetime distributions in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, J. R.; Gratton, E.; Prendergast, F. G.

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime value of tryptophan residues varies by more than a factor of 100 in different proteins and is determined by several factors, which include solvent exposure and interactions with other elements of the protein matrix. Because of the variety of different elements that can alter the lifetime value and the sensitivity to the particular environment of the tryptophan residue, it is likely that non-unique lifetime values result in protein systems. The emission decay of most proteins can be satisfactorily described only using several exponential components. Here it is proposed that continuous lifetime distributions can better represent the observed decay. An approach based on protein dynamics is presented, which provides fluorescence lifetime distribution functions for single tryptophan residue proteins. First, lifetime distributions for proteins interconverting between two conformations, each characterized by a different lifetime value, are derived. The evolution of the lifetime values as a function of the interconversion rate is studied. In this case lifetime distributions can be obtained from a distribution of rates of interconversion between the two conformations. Second, the existence of a continuum of energy substates within a given conformation was considered. The occupation of a particular energy substate at a given temperature is proportional to the Boltzmann factor. The density of energy states of the potential well depends upon the width of the well, which determines the degree of freedom the residue can move in the conformational space. Lifetime distributions can be obtained by association of each energy substate with a different lifetime value and assuming that the average conformation can change as the energy of the substate is increased. Finally, lifetime distributions for proteins interconverting between two conformations, each characterized by a quasi-continuum of energy substates, are presented. The origin of negative components

  6. Clinician Use and Acceptance of Population-Based Data about Respiratory Pathogens: Implications for Enhancing Population-Based Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Gesteland, Per H; Allison, Mandy A; Staes, Catherine J; Samore, Matthew H; Rubin, Michael A; Carter, Marjorie E; Wuthrich, Amyanne; Kinney, Anita Y; Mottice, Susan; Byington, Carrie L

    2008-01-01

    Front line health care providers (HCPs) play a central role in endemic (e.g., pertussis), epidemic (e.g., influenza) and pandemic (e.g., avian influenza) infectious disease outbreaks. Effective preparedness for this role requires access to and awareness of population-based data (PBD). We investigated the degree to which this is currently achieved among HCPs in Utah by surveying a sample about access, awareness and attitudes concerning PBD in clinical practice. We found variability in the number and nature (national vs. local, pushed vs. pulled) of PBD sources accessed by HCPs, with a subset using multiple sources and using them frequently. We found that HCPs believe PBD improves their clinical performance and that they cannot rely on their own practice to remain informed. These findings suggest that an integrated system, which interprets PBD from multiple sources and optimizes the delivery of PBD, may facilitate preparedness of HCPs through the application of PBD in routine clinical practice. PMID:18999305

  7. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for lifetime exposure to PCB 153 in male and female harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena): model development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Yang, Raymond S H; Covaci, Adrian; Das, Krishna; Blust, Ronny

    2010-09-15

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models were developed for the most persistent polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB 153) in male and female harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) to elucidate processes such as uptake, distribution, and elimination. Due to its limited metabolic capacities, long life span, and top position in marine food chains, this species is highly sensitive to pollution. The models consist of 5 compartments, liver, blubber, kidney, brain, and a compartment which accounts for the rest of the body, all connected through blood. All physiological and biochemical parameters were extracted from the literature, except for the brain/blood partition coefficient and rate of excretion, which were both fitted to data sets used for validation of the models. These data sets were compiled from our own analyses performed with GC-MS on tissue samples of harbor porpoises. The intake of PCB 153 was from milk from birth to 4 months, and after weaning fish was the main food source. Overall, these models reveal that concentrations of PCB 153 in males increase with age but suggest that, as the animals grow older, metabolic transformation can be a possible pathway for elimination as well. In contrast, the model for females confirms that gestation and lactation are key processes for eliminating PCB 153 as body burdens decrease with age. These PBPK models are capable of simulating the bioaccumulation of PCB 153 during the entire life span of approximately 20 years of the harbor porpoises. PMID:20718467

  8. Neighborhood Deprivation Is Strongly Associated with Participation in a Population-Based Health Check

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Anne Mette; Kawachi, Ichiro; Jørgensen, Torben; Pisinger, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to examine whether neighborhood deprivation is associated with participation in a large population-based health check. Such analyses will help answer the question whether health checks, which are designed to meet the needs of residents in deprived neighborhoods, may increase participation and prove to be more effective in preventing disease. In Europe, no study has previously looked at the association between neighborhood deprivation and participation in a population-based health check. Methods The study population comprised 12,768 persons invited for a health check including screening for ischemic heart disease and lifestyle counseling. The study population was randomly drawn from a population of 179,097 persons living in 73 neighborhoods in Denmark. Data on neighborhood deprivation (percentage with basic education, with low income and not in work) and individual socioeconomic position were retrieved from national administrative registers. Multilevel regression analyses with log links and binary distributions were conducted to obtain relative risks, intraclass correlation coefficients and proportional change in variance. Results Large differences between neighborhoods existed in both deprivation levels and neighborhood health check participation rate (mean 53%; range 35-84%). In multilevel analyses adjusted for age and sex, higher levels of all three indicators of neighborhood deprivation and a deprivation score were associated with lower participation in a dose-response fashion. Persons living in the most deprived neighborhoods had up to 37% decreased probability of participating compared to those living in the least deprived neighborhoods. Inclusion of individual socioeconomic position in the model attenuated the neighborhood deprivation coefficients, but all except for income deprivation remained statistically significant. Conclusion Neighborhood deprivation was associated with participation in a population-based health check in a dose

  9. Histocompatibility antigens in a population based silicosis series.

    PubMed Central

    Kreiss, K; Danilovs, J A; Newman, L S

    1989-01-01

    Individual susceptibility to silicosis is suggested by the lack of a uniform dose response relation and by the presence of immunological epiphenomena, such as increased antibody levels and associated diseases that reflect altered immune regulation. Human leucocyte antigens (HLA) are linked with immune response capability and might indicate a possible genetic susceptibility to silicosis. Forty nine silicotic subjects were identified from chest radiographs in a population based study in Leadville, Colorado. They were interviewed for symptoms and occupational history and gave a blood specimen for HLA-A, -B, -DR, and -DQ typing and for antinuclear antibody, immune complexes, immunoglobulins, and rheumatoid factor. Silicotic subjects had twice the prevalence of B44 (45%) of the reference population and had triple the prevalence of A29 (20%), both of which were statistically significant when corrected for the number of comparisons made. No perturbations in D-region antigen frequencies were detected. B44-positive subjects were older at diagnosis and had less dyspnoea than other subjects. A29-positive subjects were more likely to have abnormal levels of IgA and had higher levels of immune complexes. This study is the first to find significant HLA antigen excesses among a series of silicotic cases and extends earlier reported hypotheses that were based on groups of antigens of which B44 and A29 are components. PMID:2818968

  10. A population-based study of large granular lymphocyte leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shah, M V; Hook, C C; Call, T G; Go, R S

    2016-01-01

    Large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disorder of cytotoxic cells. T-cell LGL (T-LGL) leukemia is characterized by accumulation of cytotoxic T cells in blood and infiltration of the bone marrow, liver or spleen. Population-based studies have not been reported in LGL leukemia. We present clinical characteristics, natural history and risk factors for poor survival in patients with LGL leukemia using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) and the United States National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). LGL leukemia is an extremely rare disease with the incidence of 0.2 cases per 1 000 000 individuals. The median age at diagnosis was 66.5 years with females likely to be diagnosed at 3 years earlier compared with males. Analysis of patient-level data using NCDB (n=978) showed that 45% patients with T-LGL leukemia required some form of systemic treatment at the time of diagnosis. T-LGL leukemia patients have reduced survival compared with general population, with a median overall survival of 9 years. Multivariate analysis showed that age >60 years at the time of diagnosis and the presence of significant comorbidities were independent predictors of poor survival. PMID:27494824

  11. Provider communication on perinatal depression: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Farr, Sherry L; Ko, Jean Y; Burley, Kim; Gupta, Seema

    2016-02-01

    Women's lack of knowledge on symptoms of perinatal depression and treatment resources is a barrier to receiving care. We sought to estimate the prevalence and predictors of discussing depression with a prenatal care provider. We used the 2011 population-based data from 24 sites participating in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (n = 32,827 women with recent live births) to examine associations between maternal characteristics and report that a prenatal care provider discussed with her what to do if feeling depressed during or after pregnancy. Overall, 71.9 % of women reported discussing perinatal depression with their prenatal care provider (range 60.7 % in New York City to 85.6 % in Maine). Women were more likely to report a discussion on perinatal depression with their provider if they they were 18-29 years of age than over 35 years of age compared to older (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 18 to 19 y = 1.08, 20 to 24 y = 1.10, 25 to 29 y = 1.09), unmarried (aPR = 1.07) compared to married, had <12 years of education (aPR = 1.05) compared to > 12 years, and had no previous live births (aPR = 1.03) compared to ≥ 1 live births. Research is needed on effective ways to educate women about perinatal depression and whether increased knowledge on perinatal depression results in higher rates of treatment and shorter duration of symptoms. PMID:25578631

  12. Radiative lifetimes in Co I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitz, D. E.; Bergeson, S. D.; Lawler, J. E.

    1995-03-01

    New radiative-lifetime measurements based on time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence are reported for 133 odd-parity and 2 even-parity levels of Co I, ranging in energy from 28300 to 59400 cm-1. Our lifetimes agree with earlier, but much less extensive, lifetime measurements based on laser-induced fluorescence. Satisfactory agreement is also found with the critical compilation of atomic transition probabilities from the U.S. National Bureau of Standards [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 17, Suppl 4 (1988)]. Our measurements provide a reliable absolute normalization for a much more comprehensive determination of Co I atomic transition probabilities.

  13. A population-based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a carbon monoxide passive sampler and occupational dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, M.G.

    1997-09-01

    Two devices, an occupational carbon monoxide (CO) dosimeter (LOCD), and an indoor air quality (IAQ) passive sampler were developed for use in population-based CO exposure assessment studies. CO exposure is a serious public health problem in the U.S., causing both morbidity and mortality (lifetime mortality risk approximately 10{sup -4}). Sparse data from population-based CO exposure assessments indicate that approximately 10% of the U.S. population is exposed to CO above the national ambient air quality standard. No CO exposure measurement technology is presently available for affordable population-based CO exposure assessment studies. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested in the laboratory and field. The palladium-molybdenum based CO sensor was designed into a compact diffusion tube sampler that can be worn. Time-weighted-average (TWA) CO exposure of the device is quantified by a simple spectrophotometric measurement. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested over an exposure range of 40 to 700 ppm-hours and 200 to 4200 ppm-hours, respectively. Both devices were capable of measuring precisely (relative standard deviation <20%), with low bias (<10%). The LOCD was screened for interferences by temperature, humidity, and organic and inorganic gases. Temperature effects were small in the range of 10{degrees}C to 30{degrees}C. Humidity effects were low between 20% and 90% RH. Ethylene (200 ppm) caused a positive interference and nitric oxide (50 ppm) caused a negative response without the presence of CO but not with CO.

  14. SIRTF thermal design modifications to increase lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, S. W.

    1993-01-01

    An effort was made to increase the predicted lifetime of the SIRTF dewar by lowering the exterior shell temperature, increasing the radiated energy from the vapor cooled shields and reconfiguring the vapor cooled shields. The lifetime increases can be used to increase the scientific return from the mission and as a trade-off against mass and cost. This paper describes the configurations studied, the steady state thermal model used, the analytical methods and the results of the analysis. Much of the heat input to the outside dewar shell is radiative heat transfer from the solar panel. To lower the shell temperature, radiative cooled shields were placed between the solar panel and the dewar shell and between the bus and the dewar shell. Analysis showed that placing a radiator on the outer vapor cooled shield had a significant effect on lifetime. Lengthening the distance between the outer shell and the point where the vapor cooled shields are attached to the support straps also improved lifetime.

  15. Increased FRC lifetimes using a longer trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurden, G. A.; Grabowski, T. C.; Degnan, J. H.; Domonkos, M. T.; Ruden, E. L.; Frese, M. H.; Frese, S. D.; Camacho, F. J.; Coffey, S. K.; Kiuttu, G. F.; Lynn, A. G.; Yates, K.; Bauer, B. S.; Fuelling, S. R.

    2013-10-01

    Increasing the lifetime of the field reversed plasma in the FRCHX experiment for magnetized target fusion, has been our primary concern for the last two years. We report that the most significant increase in lifetime has resulted from lengthening the magnetic well in the liner trapping region. We have suspected for some time based on modeling and FRC lore, that a longer trapping region would be beneficial, but were constrained by the 10-cm diameter, 30-cm long metal liner. Rather than redesigning implosion hardware, we simply moved the entrance mirror downward 5 cm, and the end mirror upwards 5 cm. Now the distance between the dynamic mirror points is ~30 cm. Trapped flux lifetimes of FRCHX FRCs, as measured from the half maximum of the increasing exclusion radius in the formation region to the half maximum of the decreasing exclusion radius in trapped region now range from ~19 μs to ~ 21 μs. The analogous measure of lifetime just in the trapping region is 14 ~ 16 μs, whereas it used to be only 8-11 μs. Combined with a delay in the start of the FRC formation relative to the liner implosion time, we are well-positioned to conduct another dynamic HEDLP MTF implosion test. Supported by the Fusion Energy Sciences office in DOE, LANS DE-AC52-06NA25396, & AFRL IA DE-AI02-04ER54764.

  16. Lifetime Measurements in 162Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casarella, Clark; Aprahamian, A.; Lesher, S.; Crider, B.; Lowe, M.; Peters, E.; Prados-Estevez, F.; Ross, T.; Tully, Z.; Yates, S.

    2015-10-01

    Historically, the rare-earth region of nuclei has been a fountainhead for nuclear structure phenomena. One of the more debated structure effects is the nature of excited 0+ bands in nuclei, and continues to be an outstanding challenge in nuclear structure physics; several interpretations exist, and we hope that lifetime measurements can help distinguish between them. 162Dy has an abundance of 0+ states with limited lifetime data; we have measured excitation functions, mean lifetimes, and angular distributions of gamma rays for excited states in 162Dy at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Low lying excited states were populated up to an excitation energy of E < 3.2 MeV, where we will discuss the implications of the lifetimes under this energy threshold. This work was supported by the NSF under contract numbers PHY-1068192, PHY-1205412, and PHY-0956310.

  17. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  18. Recurrent Wheezing in Infants: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Belhassen, Manon; De Blic, Jacques; Laforest, Laurent; Laigle, Valérie; Chanut-Vogel, Céline; Lamezec, Liliane; Brouard, Jacques; Fauroux, Brigitte; de Pouvourville, Gérard; Ginoux, Marine; Van Ganse, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent wheezing (RW) has a significant impact on infants, caregivers, and society, but morbidity and related medical resource utilization (MRU) have not been thoroughly explored. The burden of RW needs to be documented with population-based data. The objective was to assess the characteristics, medical management, and MRU of RW infants identified from national claims data.Infants aged from 6 to 24 months, receiving ≥2 dispensations of respiratory drugs within 3 months, and presenting a marker of poor control (index date), were selected. During the 6 months after index date, MRU was described in the cohort and among 3 subgroups with more severe RW, defined as ≥4 dispensations of respiratory drugs, ≥3 dispensations of oral corticosteroids (OCS), or ≥1 hospitalization for respiratory symptoms.A total of 115,489 infants had RW, corresponding to 8.2% of subjects in this age group. During follow-up, 68.7% of infants received inhaled corticosteroids, but only 1.8 U (unit) were dispensed over 6 months, suggesting discontinuous use. Control was mostly inadequate: 61.7% of subjects received OCS, 80.2% antibiotics, and 71.2% short-acting beta-agonists, and medical/paramedical visits were numerous, particularly for physiotherapy. Severe RW concerned 39.0% of the cohort; 32.8% and 11.7% of infants had repeated use of respiratory drugs and OCS, respectively, and 5.5% were hospitalized for respiratory symptoms.In this real-life nation-wide study, RW was common and infants had poor control and high MRU. Interventions are needed to support adequate use of controller therapy, and to improve medical care. PMID:27082618

  19. Calibrating a population-based job-exposure matrix using inspection measurements to estimate historical occupational exposure to lead for a population-based cohort in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Bhatti, Parveen; Coble, Joseph B; Stewart, Patricia A; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ji, Bu-Tian; Xue, Shouzheng; Locke, Sarah J; Portengen, Lutzen; Yang, Gong; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Friesen, Melissa C

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiologic evidence for the carcinogenicity of lead is inconsistent and requires improved exposure assessment to estimate risk. We evaluated historical occupational lead exposure for a population-based cohort of women (n=74,942) by calibrating a job-exposure matrix (JEM) with lead fume (n=20,084) and lead dust (n=5383) measurements collected over four decades in Shanghai, China. Using mixed-effect models, we calibrated intensity JEM ratings to the measurements using fixed-effects terms for year and JEM rating. We developed job/industry-specific estimates from the random-effects terms for job and industry. The model estimates were applied to subjects' jobs when the JEM probability rating was high for either job or industry; remaining jobs were considered unexposed. The models predicted that exposure increased monotonically with JEM intensity rating and decreased 20-50-fold over time. The cumulative calibrated JEM estimates and job/industry-specific estimates were highly correlated (Pearson correlation=0.79-0.84). Overall, 5% of the person-years and 8% of the women were exposed to lead fume; 2% of the person-years and 4% of the women were exposed to lead dust. The most common lead-exposed jobs were manufacturing electronic equipment. These historical lead estimates should enhance our ability to detect associations between lead exposure and cancer risk in the future epidemiologic analyses. PMID:22910004

  20. Calibrating a population-based job-exposure matrix using inspection measurements to estimate historical occupational exposure to lead for a population-based cohort in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Bhatti, Parveen; Coble, Joseph B.; Stewart, Patricia A; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ji, Bu-Tian; Xue, Shouzheng; Locke, Sarah J.; Portengen, Lutzen; Yang, Gong; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2012-01-01

    The epidemiologic evidence for the carcinogenicity of lead is inconsistent and requires improved exposure assessment to estimate risk. We evaluated historical occupational lead exposure for a population-based cohort of women (n=74,942) by calibrating a job-exposure matrix (JEM) with lead fume (n=20,084) and lead dust (n=5,383) measurements collected over four decades in Shanghai, China. Using mixed-effect models, we calibrated intensity JEM ratings to the measurements using fixed-effects terms for year and JEM rating. We developed job/industry-specific estimates from the random-effects terms for job and industry. The model estimates were applied to subjects’ jobs when the JEM probability rating was high for either job or industry; remaining jobs were considered unexposed. The models predicted that exposure increased monotonically with JEM intensity rating and decreased 20–50-fold over time. The cumulative calibrated JEM estimates and job/industry-specific estimates were highly correlated (Pearson correlation=0.79–0.84). Overall, 5% of the person-years and 8% of the women were exposed to lead fume; 2% of the person-years and 4% of the women were exposed to lead dust. The most common lead-exposed jobs were manufacturing electronic equipment. These historical lead estimates should enhance our ability to detect associations between lead exposure and cancer risk in future epidemiologic analyses. PMID:22910004

  1. Predicting the lifetime of superlubricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anle; He, Qichang; Xu, Zhiping

    2015-12-01

    The concept of superlubricity has recently called upon notable interest after the demonstration of ultralow friction between atomistically smooth surfaces in layered materials. However, the energy dissipation process conditioning the sustainability of a superlubric state has not yet been well understood. In this work, we address this issue by performing dynamic simulations based on both full-atom and reduced Frenkel-Kontorova models. We find that the center-of-mass momentum autocorrelation of a sliding object can be used as a statistical indicator of the state of superlubricity. Beyond a critical value of it, the sliding motion experiences a catastrophic breakdown with a dramatically high rate of energy dissipation, caused by the inter-vibrational-mode coupling. By tracking this warning signal, one can extract heat from modes other than the translation to avoid the catastrophe and extend the lifetime of superlubricity. This concept is demonstrated in double-walled carbon-nanotubes-based nanomechanical devices with the indicator-based feedback design implemented.

  2. Lifetime of a one-dimensional fermion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodas, Maxim; Ussishkin, Iddo; Pustilnik, Michael; Kamenev, Alex; Glazman, Leonid

    2007-03-01

    Interaction between fermions in one dimension is usually accounted for within the exactly solvable Tomonaga-Luttinger model. The crucial simplification made in this model is the linearization of the fermionic spectrum. That simplification leads to an infinite lifetime of a fermion at the mass shell, i.e., the corresponding Green function G(,k) diverges at ɛ=ξk. We find that inclusion of the curvature of electron spectrum, ξk=vFk+k^2/2m, yields a finite decay rate of a fermion, 1/τ(ξk)θ(k)k^8/m^3; here for definiteness we consider right-moving particles, and k is measured from the Fermi wave vector. The found finite lifetime allows one to assess the limitations of the Luttinger liquid paradigm.

  3. Understanding the Association Between Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Current Anxiety: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley

    2016-10-01

    This study's objectives were to investigate the independent relationship between COPD and past-year Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in a population-based sample of adult Canadians and to identify significant correlates of GAD among COPD patients. A series of logistic regression analyses were conducted with a sample of 11,163 respondents aged 50+ from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health to determine the degree to which the direct association between COPD and GAD was attenuated by socio-demographic factors, social support, health behaviors, sleep problems, pain, functional limitations, and early childhood adversities. Additional analyses were completed using the sub-sample of those diagnosed with COPD (n = 746) to determine predictors of GAD. One in 17 (5.8%) of older individuals with COPD had past-year GAD, in comparison to 1.7% of those without (p < .001). The age-sex-race adjusted odds of GAD were four times higher for those with COPD compared to those without COPD (OR = 3.90, 95%CI: 2.64, 5.77). After full adjustment for 18 characteristics, these odds declined to 1.72 (95%CI: 1.10, 2.71). Factors associated with GAD among those with COPD include not having a confidant (OR = 7.85, 95%CI: 3.47, 17.75), exposure to parental domestic violence (OR = 5.63, 95% CI: 2.07, 15.34) and lifetime depressive disorders (OR = 3.59, 95% CI:1.61,7.98). Those with COPD have substantially higher odds of GAD even after most known risk factors for GAD are accounted for. These findings have implications for targeted outreach and screening, particularly for patients with pain and functional limitations. The importance of a multidisciplinary healthcare team is underscored by the multiple issues that may impact GAD among COPD patients. PMID:26830204

  4. "Lifetime Earnings" in Japan for the Class of 1955.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Robert, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Japan's employment model has been that of "lifetime employment," especially for male college-educated workers. Under such a system, an individual becomes employed by a firm upon graduation and remains in its employ until retirement. (Author/SSH)

  5. Cyberbullying among Finnish adolescents – a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyberbullying, threatening or harassing another via the internet or mobile phones, does not cause physically harm and thus the consequences are less visible. Little research has been performed on the occurrence of cyberbullying among adolescents or the perception of its seriousness. Only a few population-based studies have been published, none of which included research on the witnessing of cyberbullying. Here, we examined exposure to cyberbullying during the last year, and its frequency and perceived seriousness among 12 to 18-year-old adolescents in Finland. We studied four dimensions of cyberbullying: being a victim, bully, or both victim and bully of cyberbullying, and witnessing the cyberbullying of friends. Methods Self-administered questionnaires, including four questions on cyberbullying, were mailed to a representative sample of 12-, 14-, 16-, and 18-year-old Finns in 2009 (the Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Survey). The respondents could answer via the internet or paper questionnaire. Results The number of respondents was 5516 and the response rate was 56%. Girls more often than boys reported experiencing at least one dimension of cyberbullying during the last year. The proportion was highest among 14-year-olds and lowest among 18-year-olds of both sexes. Among girls, the most commonly encountered dimension was witnessing the cyberbullying of friends (16%); and being a victim was slightly more common than being a bully (11% vs. 9%). Among boys, an equal proportion, approximately 10%, had been a victim, a bully, or had witnessed cyberbullying. The proportion of bully-victims was 4%. Serious and disruptive cyberbullying was experienced by 2% of respondents and weekly cyberbullying by 1%; only 0.5% of respondents had been bullied weekly and considered bullying serious and disruptive. Conclusions Adolescents are commonly exposed to cyberbullying, but it is rarely frequent or considered serious or disruptive. Cyberbullying exposure differed between

  6. Familial risk of cerebral palsy: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Allen J; Lie, Rolv T; Moster, Dag

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate risks of recurrence of cerebral palsy in family members with various degrees of relatedness to elucidate patterns of hereditability. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, linked to the Norwegian social insurance scheme to identify cases of cerebral palsy and to databases of Statistics Norway to identify relatives. Participants 2 036 741 Norwegians born during 1967-2002, 3649 of whom had a diagnosis of cerebral palsy; 22 558 pairs of twins, 1 851 144 pairs of first degree relatives, 1 699 856 pairs of second degree relatives, and 5 165 968 pairs of third degree relatives were identified. Main outcome measure Cerebral palsy. Results If one twin had cerebral palsy, the relative risk of recurrence of cerebral palsy was 15.6 (95% confidence interval 9.8 to 25) in the other twin. In families with an affected singleton child, risk was increased 9.2 (6.4 to 13)-fold in a subsequent full sibling and 3.0 (1.1 to 8.6)-fold in a half sibling. Affected parents were also at increased risk of having an affected child (6.5 (1.6 to 26)-fold). No evidence was found of differential transmission through mothers or fathers, although the study had limited power to detect such differences. For people with an affected first cousin, only weak evidence existed for an increased risk (1.5 (0.9 to 2.7)-fold). Risks in siblings or cousins were independent of sex of the index case. After exclusion of preterm births (an important risk factor for cerebral palsy), familial risks remained and were often stronger. Conclusions People born into families in which someone already has cerebral palsy are themselves at elevated risk, depending on their degree of relatedness. Elevated risk may extend even to third degree relatives (first cousins). The patterns of risk suggest multifactorial inheritance, in which multiple genes interact with each other and with environmental factors. These data offer additional

  7. Automated analysis of multimodal fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical coherence tomography data for the diagnosis of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Paritosh; Shrestha, Sebina; Park, Jesung; Gimenez-Conti, Irma; Brandon, Jimi; Applegate, Brian E.; Jo, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the progression of oral cancer is accompanied by changes in both tissue biochemistry and morphology. A multimodal imaging approach combining functional and structural imaging modalities could therefore provide a more comprehensive prognosis of oral cancer. This idea forms the central theme of the current study, wherein this premise is examined in the context of a multimodal imaging system that combines fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Towards this end, in the first part of the present study, the diagnostic advantage obtained by using both fluorescence intensity and lifetime information is assessed. In the second part of the study, the diagnostic potential of FLIM-derived biochemical features is compared with that of OCT-derived morphological features. For an objective assessment, several quantitative biochemical and morphological features from FLIM and OCT data, respectively, were obtained using signal and image processing techniques. These features were subsequently used in a statistical classification framework to quantify the diagnostic potential of different features. The classification accuracy for combined FLIM and OCT features was estimated to be 87.4%, which was statistically higher than accuracy based on only FLIM (83.2%) or OCT (81.0%) features. Moreover, the complimentary information provided by FLIM and OCT features, resulted in highest sensitivity and specificity for the combined FLIM and OCT features for discriminating benign (88.2% sens., 92.0% spec.), pre-cancerous (81.5% sens., 96.0% spec.), and cancerous (90.1% sens., 92.0% spec.) classes. PMID:27231638

  8. Effects of Population Based Screening for Chlamydia Infections in The Netherlands Limited by Declining Participation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Boris V.; Over, Eelco A. B.; van den Broek, Ingrid V. F.; Op de Coul, Eline L. M.; van Bergen, Jan E. A. M.; Fennema, Johan S. A.; Götz, Hannelore M.; Hoebe, Christian J. P. A.; de Wit, G. Ardine; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background A large trial to investigate the effectiveness of population based screening for chlamydia infections was conducted in the Netherlands in 2008–2012. The trial was register based and consisted of four rounds of screening of women and men in the age groups 16–29 years in three regions in the Netherlands. Data were collected on participation rates and positivity rates per round. A modeling study was conducted to project screening effects for various screening strategies into the future. Methods and Findings We used a stochastic network simulation model incorporating partnership formation and dissolution, aging and a sexual life course perspective. Trends in baseline rates of chlamydia testing and treatment were used to describe the epidemiological situation before the start of the screening program. Data on participation rates was used to describe screening uptake in rural and urban areas. Simulations were used to project the effectiveness of screening on chlamydia prevalence for a time period of 10 years. In addition, we tested alternative screening strategies, such as including only women, targeting different age groups, and biennial screening. Screening reduced prevalence by about 1% in the first two screening rounds and leveled off after that. Extrapolating observed participation rates into the future indicated very low participation in the long run. Alternative strategies only marginally changed the effectiveness of screening. Higher participation rates as originally foreseen in the program would have succeeded in reducing chlamydia prevalence to very low levels in the long run. Conclusions Decreasing participation rates over time profoundly impact the effectiveness of population based screening for chlamydia infections. Using data from several consecutive rounds of screening in a simulation model enabled us to assess the future effectiveness of screening on prevalence. If participation rates cannot be kept at a sufficient level, the effectiveness

  9. Estimating HIV Prevalence in Zimbabwe Using Population-Based Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Chinomona, Amos; Mwambi, Henry Godwell

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of HIV prevalence computed using data obtained from sampling a subgroup of the national population may lack the representativeness of all the relevant domains of the population. These estimates are often computed on the assumption that HIV prevalence is uniform across all domains of the population. Use of appropriate statistical methods together with population-based survey data can enhance better estimation of national and subgroup level HIV prevalence and can provide improved explanations of the variation in HIV prevalence across different domains of the population. In this study we computed design-consistent estimates of HIV prevalence, and their respective 95% confidence intervals at both the national and subgroup levels. In addition, we provided a multivariable survey logistic regression model from a generalized linear modelling perspective for explaining the variation in HIV prevalence using demographic, socio-economic, socio-cultural and behavioural factors. Essentially, this study borrows from the proximate determinants conceptual framework which provides guiding principles upon which socio-economic and socio-cultural variables affect HIV prevalence through biological behavioural factors. We utilize the 2010–11 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey (2010–11 ZDHS) data (which are population based) to estimate HIV prevalence in different categories of the population and for constructing the logistic regression model. It was established that HIV prevalence varies greatly with age, gender, marital status, place of residence, literacy level, belief on whether condom use can reduce the risk of contracting HIV and level of recent sexual activity whereas there was no marked variation in HIV prevalence with social status (measured using a wealth index), method of contraceptive and an individual’s level of education. PMID:26624280

  10. Estimating HIV Prevalence in Zimbabwe Using Population-Based Survey Data.

    PubMed

    Chinomona, Amos; Mwambi, Henry Godwell

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of HIV prevalence computed using data obtained from sampling a subgroup of the national population may lack the representativeness of all the relevant domains of the population. These estimates are often computed on the assumption that HIV prevalence is uniform across all domains of the population. Use of appropriate statistical methods together with population-based survey data can enhance better estimation of national and subgroup level HIV prevalence and can provide improved explanations of the variation in HIV prevalence across different domains of the population. In this study we computed design-consistent estimates of HIV prevalence, and their respective 95% confidence intervals at both the national and subgroup levels. In addition, we provided a multivariable survey logistic regression model from a generalized linear modelling perspective for explaining the variation in HIV prevalence using demographic, socio-economic, socio-cultural and behavioural factors. Essentially, this study borrows from the proximate determinants conceptual framework which provides guiding principles upon which socio-economic and socio-cultural variables affect HIV prevalence through biological behavioural factors. We utilize the 2010-11 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey (2010-11 ZDHS) data (which are population based) to estimate HIV prevalence in different categories of the population and for constructing the logistic regression model. It was established that HIV prevalence varies greatly with age, gender, marital status, place of residence, literacy level, belief on whether condom use can reduce the risk of contracting HIV and level of recent sexual activity whereas there was no marked variation in HIV prevalence with social status (measured using a wealth index), method of contraceptive and an individual's level of education. PMID:26624280

  11. Vibrational lifetimes of hydrated phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, Tayebeh; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Mashaghi, Alireza; Sahimi, Muhammad; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations have been carried out to compute, at human-body temperature, the vibrational modes and lifetimes of pure and hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids. The projected atomic vibrations calculated from the spectral energy density are used to compute the vibrational modes and the lifetimes. All the normal modes of the pure and hydrated DPPC and their frequencies are identified. The computed lifetimes incorporate the full anharmonicity of the atomic interactions. The vibrational modes of the water molecules close to the head group of DPPC are active (possess large projected spectrum amplitudes) in the frequency range 0.5-55 THz, with a peak at 2.80 THz in the energy spectrum. The computed lifetimes for the high-frequency modes agree well with the recent data measured at room temperature where high-order phonon scattering is not negligible. The computed lifetimes of the low-frequency modes can be tested using the current experimental capabilities. Moreover, the approach may be applied to other lipids and biomolecules, in order to predict their vibrational dispersion relations, and to study the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer.

  12. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Madsen, Mette; Uldall, Peter

    2009-08-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs. The population analysed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analysed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about 860,000 euro for men and about 800,000 euro for women. The largest component was social care costs, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP. PMID:19416329

  13. Neutrinos and cosmology: a lifetime relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  14. The Effects of Social Reforms on Mental Disability in China: Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjie; Zhang, Lei; Li, Ning; Guo, Chao; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have explored how mental disabilities have changed with the waves of Chinese social reforms that occurred between 1912 and 2006. The present study evaluated population-based data from the Second China National Sample Survey on Disability to investigate these trends and their effects on mental disabilities. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the association between social reforms and mental disabilities. The confounding variables considered were as follows: survey age, gender, residence in 2006, ethnicity, and living arrangements in 2006. The highest risks of mental disabilities were observed in subjects born during the Mao Zedong era. Subjects who experienced social turbulence during their early development may have increased risks of mental disabilities in adulthood. The results and discussion herein contribute to our understanding of mental disabilities in China within the context of changing political, socioeconomic, and health system conditions and a developing mental health system. PMID:26969637

  15. ASSOCIATON BETWEEN INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AND IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: A POPULATION-BASED STUDY IN NICARAGUA

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Morgan, Douglas; Peña, Rodolfo; Cortes, Loreto; Martin, Christopher F.; Valladares, Eliette

    2010-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disabling functional gastrointestinal disorder, which serves as a model for abdominal pain syndromes. An association between intimate partner violence and IBS has been shown among Caucasian women in the industrialized world. To determine whether this relationship transcends cultural boundaries, we conducted a population-based, cross-sectional survey in Nicaragua, using the innovative Health and Demographic Surveillance System in the León province. Women who had experienced physical intimate partner violence had significantly increased risk of IBS (OR 2.08, 95% CI, 1.35, 3.21), as did those who had experienced sexual intimate partner violence (OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.45, 5.59). These findings argue for intimate partner violence screening among Latina women with IBS. PMID:20558772

  16. Population based analysis of directional information in serial deformation tensor morphometry.

    PubMed

    Studholme, Colin; Cardenas, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    Deformation morphometry provides a sensitive approach to detecting and mapping subtle volume changes in the brain. Population based analyses of this data have been used successfully to detect characteristic changes in different neurodegenerative conditions. However, most studies have been limited to statistical mapping of the scalar volume change at each point in the brain, by evaluating the determinant of the Jacobian of the deformation field. In this paper we describe an approach to spatial normalisation and analysis of the full deformation tensor. The approach employs a spatial relocation and reorientation of tensors of each subject. Using the assumption of small changes, we use a linear modeling of effects of clinical variables on each deformation tensor component across a population. We illustrate the use of this approach by examining the pattern of significance and orientation of the volume change effects in recovery from alcohol abuse. Results show new local structure which was not apparent in the analysis of scalar volume changes. PMID:18044583

  17. On the method of positron lifetime measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiyama, F.; Shizuma, K.; Nasai, H.; Nishi, M.

    1983-01-01

    A fast-slow coincidence system was constructed for the measurement of positron lifetimes in material. The time resolution of this system was 270 ps for the (60)Co gamma rays. Positron lifetime spectra for 14 kinds of alkali halides were measured with this system. Two lifetime components and their intensities were derived from analyses of the lifetime spectra.

  18. Predicting Lifetimes Of CMOS ASIC's From Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Zamani, Nasser; Zoutendyk, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Concise report discusses recent developments in use of semiempirical mathematical models to predict rates of failure and operating lifetimes of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC's). Each model represents specific mechanism of failure. Once failure mechanisms and models relevant to given ASIC chosen, adjustable parameters in models fitted to life-test data acquired from representative integrated-circuit structures on test coupons fabricated along with ASIC's. Then design parameters of ASIC's incorporated into models, and models yield lifetimes.

  19. Leukemia Risk After Cardiac Fluoroscopic Interventions Stratified by Procedure Number, Exposure Latent Time, and Sex: A Nationwide Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai-Che; Lin, Hon-Yi; Hung, Shih-Kai; Huang, Yu-Tung; Lee, Moon-Sing; Wang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Su, Yu-Chieh; Shen, Bing-Jie; Tsai, Shiang-Jiun; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Li, Chung-Yi; Chiou, Wen-Yen

    2016-03-01

    A number of cardiac fluoroscopic interventions have increased rapidly worldwide over the past decade. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and stent implantation have become increasingly popular, and these advancements have allowed patients to receive repetitive treatments for restenosis. However, these advancements also significantly increase radiation exposure that may lead to higher cumulative doses of radiation. In the present study, a nationwide population-based case-controlled study was used to explore the risk of leukemia after cardiac angiographic fluoroscopic intervention.A total of 5026 patients with leukemia and 100,520 control patients matched for age and sex (1:20) by a propensity score method without any cancer history were enrolled using the Registry Data for Catastrophic Illness and the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan between 2008 and 2010. All subjects were retrospectively surveyed (from year 2000) to determine receipt of cardiac fluoroscopic interventions. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression models, and estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval).After adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidities, PTCA was found to be associated with an increased risk of leukemia with an adjusted OR of 1.566 (95% CI, 1.282-1.912), whereas coronary angiography alone without PTCA and cardiac electrophysiologic study were not. Our results also showed that an increased frequency of PTCA and coronary angiography was associated with a higher risk of leukemia (adjusted OR: 1.326 to 1.530 [all P < 0.05]). Gender subgroup analyses demonstrated that men were associated with a higher risk of leukemia compared with women.These results provide additional data in the quantification of the long-term health effects of radiation exposure derived from the cardiac fluoroscopic diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. PTCA alone or PTCA with coronary angiography was associated with an

  20. Habitable zone lifetimes of exoplanets around main sequence stars.

    PubMed

    Rushby, Andrew J; Claire, Mark W; Osborn, Hugh; Watson, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    The potential habitability of newly discovered exoplanets is initially assessed by determining whether their orbits fall within the circumstellar habitable zone of their star. However, the habitable zone (HZ) is not static in time or space, and its boundaries migrate outward at a rate proportional to the increase in luminosity of a star undergoing stellar evolution, possibly including or excluding planets over the course of the star's main sequence lifetime. We describe the time that a planet spends within the HZ as its "habitable zone lifetime." The HZ lifetime of a planet has strong astrobiological implications and is especially important when considering the evolution of complex life, which is likely to require a longer residence time within the HZ. Here, we present results from a simple model built to investigate the evolution of the "classic" HZ over time, while also providing estimates for the evolution of stellar luminosity over time in order to develop a "hybrid" HZ model. These models return estimates for the HZ lifetimes of Earth and 7 confirmed HZ exoplanets and 27 unconfirmed Kepler candidates. The HZ lifetime for Earth ranges between 6.29 and 7.79×10⁹ years (Gyr). The 7 exoplanets fall in a range between ∼1 and 54.72 Gyr, while the 27 Kepler candidate planets' HZ lifetimes range between 0.43 and 18.8 Gyr. Our results show that exoplanet HD 85512b is no longer within the HZ, assuming it has an Earth analog atmosphere. The HZ lifetime should be considered in future models of planetary habitability as setting an upper limit on the lifetime of any potential exoplanetary biosphere, and also for identifying planets of high astrobiological potential for continued observational or modeling campaigns. PMID:24047111

  1. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G.; Terrill, Edward R.; Borowczak, Marc

    2012-12-01

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  2. Predictors of Cerebral Palsy in Very Preterm Infants: The EPIPAGE Prospective Population-Based Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaino, Ghada; Khoshnood, Babak; Kaminski, Monique; Pierrat, Veronique; Marret, Stephane; Matis, Jacqueline; Ledesert, Bernard; Thiriez, Gerard; Fresson, Jeanne; Roze, Jean-Christophe; Zupan-Simunek, Veronique; Arnaud, Catherine; Burguet, Antoine; Larroque, Beatrice; Breart, Gerard; Ancel, Pierre-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the independent role of cerebral lesions on ultrasound scan, and several other neonatal and obstetric factors, as potential predictors of cerebral palsy (CP) in a large population-based cohort of very preterm infants. Method: As part of EPIPAGE, a population-based prospective cohort study, perinatal data…

  3. The Work of a Lifetime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2012-01-01

    If there's one message that Joan Hillsman wants to get across to music directors, it's this: Teaching is a lifetime commitment. Hillsman is a longtime music educator, African-American music historian, author, consultant, music producer, clinician, radio show host, and current member of the Academic Board of the James Cleveland Gospel Music…

  4. Encouraging the Lifetime Reading Habit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanacore, Joseph

    Educators must accept the challenge of encouraging the lifetime reading habit in school. Students who are surrounded with books, newspapers, magazines, and other materials will be tempted to browse and to read from these sources. When selecting materials for the classroom, educators should work closely with the library media specialist who is…

  5. Osteoporosis-related fracture case definitions for population-based administrative data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Population-based administrative data have been used to study osteoporosis-related fracture risk factors and outcomes, but there has been limited research about the validity of these data for ascertaining fracture cases. The objectives of this study were to: (a) compare fracture incidence estimates from administrative data with estimates from population-based clinically-validated data, and (b) test for differences in incidence estimates from multiple administrative data case definitions. Methods Thirty-five case definitions for incident fractures of the hip, wrist, humerus, and clinical vertebrae were constructed using diagnosis codes in hospital data and diagnosis and service codes in physician billing data from Manitoba, Canada. Clinically-validated fractures were identified from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Generalized linear models were used to test for differences in incidence estimates. Results For hip fracture, sex-specific differences were observed in the magnitude of under- and over-ascertainment of administrative data case definitions when compared with CaMos data. The length of the fracture-free period to ascertain incident cases had a variable effect on over-ascertainment across fracture sites, as did the use of imaging, fixation, or repair service codes. Case definitions based on hospital data resulted in under-ascertainment of incident clinical vertebral fractures. There were no significant differences in trend estimates for wrist, humerus, and clinical vertebral case definitions. Conclusions The validity of administrative data for estimating fracture incidence depends on the site and features of the case definition. PMID:22537071

  6. Hip Fracture in People with Erectile Dysfunction: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Chai, Chee-Yin; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lu, Ying-Yi; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the risk of hip fracture and contributing factors in patients with erectile dysfunction(ED). This population-based study was performed using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The analysis included4636 patients aged ≥ 40 years who had been diagnosed with ED (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 302.72, 607.84) during 1996–2010. The control group included 18,544 randomly selected age-matched patients without ED (1:4 ratio). The association between ED and hip fracture risk was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, 59 (1.27%) patients in the ED group and 140 (0.75%) patients in the non-ED group developed hip fracture. After adjusting for covariates, the overall incidence of hip fracture was 3.74-times higher in the ED group than in the non-ED group (2.03 vs. 0.50 per 1000 person-years, respectively). The difference in the overall incidence of hip fracture was largest during the 3-year follow-up period (hazard ratio = 7.85; 95% confidence interval = 2.94–20.96; P <0.0001). To the best of our knowledge, this nationwide population-based study is the first to investigate the relationship between ED and subsequent hip fracture in an Asian population. The results showed that ED patients had a higher risk of developing hip fracture. Patients with ED, particularly those aged 40–59 years, should undergo bone mineral density examinations as early as possible and should take measures to reduce the risk of falls. PMID:27078254

  7. A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study of Migraine and Organic-Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chuang, Eric; Chuang, Tien-Yow; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Yen, Der-Jen; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-03-01

    As chronic illnesses and chronic pain are related to erectile dysfunction (ED), migraine as a prevalent chronic disorder affecting lots of people all over the world may negatively affect quality of life as well as sexual function. However, a large-scale population-based study of erectile dysfunction and other different comorbidities in patients with migraine is quite limited. This cohort longitudinal study aimed to estimate the association between migraine and ED using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan.The data used for this cohort study were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 in Taiwan. We identified 5015 patients with migraine and frequency matched 20,060 controls without migraine from 2000 to 2011. The occurrence of ED was followed up until the end of 2011. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to analyze the risks of ED.The overall incidence of ED was 1.78-fold greater in the migraine cohort than in the comparison cohort (23.3 vs 10.5 per 10,000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31-2.41). Furthermore, patients with migraine were 1.75-fold more likely to develop organic ED (95% CI = 1.27-2.41) than were the comparison cohort. The migraine patients with anxiety had a 3.6-fold higher HR of having been diagnosed with ED than the comparison cohort without anxiety (95% CI, 2.10-6.18).The results support that patients with migraine have a higher incidence of being diagnosed with ED, particularly in the patient with the comorbidity of anxiety. PMID:26962838

  8. Pioglitazone use and risk of bladder cancer: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tuccori, Marco; Filion, Kristian B; Yin, Hui; Yu, Oriana H; Platt, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether pioglitazone compared with other antidiabetic drugs is associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in people with type 2 diabetes. Design Population based cohort study. Setting General practices contributing data to the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Participants A cohort of 145 806 patients newly treated with antidiabetic drugs between 1 January 2000 and 31 July 2013, with follow-up until 31 July 2014. Main outcome measures The use of pioglitazone was treated as a time varying variable, with use lagged by one year for latency purposes. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals of incident bladder cancer associated with pioglitazone overall and by both cumulative duration of use and cumulative dose. Similar analyses were conducted for rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinedione not previously associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. Results The cohort generated 689 616 person years of follow-up, during which 622 patients were newly diagnosed as having bladder cancer (crude incidence 90.2 per 100 000 person years). Compared with other antidiabetic drugs, pioglitazone was associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer (121.0 v 88.9 per 100 000 person years; hazard ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 2.19). Conversely, rosiglitazone was not associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer (86.2 v 88.9 per 100 000 person years; 1.10, 0.83 to 1.47). Duration-response and dose-response relations were observed for pioglitazone but not for rosiglitazone. Conclusion The results of this large population based study indicate that pioglitazone is associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. The absence of an association with rosiglitazone suggests that the increased risk is drug specific and not a class effect. PMID:27029385

  9. Population-based register of acute myocardial infarction: manual of operations.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Mette; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Pajak, Andrzej; Palmieri, Luigi; Rocha, Evangelista C; Salomaa, Veikko; Sans, Susana; Steinbach, Konrad; Vanuzzo, Diego

    2007-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and hospitalization in both sexes in nearly all countries of Europe. The main forms of cardiovascular disease are ischaemic heart disease and stroke. The magnitude of the problem contrasts with the shortage, weak quality and comparability of data available in most European countries. Innovations in medical, invasive and biological treatments have substantially contributed to the escalating costs of health services. It is therefore urgent to obtain reliable information on the magnitude and distribution of the disease for both adequate health planning (including preventive strategies) and clinical decision making with correct cost-benefit assessments.A stepwise surveillance procedure based on standardized data collection, appropriate record linkage and validation methods was set up by the EUROCISS Project (EUROpean Cardiovascular Indicators Surveillance Set) to build up comparable and reliable indicators (attack rate and case fatality) for the surveillance of acute myocardial infarction/acute coronary syndrome at population level. This manual of operations is intended for health professionals and policy makers and provides a standardized and simple model for the implementation of a population-based register. It recommends to start from a minimum data set and then follow a stepwise procedure. Before implementing a population-based register, it is important to identify the target population under surveillance which should preferably cover a well-defined geographical and administrative area or region representative of the whole country for which population data and vital statistics (mortality and hospital discharge records at minimum) are routinely collected and easily available each year. All cases among residents should be recorded even if the case occurs outside the area. Validation of a sample of fatal and nonfatal events is mandatory. PMID:18091134

  10. Heterogeneity in ALSFRS-R decline and survival: a population-based study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Jessica; Biguzzi, Sara; Guidi, Carlo; Sette, Elisabetta; Terlizzi, Emilio; Ravasio, Alessandro; Casmiro, Mario; Salvi, Fabrizio; Liguori, Rocco; Rizzi, Romana; Pietrini, Vladimiro; Borghi, Annamaria; Rinaldi, Rita; Fini, Nicola; Chierici, Elisabetta; Santangelo, Mario; Granieri, Enrico; Mussuto, Vittoria; De Pasqua, Silvia; Georgoulopoulou, Eleni; Fasano, Antonio; Ferro, Salvatore; D'Alessandro, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Very few studies examined trend over time of the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and factors influencing it; previous studies, then, included only patients attending tertiary ALS Centres. We studied ALSFRS-R decline, factors influencing this trend and survival in a population-based setting. From 2009 onwards, a prospective registry records all incident ALS cases among residents in Emilia Romagna (population: 4.4 million). For each patient, demographic and clinical details (including ALSFRS-R) are collected by caring physicians at each follow-up. Analysis was performed on 402 incident cases (1279 ALSFRS-R assessments). The average decline of the ALSFRS-R was 0.60 points/month during the first year after diagnosis and 0.34 points/month in the second year. ALSFRS-R decline was heterogeneous among subgroups. Repeated measures mixed model showed that ALSFRS-R score decline was influenced by age at onset (p < 0.01), phenotype (p = 0.01), body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.01), progression rate at diagnosis (ΔFS) (p < 0.01), El Escorial Criteria-Revised (p < 0.01), and FVC% at diagnosis (p < 0.01). Among these factors, at multivariate analysis, only age, site of onset and ΔFS independently influenced survival. In this first population-based study on ALSFRS-R trend, we confirm that ALSFRS-R decline is not homogeneous among ALS patients and during the disease. Factors influencing ALSFRS-R decline may not match with those affecting survival. These disease modifiers should be taken into consideration for trials design and in clinical practice during discussions with patients on prognosis. PMID:26205535

  11. Lifetime physical activity and risk of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    John, Esther M.; Koo, Jocelyn; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    Background The role of moderate physical activity and life patterns of activity in reducing endometrial cancer risk remains uncertain. Methods We assessed lifetime histories of activity from recreation, transportation, chores, and occupation and other risk factors in a population-based case-control study of endometrial cancer conducted in the San Francisco Bay area. The analysis was based on 472 newly diagnosed cases ascertained by the regional cancer registry and 443 controls identified by random-digit dialing who completed an in-person interview. Results Reduced risks associated with greater lifetime physical activity (highest vs. lowest tertile) were found for both total activity (odds ratio (OR) = 0.61 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.43–0.87, ptrend = 0.01) and activity of moderate intensity (OR=0.44, 95% CI=0.30–0.64, ptrend < 0.0001). Compared to women with low lifetime physical activity (below median), those with greater activity throughout life had the highest reduction in risk (OR=0.62, 95% CI=0.44–0.88). Inverse associations were stronger in obese and overweight women, but differences were not statistically significantly different from those in normal weight women. Conclusion These findings suggest that physical activity in adulthood, even of moderate intensity, may be effective in lowering the risk of endometrial cancer, particularly among those at highest risk for this disease. Impact The results emphasize the importance of evaluating lifetime histories of physical activity from multiple sources, including both recreational and non-recreational activities of various intensities, in order to fully understand the relation between physical activity and disease risk. PMID:20406960

  12. Exits in order: How crowding affects particle lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penington, Catherine J.; Baker, Ruth E.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-06-01

    Diffusive processes are often represented using stochastic random walk frameworks. The amount of time taken for an individual in a random walk to intersect with an absorbing boundary is a fundamental property that is often referred to as the particle lifetime, or the first passage time. The mean lifetime of particles in a random walk model of diffusion is related to the amount of time required for the diffusive process to reach a steady state. Mathematical analysis describing the mean lifetime of particles in a standard model of diffusion without crowding is well known. However, the lifetime of agents in a random walk with crowding has received much less attention. Since many applications of diffusion in biology and biophysics include crowding effects, here we study a discrete model of diffusion that incorporates crowding. Using simulations, we show that crowding has a dramatic effect on agent lifetimes, and we derive an approximate expression for the mean agent lifetime that includes crowding effects. Our expression matches simulation results very well, and highlights the importance of crowding effects that are sometimes overlooked.

  13. Predicting sample lifetimes in creep fracture of heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, Juha; Ovaska, Markus; Miksic, Amandine; Laurson, Lasse; Alava, Mikko J.

    2016-08-01

    Materials flow—under creep or constant loads—and, finally, fail. The prediction of sample lifetimes is an important and highly challenging problem because of the inherently heterogeneous nature of most materials that results in large sample-to-sample lifetime fluctuations, even under the same conditions. We study creep deformation of paper sheets as one heterogeneous material and thus show how to predict lifetimes of individual samples by exploiting the "universal" features in the sample-inherent creep curves, particularly the passage to an accelerating creep rate. Using simulations of a viscoelastic fiber bundle model, we illustrate how deformation localization controls the shape of the creep curve and thus the degree of lifetime predictability.

  14. Hybrid lipids increase nanoscale fluctuation lifetimes in mixed membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Safran, Samuel A.

    2013-09-01

    A recently proposed ternary mixture model is used to predict fluctuation domain lifetimes in the one phase region. The membrane is made of saturated, unsaturated, and hybrid lipids that have one saturated and one unsaturated hydrocarbon chain. The hybrid lipid is a natural linactant which can reduce the packing incompatibility between saturated and unsaturated lipids. The fluctuation lifetimes are predicted as a function of the hybrid lipid fraction and the fluctuation domain size. These lifetimes can be increased by up to three orders of magnitude compared to the case of no hybrids. With hybrid, small length scale fluctuations have sizable amplitudes even close to the critical temperature and, hence, benefit from enhanced critical slowing down. The increase in lifetime is particularly important for nanometer scale fluctuation domains where the hybrid orientation and the other lipids composition are highly coupled.

  15. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging and its biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi

    Even though oxygen plays a crucial role in body function and cancer biology, methods of measuring oxygen level in tissue are all limited. The current gold standard relies on an invasive electrode for only single-point reading at a time. The photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) approach overcomes these major limitations by applying photoacoustic probing to oxygen-sensitive optical transient absorption. The capability of assessing oxygen distribution is demonstrated by imaging tumor hypoxia in a small animal model, and monitoring changes of tissue oxygen induced by external modulations. Proposed applications of this imaging technique includes imaging-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) and activatable probes for molecular imaging.

  16. Lifetime measurements in neutral alkalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diberardino, Diana

    1998-12-01

    Precision measurements of transition probabilities and energies provide a means for testing atomic structure calculations. The most accurate atomic structure calculations employ many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) and are used for the interpretation of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) measurements and for testing of quantum electrodynamics (QED). Our group's measurement of the 6p/ 2P3/2,1/2 state lifetimes in atomic cesium provides constraints for recent MBPT calculations in cesium and electric dipole (E1) matrix elements. These E1 matrix elements contribute a large fraction to the weak-interaction-induced 6S[-]7S transition amplitude in cesium. Part of this thesis has been motivated by our desire to reduce the uncertainties in the measured 6p/ 2P3/2,1/2 state lifetimes in atomic cesium using improvements in our fast-beam apparatus. Thus, a new fiber optic detector system is designed to provide better collection efficiency and reduce beam tracking errors. Also, a new method of measuring the atomic beam velocity using a solid etalon is demonstrated to improve the velocity precision by a factor of seven. Additionally, this thesis describes measurements of the cesium 5d/ 2D5/2,/ 5d/ 2D3/2, and 11s/ 2S1/2 state lifetimes using pulsed-dye laser excitation of cesium vapor. The 5d/ 2D3/2 lifetime measurement, along with its branching ratio, provides the electric dipole reduced matrix element between the 5d/ 2D3/2 state and the 6p/ 2P1/2 state. Furthermore, a previous 5d/ 2D5/2 experimental value is compared with our new value and recent theoretical calculations.

  17. Lifetime of MCP-PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-05-01

    The hadron identification in the PANDA experiment at FAIR will be done with DIRC detectors. Because of design and space reasons the sensors of the DIRCs have to be placed inside the strong magnetic field of the solenoid. As the favored photon sensors microchannel-plate photomultipliers (MCP-PMTs) were identified. However, these devices showed serious aging problems until very recently, which manifest themselves by a fast degrading quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode (PC). This is mainly due to feedback ions from the residual gas. In this paper we discuss the recently accomplished huge improvements in the lifetime of MCP-PMTs. With innovative countermeasures applied to the MCP-PMTs in the attempt to reduce the aging effects the manufacturers were able to increase the lifetime of MCP-PMT prototypes by almost two orders of magnitude compared to the former commercially available devices. Our group has studied the aging of MCP-PMTs for more than four years by simultaneously illuminating different types of lifetime-enhanced MCP-PMTs at the same photon rate. Gain, dark count rate, and QE as a function of the wavelength and the PC surface were measured in regular time intervals and studied in dependence of the integrated anode charge. We observe that MCP-PMTs treated with an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique are by far the best devices available now. A lifetime of up to 10 C/cm2 integrated anode charge was reached with these sensors. This is sufficient for both PANDA DIRCs.

  18. Predictors of Colorectal Cancer Survival in Golestan, Iran: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Aryaie, Mohammad; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Semnani, Shahryar; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Aarabi, Mohsen; Vakili, Mohammad Ali; Kazemnejhad, Vahideh; Sedaghat, Seyed Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We aimed to investigate factors associated with colorectal cancer survival in Golestan, Iran. METHODS We used a population based cancer registry to recruit study subjects. All patients registered since 2004 were contacted and data were collected using structured questionnaires and trained interviewers. All the existing evidences to determine the stage of the cancer were also collected. The time from first diagnosis to death was compared in patients according to their stage of cancer using the Kaplan-Meir method. A Cox proportional hazard model was built to examine their survival experience by taking into account other covariates. RESULTS Out of a total of 345 subjects, 227 were traced. Median age of the subjects was 54 and more than 42% were under 50 years old. We found 132 deaths among these patients, 5 of which were non-colorectal related deaths. The median survival time for the entire cohort was 3.56 years. A borderline significant difference in survival experience was detected for ethnicity (log rank test, p=0.053). Using Cox proportional hazard modeling, only cancer stage remained significantly associated with time of death in the final model. CONCLUSIONS Colorectal cancer occurs at a younger age among people living in Golestan province. A very young age at presentation and what appears to be a high proportion of patients presenting with late stage in this area suggest this population might benefit substantially from early diagnoses by introducing age adapted screening programs. PMID:23807907

  19. Unsolved homicides in Sweden: A population-based study of 264 homicides.

    PubMed

    Sturup, Joakim; Karlberg, Daniel; Kristiansson, Marianne

    2015-12-01

    The clearance rates for homicides have decreased internationally. This retrospective population-based study of all Swedish homicide incidents between 2007 and 2009 (n=264) aims to investigate factors associated with solvability in homicides. Victims were identified in an autopsy registry and offenders in a criminal-conviction registry. Autopsy reports, police files, court verdicts and criminal records were systematically collected and linked. The clearance rate was 86.4% (n=228), and almost three quarters of cases (71.9%) were solved within the first week. Nine factors were significantly associated with the case status; however, only four factors remained significant in the multivariate logistic-regression model. Cases were more likely to be solved if there was an eyewitness and if the victim was intoxicated with alcohol. Moreover, cases were less likely to be solved if the victim had a criminal record in the past five years and was killed by a firearm. In the final model, a Cox proportional-hazards model, where time to arrest was taken into account, only alcohol intoxication were positively and firearms negatively significantly associated with clearance status. The study concludes that cases involving these factors should be granted extra, intensive and lasting resources. PMID:26295928

  20. Lifetime Assessment of the NEXT Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    Ion thrusters are low thrust, high specific impulse devices with required operational lifetimes on the order of 10,000 to 100,000 hr. The NEXT ion thruster is the latest generation of ion thrusters under development. The NEXT ion thruster currently has a qualification level propellant throughput requirement of 450 kg of xenon, which corresponds to roughly 22,000 hr of operation at the highest throttling point. Currently, a NEXT engineering model ion thruster with prototype model ion optics is undergoing a long duration test to determine wear characteristics and establish propellant throughput capability. The NEXT thruster includes many improvements over previous generations of ion thrusters, but two of its component improvements have a larger effect on thruster lifetime. These include the ion optics with tighter tolerances, a masked region and better gap control, and the discharge cathode keeper material change to graphite. Data from the NEXT 2000 hr wear test, the NEXT long duration test, and further analysis is used to determine the expected lifetime of the NEXT ion thruster. This paper will review the predictions for all of the anticipated failure mechanisms. The mechanisms will include wear of the ion optics and cathode s orifice plate and keeper from the plasma, depletion of low work function material in each cathode s insert, and spalling of material in the discharge chamber leading to arcing. Based on the analysis of the NEXT ion thruster, the first failure mode for operation above a specific impulse of 2000 sec is expected to be the structural failure of the ion optics at 750 kg of propellant throughput, 1.7 times the qualification requirement. An assessment based on mission analyses for operation below a specific impulse of 2000 sec indicates that the NEXT thruster is capable of double the propellant throughput required by these missions.

  1. Normative Data of the EORTC QLQ-C30 For the German Population: A Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, Annika; Schubert, Daniel; Katalinic, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to generate up-to-date normative data for health-related quality of life (QoL) measured with the “European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30)” in a random sample of the population in Northern Germany. Methods We conducted a population-based survey of a random sample of 10,000 persons aged 16 years or older. The postal questionnaire included questions regarding lifetime prevalence of common diseases and quality of life. EORTC QLQ-C30 scales were scored according to standard procedures. The results were stratified for age and sex. Results The questionnaire was completed by 4,684 (47%) of 9,928 eligible persons. Mean age of the participants was 51.7 years (standard deviation: 18.5) and 57% were females. Missing values for the EORTC QLQ-C30 scales and items were sparse (minimum: 0.2%, maximum: 1.5%). Self-reported health related QoL varied by age and sex. Generally, men reported better functioning and fewer symptoms than women. In both sexes function declined and symptoms increased with increasing age. Symptoms most frequently reported were fatigue, pain and insomnia. Compared to the German reference data published in 2001 our participants scored more than 10 points higher on the latter three scales/items. The most frequently reported diseases were hypertension (36%), hyperlipidemia (26%) and arthritis (30%). Lifetime prevalence of depression was 16% in women and 11% in men. Conclusion Our study participants are representative for the German general population with regard to age, sex and education. Of special interest is the high proportion of participants reporting depression which is also mirrored by high fatigue, pain and insomnia scores. The normative data provided should be used as comparison health-related QoL data when evaluating the QoL in German cancer patients. PMID:24058523

  2. A non-invasive approach to study lifetime exposure and bioaccumulation of PCBs in protected marine mammals: PBPK modeling in harbor porpoises

    SciTech Connect

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Covaci, Adrian; Yang, Raymond S.H.; Das, Krishna; Blust, Ronny

    2011-10-15

    In the last decade, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have increasingly been developed to explain the kinetics of environmental pollutants in wildlife. For marine mammals specifically, these models provide a new, non-destructive tool that enables the integration of biomonitoring activities and in vitro studies. The goals of the present study were firstly to develop PBPK models for several environmental relevant PCB congeners in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), a species that is sensitive to pollution because of its limited metabolic capacity for pollutant transformation. These models were tested using tissue data of porpoises from the Black Sea. Secondly, the predictive power of the models was investigated for time trends in the PCB concentrations in North Sea harbor porpoises between 1990 and 2008. Thirdly, attempts were made to assess metabolic capacities of harbor porpoises for the investigated PCBs. In general, results show that parameter values from other species (rodents, humans) are not always suitable in marine mammal models, most probably due to differences in physiology and exposure. The PCB 149 levels decrease the fastest in male harbor porpoises from the North Sea in a time period of 18 years, whereas the PCB 101 levels decrease the slowest. According to the models, metabolic breakdown of PCB 118 is probably of lesser importance compared to other elimination pathways. For PCB 101 and 149 however, the presence of their metabolites can be attributed to bioaccumulation of metabolites from the prey and to metabolic breakdown of the parent compounds in the harbor porpoises. - Highlights: > PBPK modeling was used to study the kinetics of several PCBs in a marine mammal. > Harbor porpoises are sensitive to pollution and therefore ideal model organisms. > Black Sea data were used for parameterization. > North Sea data for assessing temporal trends (1990-2008). > PBPK modeling is a non-invasive and non-destructive tool.

  3. Minority carrier lifetime in indium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Weinberg, Irving; Kneisel, Keith

    1991-01-01

    Transient photoluminescence is used to measure the minority carrier lifetime on n-type and p-type InP wafers. The measurements show that unprocessed InP wafers have very high minority carrier lifetimes. Lifetimes of 200 ns and 700 ns were observed for lightly-doped p- and n-type material respectively. Lifetimes over 5 ns were found in heavily doped n-type material.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime imaging in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, M. A.; Boas, D. A.; Li, X. D.; Chance, B.; Yodh, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    The lifetime of a fluorophore generally varies in different environments, making the molecule a sensitive indicator of tissue oxygenation, pH, and glucose. However, lifetime measurements are complicated when the fluorophore is embedded in an optically thick, highly scattering medium such as human tissue. We formulate the inverse problem for fluorescence lifetime tomography using diffuse photon density waves, and we demonstrate the technique by deriving spatial images of heterogeneous fluorophore distribution and lifetime, using simulated measurements in heterogeneous turbid media.

  5. The Henry street consortium population-based competencies for educating public health nursing students.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Cross, Sharon; Keller, Linda O; Nelson, Pamela; Schoon, Patricia M; Henton, Pat

    2011-01-01

    The Henry Street Consortium, a collaboration of nurse educators from universities and colleges and public health nurses (PHNs) from government, school, and community agencies, developed 11 population-based competencies for educating nursing students and the novice PHN. Although many organizations have developed competency lists for experts, the Consortium developed a set of competencies that clearly define expectations for the beginning PHN. The competencies are utilized by both education and practice. They guide nurse educators and PHNs in the creation of learning experiences that develop population-based knowledge and skills for baccalaureate nursing students. Public health nursing leaders use the competencies to frame their expectations and orientations for nurses who are new to public health nursing. This paper explains the meaning of each of the 11 population-based competencies and provides examples of student projects that demonstrate competency development. Strategies are suggested for nurse educators and PHNs to promote effective population-based student projects in public health agencies. PMID:21198818

  6. A non-invasive approach to study lifetime exposure and bioaccumulation of PCBs in protected marine mammals: PBPK modeling in harbor porpoises.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Covaci, Adrian; Yang, Raymond S H; Das, Krishna; Blust, Ronny

    2011-10-15

    In the last decade, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have increasingly been developed to explain the kinetics of environmental pollutants in wildlife. For marine mammals specifically, these models provide a new, non-destructive tool that enables the integration of biomonitoring activities and in vitro studies. The goals of the present study were firstly to develop PBPK models for several environmental relevant PCB congeners in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), a species that is sensitive to pollution because of its limited metabolic capacity for pollutant transformation. These models were tested using tissue data of porpoises from the Black Sea. Secondly, the predictive power of the models was investigated for time trends in the PCB concentrations in North Sea harbor porpoises between 1990 and 2008. Thirdly, attempts were made to assess metabolic capacities of harbor porpoises for the investigated PCBs. In general, results show that parameter values from other species (rodents, humans) are not always suitable in marine mammal models, most probably due to differences in physiology and exposure. The PCB 149 levels decrease the fastest in male harbor porpoises from the North Sea in a time period of 18years, whereas the PCB 101 levels decrease the slowest. According to the models, metabolic breakdown of PCB 118 is probably of lesser importance compared to other elimination pathways. For PCB 101 and 149 however, the presence of their metabolites can be attributed to bioaccumulation of metabolites from the prey and to metabolic breakdown of the parent compounds in the harbor porpoises. PMID:21851832

  7. NSAID Use and Incident Cognitive Impairment in a Population-based Cohort.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Margarete A; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Chappell, Rick; Fischer, Mary E; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Schubert, Carla R

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may prevent dementia, but previous studies have yielded conflicting results. This study estimated the association of prior NSAID use with incident cognitive impairment in the population-based Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS, n=2422 without cognitive impairment in 1998-2000). Prospectively collected medication data from 1988-1990, 1993-1995, and 1998-2000 were used to categorize NSAID use history at the cognitive baseline (1998-2000). Aspirin use and nonaspirin NSAID use were separately examined. Cox regression models were used to estimate the associations between NSAID use history at baseline and incident cognitive impairment in 2003-2005 or 2009-2010. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate associations with a second outcome, mild cognitive impairment/dementia, available in 2009-2010. Participants using aspirin at baseline but not 5 years prior were more likely to develop cognitive impairment (adjusted hazard ratio=1.77; 95% confidence interval=1.11, 2.82; model 2), with nonsignificant associations for longer term use. Nonaspirin NSAID use was not associated with incident cognitive impairment or mild cognitive impairment/dementia odds. These results provided no evidence to support a potential protective effect of NSAIDs against dementia. PMID:26079710

  8. Clinical risk factors for fracture in postmenopausal Canadian women: a population-based prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Leslie, William D; Anderson, William A; Metge, Colleen J; Manness, Lori-Jean

    2007-04-01

    Clinical risk factor assessment can be used to enhance fracture risk estimation based upon bone densitometry alone. Population- and age-specific risk factor prevalence data are required for the construction of these risk models. Our objective was to derive population-based prevalence estimates of specific clinical risk factors for postmenopausal women resident in the Province of Manitoba, Canada. A random sample of 40,300 women age 50 or older identified from the provincial health plan was mailed a validated self-report risk factor survey. The response rate was 8747 (21.7%) with a final study population of 8027 women after exclusions. The individual prevalence for each clinical risk factor ranged from 5.8% for hyperthyroidism to 33.0% for a fall in the preceding 12 months. Most point prevalence estimates were similar to other large cohort studies, though the prevalences of inactivity and poor mobility were higher than expected while height at age 25 and the prevalence of any fracture after age 50 were lower than expected. Most of the respondents (86.9%) had at least one non-age clinical risk factor, 60.6% had two or more, and 33.5% had three or more. Age affected risk factor prevalence, and older age was associated with a higher rate of multiple risk factors. The availability of age-specific risk factor prevalence rates in this population may allow for more accurate fracture risk modeling. PMID:17182296

  9. Outcome Predictors in First-Ever Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Giovanni; Bottacchi, Edo; Tosi, Piera; Caligiana, Laura; Lia, Chiara; Veronese Morosini, Massimo; Dalmasso, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Background. There is scant population-based information regarding predictors of stroke severity and long-term mortality for first-ever ischemic strokes. The aims of this study were to determine the characteristics of patients who initially presented with first-ever ischemic stroke and to identify predictors of severity and long-term mortality. Methods. Data were collected from the population-based Cerebrovascular Aosta Registry. Between 2004 and 2008, 1057 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke were included. Variables analysed included comorbidities, sociodemographic factors, prior-to-stroke risk factors, therapy at admission and pathophysiologic and metabolic factors. Multivariate logistic regression models, Kaplan-Meier estimates, and Cox proportional Hazards model were used to assess predictors. Results. Predictors of stroke severity at admission were very old age (odds ratio [OR] 2.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.75–5.06), female gender (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.21–2.40), atrial fibrillation (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.72–4.44), low ejection fraction (OR 2.22, CI 95% 1.13–4.32), and cardioembolism (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.36–2.93). Predictors of long-term mortality were very old age (hazard ratio [HR] 2.02, 95% CI 1.65–2.47), prestroke modified Rankin scale 3–5 (HR 1.82; 95% CI 1.46–2.26), Charlson Index ≥2 (HR 1.97; 95% CI 1.62–2.42), atrial fibrillation (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.04–1.98), and stroke severity (HR 3.54, 95% CI 2.87–4.36). Conclusions. Very old age and cardiac embolism risk factors are the independent predictors of stroke severity. Moreover, these factors associated with other comorbid medical conditions influence independently long-term mortality after ischemic stroke.

  10. Adipocytokines, C-Reactive Protein, and Cardiovascular Disease: A Population-Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Seven, Ekim; Husemoen, Lise L. N.; Sehested, Thomas S. G.; Ibsen, Hans; Wachtell, Kristian; Linneberg, Allan; Jeppesen, Jørgen L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Being overweight or obese is associated with a greater risk of coronary heart disease and stroke compared with normal weight. The role of the specific adipose tissue-derived substances, called adipocytokines, in overweight- and obesity-related cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still unclear. Objective To investigate the associations of three adipose tissue-derived substances: adiponectin, leptin, and interleukin-6 with incident CVD in a longitudinal population-based study, including extensive adjustments for traditional and metabolic risk factors closely associated with overweight and obesity. C-reactive protein (CRP) was used as a proxy for interleukin-6. Methods Prospective population-based study of 6.502 participants, 51.9% women, aged 30–60 years, free of CVD at baseline, with a mean follow-up time of 11.4 years, equivalent to 74,123 person-years of follow-up. As outcome, we defined a composite outcome comprising of the first event of fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease and fatal and nonfatal stroke. Results During the follow-up period, 453 composite CV outcomes occurred among participants with complete datasets. In models, including gender, age, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, treatment for hypertension, diabetes, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, estimated glomerular filtration rate, adiponectin, leptin, and CRP, neither adiponectin (hazard ratio [HR] with 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.97 [0.87–1.08] per SD increase, P = 0.60) nor leptin (0.97 [0.85–1.12] per SD increase, P = 0.70) predicted the composite outcome, whereas CRP was significantly associated with the composite outcome (1.19 [1.07–1.35] per SD increase, P = 0.002). Furthermore, in mediation analysis, adjusted for age and sex, CRP decreased the BMI-associated CV risk by 43% (95%CI 29–72). Conclusions In this study, neither adiponectin nor leptin were independently

  11. Fluorescence lifetimes of some Rauwolfia alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, J.; Arjona, D. Gonzalez; Roldan, E.; Sanchez, M.

    1986-03-01

    The natural fluorescence lifetimes of the following Rauwolfia alkaloids, Reserpine, Rescinnamine, Corynanthine, Yohimbine, --- Ajmalicine, Serpentine and Ajmaline, have been calculated from a modified form of the Strickler-Berg equation. The actual lifetimes were derived from the quantum yields and the calculated natural lifetimes.

  12. Lifetime effects of iron and iron complexes in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kamal K.; Banan, M.; Moody, Jerry; Chandrasekhar, S.

    1994-09-01

    Iron doped p- and n-type samples were prepared using Czochralski method. The effect of pairing of iron with acceptors B and Al on the minority carrier lifetime was studied using the Surface Photovoltage (SPV) and DLTS methods. The effect of resistivity on the minority carrier lifetime in iron doped samples was investigated over 1 to 60 ohmcm resistivity range. The minority carrier lifetime dominated by Fei was found to be independent of resistivity. On the other hand, the lifetime controlled by FeB pairs increased by a factor of approximately town on increasing the resistivity from 1 ohmcm to 60 ohmcm. The data were analyzed using the Shockley-Reed-Hall model (SRH). The results indicate that the acceptor level of FeB pair at Ec(subscript 0.29 eV is the main recombination level of iron in p-Si. The partitioning of iron between FeB and FeAl pairs in silicon samples codoped with B and Al was found to depend upon the relative concentrations of the two acceptors. Although minority carrier lifetime values dominated by Fe(subscript i in B and Al doped samples were similar, FeAl pair was found to be approximately five times more effective as a lifetime-killer than FeB. FeAl pairs can be dissociated optically.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus testing for patient-based and population-based diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Albritton, W L; Vittinghoff, E; Padian, N S

    1996-10-01

    Laboratory testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been introduced for individual patient-based diagnosis as well as high-risk and low-risk population-based screening. The choice of test, confirmatory algorithm, and interpretative criteria used depend on the clinical setting. In the context of general population-based testing, factors affecting test performance will have to be considered carefully in the development of testing policy. PMID:8843247

  14. Lifetime constraints for late dark matter decay

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nicole F.; Galea, Ahmad J.; Petraki, Kalliopi

    2010-07-15

    We consider a class of late-decaying dark matter models, in which a dark matter particle decays to a heavy stable daughter of approximately the same mass, together with one or more relativistic particles which carry away only a small fraction of the parent rest mass. Such decays can affect galactic halo structure and evolution, and have been invoked as a remedy to some of the small-scale structure formation problems of cold dark matter. There are existing stringent limits on the dark matter lifetime if the decays produce photons. By considering examples in which the relativistic decay products instead consist of neutrinos or electron-position pairs, we derive stringent limits on these scenarios for a wide range of dark matter masses. We thus eliminate a sizable portion of the parameter space for these late-decay models if the dominant decay channel involves standard model final states.

  15. Probabilistic Prediction of Lifetimes of Ceramic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Palfi, Tamas; Powers, Lynn; Reh, Stefan; Baker, Eric H.

    2006-01-01

    ANSYS/CARES/PDS is a software system that combines the ANSYS Probabilistic Design System (PDS) software with a modified version of the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life (CARES/Life) Version 6.0 software. [A prior version of CARES/Life was reported in Program for Evaluation of Reliability of Ceramic Parts (LEW-16018), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 20, No. 3 (March 1996), page 28.] CARES/Life models effects of stochastic strength, slow crack growth, and stress distribution on the overall reliability of a ceramic component. The essence of the enhancement in CARES/Life 6.0 is the capability to predict the probability of failure using results from transient finite-element analysis. ANSYS PDS models the effects of uncertainty in material properties, dimensions, and loading on the stress distribution and deformation. ANSYS/CARES/PDS accounts for the effects of probabilistic strength, probabilistic loads, probabilistic material properties, and probabilistic tolerances on the lifetime and reliability of the component. Even failure probability becomes a stochastic quantity that can be tracked as a response variable. ANSYS/CARES/PDS enables tracking of all stochastic quantities in the design space, thereby enabling more precise probabilistic prediction of lifetimes of ceramic components.

  16. Micromechanics-based strength and lifetime prediction of polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandorawalla, Tozer Jamshed

    With the increasing use of composite materials for diverse applications ranging from civil infrastructure to offshore oil exploration, the durability of these materials is an important issue. Practical and accurate models for lifetime will enable engineers to push the boundaries of design and make the most efficient use of composite materials, while at the same time maintaining the utmost standards of safety. The work described in this dissertation is an effort to predict the strength and rupture lifetime of a unidirectional carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite using micromechanical techniques. Sources of material variability are incorporated into these models to predict probabilistic distributions for strength and lifetime. This approach is best suited to calculate material reliability for a desired lifetime under a given set of external conditions. A systematic procedure, with experimental verification at each important step, is followed to develop the predictive models in this dissertation. The work begins with an experimental and theoretical understanding of micromechanical stress redistribution due to fiber fractures in unidirectional composite materials. In-situ measurements of fiber stress redistribution are made in macromodel composites where the fibers are large enough that strain gauges can be mounted directly onto the fibers. The measurements are used to justify and develop a new form of load sharing where the load of the broken fiber is redistributed only onto the nearest adjacent neighbors. The experimentally verified quasi-static load sharing is incorporated into a Monte Carlo simulation for tensile strength modeling. Very good agreement is shown between the predicted and experimental strength distribution of a unidirectional composite. For the stress-rupture models a time and temperature dependent load-sharing analysis is developed to compute stresses due to an arbitrary sequence of fiber fractures. The load sharing is incorporated into a simulation

  17. Public assistance, drug testing, and the law: the limits of population-based legal analysis.

    PubMed

    Player, Candice T

    2014-01-01

    In Populations, Public Health and the Law, legal scholar Wendy Parmet urges courts to embrace population-based legal analysis, a public health inspired approach to legal reasoning. Parmet contends that population-based legal analysis offers a way to analyze legal issues--not unlike law and economics--as well as a set of values from which to critique contemporary legal discourse. Population-based analysis has been warmly embraced by the health law community as a bold new way of analyzing legal issues. Still, population-based analysis is not without its problems. At times, Parmet claims too much territory for the population perspective. Moreover, Parmet urges courts to recognize population health as an important norm in legal reasoning. What should we do when the insights of public health and conventional legal reasoning conflict? Still in its infancy, population-based analysis offers little in the way of answers to these questions. This Article applies population-based legal analysis to the constitutional problems that arise when states condition public assistance benefits on passing a drug test, thereby highlighting the strengths of the population perspective and exposing its weaknesses. PMID:24844042

  18. When to be skeptical of negative studies: pitfalls in evaluating occupational risks using population-based case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Hu, S W; Hertz-Picciotto, I; Siemiatycki, J

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated arsenic and lung cancer incidence in a community setting in the Montreal area. Job histories and sociodemographic factors were collected by interview from 857 lung cancer cases, 533 general population controls, and 1,360 controls with other cancers. Chemist-hygienists assessed each subject's life-time occupational exposure to 294 substances. Logistic regressions yielded arsenic/lung cancer odds ratios of 1.1 (95% confidence interval = 0.60, 1.7) based on cancer controls, and 0.82 (95% confidence interval = 0.41, 1.6) based on population controls. Risk did not rise with increasing level or probability of exposure. Worksite studies consistently show lung carcinogenicity from arsenic. Since confounding from other chemicals was well controlled, the most likely explanation is substantially lower exposures than in previous studies. The lack of association in this study demonstrates the need for caution in interpreting negative findings from population-based case-control studies, particularly when exposures are low or rare, as well as the difficulty in generating hypotheses from such studies. PMID:10349223

  19. A population-based study on infertility and its influencing factors in four selected provinces in Iran (2008-2010)

    PubMed Central

    Rostami Dovom, Marzieh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Abedini, Mehrandokht; Amirshekari, Golshan; Hashemi, Somayeh; Noroozzadeh, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility has a varied impact on multiple dimensions of health and functioning of women. Objective: We aimed to identify the burden of infertility and its influencing factors based on a population based study conducted in four provinces of Iran. Materials and Methods: A sample of 1126 women, aged 18-45 years, was selected using the multi stage, stratified probability sampling procedure; those met the eligibility criteria were invited for further comprehensive interview. This study used the definition of infertility proposed by World Health Organization “the woman has never conceived despite cohabitation and exposure to pregnancy for a period of 1 year”. Results : The overall prevalence of lifetime infertility and current primary infertility were 21.1% (95% CI: 18.4- 23.8) and 6.4% (95% CI: 4.8-8) respectively. The probability of first pregnancy at the end of 2 years of marriage was 94% for all ever-married women. Infertility were observed as significantly higher among women age 31-35 (OR: 4.6; 95% CI: 1.9-11.5; p=0.001) and women with more than 9 years of education (OR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.5-3.3; p<0.0001). Conclusion: The necessities of modern living have compelled many women to postpone childbearing to their late reproductive years; however they must be informed of being at risk of infertility with ageing. PMID:25408706

  20. Associations between early first sexual intercourse and later sexual and reproductive outcomes: a systematic review of population-based data.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Wendy; Patrick, Kent; Smith, Anthony M A; Pitts, Marian K

    2015-04-01

    The assumption that early sexual debut leads to adverse outcomes has been used as justification for sexual health interventions and policies aimed at delaying sexual initiation, yet research in the area has been limited. This review identified and synthesized published literature on the association between early first sexual intercourse and later sexual/reproductive outcomes. Literature searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and Current Contents. In all, 65 citations met the selection criteria (industrialized, population-based studies). By far the most common sexual behavior to have been investigated has been sexual partners. Studies consistently reported early first intercourse to be associated with more recent, lifetime, and concurrent sexual partners. Early initiators were also more likely to participate in a wider range of sexual practices and report increased sexual satisfaction (among men). Furthermore, early first intercourse, in some studies, was shown to increase the risk of teen pregnancies, teen births, and having an abortion, while findings on STIs and contraceptive use have been mixed. These findings, however, must be interpreted with caution due to methodological problems and limitations present in the research, including a lack of consensus on what constitutes early sexual intercourse and inconsistencies and problems with analyses. PMID:25425161

  1. Nutritional intake and dietary patterns in pregnancy: a longitudinal study of women with lifetime eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Micali, Nadia; Northstone, Kate; Emmett, Pauline; Naumann, Ulrike; Treasure, Janet L

    2012-12-14

    There is limited knowledge about dietary patterns and nutrient/food intake during pregnancy in women with lifetime eating disorders (ED). The objective of the present study was to determine patterns of food and nutrient intake in women with lifetime ED as part of an existing longitudinal population-based cohort: the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Women with singleton pregnancies and no lifetime psychiatric disorders other than ED (n 9723) were compared with women who reported lifetime (ever) ED: (anorexia nervosa (AN, n 151), bulimia nervosa (BN, n 186) or both (AN+BN, n 77)). Women reported usual food consumption using a FFQ at 32 weeks of gestation. Nutrient intakes, frequency of consumption of food groups and overall dietary patterns were examined. Women with lifetime ED were compared with control women using linear regression and logistic regression (as appropriate) after adjustment for relevant covariates, and for multiple comparisons. Women with lifetime ED scored higher on the 'vegetarian' dietary pattern; they had a lower intake of meat, which was compensated by a higher consumption of soya products and pulses compared with the controls. Lifetime AN increased the risk for a high ( ≥ 2500 g/week) caffeine consumption in pregnancy. No deficiencies in mineral and vitamin intake were evident across the groups, although small differences were observed in macronutrient intakes. In conclusion, despite some differences in food group consumption, women with lifetime ED had similar patterns of nutrient intake to healthy controls. Important differences in relation to meat eating and vegetarianism were highlighted, as well as high caffeine consumption. These differences might have an important impact on fetal development. PMID:22784642

  2. Using Sport Education to Teach the Lifetime Sport of Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarboro, Shot; Pritchard, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport activity that can be taught in physical education classes. How one teaches golf in physical education could influence whether students will want to continue to participate outside of physical education. The sport education model (SEM) is an instructional model that promotes student learning in all three domains by ensuring…

  3. Assessing the Validity of a Stage Measure on Physical Activity in a Population-Based Sample of Individuals with Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Lippke, Sonia; Reinbold-Matthews, Melissa; Courneya, Kerry S.; Karunamuni, Nandini; Sigal, Ronald J.; Birkett, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to test the validity of a transtheoretical model's physical activity (PA) stage measure with intention and different intensities of behavior in a large population-based sample of adults living with diabetes (Type 1 diabetes, n = 697; Type 2 diabetes, n = 1,614) and examine different age groups. The overall "specificity"…

  4. Discriminating Famous from Fictional Names Based on Lifetime Experience: Evidence in Support of a Signal-Detection Model Based on Finite Mixture Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Ben; Harlow, Iain M.; Meeking, Melissa M.; Kohler, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that signal-detection mechanisms contribute to item-recognition memory decisions that involve discriminations between targets and lures based on a controlled laboratory study episode. Here, the authors employed mathematical modeling of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) to determine whether and how a signal-detection…

  5. Ambient Fine Particulate Matter and Mortality among Survivors of Myocardial Infarction: Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Burnett, Richard T.; Copes, Ray; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Villeneuve, Paul J.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Brook, Robert D.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Jerrett, Michael; Martin, Randall V.; Brook, Jeffrey R.; Kopp, Alexander; Tu, Jack V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Survivors of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are at increased risk of dying within several hours to days following exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution. Little is known, however, about the influence of long-term (months to years) air pollution exposure on survival after AMI. Objective: We conducted a population-based cohort study to determine the impact of long-term exposure to fine particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) on post-AMI survival. Methods: We assembled a cohort of 8,873 AMI patients who were admitted to 1 of 86 hospital corporations across Ontario, Canada in 1999–2001. Mortality follow-up for this cohort extended through 2011. Cumulative time-weighted exposures to PM2.5 were derived from satellite observations based on participants’ annual residences during follow-up. We used standard and multilevel spatial random-effects Cox proportional hazards models and adjusted for potential confounders. Results: Between 1999 and 2011, we identified 4,016 nonaccidental deaths, of which 2,147 were from any cardiovascular disease, 1,650 from ischemic heart disease, and 675 from AMI. For each 10-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR10) of nonaccidental mortality was 1.22 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.45]. The association with PM2.5 was robust to sensitivity analyses and appeared stronger for cardiovascular-related mortality: ischemic heart (HR10 = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.83) and AMI (HR10 = 1.64; 95% CI: 1.13, 2.40). We estimated that 12.4% of nonaccidental deaths (or 497 deaths) could have been averted if the lowest measured concentration in an urban area (4 μg/m3) had been achieved at all locations over the course of the study. Conclusions: Long-term air pollution exposure adversely affects the survival of AMI patients. Citation: Chen H, Burnett RT, Copes R, Kwong JC, Villeneuve PJ, Goldberg MS, Brook RD, van Donkelaar A, Jerrett M, Martin RV, Brook JR, Kopp A, Tu JV. 2016. Ambient fine

  6. The Epidemiology of Chronic Kidney Disease in Northern Tanzania: A Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Stanifer, John W.; Maro, Venance; Egger, Joseph; Karia, Francis; Thielman, Nathan; Turner, Elizabeth L.; Shimbi, Dionis; Kilaweh, Humphrey; Matemu, Oliver; Patel, Uptal D.

    2015-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, kidney failure has a high morbidity and mortality. Despite this, population-based estimates of prevalence, potential etiologies, and awareness are not available. Methods Between January and June 2014, we conducted a household survey of randomly-selected adults in Northern Tanzania. To estimate prevalence we screened for CKD, which was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73m2 and/or persistent albuminuria. We also screened for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and lifestyle practices including alcohol, tobacco, and traditional medicine use. Awareness was defined as a self-reported disease history and subsequently testing positive. We used population-based age- and gender-weights in estimating prevalence, and we used generalized linear models to explore potential risk factors associated with CKD, including living in an urban environment. Results We enrolled 481 adults from 346 households with a median age of 45 years. The community-based prevalence of CKD was 7.0% (95% CI 3.8-12.3), and awareness was low at 10.5% (4.7-22.0). The urban prevalence of CKD was 15.2% (9.6-23.3) while the rural prevalence was 2.0% (0.5-6.9). Half of the cases of CKD (49.1%) were not associated with any of the measured risk factors of hypertension, diabetes, or HIV. Living in an urban environment had the strongest crude (5.40; 95% CI 2.05-14.2) and adjusted prevalence risk ratio (4.80; 1.70-13.6) for CKD, and the majority (79%) of this increased risk was not explained by demographics, traditional medicine use, socioeconomic status, or co-morbid non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Conclusions We observed a high burden of CKD in Northern Tanzania that was associated with low awareness. Although demographic, lifestyle practices including traditional medicine use, socioeconomic factors, and NCDs accounted for some of the excess CKD risk observed with urban residence, much of the increased urban

  7. Carrier lifetimes in thin-film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Dohyun

    2015-09-01

    The carrier lifetimes in thin-film solar cells are reviewed and discussed. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination is dominant at low carrier density, Auger recombination is dominant under a high injection condition and high carrier density, and surface recombination is dominant under any conditions. Because the surface photovoltage technique is insensitive to the surface condition, it is useful for bulk lifetime measurements. The photoconductance decay technique measures the effective recombination lifetime. The time-resolved photoluminescence technique is very useful for measuring thin-film semiconductor or solar-cell materials lifetime, because the sample is thin, other techniques are not suitable for measuring the lifetime. Many papers have provided time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) lifetimes for copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) and CdTe thin-film solar cell. The TRPL lifetime strongly depends on open-circuit voltage and conversion efficiency; however, the TRPL life time is insensitive to the short-circuit current.

  8. A new receptor model-incremental lifetime cancer risk method to quantify the carcinogenic risks associated with sources of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from Chengdu in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gui-Rong; Peng, Xing; Wang, Rong-Kang; Tian, Ying-Ze; Shi, Guo-Liang; Wu, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Pu; Zhou, Lai-Dong; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2015-01-01

    PM10 and PM2.5 samples were simultaneously collected during a one-year monitoring period in Chengdu. The concentrations of 16 particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Σ16PAHs) were measured. Σ16PAHs concentrations varied from 16.85 to 160.24 ng m(-3) and 14.93 to 111.04ngm(-3) for PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. Three receptor models (principal component analysis (PCA), positive matrix factorization (PMF), and Multilinear Engine 2 (ME2)) were applied to investigate the sources and contributions of PAHs. The results obtained from the three receptor models were compared. Diesel emissions, gasoline emissions, and coal and wood combustion were the primary sources. Source apportionment results indicated that these models were able to track the ΣPAHs. For the first time, the cancer risks for each identified source were quantitatively calculated for ingestion and dermal contact routes by combining the incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) values with the estimated source contributions. The results showed that gasoline emissions posed the highest cancer risk, even though it contributed less to Σ16PAHs. The results and method from this work can provide useful information for quantifying the toxicity of source categories and studying human health in the future. PMID:25464284

  9. Population-based 3D genome structure analysis reveals driving forces in spatial genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Kalhor, Reza; Dai, Chao; Hao, Shengli; Gong, Ke; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Haochen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Chen, Lin; Alber, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Conformation capture technologies (e.g., Hi-C) chart physical interactions between chromatin regions on a genome-wide scale. However, the structural variability of the genome between cells poses a great challenge to interpreting ensemble-averaged Hi-C data, particularly for long-range and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we present a probabilistic approach for deconvoluting Hi-C data into a model population of distinct diploid 3D genome structures, which facilitates the detection of chromatin interactions likely to co-occur in individual cells. Our approach incorporates the stochastic nature of chromosome conformations and allows a detailed analysis of alternative chromatin structure states. For example, we predict and experimentally confirm the presence of large centromere clusters with distinct chromosome compositions varying between individual cells. The stability of these clusters varies greatly with their chromosome identities. We show that these chromosome-specific clusters can play a key role in the overall chromosome positioning in the nucleus and stabilizing specific chromatin interactions. By explicitly considering genome structural variability, our population-based method provides an important tool for revealing novel insights into the key factors shaping the spatial genome organization. PMID:26951677

  10. Physical Function and Health-Related Quality-of-Life in a Population-Based Sample

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Susan A.; Chiu, Gretchen R.; Williams, Rachel E.; Clark, Richard V.; Araujo, Andre B.

    2011-01-01

    Background It is of interest to understand whether impaired physical function is associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL). We examined upper and lower body physical function and its relationship with two domains of HRQOL among men. Methods We conducted a population-based observational study of musculoskeletal health among Boston, MA residents, the Boston Area Community Health/Bone Survey. Participants were 1,219 randomly-selected Black, Hispanic, and White males (30–79 years). Upper body function was measured using hand grip strength, while lower body function was measured by combining a timed walk and a chair stand test. HRQOL was measured using the physical (PCS-12) and mental health (MCS-12) component scores of the SF-12. Multivariate linear regression models were used to estimate the association between poor function and HRQOL. Results There was a significant association of poor upper body physical function with the MCS-12 (beta coefficient: −4.12, p=0.003) but not the PCS-12 (beta coefficient: 0.79, p=0.30) compared to those without poor function. Those with poor lower body physical function had significantly lower PCS-12 scores (beta: −2.95, p=0.007), compared to those without poor function, but an association was not observed for MCS-12 scores. Conclusions Domains of physical function was not consistently related to domains of HRQOL. PMID:20670102

  11. Population-based study of facial morphology and excessive daytime somnolence.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Pablo R; Mera, Robertino M; Zambrano, Mauricio; Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2014-11-01

    Studies in patients seeking attention for nasal obstruction or pharyngeal disorders suggest that craniofacial abnormalities correlate with obstructive sleep apnea, but there is little information on the relevance of this association in the population at large. We aimed to determine whether characteristics of facial morphology correlate with excessive daytime somnolence (EDS) in a population-based, door-to-door survey. Residents of a village in rural Ecuador were screened with the Epworth sleepiness scale to assess EDS and underwent physical examination with attention to nasal septum deflection, mandibular retrognathia and presence of Friedman's palate position type IV. From 665 participants aged ≥40 years, 155 had EDS, 98 had nasal septum deflection, 47 had mandibular retrognathia and 528 had a Friedman's palate position type IV. In a logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and nightly sleep hours, persons with nasal septum deflection were twice as likely to have EDS (p=0.009). The other two variables were not associated with EDS. Identification of nasal septum deflection may be a cost-effective method of detecting persons at risk for obstructive sleep apnea in remote areas where sophisticated technology is not readily available. PMID:24986788

  12. A Population-Based Cohort Study on Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wen-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is considered the leading cause of atherosclerotic cardiovascular morbidity. Several risk factors of PAD have been observed in patients with schizophrenia. Therefore, we hypothesize that the incidence of PAD is higher in the schizophrenia population than in the general population. Methods The patients in this population-based cohort study were selected from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database on the basis of the claims data from 2000 to 2011. We compared the incidence of PAD between schizophrenia and nonschizophrenia cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regression models were employed for analyzing the risk of PAD after adjustment for sex, age, and comorbidities. Results The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for PAD in the schizophrenia cohort was 1.26-fold higher than that in the nonschizophrenia cohort. Furthermore, patients with schizophrenia using atypical antipsychotics exhibited a high adjusted HR for PAD. Conclusion Compared with the general population, the risk of PAD is higher among patients with schizophrenia. Early diagnosis and intervention can mitigate complications resulting from cardiovascular diseases and lower mortality. PMID:26871697

  13. Seasonal variation of peripheral blood leukocyte telomere length in Costa Rica: a population based observational study

    PubMed Central

    Rehkopf, David H; Dow, William H; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Lin, Jue; Epel, Elissa S; Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Peripheral blood leukocyte telomere length is increasingly being used as a biomarker of aging, but its natural variation in human populations is not well understood. Several other biomarkers show seasonal variation, as do several determinants of leukocyte telomere length. We examined whether there was monthly variation in leukocyte telomere length in Costa Rica, a country with strong seasonal differences in precipitation and infection. Methods We examined a longitudinal population based cohort of 581 Costa Rican adults age 60 and above, from which blood samples were drawn between October 2006 and July 2008. Leukocyte telomere length was assayed from these samples using the quantitative PCR method. Multivariate regression models were used to examine correlations between month of blood draw and leukocyte telomere length. Results Telomere length from peripheral blood leukocytes varied by as much as 200 base pairs depending on month of blood draw, and this difference is not likely to be due to random variation. A moderate proportion of this association is statistically accounted for by month and region specific average rainfall. We found shorter telomere length associated with greater rainfall. Conclusions There are two possible explanations of our findings. First, there could be relatively rapid month-to-month changes in leukocyte telomere length. This conclusion would have implications for understanding the natural population dynamics of telomere length. Second, there could be seasonal differences in constituent cell populations. This conclusion would suggest that future studies of leukocyte telomere length use methods to account for the potential impact of constituent cell type. PMID:24615938

  14. The association of psychosocial and familial factors with adolescent suicidal ideation: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    An, Hoyoung; Ahn, Joon-ho; Bhang, Soo-young

    2010-05-30

    We aimed to compare the influence of various parental factors on adolescent suicidal ideas from a population-based sample of 2965 adolescents between 15 to 18 years-old, and their parents. Among the subject variables, gender, satisfaction with one's health, having an illness, and satisfaction with family; and among parental variables, fathers' satisfaction with health; mothers' insufficient sleep; parents' history of suicidal ideation, and satisfaction with family were significantly different in adolescents who reported suicidal ideation compared to those who reported none. Odds ratios indicated increased risk of adolescent suicidal ideation was associated with the subject factors female gender, insufficient sleep, dissatisfaction with one's health, dissatisfaction with family, and with maternal data showing insufficient sleep and a positive history of suicidal impulse. A path analysis model (comparative fit index (CFI)=0.907; root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA)=0.047), indicated psychosocial factors (beta=0.232) had a greater influence on adolescent suicidal ideation than did genetic factors (beta=0.120). These results show psychosocial factors have an almost two-fold greater influence on adolescent suicidal ideation than genetic factors. Assessment and modification of these factors would greatly assist future interventions. PMID:20381165

  15. Incidence of Hidradenitis Suppurativa and Associated Factors: A Population-Based Study of Olmsted County, Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Benjamin G.; Alikhan, Ali; Weaver, Amy L.; Wetter, David A.; Davis, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    There are no population-based incidence studies of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Using the medical records linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, we sought to determine incidence, as well as other associations and characteristics, for HS patients diagnosed in Olmsted County, Minnesota between 1968 and 2008. Incidence was estimated using the decennial census data for the county. Logistic regression models were fit to evaluate associations between patient characteristics and disease severity. A total of 268 incident cases were identified, with an overall annual age- and sex-adjusted incidence of 6.0 per 100,000. Age-adjusted incidence was significantly higher in women compared to men [8.2 (95% CI, 7.0–9.3) vs. 3.8 (95% CI, 3.0–4.7)]. The highest incidence was among young women aged 20–29 (18.4 per 100,000). The incidence has risen over the past four decades, particularly among women. Women were more likely to have axillary and upper anterior torso involvement, while men were more likely to have perineal or perianal disease. Additionally, 54.9% (140/255) patients were obese; 70.2% were current or former smokers; 42.9% carried a diagnosis of depression; 36.2% carried a diagnosis of acne; and 6% had pilonidal disease. Smoking and gender were significantly associated with more severe disease. PMID:22931916

  16. Sleep and academic performance in later adolescence: results from a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hysing, Mari; Harvey, Allison G; Linton, Steven J; Askeland, Kristin G; Sivertsen, Børge

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the association between sleep duration and sleep patterns and academic performance in 16-19 year-old adolescents using registry-based academic grades. A large population-based study from Norway conducted in 2012, the youth@hordaland-survey, surveyed 7798 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53.5% girls). The survey was linked with objective outcome data on school performance. Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep deficit and bedtime differences between weekday and weekend. School performance [grade point average (GPA)] was obtained from official administrative registries. Most sleep parameters were associated with increased risk for poor school performance. After adjusting for sociodemographic information, short sleep duration and sleep deficit were the sleep measures with the highest odds of poor GPA (lowest quartile). Weekday bedtime was associated significantly with GPA, with adolescents going to bed between 22:00 and 23:00 hours having the best GPA. Also, delayed sleep schedule during weekends was associated with poor academic performance. The associations were somewhat reduced after additional adjustment for non-attendance at school, but remained significant in the fully adjusted models. In conclusion, the demonstrated relationship between sleep problems and poor academic performance suggests that careful assessment of sleep is warranted when adolescents are underperforming at school. Future studies are needed on the association between impaired sleep in adolescence and later functioning in adulthood. PMID:26825591

  17. Firearm and Nonfirearm Homicide in 5 South African Cities: A Retrospective Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mary Lou; Myers, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We assessed the effectiveness of South Africa’s Firearm Control Act (FCA), passed in 2000, on firearm homicide rates compared with rates of nonfirearm homicide across 5 South African cities from 2001 to 2005. Methods. We conducted a retrospective population-based study of 37 067 firearm and nonfirearm homicide cases. Generalized linear models helped estimate and compare time trends of firearm and nonfirearm homicides, adjusting for age, sex, race, day of week, city, year of death, and population size. Results. There was a statistically significant decreasing trend regarding firearm homicides from 2001, with an adjusted year-on-year homicide rate ratio of 0.864 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.848, 0.880), representing a decrease of 13.6% per annum. The year-on-year decrease in nonfirearm homicide rates was also significant, but considerably lower at 0.976 (95% CI = 0.954, 0.997). Results suggest that 4585 (95% CI = 4427, 4723) lives were saved across 5 cities from 2001 to 2005 because of the FCA. Conclusions. Strength, timing and consistent decline suggest stricter gun control mediated by the FCA accounted for a significant decrease in homicide overall, and firearm homicide in particular, during the study period. PMID:24432917

  18. Normal liver enzymes are correlated with severity of metabolic syndrome in a large population based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kälsch, Julia; Bechmann, Lars P.; Heider, Dominik; Best, Jan; Manka, Paul; Kälsch, Hagen; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Moebus, Susanne; Slomiany, Uta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund; Gerken, Guido; Canbay, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Key features of the metabolic syndrome are insulin resistance and diabetes. The liver as central metabolic organ is not only affected by the metabolic syndrome as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but may contribute to insulin resistance and metabolic alterations. We aimed to identify potential associations between liver injury markers and diabetes in the population-based Heinz Nixdorf RECALL Study. Demographic and laboratory data were analyzed in participants (n = 4814, age 45 to 75y). ALT and AST values were significantly higher in males than in females. Mean BMI was 27.9 kg/m2 and type-2-diabetes (known and unkown) was present in 656 participants (13.7%). Adiponectin and vitamin D both correlated inversely with BMI. ALT, AST, and GGT correlated with BMI, CRP and HbA1c and inversely correlated with adiponectin levels. Logistic regression models using HbA1c and adiponectin or HbA1c and BMI were able to predict diabetes with high accuracy. Transaminase levels within normal ranges were closely associated with the BMI and diabetes risk. Transaminase levels and adiponectin were inversely associated. Re-assessment of current normal range limits should be considered, to provide a more exact indicator for chronic metabolic liver injury, in particular to reflect the situation in diabetic or obese individuals. PMID:26269425

  19. Normal liver enzymes are correlated with severity of metabolic syndrome in a large population based cohort.

    PubMed

    Kälsch, Julia; Bechmann, Lars P; Heider, Dominik; Best, Jan; Manka, Paul; Kälsch, Hagen; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Moebus, Susanne; Slomiany, Uta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund; Gerken, Guido; Canbay, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Key features of the metabolic syndrome are insulin resistance and diabetes. The liver as central metabolic organ is not only affected by the metabolic syndrome as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but may contribute to insulin resistance and metabolic alterations. We aimed to identify potential associations between liver injury markers and diabetes in the population-based Heinz Nixdorf RECALL Study. Demographic and laboratory data were analyzed in participants (n = 4814, age 45 to 75 y). ALT and AST values were significantly higher in males than in females. Mean BMI was 27.9 kg/m(2) and type-2-diabetes (known and unkown) was present in 656 participants (13.7%). Adiponectin and vitamin D both correlated inversely with BMI. ALT, AST, and GGT correlated with BMI, CRP and HbA1c and inversely correlated with adiponectin levels. Logistic regression models using HbA1c and adiponectin or HbA1c and BMI were able to predict diabetes with high accuracy. Transaminase levels within normal ranges were closely associated with the BMI and diabetes risk. Transaminase levels and adiponectin were inversely associated. Re-assessment of current normal range limits should be considered, to provide a more exact indicator for chronic metabolic liver injury, in particular to reflect the situation in diabetic or obese individuals. PMID:26269425

  20. Epidemiology in a changing world: implications for population-based research on mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Cooper, B

    2014-06-01

    Introduction and objectives. Population-based research on mental disorders needs to keep pace with trends in general epidemiology. At present, this requirement is complicated by uncertainty within the parent discipline about its future development. The present study examines proposals for new directions in strategy and methods and considers their significance for psychiatric epidemiology. Method. Narrative review, cross-checked by search of English-language journals of epidemiology for new trends and developments reported in the years from 2000 onwards. Results. The proposals reviewed here are divided into three groups: 1. A new research paradigm of 'eco-epidemiology', which includes both individual risk factors and macro-environmental systems that mediate population levels of health and sickness. 2. Improved 'translation' of research findings - i.e. more rapid and effective implementation of epidemiological evidence into health policy and practice. 3. Adaptation of epidemiology to a globalised economy, with firmer regulation of funding and resources. Conclusions. Each of these proposals has implications for psychiatric epidemiology. Workers in this field, however, are still preoccupied by relatively specific problems of definition, measurement and classification, and so far the current debates in general epidemiology are scarcely reflected. The proposals outlined above call for: • a working model of eco-epidemiology as it relates to psychiatric disorders; • implementation strategies to encourage more active participation in epidemiological research by community health services and caregiver organisations; • international collaborative projects that offer practical benefits in training and service facilities for the countries taking part. PMID:24345606

  1. Physical Trauma and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Population-Based Study Using Danish National Registries.

    PubMed

    Seals, Ryan M; Hansen, Johnni; Gredal, Ole; Weisskopf, Marc G

    2016-02-15

    Prior studies have suggested that physical trauma might be associated with the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We conducted a population-based, individually matched case-control study in Denmark to assess whether hospitalization for trauma is associated with a higher risk of developing ALS. There were 3,650 incident cases of ALS in the Danish National Patient Register from 1982 to 2009. We used risk-set sampling to match each case to 100 age- and sex-matched population controls alive on the date of the case's diagnosis. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a conditional logistic regression model. History of trauma diagnosis was also obtained from the Danish Patient Register. When traumas in the 5 years prior to the index date were excluded, there was a borderline association between any trauma and ALS (odds ratio (OR) = 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99, 1.19). A first trauma before age 55 years was associated with ALS (OR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.37), whereas first traumas at older ages were not (OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.85, 1.10). Our data suggest that physical trauma at earlier ages is associated with ALS risk. Age at first trauma could help explain discrepancies in results of past studies of trauma and ALS. PMID:26825926

  2. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically-encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters are powerful tools to analyze cell signaling and function at single cell resolution in standard two-dimensional cell cultures, but these reporters rarely have been applied to three-dimensional environments. FRET interactions between donor and acceptor molecules typically are determined by changes in relative fluorescence intensities, but wavelength-dependent differences in absorption of light complicate this analysis method in three-dimensional settings. Here we report fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with phasor analysis, a method that displays fluorescence lifetimes on a pixel-wise basis in real time, to quantify apoptosis in breast cancer cells stably expressing a genetically encoded FRET reporter. This microscopic imaging technology allowed us to identify treatment-induced apoptosis in single breast cancer cells in environments ranging from two-dimensional cell culture, spheroids with cancer and bone marrow stromal cells, and living mice with orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts. Using this imaging strategy, we showed that combined metabolic therapy targeting glycolysis and glutamine pathways significantly reduced overall breast cancer metabolism and induced apoptosis. We also determined that distinct subpopulations of bone marrow stromal cells control resistance of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy, suggesting heterogeneity of treatment responses of malignant cells in different bone marrow niches. Overall, this study establishes FLIM with phasor analysis as an imaging tool for apoptosis in cell-based assays and living mice, enabling real-time, cellular-level assessment of treatment efficacy and heterogeneity. PMID:26771007

  3. Lifetimes and heavy quark expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Kolya Uraltsev was one of the inventors of the Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), that describes inclusive weak decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks and in particular lifetimes. Besides giving a pedagogic introduction to the subject, we review the development and the current status of the HQE, which just recently passed several non-trivial experimental tests with an unprecedented precision. In view of many new experimental results for lifetimes of heavy hadrons, we also update several theory predictions: τ (B+)/τ (Bd) = 1.04+0.05-0.01 ± 0.02 ± 0.01, τ(Bs)/τ(Bd) = 1.001 ±0.002, τ(Λb)/τ(Bd) = 0.935 ±0.054 and \\bar {τ } (Ξ b0)/\\bar {τ } (Ξ b+) = 0.95 ± 0.06. The theoretical precision is currently strongly limited by the unknown size of the non-perturbative matrix elements of four-quark operators, which could be determined with lattice simulations.

  4. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: HD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  5. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Copp, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: RD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  6. Quantum-classical lifetimes of Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junginger, Andrej; Main, Jörg; Wunner, Günter

    2013-04-01

    A remarkable property of Rydberg atoms is the possibility of creating molecules formed by one highly excited atom and another atom in the ground state. The first realization of such a Rydberg molecule has opened an active field of physical investigations, and showed that its basic properties can be described within a simple model regarding the ground state atom as a small perturber that is bound by a low-energy scattering process with the Rydberg electron (Greene et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 2458). Besides the good agreement between theory and the experiment concerning the vibrational states of the molecule, the experimental observations yield the astonishing feature that the lifetime of the molecule is clearly reduced as compared to the bare Rydberg atom (Butscher et al 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 184004). With focus on this yet unexplained observation, we investigate in this paper the vibrational ground state of the molecule in a quantum-classical framework. We show that the Rydberg wavefunction is continuously detuned by the presence of the moving ground state atom and that the timescale on which the detuning significantly exceeds the natural linewidth is in good agreement with the observed reduced lifetimes of the Rydberg molecule.

  7. Population-Based Prospective Study of Cigarette Smoking and Risk of Incident Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Benito-León, Julián; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Smoking cigarettes is associated with lower risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Despite the clinical links between PD and essential tremor (ET), there are few data on smoking in ET. One study showed an association between smoking and lower ET prevalence. We now study whether baseline smoking is associated with lower risk of incident ET. METHODS Using a population-based, cohort design, baseline cigarette smoking habits were assessed in 3,348 participants in an epidemiological study in Spain, among whom 77 developed incident ET. RESULTS There were 3,348 participants, among whom 397 (11.9%) were smokers at baseline. Five (6.5%) of 77 incident ET cases had been smokers at baseline compared with 392 (12.0%) of 3,271 controls (p = 0.14). Baseline pack-years were lower in incident ET cases than controls (9.2 ± 17.7 vs. 15.7 ± 28.4, p = 0.002). Participants were stratified into baseline pack-year tertiles and few incident ET cases were in the highest tertile (4 [5.2%] cases vs. 431 [13.2%] controls, p = 0.039). In Cox Proportional Hazards Models, highest baseline pack-year tertile was associated with lower risk of incident ET; those in the highest pack-year tertile were one-third as likely to develop ET when compared to non-smokers (RR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.14–1.03, p = 0.057 [unadjusted model] and RR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.09–0.90, p = 0.03 [adjusted model]). CONCLUSIONS We demonstrated an association between baseline heavy cigarette smoking and lower risk of incident ET. The biological basis for this association requires future investigation. PMID:18458228

  8. Positron and Positronium Annihilation Lifetime, and Free Volume in Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhibin

    1995-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime measurements were carried out for six polycarbonates of different structures and four polystyrenes of different molecular weight over a wide temperature range covering the glass transition region. The o-Ps mean lifetime is very sensitive to the changes of free volume in those polymers which occur due to change of molecular structure, chain length, and temperature. The influence of the unavoidable e^{+} irradiation and physical aging on the mean lifetime and the intensity of o-Ps annihilation were studied by conducting time dependent measurements on both very aged and rejuvenated samples. Both irradiation and physical aging reduce the formation of positronium, but have no effect on the mean lifetime of Ps atoms. The free volume fraction h obtained from the positron lifetime measurements was compared with the prediction of the statistical mechanical theory of Simha and Somcynsky; good agreement was found in the melt state though clear deviations were observed in the glassy state. A free volume quantity, computed from the bulk volume, which is in a good numerical agreement with the Simha-Somcynsky h-function in the melt, gives improved agreement with the h value calculated from the positron lifetime measurements. To investigate certain anomalies observed in the computer analysis of the positron annihilation lifetime spectra on polymers, we developed a computer simulation of the experimental data, which then was used to test the accuracy of the fitting results in the different circumstances. The influence caused by a possible distribution of the o-Ps mean lifetimes and the width of the spectrometer time resolution function were studied. The theoretical connection between the o-Ps mean lifetime and the free volume hole size was reviewed based on a finite spherical potential well model, and the status of the localized Ps atom in polymers was evaluated by calculation of the barrier transmission probability and the escaping probability of the

  9. Prevalence of Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS): A Population-Based Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Varun; Alikhan, Ali; Vazquez, Benjamin G.; Weaver, Amy L.; Davis, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a follicular occlusion disorder occurring in apocrine-rich regions of the skin. Estimates of the prevalence of this disorder have not been population-based. We sought to provide population-based information on the prevalence of HS in Olmsted County, Minnesota as of 1/1/2009. METHODS Rochester Epidemiology Project, a unique infrastructure that combines and makes accessible all medical records in Olmsted County since the 1960s, was used to collect population-based data on the prevalence of HS. RESULTS We identified 178 confirmed cases of HS that included 135 females and 43 males, and estimated the total sex- and age-adjusted prevalence in Olmsted County to be 127.8 per 100,000 or 0.13%. The total prevalence was significantly higher among women than men. CONCLUSION This study represents the first population-based investigation on the prevalence of HS. In this population-based cohort, HS was less prevalent than previous reports have suggested. PMID:25228133

  10. Influences on lifetime of wire ropes in traction lifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, W.

    2016-05-01

    Traction lifts are complex systems with rotating and translating moving masses, springs and dampers and several system inputs from the lifts and the users. The wire ropes are essential mechanical elements. The mechanical properties of the ropes in use depend on the rope construction, the load situation, nonlinearities and the lift dimensions. The mechanical properties are important for the proper use in lifts and the ride quality. But first of all the wire ropes (for all other suspension means as well) have to satisfy the safety relevant requirements sufficient lifetime, reliable determination of discard and sufficient and limited traction capacity. The lifetime of the wire ropes better the number of trips until rope discard depends on a lot of parameters of the rope and the rope application eg use of plastic deflection sheaves and reverse bending layouts. New challenges for rope lifetime are resulting from the more or less open D/d-ratio limits possible by certificates concerning the examination of conformity by notified bodies. This paper will highlight the basics of wire rope technology, the endurance and lifetime of wire ropes running over sheaves, and the different influences from the ropes and more and more important from the lift application parameters. Very often underestimated are the influences of transport, storage, installation and maintenance. With this background we will lead over to the calculation methods of wire rope lifetime considering the actual findings of wire rope endurance research. We'll show in this paper new and innovative facts as the influence of rope length and size factor in the lifetime formular, the reduction of lifetime caused by traction grooves, the new model for the calculation in reverse bending operations and the statistically firmed possibilities for machine roomless lifts (MRL) under very small bending conditions.

  11. Inhomogeneous dephasing masks coherence lifetimes in ensemble measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Griffin, Graham B.; Engel, Gregory S.; Gray, Stephen K.

    2012-04-28

    An open question at the forefront of modern physical sciences is what role, if any, quantum effects may play in biological sensing and energy transport mechanisms. One area of such research concerns the possibility of coherent energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Spectroscopic evidence of long-lived quantum coherence in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment protein complexes (PPCs), along with theoretical modeling of PPCs, has indicated that coherent energy transport might boost efficiency of energy transport in photosynthesis. Accurate assessment of coherence lifetimes is crucial for modeling the extent to which quantum effects participate in this energy transfer, because such quantum effects can only contribute to mechanisms proceeding on timescales over which the coherences persist. While spectroscopy is a useful way to measure coherence lifetimes, inhomogeneity in the transition energies across the measured ensemble may lead to underestimation of coherence lifetimes from spectroscopic experiments. Theoretical models of antenna complexes generally model a single system, and direct comparison of single system models to ensemble averaged experimental data may lead to systematic underestimation of coherence lifetimes, distorting much of the current discussion. In this study, we use simulations of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex to model single complexes as well as averaged ensembles to demonstrate and roughly quantify the effect of averaging over an inhomogeneous ensemble on measured coherence lifetimes. We choose to model the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex because that system has been a focus for much of the recent discussion of quantum effects in biology, and use an early version of the well known environment-assisted quantum transport model to facilitate straightforward comparison between the current model and past work. Although ensemble inhomogeneity is known to lead to shorter lifetimes of observed oscillations (simply inhomogeneous spectral

  12. Lifetime measurements for bottom hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.

    1984-09-01

    The review of lifetime measurements of bottom hadrons begins with a first measurement by JADE, followed by similar measurements by MAC and MKII groups. New MAC data are reviewed based on a total of 75,000 multihadron events taken at a c.m. energy of 29 GeV. According to Monte Carlo calculations, 18% of the lepton candidates stem from charm decay and roughly 30% were misidentified hadrons. DELCO studied electrons obtained from 42,000 multihadron events at 29 GeV. The electrons were identified by means of Cerenkov counters. JADE analayzed 22,000 multihadron events at 35 GeV. Data were analyzed using two methods - one using a sample of b-enriched events, and the other using weighted distributions. The TASSO results were obtained with two different configurations of the detector - one of which used a drift chamber and the other a vertex detector. (LEW)

  13. Microfabricated microporous membranes reduce the host immune response and prolong the functional lifetime of a closed-loop insulin delivery implant in a type 1 diabetic rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jason; Chu, Michael K L; Gordijo, Claudia R; Abbasi, Azhar Z; Chen, Kuan; Adissu, Hibret A; Löhn, Matthias; Giacca, Adria; Plettenburg, Oliver; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2015-04-01

    Implantation of a medical implant within the body inevitably triggers a host inflammatory response that negatively impacts its function and longevity. Nevertheless, the degree and severity of this response may be reduced by selecting appropriate materials, implant geometry, surface topography and surface treatment. Here we demonstrate a strategy to improve the biocompatibility of a chemically-driven closed-loop insulin delivery implant. A microfabricated microporous, poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted polydimethylsiloxane membrane was placed on top of the glucose-responsive insulin release plug of the implant. Implant biocompatibility was assessed in healthy rats while implant function was evaluated in a type 1 diabetic rat model. The microporous membrane with a small distance to the plug provided a geometric barrier to inflammatory cell migration and prevented leukocyte-mediated degradation of the plug for at least 30 days. Membrane-protected devices elicited a significantly milder inflammatory response and formation of a well-defined fibrous capsule at the device opening compared to unprotected devices. The device's glucose-responsiveness was nearly unchanged, although the insulin release rate decreased with decreasing pore size. The microporous membrane improved biocompatibility and prolonged in vivo efficacy of the implant by ∼3-fold. This work suggests the importance of implant design in modulating inflammatory response and thereby extending the functional duration of the implant. PMID:25682160

  14. Men's sexual interest in children: one-year incidence and correlates in a population-based sample of Finnish male twins.

    PubMed

    Santtila, Pekka; Antfolk, Jan; Räfså, Anna; Hartwig, Maria; Sariola, Heikki; Sandnabba, N Kenneth; Mokros, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In a study of 1,310 Finnish adult male twins we found that sexual interest in children aged 12 or younger was reported by 0.2% of the sample. Sexual interest in children aged 15 or younger was reported by 3.3%. Participants reporting sexual interest in children aged 15 or younger were younger, reported stronger sexual desire, and had experienced more childhood sexual and nonsexual abuse. The present study is the first to give a population-based estimate of the incidence of sexual interest in children among adult men. The 12-month incidence of sexual interest in children below the age of 16 years is roughly comparable to the one-year incidence of major depression or the lifetime prevalence of transvestitic fetishism. PMID:25747416

  15. Developmental Profiles of Eczema, Wheeze, and Rhinitis: Two Population-Based Birth Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The term “atopic march” has been used to imply a natural progression of a cascade of symptoms from eczema to asthma and rhinitis through childhood. We hypothesize that this expression does not adequately describe the natural history of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis during childhood. We propose that this paradigm arose from cross-sectional analyses of longitudinal studies, and may reflect a population pattern that may not predominate at the individual level. Methods and Findings Data from 9,801 children in two population-based birth cohorts were used to determine individual profiles of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis and whether the manifestations of these symptoms followed an atopic march pattern. Children were assessed at ages 1, 3, 5, 8, and 11 y. We used Bayesian machine learning methods to identify distinct latent classes based on individual profiles of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis. This approach allowed us to identify groups of children with similar patterns of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis over time. Using a latent disease profile model, the data were best described by eight latent classes: no disease (51.3%), atopic march (3.1%), persistent eczema and wheeze (2.7%), persistent eczema with later-onset rhinitis (4.7%), persistent wheeze with later-onset rhinitis (5.7%), transient wheeze (7.7%), eczema only (15.3%), and rhinitis only (9.6%). When latent variable modelling was carried out separately for the two cohorts, similar results were obtained. Highly concordant patterns of sensitisation were associated with different profiles of eczema, rhinitis, and wheeze. The main limitation of this study was the difference in wording of the questions used to ascertain the presence of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis in the two cohorts. Conclusions The developmental profiles of eczema, wheeze, and rhinitis are heterogeneous; only a small proportion of children (∼7% of those with symptoms) follow trajectory profiles resembling the atopic march. Please see later

  16. A Population-based Study of Age Inequalities in Access to Palliative Care Among Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Frederick I.; Lawson, Beverley J.; Johnston, Grace M.; Grunfeld, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Background Inequalities in access to palliative care programs (PCP) by age have been shown to exist in Canada and elsewhere. Few studies have been able to provide greater insight by simultaneously adjusting for multiple demographic, health service, and socio-cultural indicators. Objective To re-examine the relationship between age and registration to specialized community-based PCP programs among cancer patients and identify the multiple indicators contributing to these inequalities. Methods This retrospective, population-based study was a secondary data analysis of linked individual level information extracted from 6 administrative health databases and contextual (neighborhood level) data from provincial and census information. Subjects included all adults who died due to cancer between 1998 and 2003 living within 2 District Health Authorities in the province of Nova Scotia, Canada. The relationship between registration in a PCP and age was examined using hierarchical nonlinear regression modeling techniques. Identification of potential patient and ecologic contributing indicators was guided by Andersen’s conceptual model of health service utilization. Results Overall, 66% of 7511 subjects were registered with a PCP. Older subjects were significantly less likely than those <65 years of age to be registered with a PCP, in particular those aged 85 years and older (adjusted odds ratio: 0.4; 95% confidence interval: 0.3–0.5). Distance to the closest cancer center had a major impact on registration. Conclusions Age continues to be a significant predictor of PCP registration in Nova Scotia even after controlling for the confounding effects of many new demographic, health service, and ecologic indicators. PMID:19300309

  17. Air pollution and newly diagnostic autism spectrum disorders: a population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chau-Ren; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hwang, Bing-Fang

    2013-01-01

    There is limited evidence that long-term exposure to ambient air pollution increases the risk of childhood autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The objective of the study was to investigate the associations between long-term exposure to air pollution and newly diagnostic ASD in Taiwan. We conducted a population-based cohort of 49,073 children age less than 3 years in 2000 that were retrieved from Taiwan National Insurance Research Database and followed up from 2000 through 2010. Inverse distance weighting method was used to form exposure parameter for ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 µm (PM10). Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards (PH) model was performed to evaluate the relationship between yearly average exposure air pollutants of preceding years and newly diagnostic ASD. The risk of newly diagnostic ASD increased according to increasing O3, CO, NO2, and SO2 levels. The effect estimate indicating an approximately 59% risk increase per 10 ppb increase in O3 level (95% CI 1.42-1.79), 37% risk increase per 10 ppb in CO (95% CI 1.31-1.44), 340% risk increase per 10 ppb increase in NO2 level (95% CI 3.31-5.85), and 17% risk increase per 1 ppb in SO2 level (95% CI 1.09-1.27) was stable with different combinations of air pollutants in the multi-pollutant models. Our results provide evident that children exposure to O3, CO, NO2, and SO2 in the preceding 1 year to 4 years may increase the risk of ASD diagnosis. PMID:24086549

  18. Radiotherapy and Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Esther H. Ellis, Rodney J.; Cherullo, Edward; Colussi, Valdir; Xu Fang; Chen Weidong; Gupta, Sanjay; Whalen, Christopher C.; Bodner, Donald; Resnick, Martin I.; Rimm, Alfred A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of overall and disease-specific survival with the five standard treatment modalities for prostate cancer (CaP): radical prostatectomy (RP), brachytherapy (BT), external beam radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and no treatment (NT) within 6 months after CaP diagnosis. Methods and Materials: The study population included 10,179 men aged 65 years and older with incident CaP diagnosed between 1999 and 2001. Using the linked Ohio Cancer Incidence Surveillance System, Medicare, and death certificate files, overall and disease-specific survival through 2005 among the five clinically accepted therapies were analyzed. Results: Disease-specific survival rates were 92.3% and 23.9% for patients with localized vs. distant disease at 7 years, respectively. Controlling for age, race, comorbidities, stage, and Gleason score, results from the Cox multiple regression models indicated that the risk of CaP-specific death was significantly reduced in patients receiving RP or BT, compared with NT. For localized disease, compared with NT, in the monotherapy cohort, RP and BT were associated with reduced hazard ratios (HR) of 0.25 and 0.45 (95% confidence intervals 0.13-0.48 and 0.23-0.87, respectively), whereas in the combination therapy cohort, HR were 0.40 (0.17-0.94) and 0.46 (0.27-0.80), respectively. Conclusions: The present population-based study indicates that RP and BT are associated with improved survival outcomes. Further studies are warranted to improve clinical determinates in the selection of appropriate management of CaP and to improve predictive modeling for which patient subsets may benefit most from definitive therapy vs. conservative management and/or observation.

  19. Direct costs in impaired glucose regulation: results from the population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall study

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, C; Claessen, H; Andrich, S; Brüne, M; Dintsios, C M; Slomiany, U; Roggenbuck, U; Jöckel, K H; Moebus, S; Icks, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective For the first time, this population-based study sought to analyze healthcare utilization and associated costs in people with normal fasting glycemia (NFG), impaired fasting glycemia (IFG), as well as previously undetected diabetes and previously diagnosed diabetes linking data from the prospective German Heinz Nixdorf Recall (HNR) study with individual claims data from German statutory health insurances. Research design and methods A total of 1709 participants of the HNR 5-year follow-up (mean age (SD) 64.9 (7.5) years, 44.5% men) were included in the study. Age-standardized and sex-standardized healthcare utilization and associated costs (reported as € for the year 2008, perspective of the statutory health insurance) were stratified by diabetes stage defined by the participants' self-report and fasting plasma glucose values. Cost ratios (CRs) were estimated using two-part regression models, adjusting for age, sex, sociodemographic variables and comorbidity. Results The mean total direct healthcare costs for previously diagnosed diabetes, previously undetected diabetes, IFG, and NFG were €2761 (95% CI 2378 to 3268), €2210 (1483 to 4279), €2035 (1732 to 2486) and €1810 (1634 to 2035), respectively. Corresponding age-adjusted and sex-adjusted CRs were 1.53 (1.30 to 1.80), 1.16 (0.91 to 1.47), and 1.09 (0.95 to 1.25) (reference: NFG). Inpatient, outpatient and medication costs varied in order between people with IFG and those with previously undetected diabetes. Conclusions The study provides claims-based detailed cost data in well-defined glucose metabolism subgroups. CRs of individuals with IFG and previously undetected diabetes were surprisingly low. Data are important for the model-based evaluation of screening programs and interventions that are aimed either to prevent diabetes onset or to improve diabetes therapy as well. PMID:27252871

  20. The He II Proximity Effect and The Lifetime of Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrykin, I. S.; Hennawi, J. F.; McQuinn, M.; Worseck, G.

    2016-06-01

    The lifetime of quasars is fundamental for understanding the growth of supermassive black holes, and is an important ingredient in models of the reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM). However, despite various attempts to determine quasar lifetimes, current estimates from a variety of methods are uncertain by orders of magnitude. This work combines cosmological hydrodynamical simulations and 1D radiative transfer to investigate the structure and evolution of the He ii Lyα proximity zones around quasars at z ≃ 3–4. We show that the time evolution in the proximity zone can be described by a simple analytical model for the approach of the He ii fraction {x}{He{{II}}}(t) to ionization equilibrium, and use this picture to illustrate how the transmission profile depends on the quasar lifetime, quasar UV luminosity, and the ionization state of Helium in the ambient IGM (i.e., the average He ii fraction, or equivalently the metagalactic He ii ionizing background). A significant degeneracy exists between the lifetime and the average He ii fraction, however the latter can be determined from measurements of the He ii Lyα optical depth far from quasars, allowing the lifetime to be measured. We advocate stacking existing He ii quasar spectra at z ∼ 3, and show that the shape of this average proximity zone profile is sensitive to lifetimes as long as ∼30 Myr. At higher redshift z ∼ 4 where the He ii fraction is poorly constrained, degeneracies will make it challenging to determine these parameters independently. Our analytical model for He ii proximity zones should also provide a useful description of the properties of H i proximity zones around quasars at z ≃ 6–7.

  1. Lifetime measurements in {sup 133}Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Emediato, L.G.; Rao, M.N.; Medina, N.H.; Seale, W.A.; Botelho, S.; Ribas, R.V.; Oliveira, J.R.; Cybulska, E.W.; Espinoza-Quinones, F.R.; Guimaraes, V.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Acquadro, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    Lifetimes of low-lying levels in the one- and three-quasiparticle bands in {sup 133}Ce have been measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift technique. The E2 transition strengths extracted for the negative parity yrast states are well described by the triaxial-rotor-plus-quasiparticle and the geometrical models, but the interacting-boson-plus-fermion predictions are too small by about a factor of 3. The B(M1) values extracted for the levels in the positive parity three-quasiparticle band are consistent with the previous {nu}h{sub 11/2}{circle_times}{pi}h{sub 11/2}{circle_times}{pi}g{sub 7/2} configuration assignment to this band. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Optimal estimator for tomographic fluorescence lifetime multiplexing

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Steven S.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Kumar, Anand T. N.

    2016-01-01

    We use the model resolution matrix to analytically derive an optimal Bayesian estimator for multiparameter inverse problems that simultaneously minimizes inter-parameter cross talk and the total reconstruction error. Application of this estimator to time-domain diffuse fluorescence imaging shows that the optimal estimator for lifetime multiplexing is identical to a previously developed asymptotic time-domain (ATD) approach, except for the inclusion of a diagonal regularization term containing decay amplitude uncertainties. We show that, while the optimal estimator and ATD provide zero cross talk, the optimal estimator provides lower reconstruction error, while ATD results in superior relative quantitation. The framework presented here is generally applicable to other multiplexing problems where the simultaneous and accurate relative quantitation of multiple parameters is of interest. PMID:27192234

  3. Predicting the Lifetimes of Nuclear Waste Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Fraser

    2014-03-01

    As for many aspects of the disposal of nuclear waste, the greatest challenge we have in the study of container materials is the prediction of the long-term performance over periods of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. Various methods have been used for predicting the lifetime of containers for the disposal of high-level waste or spent fuel in deep geological repositories. Both mechanical and corrosion-related failure mechanisms need to be considered, although until recently the interactions of mechanical and corrosion degradation modes have not been considered in detail. Failure from mechanical degradation modes has tended to be treated through suitable container design. In comparison, the inevitable loss of container integrity due to corrosion has been treated by developing specific corrosion models. The most important aspect, however, is to be able to justify the long-term predictions by demonstrating a mechanistic understanding of the various degradation modes.

  4. Theoretical uncertainties in proton lifetime estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolešová, Helena; Malinský, Michal; Mede, Timon

    2016-06-01

    We recapitulate the primary sources of theoretical uncertainties in proton lifetime estimates in renormalizable, four-dimensional & non-supersymmetric grand unifications that represent the most conservative framework in which this question may be addressed at the perturbative level. We point out that many of these uncertainties are so severe and often even irreducible that there are only very few scenarios in which an NLO approach, as crucial as it is for a real testability of any specific model, is actually sensible. Among these, the most promising seems to be the minimal renormalizable SO(10) GUT whose high-energy gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken by the adjoint and the five-index antisymmetric irreducible representations.

  5. Finite quasiparticle lifetime in disordered superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Zemlicka, M.; Neilinger, P.; Trgala, M; Rehak, M; Manca, D.; Grajcar, M.; Szabo, P.; Samuely, P.; Gazi, S.; Hubner, U.; Vinokur, V. M.; Il'ichev, E.

    2015-12-08

    We investigate the complex conductivity of a highly disordered MoC superconducting film with k(F)l approximate to 1, where k(F) is the Fermi wave number and l is the mean free path, derived from experimental transmission characteristics of coplanar waveguide resonators in a wide temperature range below the superconducting transition temperature T-c. We find that the original Mattis-Bardeen model with a finite quasiparticle lifetime, tau, offers a perfect description of the experimentally observed complex conductivity. We show that iota is appreciably reduced by scattering effects. Characteristics of the scattering centers are independently found by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and agree with those determined from the complex conductivity.

  6. Photoacoustic imaging of the excited state lifetime of fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Laufer, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging using pump-probe excitation has been shown to allow the detection and visualization of fluorescent contrast agents. The technique relies upon inducing stimulated emission using pump and probe pulses at excitation wavelengths that correspond to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. By changing the time delay between the pulses, the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore is modulated to vary the amount of thermalized energy, and hence PA signal amplitude, to provide fluorophore-specific PA contrast. In this study, this approach was extended to the detection of differences in the excited state lifetime of fluorophores. PA waveforms were measured in solutions of a near-infrared fluorophore using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. The lifetime of the fluorophore solutions was varied by using different solvents and quencher concentrations. By calculating difference signals and by plotting their amplitude as a function of pump-probe time delay, a correlation with the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore was observed. The results agreed with the output of a forward model of the PA signal generation in fluorophores. The application of this method to tomographic PA imaging of differences in the excited state lifetime was demonstrated in tissue phantom experiments.

  7. Population-Based Age Group Specific Annual Incidence Rates of Symptomatic Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Saari, Jukka M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the population-based annual incidence rates of exudative, dry and all cases of symptomatic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in different age and sex groups. Methods. This is a one year, prospective, population-based study on all consecutive new patients with AMD in the hospital district of Central Finland. The diagnosis was confirmed in all patients with slit lamp biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography (OCT) using a Spectralis HRA + OCT device, and the Heidelberg Eye Explorer 1.6.2.0 program. Fluorescein angiograms were taken when needed. Results. The population-based annual incidence rates of all cases of symptomatic AMD increased from 0.03% (95% CI, 0.01-0.05%) in the age group 50-59 years to 0.82% (95% CI, 0.55-1.09%) in the age group 85-89 years and were 0.2% (95% CI, 0.17-0.24%) in exudative, 0.11% (95% CI, 0.09-0.14%) in dry, and 0.32% (95% CI, 0.28-0.36%) in all cases of AMD in the age group 60 years and older. During the next 20 years in Central Finland the population-based annual incidence rates can be estimated to increase to 0.27% (95% CI, 0.24-0.30%) in exudative, to 0.13% (95% CI, 0.11-0.15%) in dry, and to 0.41% (95% CI, 0.37-0.45%) in all cases of AMD in the age group 60 years and older. The population-based annual incidence of AMD did not show statistically significant differences between males and females (p>0.1). Conclusion: The population-based age-group specific annual incidence rates of symptomatic AMD of this study may help to plan health care provision for patients of AMD. PMID:25674187

  8. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I.; Neubauer, A.; Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F.; Becker, W.

    2016-02-01

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  9. Marital status and risk of dementia: a nationwide population-based prospective study from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Sundström, Anna; Westerlund, Olle; Kotyrlo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between marital status and dementia in a cohort of young-old (50–64) and middle-old (65–74) adults, and also whether this may differ by gender. Design Prospective population-based study with follow-up time of up to 10 years. Setting Swedish national register-based study. Participants 2 288 489 individuals, aged 50–74 years, without prior dementia diagnosis at baseline. Dementia was identified using the Swedish National Patient Register and the Cause of Death Register. Outcome measures The influence of marital status on dementia was analysed using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted stepwise for multiple covariates (model 1: adjusted for age and gender; and model 2: additionally adjusted for having adult children, education, income and prior cardiovascular disease). Results During follow-up, 31 572 individuals in the study were identified as demented. Cox regression showed each non-married subcategory to be associated with a significantly higher risk of dementia than the married group, with the highest risk observed among people in the young-old age group, especially among those who were divorced or single (HRs 1.79 vs 1.71, fully adjusted model). Analyses stratified by gender showed gender differences in the young-old group, with indications of divorced men having a higher relative risk compared with divorced women (HRs 2.1 vs 1.7, only-age adjusted model). However, in the fully adjusted model, these differences were attenuated and there was no longer any significant difference between male and female participants. Conclusions Our results suggest that those living alone as non-marrieds may be at risk for early-onset and late-onset dementia. Although more research is needed to understand the underlying mechanism by which marital status is associated with dementia, this suggests that social relationships should be taken seriously as a risk factor for dementia and that social-based interventions may provide

  10. Usefulness of data from magnetic resonance imaging to improve prediction of dementia: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Blossom C M; Tzourio, Christophe; Auriacombe, Sophie; Amieva, Hélène; Dufouil, Carole; Alpérovitch, Annick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the addition of data derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain to a model incorporating conventional risk variables improves prediction of dementia over 10 years of follow-up. Design Population based cohort study of individuals aged ≥65. Setting The Dijon magnetic resonance imaging study cohort from the Three-City Study, France. Participants 1721 people without dementia who underwent an MRI scan at baseline and with known dementia status over 10 years’ follow-up. Main outcome measure Incident dementia (all cause and Alzheimer’s disease). Results During 10 years of follow-up, there were 119 confirmed cases of dementia, 84 of which were Alzheimer’s disease. The conventional risk model incorporated age, sex, education, cognition, physical function, lifestyle (smoking, alcohol use), health (cardiovascular disease, diabetes, systolic blood pressure), and the apolipoprotein genotype (C statistic for discrimination performance was 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.71 to 0.82). No significant differences were observed in the discrimination performance of the conventional risk model compared with models incorporating data from MRI including white matter lesion volume (C statistic 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.72 to 0.82; P=0.48 for difference of C statistics), brain volume (0.77, 0.72 to 0.82; P=0.60), hippocampal volume (0.79, 0.74 to 0.84; P=0.07), or all three variables combined (0.79, 0.75 to 0.84; P=0.05). Inclusion of hippocampal volume or all three MRI variables combined in the conventional model did, however, lead to significant improvement in reclassification measured by using the integrated discrimination improvement index (P=0.03 and P=0.04) and showed increased net benefit in decision curve analysis. Similar results were observed when the outcome was restricted to Alzheimer’s disease. Conclusions Data from MRI do not significantly improve discrimination performance in prediction of all cause dementia

  11. Radiative lifetimes and cooling functions for astrophysically important molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Hulme, Kelsey; Naim, Omree K.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.

    2016-02-01

    Extensive line lists generated as part of the ExoMol project are used to compute lifetimes for individual rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic excited states, and temperature-dependent cooling functions by summing over all dipole-allowed transitions for the states concerned. Results are presented for SiO, CaH, AlO, ScH, H2O and methane. The results for CH4 are particularly unusual with four excited states with no dipole-allowed decay route and several others, where these decays lead to exceptionally long lifetimes. These lifetime data should be useful in models of masers and estimates of critical densities, and can provide a link with laboratory measurements. Cooling functions are important in stellar and planet formation.

  12. TOUSCHEK LIFETIME CALCULATIONS AND SIMULATIONS FOR NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.; BENGTSSON, J.; NASH, B.

    2007-06-25

    The beam lifetime in most medium energy synchrotron radiation sources is limited by the Touschek effect, which describes the momentum transfer from the transverse into the longitudinal direction due to binary collisions between electrons. While an analytical formula exists to calculate the resulting lifetime, the actual momentum acceptance necessary to perform this calculation can only be determined by tracking. This is especially the case in the presence of small vertical apertures at insertion devices. In this case, nonlinear betatron coupling leads to beam losses at these vertical aperture restrictions. In addition, a realistic model of the storage ring is necessary for calculation of equilibrium beam sizes (particularly in the vertical direction) which are important for a self-consistent lifetime calculation.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of nanodiamonds in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yung; Hsu, Tsung-Yuan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Jui-Hung; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) center in bulk diamond is a photostable fluorophore with a radiative lifetime of 11.6 ns at room temperature. The lifetime substantially increases to ~20 ns for diamond nanoparticles (size ~ 100 nm) suspended in water due to the change in refractive index of the surrounding medium of the NV- centers. This fluorescence decay time is much longer than that (typically 1 - 4 ns) of endogenous and exogenous fluorophores commonly used in biological imaging, making it possible to detect NV--containing nanodiamonds in vivo at the single particle level by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as a model organism.

  14. Measurement of masses and lifetimes of B hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Filthaut, F.; /Nijmegen U.

    2007-05-01

    We present recent measurements by the CDF and D{O} Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider on the masses and lifetimes of B hadrons. The results are compared to predictions based on Heavy Quark Effective Theory, lattice gauge theory, and quark models.

  15. An upper limit for the proton lifetime in SO(10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Miele, G.; Rosa, L.; Santorelli, P.; Tuzi, T.

    1989-12-01

    We find in a rather general class of SO(10) unified models the upper limit for the proton lifetime: τP⩽1.6×10 +33±3 yr, where the large error is due to the uncertainties on sin 2θw( MW) and α3( MW).

  16. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  17. Systems and methods for circuit lifetime evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, Timothy L. (Inventor); Sheldon, Douglas J. (Inventor); Bowerman, Paul N. (Inventor); Everline, Chester J. (Inventor); Shalom, Eddy (Inventor); Rasmussen, Robert D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods for estimating the lifetime of an electrical system in accordance with embodiments of the invention are disclosed. One embodiment of the invention includes iteratively performing Worst Case Analysis (WCA) on a system design with respect to different system lifetimes using a computer to determine the lifetime at which the worst case performance of the system indicates the system will pass with zero margin or fail within a predetermined margin for error given the environment experienced by the system during its lifetime. In addition, performing WCA on a system with respect to a specific system lifetime includes identifying subcircuits within the system, performing Extreme Value Analysis (EVA) with respect to each subcircuit to determine whether the subcircuit fails EVA for the specific system lifetime, when the subcircuit passes EVA, determining that the subcircuit does not fail WCA for the specified system lifetime, when a subcircuit fails EVA performing at least one additional WCA process that provides a tighter bound on the WCA than EVA to determine whether the subcircuit fails WCA for the specified system lifetime, determining that the system passes WCA with respect to the specific system lifetime when all subcircuits pass WCA, and determining that the system fails WCA when at least one subcircuit fails WCA.

  18. The Risk of Chronic Pancreatitis in Patients with Psoriasis: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yi-Ting; Huang, Weng-Foung; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disorder, and studies have revealed its association with a variety of comorbidities. However, the risk of chronic pancreatitis (CP) in psoriasis has not been studied. This study aimed to investigate the risk of CP among patients with psoriasis. Methods Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, this population-based cohort study enrolled 48430 patients with psoriasis and 193720 subjects without psoriasis. Stratified Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the risks of CP between the patients with and without psoriasis. Results The incidence of CP was 0.61 per 1000 person-years in patients with psoriasis and 0.34 per 1000 person-years in controls during a mean 6.6-year follow-up period. Before adjustment, patients with psoriasis had a significantly higher risk of CP (crude hazard ratio (HR) = 1.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.53–2.15), and the risk remained significantly higher after adjustments for gender, age group, medications, and comorbidities (adjusted HR (aHR) = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.47–2.10). All psoriasis patient subgroups other than those with arthritis, including those with mild and severe psoriasis and those without arthritis, had significantly increased aHRs for CP, and the risk increased with increasing psoriasis severity. Psoriasis patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aHR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.22–0.49) and methotrexate (aHR = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.12–0.64) had a lower risk of developing CP after adjustments. Conclusions Psoriasis is associated with a significantly increased risk of CP. The results of our study call for more research to provide additional insight into the relationship between psoriasis and CP. PMID:27467265

  19. Early Cognitive Deficits in Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Anna; Fratiglioni, Laura; Laukka, Erika J.; Santoni, Giola; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Bäckman, Lars; Xu, Weili

    2016-01-01

    Evidence links type 2 diabetes to dementia risk. However, our knowledge on the initial cognitive deficits in diabetic individuals and the factors that might promote such deficits is still limited. This study aimed to identify the cognitive domains initially impaired by diabetes and the factors that play a role in this first stage. Within the population-based Swedish National Study on Aging and Care–Kungsholmen, 2305 cognitively intact participants aged ≥60 y were identified. Attention/working memory, perceptual speed, category fluency, letter fluency, semantic memory, and episodic memory were assessed. Diabetes (controlled and uncontrolled) and prediabetes were ascertained by clinicians, who also collected information on vascular disorders (hypertension, heart diseases, and stroke) and vascular risk factors (VRFs, including smoking and overweight/obesity). Data were analyzed with linear regression models. Overall, 196 participants (8.5%) had diabetes, of which 144 (73.5%) had elevated glycaemia (uncontrolled diabetes); 571 (24.8%) persons had prediabetes. In addition, diabetes, mainly uncontrolled, was related to lower performance in perceptual speed (β – 1.10 [95% CI – 1.98, – 0.23]), category fluency (β – 1.27 [95% CI – 2.52, – 0.03]), and digit span forward (β – 0.35 [95% CI – 0.54, – 0.17]). Critically, these associations were present only among APOE ɛ4 non–carriers. The associations of diabetes with perceptual speed and category fluency were present only among participants with VRFs or vascular disorders. Diabetes, especially uncontrolled diabetes, is associated with poorer performance in perceptual speed, category fluency, and attention/primary memory. VRFs, vascular disorders, and APOE status play a role in these associations. PMID:27314527

  20. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-04-01

    To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset.This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531-534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model.During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19-142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03-1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use.This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  1. Shift-work and cardiovascular disease: a population-based 22-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hublin, Christer; Partinen, Markku; Koskenvuo, Karoliina; Silventoinen, Karri; Koskenvuo, Markku; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2010-05-01

    Studies on the association between shift-work and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in particular coronary heart disease (CHD), have given conflicting results. In this prospective population-based study we assessed the association of shift-work with three endpoints: CHD mortality, disability retirement due to CVD, and incident hypertension. A cohort of 20,142 adults (the Finnish Twin Cohort) was followed from 1982 to 2003. Type of working time (daytime/nighttime/shift-work) was assessed by questionnaires in 1975 (response rate 89%) and in 1981 (84%). Causes of death, information on disability retirement and hypertension medication were obtained from nationwide official registers. Cox proportional hazard models were used to obtain hazard ratios (HR) for each endpoint by type of working time. Adjustments were made for 14 socio-demographic and lifestyle covariates. 76.9% were daytime workers and 9.5% shift-workers both in 1975 and in 1981. During the follow-up, 857 deaths due to CHD, 721 disability retirements due to CVD, and 2,642 new cases of medicated hypertension were observed. However, HRs for shift-work were not significant (mortality HR men 1.09 and women 1.22; retirement 1.15 and 0.96; hypertension 1.15 and 0.98, respectively). The results were essentially similar after full adjustments for all covariates. Within twin pairs, no association between shift work and outcome was observed. Our results do not support an association between shift-work and cardiovascular morbidity. PMID:20229313

  2. HIV testing in national population-based surveys: experience from the Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vinod; Vaessen, Martin; Boerma, J. Ties; Arnold, Fred; Way, Ann; Barrere, Bernard; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth; Sangha, Jasbir

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the methods used in the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to collect nationally representative data on the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and assess the value of such data to country HIV surveillance systems. METHODS: During 2001-04, national samples of adult women and men in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Ghana, Mali, Kenya, United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia were tested for HIV. Dried blood spot samples were collected for HIV testing, following internationally accepted ethical standards. The results for each country are presented by age, sex, and urban versus rural residence. To estimate the effects of non-response, HIV prevalence among non-responding males and females was predicted using multivariate statistical models for those who were tested, with a common set of predictor variables. RESULTS: Rates of HIV testing varied from 70% among Kenyan men to 92% among women in Burkina Faso and Cameroon. Despite large differences in HIV prevalence between the surveys (1-16%), fairly consistent patterns of HIV infection were observed by age, sex and urban versus rural residence, with considerably higher rates in urban areas and in women, especially at younger ages. Analysis of non-response bias indicates that although predicted HIV prevalence tended to be higher in non-tested males and females than in those tested, the overall effects of non-response on the observed national estimates of HIV prevalence are insignificant. CONCLUSIONS: Population-based surveys can provide reliable, direct estimates of national and regional HIV seroprevalence among men and women irrespective of pregnancy status. Survey data greatly enhance surveillance systems and the accuracy of national estimates in generalized epidemics. PMID:16878227

  3. Clozapine use in childhood and adolescent schizophrenia: A nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Carolina; Papachristou, Efstathios; Wimberley, Theresa; Gasse, Christiane; Dima, Danai; MacCabe, James H; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Frangou, Sophia

    2015-06-01

    Early onset schizophrenia (EOS) begins in childhood or adolescence. EOS is associated with poor treatment response and may benefit from timely use of clozapine. This study aimed to identify the predictors of clozapine use in EOS and characterize the clinical profile and outcome of clozapine-treated youths with schizophrenia. We conducted a nationwide population-based study using linked data from Danish medical registries. We examined all incident cases of EOS (i.e., cases diagnosed prior to their 18th birthday) between December 31st 1994 and December 31st 2006 and characterized their demographic, clinical and treatment profiles. We then used multivariable cox proportional hazard models to identify predictors of clozapine treatment in this patient population. We identified 662 EOS cases (1.9% of all schizophrenia cases), of whom 108 (17.6%) had commenced clozapine by December 31st 2008. Patients had on average 3 antipsychotic trials prior to clozapine initiation. The mean interval between first antipsychotic treatment and clozapine initiation was 3.2 (2.9) years. Older age at diagnosis of schizophrenia [HR=1.2, 95% CI (1.05-1.4), p=0.01], family history of schizophrenia [HR=2.1, 95% CI (1.1-3.04), p=0.02] and attempted suicide [HR=1.8, 95% CI (1.1-3.04), p=0.02] emerged as significant predictors of clozapine use. The majority of patients (n=96, 88.8%) prescribed clozapine appeared to have a favorable clinical response as indicated by continued prescription redemption and improved occupational outcomes. Our findings support current recommendations for the timely use of clozapine in EOS. PMID:25769917

  4. Epilepsy in Onchocerciasis Endemic Areas: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Population-Based Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Pion, Sébastien D. S.; Kaiser, Christoph; Boutros-Toni, Fernand; Cournil, Amandine; Taylor, Melanie M.; Meredith, Stefanie E. O.; Stufe, Ansgar; Bertocchi, Ione; Kipp, Walter; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Boussinesq, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Objective We sought to evaluate the relationship between onchocerciasis prevalence and that of epilepsy using available data collected at community level. Design We conducted a systematic review and meta-regression of available data. Data Sources Electronic and paper records on subject area ever produced up to February 2008. Review Methods We searched for population-based studies reporting on the prevalence of epilepsy in communities for which onchocerciasis prevalence was available or could be estimated. Two authors independently assessed eligibility and study quality and extracted data. The estimation of point prevalence of onchocerciasis was standardized across studies using appropriate correction factors. Variation in epilepsy prevalence was then analyzed as a function of onchocerciasis endemicity using random-effect logistic models. Results Eight studies from west (Benin and Nigeria), central (Cameroon and Central African Republic) and east Africa (Uganda, Tanzania and Burundi) met the criteria for inclusion and analysis. Ninety-one communities with a total population of 79,270 individuals screened for epilepsy were included in the analysis. The prevalence of epilepsy ranged from 0 to 8.7% whereas that of onchocerciasis ranged from 5.2 to 100%. Variation in epilepsy prevalence was consistent with a logistic function of onchocerciasis prevalence, with epilepsy prevalence being increased, on average, by 0.4% for each 10% increase in onchocerciasis prevalence. Conclusion These results give further evidence that onchocerciasis is associated with epilepsy and that the disease burden of onchocerciasis might have to be re-estimated by taking into account this relationship. PMID:19529767

  5. Metformin use and survival after colorectal cancer: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Mc Menamin, Úna C; Murray, Liam J; Hughes, Carmel M; Cardwell, Chris R

    2016-01-15

    Preclinical evidence suggests that metformin could delay cancer progression. Previous epidemiological studies however have been limited by small sample sizes and certain time-related biases. This study aimed to investigate whether colorectal cancer patients with type 2 diabetes who were exposed to metformin had reduced cancer-specific mortality. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 1,197 colorectal cancer patients newly diagnosed from 1998 to 2009 (identified from English cancer registries) with type 2 diabetes (based upon Clinical Practice Research Datalink, CPRD, prescription and diagnosis records). In this cohort 382 colorectal cancer-specific deaths occurred up to 2012 from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) mortality data. Metformin use was identified from CPRD prescription records. Using time-dependent Cox regression models, unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CIs were calculated for the association between post-diagnostic exposure to metformin and colorectal cancer-specific mortality. Overall, there was no evidence of an association between metformin use and cancer-specific death before or after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.80, 1.40). In addition, after adjustment for confounders, there was also no evidence of associations between other diabetic medications and cancer-specific mortality including sulfonylureas (HR 1.14, 95% CI 0.86, 1.51), insulin use (HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.95, 1.93) or other anti-diabetic medications including thiazolidinediones (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.46, 1.14). Similar associations were observed by duration of use and for all-cause mortality. This population-based study, the largest to date, does not support a protective association between metformin and survival in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:26331456

  6. Genocide Exposure and Subsequent Suicide Risk: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Stephen Z.; Levav, Itzhak; Yoffe, Rinat; Becher, Yifat; Pugachova, Inna

    2016-01-01

    The association between periods of genocide-related exposures and suicide risk remains unknown. Our study tests that association using a national population-based study design. The source population comprised of all persons born during1922-1945 in Nazi-occupied or dominated European nations, that immigrated to Israel by 1965, were identified in the Population Register (N = 220,665), and followed up for suicide to 2014, totaling 16,953,602 person-years. The population was disaggregated to compare a trauma gradient among groups that immigrated before (indirect, n = 20,612, 9%); during (partial direct, n = 17,037, 8%); or after (full direct, n = 183,016, 83%) exposure to the Nazi era. Also, the direct exposure groups were examined regarding pre- or post-natal exposure periods. Cox regression models were used to compute Hazard Ratios (HR) of suicide risk to compare the exposure groups, adjusting for confounding by gender, residential SES and history of psychiatric hospitalization. In the total population, only the partial direct exposure subgroup was at greater risk compared to the indirect exposure group (HR = 1.73, 95% CI, 1.10, 2.73; P < .05). That effect replicated in six sensitivity analyses. In addition, sensitivity analyses showed that exposure at ages 13 plus among females, and follow-up by years since immigration were associated with a greater risk; whereas in utero exposure among persons with no psychiatric hospitalization and early postnatal exposure among males were at a reduced risk. Tentative mechanisms impute biopsychosocial vulnerability and natural selection during early critical periods among males, and feelings of guilt and entrapment or defeat among females. PMID:26901411

  7. Diagnostic Ionizing Radiation Exposure in a Population-based Sample of Children with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Lena; Herfarth, Hans; Porter, Carol Q.; Fordham, Lynn A.; Sandler, Robert S.; Kappelman, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The degree of diagnostic radiation exposure in children with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is largely unknown. Here we describe this exposure in a population-based sample of children with IBD and determine characteristics associated with moderate radiation exposure. Methods We ascertained radiological study use, demographic characteristics, IBD medication use, and the requirement for hospitalization, emergency department (ED) encounter, or inpatient GI surgery among children with IBD within a large insurance claims database. Characteristics associated with moderate radiation exposure (at least one computed tomography (CT) or three fluoroscopies over two years) were determined using logistic regression models. Results We identified 965 children with Crohn’s Disease (CD) and 628 with Ulcerative Colitis (UC). Over 24 months, 34% of CD subjects and 23% of UC subjects were exposed to moderate diagnostic radiation [odds ratio (OR) 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.36–2.14]. CT accounted for 28% and 25% of all studies in CD and UC subjects, respectively. For CD subjects, moderate radiation exposure was associated with hospitalization (OR 4.89, 95% CI 3.37–7.09), surgery (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.59–5.39), ED encounter (OR 2.65, 1.93–3.64 95% CI), oral steroids (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.50–3.38), and budesonide (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.10–3.06); an inverse association was seen with immunomodulator use (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.47–0.97). Except for oral steroids and immunomodulators, similar relationships were seen in UC. Conclusion A substantial proportion of children with IBD are exposed to moderate amounts of radiation as a result of diagnostic testing. This high utilization may impart long-term risk given the chronic nature of the disease. PMID:19690524

  8. A strategy for teaching students concepts of population-based health care for older persons.

    PubMed

    Xakellis, George C; Robinson, Mark

    2003-08-01

    The authors present a strategy for organizing and teaching the concepts of population-based health care for patients over the age of 65. The key ingredients are a case study based on a representative sample of 5,000 Medicare recipients and a student guide containing the sample group's demographics, clinical characteristics, and utilization patterns. As part of the case study, three subgroups within the sample are described: the basically healthy 50% that consume only 3% of medical resources, the most severely ill 10% that consume 70% of medical resources, and the moderately ill 40% that consume the remaining 27% of medical resources. These categories introduce the concepts of severity of illness, highlight the clinical challenges facing providers of care to the elderly, and contrast the divergent needs of individual health care consumers in an aging population. Armed with this succinct and manageable information packet, students are asked to play the role of an interdisciplinary team that is responsible for effectively managing the care of this population of 5,000 lives. Included in this article is a description of learning resources provided; sample group discussion questions; one strategy for caring for the population developed by a faculty-student group; and a brief description of the educational implications of the model. At the end of the article the reader is provided a Web address containing a description of the case and supporting materials (http://healthyaging.ucdavis.edu/education/continuing/ManagedMedicareTeachingCase.pdf). Readers are invited to view, print, and/or utilize the case in their own academic settings. PMID:12915368

  9. Aspirin Use Associated With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a Total Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Piao; Lin, Feng-Cheng; Lee, Johnny Kuang-Wu; Lee, Charles Tzu-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of aspirin use and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) risk is unclear. This study determined whether use of any individual compound is associated with ALS risk by conducting a total population-based case-control study in Taiwan. Methods A total of 729 patients with newly diagnosed ALS who had a severely disabling disease certificate between January 1, 2002, and December 1, 2008, comprised the case group. These cases were compared with 7290 sex-, age-, residence-, and insurance premium-matched controls. Drug use by each Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code was analyzed using conditional logistic regression models. False discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted P values were reported in order to avoid inflating false positives. Results Of the 1336 compounds, only the 266 with use cases exceeding 30 in our database were included in the screening analysis. Without controlling for steroid use, the analysis failed to reveal any compound that was inversely associated with ALS risk according to FDR criteria. After controlling for steroid use, we found use of the following compounds to be associated with ALS risk: aspirin, diphenhydramine (one of the antihistamines), and mefenamic acid (one of the NSAIDs). A multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was independently inversely associated with ALS risk after controlling for diphenhydramine, mefenamic acid, and steroid use. The inverse association between aspirin and ALS was present predominately in patients older than 55 years. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that aspirin use might reduce the risk of ALS, and the benefit might be more prominent for older people. PMID:25721071

  10. Association between gastroesophageal reflux disease and coronary heart disease: A nationwide population-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) development, if any, and to evaluate whether longer use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increases the risk of CHD.Patients diagnosed with GERD between 2000 and 2011 were identified as the study cohort (n = 12,960). Patients without GERD were randomly selected from the general population, frequency-matched with the study group according to age, sex, and index year, and evaluated as the comparison cohort (n = 51,840). Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to determine the incidence of CHD. The risk of CHD was evaluated in both groups by using Cox proportional hazards regression models.The GERD patients had a greater probability of CHD than the cohort without GERD did (log-rank test, P < 0.001 and 11.8 vs 6.5 per 1000 person-years). The GERD cohort had a higher risk of CHD than the comparison cohort did after adjustment for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, alcohol-related illness, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, biliary stone, anxiety, depression, chronic kidney disease, and cirrhosis (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.49, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34-1.66). The risk of CHD was greater for the patients treated with PPIs for more than 1 year (aHR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.34-2.08) than for those treated with PPIs for <1 year (aHR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.39-1.74).Our population-based cohort study results indicate that GERD was associated with an increased risk of developing CHD, and that PPI use for more than 1 year might increase the risk of CHD. PMID:27399102

  11. Dietary patterns and risk of oesophageal cancers: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Hughes, Maria Celia; Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M

    2012-04-01

    Epidemiological studies investigating the association between dietary intake and oesophageal cancer have mostly focused on nutrients and food groups instead of dietary patterns. We conducted a population-based case-control study, which included 365 oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), 426 oesophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (OGJAC) and 303 oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cases, with frequency matched on age, sex and geographical location to 1580 controls. Data on demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors were collected using self-administered questionnaires. We used principal component analysis to derive three dietary patterns: 'meat and fat', 'pasta and pizza' and 'fruit and vegetable', and unconditional logistic regression models to estimate risks of OAC, OGJAC and OSCC associated with quartiles (Q) of dietary pattern scores. A high score on the meat-and-fat pattern was associated with increased risk of all three cancers: multivariable-adjusted OR 2·12 (95 % CI 1·30, 3·46) for OAC; 1·88 (95% CI 1·21, 2·94) for OGJAC; 2·84 (95% CI 1·67, 4·83) for OSCC (P-trend <0·01 for all three cancers). A high score on the pasta-and-pizza pattern was inversely associated with OSCC risk (OR 0·58, 95 % CI 0·36, 0·96, P for trend=0·009); and a high score on the fruit-and-vegetable pattern was associated with a borderline significant decreased risk of OGJAC (OR for Q4 v. Q1 0·66, 95% CI 0·42, 1·04, P=0·07) and significantly decreased risk of OSCC (OR 0·41, 95% CI 0·24, 0·70, P for trend=0·002). High-fat dairy foods appeared to play a dominant role in the association between the meat-and-fat pattern and risk of OAC and OGJAC. Further investigation in prospective studies is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:21899799

  12. Socioeconomic Status and Incidence of Traffic Accidents in Metropolitan Tehran: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Sehat, Mojtaba; Naieni, Kourosh Holakouie; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi; Malek-Afzali, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Background: Population-based estimates of traffic accidents (TAs) are not readily available for developing countries. This study examined the contribution of socioeconomic status (SES) to the risk of TA among Iranian adults. Methods: A total of 64,200people aged ≥18years were identified from 2008 Urban Health Equity Assessment and Response Tool (Urban HEART) survey. 22,128 households were interviewed to estimate the overall annual incidence, severity and socioeconomic determinants of TAs for males and females in Iranian capital over the preceding year. Wealth index and house value index were constructed for economic measurement. Weighted estimates were computed adjusting for complex survey design. Logistic regression models were used to examine individual and SES measures as potential determinants of TAs in adults. Results: The overall incidence of traffic accident was 17.3(95% CI 16.0, 18.7) per 1000 per year. TA rate in men and women was 22.6(95% CI 20.6, 24.8) and 11.8(95% CI 10.4, 13.2), respectively. The overall TA mortality rate was 26.6(95% CI 13.4, 39.8) per 100,000 person-years, which was almost three times higher in men than that for women (40.4 vs. 12.1 per 100,000person-years). Lower economic level was associated with increased incidence and mortality of TA. Association between SES and incidence, and severity and mortality of TA were identified. Conclusion: TAs occur more in lower socioeconomic layers of the society. This should be taken seriously into consideration by policy makers, so that preventive programs aimed at behavioral modifications in the society are promoted to decrease the health and economic burden imposed by TAs. PMID:22448311

  13. Characterization of mitochondrial haplogroups in a large population-based sample from the United States.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sabrina L; Goodloe, Robert; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Murdock, Deborah G; Crawford, Dana C

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are valuable for investigations in forensic science, molecular anthropology, and human genetics. In this study, we developed a custom panel of 61 mtDNA markers for high-throughput classification of European, African, and Native American/Asian mitochondrial haplogroup lineages. Using these mtDNA markers, we constructed a mitochondrial haplogroup classification tree and classified 18,832 participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). To our knowledge, this is the largest study to date characterizing mitochondrial haplogroups in a population-based sample from the United States, and the first study characterizing mitochondrial haplogroup distributions in self-identified Mexican Americans separately from Hispanic Americans of other descent. We observed clear differences in the distribution of maternal genetic ancestry consistent with proposed admixture models for these subpopulations, underscoring the genetic heterogeneity of the United States Hispanic population. The mitochondrial haplogroup distributions in the other self-identified racial/ethnic groups within NHANES were largely comparable to previous studies. Mitochondrial haplogroup classification was highly concordant with self-identified race/ethnicity (SIRE) in non-Hispanic whites (94.8 %), but was considerably lower in admixed populations including non-Hispanic blacks (88.3 %), Mexican Americans (81.8 %), and other Hispanics (61.6 %), suggesting SIRE does not accurately reflect maternal genetic ancestry, particularly in populations with greater proportions of admixture. Thus, it is important to consider inconsistencies between SIRE and genetic ancestry when performing genetic association studies. The mitochondrial haplogroup data that we have generated, coupled with the epidemiologic variables in NHANES, is a valuable resource for future studies investigating the contribution of mtDNA variation to human health and disease. PMID:24488180

  14. Sex differences in the outcomes of peripheral arterial disease: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mohamad A.; Lindsay, Thomas F.; Mamdani, Muhammad; Wang, Xuesong; Verma, Subodh; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: The role of sex in the outcomes of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has been poorly studied. We sought to investigate differences in the long-term adverse cardiovascular and limb outcomes between men and women with PAD. Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study with up to 7 years of follow-up using linked administrative databases in Ontario, Canada. Patients aged 40 years or older who visited a vascular surgeon between Apr. 1, 2004, and Mar. 31, 2007 (index date), and carried a diagnosis of PAD comprised the study cohort. The primary outcome was a composite of death or hospital admission for stroke or myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included lower limb amputation or revascularization. We used Cox proportional hazards modelling to compute unadjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and HRs adjusted for baseline covariates. Results: A total of 6915 patients were studied, of whom 2461 (35.6%) were women. No significant differences in the risk of the primary outcome were observed between men and women (adjusted HR 0.99 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92-1.05]). Women were less likely than men to undergo minor amputation (adjusted HR 0.73 [95% CI 0.62-0.85]) and arterial bypass surgery (adjusted HR 0.82 [95% CI 0.71-0.94]) but were more likely to be admitted to hospital for acute myocardial infarction (adjusted HR 1.15 [95% CI 1.00-1.31]). There were no sex differences in the rates of major amputation or transluminal percutaneous angioplasty. Interpretation: We identified no significant differences in the composite risk of major adverse cardiovascular events between women and men with PAD, although our findings suggest men may be at increased risk for adverse limb events compared with women. Cardiovascular health campaigns should focus on both women and men to promote early diagnosis and management of PAD. PMID:27280110

  15. Opioid use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis 2005-2014: a population-based comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Legoff, Jorge A; Achenbach, Sara J; Crowson, Cynthia S; Krause, Megan L; Davis, John M; Matteson, Eric L

    2016-05-01

    Opioid prescriptions have seen an increase across the USA, Canada, Europe, and the UK. In the USA, they have quadrupled from 1999 to 2010. Opioid use among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over time is not well described. This study examined trends of opioid use in patients with RA. Retrospective prescription data was examined from 2005 to 2014 in a population-based incidence cohort of patients with RA by 1987 ACR criteria and comparable non-RA subjects. Differences in opioid use were examined with Poisson models. A total of 501 patients with RA (71 % female) and 532 non-RA subjects (70 % female) were included in the study. Total and chronic opioid use in 2014 was substantial in both cohorts 40 % RA vs 24 % non-RA and 12 % RA vs. 4 % non-RA, respectively. Opioid use increased by 19 % per year in both cohorts during the study period (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.15, 1.25). Relative risk (RR) of chronic opiate use for RA patients compared to non-RA subjects was highest in adults aged 50-64 years (RR 2.82; 95 % CI 1.43-6.23). RA disease characteristics, biologic use at index, treated depression/fibromyalgia, education, and smoking status were not significantly associated with chronic opiate use. Over a third of patients with RA use opioids in some form, and in more than a tenth use is chronic. Use has increased in recent years. Patients aged 50-64 with RA use substantially more opioids than their non-RA counterparts. PMID:27022929

  16. Systemic inflammation, depression and obstructive pulmonary function: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-creative protein (CRP) indicating systemic inflammation are known to be elevated in chronic diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and depression. Comorbid depression is common in patients with COPD, but no studies have investigated whether proinflammatory cytokines mediate the association between pulmonary function and depressive symptoms in healthy individuals with no known history of obstructive pulmonary diseases. Methods In a population-based sample (n = 2077) of individuals aged 55 and above with no known history of obstructive pulmonary disease in the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study (SLAS), we analyzed the relationships between IL-6 and CRP, depressive symptoms (GDS-15 ≥5) and obstructive pulmonary function (FEV1% predicted and FEV1/FVC% predicted). Results High serum levels of IL-6 and CRP were associated with greater prevalence of depressive symptoms (p < 0.05). High IL-6, high CRP and depressive symptoms were independently associated with decreased FEV1% predicted and FEV1/FVC% predicted after adjusting for smoking status, BMI and number of chronic inflammatory diseases. Increasing grades of combination of inflammatory markers and/or depressive symptoms was associated with progressive increases in pulmonary obstruction. In hierarchical models, the significant association of depressive symptoms with pulmonary obstruction was reduced by the presence of IL-6 and CRP. Conclusions This study found for the first time an association of depressive symptoms and pulmonary function in older adults which appeared to be partly mediated by proinflammatory cytokines. Further studies should be conducted to investigate proinflammatory immune markers and depressive symptoms as potential phenotypic indicators for chronic obstructive airway disorders in older adults. PMID:23676005

  17. Ethnic Differences in Gestational Weight Gain: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Norway.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Tarja I; Waage, Christin W; Sommer, Christine; Sletner, Line; Raitanen, Jani; Jenum, Anne Karen

    2016-07-01

    Objectives To explore ethnic differences in gestational weight gain (GWG). Methods This was a population-based cohort study conducted in primary care child health clinics in Groruddalen, Oslo, Norway. Participants were healthy pregnant women (n = 632) categorised to six ethnic groups (43 % were Western European women, the reference group). Body weight was measured at 15 and 28 weeks' gestation on average. Data on pre-pregnancy weight and total GWG until delivery were self-reported. The main method of analysis was linear regression adjusting for age, weeks' gestation, pre-pregnancy body mass index, education and severe nausea. Results No ethnic differences were observed in GWG by 15 weeks' gestation. By 28 weeks' gestation, Eastern European women had gained 2.71 kg (95 % confidence interval, CI 1.10-4.33) and Middle Eastern women 1.32 kg (95 % CI 0.14-2.50) more weight on average than the Western European women in the fully adjusted model. Among Eastern European women, the total adjusted GWG was 3.47 kg (95 % CI 1.33-5.61) above the reference group. Other ethnic groups (South Asian, East Asian and African) did not differ from the reference group. When including non-smokers (n = 522) only, observed between-group differences increased and Middle Eastern women gained more weight than the reference group by all time points. Conclusions Eastern European and Middle Eastern women had higher GWG on average than Western European women, especially among the non-smokers. Although prevention of excessive GWG is important for all pregnant women, these ethnic groups might need special attention during pregnancy. PMID:26979613

  18. Effect of radical prostatectomy surgeon volume on complication rates from a large population-based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Almatar, Ashraf; Wallis, Christopher J.D.; Herschorn, Sender; Saskin, Refik; Kulkarni, Girish S.; Kodama, Ronald T.; Nam, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical volume can affect several outcomes following radical prostatectomy (RP). We examined if surgical volume was associated with novel categories of treatment-related complications following RP. Methods: We examined a population-based cohort of men treated with RP in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2009. We used Cox proportional hazard modeling to examine the effect of physician, hospital and patient demographic factors on rates of treatment-related hospital admissions, urologic procedures, and open surgeries. Results: Over the study interval, 15 870 men were treated with RP. A total of 196 surgeons performed a median of 15 cases per year (range: 1–131). Patients treated by surgeons in the highest quartile of annual case volume (>39/year) had a lower risk of hospital admission (hazard ratio [HR]=0.54, 95% CI 0.47–0.61) and urologic procedures (HR=0.69, 95% CI 0.64–0.75), but not open surgeries (HR=0.83, 95% CI 0.47–1.45) than patients treated by surgeons in the lowest quartile (<15/year). Treatment at an academic hospital was associated with a decreased risk of hospitalization (HR=0.75, 95% CI 0.67–0.83), but not of urologic procedures (HR=0.94, 95% CI 0.88–1.01) or open surgeries (HR=0.87, 95% CI 0.54–1.39). There was no significant trend in any of the outcomes by population density. Conclusions: The annual case volume of the treating surgeon significantly affects a patient’s risk of requiring hospitalization or urologic procedures (excluding open surgeries) to manage treatment-related complications. PMID:26977206

  19. Severity of malocclusion in adolescents: populational-based study in the north of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Freire, Rafael Silveira; Nepomuceno, Marcela Oliveira; Martins, Andrea Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Marcopito, Luiz Francisco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify the factors associated with severity of malocclusion in a population of adolescents. METHODS In this cross-sectional population-based study, the sample size (n = 761) was calculated considering a prevalence of malocclusion of 50.0%, with a 95% confidence level and a 5.0% precision level. The study adopted correction for the effect of delineation (deff = 2), and a 20.0% increase to offset losses and refusals. Multistage probability cluster sampling was adopted. Trained and calibrated professionals performed the intraoral examinations and interviews in households. The dependent variable (severity of malocclusion) was assessed using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). The independent variables were grouped into five blocks: demographic characteristics, socioeconomic condition, use of dental services, health-related behavior and oral health subjective conditions. The ordinal logistic regression model was used to identify the factors associated with severity of malocclusion. RESULTS We interviewed and examined 736 adolescents (91.5% response rate), 69.9% of whom showed no abnormalities or slight malocclusion. Defined malocclusion was observed in 17.8% of the adolescents, being severe or very severe in 12.6%, with pressing or essential need of orthodontic treatment. The probabilities of greater severity of malocclusion were higher among adolescents who self-reported as black, indigenous, pardo or yellow, with lower per capita income, having harmful oral habits, negative perception of their appearance and perception of social relationship affected by oral health. CONCLUSIONS Severe or very severe malocclusion was more prevalent among socially disadvantaged adolescents, with reported harmful habits and perception of compromised esthetics and social relationships. Given that malocclusion can interfere with the self-esteem of adolescents, it is essential to improve public policy for the inclusion of orthodontic treatment among health care

  20. Severity of malocclusion in adolescents: populational-based study in the north of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Freire, Rafael Silveira; Nepomuceno, Marcela Oliveira; Martins, Andrea Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Marcopito, Luiz Francisco

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify the factors associated with severity of malocclusion in a population of adolescents. METHODS In this cross-sectional population-based study, the sample size (n = 761) was calculated considering a prevalence of malocclusion of 50.0%, with a 95% confidence level and a 5.0% precision level. The study adopted correction for the effect of delineation (deff = 2), and a 20.0% increase to offset losses and refusals. Multistage probability cluster sampling was adopted. Trained and calibrated professionals performed the intraoral examinations and interviews in households. The dependent variable (severity of malocclusion) was assessed using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). The independent variables were grouped into five blocks: demographic characteristics, socioeconomic condition, use of dental services, health-related behavior and oral health subjective conditions. The ordinal logistic regression model was used to identify the factors associated with severity of malocclusion. RESULTS We interviewed and examined 736 adolescents (91.5% response rate), 69.9% of whom showed no abnormalities or slight malocclusion. Defined malocclusion was observed in 17.8% of the adolescents, being severe or very severe in 12.6%, with pressing or essential need of orthodontic treatment. The probabilities of greater severity of malocclusion were higher among adolescents who self-reported as black, indigenous, pardo or yellow, with lower per capita income, having harmful oral habits, negative perception of their appearance and perception of social relationship affected by oral health. CONCLUSIONS Severe or very severe malocclusion was more prevalent among socially disadvantaged adolescents, with reported harmful habits and perception of compromised esthetics and social relationships. Given that malocclusion can interfere with the self-esteem of adolescents, it is essential to improve public policy for the inclusion of orthodontic treatment among health care provided to this

  1. Healthcare Costs Attributable to Hypertension: Canadian Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Colin G; Clement, Fiona M; Campbell, Norm R C; James, Matthew T; Klarenbach, Scott W; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Tonelli, Marcello; McBrien, Kerry A

    2015-09-01

    Accurately documenting the current and future costs of hypertension is required to fully understand the potential economic impact of currently available and future interventions to prevent and treat hypertension. The objective of this work was to calculate the healthcare costs attributable to hypertension in Canada and to project these costs to 2020. Using population-based administrative data for the province of Alberta, Canada (>3 million residents) from 2002 to 2010, we identified individuals with and without diagnosed hypertension. We calculated their total healthcare costs and estimated costs attributable to hypertension using a regression model adjusting for comorbidities and sociodemographic factors. We then extrapolated hypertension-attributable costs to the rest of Canada and projected costs to the year 2020. Twenty-one percent of adults in Alberta had diagnosed hypertension in 2010, with a projected increase to 27% by 2020. The average individual with hypertension had annual healthcare costs of $5768, of which $2341 (41%) were attributed to hypertension. In Alberta, the healthcare costs attributable to hypertension were $1.4 billion in 2010. In Canada, the hypertension-attributable costs were estimated to be $13.9 billion in 2010, rising to $20.5 billion by 2020. The increase was ascribed to demographic changes (52%), increasing prevalence (16%), and increasing per-patient costs (32%). Hypertension accounts for a significant proportion of healthcare spending (10.2% of the Canadian healthcare budget) and is projected to rise even further. Interventions to prevent and treat hypertension may play a role in limiting this cost growth. PMID:26169049

  2. Socioeconomic inequalities in pregnancy outcome associated with Down syndrome: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Judith L S; Draper, Elizabeth S; Lotto, Robyn R; Berry, Laura E; Smith, Lucy K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate socioeconomic inequalities in outcome of pregnancy associated with Down syndrome (DS) compared with other congenital anomalies screened for during pregnancy. Design and setting Retrospective population-based registry study (East Midlands & South Yorkshire in England). Participants All registered cases of DS and nine selected congenital anomalies with poor prognostic outcome (the UK Fetal Anomaly Screening Programme (FASP)9) with an end of pregnancy date between 1 January 1998 and 31 December 2007. Main outcome measures: Poisson regression models were used to explore outcome measures, including socioeconomic variation in rates of anomaly; antenatal detection; pregnancy outcome; live birth incidence and neonatal mortality. Deprivation was measured using the Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004 at super output area level. Results There were 1151 cases of DS and 1572 cases of the nine severe anomalies combined. The overall rate of antenatal detection was 57% for DS, which decreased with increasing deprivation (rate ratio comparing the most deprived tenth with the least deprived: 0.76 (0.60 to 0.97)). Antenatal detection rates were considerably higher for FASP9 anomalies (86%), with no evidence of a trend with deprivation (0.99 95% CI (0.84 to 1.17)). The termination of pregnancy rate following antenatal diagnosis was higher for DS (86%) than the FASP9 anomalies (70%). Both groups showed wide socioeconomic variation in the termination of pregnancy rate (rate ratio: DS: 0.76 (0.58 to 0.99); FASP9 anomalies: 0.80 (0.65 to 0.97)). Consequently, socioeconomic inequalities in live birth and neonatal mortality rates associated with these anomalies arise that were not observed in utero. Conclusions Socioeconomic inequalities exist in the antenatal detection of DS, and subsequent termination rates are much higher for DS than other anomalies. Termination rates for all anomalies are lower in more deprived areas leading to wide socioeconomic inequalities in

  3. Cell-cycle protein expression in a population-based study of ovarian and endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Felix, Ashley S; Sherman, Mark E; Hewitt, Stephen M; Gunja, Munira Z; Yang, Hannah P; Cora, Renata L; Boudreau, Vicky; Ylaya, Kris; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors is implicated in the carcinogenesis of many cancers, including ovarian and endometrial cancers. We examined associations between CDK inhibitor expression, cancer risk factors, tumor characteristics, and survival outcomes among ovarian and endometrial cancer patients enrolled in a population-based case-control study. Expression (negative vs. positive) of three CDK inhibitors (p16, p21, and p27) and ki67 was examined with immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between biomarkers, risk factors, and tumor characteristics. Survival outcomes were only available for ovarian cancer patients and examined using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards regression. Among ovarian cancer patients (n = 175), positive p21 expression was associated with endometrioid tumors (OR = 12.22, 95% CI = 1.45-102.78) and higher overall survival (log-rank p = 0.002). In Cox models adjusted for stage, grade, and histology, the association between p21 expression and overall survival was borderline significant (hazard ratio = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.42-1.05). Among endometrial cancer patients (n = 289), positive p21 expression was inversely associated with age (OR ≥ 65 years of age = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.07-0.84) and current smoking status (OR: 0.33, 95% CI 0.15, 0.72) compared to negative expression. Our study showed heterogeneity in expression of cell-cycle proteins associated with risk factors and tumor characteristics of gynecologic cancers. Future studies to assess these markers of etiological classification and behavior may be warranted. PMID:25709969

  4. Childhood ADHD and Risk for Substance Dependence in Adulthood: A Longitudinal, Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Sharon; Katusic, Slavica K.; Colligan, Robert C.; Weaver, Amy L.; Killian, Jill M.; Voigt, Robert G.; Barbaresi, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are known to be at significantly greater risk for the development of substance use disorders (SUD) compared to peers. Impulsivity, which could lead to higher levels of drug use, is a known symptom of ADHD and likely accounts, in part, for this relationship. Other factors, such as a biologically increased susceptibility to substance dependence (addiction), may also play a role. Objective This report further examines the relationships between childhood ADHD, adolescent- onset SUD, and substance abuse and substance dependence in adulthood. Method Individuals with childhood ADHD and non-ADHD controls from the same population-based birth cohort were invited to participate in a prospective outcome study. Participants completed a structured neuropsychiatric interview with modules for SUD and a psychosocial questionnaire. Information on adolescent SUD was obtained retrospectively, in a previous study, from medical and school records. Associations were summarized using odds ratios (OR) and 95% CIs estimated from logistic regression models adjusted for age and gender. Results A total of 232 ADHD cases and 335 non-ADHD controls participated (mean age, 27.0 and 28.6 years, respectively). ADHD cases were more likely than controls to have a SUD diagnosed in adolescence and were more likely to have alcohol (adjusted OR 14.38, 95% CI 1.49–138.88) and drug (adjusted OR 3.48, 95% CI 1.38–8.79) dependence in adulthood. The subgroup of participating ADHD cases who did not have SUD during adolescence were no more likely than controls to develop new onset alcohol dependence as adults, although they were significantly more likely to develop new onset drug dependence. Conclusions Our study found preliminary evidence that adults with childhood ADHD are more susceptible than peers to developing drug dependence, a disorder associated with neurological changes in the brain. The relationship between ADHD and

  5. Gout increases risk of fracture: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-En; Lin, Che-Chen; Wang, I-Kuan; Huang, Po-Hao; Tsai, Chun-Hao

    2016-08-01

    There is still debate on whether high uric acid increases bone mineral density (BMD) against osteoporotic fracture or bone resorption caused by gout inflammation. This study aimed to evaluate whether gout offers a protective effect on bone health or not. We conducted a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study to evaluate the association between gout history and risk factors of fracture.A retrospective cohort study was designed using the claim data from Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (LHID). A total of 43,647 subjects with gout and a cohort of 87,294 comparison subjects without gout were matched in terms of age and sex between 2001 and 2009, and the data were followed until December 31, 2011. The primary outcome of the study was the fracture incidence, and the impacts of gout on fracture risks were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model.After an 11-year follow-up period, 6992 and 11,412 incidents of fracture were reported in gout and comparison cohorts, respectively. The overall incidence rate of fracture in individuals with gout was nearly 23%, which was higher than that in individuals without gout (252 vs 205 per 10,000 person-years) at an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.17 (95% confidence interval = 1.14-1.21). Age, sex, and fracture-associated comorbidities were adjusted accordingly. As for fracture locations, patients with gout were found at significant higher fracture risks for upper/lower limbs and spine fractures. In gout patient, the user of allopurinol or benzbromarone has significantly lower risk of facture than nonusers.Gout history is considered as a risk factor for fractures, particularly in female individuals and fracture sites located at the spine or upper/lower limbs. PMID:27559970

  6. Genocide Exposure and Subsequent Suicide Risk: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Levine, Stephen Z; Levav, Itzhak; Yoffe, Rinat; Becher, Yifat; Pugachova, Inna

    2016-01-01

    The association between periods of genocide-related exposures and suicide risk remains unknown. Our study tests that association using a national population-based study design. The source population comprised of all persons born during1922-1945 in Nazi-occupied or dominated European nations, that immigrated to Israel by 1965, were identified in the Population Register (N = 220,665), and followed up for suicide to 2014, totaling 16,953,602 person-years. The population was disaggregated to compare a trauma gradient among groups that immigrated before (indirect, n = 20,612, 9%); during (partial direct, n = 17,037, 8%); or after (full direct, n = 183,016, 83%) exposure to the Nazi era. Also, the direct exposure groups were examined regarding pre- or post-natal exposure periods. Cox regression models were used to compute Hazard Ratios (HR) of suicide risk to compare the exposure groups, adjusting for confounding by gender, residential SES and history of psychiatric hospitalization. In the total population, only the partial direct exposure subgroup was at greater risk compared to the indirect exposure group (HR = 1.73, 95% CI, 1.10, 2.73; P < .05). That effect replicated in six sensitivity analyses. In addition, sensitivity analyses showed that exposure at ages 13 plus among females, and follow-up by years since immigration were associated with a greater risk; whereas in utero exposure among persons with no psychiatric hospitalization and early postnatal exposure among males were at a reduced risk. Tentative mechanisms impute biopsychosocial vulnerability and natural selection during early critical periods among males, and feelings of guilt and entrapment or defeat among females. PMID:26901411

  7. The Association Between Peptic Ulcer Disease and Ischemic Stroke: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Guo, How-Ran; Chang, Chia-Yu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Li, Pi-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wu, Wen-Shiann

    2016-05-01

    Stroke is a common cause of death worldwide, but about 30% of ischemic stroke (IS) patients have no identifiable contributing risk factors. Because peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and vascular events share some common risk factors, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the association between PUD and IS.We followed up a representative sample of 1 million residents of Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1997 to 2011. We defined patients who received medications for PUD and had related diagnosis codes as the PUD group, and a reference group matched by age and sex was sampled from those who did not have PUD. We also collected data on medical history and monthly income. The events of IS occurred after enrollment were compared between the 2 groups. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models at the 2-tailed significant level of 0.05.The PUD group had higher income and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. They also had a higher risk of developing IS with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.20-1.41). Other independent risk factors included male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and heart disease.PUD is a risk factor for IS, independent of conventional risk factors such as male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, DM, and heart disease. Prevention strategies taking into account PUD should be developed and evaluated. PMID:27258514

  8. Population-based analysis of Alzheimer’s disease risk alleles implicates genetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ebbert, Mark T. W.; Ridge, Perry G.; Wilson, Andrew R.; Sharp, Aaron R.; Bailey, Matthew; Norton, Maria C.; Tschanz, JoAnn T.; Munger, Ronald G.; Corcoran, Christopher D.; Kauwe, John S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Reported odds ratios and population attributable fractions (PAF) for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) risk loci (BIN1, ABCA7, CR1, MS4A4E, CD2AP, PICALM, MS4A6A, CD33, and CLU) come from clinically ascertained samples. Little is known about the combined PAF for these LOAD risk alleles and the utility of these combined markers for case-control prediction. Here we evaluate these loci in a large population-based sample to estimate PAF and explore the effects of additive and non-additive interactions on LOAD status prediction performance. Methods 2,419 samples from the Cache County Memory Study were genotyped for APOE and nine LOAD risk loci from AlzGene.org. We used logistic regression and ROC analysis to assess the LOAD status prediction performance of these loci using additive and non-additive models, and compared ORs and PAFs between AlzGene.org and Cache County. Results Odds ratios were comparable between Cache County and AlzGene.org when identical SNPs were genotyped. PAFs from AlzGene.org ranged from 2.25–37%; those from Cache County ranged from 0.05–20%. Including non-APOE alleles significantly improved LOAD status prediction performance (AUC = 0.80) over APOE alone (AUC = 0.78) when not constrained to an additive relationship (p < 0.03). We identified potential allelic interactions (p-values uncorrected): CD33-MS4A4E (Synergy Factor = 5.31; p < 0.003) and CLU-MS4A4E (SF = 3.81; p < 0.016). Conclusions While non-additive interactions between loci significantly improve diagnostic ability, the improvement does not reach the desired sensitivity or specificity for clinical use. Nevertheless, these results suggest that understanding gene-gene interactions may be important in resolving Alzheimer’s disease etiology. PMID:23954108

  9. Lifetime degradation and regeneration in multicrystalline silicon under illumination at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeier, Dennis; Walter, Dominic; Herlufsen, Sandra; Schmidt, Jan

    2016-03-01

    We examine the carrier lifetime evolution of block-cast multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers under illumination (100 mW/cm2) at elevated temperature (75°C). Samples are treated with different process steps typically applied in industrial solar cell production. We observe a pronounced degradation in lifetime after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 900°C. However, we detect only a weak lifetime instability in mc-Si wafers which are RTA-treated at 650°C. After completion of the degradation, the lifetime is observed to recover and finally reaches carrier lifetimes comparable to the initial state. To explain the observed lifetime evolution, we suggest a defect model, where metal precipitates in the mc-Si bulk dissolve during the RTA treatment.

  10. Rapid Global Fitting of Large Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Sean C.; Margineanu, Anca; Alibhai, Dominic; Kelly, Douglas J.; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Katan, Matilda

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset). This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis of live cell

  11. Maternal Use of Antibiotics and the Risk of Childhood Febrile Seizures: A Danish Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica E.; Pedersen, Lars Henning; Vestergaard, Mogens; Olsen, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    Objective In a large population-based cohort in Denmark to examine if maternal use of antibiotics during pregnancy, as a marker of infection, increases the risk of febrile seizures in childhood in a large population-based cohort in Denmark. Methods All live-born singletons born in Denmark between January 1, 1996 and September 25, 2004 and who were alive on the 90th day of life were identified from the Danish National Birth Registry. Diagnoses of febrile seizures were obtained from the Danish National Hospital Register and maternal use of antibiotics was obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazard regression models. Results We followed 551,518 singletons for up to 5 years and identified a total of 21,779 children with a diagnosis of febrile seizures. Slightly increased hazard ratios were observed among most exposure groups when compared to the unexposed group, ex. HR 1.08 95% CI: 1.05–1.11 for use of any systemic antibiotic during pregnancy. Conclusion We found weak associations between the use of pharmacologically different antibiotics during pregnancy and febrile seizures in early childhood which may indicate that some infections, or causes or effects of infections, during pregnancy could affect the fetal brain and induce susceptibility to febrile seizures. PMID:23613800

  12. Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Guang; Lin, Te-Yu; Dai, Ming-Shen; Lin, Cheng-Li; Hung, Yuan; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-10-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning can cause several life-threatening complications, particularly in cardiovascular and neurological systems. However, no studies have been performed to investigate the association between peripheral artery disease (PAD) and CO poisoning. We constructed a population-based retrospective cohort study to clarify the risks between PAD and CO poisoning. This population-based cohort study involved analyzing data from 1998 to 2010 obtained from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, with a follow-up period extending to the end of 2011. We identified patients with CO poisoning and selected a comparison cohort that was frequency matched according to age, sex, and year of diagnosis of CO poisoning at a ratio of 1 patient to 4 control patients. We analyzed the risks for patients with CO poisoning and PAD by using Cox proportional hazards regression models. In this study, 9046 patients with CO poisoning and 36,183 controls were included. The overall risks for developing PAD were 1.85-fold in the patients with CO poisoning compared with the comparison cohort after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities. Our long-term cohort study results showed a higher risk for PAD development among patients with CO poisoning. PMID:26448007

  13. Aspects of silicon bulk lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsberg, P. T.

    1985-01-01

    The best lifetimes attained for bulk crytalline silicon as a function of doping concentrations are analyzed. It is assumed that the dopants which set the Fermi level do not contribute to the recombination traffic which is due to the unknown defect. This defect is assumed to have two charge states: neutral and negative, the neutral defect concentration is frozen-in at some temperature T sub f. The higher doping concentrations should include the band-band Auger effect by using a generalization of the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism. The generalization of the SRH mechanism is discussed. This formulation gives a straightforward procedure for incorporating both band-band and band-trap Auger effects in the SRH procedure. Two related questions arise in this context: (1) it may sometimes be useful to write the steady-state occupation probability of the traps implied by SRH procedure in a form which approximates to the Fermi-Dirac distribution; and (2) the effect on the SRH mechanism of spreading N sub t levels at one energy uniformly over a range of energies is discussed.

  14. Lifetime measurement in ^170Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Krücken, R.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Cooper, J. R.; Cederkäll, J.; Caprio, M.; Novak, J. R.; Zamfir, N. V.; Barton, C.

    1999-10-01

    The nature of the low lying K^π=0^+ excitations in deformed nuclei have recently been subject of intense discussion. In this context we present results from a Coulomb excitation experiment on ^170Yb using a 70MeV ^16O beam on a gold backed, 1.5 mg/cm^2 thick ^170Yb target. The beam was delivered by the ESTU tandem accelerator of WNSL at Yale University. Gamma rays were detected by the YRAST Ball array in coincidence with back-scattered ^16O particles, which were detected in an array of 8 solar cells. Lineshapes were observed for several transitions from collective states in ^170Yb and the lifetimes for those states were extracted using a standard DSAM analysis. The results will be presented together with a short introduction to the solar cell array at Yale (SCARY) that was used to make angular selection of the excited ^170Yb nuclei. This work is supported by the US-DOE under grant numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  15. Lifetime Evolution of UV Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corti, G.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Moore, R.; Sterling, A.

    2006-01-01

    We report on observations acquired in May 2003 during a SOHO-Ulysses quadrature campaign. From May 25 to May 28, the SoHO LASCO Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) catalog lists a number of events which might have been observed by SOHO/UVCS, whose slit was centered along the Ulysses direction. However, because of time gaps in the observing schedule, or because of the unfavorable position of some CMEs, the most interesting events recorded by UVCS were a few short-lived ejections that represent the extension at higher altitudes of recursive EIT jets. We focus on jets occurring on May 26/27, visible also in EIT and LASCO images, which seem to propagate along the radial to Ulysses. UVCS spectra at 1.7 Rsun showed an unusually high emission in cool lines, lasting for about 10 to 25 minutes, with no evidence of hot plasma. Analysis of the cool line emission allowed us to infer the evolution of physical parameters during the jets lifetime and derive a crude estimate of the energy needed to account for their properties. We also looked for any evidence of the event in in situ data. Whether UVCS is observing jets or narrow CMEs is discussed in the contest of previous works on these classes of events and, in the last Section, we propose a scenario that accounts for our observations.

  16. Cosmology in Mr. Tompkins' Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mr. Tompkins, the hero of George Gamow's most famous book, was born in the first decade of the twentieth century and lived until its end. A bank clerk by day, Mr. Tompkins had wide-ranging interests, and his curiosity led him to popular scientific presentations, and these in turn brought him a long and happy marriage to Maud, the daughter of a professor of physics. His lifetime offers an appropriate framework for a meditation on the history of cosmology during the century in which cosmology became a scientific enterprise. As it happens, Mr. Tompkins' first exposure to cosmology, in which he observed both the expansion and contraction of an oscillating universe in 1939, happened during the long night of relativity, the generation in which relativity specialists became few and, like the galaxies, far between. This talk will consider the heyday of early relativistic cosmology from 1917 to 1935, the causes and consequences of the "long night" from 1935 until 1963, and the renaissance of cosmology, which, occurring as it did upon the retirement of Mr. Tompkins, afforded him great pleasure in his later years.

  17. On estimating mean lifetimes by a weighted sum of lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosper, Harrison Bertrand

    1987-10-01

    Given N lifetime measurements an estimate of the mean lifetime can be obtained from a weighted sum of these measurements. We derive exact expressions for the probability density function, the moment-generating function, and the cumulative distribution function for the weighted sum. We indicate how these results might be used in the estimation of particle lifetimes. The probability distribution function of Yost for the distribution of lifetime measurements with finite measurement error is our starting point.

  18. Understanding Risk and Protective Factors for Child Maltreatment: The Value of Integrated, Population-Based Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam-Hornstein, Emily; Needell, Barbara; Rhodes, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we argue for expanded efforts to integrate administrative data systems as a "practical strategy" for developing a richer understanding of child abuse and neglect. Although the study of child maltreatment is often critiqued for being atheoretical, we believe that a more pressing concern is the absence of population-based and…

  19. Paediatric cancer stage in population-based cancer registries: the Toronto consensus principles and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumit; Aitken, Joanne F; Bartels, Ute; Brierley, James; Dolendo, Mae; Friedrich, Paola; Fuentes-Alabi, Soad; Garrido, Claudia P; Gatta, Gemma; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Gross, Thomas; Howard, Scott C; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Moreno, Florencia; Pole, Jason D; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Ramirez, Oscar; Ries, Lynn A G; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Shin, Hee Young; Steliarova-Foucher, Eva; Sung, Lillian; Supriyadi, Eddy; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Torode, Julie; Vora, Tushar; Kutluk, Tezer; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2016-04-01

    Population-based cancer registries generate estimates of incidence and survival that are essential for cancer surveillance, research, and control strategies. Although data on cancer stage allow meaningful assessments of changes in cancer incidence and outcomes, stage is not recorded by most population-based cancer registries. The main method of staging adult cancers is the TNM classification. The criteria for staging paediatric cancers, however, vary by diagnosis, have evolved over time, and sometimes vary by cooperative trial group. Consistency in the collection of staging data has therefore been challenging for population-based cancer registries. We assembled key experts and stakeholders (oncologists, cancer registrars, epidemiologists) and used a modified Delphi approach to establish principles for paediatric cancer stage collection. In this Review, we make recommendations on which staging systems should be adopted by population-based cancer registries for the major childhood cancers, including adaptations for low-income countries. Wide adoption of these guidelines in registries will ease international comparative incidence and outcome studies. PMID:27300676

  20. Asthma and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Nationwide Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Su, Tung-Ping; Chen, Ying-Sheue; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Bai, Ya-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous cross-sectional studies have suggested an association between asthma and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the temporal relationship was not determined. Using a nationwide population-based prospective case-control cohort study (1:4, age-/gender-matched), we hypothesized that asthma in infanthood or early…

  1. Mortality in Adults with Moderate to Profound Intellectual Disability: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrer, F.; Smith, L. K.; McGrother, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability (ID) experience a variety of health inequalities compared with the general population including higher mortality rates. This is the first UK population-based study to measure the extent of excess mortality in people with ID compared with the general population. Method: Indirectly standardized…

  2. Minor Self-Harm and Psychiatric Disorder: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skegg, Keren; Nada-Raja, Shyamala; Moffit, Terrie E.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which minor self-harm in the general population is associated with psychiatric disorder. A population-based sample of 980 young adults was interviewed independently about past-year suicidal and self-harm behavior and thoughts, and psychiatric disorders. Self-harm included self-harmful behaviors such as…

  3. A Population-Based Study of Preschoolers' Food Neophobia and Its Associations with Food Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Catherine Georgina; Worsley, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the relationships between food preferences, food neophobia, and children's characteristics among a population-based sample of preschoolers. Design: A parent-report questionnaire. Setting: Child-care centers, kindergartens, playgroups, day nurseries, and swimming centers. Subjects:…

  4. Epilepsy Among Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokiranta, Elina; Sourander, Andre; Suominen, Auli; Timonen-Soivio, Laura; Brown, Alan S.; Sillanpää, Matti

    2014-01-01

    The present population-based study examines associations between epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The cohort includes register data of 4,705 children born between 1987 and 2005 and diagnosed as cases of childhood autism, Asperger's syndrome or pervasive developmental disorders--not otherwise specified. Each case was matched to…

  5. Long-Term Benefits of Full-Day Kindergarten: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, M. D.; Nickel, N. C.; Chateau, D.; Martens, P. J.; Taylor, C.; Crockett, L.; Katz, A.; Sarkar, J.; Burland, E.; Goh, C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    In the first longitudinal, population-based study of full-day kindergarten (FDK) outcomes beyond primary school in Canada, we used linked administrative data to follow 15 kindergarten cohorts (n ranging from 112 to 736) up to grade 9. Provincial assessments conducted in grades 3, 7, and 8 and course marks and credits earned in grade 9 were…

  6. HIV/AIDS Misconceptions among Latinos: Findings from a Population-Based Survey of California Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritieni, Assunta; Moskowitz, Joel; Tholandi, Maya

    2008-01-01

    Misconceptions about HIV/AIDS among Latino adults (N=454) in California were examined using data from a population-based telephone survey conducted in 2000. Common misconceptions concerning modes of HIV transmission included transmission via mosquito or animal bite (64.1%), public facilities (48.3%), or kissing someone on the cheek (24.8%). A…

  7. Evaluating Nicotine Replacement Therapy and Stage-Based Therapies in a Population-Based Effectiveness Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velicer, Wayne F.; Friedman, Robert H.; Fava, Joseph L.; Gulliver, Suzy B.; Keller, Stefan; Sun, Xiaowu; Ramelson, Harley; Prochaska, James O.

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological interventions for smoking cessation are typically evaluated using volunteer samples (efficacy trials) but should also be evaluated in population-based trials (effectiveness trials). Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) alone and in combination with behavioral interventions was evaluated on a population of smokers from a New England…

  8. Relationship Status among Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Brian H.; Kalb, Luther G.; Zablotsky, Benjamin; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite speculation about an 80% divorce rate among parents of children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), very little empirical and no epidemiological research has addressed the issue of separation and divorce among this population. Data for this study was taken from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a population-based,…

  9. Development of Population-Based Resilience Measures in the Primary School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Jing; Stewart, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the population-based study in the paper is to report on progress in formulating instruments to measure children's resilience and associated protective factors in family, primary school and community contexts. Design/methodology/approach: In this paper a total of 2,794 students, 1,558 parents/caregivers, and 465 staff were…

  10. Psychological Abuse between Parents: Associations with Child Maltreatment from a Population-Based Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Jen Jen; Theodore, Adrea D.; Martin, Sandra L.; Runyan, Desmond K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the association between partner psychological abuse and child maltreatment perpetration. Methods: This cross-sectional study examined a population-based sample of mothers with children aged 0-17 years in North and South Carolina (n = 1,149). Mothers were asked about the occurrence of potentially neglectful or abusive…

  11. A Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Depression in Children with Developmental Disabilities in Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shooshtari, Shahin; Brownell, Marni; Dik, Natalia; Chateau, Dan; Yu, C. T.; Mills, Rosemary S. L.; Burchill, Charles A.; Wetzel, Monika

    2014-01-01

    In this population-based study, prevalence of depression was estimated and compared between children with and without developmental disability (DD). Twelve years of administrative data were linked to identify a cohort of children with DD living in the Canadian province of Manitoba. Children in the study cohort were matched with children without DD…

  12. Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Risk Behaviors among California Farmworkers: Results from a Population-Based Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brammeier, Monique; Chow, Joan M.; Samuel, Michael C.; Organista, Kurt C.; Miller, Jamie; Bolan, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases and associated risk behaviors among California farmworkers is not well described. Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and associated risk behaviors among California farmworkers. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of population-based survey data from 6…

  13. Understanding Disabled Childhoods: What Can We Learn from Population-Based Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric

    2012-01-01

    This article illustrates the potential value of undertaking secondary analyses of large-scale population-based survey data to better inform our understanding of disabled childhoods. It is argued that while such approaches can never address the lived experience of growing up with disability, they can provide valuable insights into the ways in which…

  14. Associated Medical Disorders and Disabilities in Children with Autistic Disorder: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kielinen, Marko; Rantala, Heikki; Timonen, Eija; Linna, Sirkka-Liisa; Moilanen, Irma

    2004-01-01

    A population-based survey was conducted among 152,732 Finnish children and adolescents aged under 16 years and living in northern Finland. Diagnoses and associated medical conditions were derived from the hospital and institutional records of this area. One hundred and eighty-seven children with DSM-IV autistic disorder were identified. Associated…

  15. Methods of Suicide among Cancer Patients: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Kuo-Hsuan; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2010-01-01

    A 3-year nationwide population-based data set was used to explore methods of suicide (violent vs. nonviolent) and possible contributing factors among cancer patients in Taiwan. A total of 1,065 cancer inpatients who committed suicide were included as our study sample. The regression shows that those who had genitourinary cancer were 0.55 times (p…

  16. Prevalence of physical violence against children in Haiti: A national population-based cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Flynn-O'Brien, Katherine T; Rivara, Frederick P; Weiss, Noel S; Lea, Veronica A; Marcelin, Louis H; Vertefeuille, John; Mercy, James A

    2016-01-01

    Although physical violence against children is common worldwide, there are no national estimates in Haiti. To establish baseline national estimates, a three-stage clustered sampling design was utilized to administer a population-based household survey about victimization due to physical violence to 13-24 year old Haitians (n=2,916), including those residing in camps or settlements. Descriptive statistics and weighted analysis techniques were used to estimate national lifetime prevalence and characteristics of physical violence against children. About two-thirds of respondents reported having experienced physical violence during childhood (67.0%; 95% CI 63.4-70.4), the percentage being similar in males and females. More than one-third of 13-17 year old respondents were victimized in the 12 months prior to survey administration (37.8%; 95% CI 33.6-42.1). The majority of violence was committed by parents and teachers; and the perceived intent was often punishment or discipline. While virtually all (98.8%; 95% CI 98.0-99.3) victims of childhood physical violence were punched, kicked, whipped or beaten; 11.0% (95% CI 9.2-13.2) were subject to abuse by a knife or other weapon. Injuries sustained from violence varied by victim gender and perpetrator, with twice as many females (9.6%; 95% CI 7.1-12.7) than males (4.0%; 95% CI 2.6-6.1) sustaining permanent injury or disfigurement by a family member or caregiver (p-value<.001). Our findings suggest that physical violence against children in Haiti is common, and may lead to severe injury. Characterization of the frequency and nature of this violence provides baseline estimates to inform interventions. PMID:26612595

  17. Effects of Low Activity Solar Cycle on Orbital Debris Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Samual B.; Sutton, Eric K.; Lin, chin S.; Liou, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    Long duration of low solar activity in the last solar minimum has an undesirable consequence of extending the lifetime of orbital debris. The AFRL TacSat-2 satellite decommissioned in 2008 has finally re-entered into the atmosphere on February 5th after more than one year overdue. Concerning its demise we have monitored its orbital decay and monthly forecasted Tacsat-2 re-entry since September 2010 by using the Orbital Element Prediction (OEP) model developed by the AFRL Orbital Drag Environment program. The model combines estimates of future solar activity with neutral density models, drag coefficient models, and an orbit propagator to predict satellite lifetime. We run the OEP model with solar indices forecast by the NASA Marshall Solar Activity Future Estimation model, and neutral density forecast by the MSIS-00 neutral density model. Based on the two line elements in 2010 up to mid September, we estimated at a 50% confidence level TacSat-2's re-entry time to be in early February 2011, which turned out to be in good agreement with Tacsat-2's actual re-entry date. The potential space weather effects of the coming low activity solar cycle on satellite lifetime and orbital debris population are examined. The NASA long-term orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND, is used to quantify the effects of solar flux on the orbital debris population in the 200-600 km altitude environment. The results are discussed for developing satellite orbital drag application product.

  18. Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

  19. Indices of Lifetime Polydrug Use among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, Carl D.; Morisky, Donald E.; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Lee, Sung-Jae; Ebin, V. J. Vicki J.

    2004-01-01

    The functional equivalency for three indices of lifetime polydrug use was examined in a sample of adolescents (N=794). The following indices were included in analyses: (a) a count of lifetime self-report of substances used; (b) an index weighted by the severity of the substances used; and (c) a hierarchical index of substance use. Analyses for…

  20. Multimodel Estimates of Atmospheric Lifetimes of Long-lived Ozone-Depleting Substances: Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipperfield, M. P.; Liang, Q.; Strahan, S. E.; Morgenstern, O.; Dhomse, S. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Archibald, A. T.; Bekki, S.; Braesicke, P.; Di Genova, G.; Fleming, E. L.; Hardiman, S. C.; Iachetti, D.; Jackman, C. H.; Kinnison, D. E.; Marchand, M.; Pitari, G.; Pyle, J. A.; Rozanov, E.; Stenke, A.; Tummon, F.

    2014-01-01

    We have diagnosed the lifetimes of long-lived source gases emitted at the surface and removed in the stratosphere using six three-dimensional chemistry-climate models and a two-dimensional model. The models all used the same standard photochemical data. We investigate the effect of different definitions of lifetimes, including running the models with both mixing ratio (MBC) and flux (FBC) boundary conditions. Within the same model, the lifetimes diagnosed by different methods agree very well. Using FBCs versus MBCs leads to a different tracer burden as the implied lifetime contained in the MBC value does not necessarily match a model's own calculated lifetime. In general, there are much larger differences in the lifetimes calculated by different models, the main causes of which are variations in the modeled rates of ascent and horizontal mixing in the tropical midlower stratosphere. The model runs have been used to compute instantaneous and steady state lifetimes. For chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) their atmospheric distribution was far from steady state in their growth phase through to the 1980s, and the diagnosed instantaneous lifetime is accordingly much longer. Following the cessation of emissions, the resulting decay of CFCs is much closer to steady state. For 2100 conditions the model circulation speeds generally increase, but a thicker ozone layer due to recovery and climate change reduces photolysis rates. These effects compensate so the net impact on modeled lifetimes is small. For future assessments of stratospheric ozone, use of FBCs would allow a consistent balance between rate of CFC removal and model circulation rate

  1. Multimodel estimates of atmospheric lifetimes of long-lived ozone-depleting substances: Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipperfield, M. P.; Liang, Q.; Strahan, S. E.; Morgenstern, O.; Dhomse, S. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Archibald, A. T.; Bekki, S.; Braesicke, P.; Di Genova, G.; Fleming, E. L.; Hardiman, S. C.; Iachetti, D.; Jackman, C. H.; Kinnison, D. E.; Marchand, M.; Pitari, G.; Pyle, J. A.; Rozanov, E.; Stenke, A.; Tummon, F.

    2014-03-01

    We have diagnosed the lifetimes of long-lived source gases emitted at the surface and removed in the stratosphere using six three-dimensional chemistry-climate models and a two-dimensional model. The models all used the same standard photochemical data. We investigate the effect of different definitions of lifetimes, including running the models with both mixing ratio (MBC) and flux (FBC) boundary conditions. Within the same model, the lifetimes diagnosed by different methods agree very well. Using FBCs versus MBCs leads to a different tracer burden as the implied lifetime contained in the MBC value does not necessarily match a model's own calculated lifetime. In general, there are much larger differences in the lifetimes calculated by different models, the main causes of which are variations in the modeled rates of ascent and horizontal mixing in the tropical midlower stratosphere. The model runs have been used to compute instantaneous and steady state lifetimes. For chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) their atmospheric distribution was far from steady state in their growth phase through to the 1980s, and the diagnosed instantaneous lifetime is accordingly much longer. Following the cessation of emissions, the resulting decay of CFCs is much closer to steady state. For 2100 conditions the model circulation speeds generally increase, but a thicker ozone layer due to recovery and climate change reduces photolysis rates. These effects compensate so the net impact on modeled lifetimes is small. For future assessments of stratospheric ozone, use of FBCs would allow a consistent balance between rate of CFC removal and model circulation rate.

  2. Residual Motion and Duty Time in Respiratory Gating Radiotherapy Using Individualized or Population-Based Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Fuji, Hiroshi Asada, Yoshihiro; Numano, Masumi; Yamashita, Haruo; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Harada, Hideyuki; Asakura, Hirofumi; Murayama, Shigeyuki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: The efficiency and precision of respiratory gated radiation therapy for tumors is affected by variations in respiration-induced tumor motion. We evaluated the use of individualized and population-based parameters for such treatment. Methods and Materials: External respiratory signal records and images of respiration-induced tumor motion were obtained from 42 patients undergoing respiratory gated radiation therapy for liver tumors. Gating window widths were calculated for each patient, with 2, 4, and 10 mm of residual motion, and the mean was defined as the population-based window width. Residual motions based on population-based and predefined window widths were compared. Duty times based on whole treatment sessions, at various window levels, were calculated. The window level giving the longest duty time was defined as the individualized most efficient level (MEL). MELs were also calculated based on the first 10 breathing cycles. The duty times for population-based MELs (defined as mean MELs) and individualized MELs were compared. Results: Tracks of respiration-induced tumor motion ranged from 3 to 50 mm. Half of the patients had larger actual residual motions than the assigned residual motions. Duty times were greater when based on individualized, rather than population-based, window widths. The MELs established during whole treatment sessions for 2 mm and 4 mm of residual motion gave significantly increased duty times, whereas those calculated using the first 10 breathing cycles showed only marginal increases. Conclusions: Using individualized window widths and levels provided more precise and efficient respiratory gated radiation therapy. However, methods for predicting individualized window levels before treatment remain to be explored.

  3. Beam lifetime and beam brightness in ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Jackson, A.; Warwick, A.

    1995-04-01

    Beam lifetime in ALS is dominated by the Touschek scattering. Measurements of lifetime in single-bunch mode with estimates of bunch dimensions obtained from undulator radiation data are consistent with expectations (t=1.8 hours at 1.25 mA per bunch). However, the lifetime is significantly longer in multi-bunch mode (t=ll hours at 400 mA per 320 bunches). This discrepancy has been traced to an increase in the momentum spread and bunch length in the beam caused by longitudinal coupled-bunch motions driven by higher-order modes in the rf cavities. The increased momentum spread leads to a significant degradation in the undulator spectral performance. Feedback stabilization of the coupled-bunch motion improves the spectral characteristics of the undulator beam at the expense of beam lifetime. We observe an increase of {approximately}200% in beam lifetime by operating at the betatron coupling resonance.

  4. Long term trends in prevalence of neural tube defects in Europe: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Loane, Maria; de Walle, Hermien; Arriola, Larraitz; Addor, Marie-Claude; Barisic, Ingeborg; Beres, Judit; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Dias, Carlos; Draper, Elizabeth; Garne, Ester; Gatt, Miriam; Haeusler, Martin; Klungsoyr, Kari; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Lynch, Catherine; McDonnell, Bob; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O’Mahony, Mary T; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Ritvanen, Annukka; Rounding, Catherine; Sipek, Antonin; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Study question What are the long term trends in the total (live births, fetal deaths, and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly) and live birth prevalence of neural tube defects (NTD) in Europe, where many countries have issued recommendations for folic acid supplementation but a policy for mandatory folic acid fortification of food does not exist? Methods This was a population based, observational study using data on 11 353 cases of NTD not associated with chromosomal anomalies, including 4162 cases of anencephaly and 5776 cases of spina bifida from 28 EUROCAT (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) registries covering approximately 12.5 million births in 19 countries between 1991 and 2011. The main outcome measures were total and live birth prevalence of NTD, as well as anencephaly and spina bifida, with time trends analysed using random effects Poisson regression models to account for heterogeneities across registries and splines to model non-linear time trends. Summary answer and limitations Overall, the pooled total prevalence of NTD during the study period was 9.1 per 10 000 births. Prevalence of NTD fluctuated slightly but without an obvious downward trend, with the final estimate of the pooled total prevalence of NTD in 2011 similar to that in 1991. Estimates from Poisson models that took registry heterogeneities into account showed an annual increase of 4% (prevalence ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.07) in 1995-99 and a decrease of 3% per year in 1999-2003 (0.97, 0.95 to 0.99), with stable rates thereafter. The trend patterns for anencephaly and spina bifida were similar, but neither anomaly decreased substantially over time. The live birth prevalence of NTD generally decreased, especially for anencephaly. Registration problems or other data artefacts cannot be excluded as a partial explanation of the observed trends (or lack thereof) in the prevalence of NTD. What this study adds In the absence of mandatory fortification

  5. (Mis)use of Prescribed Stimulants in the Medical Student Community: Motives and Behaviors: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Fond, Guillaume; Gavaret, Martine; Vidal, Christophe; Brunel, Lore; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Domenech, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of psychostimulant use in the French medical community and their motives.A population-based cross-sectional study using a self-administered online survey was done.A total of 1718 French students and physicians (mean age, 26.84±7.19 years, 37.1% men) were included. Self-reported lifetime use, motives, socio-demographic and academic features for over the counter (OTC), medically prescribed (MPP), and illicit (IP) psychostimulant users were reported. Lifetime prevalence of psychostimulant use was 33% (29.7% for OTC, 6.7% for MPP, and 5.2% for IP). OTC consumption mainly aimed at increasing academic performance and wakefulness during competitive exams preparation. OTC consumption started early and was predictive of later MPP use. Corticoids were the most frequently consumed MPP (4.5%) before methylphenidate and modafinil. Motives for MPP consumption were increased academic performance, concentration, memory, and wakefulness.Psychostimulant use is common among French medical community. Our results suggest that restrictions on methylphenidate and modafinil prescriptions are effective at limiting their use. However, these restrictions may explain the observed rates of corticoids consumption, which raise a new public health problem, given that corticoids may have severe side effects. PMID:27100420

  6. Investigation on the lifetime of He--Ne lasers by means of Weibull function

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xishan; Sun Zhendong

    1987-04-01

    The failure mechanism of He-Ne lasers is compared with the physical model of the Weibull function. It follows that the lifetime of He-Ne lasers ought to obey Weibull function. An equation for accelerated aging is derived, which is used to determine readily the lifetime characteristics of He-Ne lasers.

  7. The lifetime of axion stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, Joshua; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the decay of condensates of scalars in a field theory defined by V (𝒜) = m2f2[1 ‑cos(𝒜/f)], where m and f are the mass and decay constant of the scalar field. An example of such a theory is that of the axion, in which case the condensates are called axion stars. The axion field, 𝒜, is self-adjoint. As a result, the axion number is not an absolutely conserved quantity. Therefore, axion stars are not stable and have finite lifetimes. Bound axions, localized on the volume of the star, have a coordinate uncertainty δx ˜ R ˜ 1/(maΔ), where R is the radius of the star and Δ = 1 ‑ E0 2/ma 2. Here ma and E0 are the mass, and the ground state energy of the bound axion. Then the momentum distribution of axions has a width of δp ˜ maΔ. At strong binding, Δ = 𝒪(1), bound axions can easily transfer a sufficient amount of momentum to create and emit a free axion, leading to fast decay of the star with a transition rate Γ ˜ ma. However, when Δ ≪ 1, the momentum distribution is more restricted, and as shown in this paper, the transition rate for creating a free axion decreases as exp(‑pδx) ˜exp(‑Δ‑1). Then sufficiently large, weakly bound axion stars, produced after the Big Bang, survive until the present time. We plot the region of their stability, limited by decay through axion loss and by gravitational instability, as a function of the mass of the axion and the mass of the star.

  8. Measurement of the Tau Lepton Lifetime at Opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janissen, Anna Cornelia

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes a new measurement of the tau (tau) lepton lifetime using two statistically independent techniques each associated with one of the two principle decay topologies of the tau to one and three charged particles, respectively. The measurement was performed with data collected in 1990 and 1991 at the OPAL detector at the LEP e^+e ^- colliding beam accelerator at CERN. The LEP collider operates at a significantly higher energy than previous e^+e^- colliders. This presents a new experimental opportunity to investigate the physics associated with the tau<=pton in general and the tau lifetime in particular. The tau lepton is one of three similar electron -like particles: e, mu, and tau. These leptons exhibit a hierarchy of masses with: m_{e} < m_ {mu} < m_{tau}. While the electron is stable, the mu and the tau are unstable and decay via the weak interaction charged current. It is a fundamental feature of the standard model of fundamental particles and their interactions that this weak charged current has exactly the same strength for each of the three leptons; a phenomenon called lepton universality. The tau lifetime, tau_tau, can be related to the mu lifetime, tau_ mu, and the average leptonic branching ratio, BR(tau to lnu| nu), by:tau_ tau = tau_mu {G_mu G_{e}over G_tau G_ l} ({m_muover m_tau})^5 {rm BR}(tautolnu|nu)R where R is a calculable factor to account for phase space and radiative corrections, and G _l is the Fermi effective coupling strength of the weak charged current to the lepton l. Lepton universality implies that G _mu = G_{e} = G_tau. The experimentally measured tau lifetime, together with the measurements of the other quantities in the above relation, can be interpreted as a direct test of lepton universality. The tau lifetime measured with each of the two independent techniques is: eqalign{tau_1 &rm= 296.4+/-7.1(stat.)+/- 3.8(sys.) fscr tau_3 &rm= 286.3+/-7.4(stat.)+/-5.2(sys.) fs.}The systematic uncertainties for each of the

  9. Prediction of critical illness in elderly outpatients using elder risk assessment: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Biehl, Michelle; Takahashi, Paul Y; Cha, Stephen S; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Gajic, Ognjen; Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Identifying patients at high risk of critical illness is necessary for the development and testing of strategies to prevent critical illness. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between high elder risk assessment (ERA) score and critical illness requiring intensive care and to see if the ERA can be used as a prediction tool to identify elderly patients at the primary care visit who are at high risk of critical illness. Methods A population-based historical cohort study was conducted in elderly patients (age >65 years) identified at the time of primary care visit in Rochester, MN, USA. Predictors including age, previous hospital days, and comorbid health conditions were identified from routine administrative data available in the electronic medical record. The main outcome was critical illness, defined as sepsis, need for mechanical ventilation, or death within 2 years of initial visit. Patients with an ERA score of 16 were considered to be at high risk. The discrimination of the ERA score was assessed using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results Of the 13,457 eligible patients, 9,872 gave consent for medical record review and had full information on intensive care unit utilization. The mean age was 75.8 years (standard deviation ±7.6 years), and 58% were female, 94% were Caucasian, 62% were married, and 13% were living in nursing homes. In the overall group, 417 patients (4.2%) suffered from critical illness. In the 1,134 patients with ERA >16, 154 (14%) suffered from critical illness. An ERA score ≥16 predicted critical illness (odds ratio 6.35; 95% confidence interval 3.51–11.48). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.75, which indicated good discrimination. Conclusion A simple model based on easily obtainable administrative data predicted critical illness in the next 2 years in elderly outpatients with up to 14% of the highest risk population suffering from critical illness

  10. Benzodiazepine use and risk of incident dementia or cognitive decline: prospective population based study

    PubMed Central

    Dublin, Sascha; Yu, Onchee; Walker, Rod; Anderson, Melissa; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Crane, Paul K; Larson, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether higher cumulative use of benzodiazepines is associated with a higher risk of dementia or more rapid cognitive decline. Design Prospective population based cohort. Setting Integrated healthcare delivery system, Seattle, Washington. Participants 3434 participants aged ≥65 without dementia at study entry. There were two rounds of recruitment (1994-96 and 2000-03) followed by continuous enrollment beginning in 2004. Main outcomes measures The cognitive abilities screening instrument (CASI) was administered every two years to screen for dementia and was used to examine cognitive trajectory. Incident dementia and Alzheimer’s disease were determined with standard diagnostic criteria. Benzodiazepine exposure was defined from computerized pharmacy data and consisted of the total standardized daily doses (TSDDs) dispensed over a 10 year period (a rolling window that moved forward in time during follow-up). The most recent year was excluded because of possible use for prodromal symptoms. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine time varying use of benzodiazepine and dementia risk. Analyses of cognitive trajectory used linear regression models with generalized estimating equations. Results Over a mean follow-up of 7.3 years, 797 participants (23.2%) developed dementia, of whom 637 developed Alzheimer’s disease. For dementia, the adjusted hazard ratios associated with cumulative benzodiazepine use compared with non-use were 1.25 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.51) for 1-30 TSDDs; 1.31 (1.00 to 1.71) for 31-120 TSDDs; and 1.07 (0.82 to 1.39) for ≥121 TSDDs. Results were similar for Alzheimer’s disease. Higher benzodiazepine use was not associated with more rapid cognitive decline. Conclusion The risk of dementia is slightly higher in people with minimal exposure to benzodiazepines but not with the highest level of exposure. These results do not support a causal association between benzodiazepine use and

  11. Barriers to healthcare utilization in fatiguing illness: a population-based study in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jin-Mann S; Brimmer, Dana J; Boneva, Roumiana S; Jones, James F; Reeves, William C

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of barriers to healthcare utilization in persons with fatiguing illness and describe its association with socio-demographics, the number of health conditions, and frequency of healthcare utilization. Furthermore, we sought to identify what types of barriers interfered with healthcare utilization and why they occurred. Methods In a cross-sectional population-based survey, 780 subjects, 112 of them with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), completed a healthcare utilization questionnaire. Text analysis was used to create the emerging themes from verbatim responses regarding barriers to healthcare utilization. Multiple logistic regression was performed to examine the association between barriers to healthcare utilization and other factors. Results Forty percent of subjects reported at least one barrier to healthcare utilization. Of 112 subjects with CFS, 55% reported at least one barrier to healthcare utilization. Fatiguing status, reported duration of fatigue, insurance, and BMI were significant risk factors for barriers to healthcare utilization. After adjusting for socio-demographics, medication use, the number of health problems, and frequency of healthcare utilization, fatiguing status remained significantly associated with barriers to healthcare utilization. Subjects with CFS were nearly 4 times more likely to forego needed healthcare during the preceding year than non-fatigued subjects while those with insufficient fatigue (ISF) were nearly 3 times more likely. Three domains emerged from text analysis on barriers to healthcare utilization: 1) accessibility; 2) knowledge-attitudes-beliefs (KABs); and, 3) healthcare system. CFS and reported duration of fatigue were significantly associated with each of these domains. Persons with CFS reported high levels of healthcare utilization barriers for each domain: accessibility (34%), healthcare system (25%), and KABs (19%). In further examination of barrier

  12. Population-based programs for increasing colorectal cancer screening in the United States.

    PubMed

    Verma, Manisha; Sarfaty, Mona; Brooks, Durado; Wender, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Screening to detect polyps or cancer at an early stage has been shown to produce better outcomes in colorectal cancer (CRC). Programs with a population-based approach can reach a large majority of the eligible population and can offer cost-effective interventions with the potential benefit of maximizing early cancer detection and prevention using a complete follow-up plan. The purpose of this review was to summarize the key features of population-based programs to increase CRC screening in the United States. A search was conducted in the SCOPUS, OvidSP, and PubMed databases. The authors selected published reports of population-based programs that met at least 5 of the 6 International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) criteria for cancer prevention and were known to the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable. Interventions at the level of individual practices were not included in this review. IARC cancer prevention criteria served as a framework to assess the effective processes and elements of a population-based program. Eight programs were included in this review. Half of the programs met all IARC criteria, and all programs led to improvements in screening rates. The rate of colonoscopy after a positive stool test was heterogeneous among programs. Different population-based strategies were used to promote these screening programs, including system-based, provider-based, patient-based, and media-based strategies. Treatment of identified cancer cases was not included explicitly in 4 programs but was offered through routine medical care. Evidence-based methods for promoting CRC screening at a population level can guide the development of future approaches in health care prevention. The key elements of a successful population-based approach include adherence to the 6 IARC criteria and 4 additional elements (an identified external funding source, a structured policy for positive fecal occult blood test results and confirmed cancer

  13. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-04-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

  14. The association between cannabis use and anxiety disorders: Results from a population-based representative sample.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Daniel; Weiser, Mark; Rehm, Jürgen; Lev-Ran, Shaul

    2016-03-01

    The cross-sectional association between cannabis use and anxiety disorders is well documented, yet less is known about the longitudinal association between the two. This study explored the association between cannabis use, cannabis use disorders (CUDs) and anxiety disorders in a 3-year prospective study. Data was drawn from waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety, panic disorder and specific phobias, were controlled for at baseline. Initiation of cannabis use was defined as any cannabis use by former lifetime abstainers in the time period between baseline and follow-up, CUDs were defined as a diagnosis of cannabis abuse or dependence. Results indicate that cannabis use was not associated with increased incidence of any anxiety disorder (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.12(0.63-0.98)). Though heavy cannabis use was associated with increased incidence of social anxiety in most models, this was not fully retained in the final adjusted model (AOR=1.98(0.99-1.98)). Investigation of the association between baseline CUDs and anxiety disorders at follow-up revealed similar results. Any baseline anxiety disorder was not associated with future initiation of cannabis use (AOR=1.03(0.62-1.69)) or onset of a CUD (AOR=0.68(0.41-1.14)), yet individuals with baseline panic disorder were more prone to initiate cannabis use at follow-up (AOR=2.2(1.15-4.18)), possibly as a means of self-medication. Our findings suggest that cannabis use and CUDs are not associated with increased incidence of most anxiety disorders and inversely, most anxiety disorders are not associated with increased incidence of cannabis use or CUDs. PMID:26775742

  15. Lifetimes and Accretion Rates of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Xiao, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Protoplanetary disks originate in the collapse of molecular cloud cores. The formation and evolution of disks are influenced by the properties of molecular cloud cores. In this paper we investigate the dependence of disk lifetimes and accretion rates on cloud core properties. We find that the lifetime increases as the angular velocities and the mass of cloud cores increase and that the lifetime decreases as the core temperature increases. We have calculated the distribution of disk lifetimes and disk fractions with stellar age. Our calculations show that the lifetime is in the range of 1-15 Myr and that the typical lifetime is 1-3 Myr. There are a few disks with lifetimes greater than 10 Myr and ˜ 30% of the disks have lifetimes less than 1 Myr. We also fit the disk fraction by an exponential decay curve with characteristic time ˜3.7 Myr. Our results explain the observations of disk lifetimes. We also find that the accretion rate does not change significantly with ω and generally decreases with {T}{{cd}}. At the early evolution of the disks, the \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relation is about \\dot{M}\\propto {M}*1.2-2. Since the effects of the photoevaporation are weak at this stage, this relation is the consequence of the cloud core properties. At the late evolution of the disks, the \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relation is about \\dot{M}\\propto {M}*1.2-1.7. For low accretion rates at this stage, the \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relation results from the effects of X-ray photoevaporation. The calculated \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relations are consistent with the observations.

  16. Contactless Spectral-dependent Charge Carrier Lifetime Measurements in Silicon Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, John; Hamadani, Behrang; Dagenais, Mario

    Charge carrier lifetime measurements in bulk or unfinished photovoltaic (PV) materials allow for a more accurate estimate of power conversion efficiency in completed solar cells. In this work, carrier lifetimes in PV-grade silicon wafers are obtained by way of quasi-steady state photoconductance measurements. These measurements use a contactless RF system coupled with varying narrow spectrum input LEDs, ranging in wavelength from 460 nm to 1030 nm. Spectral dependent lifetime measurements allow for determination of bulk and surface properties of the material, including the intrinsic bulk lifetime and the surface recombination velocity. The effective lifetimes are fit to an analytical physics-based model to determine the desired parameters. Passivated and non-passivated samples are both studied and are shown to have good agreement with the theoretical model.

  17. Lifetimes of Electrodes for AMTEC Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Kisor, A.; Williams, R F.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; O'Connor, D.

    1994-01-01

    The lifetime of an AMTEC electrode depends on the rate of grain growth, which in turn depends on the surface self-diffusion coefficient of the electrode material under AMTEC operating conditions. Grain growth rates for molybdenum and platinum-tungsten alloy electrodes have been determined, and have been used to predict operating lifetimes of AMTEC electrodes. For lifetimes of 10 years of more, Mo may be used in AMTEC cells only at operating temperatures under 1100 K. Pt(sub 2.5)W electrodes may be used at much higher temperatures, up to 1300 K.

  18. Measurement of Rydberg positronium fluorescence lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements of the fluorescence lifetimes of positronium (Ps) atoms with principal quantum numbers n =10 -19 . Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states were produced via a two-color two-step 1 3S→2 3P→n 3S/n lifetimes of the Rydberg levels, yielding values ranging from 3 μ s to 26 μ s . Our data are in accord with the expected radiative lifetimes of Rydberg-Stark states of Ps.

  19. Fluorescence lifetime resolution with phase fluorometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Geert; Engelborghs, Yves; Persoons, Andre

    1983-07-01

    A phase fluorometer for the measurement of fluorescence lifetimes was constructed from commercially available components. The instrument was tested by using optical delays of 4 and 2 cm, showing an accuracy of 10 ps. Lifetimes, as short as 0.3 ns, obtained by the quenching of fluorescein by KI, were analyzed with a standard deviation of 3 ps. The lifetime resolving power was checked using mixtures of acridine and quinine-sulphate and least-squares fitting procedures. Accurate amplitude ratios were obtained with the technique of phase-sensitive detection [J. R. Lakowicz and H. Cherek, J. Biochem. Biophys. Methods 5, 19 (1981)].

  20. Declining Fertility and the Use of Cesarean Delivery: Evidence from a Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke-Zong M; Norton, Edward C; Lee, Shoou-Yih D

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that declining fertility would affect the number of cesarean sections (c-sections) on maternal demand, but not medically indicated c-sections. Data Sources The 1996–2004 National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan for all singleton deliveries. Study Design Retrospective population-based, longitudinal study. Estimation was performed using multinomial probit models. Principal Findings Results revealed that declining fertility had a significant positive effect on the probability of having a c-section on maternal request but not medically indicated c-section. Conclusions Our findings offer a precautionary note to countries experiencing a fertility decline. Policies to contain the rise of c-sections should understand the role of women's preferences, especially regarding cesarean deliveries on maternal request. PMID:20545781

  1. Proton lifetime from SU(5) unification in extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alciati, Maria Laura; Feruglio, Ferruccio; Lin, Yin; Varagnolo, Alvise

    2005-03-01

    We provide detailed estimates of the proton lifetime in the context of simple supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified models with an extra compact spatial dimension, described by the orbifold S1/(Z2 × Z2') and by a large compactification scale Mc approx 1014÷1016 GeV. We focus on a class of models where the grand unified symmetry is broken by the compactification mechanism and where baryon violation proceeds mainly through gauge vector boson exchange so that the proton lifetime scales as Mc4. We carefully compute Mc from a next-to-leading analysis of gauge coupling unification and we find that Mc can only be predicted up to an overall factor 10+/-1. The simplest model, where the dominant decay mode is π0e+ and has no flavour suppression, is strongly constrained by existing data, but not totally ruled out. We also analyze models where some of the matter fields are localized in the extra space and proton decay is flavour suppressed. In models associated to anarchy in the neutrino sector the preferred decay channel is K+bar nu and the lifetime can be within the reach of the next generation of experiments.

  2. Topological lifetimes of polydisperse colloidal hard spheres at a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullens, Roel P. A.; Kegel, Willem K.

    2005-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study the behavior of dense suspensions of model colloidal hard spheres at a single wall. Due to the slight polydispersity, our system shows a reentrant melting transition at high densities involving a hexatic structure [R. P. A. Dullens and W. K. Kegel, Phys. Rev. Lett 92, 195702 (2004)]. The reentrant melting transition is accompanied by an increase in the mean-squared displacement. The correlation between structure and dynamics was quantitatively analyzed on a single-particle level. In particular, the topological lifetime, being the average time that a particle spends having the same coordination number, is determined for all coordination numbers and as a function of volume fraction. The defective (non-sixfold-coordinated) particles exhibit shorter lifetimes than sixfold-coordinated particles, indicating that the mobility of the system is larger at or close to defective particles. The lifetime itself is a strong function of volume fraction. In particular, the global behavior of the mean-squared displacement is proportional to the hopping frequency (the inverse of the lifetime), showing that particles changing their coordination number contribute most to the local mobility.

  3. Exploring the acceptability and feasibility of conducting a large longitudinal population-based study in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Susan A; Raina, Parminder S; Wolfson, Christina; Strople, Geoff; Kits, Olga; Dukeshire, Steven; Angus, Camille L; Szala-Meneok, Karen; Uniat, Jennifer; Keshavarz, Homa; Furlini, Linda; Pelletier, Amélie

    2009-09-01

    ABSTRACTSuccessful recruitment and retention for population-based longitudinal studies requires understanding facilitators and barriers to participation. This study explored Canadians' views regarding one such study, the proposed Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA). Focus groups of participants > or =40 years of age were held in six proposed CLSA data collection sites (Halifax, Montreal, Hamilton, Winnipeg, Calgary, and Vancouver) to discuss participating in a long-term study of healthy aging. There was fundamental support for longitudinal research on health and aging. Altruism was a key motivation to participation, and universities were viewed as credible parties to conduct such studies. Participants had few worries about providing biological samples but expressed concern about potential misuse of genetic materials, commercialization of participant data, and privacy issues. These findings have already informed current, and will inform future, work on the CLSA, and will also provide useful information to researchers who undertake other population-based longitudinal studies. PMID:19860978

  4. The future of population-based postmarket drug risk assessment: a regulator's perspective.

    PubMed

    Hammad, T A; Neyarapally, G A; Iyasu, S; Staffa, J A; Dal Pan, G

    2013-09-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration emphasizes the role of regulatory science in the fulfillment of its mission to promote and protect public health and foster innovation. With respect to the evaluation of drug effects in the real world, regulatory science plays an important role in drug risk assessment and management. This article discusses opportunities and challenges with population-based drug risk assessment as well as related regulatory science knowledge gaps in the following areas: (i) population-based data sources and methods to evaluate drug safety issues; (ii) evidence-based thresholds to account for uncertainty in postmarket data; (iii) approaches to optimize the integration and interpretation of evidence from different sources; and (iv) approaches to evaluate the real-world impact of regulatory decisions. Regulators should continue the ongoing dialogue with multiple stakeholders to strengthen regulatory safety science and address these and other critical knowledge gaps. PMID:23739537

  5. An overview of population-based algorithms for multi-objective optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giagkiozis, Ioannis; Purshouse, Robin C.; Fleming, Peter J.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present an overview of the most prominent population-based algorithms and the methodologies used to extend them to multiple objective problems. Although not exact in the mathematical sense, it has long been recognised that population-based multi-objective optimisation techniques for real-world applications are immensely valuable and versatile. These techniques are usually employed when exact optimisation methods are not easily applicable or simply when, due to sheer complexity, such techniques could potentially be very costly. Another advantage is that since a population of decision vectors is considered in each generation these algorithms are implicitly parallelisable and can generate an approximation of the entire Pareto front at each iteration. A critique of their capabilities is also provided.

  6. Predictors of fracture while on treatment with oral bisphosphonates: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Pagès-Castellà, Aina; Wallace, Gemma; Javaid, M Kassim; Judge, Andrew; Nogués, Xavier; Arden, Nigel K; Cooper, Cyrus; Diez-Perez, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    Although oral bisphosphonates (BPs) are highly effective in preventing fractures, some patients will fracture while on treatment. We identified predictors of such fractures in a population-based cohort of incident users of oral BPs. We screened the Sistema d'Informació per al Desenvolupament de l'Investigació en Atenció Primària (SIDIAP) database to identify new users of oral BPs in 2006-2007. SIDIAP includes pharmacy invoice data and primary care electronic medical records for a representative 5 million people in Catalonia (Spain). Exclusion criteria were the following: Paget disease; <40 years of age; and any antiosteoporosis treatment in the previous year. A priori defined risk factors included age, gender, body mass index, vitamin D deficiency, smoking, alcohol drinking, preexisting comorbidities, and medications. Fractures were considered if they appeared at least 6 months after treatment initiation. "Fractures while on treatment" were defined as those occurring among participants persisting for at least 6 months and with an overall high compliance (medication possession ratio ≥80%). Fine and Gray survival models accounting for competing risk with therapy discontinuation were fitted to identify key predictors. Only 7449 of 21,385 (34.8%) participants completed >6 months of therapy. Incidence of fracture while on treatment was 3.4/100 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-3.7). Predictors of these among patients persisting and adhering to treatment included: older age (subhazard ratio [SHR] for 60 to <80 years, 2.18 [95% CI, 1.70-2.80]; for ≥80 years, 2.5 [95% CI, 1.82-3.43]); previous fracture (1.75 [95% CI, 1.39-2.20] and 2.49 [95% CI, 1.98-3.13], in the last 6 months and longer, respectively); underweight, 2.11 (95% CI, 1.14-3.92); inflammatory arthritis, 1.46 (95% CI, 1.02-2.10); use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.02-1.46); and vitamin D deficiency, 2.69 (95% CI, 1.27-5.72). Even among high compliers, 3.4% of oral BP

  7. Splenectomy and risk of renal and perinephric abscesses: A population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-08-01

    Little epidemiological research is available on the relationship between splenectomy and renal and perinephric abscesses. The purpose of the study was to examine this issue in Taiwan.We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using the hospitalization dataset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. A total of 16,426 participants aged 20 and older who were newly diagnosed with splenectomy from 1998 to 2010 were assigned to the splenectomy group, whereas 65,653 sex-matched, age-matched, and comorbidity-matched, randomly selected participants without splenectomy were assigned to the nonsplenectomy group. The incidence of renal and perinephric abscesses at the end of 2011 was measured in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of renal and perinephric abscesses associated with splenectomy and other comorbidities including cystic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis.The overall incidence rate of renal and perinephric abscesses was 2.14-fold greater in the splenectomy group than that in the nonsplenectomy group (2.24 per 10,000 person-years vs 1.05 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 2.02, 2.28). After controlling for sex, age, cystic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis, the multivariable regression analysis demonstrated that the adjusted HR of renal and perinephric abscesses was 2.24 for the splenectomy group (95 % CI 1.30, 3.88), when compared with the nonsplenectomy group. In further analysis, the adjusted HR markedly increased to 7.69 for those comorbid with splenectomy and diabetes mellitus (95% CI 3.31, 17.9).Splenectomy is associated with renal and perinephric abscesses, particularly comorbid with diabetes mellitus. In view of its potential morbidity and mortality, clinicians should consider the possibility of renal and perinephric abscesses when

  8. Metabolome in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders: a general population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Persons with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders have a high prevalence of obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, and lipid abnormalities, particularly hypertriglyceridemia and low high-density lipoprotein. More detailed molecular information on the metabolic abnormalities may reveal clues about the pathophysiology of these changes, as well as about disease specificity. Methods We applied comprehensive metabolomics in serum samples from a general population-based study in Finland. The study included all persons with DSM-IV primary psychotic disorder (schizophrenia, n = 45; other non-affective psychosis (ONAP), n = 57; affective psychosis, n = 37) and controls matched by age, sex, and region of residence. Two analytical platforms for metabolomics were applied to all serum samples: a global lipidomics platform based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, which covers molecular lipids such as phospholipids and neutral lipids; and a platform for small polar metabolites based on two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS). Results Compared with their matched controls, persons with schizophrenia had significantly higher metabolite levels in six lipid clusters containing mainly saturated triglycerides, and in two small-molecule clusters containing, among other metabolites, (1) branched chain amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine, and (2) proline, glutamic, lactic and pyruvic acids. Among these, serum glutamic acid was elevated in all psychoses (P = 0.0020) compared to controls, while proline upregulation (P = 0.000023) was specific to schizophrenia. After adjusting for medication and metabolic comorbidity in linear mixed models, schizophrenia remained independently associated with higher levels in seven of these eight clusters (P < 0.05 in each cluster). The metabolic abnormalities were less pronounced in persons with ONAP or affective psychosis. Conclusions Our

  9. Long-term musculoskeletal morbidity after adult burn injury: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Sean M; Fear, Mark W; Wood, Fiona M; Rea, Suzanne; Boyd, James H; Duke, Janine M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate if adults who are hospitalised for a burn injury have increased long-term hospital use for musculoskeletal diseases. Design A population-based retrospective cohort study using linked administrative health data from the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Subjects Records of 17 753 persons aged at least 20 years when hospitalised for a first burn injury in Western Australia during the period 1980–2012, and 70 758 persons who were age and gender-frequency matched with no injury admissions randomly selected from Western Australia's electoral roll. Main outcome measures Admission rates and cumulative length of stay for musculoskeletal diseases. Negative binomial and Cox proportional hazards regression modelling were used to generate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and HRs with 95% CIs, respectively. Results After adjustment for pre-existing health status and demographic characteristics, the burn cohort had almost twice the hospitalisation rate for a musculoskeletal condition (IRR, 95% CI 1.98, 1.86 to 2.10), and spent 3.70 times as long in hospital with a musculoskeletal diagnosis (95% CI 3.10 to 4.42) over the 33-year period, than the uninjured comparison cohort. Adjusted survival analyses of incident post-burn musculoskeletal disease admissions found significant increases for the 15-year post burn discharge period (0–6 months: HR, 95% CI 2.51, 2.04 to 3.11; 6 months–2 years: HR, 95% CI 1.77, 1.53 to 2.05; 2–15 years: HR, 95% CI 1.32, 1.23 to 1.42). Incident admission rates were significantly elevated for 20 years post-burn for minor and severe burn injury for a range of musculoskeletal diseases that included arthropathies, dorsopathies, osteopathies and soft tissue disorders. Conclusions Minor and severe burn injuries were associated with significantly increased post-burn incident admission rates, long-term hospital use and prolonged length of stay for a range of musculoskeletal diseases. Further research is required

  10. Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Bereavement and Childbirths in the Offspring: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Olsen, Jørn; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gómez, Guadalupe; Cnattingius, Sven; Li, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The decline in birth rates is a concern in public health. Fertility is partly determined before birth by the intrauterine environment and prenatal exposure to maternal stress could, through hormonal disturbance, play a role. There has been such evidence from animal studies but not from humans. We aimed to examine the association between prenatal stress due to maternal bereavement following the death of a relative and childbirths in the offspring. Materials and Methods This population-based cohort study included all subjects born in Denmark after 1968 and in Sweden after 1973 and follow-up started at the age of 12 years. Subjects were categorized as exposed if their mothers lost a close relative during pregnancy or the year before and unexposed otherwise. The main outcomes were age at first child and age-specific mean numbers of childbirths. Data was analyzed using Cox Proportional Hazards models stratified by gender and adjusted for several covariates. Subanalyses were performed considering the type of relative deceased and timing of bereavement. Results A total of 4,121,596 subjects were followed-up until up to 41 years of age. Of these subjects, 93,635 (2.3%) were exposed and 981,989 (23.8%) had at least one child during follow-up time. Compared to unexposed, the hazard ratio (HR) [95% confidence interval] of having at least one child for exposed males and females were 0.98 [0.96–1.01] and 1.01 [0.98–1.03], respectively. We found a slightly reduced probability of having children in females born to mothers who lost a parent with HR = 0.97 [0.94–0.99] and increased probability in females born to mothers who lost another child (HR = 1.09 [1.04–1.14]), the spouse (HR = 1.29 [1.12–1.48]) or a sibling (HR = 1.13 [1.01–1.27]). Conclusions Our results suggested no overall association between prenatal exposure to maternal stress and having a child in early adulthood but a longer time of follow-up is necessary in order to reach a

  11. Population based case–control study of serious non-fatal motorcycle crashes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Motorcycle sales, registration and use are increasing in many countries. The epidemiological literature on risk factors for motorcycle injury is becoming outdated, due to changes in rider demography, licensing regulations, traffic mix and density, road environments, and motorcycle designs and technologies. Further, the potential contribution of road infrastructure and travel speed has not yet been examined. Methods/design A population based case–control study together with a nested case-crossover study is planned. Cases will be motorcycle riders who are injured but not killed in a motorcycle crash on a public road within 150 km radius of Melbourne, Australia, and admitted to one of the study hospitals. Controls will be motorcycle riders who ride through the crash site on the same type of day (weekday or weekend) within an hour of the crash time. Data on rider, bike, and trip characteristics will be collected from the participants by questionnaire. Data on crash site characteristics will be collected in a structured site inspection, and travel speed for the cases will be estimated from these data. Travel speed for the controls will be measured prior to recruitment with a radar traffic detection device as they ride through the crash site. Control sites for the case-crossover study will be selected 1 km upstream from the crash site and matched on either intersection status or road curvature (either straight or cornered). If the initial site selected does not match the case site on these characteristics, then the closest matching site on the case route will be selected. Conditional multivariate logistic regression models will be used to compare risk between the matched case and control riders and to examine associations between road infrastructure and road environment characteristics and crash occurrence. Interactions between type of site and speed will be tested to determine if site type is an effect modifier of the relationship between speed and crash

  12. Predictors of fracture while on treatment with oral bisphosphonates: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Alhambra, D; Pagès-Castellà, A; Wallace, G; Javaid, MK; Judge, A; Nogués, X; Arden, NK; Cooper, C; Diez-Perez, A

    2013-01-01

    Although oral bisphosphonates (BP) are highly effective in preventing fractures, some patients will fracture while on treatment. We identified predictors of such fractures in a population-based cohort of incident users of oral BP. We screened the SIDIAP database to identify new users of oral BP in 2006-2007. SIDIAP includes pharmacy invoice data and primary care electronic medical records for a representative 5 million people in Catalonia (Spain). Exclusion criteria were: Paget disease, <40 years of age, and any anti-osteoporosis treatment in the previous year. A priori defined risk factors included age, gender, body mass index, vitamin D deficiency, smoking, alcohol drinking, pre-existing comorbidities, and medications. Fractures were considered if they appeared after at least 6 months after treatment initiation. Fractures while on treatment were defined as those occurring among participants persisting for at least 6 months and with an overall high compliance (medication possession ratio ≥ 80%). Fine and Gray survival models accounting for competing risk with therapy discontinuation were fitted to identify key predictors. Results Only 7,449/21,385 (34.8%) participants completed >6 months of therapy. Incidence of “fracture while on treatment” was 3.4/100 person-years [95%CI 3.1-3.7]. Predictors of these among patients persisting and adhering to treatment included: older age (sub-hazard ratio (SHR) for 60 to <80 years 2.18 [1.70-2.80]; for ≥80years 2.5 [1.82-3.43]), previous fracture (SHR 1.75 [1.39-2.20] and 2.49 [1.98-3.13] in the last 6 months and longer respectively), underweight (SHR 2.11 [1.14-3.92]), inflammatory arthritis (SHR 1.46 [1.02-2.10]), use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) (SHR 1.22 [1.02-1.46]) and vitamin D deficiency (SHR 2.69 [1.27-5.72]. Conclusion(s) Even among high compliers, 3.4% of oral BP users will fracture every year. Older age, underweight, vitamin D deficiency, PPI use, previous fracture and inflammatory arthritides increase

  13. Comorbidities and Burden of COPD: A Population Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Baty, Florent; Putora, Paul Martin; Isenring, Bruno; Blum, Torsten; Brutsche, Martin

    2013-01-01

    COPD is associated with a relevant burden of disease and a high mortality worldwide. Only recently, the importance of comorbidities of COPD has been recognized. Studies postulated an association with inflammatory conditions potentially sharing pathogenic pathways and worsening overall prognosis. More evidence is required to estimate the role of comorbidities of COPD. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence and clustering of comorbidities associated with COPD, and to estimate their impact on clinically relevant outcomes. In this population-based case-control study, a nation-wide database provided by the Swiss Federal Office for Statistics enclosing every hospital entry covering the years 2002–2010 (n = 12′888′075) was analyzed using MySQL and R statistical software. Statistical methods included non-parametric hypothesis testing by means of Fisher’s exact test and Wilcoxon rank sum test, as well as linear models with generalized estimating equation to account for intra-patient variability. Exploratory multivariate approaches were also used for the identification of clusters of comorbidities in COPD patients. In 2.6% (6.3% in patients aged >70 years) of all hospitalization cases an active diagnosis of COPD was recorded. In 21% of these cases, COPD was the main reason for hospitalization. Patients with a diagnosis of COPD had more comorbidities (7 [IQR 4–9] vs. 3 [IQR 1–6]; ), were more frequently rehospitalized (annual hospitalization rate 0.33 [IQR 0.20–0.67] vs. 0.25 [IQR 0.14–0.43]/year; ), had a longer hospital stay (9 [IQR 4–15] vs. 5 [IQR 2–11] days; ), and had higher in-hospital mortality (5.9% [95% CI 5.8%–5.9%] vs. 3.4% [95% CI 3.3%–3.5%]; ) compared to matched controls. A set of comorbidities was associated with worse outcome. We could identify COPD-related clusters of COPD-comorbidities. PMID:23691009

  14. Irritable Bowel Syndrome Increases the Risk of Epilepsy: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    An abnormal interaction in the brain-gut axis is regarded as the cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We attempted to determine the association between IBS and subsequent development of epilepsy.A total of 32,122 patients diagnosed with IBS between 2000 and 2011 were identified from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database as the study cohort, and 63,295 controls were randomly selected from the insurants without IBS and frequency-matched according to age, sex, and index year as the comparison cohort. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to measure the incidence of epilepsy. We analyzed the risks of epilepsy using Cox proportional hazards regression models.The IBS patients had greater cumulative incidence of epilepsy than the cohort without IBS (log-rank test, P < 0.001 and 2.54 versus 1.86 per 1000 person-years). The IBS cohort had a higher risk of epilepsy after adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, head injury, depression, systemic lupus erythematosus, brain tumor, and antidepressants usage (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-1.45). Stratified by the presence of other risk factors, the relative risk was also greater for patients with (aHR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10-1.41) or without other risk factors (aHR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.35-2.10) in the IBS cohort than for those in the non-IBS cohort. The age-specific relative risk of epilepsy in the IBS cohort was greater than that in the non-IBS cohort for both 35 to 49 age group and 50 to 64 age group (age ≤ 34, aHR:1.31, 95% CI: 0.93-1.85; age 35-49, aHR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.12-1.83; age 50-64, aHR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.27-1.91). However, there was no difference between patients > 65 years with IBS and those without IBS (aHR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.94-1.31).This population-based cohort study revealed that IBS increases the risk of developing epilepsy. However, IBS may be less influential than other risk factors. Further study is necessary to

  15. Cancer Mortality in People Treated with Antidepressants before Cancer Diagnosis: A Population Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuelian; Vedsted, Peter; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Wu, Chun Sen; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Olsen, Jørn; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is common after a cancer diagnosis and is associated with an increased mortality, but it is unclear whether depression occurring before the cancer diagnosis affects cancer mortality. We aimed to study cancer mortality of people treated with antidepressants before cancer diagnosis. Methods and Findings We conducted a population based cohort study of all adults diagnosed with cancer between January 2003 and December 2010 in Denmark (N = 201,662). We obtained information on cancer from the Danish Cancer Registry, on the day of death from the Danish Civil Registry, and on redeemed antidepressants from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Current users of antidepressants were defined as those who redeemed the latest prescription of antidepressant 0–4 months before cancer diagnosis (irrespective of earlier prescriptions), and former users as those who redeemed the latest prescription five or more months before cancer diagnosis. We estimated an all-cause one-year mortality rate ratio (MRR) and a conditional five-year MRR for patients who survived the first year after cancer diagnosis and confidence interval (CI) using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Overall, 33,111 (16.4%) patients redeemed at least one antidepressant prescription in the three years before cancer diagnosis of whom 21,851 (10.8%) were current users at the time of cancer diagnosis. Current antidepressant users had a 32% higher one-year mortality (MRR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.29–1.35) and a 22% higher conditional five-year mortality (MRR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.17–1.26) if patients survived the first year after the cancer diagnosis than patients not redeeming antidepressants. The one-year mortality was particularly high for patients who initiated antidepressant treatment within four months before cancer diagnosis (MRR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.47–1.61). Former users had no increased cancer mortality. Conclusions Initiation of antidepressive treatment prior to cancer diagnosis is

  16. Increased Risk of Active Tuberculosis following Acute Kidney Injury: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsui; Huang, Hui-Yu; Huang, Tao-Min; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Meng-Chun; Ko, Wen-Je; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Yu, Chong-Jen; Shu, Chin-Chung; Lee, Chih-Hsin; Wang, Jann-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Profound alterations in immune responses associated with uremia and exacerbated by dialysis increase the risk of active tuberculosis (TB). Evidence of the long-term risk and outcome of active TB after acute kidney injury (AKI) is limited. Methods This population-based-cohort study used claim records retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. We retrieved records of all hospitalized patients, more than 18 years, who underwent dialysis for acute kidney injury (AKI) during 1999–2008 and validated using the NSARF data. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model to adjust for the ongoing effect of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was conducted to predict long-term de novo active TB after discharge from index hospitalization. Results Out of 2,909 AKI dialysis patients surviving 90 days after index discharge, 686 did not require dialysis after hospital discharge. The control group included 11,636 hospital patients without AKI, dialysis, or history of TB. The relative risk of active TB in AKI dialysis patients, relative to the general population, after a mean follow-up period of 3.6 years was 7.71. Patients who did (hazard ratio [HR], 3.84; p<0.001) and did not (HR, 6.39; p<0.001) recover from AKI requiring dialysis had significantly higher incidence of TB than patients without AKI. The external validated data also showed nonrecovery subgroup (HR = 4.37; p = 0.049) had high risk of developing active TB compared with non-AKI. Additionally, active TB was associated with long-term all-cause mortality after AKI requiring dialysis (HR, 1.34; p = 0.032). Conclusions AKI requiring dialysis seems to independently increase the long-term risk of active TB, even among those who weaned from dialysis at discharge. These results raise concerns that the increasing global burden of AKI will in turn increase the incidence of active TB. PMID:23936044

  17. Association Between Tuberculosis and Parkinson Disease: A Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chih-Hao; Chou, Chung-Hsing; Liu, Feng-Cheng; Lin, Te-Yu; Huang, Wen-Yen; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have investigated the association between tuberculosis (TB) and Parkinson disease (PD). This nationwide, population-based, retrospective cohort study investigated the risk of PD in patients with TB.We selected patients newly diagnosed with TB (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification: 011) from 2000 to 2009 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database as the TB cohort. The comparison cohort (the non-TB cohort) was frequency matched to the TB cohort at a ratio of 4:1 by sex, age, and the index date. We analyzed the risks of PD by using Cox proportional hazard regression models.A total of 121,951 patients with TB and 487,800 non-TB controls were enrolled in this study. The TB cohort had a 1.38-fold risk of PD compared with the non-TB cohort after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities (aHR, 95% CI: 1.30-1.46). The adjusted risk of PD in the TB and non-TB cohorts increased in subgroups regardless of age, sex, and comorbidities. Combined effect of TB and comorbidities on the risk of PD were significant in patients with TB who had diabetes (aHR: 2.26, 95% CI: 2.02-2.52), hypertension (aHR: 2.23, 95% CI: 2.04-2.44), head injury (aHR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.95-2.77), chronic kidney disease (aHR: 2.02, 95% CI: 1.49-2.72), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (aHR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.66-2.05), depression (aHR: 4.66, 95% CI: 3.59-6.05), dementia (aHR: 3.70, 95% CI: 2.99-4.59), and stroke (aHR: 2.56, 95% CI: 2.28-2.87). The risk of PD was higher in a follow-up within 1 year (aHR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.58-2.00) and decreased with the follow-up period in the TB cohort.Patients with TB have an independently 1.38-fold risk of PD. The risk of PD decreased with the follow-up period in the TB cohort. Physicians should be aware of the risk of PD in patients with TB when treating such patients. PMID:26937925

  18. Prison tobacco control policies and deaths from smoking in United States prisons: population based retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carson, E Ann; Krueger, Patrick M; Mueller, Shane R; Steiner, John F; Sabol, William J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the mortality attributable to smoking and years of potential life lost from smoking among people in prison and whether bans on smoking in prison are associated with reductions in smoking related deaths. Design Analysis of cross sectional survey data with the smoking attributable mortality, morbidity, and economic costs system; population based time series analysis. Setting All state prisons in the United States. Main outcome measures Prevalence of smoking from cross sectional survey of inmates in state correctional facilities. Data on state prison tobacco policies from web based searches of state policies and legislation. Deaths and causes of death in US state prisons from the deaths in custody reporting program of the Bureau of Justice Statistics for 2001-11. Smoking attributable mortality and years of potential life lost was assessed from the smoking attributable mortality, morbidity, and economic costs system of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Multivariate Poisson models quantified the association between bans and smoking related cancer, cardiovascular and pulmonary deaths. Results The most common causes of deaths related to smoking among people in prison were lung cancer, ischemic heart disease, other heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic airways obstruction. The age adjusted smoking attributable mortality and years of potential life lost rates were 360 and 5149 per 100 000, respectively; these figures are higher than rates in the general US population (248 and 3501, respectively). The number of states with any smoking ban increased from 25 in 2001 to 48 by 2011. In prisons the mortality rate from smoking related causes was lower during years with a ban than during years without a ban (110.4/100 000 v 128.9/100 000). Prisons that implemented smoking bans had a 9% reduction (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 0.95) in smoking related deaths. Bans in place for longer than

  19. Evaluation of a complex, population-based injury claims management intervention for improving injury outcomes: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Collie, Alex; Gabbe, Belinda; Fitzharris, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Injuries resulting from road traffic crashes are a substantial cause of disability and death worldwide. Injured persons receiving compensation have poorer recovery and return to work than those with non-compensable injury. Case or claims management is a critical component of injury compensation systems, and there is now evidence that claims management can have powerful positive impacts on recovery, but can also impede recovery or exacerbate mental health concerns in some injured people. This study seeks to evaluate the impact of a population-based injury claims management intervention in the State of Victoria, Australia, on the health of those injured in motor vehicle crashes, their experience of the compensation process, and the financial viability of the compensation system. Methods and analysis Evaluation of this complex intervention involves a series of linked but stand-alone research projects to assess the anticipated process changes, impacts and outcomes of the intervention over a 5-year time frame. Linkage and analysis of routine administrative and health system data is supplemented with a series of primary studies collecting new information. Additionally, a series of ‘action’ research projects will be undertaken to inform the implementation of the intervention. A program logic model designed by the state government Transport Accident Commission in conjunction with the research team provides the evaluation framework. Ethics and dissemination Relatively few studies have comprehensively examined the impact of compensation system processes on the health of injured persons, their satisfaction with systems processes, and impacts on the financial performance of the compensation scheme itself. The wholesale, population-based transformation of an injury claims management model is a rare opportunity to document impacts of system-level policy change on outcomes of injured persons. Findings will contribute to the evidence base of information on the

  20. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Jeremy P.; Murphy, James D.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Loo, Billy W.; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  1. Hand, hip and knee osteoarthritis in a Norwegian population-based study - The MUST protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the prevalence and consequences of osteoarthritis (OA) in the Norwegian population is limited. This study has been designed to gain a greater understanding of musculoskeletal pain in the general population with a focus on clinically and radiologically confirmed OA, as well as risk factors, consequences, and management of OA. Methods/Design The Musculoskeletal pain in Ullensaker STudy (MUST) has been designed as an observational study comprising a population-based postal survey and a comprehensive clinical examination of a sub-sample with self-reported OA (MUST OA cohort). All inhabitants in Ullensaker municipality, Norway, aged 40 to 79 years receive the initial population-based postal survey questionnaire with questions about life style, general health, musculoskeletal pain, self-reported OA, comorbidities, health care utilisation, medication use, and functional ability. Participants who self-report OA in their hip, knee and/or hand joints are asked to attend a comprehensive clinical examination at Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, including a comprehensive medical examination, performance-based functional tests, different imaging modalities, cardiovascular assessment, blood and urine samples, and a number of patient-reported questionnaires including five OA disease specific instruments. Data will be merged with six national data registries. A subsample of those who receive the questionnaire has previously participated in postal surveys conducted in 1990, 1994, and 2004 with data on musculoskeletal pain and functional ability in addition to demographic characteristics and a number of health related factors. This subsample constitutes a population based cohort with 20 years follow-up. Discussion This protocol describes the design of an observational population-based study that will involve the collection of data from a postal survey on musculoskeletal pain, and a comprehensive clinical examination on those with self-reported hand, hip and

  2. Molecular Variation at the SLC6A3 Locus Predicts Lifetime Risk of PTSD in the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shun-Chiao; Koenen, Karestan C.; Galea, Sandro; Aiello, Allison E.; Soliven, Richelo; Wildman, Derek E.; Uddin, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the 9-repeat (9R) allele located in the 3′UTR VNTR of the SLC6A3 gene increases risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, no study reporting this association to date has been based on population-based samples. Furthermore, no study of which we are aware has assessed the joint action of genetic and DNA methylation variation at SLC6A3 on risk of PTSD. In this study, we assessed whether molecular variation at SLC6A3 locus influences risk of PTSD. Participants (n = 320; 62 cases/258 controls) were drawn from an urban, community-based sample of predominantly African American Detroit adult residents, and included those who had completed a baseline telephone survey, had provided blood specimens, and had a homozygous genotype for either the 9R or 10R allele or a heterozygous 9R/10R genotype. The influence of DNA methylation variation in the SLC6A3 promoter locus was also assessed in a subset of participants with available methylation data (n = 83; 16 cases/67 controls). In the full analytic sample, 9R allele carriers had almost double the risk of lifetime PTSD compared to 10R/10R genotype carriers (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.02–3.86), controlling for age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, number of traumas, smoking, and lifetime depression. In the subsample of participants with available methylation data, a significant (p = 0.008) interaction was observed whereby 9R allele carriers showed an increased risk of lifetime PTSD only in conjunction with high methylation in the SLC6A3 promoter locus, controlling for the same covariates. Our results confirm previous reports supporting a role for the 9R allele in increasing susceptibility to PTSD. They further extend these findings by providing preliminary evidence that a “double hit” model, including both a putatively reduced-function allele and high methylation in the promoter region, may more accurately capture molecular risk of PTSD at the SLC6A3 locus. PMID:22745713

  3. Lifetimes of Stratospheric Ozone-Depleting Substances, Their Replacements, and Related Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, P. A.; Ko, M. K.; Reimann, S.; Strahan, S. E.; Atlas, E. L.; Burkholder, J. B.; Chipperfield, M.; Engel, A.; Liang, Q.; Plumb, R. A.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Estimating the average lifetime of a chemical in the atmosphere is crucial to understanding its current and future atmospheric concentration. Furthermore, for both ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases, information on their lifetimes is of paramount importance for obtaining future estimates for ozone depletion and climate forcing. The 'Lifetimes of Stratospheric Ozone-Depleting Substances, Their Replacements, and Related Species', under the World Climate Research Programme/Stratospheric Processes And their Role in Climate project, was completed in August 2013. The goal was to estimate both lifetimes and uncertainties. In this presentation we will provide: 1) an overview of key aspects of the definitions of lifetimes, 2) discuss the extensively revised photochemical values and uncertainties for obtaining lifetimes, 3) show new observational and 4) modeling estimates of lifetimes, and finally, 5) show new recommendations for the steady-state atmospheric lifetimes of 27 long-lived species. New findings include: * New chemical kinetic and photochemical information on the uncertainties associated with the Lyman-a absorption cross-sections, and revisions of absorption cross-section parameterizations for several chlorofluorocarbons. * State-of-the-art chemistry-climate models (CCMs) were used to estimate lifetimes over the course of the 21st century. Projected increases of the Brewer-Dobson circulation suggest that lifetimes should be shorter during the 21st century. However, the recovery of ozone in the CCMs shows that the photolysis of many species will decline, yielding only small changes in lifetimes of most species * The CFC-11 recommended lifetime increases to 52 years from the WMO (2011) value of 45 years. The most likely range is narrowed to 43-67 years. * The 44 year steady-state lifetime of CCl4 due to atmospheric loss determined in this report is substantially longer than the 35 years from WMO (2011). However, inclusion of the land and ocean

  4. Collection, use, and protection of population-based birth defects surveillance data in the united states.

    PubMed

    Mai, Cara T; Law, David J; Mason, Craig A; McDowell, Bradley D; Meyer, Robert E; Musa, Debra

    2007-12-01

    Birth defects surveillance systems collect population-based birth defects data from multiple sources to track trends in prevalence, identify risk factors, refer affected families to services, and evaluate prevention efforts. Strong state and federal public health and legal mandates are in place to govern the collection and use of these data. Despite the prima facie appeal of "opt-in" and similar strategies to those who view data collection as a threat to privacy, the use of these strategies in lieu of population-based surveillance can severely limit the ability of public health agencies to accurately access the health status of a group within a defined geographical area. With the need for population-based data central to their mission, birth defects programs around the country take their data stewardship role seriously, recognizing both moral and legal obligations to protect the data by employing numerous safeguards. Birth defects surveillance systems are shaped by the needs of the community they are designed to serve, with the goal of preventing birth defects or alleviating the burdens associated with them. PMID:18064713

  5. Population-Based Studies on the Epidemiology of Insulin Resistance in Children

    PubMed Central

    van der Aa, M. P.; Fazeli Farsani, S.; Knibbe, C. A. J.; de Boer, A.; van der Vorst, M. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In view of the alarming incidence of obesity in children, insight into the epidemiology of the prediabetic state insulin resistance (IR) seems important. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to give an overview of all population-based studies reporting on the prevalence and incidence rates of IR in childhood. Methods. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library were searched in order to find all available population-based studies describing the epidemiology of IR in pediatric populations. Prevalence rates together with methods and cut-off values used to determine IR were extracted and summarized with weight and sex specific prevalence rates of IR if available. Results. Eighteen population-based studies were identified, describing prevalence rates varying between 3.1 and 44%, partly explained by different definitions for IR. Overweight and obese children had higher prevalence rates than normal weight children. In seven out of thirteen studies reporting sex specific results, girls seemed to be more affected than boys. Conclusion. Prevalence rates of IR reported in children vary widely which is partly due to the variety of definitions used. Overweight and obese children had higher prevalence and girls were more insulin resistant than boys. Consensus on the definition for IR in children is needed to allow for comparisons between different studies. PMID:26273668

  6. A population-based cohort study of oral health in South Brazil: The Porto Alegre Study.

    PubMed

    Haas, Alex Nogueira; Gaio, Eduardo José; Wagner, Marcius Comparsi; Rios, Fernando Silva; Costa, Ricardo dos Santos Araujo; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Albandar, Jasim; Susin, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Few population-based cohort studies have been established in Dentistry and this is especially true for Latin America. We conducted a population-based prospective study focusing on oral health in Porto Alegre, south Brazil, and herein we describe its methodology and discuss directions for further research. The cohort was established in 2001 using a multistage probability sample of 1,465 toothed and 121 edentulous subjects. A 5-year follow-up was performed in 2006 that included 755 individuals. The main aim of this study was to determine the pattern and risk factors for periodontal disease progression and tooth loss incidence. A full-mouth protocol was used including periodontal assessments at six sites per tooth. Primary outcomes were periodontal attachment loss and tooth loss. Oral mucosal lesions, dental plaque, gingivitis, supragingival calculus, probing depths, gingival recession, and dental caries were also assessed. This is the first population-based cohort study to focus on periodontal disease in Latin America. Findings will contribute to our understanding of the epidemiology of periodontal disease and provide valuable data for the planning and implementation of preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26083520

  7. Cosmological constraints on the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvati, L.; Pagano, L.; Consiglio, R.; Melchiorri, A.

    2016-03-01

    We derive new constraints on the neutron lifetime based on the recent Planck 2015 observations of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB. Under the assumption of standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, we show that Planck data constrains the neutron lifetime to τn = (907±69) [s] at 68% c.l.. Moreover, by including the direct measurements of primordial Helium abundance of Aver et al. (2015) and Izotov et al. (2014), we show that cosmological data provide the stringent constraints τn = (875±19) [s] and τn = (921±11) [s] respectively. The latter appears to be in tension with neutron lifetime value quoted by the Particle Data Group (τn = (880.3±1.1) [s]). Future CMB surveys as COrE+, in combination with a weak lensing survey as EUCLID, could constrain the neutron lifetime up to a ~ 6 [s] precision.

  8. Hadamard-transform fluorescence-lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takahiko; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2016-04-18

    We discuss a Hadamard-transform-based fluorescence-lifetime-imaging (HT-FLI) technique for fluorescence-lifetime-imaging microscopy (FLIM). The HT-FLI uses a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer (FT-PMF) for fluorescence-lifetime measurements, where the modulation frequency of the excitation light is swept linearly in frequency from zero to a specific maximum during a fixed duration of time. Thereafter, fluorescence lifetimes are derived through Fourier transforms for the fluorescence and reference waveforms. The FT-PMF enables the analysis of multi-component samples simultaneously. HT imaging uses electronic exchange of HT illumination mask patterns, and a high-speed, high-sensitivity photomultiplier, to eliminate frame-rate issues that accompany two-dimensional image detectors. PMID:27137259

  9. Lifetime and Temperature of Incandescent Lamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Dulli C.; Menon, V. Jayaram

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure based on the assumption that during the rated lifetime of a light bulb roughly half of the radius of the filament evaporates. Explains how the filament's operating temperature can be deduced. (DDR)

  10. Air Pollution Exposure during Pregnancy and Childhood Autistic Traits in Four European Population-Based Cohort Studies: The ESCAPE Project

    PubMed Central

    Guxens, Mònica; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Gong, Tong; Garcia-Esteban, Raquel; Porta, Daniela; Giorgis-Allemand, Lise; Almqvist, Catarina; Aranbarri, Aritz; Beelen, Rob; Badaloni, Chiara; Cesaroni, Giulia; de Nazelle, Audrey; Estarlich, Marisa; Forastiere, Francesco; Forns, Joan; Gehring, Ulrike; Ibarluzea, Jesús; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Korek, Michal; Lichtenstein, Paul; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Rebagliato, Marisa; Slama, Rémy; Tiemeier, Henning; Verhulst, Frank C.; Volk, Heather E.; Pershagen, Göran; Brunekreef, Bert; Sunyer, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Background Prenatal exposure to air pollutants has been suggested as a possible etiologic factor for the occurrence of autism spectrum disorder. Objectives We aimed to assess whether prenatal air pollution exposure is associated with childhood autistic traits in the general population. Methods Ours was a collaborative study of four European population-based birth/child cohorts—CATSS (Sweden), Generation R (the Netherlands), GASPII (Italy), and INMA (Spain). Nitrogen oxides (NO2, NOx) and particulate matter (PM) with diameters of ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ≤ 10 μm (PM10), and between 2.5 and 10 μm (PMcoarse), and PM2.5 absorbance were estimated for birth addresses by land-use regression models based on monitoring campaigns performed between 2008 and 2011. Levels were extrapolated back in time to exact pregnancy periods. We quantitatively assessed autistic traits when the child was between 4 and 10 years of age. Children were classified with autistic traits within the borderline/clinical range and within the clinical range using validated cut-offs. Adjusted cohort-specific effect estimates were combined using random-effects meta-analysis. Results A total of 8,079 children were included. Prenatal air pollution exposure was not associated with autistic traits within the borderline/clinical range (odds ratio = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.81, 1.10 per each 10-μg/m3 increase in NO2 pregnancy levels). Similar results were observed in the different cohorts, for the other pollutants, and in assessments of children with autistic traits within the clinical range or children with autistic traits as a quantitative score. Conclusions Prenatal exposure to NO2 and PM was not associated with autistic traits in children from 4 to 10 years of age in four European population-based birth/child cohort studies. Citation Guxens M, Ghassabian A, Gong T, Garcia-Esteban R, Porta D, Giorgis-Allemand L, Almqvist C, Aranbarri A, Beelen R, Badaloni C, Cesaroni G, de Nazelle A, Estarlich M, Forastiere F

  11. Long-term orbital lifetime predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreher, P. E.; Lyons, A. T.

    1990-10-01

    Long-term orbital lifetime predictions are analyzed. Predictions were made for three satellites: the Solar Max Mission (SMM), the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), and the Pegasus Boiler Plate (BP). A technique is discussed for determining an appropriate ballistic coefficient to use in the lifetime prediction. The orbital decay rate should be monitored regularly. Ballistic coefficient updates should be done whenever there is a significant change in the actual decay rate or in the solar activity prediction.

  12. Efficiency and lifetime of carbon foils

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Kostin, M.; Tang, Z.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    Charge-exchange injection by means of carbon foils is a widely used method in accelerators. This paper discusses two critical issues concerning the use of carbon foils: efficiency and lifetime. An energy scaling of stripping efficiency was suggested and compared with measurements. Several factors that determine the foil lifetime--energy deposition, heating, stress and buckling--were studied by using the simulation codes MARS and ANSYS.

  13. Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-02

    The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

  14. Lifetimes of charm and beauty hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, G.; Bigi, I. I.; Dornan, P. J.

    1997-10-01

    Major breakthroughs have been achieved in the determination of the lifetimes of charm and beauty hadrons. Much larger data samples than previously have become available and new experimental devices and techniques have been developed and employed. The lifetimes of all weakly decaying singly charmed hadrons have been measured, some with an accuracy of a few percent. The difference in the shortest lifetime - τ(Ω c) - and the longest one - τ( D+) - is given by a factor of close to ten. The experimental status of beauty lifetimes, while less complete, has still reached a new level of quality and is now better than 5% for the commoner states. New theoretical tools, based mainly on heavy quark expansions, have been developed; they incorporate as well as transcend earlier phenomenological descriptions. The observed pattern in the charm lifetime ratios is reproduced in a semi-quantitative manner as well as could be expected; as far as the beauty lifetime ratios are concerned some problems may well be emerging. The maturity level achieved in the measurements bodes quite well for future challenges where reliable and efficient tracking of the decay vertices will be crucial.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of coral fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Cox, Guy; Matz, Mikhail; Salih, Anya

    2007-03-01

    Corals, like many other coelenterates, contain fluorescent pigments that show considerable homology with the well known green fluorescent protein of the jellyfish Aequoria. In corals, unlike jellyfish, multiple proteins are present and the range of excitations and emissions suggest the possibility of energy transfer. The occurrence of Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins in corals has already been reported and time-resolved spectra have shown the effect on fluorescent lifetime, but without any spatial resolution. Lifetime confocal microscopy offers lower time resolution but excellent spatial resolution. Lifetimes of the isolated A. millepora pigments amilFP490, amilFP504, and amilFP593 (names indicate emission peaks) were 2.8, 2.9, and 2.9 ns, respectively. In the coral sample, imaging the entire emission spectrum from 420 nm, the mean lifetime was reduced to 1.5 ns, implying that FRET was occurring. Looking just at the fluorescence from FRET donors the lifetime was even shorter, at 1.3 ns, supporting this interpretation. In contrast, no reduction in lifetime is seen in the coral Euphyllia ancora, where the pigment distribution also suggests that the pigments are unlikely to be involved in photoprotection. This study set out to determine the extent of FRET between pigments in two corals, Acropora millepora and Euphyllia, ancora which differ in the arrangement of their pigments and hence possibly in pigment function. PMID:17279514

  16. Cancer incidence in Ghana, 2012: evidence from a population-based cancer registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on cancers is a challenge in most developing countries. Population-based cancer registries are also not common in developing countries despite the usefulness of such registries in informing cancer prevention and control programmes. The availability of population-based data on cancers in Africa varies across different countries. In Ghana, data and research on cancer have focussed on specific cancers and have been hospital-based with no reference population. The Kumasi Cancer Registry was established as the first population-based cancer registry in Ghana in 2012 to provide information on cancer cases seen in the city of Kumasi. Methods This paper reviews data from the Kumasi Cancer Registry for the year 2012. The reference geographic area for the registry is the city of Kumasi as designated by the 2010 Ghana Population and Housing Census. Data was from all clinical departments of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Pathology Laboratory Results, Death Certificates and the Kumasi South Regional Hospital. Data was abstracted and entered into Canreg 5 database. Analysis was conducted using Canreg 5, Microsoft Excel and Epi Info Version 7.1.2.0. Results The majority of cancers were recorded among females accounting for 69.6% of all cases. The mean age at diagnosis for all cases was 51.6 years. Among males, the mean age at diagnosis was 48.4 compared with 53.0 years for females. The commonest cancers among males were cancers of the Liver (21.1%), Prostate (13.2%), Lung (5.3%) and Stomach (5.3%). Among females, the commonest cancers were cancers of the Breast (33.9%), Cervix (29.4%), Ovary (11.3%) and Endometrium (4.5%). Histology of the primary tumour was the basis of diagnosis in 74% of cases with clinical and other investigations accounting for 17% and 9% respectively. The estimated cancer incidence Age Adjusted Standardised Rate for males was 10.9/100,000 and 22.4/100, 000 for females. Conclusion This first attempt at population-based cancer

  17. Phonon-lifetimes in demixing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaasambuu, J.; Güthoff, F.; Petri, M.; Hradil, K.; Schober, H.; Ollivier, J.; Eckold, G.

    2012-06-01

    The dynamics of silver-alkali halide mixed single crystals (AgxNa1-xBr, x = 0.23, 0.35, 0.40 and 0.70) were studied by inelastic neutron scattering during the process of spinodal decomposition. Using the thermal three-axes spectrometer PUMA as well as the time-of-flight spectrometer IN5, the time evolution of phonons was observed in time-resolved, stroboscopic measurements. Complementary to the study of long wavelength acoustic phonons, as studied previously, we extended these investigations to Brillouin-zone boundary modes that are particularly sensitive to variations of the local structure. Starting from the homogeneous mixed phase the behaviour of these modes during demixing is observed in real-time. A simple dynamical model based on local structure variants helps to interpret the results. It is shown that the phonon lifetimes vary strongly during the phase separation and increase drastically during the coarsening process. Up to a critical size of precipitates of about 10 nm, zone-boundary modes are found to be strongly damped, while beyond the line widths are reduced to the experimental resolution. This finding leads to the conclusion that the typical mean free path of these modes is of the order of 10 nm, which corresponds to 20 unit cells.