Science.gov

Sample records for populations feedback structures

  1. Climate Effects and Feedback Structure Determining Weed Population Dynamics in a Long-Term Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements. PMID:22272362

  2. Accreting binary population synthesis and feedback prescriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragos, Tassos

    2016-04-01

    Studies of extagalactic X-ray binary populations have shown that the characteristics of these populations depend strongly on the characteristics of the host galaxy's parent stellar population (e.g. star-formation history and metallicity). These dependencies not only make X-ray binaries promising for aiding in the measurement of galaxy properties themselves, but they also have important astrophysical and cosmological implications. For example, due to the relatively young stellar ages and primordial metallicities in the early Universe (z > 3), it is predicted that X-ray binaries were more luminous than today. The more energetic X-ray photons, because of their long mean-free paths, can escape the galaxies where they are produced, and interact at long distances with the intergalactic medium. This could result in a smoother spatial distribution of ionized regions, and more importantly in an overall warmer intergalactic medium. The energetic X-ray photons emitted from X-ray binaries dominate the X-ray radiation field over active galactic nuclei at z > 6 - 8, and hence Χ-ray binary feedback can be a non-negligible contributor to the heating and reionization of the inter-galactic medium in the early universe. The spectral energy distribution shape of the XRB emission does not change significantly with redshift, suggesting that the same XRB subpopulation, namely black-hole XRBs in the high-soft state, dominates the cumulative emission at all times. On the contrary, the normalization of the spectral energy distribution does evolve with redshift. To zeroth order, this evolution is driven by the cosmic star-formation rate evolution. However, the metallicity evolution of the universe and the mean stellar population age are two important factors that affect the X-ray emission from high-mass and low-mass XRBs, respectively. In this talk, I will review recent studies on the potential feedback from accreting binary populations in galactic and cosmological scales. Furthermore, I

  3. Optical feedback structures and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Snee, Preston T; Chan, Yin Thai; Nocera, Daniel G; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2014-11-18

    An optical resonator can include an optical feedback structure disposed on a substrate, and a composite including a matrix including a chromophore. The composite disposed on the substrate and in optical communication with the optical feedback structure. The chromophore can be a semiconductor nanocrystal. The resonator can provide laser emission when excited.

  4. Effects of Active galactic nuclei feedback in galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, C.; Cora, S.; Padilla, N.

    We analyze the effects of feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) on the formation and evolution of galaxies, which is assumed to quench cooling flows in massive halos. With this aim we use an hybrid model that combines a cosmological Lambda CDM simulation with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. We consider the semi-analytic model described by Cora (2006) (SAMC06) which has been improved by including AGNs, which are associated with the presence of supermassive black holes (BHs). Modellization of BH includes gas accretion during merger-driven starbursts and black hole mergers (Malbon et al., 2006), accretion during starbursts triggered by disk instabilities (Bower et al. 2006), and accretion of cooling gas from quasi-hydrostatically cooling haloes (Croton et al. 2006); Eddington limit is applied in all accretion processes. It is assumed that feedback from AGNs operates in the later case. We show that this new model can simultaneously explain: (i) the bright-end of the galaxy luminosity function (LF); (ii) the observed older population of stars in massive galaxies, thus reproducing the stellar mass function (SMF); (iii) a star formation rate (SFR) seemingly showing an anti-hierarchical galaxy growth. The success of our model is mainly due to the ability of AGN feedback to suppress further cooling and SF in the most massive structures.

  5. Structural learning in feedforward and feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2012-01-01

    For smooth and efficient motor control, the brain needs to make fast corrections during the movement to resist possible perturbations. It also needs to adapt subsequent movements to improve future performance. It is important that both feedback corrections and feedforward adaptation need to be made based on noisy and often ambiguous sensory data. Therefore, the initial response of the motor system, both for online corrections and adaptive responses, is guided by prior assumptions about the likely structure of perturbations. In the context of correcting and adapting movements perturbed by a force field, we asked whether these priors are hard wired or whether they can be modified through repeated exposure to differently shaped force fields. We found that both feedback corrections to unexpected perturbations and feedforward adaptation to a new force field changed, such that they were appropriate to counteract the type of force field that participants had experienced previously. We then investigated whether these changes were driven by a common mechanism or by two separate mechanisms. Participants experienced force fields that were either temporally consistent, causing sustained adaptation, or temporally inconsistent, causing little overall adaptation. We found that the consistent force fields modified both feedback and feedforward responses. In contrast, the inconsistent force field modified the temporal shape of feedback corrections but not of the feedforward adaptive response. These results indicate that responses to force perturbations can be modified in a structural manner and that these modifications are at least partly dissociable for feedback and feedforward control. PMID:22896725

  6. Population-dynamics method with a multicanonical feedback control.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Bouchet, Freddy; Jack, Robert L; Lecomte, Vivien

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the Giardinà-Kurchan-Peliti population dynamics method for evaluating large deviations of time-averaged quantities in Markov processes [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 120603 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.120603]. This method exhibits systematic errors which can be large in some circumstances, particularly for systems with weak noise, with many degrees of freedom, or close to dynamical phase transitions. We show how these errors can be mitigated by introducing control forces within the algorithm. These forces are determined by an iteration-and-feedback scheme, inspired by multicanonical methods in equilibrium sampling. We demonstrate substantially improved results in a simple model, and we discuss potential applications to more complex systems. PMID:27415224

  7. Population-dynamics method with a multicanonical feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Bouchet, Freddy; Jack, Robert L.; Lecomte, Vivien

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the Giardinà-Kurchan-Peliti population dynamics method for evaluating large deviations of time-averaged quantities in Markov processes [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 120603 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.120603]. This method exhibits systematic errors which can be large in some circumstances, particularly for systems with weak noise, with many degrees of freedom, or close to dynamical phase transitions. We show how these errors can be mitigated by introducing control forces within the algorithm. These forces are determined by an iteration-and-feedback scheme, inspired by multicanonical methods in equilibrium sampling. We demonstrate substantially improved results in a simple model, and we discuss potential applications to more complex systems.

  8. Formation of the first galaxies under Population III stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Myoungwon

    2015-01-01

    The first galaxies, which formed a few hundred million years after the big bang, are related to important cosmological questions. Given thatthey are thought to be the basic building blocks of large galaxies seen today, understanding their formation and properties is essentialto studying galaxy formation as a whole. In this dissertation talk, I will present the results of our highly-resolved cosmological ab-initio simulations to understand the assembly process of first galaxies under the feedback from the preceding generations of first stars, the so-called Population III (Pop III). The first stars formed at z≲30 in dark matter (DM) minihalos with M_{vir}=10^5-10^6Msun, predominately via molecular hydrogen (H_2) cooling. Radiation from Pop III stars dramatically altered the gas within their host minihalos, through photoionization, photoheating, and photoevaporation. Once a Pop III star explodes as a supernova (SN), heavy elements are dispersed, enriching the interstellar (ISM) and intergalactic medium (IGM), thus initiating the process of chemical evolution. I will begin by presenting how the SN explosion of the first stars influences early cosmic history, specifically assessing the time delay in further star formation and tracing the evolution of metal-enriched gas until the second episode star formation happens. These results will show the role of Pop III supernovae on the star formation transition from Pop III to Population II. Additionally, the more distant, diffuse IGM was heated by X-rays emitted by accreting black holes (BHs), or high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), both remnants of Pop III stars. I will present results of a series of simulations where we study the impact of X-ray feedback from BHs and HMXBs on the star formation history in the early universe, and discuss the resulting implications on reionization. I will also present the role of X-rays on the early BH growth, providing constraints on models for supermassive black hole formation. Finally, I

  9. Sparse feedback structures for wireless control of civil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoljak, Reuben D.; Linderman, Lauren E.

    2015-03-01

    Although originally popularized for structural health monitoring, wireless smart sensors are an attractive alternative to traditional tethered systems for structural control. Their onboard sensing, processing, and wireless communication offer all the components of a feedback control system. However, wireless smart sensors pose unique challenges for the application of centralized control, which is common in most modern control systems. Decentralized control offers several advantages to wireless structural control, including limiting the wireless communication required and the associated slow sampling rate and time delays in the control system. Previous decentralized structural control algorithms, both Ad-Hoc and Heuristic, enforce a spatial sparsity pattern during the design, which is assumed a priori. Therefore, the optimal feedback structure is not considered in the design. This work explores a decentralized optimal LQR design algorithm where the sparsity of the feedback gain is incorporated into the objective function. The control approach is compared to previous decentralized control techniques on the 20-Story control benchmark structure. Sparsity and control requirements are compared to centralized designs. The optimal sparse feedback design offers the best balance of performance, measurement feedback, and control effort. Additionally, the feedback structure identified is not easily identifiable a priori; thus, highlighting the significance of particular measurements in this feedback framework.

  10. Finite Feedback Cycling in Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayduk, Leslie A.

    2009-01-01

    In models containing reciprocal effects, or longer causal loops, the usual effect estimates assume that any effect touching a loop initiates an infinite cycling of effects around that loop. The real world, in contrast, might permit only finite feedback cycles. I use a simple hypothetical model to demonstrate that if the world permits only a few…

  11. How Supernova Feedback Affects Observed Galaxy Sizes and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, M. K. Ryan; Cen, R.; Bryan, G. L.

    2009-01-01

    Feedback from massive stars is perhaps the least understood aspect of galaxy formation. Based on adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations and stellar population synthesis models, we compute half-light radii of high redshift galaxies and use them to compare simulated and observed size-mass and size-luminosity relations in the rest-frame UV/optical. The sizes of the simulated galaxies depend on the assumed strength of supernova feedback; we investigate the origin of this relation. We discuss minimum requirements for correct numerical modeling of supernova feedback in starburst galaxies.

  12. HIGHER EDUCATION--A POPULATION FLOW FEEDBACK MODEL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REISMAN, ARNOLD

    A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IS DEVELOPED TO STUDY THE PRODUCTION OF DOCTORAL, MASTER'S, AND BACHELOR'S DEGREES AND THEIR FEEDBACK INTO HIGHER EDUCATION. FEEDBACK IS DETERMINED BY A SET OF "BASIC BALANCE EQUATIONS" WHICH STATE THAT THE TOTAL RATE OF FLOW INTO A CATEGORY LESS THE RATE OF OUTFLOW IS EQUAL TO THE RATE OF ACCUMULATION OR GROWTH IN A GIVEN…

  13. An improved output feedback control of flexible large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y. H.; Lin, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    A special output feedback control design technique for flexible large space structures is proposed. It is shown that the technique will increase both the damping and frequency of selected modes for more effective control. It is also able to effect integrated control of elastic and rigid-body modes and, in particular, closed-loop system stability and robustness to modal truncation and parameter variation. The technique is seen as marking an improvement over previous work concerning large space structures output feedback control.

  14. Compensatory density feedback of Oncomelania hupensis populations in two different environmental settings in China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The most recent strategy for schistosomiasis control in the People's Republic of China aims to reduce the likelihood of environmental contamination of schistosome eggs. Despite considerable progress, it is believed that achievements would be further consolidated with additional intermediate host snail control measures. We provide an empirical framework for discerning the relative contribution of intrinsic effects (density feedback) from other extrinsic drivers of snail population dynamics. Methods We set up experiments in two study locations to collect reproduction data of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host snail of Schistosoma japonicum. We applied a set of four population dynamic models that have been widely used to study phenomenological time-series data to examine the properties of demographic density feedback patterns from abundance data. We also contrasted the obtained results with the component feedback of density on survival rate to determine whether adult survival was the principal driver of the demographic feedback observed. Results Demographic density feedback models (Ricker- and Gompertz-logistic) accounted for > 99% of Akaike's information criterion model weight, with the Gompertz ranking highest in all O. hupensis population groups. We found some evidence for stronger compensatory feedback in the O. hupensis population from Sichuan compared to a Jiangsu population. Survival rates revealed strong component feedback, but the log-linear relationships (i.e. Gompertz) had less support in the demographic feedback analysis. Conclusions Our findings indicate that integrated schistosomiasis control measures must continue to reduce parasite abundance further because intermediate host snail populations tend to grow exponentially at low densities, especially O. hupensis populations in mountainous regions. We conclude that density feedback in adult survival is the principal component contribution to the demographic phenomenon observed in the

  15. Identification and feedback control in structures with piezoceramic actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Ito, K.; Wang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    In this lecture we give fundamental well-posedness results for a variational formulation of a class of damped second order partial differential equations with unbounded input or control coefficients. Included as special cases in this class are structures with piezoceramic actuators. We consider approximation techniques leading to computational methods in the context of both parameter estimation and feedback control problems for these systems. Rigorous convergence results for parameter estimates and feedback gains are discussed.

  16. Effective population size and population subdivision in demographically structured populations.

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Valérie; Charlesworth, Brian

    2002-01-01

    A fast-timescale approximation is applied to the coalescent process in a single population, which is demographically structured by sex and/or age. This provides a general expression for the probability that a pair of alleles sampled from the population coalesce in the previous time interval. The effective population size is defined as the reciprocal of twice the product of generation time and the coalescence probability. Biologically explicit formulas for effective population size with discrete generations and separate sexes are derived for a variety of different modes of inheritance. The method is also applied to a nuclear gene in a population of partially self-fertilizing hermaphrodites. The effects of population subdivision on a demographically structured population are analyzed, using a matrix of net rates of movement of genes between different local populations. This involves weighting the migration probabilities of individuals of a given age/sex class by the contribution of this class to the leading left eigenvector of the matrix describing the movements of genes between age/sex classes. The effects of sex-specific migration and nonrandom distributions of offspring number on levels of genetic variability and among-population differentiation are described for different modes of inheritance in an island model. Data on DNA sequence variability in human and plant populations are discussed in the light of the results. PMID:12242257

  17. Effectiveness of Structural Feedback Provided by Pathfinder Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumpower, David L.; Sarwar, Gul Shahzad

    2010-01-01

    Within the field of education, there has been an increasing recognition of the importance of formative assessment and of structural knowledge. In an effort to fill needs in each of these areas, this article describes an innovative feedback strategy intended to improve students' structural knowledge. Twenty-four high school physics students were…

  18. Real-time feedback from iterative electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Vaucher, Alain C; Haag, Moritz P; Reiher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Real-time feedback from iterative electronic structure calculations requires to mediate between the inherently unpredictable execution times of the iterative algorithm used and the necessity to provide data in fixed and short time intervals for real-time rendering. We introduce the concept of a mediator as a component able to deal with infrequent and unpredictable reference data to generate reliable feedback. In the context of real-time quantum chemistry, the mediator takes the form of a surrogate potential that has the same local shape as the first-principles potential and can be evaluated efficiently to deliver atomic forces as real-time feedback. The surrogate potential is updated continuously by electronic structure calculations and guarantees to provide a reliable response to the operator for any molecular structure. To demonstrate the application of iterative electronic structure methods in real-time reactivity exploration, we implement self-consistent semiempirical methods as the data source and apply the surrogate-potential mediator to deliver reliable real-time feedback. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26678030

  19. Integrated Control with Structural Feedback to Enable Lightweight Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation for the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference covers the benefits of active structural control, related research areas, and focuses on the use of optimal control allocation for the prevention of critical loads. Active control of lightweight structures has the potential to reduce aircraft weight and fuel burn. Sensor, control law, materials, control effector, and system level research will be necessary to enable active control of lightweight structures. Optimal control allocation with structural feedback has been shown in simulation to be feasible in preventing critical loads and is one example of a control law to enable future lightweight aircraft.

  20. Strategy selection in structured populations.

    PubMed

    Tarnita, Corina E; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Antal, Tibor; Fu, Feng; Nowak, Martin A

    2009-08-01

    Evolutionary game theory studies frequency dependent selection. The fitness of a strategy is not constant, but depends on the relative frequencies of strategies in the population. This type of evolutionary dynamics occurs in many settings of ecology, infectious disease dynamics, animal behavior and social interactions of humans. Traditionally evolutionary game dynamics are studied in well-mixed populations, where the interaction between any two individuals is equally likely. There have also been several approaches to study evolutionary games in structured populations. In this paper we present a simple result that holds for a large variety of population structures. We consider the game between two strategies, A and B, described by the payoff matrix(abcd). We study a mutation and selection process. For weak selection strategy A is favored over B if and only if sigma a+b>c+sigma d. This means the effect of population structure on strategy selection can be described by a single parameter, sigma. We present the values of sigma for various examples including the well-mixed population, games on graphs, games in phenotype space and games on sets. We give a proof for the existence of such a sigma, which holds for all population structures and update rules that have certain (natural) properties. We assume weak selection, but allow any mutation rate. We discuss the relationship between sigma and the critical benefit to cost ratio for the evolution of cooperation. The single parameter, sigma, allows us to quantify the ability of a population structure to promote the evolution of cooperation or to choose efficient equilibria in coordination games. PMID:19358858

  1. Strategy selection in structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Tarnita, Corina E.; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Antal, Tibor; Fu, Feng; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary game theory studies frequency dependent selection. The fitness of a strategy is not constant, but depends on the relative frequencies of strategies in the population. This type of evolutionary dynamics occurs in many settings of ecology, infectious disease dynamics, animal behavior and social interactions of humans. Traditionally evolutionary game dynamics are studied in well-mixed populations, where the interaction between any two individuals is equally likely. There have also been several approaches to study evolutionary games in structured populations. In this paper we present a simple result that holds for a large variety of population structures. We consider the game between two strategies, A and B, described by the payoff matrix (abcd). We study a mutation and selection process. If the payoffs are linear in a, b, c, d, then for weak selection strategy A is favored over B if and only if σa + b > c + σd. This means the effect of population structure on strategy selection can be described by a single parameter, σ. We present the values of σ for various examples including the well-mixed population, games on graphs and games in phenotype space. We give a proof for the existence of such a σ, which holds for all population structures and update rules that have certain (natural) properties. We assume weak selection, but allow any mutation rate. We discuss the relationship between σ and the critical benefit to cost ratio for the evolution of cooperation. The single parameter, σ, allows us to quantify the ability of a population structure to promote the evolution of cooperation or to choose efficient equilibria in coordination games. PMID:19358858

  2. Feedback Linearized Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS ) Neural Network was developed which learns a topology representing network (TRN) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is combined with a feedback linearized tracking controller to produce a robust control architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off-nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes network and its performance for accident scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control, stability derivative variation, and turbulence.

  3. Structured Organic-Inorganic Perovskite toward a Distributed Feedback Laser.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Michael; Wood, Simon M; Patel, Jay B; Nayak, Pabitra K; Huang, Jian; Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Wenger, Bernard; Stranks, Samuel D; Hörantner, Maximilian T; Wang, Jacob Tse-Wei; Nicholas, Robin J; Herz, Laura M; Johnston, Michael B; Morris, Stephen M; Snaith, Henry J; Riede, Moritz K

    2016-02-01

    A general strategy for the in-plane structuring of organic-inorganic perovskite films is presented. The method is used to fabricate an industrially relevant distributed feedback (DFB) cavity, which is a critical step toward all-electrially pumped injection laser diodes. This approach opens the prospects of perovskite materials for much improved optical control in LEDs, solar cells, and also toward applications as optical devices. PMID:26630410

  4. Endogenous field feedback promotes the detectability for exogenous electric signal in the hybrid coupled population

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xile; Zhang, Danhong; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Lu, Meili; Che, Yanqiu

    2015-01-15

    This paper presents the endogenous electric field in chemical or electrical synaptic coupled networks, aiming to study the role of endogenous field feedback in the signal propagation in neural systems. It shows that the feedback of endogenous fields to network activities can reduce the required energy of the noise and enhance the transmission of input signals in hybrid coupled populations. As a common and important nonsynaptic interactive method among neurons, particularly, the endogenous filed feedback can not only promote the detectability of exogenous weak signal in hybrid coupled neural population but also enhance the robustness of the detectability against noise. Furthermore, with the increasing of field coupling strengths, the endogenous field feedback is conductive to the stochastic resonance by facilitating the transition of cluster activities from the no spiking to spiking regions. Distinct from synaptic coupling, the endogenous field feedback can play a role as internal driving force to boost the population activities, which is similar to the noise. Thus, it can help to transmit exogenous weak signals within the network in the absence of noise drive via the stochastic-like resonance.

  5. Evolutionary dynamics in structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Martin A.; Tarnita, Corina E.; Antal, Tibor

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary dynamics shape the living world around us. At the centre of every evolutionary process is a population of reproducing individuals. The structure of that population affects evolutionary dynamics. The individuals can be molecules, cells, viruses, multicellular organisms or humans. Whenever the fitness of individuals depends on the relative abundance of phenotypes in the population, we are in the realm of evolutionary game theory. Evolutionary game theory is a general approach that can describe the competition of species in an ecosystem, the interaction between hosts and parasites, between viruses and cells, and also the spread of ideas and behaviours in the human population. In this perspective, we review the recent advances in evolutionary game dynamics with a particular emphasis on stochastic approaches in finite sized and structured populations. We give simple, fundamental laws that determine how natural selection chooses between competing strategies. We study the well-mixed population, evolutionary graph theory, games in phenotype space and evolutionary set theory. We apply these results to the evolution of cooperation. The mechanism that leads to the evolution of cooperation in these settings could be called ‘spatial selection’: cooperators prevail against defectors by clustering in physical or other spaces. PMID:20008382

  6. Genealogical histories in structured populations.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Seiji; Uyenoyama, Marcy K

    2015-06-01

    In genealogies of genes sampled from structured populations, lineages coalesce at rates dependent on the states of the lineages. For migration and coalescence events occurring on comparable time scales, for example, only lineages residing in the same deme of a geographically subdivided population can have descended from a common ancestor in the immediately preceding generation. Here, we explore aspects of genealogical structure in a population comprising two demes, between which migration may occur. We use generating functions to obtain exact densities and moments of coalescence time, number of mutations, total tree length, and age of the most recent common ancestor of the sample. We describe qualitative features of the distribution of gene genealogies, including factors that influence the geographical location of the most recent common ancestor and departures of the distribution of internode lengths from exponential. PMID:25770971

  7. Genetic structure of forensic populations.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, N E

    1992-01-01

    DNA-based identification depends on the probability that two different individuals have the same phenotype, which is given by kinship theory. Together with the large and consistent body of evidence on human population structure, kinship theory provides a sound basis for forensic use of DNA markers. PMID:1557360

  8. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  9. Feedback magnetization of ultra-low index irradiative structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Oleg; Shulga, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    Ultra-low refractive index irradiative structure is considered. The structure consists of a patch antenna with the metamaterial slab located on top of the antenna, as superstrate. In this study, ultra-low index phenomenon of the irradiative system is associated with improving the directivity of the patch antenna by putting the metamaterial slab on top of the antenna. The last phenomenon, in turn, is associated with the feedback partial magnetization of Iron inclusions of the slab caused by the radiation from the antenna. Mathematical model for evaluating the complex effective relative permittivity of the irradiative structure is developed. Numerical calculations for complex effective relative permittivity of the irradiative structure and real part of the complex effective relative permeability of the metamaterial slab are done in the study.

  10. Association mapping in structured populations.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, J K; Stephens, M; Rosenberg, N A; Donnelly, P

    2000-07-01

    The use, in association studies, of the forthcoming dense genomewide collection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been heralded as a potential breakthrough in the study of the genetic basis of common complex disorders. A serious problem with association mapping is that population structure can lead to spurious associations between a candidate marker and a phenotype. One common solution has been to abandon case-control studies in favor of family-based tests of association, such as the transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT), but this comes at a considerable cost in the need to collect DNA from close relatives of affected individuals. In this article we describe a novel, statistically valid, method for case-control association studies in structured populations. Our method uses a set of unlinked genetic markers to infer details of population structure, and to estimate the ancestry of sampled individuals, before using this information to test for associations within subpopulations. It provides power comparable with the TDT in many settings and may substantially outperform it if there are conflicting associations in different subpopulations. PMID:10827107

  11. Microbial Population and Community Dynamics on Plant Roots and Their Feedbacks on Plant Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bever, James D.; Platt, Thomas G.; Morton, Elise R.

    2012-01-01

    The composition of the soil microbial community can be altered dramatically due to association with individual plant species, and these effects on the microbial community can have important feedbacks on plant ecology. Negative plant-soil feedback plays primary roles in maintaining plant community diversity, whereas positive plant-soil feedback may cause community conversion. Host-specific differentiation of the microbial community results from the trade-offs associated with overcoming plant defense and the specific benefits associated with plant rewards. Accumulation of host-specific pathogens likely generates negative feedback on the plant, while changes in the density of microbial mutualists likely generate positive feedback. However, the competitive dynamics among microbes depends on the multidimensional costs of virulence and mutualism, the fine-scale spatial structure within plant roots, and active plant allocation and localized defense. Because of this, incorporating a full view of microbial dynamics is essential to explaining the dynamics of plant-soil feedbacks and therefore plant community ecology. PMID:22726216

  12. Positive and Negative Feedbacks and Free-Scale Pattern Distribution in Rural-Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Alados, Concepción L.; Errea, Paz; Gartzia, Maite; Saiz, Hugo; Escós, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Depopulation of rural areas is a widespread phenomenon that has occurred in most industrialized countries, and has contributed significantly to a reduction in the productivity of agro-ecological resources. In this study, we identified the main trends in the dynamics of rural populations in the Central Pyrenees in the 20th C and early 21st C, and used density independent and density dependent models and identified the main factors that have influenced the dynamics. In addition, we investigated the change in the power law distribution of population size in those periods. Populations exhibited density-dependent positive feedback between 1960 and 2010, and a long-term positive correlation between agricultural activity and population size, which has resulted in a free-scale population distribution that has been disrupted by the collapse of the traditional agricultural society and by emigration to the industrialized cities. We concluded that complex socio-ecological systems that have strong feedback mechanisms can contribute to disruptive population collapses, which can be identified by changes in the pattern of population distribution. PMID:25474704

  13. Cloud structure and feedback effects in the Carina Nebula Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccatagliata, Veronica; Preibisch, Thomas; Gaczkowski, Benjamin; Ratzka, Thorsten

    2013-07-01

    The star formation process in large clusters/associations can be strongly influenced by the feedback from high mass stars. Whether the resulting net effect of the feedback is predominantly negative (cloud dispersal) or positive (triggering of star formation due to cloud compression) is still an open question. The Carina Nebula complex (CNC) represents one of the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We use our Herschel far-infrared observations to study the properties of the clouds over the entire CNC and LABOCA/APEX telescope on the central part of the CNC.Our Herschel maps resolve, for the first time, the small-scale structure of the dense clouds over the entire spatial extent of the CNC. Several particularly interesting regions, including the prominent pillars south of eta Car, are analyzed in detail. Our maps also reveal a peculiar 'wave'-like pattern in the northern part of the Carina Nebula. The total mass of the clouds seen by Herschel in the central region is about 656 000 Msun. We derive the global spectral energy distribution in the mid-infrared to mm wavelength range and derive a total mass of < 890 000 Msun. We find that the density and temperature structure of the clouds in most parts of the CNC is dominated by the strong feedback from the numerous massive stars, rather than random turbulence. Comparing the cloud mass and the star formation rate derived for the CNC to other Galactic star forming regions suggests that the CNC is forming stars very efficiently. We suggest this to be a consequence of triggered star formation by radiative cloud compression.In our LABOCA sub-mm map, we identify about 600 individual clumps. We analyze and interpret the clump initial mass function (CIMF) as signature of turbulent pre-stellar clouds or star-forming clouds.

  14. Multiple strategies in structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Tarnita, Corina E.; Wage, Nicholas; Nowak, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    Many specific models have been proposed to study evolutionary game dynamics in structured populations, but most analytical results so far describe the competition of only two strategies. Here we derive a general result that holds for any number of strategies, for a large class of population structures under weak selection. We show that for the purpose of strategy selection any evolutionary process can be characterized by two key parameters that are coefficients in a linear inequality containing the payoff values. These structural coefficients, σ1 and σ2, depend on the particular process that is being studied, but not on the number of strategies, n, or the payoff matrix. For calculating these structural coefficients one has to investigate games with three strategies, but more are not needed. Therefore, n = 3 is the general case. Our main result has a geometric interpretation: Strategy selection is determined by the sum of two terms, the first one describing competition on the edges of the simplex and the second one in the center. Our formula includes all known weak selection criteria of evolutionary games as special cases. As a specific example we calculate games on sets and explore the synergistic interaction between direct reciprocity and spatial selection. We show that for certain parameter values both repetition and space are needed to promote evolution of cooperation. PMID:21257906

  15. Multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control using adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators.

    PubMed

    Vipperman, J S; Clark, R L

    1999-01-01

    An experimental implementation of a multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control system is demonstrated on a piezostructure plate with pinned boundary conditions. Four adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators provide an array of truly colocated actuator/sensor pairs to be used as control transducers. Radiation filters are developed based on the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the structure and are included into the performance cost of an H2 control law which minimizes total radiated sound power. In the cost function, control effort is balanced with reductions in radiated sound power. A similarity transform which produces generalized velocity states that are required as inputs to the radiation filters is presented. Up to 15 dB of attenuation in radiated sound power was observed at the resonant frequencies of the piezostructure. PMID:9921654

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  17. Eco-evolutionary feedback promotes Red Queen dynamics and selects for sex in predator populations.

    PubMed

    Haafke, Julia; Abou Chakra, Maria; Becks, Lutz

    2016-03-01

    Although numerous hypotheses exist to explain the overwhelming presence of sexual reproduction across the tree of life, we still cannot explain its prevalence when considering all inherent costs involved. The Red Queen hypothesis states that sex is maintained because it can create novel genotypes with a selective advantage. This occurs when the interactions between species induce frequent environmental change. Here, we investigate whether coevolution and eco-evolutionary feedback dynamics in a predator-prey system allows for indirect selection and maintenance of sexual reproduction in the predator. Combining models and chemostat experiments of a rotifer-algae system we show a continuous feedback between population and trait change along with recurrent shifts from selection by predation and competition for a limited resource. We found that a high propensity for sex was indirectly selected and was maintained in rotifer populations within environments containing these eco-evolutionary dynamics; whereas within environments under constant conditions, predators evolved rapidly to lower levels of sex. Thus, our results indicate that the influence of eco-evolutionary feedback dynamics on the overall evolutionary change has been underestimated. PMID:26899793

  18. Direct reciprocity in structured populations

    PubMed Central

    van Veelen, Matthijs; García, Julián; Rand, David G.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocity and repeated games have been at the center of attention when studying the evolution of human cooperation. Direct reciprocity is considered to be a powerful mechanism for the evolution of cooperation, and it is generally assumed that it can lead to high levels of cooperation. Here we explore an open-ended, infinite strategy space, where every strategy that can be encoded by a finite state automaton is a possible mutant. Surprisingly, we find that direct reciprocity alone does not lead to high levels of cooperation. Instead we observe perpetual oscillations between cooperation and defection, with defection being substantially more frequent than cooperation. The reason for this is that “indirect invasions” remove equilibrium strategies: every strategy has neutral mutants, which in turn can be invaded by other strategies. However, reciprocity is not the only way to promote cooperation. Another mechanism for the evolution of cooperation, which has received as much attention, is assortment because of population structure. Here we develop a theory that allows us to study the synergistic interaction between direct reciprocity and assortment. This framework is particularly well suited for understanding human interactions, which are typically repeated and occur in relatively fluid but not unstructured populations. We show that if repeated games are combined with only a small amount of assortment, then natural selection favors the behavior typically observed among humans: high levels of cooperation implemented using conditional strategies. PMID:22665767

  19. Factors shaping e-feedback utilization following electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Samantha E; Snodgrass, Suzanne H; Rivett, Darren A; Russell, Trevor

    2016-09-01

    The development of student-practitioners' practical clinical skills is essential in health professional education. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations are central to the assessment of students performing clinical procedures on simulated patients (actors). While feedback is considered core to learning providing timely, individualised student OSCE feedback is difficult. This study explored the perceptions of students about the multiple factors which shape the utility of e-feedback following an electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations, which utilized iPad and specialised software. The e-feedback was trialled in four courses within occupational therapy and physiotherapy pre-professional programs with a cohort of 204 students. Evaluation of student perceptions about feedback was collected using two surveys and eight focus groups. This data showed three factors shaped perceptions of the utility of e- Objective Structured Clinical Examinations feedback: 1) timely accessibility within one day of the assessment, 2) feedback demonstrating examiners' academic literacy and 3) feedback orientated to ways of improving future performance of clinical skills. The study found training in the provision of feedback using IPads and software is needed for examiners to ensure e-feedback meets students' needs for specific, future-oriented e-feedback and institutional requirements for justification of grades. PMID:27029015

  20. Ordering structured populations in multiplayer cooperation games

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Jorge; Wu, Bin; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Spatial structure greatly affects the evolution of cooperation. While in two-player games the condition for cooperation to evolve depends on a single structure coefficient, in multiplayer games the condition might depend on several structure coefficients, making it difficult to compare different population structures. We propose a solution to this issue by introducing two simple ways of ordering population structures: the containment order and the volume order. If population structure is greater than population structure in the containment or the volume order, then can be considered a stronger promoter of cooperation. We provide conditions for establishing the containment order, give general results on the volume order, and illustrate our theory by comparing different models of spatial games and associated update rules. Our results hold for a large class of population structures and can be easily applied to specific cases once the structure coefficients have been calculated or estimated. PMID:26819335

  1. Evolution in Stage-Structured Populations

    PubMed Central

    Barfield, Michael; Holt, Robert D.; Gomulkiewicz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    For many organisms, stage is a better predictor of demographic rates than age. Yet no general theoretical framework exists for understanding or predicting evolution in stage-structured populations. Here, we provide a general modeling approach that can be used to predict evolution and demography of stage-structured populations. This advances our ability to understand evolution in stage-structured populations to a level previously available only for populations structured by age. We use this framework to provide the first rigorous proof that Lande’s theorem, which relates adaptive evolution to population growth, applies to stage-classified populations, assuming only normality and that evolution is slow relative to population dynamics. We extend this theorem to allow for different means or variances among stages. Our next major result is the formulation of Price’s theorem, a fundamental law of evolution, for stage-structured populations. In addition, we use data from Trillium grandiflorum to demonstrate how our models can be applied to a real-world population and thereby show their practical potential to generate accurate projections of evolutionary and population dynamics. Finally, we use our framework to compare rates of evolution in age- versus stage-structured populations, which shows how our methods can yield biological insights about evolution in stage-structured populations. PMID:21460563

  2. Evolutionary dynamics in set structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Tarnita, Corina E.; Antal, Tibor; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary dynamics are strongly affected by population structure. The outcome of an evolutionary process in a well-mixed population can be very different from that in a structured population. We introduce a powerful method to study dynamical population structure: evolutionary set theory. The individuals of a population are distributed over sets. Individuals interact with others who are in the same set. Any 2 individuals can have several sets in common. Some sets can be empty, whereas others have many members. Interactions occur in terms of an evolutionary game. The payoff of the game is interpreted as fitness. Both the strategy and the set memberships change under evolutionary updating. Therefore, the population structure itself is a consequence of evolutionary dynamics. We construct a general mathematical approach for studying any evolutionary game in set structured populations. As a particular example, we study the evolution of cooperation and derive precise conditions for cooperators to be selected over defectors. PMID:19433793

  3. Predation risk suppresses the positive feedback between size structure and cannibalism.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Osamu; Trussell, Geoffrey C; Ohno, Ayaka; Kuwano, Shinya; Ikawa, Takuya; Nishimura, Kinya

    2011-11-01

    between cannibals and victims was similar in both risk treatments. These results suggest that dragonfly risk cues first suppress cannibalism among hatchlings and then prevent size variation from increasing through time. 5. We suggest that the positive feedback dynamics between size structure and cannibalism and their modification by predation risk may also operate in other systems to shape the population dynamics of cannibalistic prey species as well as overall community dynamics. PMID:21668893

  4. Structural dynamics and ecology of flatfish populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Kevin M.

    1997-11-01

    The concept of structure in populations of marine fishes is fundamental to how we manage and conduct research on these resources. The degree of population structure ranges widely among flatfishes. Although we know that large populations tend to be subdivided into local populations, based on morphological, meristic and reproductive characteristics, these data often conflict with evidence on genetic stock structure, due to the scale and organization of movement within the metapopulation. Movement of individuals between local subpopulations and colonization events on a macroecological scale are probably important to some flatfish populations. Dispersal of larvae is known to be a major factor affecting population mixing. Some flatfishes have planktonic stages of long duration and for these species there is often, but not always, little population structure; gene flow sometimes may be limited by oceanographic features, such as eddies and fronts. At the juvenile stage dispersal can result in colonization of under-utilized habitats; however, for flatfishes with strong habitat requirements, this type of event may be less likely when suitable habitats are fragmented. Complex population structure has major implications for management, e.g. lumping harvested populations with little gene flow can have detrimental local effects. Moreover, the issue of population structure and movement influences the interpretation of research data, where populations are generally treated as closed systems. There is currently a strong need for a multidisciplinary approach to study fish population dynamics and the structure of their populations. This research should involve molecular geneticists, population geneticists, animal behaviourists and ecologists. Migration mechanisms, colonization and extinction events, gene flow and density-dependent movements are subject areas of great importance to managing large harvested populations, but our understanding of them at ecological scales, at least for

  5. Structuring feedback and debriefing to achieve mastery learning goals.

    PubMed

    Eppich, Walter J; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Duval-Arnould, Jordan M; Siddall, Viva Jo; Cheng, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Mastery learning is a powerful educational strategy in which learners gain knowledge and skills that are rigorously measured against predetermined mastery standards with different learners needing variable time to reach uniform outcomes. Central to mastery learning are repetitive deliberate practice and robust feedback that promote performance improvement. Traditional health care simulation involves a simulation exercise followed by a facilitated postevent debriefing in which learners discuss what went well and what they should do differently next time, usually without additional opportunities to apply the specific new knowledge. Mastery learning approaches enable learners to "try again" until they master the skill in question. Despite the growing body of health care simulation literature documenting the efficacy of mastery learning models, to date insufficient details have been reported on how to design and implement the feedback and debriefing components of deliberate-practice-based educational interventions. Using simulation-based training for adult and pediatric advanced life support as case studies, this article focuses on how to prepare learners for feedback and debriefing by establishing a supportive yet challenging learning environment; how to implement educational interventions that maximize opportunities for deliberate practice with feedback and reflection during debriefing; describing the role of within-event debriefing or "microdebriefing" (i.e., during a pause in the simulation scenario or during ongoing case management without interruption), as a strategy to promote performance improvement; and highlighting directions for future research in feedback and debriefing for mastery learning. PMID:26375272

  6. Formation of Massive Population III Galaxies through Photoionization Feedback: A Possible Explanation for CR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visbal, Eli; Haiman, Zoltán; Bryan, Greg L.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the formation of massive high-redshift Population III (Pop III) galaxies through photoionization feedback. We consider dark matter halos formed from progenitors that have undergone no star formation as a result of early reionization and photoevaporation caused by a nearby galaxy. Once such a halo reaches ≈109~M⊙, corresponding to the Jeans mass of the photoheated intergalactic medium (IGM) at z ≈ 7, pristine gas is able to collapse into the halo, potentially producing a massive Pop III starburst. We suggest that this scenario may explain the recent observation of strong He II 1640 Å line emission in CR7, which is consistent with ˜107~M⊙ of young Pop III stars. Such a large mass of Pop III stars is unlikely without the photoionization feedback scenario, because star formation is expected to inject metals into halos above the atomic cooling threshold (˜108~M⊙ at z ≈ 7). We use merger trees to analytically estimate the abundance of observable Pop III galaxies formed through this channel, and find a number density of ≈10-7~Mpc-3 at z = 6.6 (the redshift of CR7). This is approximately a factor of ten lower than the density of Lyα emitters as bright as CR7.

  7. Formation of massive Population III galaxies through photoionization feedback: a possible explanation for CR 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visbal, Eli; Haiman, Zoltán; Bryan, Greg L.

    2016-07-01

    We explore the formation of massive high-redshift Population III (Pop III) galaxies through photoionization feedback. We consider dark matter haloes formed from progenitors that have undergone no star formation as a result of early reionization and photoevaporation caused by a nearby galaxy. Once such a halo reaches ≈109 M⊙, corresponding to the Jeans mass of the photoheated intergalactic medium at z ≈ 7, pristine gas is able to collapse into the halo, potentially producing a massive Pop III starburst. We suggest that this scenario may explain the recent observation of strong He II 1640 Å line emission in CR 7, which is consistent with ˜107 M⊙ of young Pop III stars. Such a large mass of Pop III stars is unlikely without the photoionization feedback scenario, because star formation is expected to inject metals into haloes above the atomic cooling threshold (˜108 M⊙ at z ≈ 7). We use merger trees to analytically estimate the abundance of observable Pop III galaxies formed through this channel, and find a number density of ≈10-7 Mpc-3 at z = 6.6 (the redshift of CR 7). This is approximately a factor of 10 lower than the density of Ly α emitters as bright as CR 7.

  8. Intraspecific competition delays recovery of population structure.

    PubMed

    Liess, Matthias; Foit, Kaarina

    2010-04-01

    Ecotoxicological field studies have shown that total abundance and biomass often recover shortly after pulsed toxicant stress. In contrast, population structure showed comparatively long-term alterations before reaching pre-treatment conditions. We investigated two mechanisms that may explain the prolonged recovery of population structure: latent toxicant effects on life-history traits on the individual level and competition on the population level. To test these hypotheses we exposed populations of Daphnia magna to a pulse of the pyrethroid Fenvalerate. For several generations the populations were kept at two different degrees of competition: strong competition at carrying capacity and reduced competition maintained by simulated predation. After disturbance due to Fenvalerate exposure, biomass recovered after 14-17 days. In contrast, size structure characterised by a lack of large and dominance of small organisms recovered after 43 days in populations with strong competition. Size structure recovered twice faster in populations with reduced competition. We explain this as follows: due to toxicant induced mortality, food availability and consequently birth rate increased and populations were dominated by small individuals. In populations without predation, these cohorts grew and eventually exerted high intraspecific competition that (i) stopped further growth of juveniles and (ii) increased mortality of adults. These demographic processes were mainly responsible for the prolonged recovery of size structure. In contrast, for populations with predation, the regular harvest of individuals reduced competition. Juveniles developed continuously, allowing a fast recovery of size structure in these dynamic populations. In risk assessment the duration for populations to recover from (toxicant) stress, is crucial for the determination of ecological acceptable effects. We conclude that competition needs to be considered in order to understand and predict recovery of size

  9. On the Apportionment of Population Structure

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Yaron; Tal, Omri; Rosset, Saharon; Skorecki, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Measures of population differentiation, such as FST, are traditionally derived from the partition of diversity within and between populations. However, the emergence of population clusters from multilocus analysis is a function of genetic structure (departures from panmixia) rather than of diversity. If the populations are close to panmixia, slight differences between the mean pairwise distance within and between populations (low FST) can manifest as strong separation between the populations, thus population clusters are often evident even when the vast majority of diversity is partitioned within populations rather than between them. For any given FST value, clusters can be tighter (more panmictic) or looser (more stratified), and in this respect higher FST does not always imply stronger differentiation. In this study we propose a measure for the partition of structure, denoted EST, which is more consistent with results from clustering schemes. Crucially, our measure is based on a statistic of the data that is a good measure of internal structure, mimicking the information extracted by unsupervised clustering or dimensionality reduction schemes. To assess the utility of our metric, we ranked various human (HGDP) population pairs based on FST and EST and found substantial differences in ranking order. EST ranking seems more consistent with population clustering and classification and possibly with geographic distance between populations. Thus, EST may at times outperform FST in identifying evolutionary significant differentiation. PMID:27505172

  10. The effectiveness of immediate feedback during the objective structured clinical examination.

    PubMed

    Hodder, R V; Rivington, R N; Calcutt, L E; Hart, I R

    1989-03-01

    Using eight different physical examination or technical stations, 400 examinations were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of immediate feedback during the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). The test group comprised 50 medical students who underwent a standard 4-minute examination followed by 2 minutes of feedback. Immediately following feedback the students repeated an identical 4-minute examination scored by the same examiners. The control group consisted of 50 students from the same class who underwent an identical testing sequence, but instead of receiving feedback, they were instructed to continue their examinations for an additional 2 minutes before repeating the stations. Simple repetition of the task did not significantly improve score (mean increase 2.0%, NS). Extending the testing period from 4 to 6 minutes resulted in a small but significant increase in score (mean 6.7%, P less than 0.001). However, there was a much larger increase in the scores obtained following 2 minutes of immediate feedback compared to pre-feedback performance (mean 26.3%, P less than 0.0001). The majority of students and examiners felt that feedback, as administered in this study, was valuable both as a learning and teaching experience. Short periods of immediate feedback during an OSCE are practical and can improve competency in the performance of criterion-based tasks, at least over the short term. In addition, such feedback provides students with valuable self-assessment that may stimulate further learning. PMID:2716557

  11. Simulation of population growth and structure of the population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymowicz, A. Z.

    2002-08-01

    A computer study of population growth and biological ageing in the Penna model is presented. The stress is put on the analysis of the age structure and the distribution of 'bad' mutations m in the population. Results of computer simulation are compared with the simplest logistic model approach which ignores genetic contribution to the life game and accounts only for death due to limited environmental capacity, the Verhulst factor. The Penna model accounts also for genetic load and results of the simulation show that the final population essentially consists of the fittest individuals, as is expected. A more detailed analysis of the genome structure Δ( m) discloses significant marks of the history. The main conclusions are: (a) there is a clear correlation between population n, age a and the number m of bad mutations and (b) there is no correlation between particular configurations Δ( m) of genomes of the same m and the fraction of the population of this characteristics Δ( m). A typical run takes a couple of hours on an HP EXEMPLAR machine, and for a population of about n=10 6.

  12. Getting on the same page: The effect of normative feedback interventions on structured interview ratings.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Christopher J; Campion, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    This study explores normative feedback as a way to reduce rating errors and increase the reliability and validity of structured interview ratings. Based in control theory and social comparison theory, we propose a model of normative feedback interventions (NFIs) in the context of structured interviews and test our model using data from over 20,000 interviews conducted by more than 100 interviewers over a period of more than 4 years. Results indicate that lenient and severe interviewers reduced discrepancies between their ratings and the overall normative mean rating after receipt of normative feedback, though changes were greater for lenient interviewers. When various waves of feedback were presented in later NFIs, the combined normative mean rating over multiple time periods was more predictive of subsequent rating changes than the normative mean rating from the most recent time period. Mean within-interviewer rating variance, along with interrater agreement and interrater reliability, increased after the initial NFI, but results from later NFIs were more complex and revealed that feedback interventions may lose effectiveness over time. A second study using simulated data indicated that leniency and severity errors did not impact rating validity, but did affect which applicants were hired. We conclude that giving normative feedback to interviewers will aid in minimizing interviewer rating differences and enhance the reliability of structured interview ratings. We suggest that interviewer feedback might be considered as a potential new component of interview structure, though future research is needed before a definitive conclusion can be drawn. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26867105

  13. Population Structure in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    LaCross, Nathan C.; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) frequently colonize the human pharynx asymptomatically, and are an important cause of otitis media in children. Past studies have identified typeable H. influenzae as being clonal, but the population structure of NTHi has not been extensively characterized. The research presented here investigated the diversity and population structure in a well-characterized collection of NTHi isolated from the middle ears of children with otitis media or the pharynges of healthy children in three disparate geographic regions. Multilocus sequence typing identified 109 unique sequence types among 170 commensal and otitis media-associated NTHi isolates from Finland, Israel, and the US. The largest clonal complex contained only five sequence types, indicating a high level of genetic diversity. The eBURST v3, ClonalFrame 1.1, and structure 2.3.3 programs were used to further characterize diversity and population structure from the sequence typing data. Little clustering was apparent by either disease state (otitis media or commensalism) or geography in the ClonalFrame phylogeny. Population structure was clearly evident, with support for eight populations when all 170 isolates were analyzed. Interestingly, one population contained only commensal isolates, while two others consisted solely of otitis media isolates, suggesting associations between population structure and disease. PMID:23266487

  14. A cholinergic feedback circuit to regulate striatal population uncertainty and optimize reinforcement learning

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Nicholas T; Frank, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Convergent evidence suggests that the basal ganglia support reinforcement learning by adjusting action values according to reward prediction errors. However, adaptive behavior in stochastic environments requires the consideration of uncertainty to dynamically adjust the learning rate. We consider how cholinergic tonically active interneurons (TANs) may endow the striatum with such a mechanism in computational models spanning three Marr's levels of analysis. In the neural model, TANs modulate the excitability of spiny neurons, their population response to reinforcement, and hence the effective learning rate. Long TAN pauses facilitated robustness to spurious outcomes by increasing divergence in synaptic weights between neurons coding for alternative action values, whereas short TAN pauses facilitated stochastic behavior but increased responsiveness to change-points in outcome contingencies. A feedback control system allowed TAN pauses to be dynamically modulated by uncertainty across the spiny neuron population, allowing the system to self-tune and optimize performance across stochastic environments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12029.001 PMID:26705698

  15. (Genetic structure of natural populations)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Our efforts in the first eight months were concentrated in obtaining a genomic clone of the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Drosophila melanogaster and other Drosophila species. This we have now successfully accomplished. We seek to understand the role of SOD in radioresistance; how genetic variation in this enzyme is maintained in populations; and relevant aspects of its evolution that may contribute to these goals as well as to an understanding of molecular evolution in general. To accomplish these goals we are undertaking the following experiments: cloning and sequencing of (at least) one F allele, one S allele, and the null allele for SOD; cloning and sequencing SOD from species related to D. melanogaster; and cloning and sequencing the SOD gene from several independently sampled S and F alleles in D. melanogaster. We are also preparing to test the radioprotective effects of SOD. 67 refs.

  16. Population Structure of Francisella tularensis†

    PubMed Central

    Nübel, Ulrich; Reissbrodt, Rolf; Weller, Annette; Grunow, Roland; Porsch-Özcürümez, Mustafa; Tomaso, Herbert; Hofer, Erwin; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Finke, Ernst-Jürgen; Tschäpe, Helmut; Witte, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    We have sequenced fragments of five metabolic housekeeping genes and two genes encoding outer membrane proteins from 81 isolates of Francisella tularensis, representing all four subspecies. Phylogenetic clustering of gene sequences from F. tularensis subsp. tularensis and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica aligned well with subspecies affiliations. In contrast, F. tularensis subsp. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica were indicated to be phylogenetically incoherent taxa. Incongruent gene trees and mosaic structures of housekeeping genes provided evidence for genetic recombination in F. tularensis. PMID:16816208

  17. Population Structure of Phytophthora ramorum in Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum is infecting plants in Oregon forests and nurseries. In this study, we analyzed the population structure of P. ramorum in Oregon from 2001 to 2004, using microsatellites. The P. ramorum population in Oregon is characterized by low genetic diversity, significant genetic differenc...

  18. Population size-structure-dependent fitness and ecosystem consequences in Trinidadian guppies.

    PubMed

    Bassar, Ronald D; Heatherly, Thomas; Marshall, Michael C; Thomas, Steven A; Flecker, Alexander S; Reznick, David N

    2015-07-01

    Decades of theory and recent empirical results have shown that evolutionary, population, community and ecosystem properties are the result of feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary processes. The vast majority of theory and empirical research on these eco-evolutionary feedbacks has focused on interactions among population size and mean traits of populations. However, numbers and mean traits represent only a fraction of the possible feedback dimensions. Populations of many organisms consist of different size classes that differ in their impact on the environment and each other. Moreover, rarely do we know the map of ecological pathways through which changes in numbers or size structure cause evolutionary change. The goal of this study was to test the role of size structure in eco-evolutionary feedbacks of Trinidadian guppies and to begin to build an eco-evolutionary map along this unexplored dimension. We used a factorial experiment in mesocosms wherein we crossed high- and low-predation guppy phenotypes with population size structure. We tested the ability of changes in size structure to generate selection on the demographic rates of guppies using an integral projection model (IPM). To understand how fitness differences among high- and low-predation phenotypes may be generated, we measured the response of the biomass of lower trophic levels and nutrient cycling to the different phenotype and size structure treatments. We found a significant interaction between guppy phenotype and the size structure treatments for absolute fitness. Size structure had a very large effect on invertebrate biomass in the mesocosms, but there was little or no effect of the phenotype. The effect of size structure on algal biomass depended on guppy phenotype, with no difference in algal biomass in populations with more, smaller guppies, but a large decrease in algal biomass in mesocosms with phenotypes adapted to low-predation risk. These results indicate an important role for size

  19. Two-dimensional distributed feedback lasers based on static and dynamic Bragg structures

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, V R; Ginzburg, N S

    2011-09-30

    In order to increase the output power of DFB lasers, we consider the possibility of using two-dimensional distributed feedback. Within the framework of this scheme, the feedback circuit includes four partial wave fluxes propagating in mutually orthogonal directions, which makes it possible to provide coherent radiation from a spatially extended planar active medium characterised by large values of the Fresnel parameter. By analogy with the onedimensional distributed feedback, the wave coupling can be ensured by using both the structures with a periodically varying effective refractive index (static two-dimensional Bragg structures) and the gain modulation (photo-induced two-dimensional Bragg structures). Within the semiclassical approximation, the initial conditions and nonlinear dynamics of lasers with the above-described two-dimensional Bragg structures are analysed. Self-similarity conditions are found, allowing one to scale the laser parameters with increasing active region size, which is accompanied by an increase in the integrated output power.

  20. Breathing FIRE: How Stellar Feedback Drives Radial Migration, Rapid Size Fluctuations, and Population Gradients in Low-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Wetzel, Andrew; Geha, Marla; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dusan; Chan, T. K.; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-04-01

    We examine the effects of stellar feedback and bursty star formation on low-mass galaxies (Mstar = 2 × 106 - 5 × 1010 M⊙) using the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. While previous studies emphasized the impact of feedback on dark matter profiles, we investigate the impact on the stellar component: kinematics, radial migration, size evolution, and population gradients. Feedback-driven outflows/inflows drive significant radial stellar migration over both short and long timescales via two processes: (1) outflowing/infalling gas can remain star-forming, producing young stars that migrate ˜1 kpc within their first 100 Myr, and (2) gas outflows/inflows drive strong fluctuations in the global potential, transferring energy to all stars. These processes produce several dramatic effects. First, galaxies’ effective radii can fluctuate by factors of >2 over ˜200 Myr, and these rapid size fluctuations can account for much of the observed scatter in the radius at fixed Mstar. Second, the cumulative effects of many outflow/infall episodes steadily heat stellar orbits, causing old stars to migrate outward most strongly. This age-dependent radial migration mixes—and even inverts—intrinsic age and metallicity gradients. Thus, the galactic-archaeology approach of calculating radial star formation histories from stellar populations at z = 0 can be severely biased. These effects are strongest at Mstar ≈ 107-9.6 M⊙, the same regime where feedback most efficiently cores galaxies. Thus, detailed measurements of stellar kinematics in low-mass galaxies can strongly constrain feedback models and test baryonic solutions to small-scale problems in ΛCDM.

  1. Structural tailoring and feedback control synthesis - An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    Structural tailoring provides an attractive method to optimize the performance of actively controlled space structures. However, the simultaneous optimization of control gains and structural properties often becomes prohibitively expensive for large systems and physical insight is often lost in the resulting control law. This paper presents a method for optimization of the closed loop structural system using only structural tailoring. Optimal Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control theory is used with weighting matrices chosen based on physical considerations. The LQR control law depends only on two scalar gains and the structural properties. Hence, the closed loop-performance can be expressed in terms of the structural parameters. Results are given for a beam and a truss-beam to show the simplicity of the method and the importance of structural tailoring to increase dynamic performance and to reduce the control effort.

  2. Effects of Written Feedback and Revision on Learners' Accuracy in Using Two English Grammatical Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shintani, Natsuko; Ellis, Rod; Suzuki, Wataru

    2014-01-01

    The study compared the effects of two types of form-focused written feedback--direct corrective feedback (DCF) and metalinguistic explanation (ME) given to the whole class--on Japanese university students' accuracy of use of two grammatical structures: indefinite article and the hypothetical conditional. Both types of feedback were given with…

  3. Ocean currents help explain population genetic structure

    PubMed Central

    White, Crow; Selkoe, Kimberly A.; Watson, James; Siegel, David A.; Zacherl, Danielle C.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Management and conservation can be greatly informed by considering explicitly how environmental factors influence population genetic structure. Using simulated larval dispersal estimates based on ocean current observations, we demonstrate how explicit consideration of frequency of exchange of larvae among sites via ocean advection can fundamentally change the interpretation of empirical population genetic structuring as compared with conventional spatial genetic analyses. Both frequency of larval exchange and empirical genetic difference were uncorrelated with Euclidean distance between sites. When transformed into relative oceanographic distances and integrated into a genetic isolation-by-distance framework, however, the frequency of larval exchange explained nearly 50 per cent of the variance in empirical genetic differences among sites over scales of tens of kilometres. Explanatory power was strongest when we considered effects of multiple generations of larval dispersal via intermediary locations on the long-term probability of exchange between sites. Our results uncover meaningful spatial patterning to population genetic structuring that corresponds with ocean circulation. This study advances our ability to interpret population structure from complex genetic data characteristic of high gene flow species, validates recent advances in oceanographic approaches for assessing larval dispersal and represents a novel approach to characterize population connectivity at small spatial scales germane to conservation and fisheries management. PMID:20133354

  4. Understanding positive feedback between PNA and synoptic eddies by eddy structure decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fang; Ren, Hong-Li; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, You

    2016-08-01

    In the upper troposphere during winter, positive synoptic eddy (SE) feedback plays an indispensible role in maintaining the Pacific-North American (PNA) pattern that dominates climate variability on inter-annual timescales over the North Pacific and downstream regions. This study shows that the eddy forcing, induced by eddy-vorticity (EV) fluxes, is not only in-phase with, but also downstream to the PNA pattern in terms of its northeast Pacific lobe. We employ the eddy structure decomposition method to understand such an observed PNA-SEs feedback, and propose a kinematic mechanism that can depict dynamical processes associated with the eddy structure change and its induced positive eddy feedback relative to the PNA flow pattern. With this method, the winter-mean PNA-related SE structures are separated into climatological (basic) and anomalous SE structures, and these two parts can be used to represent the changes in SE structure in a statistical sense and then to calculate the EV fluxes in order to further elucidate the feedback mechanism. It is demonstrated that, on one hand, the winter-mean PNA flow tends to systematically deform the structures of SEs and induce anomalous EV fluxes, and these winter-mean EV fluxes primarily converge into the PNA cyclonic center, which, in return enhances the PNA flow. On the other hand, the PNA-related northeast Pacific flow is featured by a stronger zonal wind shear in the east than the west, which can induce larger zonal-slanting eddy structure change and then stronger meridional EV fluxes that converge to form downstream feedback. This kinematic mechanism may help to deeply understand the dynamical eddy feedback between the low-frequency PNA flow and high-frequency SEs.

  5. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  6. Familial Identification: Population Structure and Relationship Distinguishability

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfs, Rori V.; Fullerton, Stephanie Malia; Weir, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    With the expansion of offender/arrestee DNA profile databases, genetic forensic identification has become commonplace in the United States criminal justice system. Implementation of familial searching has been proposed to extend forensic identification to family members of individuals with profiles in offender/arrestee DNA databases. In familial searching, a partial genetic profile match between a database entrant and a crime scene sample is used to implicate genetic relatives of the database entrant as potential sources of the crime scene sample. In addition to concerns regarding civil liberties, familial searching poses unanswered statistical questions. In this study, we define confidence intervals on estimated likelihood ratios for familial identification. Using these confidence intervals, we consider familial searching in a structured population. We show that relatives and unrelated individuals from population samples with lower gene diversity over the loci considered are less distinguishable. We also consider cases where the most appropriate population sample for individuals considered is unknown. We find that as a less appropriate population sample, and thus allele frequency distribution, is assumed, relatives and unrelated individuals become more difficult to distinguish. In addition, we show that relationship distinguishability increases with the number of markers considered, but decreases for more distant genetic familial relationships. All of these results indicate that caution is warranted in the application of familial searching in structured populations, such as in the United States. PMID:22346758

  7. Optimal decentralized feedback control for a truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagle, A.; Ozguner, U.

    1989-01-01

    One approach to the decentralized control of large flexible space structures involves the design of controllers for the substructures of large systems and their subsequent application to the entire coupled system. This approach is presently developed for the case of active vibration damping on an experimental large struss structure. The isolated boundary loading method is used to define component models by FEM; component controllers are designed using an interlocking control concept which minimizes the motion of the boundary nodes, thereby reducing the exchange of mechanical disturbances among components.

  8. Spatial population structure of Yellowstone bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olexa, E.M.; Gogan, P.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in Yellowstone National Park, USA, bison (Bison bison) numbers and shifts in seasonal distribution have resulted in more frequent movements of bison beyond park boundaries and development of an interagency management plan for the Yellowstone bison population. Implementation of the plan under the adaptive management paradigm requires an understanding of the spatial and temporal structure of the population. We used polythetic agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis of radiolocations obtained from free-ranging bison to investigate seasonal movements and aggregations. We classified radiolocations into 4 periods: annual, peak rut (15 Jul-15 Sep), extended rut (1 Jun-31 Oct), and winter (1 Nov-31 May). We documented spatial separation of Yellowstone bison into 2 segments, the northern and central herds, during all periods. The estimated year-round exchange rate (4.85-5.83%) of instrumented bison varied with the fusion strategy employed. We did not observe exchange between the 2 segments during the peak rut and it varied during the extended rut (2.15-3.23%). We estimated a winter exchange of 4.85-7.77%. The outcome and effectiveness of management actions directed at Yellowstone bison may be affected by spatial segregation and herd affinity within the population. Reductions based on total population size, but not applied to the entire population, may adversely affect one herd while having little effect on the other. Similarly, management actions targeting a segment of the population may benefit from the spatial segregation exhibited.

  9. The Effects of the Timing of Corrective Feedback on the Acquisition of a New Linguistic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shaofeng; Zhu, Yan; Ellis, Rod

    2016-01-01

    The article reports on a study investigating the comparative effects of immediate and delayed corrective feedback in learning the English past passive construction, a linguistic structure of which the learners had little prior knowledge. A total of 120 learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) from 4 intact classes at a Chinese middle school…

  10. Positive feedback fishery: Population consequences of `crab-tiling' on the green crab Carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, E. V.; Thompson, R. C.; Coleman, R. A.; Attrill, M. J.

    2008-11-01

    Collection of marine invertebrates for use as fishing bait is a substantial activity in many parts of the world, often with unknown ecological consequences. As new fisheries develop, it is critical for environmental managers to have high quality ecological information regarding the potential impacts, in order to develop sound management strategies. Crab-tiling is a largely unregulated and un-researched fishery, which operates commercially in the south-west UK. The target species is the green crab Carcinus maenas. Those crabs which are pre-ecdysis and have a carapace width greater than 40 mm are collected to be sold to recreational anglers as bait. Collection involves laying artificial structures on intertidal sandflats and mudflats in estuaries. Crabs use these structures as refugia and are collected during low tide. However, the effect that this fishery has on populations of C. maenas is not known. The impact of crab-tiling on C. maenas population structure was determined by sampling crabs from tiled estuaries and non-tiled estuaries using baited drop-nets. A spatially and temporarily replicated, balanced design was used to compare crab abundance, sizes and sex ratios between estuaries. Typically, fisheries are associated with a reduction in the abundance of the target species. Crab-tiling, however, significantly increased C. maenas abundance. This was thought to be a result of the extra habitat in tiled estuaries, which probably provides protection from natural predators, such as birds and fish. Although crabs were more abundant in tiled estuaries than non-tiled estuaries, the overall percentage of reproductively active crabs in non-tiled estuaries was greater than in tiled estuaries. As with most exploited fisheries stocks, crabs in exploited (tiled) estuaries tended to be smaller, with a modal carapace width of 20-29 mm rather than 30-39 mm in non-tiled estuaries. The sex ratio of crabs however; was not significantly different between tiled and non

  11. Crystal structure of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    PubMed

    Bader, G; Schiffmann, S; Herrmann, A; Fischer, M; Gütlich, M; Auerbach, G; Ploom, T; Bacher, A; Huber, R; Lemm, T

    2001-10-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for hydroxylation of aromatic amino acids regulates its own synthesis in mammals through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I. This mechanism is mediated by a regulatory subunit called GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). The 2.6 A resolution crystal structure of rat GFRP shows that the protein forms a pentamer. This indicates a model for the interaction of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I with its regulator, GFRP. Kinetic investigations of human GTP cyclohydrolase I in complex with rat and human GFRP showed similar regulatory effects of both GFRP proteins. PMID:11580249

  12. Patterns and localized structures in population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, M. G.; Escaff, D.; Kenkre, V. M.

    2005-11-01

    Patterns, fronts, and localized structures of a prototypical model for population dynamics interaction are studied. The physical content of the model is the coexistence of a simple random walk for the motion of the individuals with a nonlinearity in the competitive struggle for resources which simultaneously stresses the Allee effect and interaction at a distance. Mathematically, the model is variational and exhibits coexistence between different stable extended states. Solutions are obtained, the phase diagram is constructed, and the emergence of localized structures is investigated.

  13. Trading stages: life expectancies in structured populations.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ulrich K; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim; Horvitz, Carol

    2012-10-01

    Interest in stage-and age structured models has recently increased because they can describe quantitative traits such as size that are left out of age-only demography. Available methods for the analysis of effects of vital rates on lifespan in stage-structured models have not been widely applied because they are hard to use and interpret, and tools for age and stage structured populations are missing. We present easily interpretable expressions for the sensitivities and elasticities of life expectancy to vital rates in age-stage models, and illustrate their application with two biological examples. Much of our approach relies on trading of time and mortality risk in one stage for time and risk in others. Our approach contributes to the new framework of the study of age- and stage-structured biodemography. PMID:22664576

  14. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  15. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz, respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  16. Decentralized guaranteed cost static output feedback vibration control for piezoelectric smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-ping; Li, Dong-xu

    2010-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the decentralized guaranteed cost static output feedback vibration control for piezoelectric smart structures. A smart panel with collocated piezoelectric actuators and velocity sensors is modeled using a finite element method, and then the size of the model is reduced in the state space using the modal Hankel singular value. The necessary and sufficient conditions of decentralized guaranteed cost static output feedback control for the reduced system have been presented. The decentralized and centralized static output feedback matrices can be obtained from solving two linear matrix inequalities. A comparison between centralized control and decentralized control is performed in order to investigate their effectiveness in suppressing vibration of a smart panel. Numerical results show that when the system is subjected to initial displacement or white noise disturbance, the decentralized and centralized controls are both very effective and the control results are very close.

  17. Auditory feedback in music performance: the role of melodic structure and musical skill.

    PubMed

    Pfordresher, Peter Q

    2005-12-01

    Five experiments explored whether fluency in musical sequence production relies on matches between the contents of auditory feedback and the planned outcomes of actions. Participants performed short melodies from memory on a keyboard while musical pitches that sounded in synchrony with each keypress (feedback contents) were altered. Results indicated that altering pitch contents can disrupt production, but only when altered pitches form a sequence that is structurally similar to the planned sequence. These experiments also addressed the role of musical skill: Experiments 1 and 3 included trained pianists; other experiments included participants with little or no musical training. Results were similar across both groups with respect to the disruptive effects of auditory feedback manipulations. These results support the idea that a common hierarchical representation guides sequences of actions and the perception of event sequences and that this coordination is not acquired from learned associations formed by musical skill acquisition. PMID:16366793

  18. On the interaction structure of linear multi-input feedback control systems. M.S. Thesis; [problem solving, lattices (mathematics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, P. K.

    1975-01-01

    The closely-related problems of designing reliable feedback stabilization strategy and coordinating decentralized feedbacks are considered. Two approaches are taken. A geometric characterization of the structure of control interaction (and its dual) was first attempted and a concept of structural homomorphism developed based on the idea of 'similarity' of interaction pattern. The idea of finding classes of individual feedback maps that do not 'interfere' with the stabilizing action of each other was developed by identifying the structural properties of nondestabilizing and LQ-optimal feedback maps. Some known stability properties of LQ-feedback were generalized and some partial solutions were provided to the reliable stabilization and decentralized feedback coordination problems. A concept of coordination parametrization was introduced, and a scheme for classifying different modes of decentralization (information, control law computation, on-line control implementation) in control systems was developed.

  19. Adaptive dynamics for physiologically structured population models.

    PubMed

    Durinx, Michel; Metz, J A J Hans; Meszéna, Géza

    2008-05-01

    We develop a systematic toolbox for analyzing the adaptive dynamics of multidimensional traits in physiologically structured population models with point equilibria (sensu Dieckmann et al. in Theor. Popul. Biol. 63:309-338, 2003). Firstly, we show how the canonical equation of adaptive dynamics (Dieckmann and Law in J. Math. Biol. 34:579-612, 1996), an approximation for the rate of evolutionary change in characters under directional selection, can be extended so as to apply to general physiologically structured population models with multiple birth states. Secondly, we show that the invasion fitness function (up to and including second order terms, in the distances of the trait vectors to the singularity) for a community of N coexisting types near an evolutionarily singular point has a rational form, which is model-independent in the following sense: the form depends on the strategies of the residents and the invader, and on the second order partial derivatives of the one-resident fitness function at the singular point. This normal form holds for Lotka-Volterra models as well as for physiologically structured population models with multiple birth states, in discrete as well as continuous time and can thus be considered universal for the evolutionary dynamics in the neighbourhood of singular points. Only in the case of one-dimensional trait spaces or when N = 1 can the normal form be reduced to a Taylor polynomial. Lastly we show, in the form of a stylized recipe, how these results can be combined into a systematic approach for the analysis of the (large) class of evolutionary models that satisfy the above restrictions. PMID:17943289

  20. Population structure and the rate of evolution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xinzhu; Zhao, Lei; Lascoux, Martin; Waxman, David

    2015-01-21

    The way population size, population structure (with migration), and spatially dependent selection (where there is no globally optimal allele), combine to affect the substitution rate is poorly understood. Here, we consider a two patch model where mutant alleles are beneficial in one patch and deleterious in the other patch. We assume that the spatial average of selection on mutant alleles is zero. We take each patch to maintain a finite number of N adults each generation, hence random genetic drift can independently occur in each patch. We show that the principal way the population size, N, when large, affects the substitution rate, R∞, is through its dependence on two composite parameters. These are the scaled migration rate M (∝ population size × migration rate), and the scaled selection intensity S (∝population size × beneficial effect of a mutant). Any relation between S and M that arises for ecological/evolutionary reasons can strongly influence the way the substitution rate, R∞, depends on the population size, N. In the simplest situation, both M and S are proportional to N, and this is shown to lead to R∞ increasing with N when S is not large. The behaviour, that R∞ increases with N, is not inevitable; a more complex relation between S and M can lead to the opposite or other behaviours. In particular, let us assume that dM/dN is positive, as would occur if the migration rate were constant, S is not large, and S depends on M (i.e., S=S(M)). We then find that if S(M) satisfies S(M)>((1+M)/1+2M)S(0) then the substitution rate, R∞, increases with N, but if S(M)<((1+M)/1+2M)S(0) then R∞ decreases with N. PMID:25451534

  1. Impact of structured verbal feedback module in medical education: A questionnaire- and test score-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Meenakshi; Singh, Sonia; Sharma, Anu; Singh, Poonam; Bansal, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Feedback is a divalent bond between the supplier (teacher) and the recipient (student). The strength of the bond depends on the instructional design of the feedback. Feedback is central to medical education in promoting self-directed learning in students. In the present study, a structured verbal feedback module was prepared, implemented, and evaluated. Methods: The study was done on 280 students from four consecutive batches (2011 to 2014) of the 1st year MBBS students exposed to different types and modes of feedback. Analysis was done using student feedback questionnaire for the perception of students to verbal feedback. Quantitative analysis using post hoc test and ANOVA for the impact of type of feedback (verbal or written) and effect of modes (individual or group) of verbal feedback on test score performance were done. Result: In this study, ≥95% of the students preferred verbal feedback of both positive and negative attributes in student questionnaires. It was observed that verbal feedback sessions made a difference of up to 2–2.4 grade points in the mean score of batch when compared to the written feedback. The initial mean test score (T1) of 2011 + 2012 and 2013 + 2014 was not statistically significant (P = 0.113). But, in all subsequent tests (T2, T3, and T4), there was a statistically significant difference in the mean test scores (P = 0.000). Conclusion: (1) Students prefer verbal one-to-one feedback over written feedback. (2) Verbal feedback changes learning process and causes sustained improvement in learning strategies. PMID:27563592

  2. Efficient eigenvalue assignment by state and output feedback with applications for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannell, Eric C.; Kenny, Sean P.; Maghami, Peiman G.

    1995-01-01

    The erection and deployment of large flexible structures having thousands of degrees of freedom requires controllers based on new techniques of eigenvalue assignment that are computationally stable and more efficient. Scientists at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a novel and efficient algorithm for the eigenvalue assignment of large, time-invariant systems using full-state and output feedback. The objectives of this research were to improve upon the output feedback version of this algorithm, to produce a toolbox of MATLAB functions based on the efficient eigenvalue assignment algorithm, and to experimentally verify the algorithm and software by implementing controllers designed using the MATLAB toolbox on the phase 2 configuration of NASA Langley's controls-structures interaction evolutionary model, a laboratory model used to study space structures. Results from laboratory tests and computer simulations show that effective controllers can be designed using software based on the efficient eigenvalue assignment algorithm.

  3. Structural Basis for l-Lysine Feedback Inhibition of Homocitrate Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Scott, Erin M.; Pillus, Lorraine; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-09-02

    The {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway of lysine biosynthesis is modulated at the transcriptional and biochemical levels by feedback inhibition. The first enzyme in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway, homocitrate synthase (HCS), is the target of the feedback regulation and is strongly inhibited by L-lysine. Here we report the structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe HCS (SpHCS) in complex with L-lysine. The structure illustrates that the amino acid directly competes with the substrate 2-oxoglutarate for binding within the active site of HCS. Differential recognition of the substrate and inhibitor is achieved via a switch position within the ({alpha}/{beta}){sub 8} TIM barrel of the enzyme that can distinguish between the C5-carboxylate group of 2-oxoglutarate and the {epsilon}-ammonium group of L-lysine. In vitro and in vivo assays demonstrate that mutations of the switch residues, which interact with the L-lysine {epsilon}-ammonium group, abrogate feedback inhibition, as do substitutions of residues within the C-terminal domain that were identified in a previous study of L-lysine-insensitive HCS mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Together, these results yield new insights into the mechanism of feedback regulation of an enzyme central to lysine biosynthesis.

  4. Origin and population structure of the Icelanders.

    PubMed

    Williams, J T

    1993-04-01

    The Norse and Celtic contributions to the founding population of Iceland have been estimated previously on a pan-Icelandic basis using gene frequency data for the entire island. Accounts of the settlement of Iceland, however, suggest that different regions received different proportions of Norse and Celtic settlers, indicating the need to incorporate geographic variation into Icelandic admixture studies. A formal likelihood ratio test rejects the null hypothesis of regional homogeneity in admixture proportions. Here, regional admixture estimates for Iceland are reported; they are in agreement with the settlement pattern inferred from historical accounts. The western, northern, and southern regions of Iceland exhibit a moderate Celtic component, consistent with historical indications that these regions were settled by Norse Vikings from the British Isles, accompanied by Celtic wives and slaves. Eastern Iceland, believed to have been settled chiefly by Vikings from Scandinavia, is characterized by a large Norse component of admixture. The northwestern peninsula is also found to be predominantly Norse. Regional genetic data are used to elucidate the contemporary population structure of Iceland. The observed structure correlates well with patterns of Icelandic geography, history, economy, marriage, urbanization, and internal migration. The northeastern region is strongly isolated, the urbanized areas of the north and southwest are representative of the overall population, and the remaining regions exhibit small-scale variation about the genetic central tendency. A high level of genetic homogeneity is indicated (RST = 0.0005), consistent with the high internal migration rate of the Icelanders. A regression of mean per-locus heterozygosity on distance from the gene frequency centroid reveals a greater than average external gene flow into the eastern region, whereas the northwestern peninsula has received less than average external gene flow. Iceland is compared with

  5. Ecological feedbacks can reduce population-level efficacy of wildlife fertility control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, Jason I.; Powers, Jenny G.; Hobbs, N. Thompson; Baker, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    1. Anthropogenic stress on natural systems, particularly the fragmentation of landscapes and the extirpation of predators from food webs, has intensified the need to regulate abundance of wildlife populations with management. Controlling population growth using fertility control has been considered for almost four decades, but nearly all research has focused on understanding effects of fertility control agents on individual animals. Questions about the efficacy of fertility control as a way to control populations remain largely unanswered. 2. Collateral consequences of contraception can produce unexpected changes in birth rates, survival, immigration and emigration that may reduce the effectiveness of regulating animal abundance. The magnitude and frequency of such effects vary with species-specific social and reproductive systems, as well as connectivity of populations. Developing models that incorporate static demographic parameters from populations not controlled by contraception may bias predictions of fertility control efficacy. 3. Many population-level studies demonstrate that changes in survival and immigration induced by fertility control can compensate for the reduction in births caused by contraception. The most successful cases of regulating populations using fertility control come from applications of contraceptives to small, closed populations of gregarious and easily accessed species. 4. Fertility control can result in artificial selection pressures on the population and may lead to long-term unintentional genetic consequences. The magnitude of such selection is dependent on individual heritability and behavioural traits, as well as environmental variation. 5. Synthesis and applications. Understanding species' life-history strategies, biology, behavioural ecology and ecological context is critical to developing realistic expectations of regulating populations using fertility control. Before time, effort and funding are invested in wildlife

  6. Ecological feedbacks can reduce population-level efficacy of wildlife fertility control

    PubMed Central

    Ransom, Jason I; Powers, Jenny G; Thompson Hobbs, N; Baker, Dan L

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic stress on natural systems, particularly the fragmentation of landscapes and the extirpation of predators from food webs, has intensified the need to regulate abundance of wildlife populations with management. Controlling population growth using fertility control has been considered for almost four decades, but nearly all research has focused on understanding effects of fertility control agents on individual animals. Questions about the efficacy of fertility control as a way to control populations remain largely unanswered. Collateral consequences of contraception can produce unexpected changes in birth rates, survival, immigration and emigration that may reduce the effectiveness of regulating animal abundance. The magnitude and frequency of such effects vary with species-specific social and reproductive systems, as well as connectivity of populations. Developing models that incorporate static demographic parameters from populations not controlled by contraception may bias predictions of fertility control efficacy. Many population-level studies demonstrate that changes in survival and immigration induced by fertility control can compensate for the reduction in births caused by contraception. The most successful cases of regulating populations using fertility control come from applications of contraceptives to small, closed populations of gregarious and easily accessed species. Fertility control can result in artificial selection pressures on the population and may lead to long-term unintentional genetic consequences. The magnitude of such selection is dependent on individual heritability and behavioural traits, as well as environmental variation. Synthesis and applications. Understanding species' life-history strategies, biology, behavioural ecology and ecological context is critical to developing realistic expectations of regulating populations using fertility control. Before time, effort and funding are invested in wildlife contraception, managers

  7. Coarse-grained analysis of stochastically simulated cell populations with a positive feedback genetic network architecture.

    PubMed

    Aviziotis, I G; Kavousanakis, M E; Bitsanis, I A; Boudouvis, A G

    2015-06-01

    Among the different computational approaches modelling the dynamics of isogenic cell populations, discrete stochastic models can describe with sufficient accuracy the evolution of small size populations. However, for a systematic and efficient study of their long-time behaviour over a wide range of parameter values, the performance of solely direct temporal simulations requires significantly high computational time. In addition, when the dynamics of the cell populations exhibit non-trivial bistable behaviour, such an analysis becomes a prohibitive task, since a large ensemble of initial states need to be tested for the quest of possibly co-existing steady state solutions. In this work, we study cell populations which carry the lac operon network exhibiting solution multiplicity over a wide range of extracellular conditions (inducer concentration). By adopting ideas from the so-called "equation-free" methodology, we perform systems-level analysis, which includes numerical tasks such as the computation of coarse steady state solutions, coarse bifurcation analysis, as well as coarse stability analysis. Dynamically stable and unstable macroscopic (population level) steady state solutions are computed by means of bifurcation analysis utilising short bursts of fine-scale simulations, and the range of bistability is determined for different sizes of cell populations. The results are compared with the deterministic cell population balance model, which is valid for large populations, and we demonstrate the increased effect of stochasticity in small size populations with asymmetric partitioning mechanisms. PMID:24929336

  8. Structure of corrective feedback for selection of ineffective vegetable parenting practices for use in a simulation videogame

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A serious videogame is being developed to train parents of preschool children in selecting and using parenting practices that are likely to encourage their child to eat more vegetables. The structure of feedback to the parents on their selection may influence what they learn from the game. Feedback ...

  9. The impact of stellar feedback on high-z galaxy populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; De Lucia, Gabriella

    One major deficiency of state-of-the-art galaxy formation models consists in their inability of capturing the observed galaxy downsizing trend significantly over-estimating the number density of low-mass galaxies, in particular at high redshifts. Employing an enhanced galaxy formation model with a full chemical enrichment scheme (DeLucia et al., 2014), we present an improved model for stellar feedback (based on parametrizations from cosmological zoom simulations), in which strong gas outflows occur due to bursty star formation at high z, while star formation is mainly ``quiescent'' not causing any significant outflows anymore at low z. Due to the stronger gas outflows at high z, early star formation is strongly delayed towards later times. This helps to sufficiently detach the evolution of galaxy growth from the hiearchical dark matter assembly resulting in a fairly good agreement with the evolution of the observed stellar mass function (SMF, see Fig. 1). With our new feedback scheme, we can also successfully reproduce many other observational constraints, such as the metallicity content, the cold gas fractions or the quiescent galaxy fractions at both low and high redshifts. The resulting new-generation galaxy catalogues (Hirschmann et al., in prep) based on that model are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming large-scale surveys (HST, JWST, Euclid). This will, in turn, provide a rapid verification and refinement of our modeling.

  10. Population inertia and its sensitivity to changes in vital rates and population structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koons, D.N.; Holmes, R.R.; Grand, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    Because the (st)age structure of a population may rarely be stable, studies of transient population dynamics and population momentum are becoming ever more popular. Yet, studies of "population momentum" are restricted in the sense that they describe the inertia of population size resulting from a demographic transition to the stationary population growth rate. Although rarely mentioned, inertia in population size is a general phenomenon and can be produced by any demographic transition or perturbation. Because population size is of central importance in demography, conservation, and management, formulas relating the sensitivity of population inertia to changes in underlying vital rates and population structure could provide much-needed insight into the dynamics of populations with unstable (st)age structure. Here, we derive such formulas, which are readily computable, and provide examples of their potential use in studies of life history and applied arenas of population study. ?? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. An L-Band Superconducting Traveling Wave Accelerating Structure With Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Avrakhov, P.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Solyak, N.; Kazakov, S.

    2009-01-22

    The most severe problem of the International Linear Collider is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the ILC. In the ILC project the required accelerating gradient is higher than 30 MeV/m. Further improvement of the coupling to the beam may be achieved by using a Traveling Wave SC structure [1]. We have demonstrated that an additional gradient increase of up to 46% may be possible if a {pi}/2 TW SC structure is employed. However, a TW SC structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few GW of circulating RF power from the structure output back to the structure input. The test cavity with feedback is designed to demonstrate the possibility of achieving a significantly higher gradient than existing SC structures. The double-coupler powering excitation and tuning have been studied numerically and the corresponding model results are presented. The proposed double-coupler powering scheme significantly reduces the tuning requirements as long as any of the partial modes of given magnitude and phase are excited independently, providing a clear traveling wave regime of structure operation.

  12. Genetic structure of populations of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Selander, R K; McKinney, R M; Whittam, T S; Bibb, W F; Brenner, D J; Nolte, F S; Pattison, P E

    1985-01-01

    The genetic structure of populations of Legionella pneumophila was defined by an analysis of electrophoretically demonstrable allelic variation at structural genes encoding 22 enzymes in 292 isolates from clinical and environmental sources. Nineteen of the loci were polymorphic, and 62 distinctive electrophoretic types (ETs), representing multilocus genotypes, were identified. Principal coordinates and clustering analyses demonstrated that isolates received as L. pneumophila were a heterogeneous array of genotypes that included two previously undescribed species. For 50 ETs of L. pneumophila (strict sense), mean genetic diversity per locus was 0.312, and diversity was equivalent in ETs represented by isolates recovered from clinical sources and those collected from environmental sources. Cluster analysis revealed four major groups or lineages of ETs in L. pneumophila. Genetic diversity among ETs of the same serotype was, on average, 93% of that in the total sample of ETs. Isolates marked by particular patterns of reactivity to a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies were also genetically heterogeneous, mean diversity within patterns being about 75% of the total. Both Pontiac fever and the pneumonic form of legionellosis may be caused by isolates of the same ET. The genetic structure of L. pneumophila is clonal, and many clones apparently are worldwide in distribution. The fact that L. pneumophila is only 60% as variable as Escherichia coli raises the possibility that isolates recovered from clinical cases and man-made environments are a restricted subset of all clones in the species as a whole. PMID:4030689

  13. A PDE-based methodology for modeling, parameter estimation and feedback control in structural and structural acoustic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Brown, D. E.; Metcalf, Vern L.; Silcox, R. J.; Smith, Ralph C.; Wang, Yun

    1994-01-01

    A problem of continued interest concerns the control of vibrations in a flexible structure and the related problem of reducing structure-borne noise in structural acoustic systems. In both cases, piezoceramic patches bonded to the structures have been successfully used as control actuators. Through the application of a controlling voltage, the patches can be used to reduce structural vibrations which in turn lead to methods for reducing structure-borne noise. A PDE-based methodology for modeling, estimating physical parameters, and implementing a feedback control scheme for problems of this type is discussed. While the illustrating example is a circular plate, the methodology is sufficiently general so as to be applicable in a variety of structural and structural acoustic systems.

  14. Population structure of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus).

    PubMed

    Jansen, Teunis; Gislason, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) occurs on both sides of the north Atlantic and has traditionally been grouped into 5 spawning components, some of which were thought to be isolated natal homing stocks. Previous studies have provided no evidence for cross Atlantic migration and no or weak support for isolated spawning components within either side of the North Atlantic. We question the de-facto accepted hypothesis of isolation between spawning components on the basis of spawning and age distribution data. The spawning intensities, proxied by larval abundances, are negatively correlated between the North Sea and Celtic Sea, which indicates that the two spawning components may be connected by straying individuals. This finding is based on unique larvae samples collected before the collapse of North Sea component, thus showing that the exchange is not a recent phenomenon due to the collapse. The analyses of old as well as more recent age distributions show that strong year classes spread into other areas where they spawn as adults ("twinning"). Our findings are in accordance with the lack of solid evidence for stock separation from previous analyses of tagging data, genetics, ectoparasite infections, otolith shapes, and blood phenotypes. Because no method has been able to identify the origin of spawning mackerel unequivocally from any of the traditional spawning components, and in the light of our results, we conclude that straying outweighs spatial segregation. We propose a new model where the population structure of mackerel is described as a dynamic cline, rather than as connected contingents. Temporal changes in hydrography and mackerel behavior may affect the steepness of the cline at various locations. The new interpretation of the population structure of Atlantic mackerel has important implications for research, assessment and management. PMID:23741381

  15. Performance limitations of joint variable-feedback controllers due to manipulator structural flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cetinkunt, Sabri; Book, Wayne J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance limitations of manipulators under joint variable-feedback control are studied as a function of the mechanical flexibility inherent in the manipulator structure. A finite-dimensional time-domain dynamic model of a two-link two-joint planar manipulator is used in the study. Emphasis is placed on determining the limitations of control algorithms that use only joint variable-feedback information in calculations of control decisions, since most motion control systems in practice are of this kind. Both fine and gross motion cases are studied. Results for fine motion agree well with previously reported results in the literature and are also helpful in explaining the performance limitations in fast gross motions.

  16. An open-structure electrowetting-based reflective display with a feedback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seungyul; Lee, Junghoon

    2015-11-01

    Electrowetting-based reflective displays have long been considered a promising display choice for electronic paper applications due to their fast operating speeds and high color contrasts. However, they still require several improvements in terms of their packaging process, color contrast, and reliability. This study investigates such enhancements via an open-structure design and a capacitive feedback system. It has a femto-farad level resolution and demonstrates a high operating speed (approximately 10 ms), effective ink dosing, and large color area change (approximately 92%). The feedback system for the precise control of the color area is verified by testing under a wide range of interfacial tension. The system reduces the deviation of color contrast by 85%. Working with high fidelity with large disturbances, which are represented by interfacial variations, the system shows robust performance against other disturbances, such as temperature variation and contact angle hysteresis.

  17. Use of Population Genetics to Assess the Ecology, Evolution, and Population Structure of Coccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Marcus M.

    2016-01-01

    During the past 20 years, a general picture of the genetic diversity and population structure of Coccidioides, the causal agent of coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever), has emerged. The genus consists of 2 genetically diverse species, C. immitis and C. posadasii, each of which contains 1 or more distinct populations with limited gene flow. Genotypic data indicate that C. immitis is divided into 2 subpopulations (central and southern California populations) and C. posadasii is divided into 3 subpopulations (Arizona, Mexico, and Texas/South America populations). However, admixture within and among these populations and the current paucity of environmental isolates limit our understanding of the population genetics of Coccidioides. We assessed population structure of Coccidioides in Arizona by analyzing 495 clinical and environmental isolates. Our findings confirm the population structure as previously described and indicate a finer scale population structure in Arizona. Environmental isolates appear to have higher genetic diversity than isolates from human patients. PMID:27191589

  18. Use of Population Genetics to Assess the Ecology, Evolution, and Population Structure of Coccidioides.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Marcus M; Barker, Bridget M

    2016-06-01

    During the past 20 years, a general picture of the genetic diversity and population structure of Coccidioides, the causal agent of coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever), has emerged. The genus consists of 2 genetically diverse species, C. immitis and C. posadasii, each of which contains 1 or more distinct populations with limited gene flow. Genotypic data indicate that C. immitis is divided into 2 subpopulations (central and southern California populations) and C. posadasii is divided into 3 subpopulations (Arizona, Mexico, and Texas/South America populations). However, admixture within and among these populations and the current paucity of environmental isolates limit our understanding of the population genetics of Coccidioides. We assessed population structure of Coccidioides in Arizona by analyzing 495 clinical and environmental isolates. Our findings confirm the population structure as previously described and indicate a finer scale population structure in Arizona. Environmental isolates appear to have higher genetic diversity than isolates from human patients. PMID:27191589

  19. Size-dependent mortality induces life-history changes mediated through population dynamical feedbacks.

    PubMed

    van Kooten, Tobias; Persson, Lennart; de Roos, André M

    2007-08-01

    The majority of taxa grow significantly during life history, which often leads to individuals of the same species having different ecological roles, depending on their size or life stage. One aspect of life history that changes during ontogeny is mortality. When individual growth and development are resource dependent, changes in mortality can affect the outcome of size-dependent intraspecific resource competition, in turn affecting both life history and population dynamics. We study the outcome of varying size-dependent mortality on two life-history types, one that feeds on the same resource throughout life history and another that can alternatively cannibalize smaller conspecifics. Compensatory responses in the life history dampen the effect of certain types of size-dependent mortality, while other types of mortality lead to dramatic changes in life history and population dynamics, including population (de-)stabilization, and the growth of cannibalistic giants. These responses differ strongly among the two life-history types. Our analysis provides a mechanistic understanding of the population-level effects that come about through the interaction between individual growth and size-dependent mortality, mediated by resource dependence in individual vital rates. PMID:17874376

  20. Understanding cooperative behavior in structurally disordered populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Zhang, W.; Du, P.; Choi, C. W.; Hui, P. M.

    2016-06-01

    The effects of an inhomogeneous competing environment on the extent of cooperation are studied within the context of a site-diluted evolutionary snowdrift game on a square lattice, with the occupied sites representing the players, both numerically and analytically. The frequency of cooperation ℱC generally shows a non-monotonic dependence on the fraction of occupied sites ρ, for different values of the payoff parameter r. Slightly diluting a lattice leads to a lower cooperation for small and high values of r. For a range of r, however, dilution leads to an enhanced cooperation. An analytic treatment is developed for ℱCI + ℱCII, with ℱCI emphasizing the importance of the small clusters of players especially for ℱCII from the other players is shown to be inadequate. A local configuration approximation (LCA) that treats the local competing configurations as the variables and amounts to include spatial correlation up to the neighborhood of a player's neighbors is developed. Results of ℱC (ρ) and the number of different local configurations from LCA are in good agreement with simulation results. A transparent physical picture of the dynamics stemming from LCA is also presented. The theoretical approach provides a framework that can be readily applied to competing agent-based models in structurally ordered and disordered populations.

  1. Understanding cooperative behavior in structurally disordered populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Zhang, W.; Du, P.; Choi, C. W.; Hui, P. M.

    2016-06-01

    The effects of an inhomogeneous competing environment on the extent of cooperation are studied within the context of a site-diluted evolutionary snowdrift game on a square lattice, with the occupied sites representing the players, both numerically and analytically. The frequency of cooperation ℱ C generally shows a non-monotonic dependence on the fraction of occupied sites ρ, for different values of the payoff parameter r. Slightly diluting a lattice leads to a lower cooperation for small and high values of r. For a range of r, however, dilution leads to an enhanced cooperation. An analytic treatment is developed for ℱC I + ℱC II, with ℱC I emphasizing the importance of the small clusters of players especially for ℱC II from the other players is shown to be inadequate. A local configuration approximation (LCA) that treats the local competing configurations as the variables and amounts to include spatial correlation up to the neighborhood of a player's neighbors is developed. Results of ℱ C ( ρ) and the number of different local configurations from LCA are in good agreement with simulation results. A transparent physical picture of the dynamics stemming from LCA is also presented. The theoretical approach provides a framework that can be readily applied to competing agent-based models in structurally ordered and disordered populations.

  2. A stage structure pest management model with impulsive state feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Guoping; Chen, Lansun; Xu, Weijian; Fu, Gang

    2015-06-01

    A stage structure pest management model with impulsive state feedback control is investigated. We get the sufficient condition for the existence of the order-1 periodic solution by differential equation geometry theory and successor function. Further, we obtain a new judgement method for the stability of the order-1 periodic solution of the semi-continuous systems by referencing the stability analysis for limit cycles of continuous systems, which is different from the previous method of analog of Poincarè criterion. Finally, we analyze numerically the theoretical results obtained.

  3. A versatile electro-optical sensor provides feedback for controls-structures interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffelt, Everett; Schroeder, Curtis

    1992-08-01

    The importance of remote sensing for high-rate, high-accuracy position feedback in the control of large flexible structures is gaining wide recognition. Less obvious is the equally important use of these sensors for target tracking, proximity sensing, systems identification, and other control-related applications. The remote attitude measurement sensor (RAMS) can be easily adapted to satisfy each of these applications by selecting the optical components to meet specific measurement needs. The RAMS system has been configured to accept many different lens/target combinations and thereby provide versatility, easy of use, and reliable performance. Examples of typical applications are provided, along with descriptions of the sensor configurations and performance. Recent experiences in RAMS hardware development and testing are also described, including the use of RAMS for the Control, Astrophysics, and Structures Experiment in Space (CASES) Advanced Development Facility (ADF) and the controls-structures interaction demonstration experiment (C-SIDE).

  4. Self-organizing biochemical cycle in dynamic feedback with soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyeva, Nadezda; Vladimirov, Artem; Smirnov, Alexander; Matveev, Sergey; Tyrtyshnikov, Evgeniy; Yudina, Anna; Milanovskiy, Evgeniy; Shein, Evgeniy

    2016-04-01

    In the present study we perform bifurcation analysis of a physically-based mathematical model of self-organized structures in soil (Vasilyeva et al., 2015). The state variables in this model included microbial biomass, two organic matter types, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water content and capillary pore size. According to our previous experimental studies, organic matter affinity to water is an important property affecting soil structure. Therefore, organic matter wettability was taken as principle distinction between organic matter types in this model. It considers general known biological feedbacks with soil physical properties formulated as a system of parabolic type non-linear partial differential equations with elements of discrete modeling for water and pore formation. The model shows complex behavior, involving emergence of temporal and spatial irregular auto-oscillations from initially homogeneous distributions. The energy of external impact on a system was defined by a constant oxygen level on the boundary. Non-linear as opposed to linear oxygen diffusion gives possibility of modeling anaerobic micro-zones formation (organic matter conservation mechanism). For the current study we also introduced population competition of three different types of microorganisms according to their mobility/feeding (diffusive, moving and fungal growth). The strongly non-linear system was solved and parameterized by time-optimized algorithm combining explicit and implicit (matrix form of Thomas algorithm) methods considering the time for execution of the evaluated time-step according to accuracy control. The integral flux of the CO2 state variable was used as a macroscopic parameter to describe system as a whole and validation was carried out on temperature series of moisture dependence for soil heterotrophic respiration data. Thus, soil heterotrophic respiration can be naturally modeled as an integral result of complex dynamics on microscale, arising from biological processes

  5. Inferring population structure and demographic history using Y-STR data from worldwide populations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyang; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Shrestha, Rukesh; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Zhang, Manfei; He, Yungang; Kidd, Judith R; Kidd, Kenneth K; Jin, Li; Li, Hui

    2015-02-01

    The Y chromosome is one of the best genetic materials to explore the evolutionary history of human populations. Global analyses of Y chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) data can reveal very interesting world population structures and histories. However, previous Y-STR works tended to focus on small geographical ranges or only included limited sample sizes. In this study, we have investigated population structure and demographic history using 17 Y chromosomal STRs data of 979 males from 44 worldwide populations. The largest genetic distances have been observed between pairs of African and non-African populations. American populations with the lowest genetic diversities also showed large genetic distances and coancestry coefficients with other populations, whereas Eurasian populations displayed close genetic affinities. African populations tend to have the oldest time to the most recent common ancestors (TMRCAs), the largest effective population sizes and the earliest expansion times, whereas the American, Siberian, Melanesian, and isolated Atayal populations have the most recent TMRCAs and expansion times, and the smallest effective population sizes. This clear geographic pattern is well consistent with serial founder model for the origin of populations outside Africa. The Y-STR dataset presented here provides the most detailed view of worldwide population structure and human male demographic history, and additionally will be of great benefit to future forensic applications and population genetic studies. PMID:25159112

  6. Feedbacks between structures and processes during initial ecosystem development in an artificial catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang; Elemer, Michael; Gerwin, Werner; Fischer, Anton; Zaplata, Markus; Neneov, Rossen

    2013-04-01

    We studied the role of strutures and processes and their feedbacks during initial ecosystem development in the artificial catchment Chicken Creek. During the first seven years, considerable changes within the catchment were observed. Both internal and external factors could be identified as driving forces for the formation of structures and patterns in the artificial catchment. Initial structures formed by the construction process and initial substrate characteristics were decisive for the distribution and flow of water. External factors like episodic events triggered erosion and dissection during this initial phase, promoted by the low vegetation cover and the unconsolidated sandy substrate. The transformation of the initial geo-system into areas with evolving terrestrial or aquatic characteristics and from a very episodic to a more permanent stream network and discharge, together with the observed vegetation dynamics increased site diversity and heterogeneity with respect to water and nutrient availability and transformation processes compared to the more homogenous conditions at point zero. The processes and feedback mechanisms in the initial development of a new landscape may deviate in rates, intensity and dominance from those known from mature ecosystems. It is therefore crucial to understand these early phases of ecosystem development and to disentangle the increasingly complex interactions between the evolving terrestrial and aquatic, biotic and abiotic compartments of the system. Artificially created catchments could be a suitable tool to study these initial developments at the landscape scale under known, designed and defined boundary conditions.

  7. Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) Observations of Ionospheric Feedback in the Alfven Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ian J.; Lessard, Marc; Lund, Eric J.; Bounds, Scott R.; Kletzing, Craig; Kaeppler, Stephen R.; Sigsbee, Kristine M.; Streltsov, Anatoly V.; Labelle, James W.; Dombrowski, Micah P.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Rowland, Doug; Jones, Sarah; Anderson, Brian Jay; Heinselman, Craig J.; Gjerloev, Jesper W.; Dudok de Wit, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) High and Low sounding rockets were launched from the Poker Flat Rocket Range (PFRR) in Alaska, with the science objective of gathering in-situ data to quantify current closure in a discrete auroral arc. As ACES High crossed through the return current of an arc (that was monitored using an all sky camera from the ground at Fort Yukon), its instruments recorded clear Alfv nic signatures both poleward and equatorward of the return current region, but not within the main region of the return current itself. These data provide an excellent opportunity to study ionospheric feedback and how it interacts with the Alfv n resonator. We compare the observations with predictions and new results from a model of ionospheric feedback in the ionospheric Alfv n resonator (IAR) and report the significance and impact of these new data for the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfv n Resonator (MICA) rocket mission to launch from PFRR this winter. MICA s primary science objectives specifically focus on better understanding the small-scale structure that the model predicts should exist within the return current region.

  8. Feedback from each retinal neuron population drives expression of subsequent fate determinant genes without influencing the cell cycle exit timing.

    PubMed

    Kei, Jeremy Ng Chi; Dudczig, Stefanie; Currie, Peter D; Jusuf, Patricia R

    2016-09-01

    During neurogenesis, progenitors balance proliferation and cell cycle exit together with expression of fate determinant genes to ensure that the correct number of each of these neuron types is generated. Although intrinsic gene expression acting cell autonomously within each progenitor drives these processes, the final number of neurons generated is also influenced by extrinsic cues, representing a potential avenue to direct neurogenesis in developmental disorders or regenerative settings without the requirement to change intrinsic gene expression. Thus, it is important to understand which of these stages of neurogenesis are amenable to such extrinsic influences. Additionally, all types of neurons are specified in a highly conserved histogenic order, although its significance is unknown. This study makes use of conserved patterns of neurogenesis in the relatively simple yet highly organized zebrafish retina model, in which such histogenic birth order is well characterized. We directly visualize and quantify birth dates and cell fate determinant expression in WT vs. environments lacking different neuronal populations. This study shows that extrinsic feedback from developing retinal neurons is important for the temporal expression of intrinsic fate determinants but not for the timing of birth dates. We found no changes in cell cycle exit timing but did find a significant delay in the expression of genes driving the generation only of later- but not earlier-born cells, suggesting that the robustness of this process depends on continuous feedback from earlier-formed cell types. Thus, extrinsic cues selectively influence cell fate determinant progression, which may explain the function of the retinal histogenic order observed. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2553-2566, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26850379

  9. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-02-01

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to beta-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each interface between GFRP and GTPCHI, thus enhancing the binding of these proteins. The complex structure suggests that phenylalanine-induced GTPCHI x GFRP complex formation enhances GTPCHI activity by locking the enzyme in the active state. PMID:11818540

  10. Structural vibration control of micro/macro-manipulator using feedforward and feedback approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, J.Y.; Cannon, D.W.; Magee, D.P.; Book, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PDL) researchers investigated the combined use of two control approaches to minimize micro/macro-manipulator structural vibration: (1) modified input shaping and (2) inertial force active damping control. Modified input shaping (MIS) is used as a feedforward controller to modify reference input by canceling the vibratory motion. Inertial force active damping (IFAD) is applied as a feedback controller to increase the system damping and robustness to unexpected disturbances. Researchers implemented both control schemes in the PNL micro/macro flexible-link manipulator testbed collaborating with Georgia Institute of Technology. The experiments successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of two control approaches in reducing structural vibration. Based on the results of the experiments, the combined use of two controllers is recommended for a micro/macro manipulator to achieve the fastest response to commands while canceling disturbances from unexpected forces.

  11. Population Structure and Genetic Diversity of Native and Invasive Populations of Solanum rostratum (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiali; Solís-Montero, Lislie; Lou, Anru; Vallejo-Marín, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Aims We investigate native and introduced populations of Solanum rostratum, an annual, self-compatible plant that has been introduced around the globe. This study is the first to compare the genetic diversity of Solanum rostratum between native and introduced populations. We aim to (1) determine the level of genetic diversity across the studied regions; (2) explore the likely origins of invasive populations in China; and (3) investigate whether there is the evidence of multiple introductions into China. Methods We genotyped 329 individuals at 10 microsatellite loci to determine the levels of genetic diversity and to investigate population structure of native and introduced populations of S. rostratum. We studied five populations in each of three regions across two continents: Mexico, the U.S.A. and China. Important Findings We found the highest genetic diversity among Mexican populations of S. rostratum. Genetic diversity was significantly lower in Chinese and U.S.A. populations, but we found no regional difference in inbreeding coefficients (FIS) or population differentiation (FST). Population structure analyses indicate that Chinese and U.S.A. populations are more closely related to each other than to sampled Mexican populations, revealing that introduced populations in China share an origin with the sampled U.S.A. populations. The distinctiveness between some introduced populations indicates multiple introductions of S. rostratum into China. PMID:24224008

  12. Genetic structure of Tribolium castaneum (Coleptera: Tenebrionidae) populations in mills

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is primarily found associated with human structures such as wheat and rice mills, which are spatially isolated resource patches with apparently limited immigration that could produce genetically structured populations. We investigated genetic diversity and...

  13. Modeling 3D soil and sediment distributions for assessing catchment structure and hydrological feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Thomas; Brück, Yasemine; Hinz, Christoph; Gerke, Horst H.

    2015-04-01

    . The established initial sediment distributions provide a basis for the consecutive modelling of feedbacks between surface and subsurface water flow and changes in soil properties, e.g. by using a landscape evolution model. The results should allow conclusions about the effect of different initial structural setups on the further dynamic landscape development at catchment scale.

  14. Population structure and genetic diversity of moose in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer I; Hundertmark, Kris J; Bowyer, R Terry; McCracken, Kevin G

    2009-01-01

    Moose (Alces alces) are highly mobile mammals that occur across arboreal regions of North America, Europe, and Asia. Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) range across much of Alaska and are primary herbivore consumers, exerting a prominent influence on ecosystem structure and functioning. Increased knowledge gained from population genetics provides insights into their population dynamics, history, and dispersal of these unique large herbivores and can aid in conservation efforts. We examined the genetic diversity and population structure of moose (n = 141) with 8 polymorphic microsatellites from 6 regions spanning much of Alaska. Expected heterozygosity was moderate (H(E) = 0.483-0.612), and private alleles ranged from 0 to 6. Both F(ST) and R(ST) indicated significant population structure (P < 0.001) with F(ST) < 0.109 and R(ST) < 0.125. Results of analyses from STRUCTURE indicated 2 prominent population groups, a mix of moose from the Yakutat and Tetlin regions versus all other moose, with slight substructure observed among the second population. Estimates of dispersal differed between analytical approaches, indicating a high level of historical or current gene flow. Mantel tests indicated that isolation-by-distance partially explained observed structure among moose populations (R(2) = 0.45, P < 0.01). Finally, there was no evidence of bottlenecks either at the population level or overall. We conclude that weak population structure occurs among moose in Alaska with population expansion from interior Alaska westward toward the coast. PMID:18836148

  15. Physical properties of simulated galaxy populations at z = 2 - I. Effect of metal-line cooling and feedback from star formation and AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Marcel R.; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C. M.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Springel, Volker; Theuns, Tom; Wiersma, Robert P. C.

    2013-11-01

    We use hydrodynamical simulations from the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project to investigate the dependence of the physical properties of galaxy populations at redshift 2 on metal-line cooling and feedback from star formation and active galactic nuclei (AGN). We find that if the sub-grid feedback from star formation is implemented kinetically, the feedback is only efficient if the initial wind velocity exceeds a critical value. This critical velocity increases with galaxy mass and also if metal-line cooling is included. This suggests that radiative losses quench the winds if their initial velocity is too low. If the feedback is efficient, then the star formation rate is inversely proportional to the amount of energy injected per unit stellar mass formed (which is proportional to the initial mass loading for a fixed wind velocity). This can be understood if the star formation is self-regulating, i.e. if the star formation rate (and thus the gas fraction) increases until the outflow rate balances the inflow rate. Feedback from AGN is efficient at high masses, while increasing the initial wind velocity with gas pressure or halo mass allows one to generate galaxy-wide outflows at all masses. Matching the observed galaxy mass function requires efficient feedback. In particular, the predicted faint-end slope is too steep unless we resort to highly mass loaded winds for low-mass objects. Such efficient feedback from low-mass galaxies (M* ≪ 1010 M⊙) also reduces the discrepancy with the observed specific star formation rates, which are higher than predicted unless the feedback transitions from highly efficient to inefficient just below M* ˜ 5 × 109 M⊙.

  16. Structural Basis for Feedback and Pharmacological Inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2010-04-30

    Structural characterization of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), the enzyme that catalyzes the initial, rate-limiting step in glutathione biosynthesis, has revealed many of the molecular details of substrate recognition. To further delineate the mechanistic details of this critical enzyme, we have determined the structures of two inhibited forms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCL (ScGCL), which shares significant sequence identity with the human enzyme. In vivo, GCL activity is feedback regulated by glutathione. Examination of the structure of ScGCL-glutathione complex (2.5 A; R = 19.9%, R(free) = 25.1%) indicates that the inhibitor occupies both the glutamate- and the presumed cysteine-binding site and disrupts the previously observed Mg(2+) coordination in the ATP-binding site. l-Buthionine-S-sulfoximine (BSO) is a mechanism-based inhibitor of GCL and has been used extensively to deplete glutathione in cell culture and in vivo model systems. Inspection of the ScGCL-BSO structure (2.2 A; R = 18.1%, R(free) = 23.9%) confirms that BSO is phosphorylated on the sulfoximine nitrogen to generate the inhibitory species and reveals contacts that likely contribute to transition state stabilization. Overall, these structures advance our understanding of the molecular regulation of this critical enzyme and provide additional details of the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme.

  17. The impact of population structure on genomic prediction in stratified populations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhigang; Tucker, Dominic M; Basten, Christopher J; Gandhi, Harish; Ersoz, Elhan; Guo, Baohong; Xu, Zhanyou; Wang, Daolong; Gay, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    Impacts of population structure on the evaluation of genomic heritability and prediction were investigated and quantified using high-density markers in diverse panels in rice and maize. Population structure is an important factor affecting estimation of genomic heritability and assessment of genomic prediction in stratified populations. In this study, our first objective was to assess effects of population structure on estimations of genomic heritability using the diversity panels in rice and maize. Results indicate population structure explained 33 and 7.5% of genomic heritability for rice and maize, respectively, depending on traits, with the remaining heritability explained by within-subpopulation variation. Estimates of within-subpopulation heritability were higher than that derived from quantitative trait loci identified in genome-wide association studies, suggesting 65% improvement in genetic gains. The second objective was to evaluate effects of population structure on genomic prediction using cross-validation experiments. When population structure exists in both training and validation sets, correcting for population structure led to a significant decrease in accuracy with genomic prediction. In contrast, when prediction was limited to a specific subpopulation, population structure showed little effect on accuracy and within-subpopulation genetic variance dominated predictions. Finally, effects of genomic heritability on genomic prediction were investigated. Accuracies with genomic prediction increased with genomic heritability in both training and validation sets, with the former showing a slightly greater impact. In summary, our results suggest that the population structure contribution to genomic prediction varies based on prediction strategies, and is also affected by the genetic architectures of traits and populations. In practical breeding, these conclusions may be helpful to better understand and utilize the different genetic resources in genomic

  18. Comparison of Active Noise Control Structures in the Presence of Acoustical Feedback by Using THEH∞SYNTHESIS Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, M. R.; Lin, H. H.

    1997-10-01

    This study compares three control structures of active noise cancellation for ducts: feedback control, feedforward control, and hybrid control. These structures are compared in terms of performance, stability, and robustness by using a general framework of theH∞robust control theory. In addition, theH∞synthesis procedure automatically incorporates the acoustic feedback path that is usually a plaguing problem to feedforward control design. The controllers are implemented by using a digital signal processor and tested on a finite-length duct. In an experimental verification, the proposed controllers are also compared with the well-known filtered-uleast mean square (FULMS) controller. The advantages and disadvantages of each ANC structure as well as the adverse effects due to acoustic feedback are addressed.

  19. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions. PMID:26986362

  20. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions.

  1. A feedback mechanism converts individual cell features into a supracellular ECM structure in Drosophila trachea

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk-Çolak, Arzu; Moussian, Bernard; Araújo, Sofia J; Casanova, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM), a structure contributed to and commonly shared by many cells in an organism, plays an active role during morphogenesis. Here, we used the Drosophila tracheal system to study the complex relationship between the ECM and epithelial cells during development. We show that there is an active feedback mechanism between the apical ECM (aECM) and the apical F-actin in tracheal cells. Furthermore, we reveal that cell-cell junctions are key players in this aECM patterning and organisation and that individual cells contribute autonomously to their aECM. Strikingly, changes in the aECM influence the levels of phosphorylated Src42A (pSrc) at cell junctions. Therefore, we propose that Src42A phosphorylation levels provide a link for the ECM environment to ensure proper cytoskeletal organisation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09373.001 PMID:26836303

  2. Distributed feedback fiber laser acoustic emission sensor for concrete structure health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Gengjie; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Sun, Baochen; Li, Fang

    2014-05-01

    This paper introduces a highly-sensitive fiber optical acoustic emission (AE) sensor and a parameter analysis method aiming at concrete structure health monitoring. Distributed feedback fiber-laser (DFB-FL), which is encapsulated to have a high acoustic sensitivity, is used for sensor unit of the AE sensor. The AE signal of concrete beam in different work stages, based on the four-point bending experiment of the concrete beam, is picked up, and the relationship between the concrete beam work stages and the AE parameter is found. The results indicate that DFB-FLAES can be used as sensitive transducers for recording acoustic events and forecasting the imminent failure of the concrete beam.

  3. Modeling laser-induced periodic surface structures: Finite-difference time-domain feedback simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Skolski, J. Z. P. Vincenc Obona, J.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Huis in 't Veld, A. J.

    2014-03-14

    A model predicting the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) is presented. That is, the finite-difference time domain method is used to study the interaction of electromagnetic fields with rough surfaces. In this approach, the rough surface is modified by “ablation after each laser pulse,” according to the absorbed energy profile, in order to account for inter-pulse feedback mechanisms. LIPSSs with a periodicity significantly smaller than the laser wavelength are found to “grow” either parallel or orthogonal to the laser polarization. The change in orientation and periodicity follow from the model. LIPSSs with a periodicity larger than the wavelength of the laser radiation and complex superimposed LIPSS patterns are also predicted by the model.

  4. Solid-state wideband GaN HEMT power amplifier with a novel negative feedback structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiqun, Cheng; Minshi, Jia; Ya, Luan; Xinxiang, Lian

    2014-12-01

    The design and fabrication of an ultra-broadband power amplifier based on a GaN HEMT, which operates in the frequency range from 3 to 8 GHz, is presented in this paper. A TGF2023-02 GaN HEMT chip from TriQuint is adopted and modeled. A novel negative feedback structure is applied in the circuit. The measured results show that the amplifier module has a wide range frequency response that is almost consistent with those of simulation at frequencies from 3 to 6.5 GHz. The measured power gain is greater than 7 dB between 3 and 6.5 GHz. The saturated output power is 38.5 dBm under DC bias of Vds = 28 V, Vgs = -3.5 V at the frequency of 5.5 GHz.

  5. Consensus positive position feedback control for vibration attenuation of smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Ehsan; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new network-based approach for active vibration control in smart structures. In this approach, a network with known topology connects collocated actuator/sensor elements of the smart structure to one another. Each of these actuators/sensors, i.e., agent or node, is enhanced by a separate multi-mode positive position feedback (PPF) controller. The decentralized PPF controlled agents collaborate with each other in the designed network, under a certain consensus dynamics. The consensus constraint forces neighboring agents to cooperate with each other such that the disagreement between the time-domain actuation of the agents is driven to zero. The controller output of each agent is calculated using state-space variables; hence, optimal state estimators are designed first for the proposed observer-based consensus PPF control. The consensus controller is numerically investigated for a flexible smart structure, i.e., a thin aluminum beam that is clamped at its both ends. Results demonstrate that the consensus law successfully imposes synchronization between the independently controlled agents, as the disagreements between the decentralized PPF controller variables converge to zero in a short time. The new consensus PPF controller brings extra robustness to vibration suppression in smart structures, where malfunctions of an agent can be compensated for by referencing the neighboring agents’ performance. This is demonstrated in the results by comparing the new controller with former centralized PPF approach.

  6. Structure of a Diguanylate Cyclase from Thermotoga maritima: Insights into Activation, Feedback Inhibition and Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, Angeline; Liew, Chong Wai; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Lescar, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale production of bis-3′-5′-cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) would facilitate biological studies of numerous bacterial signaling pathways and phenotypes controlled by this second messenger molecule, such as virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP constitutes also a potentially interesting molecule as a vaccine adjuvant. Even though chemical synthesis of c-di-GMP can be done, the yields are incompatible with mass-production. tDGC, a stand-alone diguanylate cyclase (DGC or GGDEF domain) from Thermotoga maritima, enables the robust enzymatic production of large quantities of c-di-GMP. To understand the structural correlates of tDGC thermostability, its catalytic mechanism and feedback inhibition, we determined structures of an active-like dimeric conformation with both active (A) sites facing each other and of an inactive dimeric conformation, locked by c-di-GMP bound at the inhibitory (I) site. We also report the structure of a single mutant of tDGC, with the R158A mutation at the I-site, abolishing product inhibition and unproductive dimerization. A comparison with structurally characterized DGC homologues from mesophiles reveals the presence of a higher number of salt bridges in the hyperthermophile enzyme tDGC. Denaturation experiments of mutants disrupting in turn each of the salt bridges unique to tDGC identified three salt-bridges critical to confer thermostability. PMID:25360685

  7. [Marriage structure of Yakut populations: migrations].

    PubMed

    Kucher, A I; Danilova, A L; Koneva, L A; Nogovitsina, A N

    2010-05-01

    Rural and urban settlements of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) are characterized by intense marriage migrations: both indigenous residents of different uluses (districts) of the republic (7-30%) and migrants from outside Yakutia (7-29%) contract marriages in five administrative centers analyzed in this respect. All the populations studied are characterized by a wide geographic range of the birthplaces of persons contracted marriages there (from 14 to 24 uluses of Yakutia), without any predominant migration flow from one district to another. The proportion of homolocal marriages among indigenous ethnic groups (Evenks, Evens, and Yukagirs) is as high as 75-100%; this proportion among Yakuts varies from 26 to 68%; heterolocal marriages are more characteristic of Russian immigrants (41-95%). Positive assortative marriages among persons with the same birthplaces have been found in all populations except for Momsky ulus. PMID:20583606

  8. Selection of Cooperation in Spatially Structured Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyunmo; Ghim, Cheol-Min

    The social dilemma games give rise to an emergence of cooperation in which altruistic individuals survive the natural selection at higher rate than random chance. We try to extend our understanding of this spatial reciprocity by including the impact of degree-degree correlation on the propensity toward prosocial behaviour in an otherwise well-mixed population. In a stochastic death-birth process with weak selection, we find that the disassortative degree mixing, or negative correlation between the degrees of neighbouring nodes significantly promotes the fixation of cooperators whereas the assortative mixing acts to suppress it. This is consistent with the fact that the spatial heterogeneity weakens the average tendency of a population to cooperate, which we describe in a unified scheme of the effective isothermality in coarse-grained networks. We also discuss the individual-level incentives that indirectly foster restructuring the social networks toward the more cooperative topologies.

  9. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of Arabian horse populations.

    PubMed

    Khanshour, Anas; Conant, Eleanore; Juras, Rytis; Cothran, Ernest Gus

    2013-01-01

    The Arabian horse ignites imagination throughout the world. Populations of this breed exist in many countries, and recent genetic work has examined the diversity and ancestry of a few of these populations in isolation. Here, we explore 7 different populations of Arabians represented by 682 horses. Three of these are Middle Eastern populations from near the historical origin of the breed, including Syrian, Persian, and Saudi Arabian. The remaining Western populations are found in Europe (the Shagya Arabian and Polish Arabian) and in America (American Arabian). Analysis of genetic structure was carried out using 15 microsatellite loci. Genetic distances, analysis of molecular variance, factorial correspondence analysis, and a Bayesian method were applied. The results consistently show higher level of diversity within the Middle Eastern populations than the Western populations. The Western Arabian populations were the main source among population variation. Genetic differentiation was not strong among all Middle Eastern populations, but all American Arabians showed differentiation from Middle Eastern populations and were somewhat uniform among themselves. Here, we explore the diversities of many different populations of Arabian horses and find that populations not from the Middle East have noticeably lower levels of diversity, which may adversely affect the health of these populations. PMID:23450090

  10. The population genomics of begomoviruses: global scale population structure and gene flow

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The rapidly growing availability of diverse full genome sequences from across the world is increasing the feasibility of studying the large-scale population processes that underly observable pattern of virus diversity. In particular, characterizing the genetic structure of virus populations could potentially reveal much about how factors such as geographical distributions, host ranges and gene flow between populations combine to produce the discontinuous patterns of genetic diversity that we perceive as distinct virus species. Among the richest and most diverse full genome datasets that are available is that for the dicotyledonous plant infecting genus, Begomovirus, in the Family Geminiviridae. The begomoviruses all share the same whitefly vector, are highly recombinogenic and are distributed throughout tropical and subtropical regions where they seriously threaten the food security of the world's poorest people. Results We focus here on using a model-based population genetic approach to identify the genetically distinct sub-populations within the global begomovirus meta-population. We demonstrate the existence of at least seven major sub-populations that can further be sub-divided into as many as thirty four significantly differentiated and genetically cohesive minor sub-populations. Using the population structure framework revealed in the present study, we further explored the extent of gene flow and recombination between genetic populations. Conclusions Although geographical barriers are apparently the most significant underlying cause of the seven major population sub-divisions, within the framework of these sub-divisions, we explore patterns of gene flow to reveal that both host range differences and genetic barriers to recombination have probably been major contributors to the minor population sub-divisions that we have identified. We believe that the global Begomovirus population structure revealed here could facilitate population genetics studies

  11. Population structure of three Psammodromus species in the Iberian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Fitze, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of a species’ population structure is essential for the development of adequate conservation actions as well as for the understanding of its evolution. The population structure is unknown in all species of the Genus Psammodromus, including the Western Sand Racer (Psammodromus occidentalis; a recently described species), the Edward’s Sand Racer (P. edwardsianus) and the Spanish Sand Racer (P. hispanicus). In this article, the genetic variability and population structure of Psammodromus edwardsianus, P. hispanicus, and P. occidentalis were studied in the Iberian Peninsula covering their natural geographic distribution. Mitochondrial DNA showed genetically different units in all species with higher genetic variability in their southern populations (latitudinal variation). Genetic differentiation was different among species and contrasted to those of species with similar characteristics. Our results therefore highlight the importance of species-specific studies analysing population structure. PMID:26056622

  12. Population genetic structure of traditional populations in the Peruvian Central Andes and implications for South American population history.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Graciela S; Lewis, Cecil M; Tito, Raúl Y; Covey, R Alan; Cáceres, Angela M; Cruz, Augusto F De La; Durand, Diana; Housman, Genevieve; Hulsey, Brannon I; Iannacone, Gian Carlo; López, Paul W; Martínez, Rolando; Medina, Ángel; Dávila, Olimpio Ortega; Pinto, Karla Paloma Osorio; Santillán, Susan I Polo; Domínguez, Percy Rojas; Rubel, Meagan; Smith, Heather F; Smith, Silvia E; Massa, Verónica Rubín de Celis; Lizárraga, Beatriz; Stone, Anne C

    2014-01-01

    Molecular-based characterizations of Andean peoples are traditionally conducted in the service of elucidating continent-level evolutionary processes in South America. Consequently, genetic variation among "western" Andean populations is often represented in relation to variation among "eastern" Amazon and Orinoco River Basin populations. This west-east contrast in patterns of population genetic variation is typically attributed to large-scale phenomena, such as dual founder colonization events or differing long-term microevolutionary histories. However, alternative explanations that consider the nature and causes of population genetic diversity within the Andean region remain underexplored. Here we examine population genetic diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes using data from the mtDNA first hypervariable region and Y-chromosome short tandem repeats among 17 newly sampled populations and 15 published samples. Using this geographically comprehensive data set, we first reassessed the currently accepted pattern of western versus eastern population genetic structure, which our results ultimately reject: mtDNA population diversities were lower, rather than higher, within Andean versus eastern populations, and only highland Y-chromosomes exhibited significantly higher within-population diversities compared with eastern groups. Multiple populations, including several highland samples, exhibited low genetic diversities for both genetic systems. Second, we explored whether the implementation of Inca state and Spanish colonial policies starting at about ad 1400 could have substantially restructured population genetic variation and consequently constitute a primary explanation for the extant pattern of population diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes. Our results suggest that Peruvian Central Andean population structure cannot be parsimoniously explained as the sole outcome of combined Inca and Spanish policies on the region's population demography: highland populations

  13. Host genetics and population structure effects on parasitic disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Criscione, Charles D.; VandeBerg, John L.; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Williams, Kimberly D.; Subedi, Janardan; Kent, Jack W.; Williams, Jeff; Kumar, Satish; Blangero, John

    2012-01-01

    Host genetic factors exert significant influences on differential susceptibility to many infectious diseases. In addition, population structure of both host and parasite may influence disease distribution patterns. In this study, we assess the effects of population structure on infectious disease in two populations in which host genetic factors influencing susceptibility to parasitic disease have been extensively studied. The first population is the Jirel population of eastern Nepal that has been the subject of research on the determinants of differential susceptibility to soil-transmitted helminth infections. The second group is a Brazilian population residing in an area endemic for Trypanosoma cruzi infection that has been assessed for genetic influences on differential disease progression in Chagas disease. For measures of Ascaris worm burden, within-population host genetic effects are generally more important than host population structure factors in determining patterns of infectious disease. No significant influences of population structure on measures associated with progression of cardiac disease in individuals who were seropositive for T. cruzi infection were found. PMID:22312056

  14. Population Genetic Structure of Aedes fluviatilis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Multini, Laura Cristina; Wilke, André Barretto Bruno; Suesdek, Lincoln; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2016-01-01

    Although Aedes fluviatilis is an anthropophilic mosquito found abundantly in urban environments, its biology, epidemiological potential and genetic characteristics are poorly understood. Climate change and urbanization processes that result in environmental modifications benefit certain anthropophilic mosquito species such as Ae. fluviatilis, greatly increasing their abundance in urban areas. To gain a better understanding of whether urbanization processes modulate the genetic structure of this species in the city of São Paulo, we used eight microsatellite loci to genetically characterize Ae. fluviatilis populations collected in nine urban parks in the city of São Paulo. Our results show that there is high gene flow among the populations of this species, heterozygosity deficiency and low genetic structure and that the species may have undergone a recent population expansion. There are two main hypotheses to explain these findings: (i) Ae. fluviatilis populations have undergone a population expansion as a result of urbanization; and (ii) as urbanization of the city of São Paulo occurred recently and was quite intense, the structuring of these populations cannot be observed yet, apart from in the populations of Ibirapuera and Piqueri parks, where the first signs of structuring have appeared. We believe that the expansion found in Ae. fluviatilis populations is probably correlated with the unplanned urbanization of the city of São Paulo, which transformed green areas into urbanized areas, as well as the increasing population density in the city. PMID:27598889

  15. How population structure shapes neighborhood segregation.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Elizabeth E

    2014-03-01

    This study provides a framework for understanding how population composition conditions the relationship between individuals' choices about group affiliation and aggregate patterns of social separation or integration. The substantive focus is the role of income inequality in racial residential segregation. The author identifies three population parameters--between-group inequality, within-group inequality, and relative group size--that determine how income inequality between race groups affects racial segregation. She uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to estimate models of individual-level residential mobility and incorporates these estimates into agent-based models. She then simulates segregation dynamics under alternative assumptions about (1) the relative size of minority groups and (2) the degree of correlation between race and income among individuals. The author finds that income inequality can have offsetting effects at the high and low ends of the income distribution. She demonstrates the empirical relevance of the simulation results using fixed-effects, metro-level regressions applied to 1980-2000 U.S. census data. PMID:25009360

  16. Determining population structure and hybridization for two iris species

    PubMed Central

    Hamlin, Jennafer A P; Arnold, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Identifying processes that promote or limit gene flow can help define the ecological and evolutionary history of a species. Furthermore, defining those factors that make up “species boundaries” can provide a definition of the independent evolutionary trajectories of related taxa. For many species, the historic processes that account for their distribution of genetic variation remain unresolved. In this study, we examine the geographic distribution of genetic diversity for two species of Louisiana Irises, Iris brevicaulis and Iris fulva. Specifically, we asked how populations are structured and if population structure coincides with potential barriers to gene flow. We also asked whether there is evidence of hybridization between these two species outside Louisiana hybrid zones. We used a genotyping-by-sequencing approach and sampled a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms across these species' genomes. Two different population assignment methods were used to resolve population structure in I. brevicaulis; however, there was considerably less population structure in I. fulva. We used a species tree approach to infer phylogenies both within and between populations and species. For I. brevicaulis, the geography of the collection locality was reflected in the phylogeny. The I. fulva phylogeny reflected much less structure than detected for I. brevicaulis. Lastly, combining both species into a phylogenetic analysis resolved two of six populations of I. brevicaulis that shared alleles with I. fulva. Taken together, our results suggest major differences in the level and pattern of connectivity among populations of these two Louisiana Iris species. PMID:24683457

  17. Isonymy and the genetic structure of Albanian populations.

    PubMed

    Mikerezi, Ilia; Pizzetti, Paola; Lucchetti, Enzo; Ekonomi, Milva

    2003-12-01

    It is well known that in systems of surname transmission through the paternal line, surnames simulate neutral gene alleles belonging to the Y chromosome. This property of surnames was used to analyze the genetic structure of Albanian populations. Two large samples of surnames belonging to two different periods of time were analyzed. The analysis of indicators of population structure showed that geographical distance has an important effect on surname distribution. It seems that isolation by distance and genetic drift have been still important factors in the determination of the genetic structure of the Albanian population. PMID:14746137

  18. Disentangling the effects of feedback structure and climate on Poaceae annual airborne pollen fluctuations and the possible consequences of climate change.

    PubMed

    García de León, David; García-Mozo, Herminia; Galán, Carmen; Alcázar, Purificación; Lima, Mauricio; González-Andújar, José L

    2015-10-15

    Pollen allergies are the most common form of respiratory allergic disease in Europe. Most studies have emphasized the role of environmental processes, as the drivers of airborne pollen fluctuations, implicitly considering pollen production as a random walk. This work shows that internal self-regulating processes of the plants (negative feedback) should be included in pollen dynamic systems in order to give a better explanation of the observed pollen temporal patterns. This article proposes a novel methodological approach based on dynamic systems to investigate the interaction between feedback structure of plant populations and climate in shaping long-term airborne Poaceae pollen fluctuations and to quantify the effects of climate change on future airborne pollen concentrations. Long-term historical airborne Poaceae pollen data (30 years) from Cordoba city (Southern Spain) were analyzed. A set of models, combining feedback structure, temperature and actual evapotranspiration effects on airborne Poaceae pollen were built and compared, using a model selection approach. Our results highlight the importance of first-order negative feedback and mean annual maximum temperature in driving airborne Poaceae pollen dynamics. The best model was used to predict the effects of climate change under two standardized scenarios representing contrasting temporal patterns of economic development and CO2 emissions. Our results predict an increase in pollen levels in southern Spain by 2070 ranging from 28.5% to 44.3%. The findings from this study provide a greater understanding of airborne pollen dynamics and how climate change might impact the future evolution of airborne Poaceae pollen concentrations and thus the future evolution of related pollen allergies. PMID:26026414

  19. Evolution of extortion in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-02-01

    Extortion strategies can dominate any opponent in an iterated prisoner's dilemma game. But if players are able to adopt the strategies performing better, extortion becomes widespread and evolutionary unstable. It may sometimes act as a catalyst for the evolution of cooperation, and it can also emerge in interactions between two populations, yet it is not the evolutionarily stable outcome. Here we revisit these results in the realm of spatial games. We find that pairwise imitation and birth-death dynamics return known evolutionary outcomes. Myopic best response strategy updating, on the other hand, reveals counterintuitive solutions. Defectors and extortioners coarsen spontaneously, which allows cooperators to prevail even at prohibitively high temptations to defect. Here extortion strategies play the role of a Trojan horse. They may emerge among defectors by chance, and once they do, cooperators become viable as well. These results are independent of the interaction topology, and they highlight the importance of coarsening, checkerboard ordering, and best response updating in evolutionary games.

  20. Population Size, Structural Differentiation, and Human Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadalla, Edward K.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews evidence which indicates that the sheer size of an urban center has important social and psychological consequences. Available literature suggests that size combined with structural differentiation is related to psychological and behavioral variables such as anomymity, deindividuation, deviance, personality development, and…

  1. Human population structure detection via multilocus genotype clustering

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoyi; Starmer, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Background We describe a hierarchical clustering algorithm for using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) genetic data to assign individuals to populations. The method does not assume Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage equilibrium among loci in sample population individuals. Results We show that the algorithm can assign sample individuals highly accurately to their corresponding ethnic groups in our tests using HapMap SNP data and it is also robust to admixed populations when tested with Perlegen SNP data. Moreover, it can detect fine-scale population structure as subtle as that between Chinese and Japanese by using genome-wide high-diversity SNP loci. Conclusion The algorithm provides an alternative approach to the popular STRUCTURE program, especially for fine-scale population structure detection in genome-wide association studies. This is the first successful separation of Chinese and Japanese samples using random SNP loci with high statistical support. PMID:17592628

  2. Linkage disequilibrium and population structure in wild and domesticated populations of Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Monica; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Nanni, Laura; Rau, Domenico; Attene, Giovanna; Papa, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Together with the knowledge of the population structure, a critical aspect for the planning of association and/or population genomics studies is the level of linkage disequilibrium (LD) that characterizes the species and the population used for such an analysis. We have analyzed the population structure and LD in wild and domesticated populations of Phaseolus vulgaris L. using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, most of which were genetically mapped in two recombinant inbred populations. Our results reflect the previous knowledge of the occurrence of two major wild gene pools of P. vulgaris, from which two independent domestication events originated, one in the Andes and one in Mesoamerica. The high level of LD in the whole sample was mostly due to the gene pool structure, with a much higher LD in domesticated compared to wild populations. In relation to association studies, our results also suggest that whole-genome-scan approaches are feasible in the common bean. Interestingly, an excess of inter-chromosomal LD was found in the domesticated populations, which suggests an important role for epistatic selection during domestication. Moreover, our results indicate the occurrence of a strong bottleneck in the Andean wild population before domestication, suggesting a Mesoamerican origin of P. vulgaris. Finally, our data support the occurrence of a single domestication event in Mesoamerica, and the same scenario in the Andes. PMID:25567895

  3. Parametric optimal bounded feedback control for smart parameter-controllable composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Z. G.; Ni, Y. Q.; Duan, Y. F.

    2015-03-01

    Deterministic and stochastic parametric optimal bounded control problems are presented for smart composite structures such as magneto-rheological visco-elastomer based sandwich beam with controllable bounded parameters subjected to initial disturbances and stochastic excitations. The parametric controls by actively adjusting system parameters differ from the conventional additive controls by systemic external inputs. The dynamical programming equations for the optimal parametric controls are derived based on the deterministic and stochastic dynamical programming principles. The optimal bounded functions of controls are firstly obtained from the equations with the bounded control constraints based on the bang-bang control strategy. Then the optimal bounded parametric control laws are obtained by the inversion of the nonlinear functions. The stability of the optimally controlled systems is proved according to the Lyapunov method. Finally, the proposed optimal bounded parametric feedback control strategy is applied to single-degree-of-freedom and two-degree-of-freedom dynamic systems with nonlinear parametric bounded control terms under initial disturbances and earthquake excitations and then to a magneto-rheological visco-elastomer based sandwich beam system with nonlinear parametric bounded control terms under stochastic excitations. The effective vibration suppression is illustrated with numerical results. The proposed optimal parametric control strategy is applicable to other smart composite structures with nonlinear controllable parameters.

  4. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  5. When Are Two Heads Worse than One? The Effect of Feedback and Structured Learning Groups on Confidence Calibrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCount, Judith; Fox, Paul W.

    Students' confidence calibrations on quizzes taken individually and again in structured learning groups were examined. Under conditions of weekly feedback on accuracy and confidence, students working as individuals and in groups were hypothesized to improve not only their accuracy, but also their calibration of confidence. Findings were based on…

  6. Social and population structure in the ant Cataglyphis emmae.

    PubMed

    Jowers, Michael J; Leniaud, Laurianne; Cerdá, Xim; Alasaad, Samer; Caut, Stephane; Amor, Fernando; Aron, Serge; Boulay, Raphaël R

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal has consequences not only for individual fitness, but also for population dynamics, population genetics and species distribution. Social Hymenoptera show two contrasting colony reproductive strategies, dependent and independent colony foundation modes, and these are often associated to the population structures derived from inter and intra-population gene flow processes conditioned by alternative dispersal strategies. Here we employ microsatellite and mitochondrial markers to investigate the population and social genetic structure and dispersal patterns in the ant Cataglyphis emmae at both, local and regional scales. We find that C. emmae is monogynous and polyandrous. Lack of detection of any population viscosity and population structure with nuclear markers at the local scale suggests efficient dispersal, in agreement with a lack of inbreeding. Contrasting demographic differences before and during the mating seasons suggest that C. emmae workers raise sexuals in peripheric nest chambers to reduce intracolonial conflicts. The high genetic differentiation recovered from the mtDNA haplotypes, together with the significant correlation of such to geographic distance, and presence of new nuclear alleles between areas (valleys) suggest long-term historical isolation between these regions, indicative of limited dispersal at the regional scale. Our findings on the ecological, social and population structure of this species increases our understanding of the patterns and processes involved under independent colony foundation. PMID:24039827

  7. Social and Population Structure in the Ant Cataglyphis emmae

    PubMed Central

    Jowers, Michael J.; Leniaud, Laurianne; Cerdá, Xim; Alasaad, Samer; Caut, Stephane; Amor, Fernando; Aron, Serge; Boulay, Raphaël R.

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal has consequences not only for individual fitness, but also for population dynamics, population genetics and species distribution. Social Hymenoptera show two contrasting colony reproductive strategies, dependent and independent colony foundation modes, and these are often associated to the population structures derived from inter and intra-population gene flow processes conditioned by alternative dispersal strategies. Here we employ microsatellite and mitochondrial markers to investigate the population and social genetic structure and dispersal patterns in the ant Cataglyphis emmae at both, local and regional scales. We find that C. emmae is monogynous and polyandrous. Lack of detection of any population viscosity and population structure with nuclear markers at the local scale suggests efficient dispersal, in agreement with a lack of inbreeding. Contrasting demographic differences before and during the mating seasons suggest that C. emmae workers raise sexuals in peripheric nest chambers to reduce intracolonial conflicts. The high genetic differentiation recovered from the mtDNA haplotypes, together with the significant correlation of such to geographic distance, and presence of new nuclear alleles between areas (valleys) suggest long-term historical isolation between these regions, indicative of limited dispersal at the regional scale. Our findings on the ecological, social and population structure of this species increases our understanding of the patterns and processes involved under independent colony foundation. PMID:24039827

  8. Host resistance reflected in differential nematode population structures.

    PubMed

    Viglierchio, D R; Croll, N A

    1968-07-19

    Relative efficiency of host plants to support reproduction of the garlic race of Ditylenchus dipsaci can be partially explained by diflerential population structures. If axenic cultures of callus tissue from onion, white clover, red clover, and alfalfa are arranged in order of decreasing host suitability, the nematode populations are simultaneously arranged in order of increasing maleness. PMID:5657331

  9. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  10. Auditory Feedback in Music Performance: The Role of Melodic Structure and Musical Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.

    2005-01-01

    Five experiments explored whether fluency in musical sequence production relies on matches between the contents of auditory feedback and the planned outcomes of actions. Participants performed short melodies from memory on a keyboard while musical pitches that sounded in synchrony with each keypress (feedback contents) were altered. Results…

  11. Earthworm ecology affects the population structure of their Verminephrobacter symbionts.

    PubMed

    Viana, Flávia; Jensen, Christopher Erik; Macey, Michael; Schramm, Andreas; Lund, Marie Braad

    2016-05-01

    Earthworms carry species-specific Verminephrobacter symbionts in their nephridia (excretory organs). The symbionts are vertically transmitted via the cocoon, can only colonize the host during early embryonic development, and have co-speciated with their host for about 100 million years. Although several studies have addressed Verminephrobacter diversity between worm species, the intra-species diversity of the symbiont population has never been investigated. In this study, symbiont population structure was examined by using a multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) approach on Verminephrobacter isolated from two contrasting ecological types of earthworm hosts: the high population density, fast reproducing compost worms, Eisenia andrei and Eisenia fetida, and the low-density, slow reproducing Aporrectodea tuberculata, commonly found in garden soils. Three distinct populations were investigated for both types and, according to MLST analysis of 193 Verminephrobacter isolates, the symbiont community in each worm individual was very homogeneous. The more solitary A. tuberculata carried unique symbiont populations in 9 out of 10 host individuals, whereas the symbiont populations in the social compost worms were homogeneous across host individuals from the same population. These data suggested that host ecology shaped the population structure of Verminephrobacter symbionts. The homogeneous symbiont populations in the compost worms led to the hypothesis that Verminephrobacter could be transferred bi-parentally or via leaky horizontal transmission in high-density, frequently mating worm populations. PMID:27040820

  12. Genetic Variation and Population Structure in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sohini; Ray, Nicolas; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rojas, Winston; Parra, Maria V; Molina, Julio A; Gallo, Carla; Mazzotti, Guido; Poletti, Giovanni; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, Ana M; Labuda, Damian; Klitz, William; Barrantes, Ramiro; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Tsuneto, Luiza T; Llop, Elena; Rothhammer, Francisco; Excoffier, Laurent; Feldman, Marcus W; Rosenberg, Noah A; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    We examined genetic diversity and population structure in the American landmass using 678 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 422 individuals representing 24 Native American populations sampled from North, Central, and South America. These data were analyzed jointly with similar data available in 54 other indigenous populations worldwide, including an additional five Native American groups. The Native American populations have lower genetic diversity and greater differentiation than populations from other continental regions. We observe gradients both of decreasing genetic diversity as a function of geographic distance from the Bering Strait and of decreasing genetic similarity to Siberians—signals of the southward dispersal of human populations from the northwestern tip of the Americas. We also observe evidence of: (1) a higher level of diversity and lower level of population structure in western South America compared to eastern South America, (2) a relative lack of differentiation between Mesoamerican and Andean populations, (3) a scenario in which coastal routes were easier for migrating peoples to traverse in comparison with inland routes, and (4) a partial agreement on a local scale between genetic similarity and the linguistic classification of populations. These findings offer new insights into the process of population dispersal and differentiation during the peopling of the Americas. PMID:18039031

  13. Genetic variation and population structure in native Americans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sijia; Lewis, Cecil M; Jakobsson, Mattias; Ramachandran, Sohini; Ray, Nicolas; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rojas, Winston; Parra, Maria V; Molina, Julio A; Gallo, Carla; Mazzotti, Guido; Poletti, Giovanni; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, Ana M; Labuda, Damian; Klitz, William; Barrantes, Ramiro; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Tsuneto, Luiza T; Llop, Elena; Rothhammer, Francisco; Excoffier, Laurent; Feldman, Marcus W; Rosenberg, Noah A; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2007-11-01

    We examined genetic diversity and population structure in the American landmass using 678 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 422 individuals representing 24 Native American populations sampled from North, Central, and South America. These data were analyzed jointly with similar data available in 54 other indigenous populations worldwide, including an additional five Native American groups. The Native American populations have lower genetic diversity and greater differentiation than populations from other continental regions. We observe gradients both of decreasing genetic diversity as a function of geographic distance from the Bering Strait and of decreasing genetic similarity to Siberians--signals of the southward dispersal of human populations from the northwestern tip of the Americas. We also observe evidence of: (1) a higher level of diversity and lower level of population structure in western South America compared to eastern South America, (2) a relative lack of differentiation between Mesoamerican and Andean populations, (3) a scenario in which coastal routes were easier for migrating peoples to traverse in comparison with inland routes, and (4) a partial agreement on a local scale between genetic similarity and the linguistic classification of populations. These findings offer new insights into the process of population dispersal and differentiation during the peopling of the Americas. PMID:18039031

  14. HOW POPULATION STRUCTURE SHAPES NEIGHBORHOOD SEGREGATION*

    PubMed Central

    Bruch, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how choices about social affiliation based on one attribute can exacerbate or attenuate segregation on another correlated attribute. The specific application is the role of racial and economic factors in generating patterns of racial residential segregation. I identify three population parameters—between-group inequality, within-group inequality, and relative group size—that determine how income inequality between race groups affects racial segregation. I use data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to estimate models of individual-level residential mobility, and incorporate these estimates into agent-based models. I then simulate segregation dynamics under alternative assumptions about: (1) the relative size of minority groups; and (2) the degree of correlation between race and income among individuals. I find that income inequality can have offsetting effects at the high and low ends of the income distribution. I demonstrate the empirical relevance of the simulation results using fixed-effects, metro-level regressions applied to 1980-2000 U.S. Census data. PMID:25009360

  15. Evolution of extortion in structured populations.

    PubMed

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-02-01

    Extortion strategies can dominate any opponent in an iterated prisoner's dilemma game. But if players are able to adopt the strategies performing better, extortion becomes widespread and evolutionary unstable. It may sometimes act as a catalyst for the evolution of cooperation, and it can also emerge in interactions between two populations, yet it is not the evolutionarily stable outcome. Here we revisit these results in the realm of spatial games. We find that pairwise imitation and birth-death dynamics return known evolutionary outcomes. Myopic best response strategy updating, on the other hand, reveals counterintuitive solutions. Defectors and extortioners coarsen spontaneously, which allows cooperators to prevail even at prohibitively high temptations to defect. Here extortion strategies play the role of a Trojan horse. They may emerge among defectors by chance, and once they do, cooperators become viable as well. These results are independent of the interaction topology, and they highlight the importance of coarsening, checkerboard ordering, and best response updating in evolutionary games. PMID:25353531

  16. Plasmodium vivax Diversity and Population Structure across Four Continents

    PubMed Central

    Koepfli, Cristian; Rodrigues, Priscila T.; Antao, Tiago; Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Van den Eede, Peter; Gamboa, Dionicia; van Hong, Nguyen; Bendezu, Jorge; Erhart, Annette; Barnadas, Céline; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Menard, Didier; Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela; Nour, Bakri Y. M.; Karunaweera, Nadira; Mueller, Ivo; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the geographically most widespread human malaria parasite. To analyze patterns of microsatellite diversity and population structure across countries of different transmission intensity, genotyping data from 11 microsatellite markers was either generated or compiled from 841 isolates from four continents collected in 1999–2008. Diversity was highest in South-East Asia (mean allelic richness 10.0–12.8), intermediate in the South Pacific (8.1–9.9) Madagascar and Sudan (7.9–8.4), and lowest in South America and Central Asia (5.5–7.2). A reduced panel of only 3 markers was sufficient to identify approx. 90% of all haplotypes in South Pacific, African and SE-Asian populations, but only 60–80% in Latin American populations, suggesting that typing of 2–6 markers, depending on the level of endemicity, is sufficient for epidemiological studies. Clustering analysis showed distinct clusters in Peru and Brazil, but little sub-structuring was observed within Africa, SE-Asia or the South Pacific. Isolates from Uzbekistan were exceptional, as a near-clonal parasite population was observed that was clearly separated from all other populations (FST>0.2). Outside Central Asia FST values were highest (0.11–0.16) between South American and all other populations, and lowest (0.04–0.07) between populations from South-East Asia and the South Pacific. These comparisons between P. vivax populations from four continents indicated that not only transmission intensity, but also geographical isolation affect diversity and population structure. However, the high effective population size results in slow changes of these parameters. This persistency must be taken into account when assessing the impact of control programs on the genetic structure of parasite populations. PMID:26125189

  17. Plasmodium vivax Diversity and Population Structure across Four Continents.

    PubMed

    Koepfli, Cristian; Rodrigues, Priscila T; Antao, Tiago; Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Van den Eede, Peter; Gamboa, Dionicia; van Hong, Nguyen; Bendezu, Jorge; Erhart, Annette; Barnadas, Céline; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Menard, Didier; Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela; Nour, Bakri Y M; Karunaweera, Nadira; Mueller, Ivo; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the geographically most widespread human malaria parasite. To analyze patterns of microsatellite diversity and population structure across countries of different transmission intensity, genotyping data from 11 microsatellite markers was either generated or compiled from 841 isolates from four continents collected in 1999-2008. Diversity was highest in South-East Asia (mean allelic richness 10.0-12.8), intermediate in the South Pacific (8.1-9.9) Madagascar and Sudan (7.9-8.4), and lowest in South America and Central Asia (5.5-7.2). A reduced panel of only 3 markers was sufficient to identify approx. 90% of all haplotypes in South Pacific, African and SE-Asian populations, but only 60-80% in Latin American populations, suggesting that typing of 2-6 markers, depending on the level of endemicity, is sufficient for epidemiological studies. Clustering analysis showed distinct clusters in Peru and Brazil, but little sub-structuring was observed within Africa, SE-Asia or the South Pacific. Isolates from Uzbekistan were exceptional, as a near-clonal parasite population was observed that was clearly separated from all other populations (FST>0.2). Outside Central Asia FST values were highest (0.11-0.16) between South American and all other populations, and lowest (0.04-0.07) between populations from South-East Asia and the South Pacific. These comparisons between P. vivax populations from four continents indicated that not only transmission intensity, but also geographical isolation affect diversity and population structure. However, the high effective population size results in slow changes of these parameters. This persistency must be taken into account when assessing the impact of control programs on the genetic structure of parasite populations. PMID:26125189

  18. Genetic diversity and population structure in contemporary house sparrow populations along an urbanization gradient

    PubMed Central

    Vangestel, C; Mergeay, J; Dawson, D A; Callens, T; Vandomme, V; Lens, L

    2012-01-01

    House sparrow (Passer domesticus) populations have suffered major declines in urban as well as rural areas, while remaining relatively stable in suburban ones. Yet, to date no exhaustive attempt has been made to examine how, and to what extent, spatial variation in population demography is reflected in genetic population structuring along contemporary urbanization gradients. Here we use putatively neutral microsatellite loci to study if and how genetic variation can be partitioned in a hierarchical way among different urbanization classes. Principal coordinate analyses did not support the hypothesis that urban/suburban and rural populations comprise two distinct genetic clusters. Comparison of FST values at different hierarchical scales revealed drift as an important force of population differentiation. Redundancy analyses revealed that genetic structure was strongly affected by both spatial variation and level of urbanization. The results shown here can be used as baseline information for future genetic monitoring programmes and provide additional insights into contemporary house sparrow dynamics along urbanization gradients. PMID:22588131

  19. Statistical validation of structured population models for Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Adoteye, Kaska; Banks, H.T.; Cross, Karissa; Eytcheson, Stephanie; Flores, Kevin B.; LeBlanc, Gerald A.; Nguyen, Timothy; Ross, Chelsea; Smith, Emmaline; Stemkovski, Michael; Stokely, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    In this study we use statistical validation techniques to verify density-dependent mechanisms hypothesized for populations of Daphnia magna. We develop structured population models that exemplify specific mechanisms, and use multi-scale experimental data in order to test their importance. We show that fecundity and survival rates are affected by both time-varying density-independent factors, such as age, and density-dependent factors, such as competition. We perform uncertainty analysis and show that our parameters are estimated with a high degree of confidence. Further, we perform a sensitivity analysis to understand how changes in fecundity and survival rates affect population size and age-structure. PMID:26092608

  20. Population structure and genetic diversity in natural populations of Theobroma speciosum Willd. Ex Spreng (Malvaceae).

    PubMed

    Giustina, L D; Luz, L N; Vieira, F S; Rossi, F S; Soares-Lopes, C R A; Pereira, T N S; Rossi, A A B

    2014-01-01

    The genus Theobroma found in the Amazon region is composed of 22 species, including Theobroma speciosum, better known as cacauí. These species are constantly threatened by forest fragmentation caused by human activities and require conservation strategies and management aimed at preserving them in their natural environments. The main objective of this study was to analyze the population structure and genetic diversity within and between natural populations of T. speciosum by using ISSR molecular markers to understand the population structure of the species. Four natural populations belonging to the Amazon rainforest (BAC, CRO, FLA, and PNA), located in the State of Mato Grosso, were selected. Amplification reactions were performed using 15 ISSR primers. A total of 101 loci were found, of which 54.46% were polymorphic at the species level. The BAC population showed higher genetic diversity (H=0.095 and I=0.144) and higher percentage of polymorphism (28.71%). The populations showed an FST value of 0.604, indicating marked genetic differentiation. The highest genetic variation was found between populations. Gene flow was low between populations, indicating genetic isolation between populations. PMID:24615108

  1. Landscape structure and the genetic effects of a population collapse

    PubMed Central

    Caplins, Serena A.; Gilbert, Kimberly J.; Ciotir, Claudia; Roland, Jens; Matter, Stephen F.; Keyghobadi, Nusha

    2014-01-01

    Both landscape structure and population size fluctuations influence population genetics. While independent effects of these factors on genetic patterns and processes are well studied, a key challenge is to understand their interaction, as populations are simultaneously exposed to habitat fragmentation and climatic changes that increase variability in population size. In a population network of an alpine butterfly, abundance declined 60–100% in 2003 because of low over-winter survival. Across the network, mean microsatellite genetic diversity did not change. However, patch connectivity and local severity of the collapse interacted to determine allelic richness change within populations, indicating that patch connectivity can mediate genetic response to a demographic collapse. The collapse strongly affected spatial genetic structure, leading to a breakdown of isolation-by-distance and loss of landscape genetic pattern. Our study reveals important interactions between landscape structure and temporal demographic variability on the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of populations. Projected future changes to both landscape and climate may lead to loss of genetic variability from the studied populations, and selection acting on adaptive variation will likely occur within the context of an increasing influence of genetic drift. PMID:25320176

  2. Spatial structuring within a reservoir fish population: implications for management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, David R.; Long, James M.; Shoup, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial structuring in reservoir fish populations can exist because of environmental gradients, species-specific behaviour, or even localised fishing effort. The present study investigated whether white crappie exhibited evidence of improved population structure where the northern more productive half of a lake is closed to fishing to provide waterfowl hunting opportunities. Population response to angling was modelled for each substock of white crappie (north (protected) and south (unprotected) areas), the entire lake (single-stock model) and by combining simulations of the two independent substock models (additive model). White crappie in the protected area were more abundant, consisting of larger, older individuals, and exhibited a lower total annual mortality rate than in the unprotected area. Population modelling found that fishing mortality rates between 0.1 and 0.3 resulted in sustainable populations (spawning potential ratios (SPR) >0.30). The population in the unprotected area appeared to be more resilient (SPR > 0.30) at the higher fishing intensities (0.35–0.55). Considered additively, the whole-lake fishery appeared more resilient than when modelled as a single-panmictic stock. These results provided evidence of spatial structuring in reservoir fish populations, and we recommend model assessments used to guide management decisions should consider those spatial differences in other populations where they exist.

  3. Population genetic structure of Theileria parva field isolates from indigenous cattle populations of Uganda.

    PubMed

    Muwanika, Vincent; Kabi, Fredrick; Masembe, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Theileria parva causes East Coast Fever (ECF) a protozoan infection which manifests as a non-symptomatic syndrome among endemically stable indigenous cattle populations. Knowledge of the current genetic diversity and population structure of T. parva is critical for predicting pathogen evolutionary trends to inform development of effective control strategies. In this study the population genetic structure of 78 field isolates of T. parva from indigenous cattle (Ankole, n=41 and East African shorthorn Zebu (EASZ), n=37) sampled from the different agro ecological zones (AEZs) of Uganda was investigated. A total of eight mini- and micro-satellite markers encompassing the four chromosomes of T. parva were used to genotype the study field isolates. The genetic diversity of the surveyed T. parva populations was observed to range from 0.643±0.55 to 0.663±0.41 among the Central and Western AEZs respectively. The overall Wright's F index showed significant genetic variation between the surveyed T. parva populations based on the different AEZs and indigenous cattle breeds (FST=0.133, p<0.01) and (FST=0.101, p<0.01) respectively. Significant pairwise population genetic differentiations (p<0.05) were observed with FST values ranging from 0.048 to 0.173 between the eastern and northern, eastern and western populations respectively. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed a high level of genetic and geographic sub-structuring among populations. Linkage disequilibrium was observed when populations from all the study AEZs were treated as a single population and when analysed separately. On the overall, the significant genetic diversity and geographic sub-structuring exhibited among the study T. parva isolates has critical implications for ECF control. PMID:26613662

  4. Detecting Heterogeneity in Population Structure Across the Genome in Admixed Populations.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Caitlin; Brown, Lisa; Thornton, Timothy A

    2016-09-01

    The genetic structure of human populations is often characterized by aggregating measures of ancestry across the autosomal chromosomes. While it may be reasonable to assume that population structure patterns are similar genome-wide in relatively homogeneous populations, this assumption may not be appropriate for admixed populations, such as Hispanics and African-Americans, with recent ancestry from two or more continents. Recent studies have suggested that systematic ancestry differences can arise at genomic locations in admixed populations as a result of selection and nonrandom mating. Here, we propose a method, which we refer to as the chromosomal ancestry differences (CAnD) test, for detecting heterogeneity in population structure across the genome. CAnD can incorporate either local or chromosome-wide ancestry inferred from SNP genotype data to identify chromosomes harboring genomic regions with ancestry contributions that are significantly different than expected. In simulation studies with real genotype data from phase III of the HapMap Project, we demonstrate the validity and power of CAnD. We apply CAnD to the HapMap Mexican-American (MXL) and African-American (ASW) population samples; in this analysis the software RFMix is used to infer local ancestry at genomic regions, assuming admixing from Europeans, West Africans, and Native Americans. The CAnD test provides strong evidence of heterogeneity in population structure across the genome in the MXL sample ([Formula: see text]), which is largely driven by elevated Native American ancestry and deficit of European ancestry on the X chromosomes. Among the ASW, all chromosomes are largely African derived and no heterogeneity in population structure is detected in this sample. PMID:27440868

  5. Stage-Structured Population Dynamics of AEDES AEGYPTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Nuraini; Budin, Harun; Ismail, Salemah

    Aedes aegypti is the main vector in the transmission of dengue fever, a vector-borne disease affecting world population living in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Better understanding of the dynamics of its population growth will help in the efforts of controlling the spread of this disease. In looking at the population dynamics of Aedes aegypti, this paper explored the stage-structured modeling of the population growth of the mosquito using the matrix population model. The life cycle of the mosquito was divided into five stages: eggs, larvae, pupae, adult1 and adult2. Developmental rates were obtained for the average Malaysian temperature and these were used in constructing the transition matrix for the matrix model. The model, which was based only on temperature, projected that the population of Aedes aegypti will blow up with time, which is not realistic. For further work, other factors need to be taken into account to obtain a more realistic result.

  6. Matching Strategies for Genetic Association Studies in Structured Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, David A.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Patil, Nila; Konvicka, Karel; Kershenobich, David; Cox, David R.; Ballinger, Dennis G.

    2004-01-01

    Association studies in populations that are genetically heterogeneous can yield large numbers of spurious associations if population subgroups are unequally represented among cases and controls. This problem is particularly acute for studies involving pooled genotyping of very large numbers of single-nucleotide–polymorphism (SNP) markers, because most methods for analysis of association in structured populations require individual genotyping data. In this study, we present several strategies for matching case and control pools to have similar genetic compositions, based on ancestry information inferred from genotype data for ∼300 SNPs tiled on an oligonucleotide-based genotyping array. We also discuss methods for measuring the impact of population stratification on an association study. Results for an admixed population and a phenotype strongly confounded with ancestry show that these simple matching strategies can effectively mitigate the impact of population stratification. PMID:14740319

  7. Four perspectives on climate feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldl, N.; Roe, G. H.

    2013-08-01

    The spatial pattern of climate feedbacks depends on how the feedbacks are defined. We employ an idealized aquaplanet simulation with radiative kernels diagnosed for the precise model setup and characterize the meridional structure of feedbacks under four different definitions: local feedbacks, global feedbacks, nondimensional feedback factors, and relative humidity feedbacks. First, the spatial pattern of the reference response (i.e., the Planck feedback) is found to vary with definition, largely as a consequence of polar-amplified warming, which affects other high-latitude feedbacks as well. Second, locally defined feedbacks allow for decomposition of the surface temperature response as a function of feedbacks, forcing, and heat transport. Third, different insights into the dynamical and thermodynamical underpinnings of the subtropical moisture response are gained by comparing different versions of humidity feedbacks. Thus, alternative approaches to the conventional, global definition of feedbacks offer several advantages for understanding patterns of warming and, ultimately, regional climate predictability.

  8. Distributed Feedback in and Distributed Bragg Reflection from Periodic Chiral Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, Kevin Michael

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we examine the combined effects of electromagnetic chirality and periodicity on wave interactions in active and passive media. Isotropic chiral media have the unique property of possessing two intrinsic indices of refraction without the additional complication of anisotropy. The two refractive indices arise from different propagation velocities for right-circularly-polarized (RCP) and left -circularly-polarized (LCP) waves (i.e., circular birefringence), and their existence suggests that chiral media may be used in conjunction with the coherent feedback characteristics of periodic structures to create structures that favor either RCP or LCP solutions. In this study, we develop the theory that describes the wave interactions in such periodic chiral structures, and we examine several representative cases, including active devices, to identify specific characteristics. Bandgap characteristics are developed here for finite-length slabs of periodic chiral media using coupled -mode theory. The theory shows that stratified, periodic, isotropic media fall into one of three categories: subchiral, chiral, or superchiral. The superchiral periodic medium possesses three stop bands for the fundamental Bragg condition where the three stop bands are associated with LCP rightarrow RCP coupling, LCP to LCP coupling, and RCP to RCP coupling. We examine the reflectivity for superchiral periodic media to show the degree of polarization mode isolation for both passive and active structures. We also study the relationships among the chiral constitutive parameters (i.e., permittivity, permeability, and chirality admittance) based on a canonical chiral media model, and we address how the presence of chirality may enhance the reflectivity from periodic slabs. In addition to periodic media, we investigate the role of chirality for mode coupling in symmetric planar waveguides with periodic boundaries. Such structures are of current interest as mode converters, filters, and

  9. The genetic structure of the Kuwaiti population: mtDNA Inter- and intra-population variation.

    PubMed

    Theyab, Jasem B; Al-Bustan, Suzanne; Crawford, Michael H

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated: (1) the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genetic variation in 116 unrelated individuals who originated from the Arabian Peninsula, Iran, or were of Bedouin ethnicity and (2) the genetic structure of Kuwaiti populations and compared it to their neighboring populations. These subpopulations were tested for genetic homogeneity and shown to be heterogeneous. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and mtDNA sequencing analyses of HVRI were used to reconstruct the genetic structure of Kuwait. The results indicated that the combined Kuwaiti population has a high frequency of haplogroup R0 (17%), J (12%), and U (12%) similar to other Arabian populations. In addition, contemporary African gene flow was detected through the presence of sub-haplogroup L (L1 and L2) (2%) and the absence of L3 which is reflective of an earlier migration. Furthermore, the multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot showed that the Kuwaiti population clusters with neighboring populations, including Iran and Saudi Arabia indicating gene flow into Kuwait. According to this study, the Kuwaiti population may be undergoing an expansion in a relatively short period of time, and the maternal genetic structure of Kuwait resembles both Saudi Arabia and Iran. PMID:23249314

  10. Comparative population structure of cavity-nesting sea ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, John M.; Eadie, John M.; Savard, Jean-Pierre L.; Christensen, Thomas K.; Berdeen, James; Taylor, Eric J.; Boyd, Sean; Einarsson, Árni

    2014-01-01

    A growing collection of mtDNA genetic information from waterfowl species across North America suggests that larger-bodied cavity-nesting species exhibit greater levels of population differentiation than smaller-bodied congeners. Although little is known about nest-cavity availability for these species, one hypothesis to explain differences in population structure is reduced dispersal tendency of larger-bodied cavity-nesting species due to limited abundance of large cavities. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined population structure of three cavity-nesting waterfowl species distributed across much of North America: Barrow's Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica), Common Goldeneye (B. clangula), and Bufflehead (B. albeola). We compared patterns of population structure using both variation in mtDNA control-region sequences and band-recovery data for the same species and geographic regions. Results were highly congruent between data types, showing structured population patterns for Barrow's and Common Goldeneye but not for Bufflehead. Consistent with our prediction, the smallest cavity-nesting species, the Bufflehead, exhibited the lowest level of population differentiation due to increased dispersal and gene flow. Results provide evidence for discrete Old and New World populations of Common Goldeneye and for differentiation of regional groups of both goldeneye species in Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, and the eastern coast of North America. Results presented here will aid management objectives that require an understanding of population delineation and migratory connectivity between breeding and wintering areas. Comparative studies such as this one highlight factors that may drive patterns of genetic diversity and population trends.

  11. Population connectivity and genetic structure of burbot (Lota lota) populations in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Underwood, Zachary E.; Mandeville, Elizabeth G.; Walters, Annika W.

    2016-01-01

    Burbot (Lota lota) occur in the Wind River Basin in central Wyoming, USA, at the southwestern extreme of the species’ native range in North America. The most stable and successful of these populations occur in six glacially carved mountain lakes on three different tributary streams and one large main stem impoundment (Boysen Reservoir) downstream from the tributary populations. Burbot are rarely found in connecting streams and rivers, which are relatively small and high gradient, with a variety of potential barriers to upstream movement of fish. We used high-throughput genomic sequence data for 11,197 SNPs to characterize the genetic diversity, population structure, and connectivity among burbot populations on the Wind River system. Fish from Boysen Reservoir and lower basin tributary populations were genetically differentiated from those in the upper basin tributary populations. In addition, fish within the same tributary streams fell within the same genetic clusters, suggesting there is movement of fish between lakes on the same tributaries but that populations within each tributary system are isolated and genetically distinct from other populations. Observed genetic differentiation corresponded to natural and anthropogenic barriers, highlighting the importance of barriers to fish population connectivity and gene flow in human-altered linked lake-stream habitats.

  12. Correlations in the population structure of music, genes and language

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven; Savage, Patrick E.; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Stoneking, Mark; Ko, Ying-Chin; Loo, Jun-Hun; Trejaut, Jean A.

    2014-01-01

    We present, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence that music and genes may have coevolved by demonstrating significant correlations between traditional group-level folk songs and mitochondrial DNA variation among nine indigenous populations of Taiwan. These correlations were of comparable magnitude to those between language and genes for the same populations, although music and language were not significantly correlated with one another. An examination of population structure for genetics showed stronger parallels to music than to language. Overall, the results suggest that music might have a sufficient time-depth to retrace ancient population movements and, additionally, that it might be capturing different aspects of population history than language. Music may therefore have the potential to serve as a novel marker of human migrations to complement genes, language and other markers. PMID:24225453

  13. Plasmodium vivax Populations Are More Genetically Diverse and Less Structured than Sympatric Plasmodium falciparum Populations

    PubMed Central

    Jennison, Charlie; Arnott, Alicia; Tessier, Natacha; Tavul, Livingstone; Koepfli, Cristian; Felger, Ingrid; Siba, Peter M.; Reeder, John C.; Bahlo, Melanie; Mueller, Ivo; Barry, Alyssa E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax, is proving more difficult to control and eliminate than Plasmodium falciparum in areas of co-transmission. Comparisons of the genetic structure of sympatric parasite populations may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the resilience of P. vivax and can help guide malaria control programs. Methodology/Principle findings P. vivax isolates representing the parasite populations of four areas on the north coast of Papua New Guinea (PNG) were genotyped using microsatellite markers and compared with previously published microsatellite data from sympatric P. falciparum isolates. The genetic diversity of P. vivax (He = 0.83–0.85) was higher than that of P. falciparum (He = 0.64–0.77) in all four populations. Moderate levels of genetic differentiation were found between P. falciparum populations, even over relatively short distances (less than 50 km), with 21–28% private alleles and clear geospatial genetic clustering. Conversely, very low population differentiation was found between P. vivax catchments, with less than 5% private alleles and no genetic clustering observed. In addition, the effective population size of P. vivax (30353; 13043–69142) was larger than that of P. falciparum (18871; 8109–42986). Conclusions/Significance Despite comparably high prevalence, P. vivax had higher diversity and a panmictic population structure compared to sympatric P. falciparum populations, which were fragmented into subpopulations. The results suggest that in comparison to P. falciparum, P. vivax has had a long-term large effective population size, consistent with more intense and stable transmission, and limited impact of past control and elimination efforts. This underlines suggestions that more intensive and sustained interventions will be needed to control and eventually eliminate P. vivax. This research clearly demonstrates how population genetic analyses can reveal deeper insight into transmission

  14. Genetic structure among continental and island populations of gyrfalcons.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeff A; Burnham, Kurt K; Burnham, William A; Mindell, David P

    2007-08-01

    Little is known about the possible influence that past glacial events have had on the phylogeography and population structure of avian predators in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. In this study, we use microsatellite and mitochondrial control region DNA variation to investigate the population genetic structure of gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus) throughout a large portion of their circumpolar distribution. In most locations sampled, the mtDNA data revealed little geographic structure; however, five out of eight mtDNA haplotypes were unique to a particular geographic area (Greenland, Iceland, or Alaska) and the Iceland population differed from others based on haplotype frequency differences (F(ST)). With the microsatellite results, significant population structure (F(ST), principal components analysis, and cluster analysis) was observed identifying Greenland and Iceland as separate populations, while Norway, Alaska and Canada were identified as a single population consistent with contemporary gene flow across Russia. Within Greenland, differing levels of gene flow between western and eastern sampling locations was indicated with apparent asymmetric dispersal in western Greenland from north to south. This dispersal bias is in agreement with the distribution of plumage colour variants with white gyrfalcons in much higher proportion in northern Greenland. Lastly, because the mtDNA control region sequence differed by only one to four nucleotides from a common haplotype among all gyrfalcons, we infer that the observed microsatellite population genetic structure has developed since the last glacial maximum. This conclusion is further supported by our finding that a closely related species, the saker falcon (Falco cherrug), has greater genetic heterogeneity, including mtDNA haplotypes differing by 1-16 nucleotide substitutions from a common gyrfalcon haplotype. This is consistent with gyrfalcons having expanded rapidly from a single glacial-age refugium to their current

  15. Genetic Population Structure of Tectura paleacea: Implications for the Mechanisms Regulating Population Structure in Patchy Coastal Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Begovic, Emina; Lindberg, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The seagrass limpet Tectura paleacea (Gastropoda; Patellogastropoda) belongs to a seagrass obligate lineage that has shifted from the Caribbean in the late Miocene, across the Isthmus of Panama prior to the closing of the Panamanian seaway, and then northward to its modern Baja California – Oregon distribution. To address whether larval entrainment by seagrass beds contributes to population structuring, populations were sampled at six California/Oregon localities approximately 2 degrees latitude apart during two post-settlement periods in July 2002 and June 2003. Partial cytochrome oxidase b (Cytb) sequences were obtained from 20 individuals (10 per year) from each population in order to determine the levels of population subdivision/connectivity. From the 120 individuals sequenced, there were eighty-one unique haplotypes, with the greatest haplotype diversity occurring in southern populations. The only significant genetic break detected was consistent with a peri-Point Conception (PPC) biogeographic boundary while populations north and south of Point Conception were each panmictic. The data further indicate that populations found south of the PPC biogeographic boundary originated from northern populations. This pattern of population structure suggests that seagrass patches are not entraining the larvae of T. paleacea by altering flow regimes within their environment; a process hypothesized to produce extensive genetic subdivision on fine geographic scales. In contrast to the haplotype data, morphological patterns vary significantly over very fine geographic scales that are inconsistent with the observed patterns of genetic population structure, indicating that morphological variation in T. paleacea might be attributed to differential ecophenotypic expression in response to local habitat variability throughout its distribution. These results suggest that highly localized conservation efforts may not be as effective as large-scale conservation efforts in near

  16. Genotypic structure of a Drosophila population for adult locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grechanyi, G.V.; Korzun, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the variation of adult locomotor activity in four samples taken at different times from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster showed that the total variation of this trait is relatively stable in time and has a substantial genetic component. Genotypic structure of the population for locomotor activity is characterized by the presence of large groups of genotypes with high and low values of this trait. A possible explanation for the presence of such groups in a population is cyclic density-dependent selection.

  17. Modeling structured population dynamics using data from unmarked individuals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Zipkin, Elise; Thorson, James T.; See, Kevin; Lynch, Heather J.; Kanno, Yoichiro; Chandler, Richard; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The study of population dynamics requires unbiased, precise estimates of abundance and vital rates that account for the demographic structure inherent in all wildlife and plant populations. Traditionally, these estimates have only been available through approaches that rely on intensive mark–recapture data. We extended recently developed N-mixture models to demonstrate how demographic parameters and abundance can be estimated for structured populations using only stage-structured count data. Our modeling framework can be used to make reliable inferences on abundance as well as recruitment, immigration, stage-specific survival, and detection rates during sampling. We present a range of simulations to illustrate the data requirements, including the number of years and locations necessary for accurate and precise parameter estimates. We apply our modeling framework to a population of northern dusky salamanders (Desmognathus fuscus) in the mid-Atlantic region (USA) and find that the population is unexpectedly declining. Our approach represents a valuable advance in the estimation of population dynamics using multistate data from unmarked individuals and should additionally be useful in the development of integrated models that combine data from intensive (e.g., mark–recapture) and extensive (e.g., counts) data sources.

  18. Fixed point sensitivity analysis of interacting structured populations.

    PubMed

    Barabás, György; Meszéna, Géza; Ostling, Annette

    2014-03-01

    Sensitivity analysis of structured populations is a useful tool in population ecology. Historically, methodological development of sensitivity analysis has focused on the sensitivity of eigenvalues in linear matrix models, and on single populations. More recently there have been extensions to the sensitivity of nonlinear models, and to communities of interacting populations. Here we derive a fully general mathematical expression for the sensitivity of equilibrium abundances in communities of interacting structured populations. Our method yields the response of an arbitrary function of the stage class abundances to perturbations of any model parameters. As a demonstration, we apply this sensitivity analysis to a two-species model of ontogenetic niche shift where each species has two stage classes, juveniles and adults. In the context of this model, we demonstrate that our theory is quite robust to violating two of its technical assumptions: the assumption that the community is at a point equilibrium and the assumption of infinitesimally small parameter perturbations. Our results on the sensitivity of a community are also interpreted in a niche theoretical context: we determine how the niche of a structured population is composed of the niches of the individual states, and how the sensitivity of the community depends on niche segregation. PMID:24368160

  19. The mutation-drift balance in spatially structured populations.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David M; Martins, Ayana B; de Aguiar, Marcus A M

    2016-08-01

    In finite populations the action of neutral mutations is balanced by genetic drift, leading to a stationary distribution of alleles that displays a transition between two different behaviors. For small mutation rates most individuals will carry the same allele at equilibrium, whereas for high mutation rates of the alleles will be randomly distributed with frequencies close to one half for a biallelic gene. For well-mixed haploid populations the mutation threshold is μc=1/2N, where N is the population size. In this paper we study how spatial structure affects this mutation threshold. Specifically, we study the stationary allele distribution for populations placed on regular networks where connected nodes represent potential mating partners. We show that the mutation threshold is sensitive to spatial structure only if the number of potential mates is very small. In this limit, the mutation threshold decreases substantially, increasing the diversity of the population at considerably low mutation rates. Defining kc as the degree of the network for which the mutation threshold drops to half of its value in well-mixed populations we show that kc grows slowly as a function of the population size, following a power law. Our calculations and simulations are based on the Moran model and on a mapping between the Moran model with mutations and the voter model with opinion makers. PMID:27132184

  20. Spatially explicit feedbacks between seagrass meadow structure, sediment and light: Habitat suitability for seagrass growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Joel; D'Odorico, Paul; McGlathery, Karen; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2016-01-01

    In shallow coastal bays where nutrient loading and riverine inputs are low, turbidity, and the consequent light environment are controlled by resuspension of bed sediments due to wind-waves and tidal currents. High sediment resuspension and low light environments can limit benthic primary productivity; however, both currents and waves are affected by the presence of benthic plants such as seagrass. This feedback between the presence of benthic primary producers such as seagrass and the consequent light environment has been predicted to induce bistable dynamics locally. However, these vegetated areas influence a larger area than they footprint, including a barren adjacent downstream area which exhibits reduced shear stresses. Here we explore through modeling how the patchy structure of seagrass meadows on a landscape may affect sediment resuspension and the consequent light environment due to the presence of this sheltered region. Heterogeneous vegetation covers comprising a mosaic of randomly distributed patches were generated to investigate the effect of patch modified hydrodynamics. Actual cover of vegetation on the landscape was used to facilitate comparisons across landscape realizations. Hourly wave and current shear stresses on the landscape along with suspended sediment concentration and light attenuation characteristics were then calculated and spatially averaged to examine how actual cover and mean water depth affect the bulk sediment and light environment. The results indicate that an effective cover, which incorporates the sheltering area, has important controls on the distributions of shear stress, suspended sediment, light environment, and consequent seagrass habitat suitability. Interestingly, an optimal habitat occurs within a depth range where, if actual cover is reduced past some threshold, the bulk light environment would no longer favor seagrass growth.

  1. Spatially explicit feedbacks between seagrass meadow structure, sediment and light: Habitat suitability for seagrass growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Joel A.; D'Odorico, Paolo; McGlathery, Karen J.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2016-07-01

    In shallow coastal bays where nutrient loading and riverine inputs are low, turbidity, and the consequent light environment are controlled by resuspension of bed sediments due to wind-waves and tidal currents. High sediment resuspension and low light environments can limit benthic primary productivity; however, both currents and waves are affected by the presence of benthic plants such as seagrass. This feedback between the presence of benthic primary producers such as seagrass and the consequent light environment has been predicted to induce bistable dynamics locally. However, these vegetated areas influence a larger area than they footprint, including a barren adjacent downstream area which exhibits reduced shear stresses. Here we explore through modeling how the patchy structure of seagrass meadows on a landscape may affect sediment resuspension and the consequent light environment due to the presence of this sheltered region. Heterogeneous vegetation covers comprising a mosaic of randomly distributed patches were generated to investigate the effect of patch modified hydrodynamics. Actual cover of vegetation on the landscape was used to facilitate comparisons across landscape realizations. Hourly wave and current shear stresses on the landscape along with suspended sediment concentration and light attenuation characteristics were then calculated and spatially averaged to examine how actual cover and mean water depth affect the bulk sediment and light environment. The results indicate that an effective cover, which incorporates the sheltering area, has important controls on the distributions of shear stress, suspended sediment, light environment, and consequent seagrass habitat suitability. Interestingly, an optimal habitat occurs within a depth range where, if actual cover is reduced past some threshold, the bulk light environment would no longer favor seagrass growth.

  2. Effects of structured written feedback by cards on medical students’ performance at Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) in an outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    HAGHANI, FARIBA; HATEF KHORAMI, MOHAMMAD; FAKHARI, MOHAMMAD

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Feedback cards are recommended as a feasible tool for structured written feedback delivery in clinical education while effectiveness of this tool on the medical students’ performance is still questionable.  The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of structured written feedback by cards as well as verbal feedback versus verbal feedback alone on the clinical performance of medical students at the Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) test in an outpatient clinic. Methods This is a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-test comprising four groups in two terms of medical students’ externship. The students’ performance was assessed through the Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) as a clinical performance evaluation tool. Structured written feedbacks were given to two experimental groups by designed feedback cards as well as verbal feedback, while in the two control groups feedback was delivered verbally as a routine approach in clinical education. Results By consecutive sampling method, 62 externship students were enrolled in this study and seven students were excluded from the final analysis due to their absence for three days. According to the ANOVA analysis and Post Hoc Tukey test,  no statistically significant difference was observed among the four groups at the pre-test, whereas a statistically significant difference was observed between the experimental and control groups at the post-test  (F = 4.023, p =0.012). The effect size of the structured written feedbacks on clinical performance was 0.19. Conclusion Structured written feedback by cards could improve the performance of medical students in a statistical sense. Further studies must be conducted in other clinical courses with longer durations. PMID:27382581

  3. Integrated Flight/Structural Mode Control for Very Flexible Aircraft Using L1 Adaptive Output Feedback Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Che, Jiaxing; Cao, Chengyu; Gregory, Irene M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores application of adaptive control architecture to a light, high-aspect ratio, flexible aircraft configuration that exhibits strong rigid body/flexible mode coupling. Specifically, an L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is developed for a semi-span wind tunnel model capable of motion. The wind tunnel mount allows the semi-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, resulting in better simulation of an aircraft s rigid body motion. The control objective is to design a pitch control with altitude hold while suppressing body freedom flutter. The controller is an output feedback nominal controller (LQG) augmented by an L(sub 1) adaptive loop. A modification to the L(sub 1) output feedback is proposed to make it more suitable for flexible structures. The new control law relaxes the required bounds on the unmatched uncertainty and allows dependence on the state as well as time, i.e. a more general unmatched nonlinearity. The paper presents controller development and simulated performance responses. Simulation is conducted by using full state flexible wing models derived from test data at 10 different dynamic pressure conditions. An L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is designed for a single test point and is then applied to all the test cases. The simulation results show that the L(sub 1) augmented controller can stabilize and meet the performance requirements for all 10 test conditions ranging from 30 psf to 130 psf dynamic pressure.

  4. Mini-max feedback control as a computational theory of sensorimotor control in the presence of structural uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Ueyama, Yuki

    2014-01-01

    We propose a mini-max feedback control (MMFC) model as a robust approach to human motor control under conditions of uncertain dynamics, such as structural uncertainty. The MMFC model is an expansion of the optimal feedback control (OFC) model. According to this scheme, motor commands are generated to minimize the maximal cost, based on an assumption of worst-case uncertainty, characterized by familiarity with novel dynamics. We simulated linear dynamic systems with different types of force fields–stable and unstable dynamics–and compared the performance of MMFC to that of OFC. MMFC delivered better performance than OFC in terms of stability and the achievement of tasks. Moreover, the gain in positional feedback with the MMFC model in the unstable dynamics was tuned to the direction of instability. It is assumed that the shape modulations of the gain in positional feedback in unstable dynamics played the same role as that played by end-point stiffness observed in human studies. Accordingly, we suggest that MMFC is a plausible model that predicts motor behavior under conditions of uncertain dynamics. PMID:25309415

  5. Population models for passerine birds: structure, parameterization, and analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noon, B.R.; Sauer, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Population models have great potential as management tools, as they use infonnation about the life history of a species to summarize estimates of fecundity and survival into a description of population change. Models provide a framework for projecting future populations, determining the effects of management decisions on future population dynamics, evaluating extinction probabilities, and addressing a variety of questions of ecological and evolutionary interest. Even when insufficient information exists to allow complete identification of the model, the modelling procedure is useful because it forces the investigator to consider the life history of the species when determining what parameters should be estimated from field studies and provides a context for evaluating the relative importance of demographic parameters. Models have been little used in the study of the population dynamics of passerine birds because of: (1) widespread misunderstandings of the model structures and parameterizations, (2) a lack of knowledge of life histories of many species, (3) difficulties in obtaining statistically reliable estimates of demographic parameters for most passerine species, and (4) confusion about functional relationships among demographic parameters. As a result, studies of passerine demography are often designed inappropriately and fail to provide essential data. We review appropriate models for passerine bird populations and illustrate their possible uses in evaluating the effects of management or other environmental influences on population dynamics. We identify environmental influences on population dynamics. We identify parameters that must be estimated from field data, briefly review existing statistical methods for obtaining valid estimates, and evaluate the present status of knowledge of these parameters.

  6. Temporal Changes in Population Structure of a Marine Planktonic Diatom

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Sylvie V. M.; Montresor, Marina; Procaccini, Gabriele; Kooistra, Wiebe H. C. F.

    2014-01-01

    A prevailing question in phytoplankton research addresses changes of genetic diversity in the face of huge population sizes and apparently unlimited dispersal capabilities. We investigated population genetic structure of the pennate planktonic marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata at the LTER station MareChiara in the Gulf of Naples (Italy) over four consecutive years and explored possible changes over seasons and from year to year. A total of 525 strains were genotyped using seven microsatellite markers, for a genotypic diversity of 75.05%, comparable to that found in other Pseudo-nitzschia species. Evidence from Bayesian clustering analysis (BA) identified two genetically distinct clusters, here interpreted as populations, and several strains that could not be assigned with ≥90% probability to either population, here interpreted as putative hybrids. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) recovered these two clusters in distinct clouds with most of the putative hybrids located in-between. Relative proportions of the two populations and the putative hybrids remained similar within years, but changed radically between 2008 and 2009 and between 2010 and 2011, when the 2008-population apparently became the dominant one again. Strains from the two populations are inter-fertile, and so is their offspring. Inclusion of genotypes of parental strains and their offspring shows that the majority of the latter could not be assigned to any of the two parental populations. Therefore, field strains classified by BA as the putative hybrids could be biological hybrids. We hypothesize that P. multistriata population dynamics in the Gulf of Naples follows a meta-population-like model, including establishment of populations by cell inocula at the beginning of each growth season and remixing and dispersal governed by moving and mildly turbulent water masses. PMID:25506926

  7. Structural Drift: The Population Dynamics of Sequential Learning

    PubMed Central

    Crutchfield, James P.; Whalen, Sean

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a theory of sequential causal inference in which learners in a chain estimate a structural model from their upstream “teacher” and then pass samples from the model to their downstream “student”. It extends the population dynamics of genetic drift, recasting Kimura's selectively neutral theory as a special case of a generalized drift process using structured populations with memory. We examine the diffusion and fixation properties of several drift processes and propose applications to learning, inference, and evolution. We also demonstrate how the organization of drift process space controls fidelity, facilitates innovations, and leads to information loss in sequential learning with and without memory. PMID:22685387

  8. Population genetic structure and long-distance dispersal among seabird populations: implications for colony persistence.

    PubMed

    Bicknell, A W J; Knight, M E; Bilton, D; Reid, J B; Burke, T; Votier, S C

    2012-06-01

    Dramatic local population decline brought about by anthropogenic-driven change is an increasingly common threat to biodiversity. Seabird life history traits make them particularly vulnerable to such change; therefore, understanding population connectivity and dispersal dynamics is vital for successful management. Our study used a 357-base pair mitochondrial control region locus sequenced for 103 individuals and 18 nuclear microsatellite loci genotyped for 245 individuals to investigate population structure in the Atlantic and Pacific populations of the pelagic seabird, Leach's storm-petrel Oceanodroma leucorhoa leucorhoa. This species is under intense predation pressure at one regionally important colony on St Kilda, Scotland, where a disparity between population decline and predation rates hints at immigration from other large colonies. AMOVA, F(ST), Φ(ST) and Bayesian cluster analyses revealed no genetic structure among Atlantic colonies (Global Φ(ST) = -0.02 P > 0.05, Global F(ST) = 0.003, P > 0.05, STRUCTURE K = 1), consistent with either contemporary gene flow or strong historical association within the ocean basin. The Pacific and Atlantic populations are genetically distinct (Global Φ(ST) = 0.32 P < 0.0001, Global F(ST) = 0.04, P < 0.0001, STRUCTURE K = 2), but evidence for interocean exchange was found with individual exclusion/assignment and population coalescent analyses. These findings highlight the importance of conserving multiple colonies at a number of different sites and suggest that management of this seabird may be best viewed at an oceanic scale. Moreover, our study provides an illustration of how long-distance movement may ameliorate the potentially deleterious impacts of localized environmental change, although direct measures of dispersal are still required to better understand this process. PMID:22548276

  9. Ethnicity and Population Structure in Personal Naming Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mateos, Pablo; Longley, Paul A.; O'Sullivan, David

    2011-01-01

    Personal naming practices exist in all human groups and are far from random. Rather, they continue to reflect social norms and ethno-cultural customs that have developed over generations. As a consequence, contemporary name frequency distributions retain distinct geographic, social and ethno-cultural patterning that can be exploited to understand population structure in human biology, public health and social science. Previous attempts to detect and delineate such structure in large populations have entailed extensive empirical analysis of naming conventions in different parts of the world without seeking any general or automated methods of population classification by ethno-cultural origin. Here we show how ‘naming networks’, constructed from forename-surname pairs of a large sample of the contemporary human population in 17 countries, provide a valuable representation of cultural, ethnic and linguistic population structure around the world. This innovative approach enriches and adds value to automated population classification through conventional national data sources such as telephone directories and electoral registers. The method identifies clear social and ethno-cultural clusters in such naming networks that extend far beyond the geographic areas in which particular names originated, and that are preserved even after international migration. Moreover, one of the most striking findings of this approach is that these clusters simply ‘emerge’ from the aggregation of millions of individual decisions on parental naming practices for their children, without any prior knowledge introduced by the researcher. Our probabilistic approach to community assignment, both at city level as well as at a global scale, helps to reveal the degree of isolation, integration or overlap between human populations in our rapidly globalising world. As such, this work has important implications for research in population genetics, public health, and social science adding new

  10. Structure of the New England herring gull population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kadlec, J.A.; Drury, W.H.

    1968-01-01

    Measurements of the rates of population increase, reproduction, and mortality together with an observed age ratio, were used to analyze the population of the Herring Gull in New England. Data from sporadic censuses prior to this study, aerial censuses by the authors, and National Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count indicated that the New England breeding population has been doubling every 12 to 15 years since the early 1900's. This increase has involved founding new colonies and expanding the breeding range There is evidence that 15 to 30% of the adults do not breed in any given year. Sixty-one productivity measurements on 43 islands from 1963 through 1966, involving almost 13,000 nests, showed that from 0.8 to 1.4 young/breeding pair/year is the usual range of rate of production. The age distribution in the population was determined by classifying Herring Gulls by plumage category on an aerial census of the coast from Tampico, Mexico, to Cape Sable, Nova Scotia. Of the 622,000 gulls observed, 68% were adults, 17% were second- and third-year birds, and 15% were first-year birds. Mortality rates derived from band recovery data were too high to be consistent with the observed rate of population growth, productivity, and age structure. Loss of bands increasing to the rate of about 20%/year 5 years after banding eliminates most of the discrepancy. The age structure and rate of population increase indicate a mortality rate of 4 to 9% for gulls 2 years old or older, compared with the 25 to 30% indicated by band recoveries. The population structure we have developed fits everything we have observed about Herring Gull population dynamics, except mortality based on band recoveries.

  11. Evaluating Effectiveness of Modeling Motion System Feedback in the Enhanced Hess Structural Model of the Human Operator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaychik, Kirill; Cardullo, Frank; George, Gary; Kelly, Lon C.

    2009-01-01

    In order to use the Hess Structural Model to predict the need for certain cueing systems, George and Cardullo significantly expanded it by adding motion feedback to the model and incorporating models of the motion system dynamics, motion cueing algorithm and a vestibular system. This paper proposes a methodology to evaluate effectiveness of these innovations by performing a comparison analysis of the model performance with and without the expanded motion feedback. The proposed methodology is composed of two stages. The first stage involves fine-tuning parameters of the original Hess structural model in order to match the actual control behavior recorded during the experiments at NASA Visual Motion Simulator (VMS) facility. The parameter tuning procedure utilizes a new automated parameter identification technique, which was developed at the Man-Machine Systems Lab at SUNY Binghamton. In the second stage of the proposed methodology, an expanded motion feedback is added to the structural model. The resulting performance of the model is then compared to that of the original one. As proposed by Hess, metrics to evaluate the performance of the models include comparison against the crossover models standards imposed on the crossover frequency and phase margin of the overall man-machine system. Preliminary results indicate the advantage of having the model of the motion system and motion cueing incorporated into the model of the human operator. It is also demonstrated that the crossover frequency and the phase margin of the expanded model are well within the limits imposed by the crossover model.

  12. Microsatellite and Wolbachia analysis in Rhagoletis cerasi natural populations: population structuring and multiple infections

    PubMed Central

    Augustinos, Antonios A; Asimakopoulou, Anastasia K; Moraiti, Cleopatra A; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos T; Bourtzis, Kostas

    2014-01-01

    Rhagoletis cerasi (Diptera: Tephritidae) is a major pest of sweet and sour cherries in Europe and parts of Asia. Despite its economic significance, there is a lack of studies on the genetic structure of R. cerasi populations. Elucidating the genetic structure of insects of economic importance is crucial for developing phenological-predictive models and environmental friendly control methods. All natural populations of R. cerasi have been found to harbor the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis, which widely affects multiple biological traits contributing to the evolution of its hosts, and has been suggested as a tool for the biological control of insect pests and disease vectors. In the current study, the analysis of 18 R. cerasi populations collected in Greece, Germany, and Russia using 13 microsatellite markers revealed structuring of R. cerasi natural populations, even at close geographic range. We also analyzed the Wolbachia infection status of these populations using 16S rRNA-, MLST- and wsp-based approaches. All 244 individuals screened were positive for Wolbachia. Our results suggest the fixation of the wCer1 strain in Greece while wCer2, wCer4, wCer5, and probably other uncharacterized strains were also detected in multiply infected individuals. The role of Wolbachia and its potential extended phenotypes needs a thorough investigation in R. cerasi. Our data suggest an involvement of this symbiont in the observed restriction in the gene flow in addition to a number of different ecological factors. PMID:24963388

  13. Genetic structure of the world's polar bear populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paetkau, David; Amstrup, Steven C.; Born, E.W.; Calvert, W.; Derocher, A.E.; Garner, G.W.; Messier, F.; Stirling, I.; Taylor, M.K.; Wiig, O.; Strobeck, C.

    1999-01-01

    We studied genetic structure in polar bear (Ursus maritimus) populations by typing a sample of 473 individuals spanning the species distribution at 16 highly variable microsatellite loci. No genetic discontinuities were found that would be consistent with evolutionarily significant periods of isolation between groups. Direct comparison of movement data and genetic data from the Canadian Arctic revealed a highly significant correlation. Genetic data generally supported existing population (management unit) designations, although there were two cases where genetic data failed to differentiate between pairs of populations previously resolved by movement data. A sharp contrast was found between the minimal genetic structure observed among populations surrounding the polar basin and the presence of several marked genetic discontinuities in the Canadian Arctic. The discontinuities in the Canadian Arctic caused the appearance of four genetic clusters of polar bear populations. These clusters vary in total estimated population size from 100 to over 10 000, and the smallest may merit a relatively conservative management strategy in consideration of its apparent isolation. We suggest that the observed pattern of genetic discontinuities has developed in response to differences in the seasonal distribution and pattern of sea ice habitat and the effects of these differences on the distribution and abundance of seals.

  14. The relationship between Baylisascaris procyonis prevalence and raccoon population structure.

    PubMed

    Page, L Kristen; Gehrt, Stanley D; Cascione, Andrea; Kellner, Kenneth F

    2009-12-01

    Parasite transmission is a dynamic process that can be affected by factors including host and parasite population dynamics. Raccoons ( Procyon lotor ) are the definitive host of Baylisascaris procyonis , an intestinal roundworm. Transmission of this parasite has been linked to raccoon behavior and human land-use patterns; however, we do not know the importance of host population structure. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the relationship between raccoon population attributes and prevalence of B. procyonis. We necropsied 307 trapped or road-killed raccoons collected during 2000-2006 from the Chicago area. In addition, we examined, via fecal samples (n  =  433), the patterns of B. procyonis prevalence as they relate to population dynamics among 3 subpopulations within the larger study. Baylisascaris procyonis was seen in 39% of 307 necropsied raccoons. There were differences in prevalence as a function of host age and sex. Baylisascaris procyonis was observed in 18% of 433 fecal samples obtained from live-trapped raccoons, and there were differences according to age, but not by sex. We found that the host populations consistently differed in density across study areas, but were similar regarding sex and age structure. Differences in host density were associated with differences in prevalence, suggesting that possible differences between populations, as well as ecological differences in sites and raccoon behavior, may have influenced parasite prevalence. PMID:19480537

  15. Globalization and the population structure of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Tovi; Marcet, Paula L; Graham, Doug H; Dahl, Erica R; Dubey, J P

    2006-07-25

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that infects nearly all mammal and bird species worldwide. Usually asymptomatic, toxoplasmosis can be severe and even fatal to many hosts, including people. Elucidating the contribution of genetic variation among parasites to patterns of disease transmission and manifestations has been the goal of many studies. Focusing on the geographic component of this variation, we show that most genotypes are locale-specific, but some are found across continents and are closely related to each other, indicating a recent radiation of a pandemic genotype. Furthermore, we show that the geographic structure of T. gondii is extraordinary in having one population that is found in all continents except South America, whereas other populations are generally confined to South America, and yet another population is found worldwide. Our evidence suggests that South American and Eurasian populations have evolved separately until recently, when ships populated by rats, mice, and cats provided T. gondii with unprecedented migration opportunities, probably during the transatlantic slave trade. Our results explain several enigmatic features of the population structure of T. gondii and demonstrate how pervasive, prompt, and elusive the impact of human globalization is on nature. PMID:16849431

  16. Population Structure and Inbreeding From Pedigree Analysis of Purebred Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Calboli, Federico C. F.; Sampson, Jeff; Fretwell, Neale; Balding, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Dogs are of increasing interest as models for human diseases, and many canine population-association studies are beginning to emerge. The choice of breeds for such studies should be informed by a knowledge of factors such as inbreeding, genetic diversity, and population structure, which are likely to depend on breed-specific selective breeding patterns. To address the lack of such studies we have exploited one of the world's most extensive resources for canine population-genetics studies: the United Kingdom (UK) Kennel Club registration database. We chose 10 representative breeds and analyzed their pedigrees since electronic records were established around 1970, corresponding to about eight generations before present. We find extremely inbred dogs in each breed except the greyhound and estimate an inbreeding effective population size between 40 and 80 for all but 2 breeds. For all but 3 breeds, >90% of unique genetic variants are lost over six generations, indicating a dramatic effect of breeding patterns on genetic diversity. We introduce a novel index Ψ for measuring population structure directly from the pedigree and use it to identify subpopulations in several breeds. As well as informing the design of canine population genetics studies, our results have implications for breeding practices to enhance canine welfare. PMID:18493074

  17. The genetic structure of a relict population of wood frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scherer, Rick; Muths, Erin; Noon, Barry; Oyler-McCance, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and the associated reduction in connectivity between habitat patches are commonly cited causes of genetic differentiation and reduced genetic variation in animal populations. We used eight microsatellite markers to investigate genetic structure and levels of genetic diversity in a relict population of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvatica) in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, where recent disturbances have altered hydrologic processes and fragmented amphibian habitat. We also estimated migration rates among subpopulations, tested for a pattern of isolation-by-distance, and looked for evidence of a recent population bottleneck. The results from the clustering algorithm in Program STRUCTURE indicated the population is partitioned into two genetic clusters (subpopulations), and this result was further supported by factorial component analysis. In addition, an estimate of FST (FST = 0.0675, P value \\0.0001) supported the genetic differentiation of the two clusters. Estimates of migration rates among the two subpopulations were low, as were estimates of genetic variability. Conservation of the population of wood frogs may be improved by increasing the spatial distribution of the population and improving gene flow between the subpopulations. Construction or restoration of wetlands in the landscape between the clusters has the potential to address each of these objectives.

  18. Genetic structure of the world's polar bear populations.

    PubMed

    Paetkau, D; Amstrup, S C; Born, E W; Calvert, W; Derocher, A E; Garner, G W; Messier, F; Stirling, I; Taylor, M K; Wiig, O; Strobeck, C

    1999-10-01

    We studied genetic structure in polar bear (Ursus maritimus) populations by typing a sample of 473 individuals spanning the species distribution at 16 highly variable microsatellite loci. No genetic discontinuities were found that would be consistent with evolutionarily significant periods of isolation between groups. Direct comparison of movement data and genetic data from the Canadian Arctic revealed a highly significant correlation. Genetic data generally supported existing population (management unit) designations, although there were two cases where genetic data failed to differentiate between pairs of populations previously resolved by movement data. A sharp contrast was found between the minimal genetic structure observed among populations surrounding the polar basin and the presence of several marked genetic discontinuities in the Canadian Arctic. The discontinuities in the Canadian Arctic caused the appearance of four genetic clusters of polar bear populations. These clusters vary in total estimated population size from 100 to over 10 000, and the smallest may merit a relatively conservative management strategy in consideration of its apparent isolation. We suggest that the observed pattern of genetic discontinuities has developed in response to differences in the seasonal distribution and pattern of sea ice habitat and the effects of these differences on the distribution and abundance of seals. PMID:10583821

  19. Hamilton's inclusive fitness in finite-structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter D.; Maciejewski, Wes

    2014-01-01

    Hamilton's formulation of inclusive fitness has been with us for 50 years. During the first 20 of those years attention was largely focused on the evolutionary trajectories of different behaviours, but over the past 20 years interest has been growing in the effect of population structure on the evolution of behaviour and that is our focus here. We discuss the evolutionary journey of the inclusive-fitness effect over this epoch, nurtured as it was in an essentially homogeneous environment (that of ‘transitive’ structures) having to adapt in different ways to meet the expectations of heterogeneous structures. We pay particular attention to the way in which the theory has managed to adapt the original constructs of relatedness and reproductive value to provide a formulation of inclusive fitness that captures a precise measure of allele-frequency change in finite-structured populations. PMID:24686932

  20. Turkish Population Structure and Genetic Ancestry Reveal Relatedness among Eurasian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hodoğlugil, Uğur; Mahley, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Turkey connects the Middle East, Europe, and Asia and has experienced major population movements. We examined the population structure and genetic relatedness of samples from three regions of Turkey using over 500,000 SNP genotypes. The data were analyzed together with Human Genome Diversity Panel data. To obtain a more representative sampling from Central Asia, Kyrgyz samples (Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan) were genotyped and analyzed. Principal component (PC) analysis reveals a significant overlap between Turks and Middle Easterners and a relationship with Europeans and South and Central Asians; however, the Turkish genetic structure is unique. FRAPPE, STRUCTURE, and phylogenetic analyses support the PC analysis depending upon the number of parental ancestry components chosen. For example, supervised STRUCTURE (K = 3) illustrates a genetic ancestry for the Turks of 45% Middle Eastern (95% CI, 42–49), 40% European (95% CI, 36–44), and 15% Central Asian (95% CI, 13–16), whereas at K = 4 the genetic ancestry of the Turks was 38% European (95% CI, 35–42), 35% Middle Eastern (95% CI, 33–38), 18% South Asian (95% CI, 16–19), and 9% Central Asian (95% CI, 7–11). PC analysis and FRAPPE/STRUCTURE results from three regions in Turkey (Aydin, Istanbul, and Kayseri) were superimposed, without clear subpopulation structure, suggesting the selected samples were rather homogeneous. Thus, this study demonstrates admixture of Turkish people reflecting the population migration patterns. PMID:22332727

  1. Fundamental population-productivity relationships can be modified through density-dependent feedbacks of life-history evolution.

    PubMed

    Kuparinen, Anna; Stenseth, Nils Christian; Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of life histories over contemporary time scales will almost certainly affect population demography. One important pathway for such eco-evolutionary interactions is the density-dependent regulation of population dynamics. Here, we investigate how fisheries-induced evolution (FIE) might alter density-dependent population-productivity relationships. To this end, we simulate the eco-evolutionary dynamics of an Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) population under fishing, followed by a period of recovery in the absence of fishing. FIE is associated with increases in juvenile production, the ratio of juveniles to mature population biomass, and the ratio of the mature population biomass relative to the total population biomass. In contrast, net reproductive rate (R 0 ) and per capita population growth rate (r) decline concomitantly with evolution. Our findings suggest that FIE can substantially modify the fundamental population-productivity relationships that underlie density-dependent population regulation and that form the primary population-dynamical basis for fisheries stock-assessment projections. From a conservation and fisheries-rebuilding perspective, we find that FIE reduces R 0 and r, the two fundamental correlates of population recovery ability and inversely extinction probability. PMID:25558282

  2. Genetic Structure of Daphnia galeata Populations in Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Wolinska, Justyna; Ma, Xiaolin; Yang, Zhong; Hu, Wei; Yin, Mingbo

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the first examination of the genetic structure of Daphnia longispina complex populations in Eastern China. Only one species, D. galeata, was present across the eight investigated lakes; as identified by taxon assignment using allelic variation at 15 microsatellite loci. Three genetically differentiated D. galeata subgroups emerged independent of the type of statistical analysis applied. Thus, Bayesian clustering, discriminant analysis based on results from factorial correspondence analysis, and UPGMA clustering consistently showed that populations from two neighbouring lakes were genetically separated from a mixture of genotypes found in other lakes, which formed another two subgroups. Clonal diversity was high in all D. galeata populations, and most samples showed no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, indicating that clonal selection had little effect on the genetic diversity. Overall, populations did not cluster by geographical origin. Further studies will show if the observed pattern can be explained by natural colonization processes or by recent anthropogenic impact on predominantly artificial lakes. PMID:25768727

  3. Genetics in geographically structured populations: defining, estimating and interpreting FST

    PubMed Central

    Holsinger, Kent E.; Weir, Bruce S.

    2015-01-01

    Wright’s F-statistics, and especially FST, provide important insights into the evolutionary processes that influence the structure of genetic variation within and among populations, and they are among the most widely used descriptive statistics in population and evolutionary genetics. Estimates of FST can identify regions of the genome that have been the target of selection, and comparisons of FST from different parts of the genome can provide insights into the demographic history of populations. For these reasons and others, FST has a central role in population and evolutionary genetics and has wide applications in fields that range from disease association mapping to forensic science. This Review clarifies how FST is defined, how it should be estimated, how it is related to similar statistics and how estimates of FST should be interpreted. PMID:19687804

  4. Genetic structure of Daphnia galeata populations in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenzhi; Gießler, Sabine; Wolinska, Justyna; Ma, Xiaolin; Yang, Zhong; Hu, Wei; Yin, Mingbo

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the first examination of the genetic structure of Daphnia longispina complex populations in Eastern China. Only one species, D. galeata, was present across the eight investigated lakes; as identified by taxon assignment using allelic variation at 15 microsatellite loci. Three genetically differentiated D. galeata subgroups emerged independent of the type of statistical analysis applied. Thus, Bayesian clustering, discriminant analysis based on results from factorial correspondence analysis, and UPGMA clustering consistently showed that populations from two neighbouring lakes were genetically separated from a mixture of genotypes found in other lakes, which formed another two subgroups. Clonal diversity was high in all D. galeata populations, and most samples showed no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, indicating that clonal selection had little effect on the genetic diversity. Overall, populations did not cluster by geographical origin. Further studies will show if the observed pattern can be explained by natural colonization processes or by recent anthropogenic impact on predominantly artificial lakes. PMID:25768727

  5. Population Structure, Genetic Variation, and Linkage Disequilibrium in Perennial Ryegrass Populations Divergently Selected for Freezing Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kovi, Mallikarjuna Rao; Fjellheim, Siri; Sandve, Simen R.; Larsen, Arild; Rudi, Heidi; Asp, Torben; Kent, Matthew Peter; Rognli, Odd Arne

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature is one of the abiotic stresses seriously affecting the growth of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), and freezing tolerance is a complex trait of major agronomical importance in northern and central Europe. Understanding the genetic control of freezing tolerance would aid in the development of cultivars of perennial ryegrass with improved adaptation to frost. The plant material investigated in this study was an experimental synthetic population derived from pair-crosses among five European perennial ryegrass genotypes, representing adaptations to a range of climatic conditions across Europe. A total number of 80 individuals (24 of High frost [HF]; 29 of Low frost [LF], and 27 of Unselected [US]) from the second generation of the two divergently selected populations and an unselected (US) control population were genotyped using 278 genome-wide SNPs derived from perennial ryegrass transcriptome sequences. Our studies investigated the genetic diversity among the three experimental populations by analysis of molecular variance and population structure, and determined that the HF and LF populations are very divergent after selection for freezing tolerance, whereas the HF and US populations are more similar. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay varied across the seven chromosomes and the conspicuous pattern of LD between the HF and LF population confirmed their divergence in freezing tolerance. Furthermore, two Fst outlier methods; finite island model (fdist) by LOSITAN and hierarchical structure model using ARLEQUIN, both detected six loci under directional selection. These outlier loci are most probably linked to genes involved in freezing tolerance, cold adaptation, and abiotic stress. These six candidate loci under directional selection for freezing tolerance might be potential marker resources for breeding perennial ryegrass cultivars with improved freezing tolerance. PMID:26617611

  6. Population genetic structure, linkage disequilibrium and effective population size of conserved and extensively raised village chicken populations of Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Khanyile, Khulekani S.; Dzomba, Edgar F.; Muchadeyi, Farai C.

    2015-01-01

    Extensively raised village chickens are considered a valuable source of biodiversity, with genetic variability developed over thousands of years that ought to be characterized and utilized. Surveys that can reveal a population's genetic structure and provide an insight into its demographic history will give valuable information that can be used to manage and conserve important indigenous animal genetic resources. This study reports population diversity and structure, linkage disequilibrium and effective population sizes of Southern African village chickens and conservation flocks from South Africa. DNA samples from 312 chickens from South African village and conservation flocks (n = 146), Malawi (n = 30) and Zimbabwe (n = 136) were genotyped using the Illumina iSelect chicken SNP60K BeadChip. Population genetic structure analysis distinguished the four conservation flocks from the village chicken populations. Of the four flocks, the Ovambo clustered closer to the village chickens particularly those sampled from South Africa. Clustering of the village chickens followed a geographic gradient whereby South African chickens were closer to those from Zimbabwe than to chickens from Malawi. Different conservation flocks seemed to have maintained different components of the ancestral genomes with a higher proportion of village chicken diversity found in the Ovambo population. Overall population LD averaged over chromosomes ranged from 0.03 ± 0.07 to 0.58 ± 0.41 and averaged 0.15 ± 0.16. Higher LD, ranging from 0.29 to 0.36, was observed between SNP markers that were less than 10 kb apart in the conservation flocks. LD in the conservation flocks steadily decreased to 0.15 (PK) and 0.24 (VD) at SNP marker interval of 500 kb. Genomewide LD decay in the village chickens from Malawi, Zimbabwe and South Africa followed a similar trend as the conservation flocks although the mean LD values for the investigated SNP intervals were lower. The results suggest low effective

  7. Genetic structure of the indigenous populations of Siberia.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M H; Williams, J T; Duggirala, R

    1997-10-01

    This study explores the genetic structure of Siberian indigenous populations on the basis of standard blood group and protein markers and DNA variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) variation. Four analytical methods were utilized in this study: Harpending and Jenkin's R-matrix; Harpending and Ward's method of correlating genetic heterozygosity (H) to the distance from the centroid of the gene frequency array (rii); spatial autocorrelation, and Mantel tests. Because of the underlying assumptions of the various methods, the numbers of populations used in the analyses varied from 15 to 62. Since spatial autocorrelation is based upon separate correlations between alleles, a larger number of standard blood markers and populations were used. Fewest Siberian populations have been sampled for VNTRs, thus, only a limited comparison was possible. The four analytical procedures employed in this study yielded complementary results suggestive of the effects of unique historical events, evolutionary forces, and geography on the distribution of alleles in Siberian indigenous populations. The principal components analysis of the R-matrix demonstrated the presence of populational clusters that reflect their phylogenetic relationship. Mantel comparisons of matrices indicate that an intimate relationship exists between geography, languages, and genetics of Siberian populations. Spatial autocorrelation patterns reflect the isolation-by-distance model of Malecot and the possible effects of long-distance migration. PMID:9386825

  8. Reproducibility of Vibrionaceae population structure in coastal bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Gitta; Preheim, Sarah P; Kauffman, Kathryn M; David, Lawrence A; Shapiro, Jesse; Alm, Eric J; Polz, Martin F

    2013-03-01

    How reproducibly microbial populations assemble in the wild remains poorly understood. Here, we assess evidence for ecological specialization and predictability of fine-scale population structure and habitat association in coastal ocean Vibrionaceae across years. We compare Vibrionaceae lifestyles in the bacterioplankton (combinations of free-living, particle, or zooplankton associations) measured using the same sampling scheme in 2006 and 2009 to assess whether the same groups show the same environmental association year after year. This reveals complex dynamics with populations falling primarily into two categories: (i) nearly equally represented in each of the two samplings and (ii) highly skewed, often to an extent that they appear exclusive to one or the other sampling times. Importantly, populations recovered at the same abundance in both samplings occupied highly similar habitats suggesting predictable and robust environmental association while skewed abundances of some populations may be triggered by shifts in ecological conditions. The latter is supported by difference in the composition of large eukaryotic plankton between years, with samples in 2006 being dominated by copepods, and those in 2009 by diatoms. Overall, the comparison supports highly predictable population-habitat linkage but highlights the fact that complex, and often unmeasured, environmental dynamics in habitat occurrence may have strong effects on population dynamics. PMID:23178668

  9. Latent structure of dermatoglyphs in the population of Selska Valley.

    PubMed

    Milicić, J; Vidovic, M

    2005-01-01

    The historical records of Selska Valley reveal that the eastern part of this area was first settled by Slovene agrarian colonists, the western part by German colonists and the central part by Friulians. These were later followed by Slovene and Slovenized settlers, who penetrated the valley from north to south. Because of its reproductive isolation, the population of Selska Valley is highly suitable for the study of population structures. The quantitative traits of the digital and palmar dermatoglyphs are polygenetically determined characteristics, which, due to their selective inertness to changes, may provide an insight into microevolutionary processes. The purpose of our study was to identify the possible differences between the populations of villages in the valley and the mountain villages attributable to various migration flows through history. Altogether 340 finger and palm prints of 163 males and 177 females were collected in two groups of villages: (1) the lowland villages (Praprotno, Bukovica, Sevlje, Dolenja vas, Selca, Zelezniki and Zali log), and (2) the mountain villages (Podlonk, Prtovc, Spodnje Danje, Zgornja Sorica and Spodnja Sorica). The 18 dermatoglyphic variables were analyzed. A statistical analysis using standard methods was performed and the latent structure evaluated using factor analysis. The discriminant analysis and latent structure of the quantitative properties of dermatoglyphs suggest the presence of certain differences in gene pools of two studied populations (the group of villages in the valley and the group of mountain villages). It is highly probable that these differences can be attributed to low migration in the Selska Valley and to the 'selective inertness' of quantitative dermatoglyphic traits. In a previous study, no significant biological differences between the studied populations were found in qualitative dermatoglyphic traits. This indicates that Selska Valley and its village populations represent a specific isolate, and

  10. Host Mobility Drives Pathogen Competition in Spatially Structured Populations

    PubMed Central

    Poletto, Chiara; Meloni, Sandro; Colizza, Vittoria; Moreno, Yamir; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Interactions among multiple infectious agents are increasingly recognized as a fundamental issue in the understanding of key questions in public health regarding pathogen emergence, maintenance, and evolution. The full description of host-multipathogen systems is, however, challenged by the multiplicity of factors affecting the interaction dynamics and the resulting competition that may occur at different scales, from the within-host scale to the spatial structure and mobility of the host population. Here we study the dynamics of two competing pathogens in a structured host population and assess the impact of the mobility pattern of hosts on the pathogen competition. We model the spatial structure of the host population in terms of a metapopulation network and focus on two strains imported locally in the system and having the same transmission potential but different infectious periods. We find different scenarios leading to competitive success of either one of the strain or to the codominance of both strains in the system. The dominance of the strain characterized by the shorter or longer infectious period depends exclusively on the structure of the population and on the the mobility of hosts across patches. The proposed modeling framework allows the integration of other relevant epidemiological, environmental and demographic factors, opening the path to further mathematical and computational studies of the dynamics of multipathogen systems. PMID:23966843

  11. Population Structure Shapes Copy Number Variation in Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Ian H.; Miller, Becky; Tan, John C.; Tan, Asako; Nair, Shalini; Nkhoma, Standwell C.; De Donato, Marcos; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Dondorp, Arjen; Branch, Oralee H.; Mesia, Lastenia Ruiz; Newton, Paul; Mayxay, Mayfong; Amambua-Ngwa, Alfred; Conway, David J.; Nosten, François; Ferdig, Michael T.; Anderson, Tim J. C.

    2016-01-01

    If copy number variants (CNVs) are predominantly deleterious, we would expect them to be more efficiently purged from populations with a large effective population size (Ne) than from populations with a small Ne. Malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum) provide an excellent organism to examine this prediction, because this protozoan shows a broad spectrum of population structures within a single species, with large, stable, outbred populations in Africa, small unstable inbred populations in South America and with intermediate population characteristics in South East Asia. We characterized 122 single-clone parasites, without prior laboratory culture, from malaria-infected patients in seven countries in Africa, South East Asia and South America using a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism/CNV microarray. We scored 134 high-confidence CNVs across the parasite exome, including 33 deletions and 102 amplifications, which ranged in size from <500 bp to 59 kb, as well as 10,107 flanking, biallelic single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Overall, CNVs were rare, small, and skewed toward low frequency variants, consistent with the deleterious model. Relative to African and South East Asian populations, CNVs were significantly more common in South America, showed significantly less skew in allele frequencies, and were significantly larger. On this background of low frequency CNV, we also identified several high-frequency CNVs under putative positive selection using an FST outlier analysis. These included known adaptive CNVs containing rh2b and pfmdr1, and several other CNVs (e.g., DNA helicase and three conserved proteins) that require further investigation. Our data are consistent with a significant impact of genetic structure on CNV burden in an important human pathogen. PMID:26613787

  12. Population Structure Shapes Copy Number Variation in Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Ian H; Miller, Becky; Tan, John C; Tan, Asako; Nair, Shalini; Nkhoma, Standwell C; De Donato, Marcos; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Dondorp, Arjen; Branch, Oralee H; Mesia, Lastenia Ruiz; Newton, Paul; Mayxay, Mayfong; Amambua-Ngwa, Alfred; Conway, David J; Nosten, François; Ferdig, Michael T; Anderson, Tim J C

    2016-03-01

    If copy number variants (CNVs) are predominantly deleterious, we would expect them to be more efficiently purged from populations with a large effective population size (Ne) than from populations with a small Ne. Malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum) provide an excellent organism to examine this prediction, because this protozoan shows a broad spectrum of population structures within a single species, with large, stable, outbred populations in Africa, small unstable inbred populations in South America and with intermediate population characteristics in South East Asia. We characterized 122 single-clone parasites, without prior laboratory culture, from malaria-infected patients in seven countries in Africa, South East Asia and South America using a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism/CNV microarray. We scored 134 high-confidence CNVs across the parasite exome, including 33 deletions and 102 amplifications, which ranged in size from <500 bp to 59 kb, as well as 10,107 flanking, biallelic single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Overall, CNVs were rare, small, and skewed toward low frequency variants, consistent with the deleterious model. Relative to African and South East Asian populations, CNVs were significantly more common in South America, showed significantly less skew in allele frequencies, and were significantly larger. On this background of low frequency CNV, we also identified several high-frequency CNVs under putative positive selection using an FST outlier analysis. These included known adaptive CNVs containing rh2b and pfmdr1, and several other CNVs (e.g., DNA helicase and three conserved proteins) that require further investigation. Our data are consistent with a significant impact of genetic structure on CNV burden in an important human pathogen. PMID:26613787

  13. Evolutionary dynamics for persistent cooperation in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Xinsheng; Claussen, Jens Christian; Guo, Wanlin

    2015-06-01

    The emergence and maintenance of cooperative behavior is a fascinating topic in evolutionary biology and social science. The public goods game (PGG) is a paradigm for exploring cooperative behavior. In PGG, the total resulting payoff is divided equally among all participants. This feature still leads to the dominance of defection without substantially magnifying the public good by a multiplying factor. Much effort has been made to explain the evolution of cooperative strategies, including a recent model in which only a portion of the total benefit is shared by all the players through introducing a new strategy named persistent cooperation. A persistent cooperator is a contributor who is willing to pay a second cost to retrieve the remaining portion of the payoff contributed by themselves. In a previous study, this model was analyzed in the framework of well-mixed populations. This paper focuses on discussing the persistent cooperation in lattice-structured populations. The evolutionary dynamics of the structured populations consisting of three types of competing players (pure cooperators, defectors, and persistent cooperators) are revealed by theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. In particular, the approximate expressions of fixation probabilities for strategies are derived on one-dimensional lattices. The phase diagrams of stationary states, and the evolution of frequencies and spatial patterns for strategies are illustrated on both one-dimensional and square lattices by simulations. Our results are consistent with the general observation that, at least in most situations, a structured population facilitates the evolution of cooperation. Specifically, here we find that the existence of persistent cooperators greatly suppresses the spreading of defectors under more relaxed conditions in structured populations compared to that obtained in well-mixed populations.

  14. Approximation techniques for parameter estimation and feedback control for distributed models of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    Approximation ideas are discussed that can be used in parameter estimation and feedback control for Euler-Bernoulli models of elastic systems. Focusing on parameter estimation problems, ways by which one can obtain convergence results for cubic spline based schemes for hybrid models involving an elastic cantilevered beam with tip mass and base acceleration are outlined. Sample numerical findings are also presented.

  15. Impaired and preserved aspects of feedback learning in aMCI: contributions of structural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Wessa, Michèle; King, Andrea V; Meyer, Patric; Frölich, Lutz; Flor, Herta; Poupon, Cyril; Hoppstädter, Michael; Linke, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Distinct lines of research demonstrated that patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), a potential precursor of Alzheimer disease (AD), are particularly impaired in remembering relations between items and that the use of emotional targets can facilitate memory in patients with AD. We link these findings by examining learning through positive and negative feedback in patients with aMCI, and explore its anatomic underpinnings with diffusion tensor imaging and tractography. Compared to healthy controls, patients with single-domain aMCI were impaired in learning from positive feedback, while learning from negative outcomes was preserved. Among pathways within the brain circuit involved in feedback learning, abnormal white matter microstructure was observed in tracts, which connect left-hemispheric amygdala with hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. In all participants, reduced white matter integrity in this left fiber tract was specifically associated with learning from positive outcomes. Microstructure of right-hemispheric tracts between amygdala and entorhinal cortex was related to learning from negative feedback, and was not compromised in aMCI patients. Our results provide new insight into how anatomical connections might contribute to impaired and preserved aspects of learning behaviors in the early AD process and indicate potential compensatory mechanisms. PMID:26084875

  16. Frequency domain control based on quantitative feedback theory for vibration suppression in structures equipped with magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapateiro, Mauricio; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Luo, Ningsu; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.

    2009-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of designing quantitative feedback theory (QFT) based controllers for the vibration reduction in a structure equipped with an MR damper. In this way, the controller is designed in the frequency domain and the natural frequencies of the structure can be directly accounted for in the process. Though the QFT methodology was originally conceived of for linear time invariant systems, it can be extended to nonlinear systems. A new methodology is proposed for characterizing the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the MR damper through the uncertainty template in the Nichols chart. The resulting controller performance is evaluated in a real-time hybrid testing experiment.

  17. Genetic structure and phylogeography of European catfish (Silurus glanis) populations.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllidis, A; Krieg, F; Cottin, C; Abatzopoulos, T J; Triantaphyllidis, C; Guyomard, R

    2002-06-01

    The genetic structure of Silurus glanis (Europe's largest freshwater fish species) across most of its natural distribution was investigated using 10 microsatellite loci. The revealed levels of genetic diversity were much higher than previous allozyme and restriction fragment length polymorphism mitochondrial DNA analyses had shown; relative levels of variability among populations were however, in good agreement with the previous studies. Populations from large basins (Volga and Danube rivers) were the most polymorphic, while samples from the smaller Greek rivers, which are more prone to genetic bottleneck, exhibited the lowest levels of genetic diversity. Microsatellite multilocus genotyping permitted the assignment of individual fish to their population of origin with a score as high as 98.3%. Despite the great genetic differentiation of S. glanis populations, no consistent pattern of geographical structuring was revealed, in contrast to previous studies of European freshwater fish species. A model of isolation by distance seems more probable and a hypothesis of recent dispersion from only one glacial refugium is proposed. The discovery of the highest levels of microsatellite and mitochondrial diversity in the Volga sample and the presence of river connections, during the Pleistocene, between this area and all major areas of the present catfish distribution, place this refugium around the Ponto-Caspian region. Combining these data with those from previous studies, a number of markers are now available to monitor wild and hatchery populations even at the individual level. PMID:12030981

  18. Genetic structure of a lotic population of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.G.; Shimkets, L.J.; McArthur, J.V.

    1995-05-01

    The genetic structure of a population of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia isolated from a southeastern blackwater stream was investigated by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis to examine the allelic variation in eight structural gene loci. Overall, 213 isolates were collected at transect points along the stream continuum, from both the sediments along the bank and the water column. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis revealed 164 distinct electrophoretic types, and the mean genetic diversity of the entire population was 0.574. Genetic diversity values did not vary spatially along the stream continuum. From a canonical discriminant analysis, Mahalonobis distances (measurements of genetic similarity between populations) revealed significant differences among the subpopulations at the sediment sampling points, suggesting bacterial adaptation to a heterogeneous (or patchy) microgeographical environment. Multilocus linkage disequilibrium analysis of the isolates revealed only limited association between alleles, suggesting frequent recombination, relative to binary fission, in this population. Furthermore, the dendrogram created from the data of this study and the allele mismatch distribution are typical of a population characterized by extensive genetic mixing. We suggest that B. cepacia be added to the growing list of bacteria that are not obligatorily clonal. 41 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Molecular Population Genetic Structure in the Piping Plover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mark P.; Haig, Susan M.; Gratto-Trevor, Cheri L.; Mullins, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    The Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) is a migratory shorebird currently listed as Endangered in Canada and the U.S. Great Lakes, and threatened throughout the remainder of its U.S. breeding and winter range. In this study, we undertook the first comprehensive molecular genetic-based investigation of Piping Plovers. Our primary goals were to (1) address higher level subspecific taxonomic issues, (2) characterize population genetic structure, and (3) make inferences regarding past bottlenecks or population expansions that have occurred within this species. Our analyses included samples of individuals from 23 U.S. States and Canadian Provinces, and were based on mitochondrial DNA sequences (580 bp, n = 245 individuals) and eight nuclear microsatellite loci (n = 229 individuals). Our findings illustrate strong support for separate Atlantic and Interior Piping Plover subspecies (C. m. melodus and C. m. circumcinctus, respectively). Birds from the Great Lakes region were allied with the Interior subspecies group and should be taxonomically referred to as C. m. circumcinctus. Population genetic analyses suggested that genetic structure was stronger among Atlantic birds relative to the Interior group. This pattern indicates that natal and breeding site fidelity may be reduced among Interior birds. Furthermore, analyses suggested that Interior birds have previously experienced genetic bottlenecks, whereas no evidence for such patterns existed among the Atlantic subspecies. Likewise, genetic analyses indicated that the Great Lakes region has experienced a population expansion. This finding may be interpreted as population growth following a previous bottleneck event. No genetic evidence for population expansions was found for Atlantic, Prairie Canada, or U.S. Northern Great Plains individuals. We interpret our population history insights in light of 25 years of Piping Plover census data. Overall, differences observed between Interior and Atlantic birds may reflect

  20. Population structure of the giant garter snake, Thamnophis gigas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paquin, M.M.; Wylie, G.D.; Routman, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    The giant garter snake, Thamnophis gigas, is a threatened species endemic to California's Central Valley. We tested the hypothesis that current watershed boundaries have caused genetic differentiation among populations of T. gigas. We sampled 14 populations throughout the current geographic range of T. gigas and amplified 859 bp from the mitochondrial gene ND4 and one nuclear microsatellite locus. DNA sequence variation from the mitochondrial gene indicates there is some genetic structuring of the populations, with high F ST values and unique haplotypes occurring at high frequency in several populations. We found that clustering populations by watershed boundary results in significant between-region genetic variance for mtDNA. However, analysis of allele frequencies at the microsatellite locus NSU3 reveals very low F ST values and little between-region variation in allele frequencies. The discordance found between mitochondrial and microsatellite data may be explained by aspects of molecular evolution and/or T. gigas life history characteristics. Differences in effective population size between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, or male-biased gene flow, result in a lower migration rate of mitochondrial haplotypes relative to nuclear alleles. However, we cannot exclude homoplasy as one explanation for homogeneity found for the single microsatellite locus. The mitochondrial nucleotide sequence data supports conservation practices that identify separate management units for T. gigas. ?? Springer 2006.

  1. A Spatial Framework for Understanding Population Structure and Admixture.

    PubMed

    Bradburd, Gideon S; Ralph, Peter L; Coop, Graham M

    2016-01-01

    Geographic patterns of genetic variation within modern populations, produced by complex histories of migration, can be difficult to infer and visually summarize. A general consequence of geographically limited dispersal is that samples from nearby locations tend to be more closely related than samples from distant locations, and so genetic covariance often recapitulates geographic proximity. We use genome-wide polymorphism data to build "geogenetic maps," which, when applied to stationary populations, produces a map of the geographic positions of the populations, but with distances distorted to reflect historical rates of gene flow. In the underlying model, allele frequency covariance is a decreasing function of geogenetic distance, and nonlocal gene flow such as admixture can be identified as anomalously strong covariance over long distances. This admixture is explicitly co-estimated and depicted as arrows, from the source of admixture to the recipient, on the geogenetic map. We demonstrate the utility of this method on a circum-Tibetan sampling of the greenish warbler (Phylloscopus trochiloides), in which we find evidence for gene flow between the adjacent, terminal populations of the ring species. We also analyze a global sampling of human populations, for which we largely recover the geography of the sampling, with support for significant histories of admixture in many samples. This new tool for understanding and visualizing patterns of population structure is implemented in a Bayesian framework in the program SpaceMix. PMID:26771578

  2. A Spatial Framework for Understanding Population Structure and Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Bradburd, Gideon S.; Ralph, Peter L.; Coop, Graham M.

    2016-01-01

    Geographic patterns of genetic variation within modern populations, produced by complex histories of migration, can be difficult to infer and visually summarize. A general consequence of geographically limited dispersal is that samples from nearby locations tend to be more closely related than samples from distant locations, and so genetic covariance often recapitulates geographic proximity. We use genome-wide polymorphism data to build “geogenetic maps,” which, when applied to stationary populations, produces a map of the geographic positions of the populations, but with distances distorted to reflect historical rates of gene flow. In the underlying model, allele frequency covariance is a decreasing function of geogenetic distance, and nonlocal gene flow such as admixture can be identified as anomalously strong covariance over long distances. This admixture is explicitly co-estimated and depicted as arrows, from the source of admixture to the recipient, on the geogenetic map. We demonstrate the utility of this method on a circum-Tibetan sampling of the greenish warbler (Phylloscopus trochiloides), in which we find evidence for gene flow between the adjacent, terminal populations of the ring species. We also analyze a global sampling of human populations, for which we largely recover the geography of the sampling, with support for significant histories of admixture in many samples. This new tool for understanding and visualizing patterns of population structure is implemented in a Bayesian framework in the program SpaceMix. PMID:26771578

  3. Coalescent approximation for structured populations in a stationary random environment.

    PubMed

    Sagitov, S; Jagers, P; Vatutin, V

    2010-11-01

    We establish convergence to the Kingman coalescent for the genealogy of a geographically-or otherwise-structured version of the Wright-Fisher population model with fast migration. The new feature is that migration probabilities may change in a random fashion. This brings a novel formula for the coalescent effective population size (EPS). We call it a quenched EPS to emphasize the key feature of our model - random environment. The quenched EPS is compared with an annealed (mean-field) EPS which describes the case of constant migration probabilities obtained by averaging the random migration probabilities over possible environments. PMID:20619285

  4. Inter-population variability of DEFA3 gene absence: correlation with haplotype structure and population variability

    PubMed Central

    Ballana, Ester; González, Juan Ramón; Bosch, Nina; Estivill, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Background Copy number variants (CNVs) account for a significant proportion of normal phenotypic variation and may have an important role in human pathological variation. The α-defensin cluster on human chromosome 8p23.1 is one of the better-characterized CNVs, in which high copy number variability affecting the DEFA1 and DEFA3 genes has been reported. Moreover, the DEFA3 gene has been found to be absent in a significant proportion of control population subjects. CNVs involving immune genes, such as α-defensins, are possibly contributing to innate immunity differences observed between individuals and influence predisposition and susceptibility to disease. Results We have tested the DEFA3 absence in 697 samples from different human populations. The proportion of subjects lacking DEFA3 has been found to vary from 10% to 37%, depending on the population tested, suggesting differences in innate immune function between populations. Absence of DEFA3 was correlated with the region's haplotype block structure. African samples showed a higher intra-populational variability together with the highest proportion of subjects without DEFA3 (37%). Association analysis of DEFA3 absence with 136 SNPs from a 100-kb region identified a conserved haplotype in the Caucasian population, extending for the whole region. Conclusion Complexity and variability are essential genomic features of the α-defensin cluster at the 8p23.1 region. The identification of population differences in subjects lacking the DEFA3 gene may be suggestive of population-specific selective pressures with potential impact on human health. PMID:17214878

  5. Demographic analysis from summaries of an age-structured population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hatfield, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Demographic analyses of age-structured populations typically rely on life history data for individuals, or when individual animals are not identified, on information about the numbers of individuals in each age class through time. While it is usually difficult to determine the age class of a randomly encountered individual, it is often the case that the individual can be readily and reliably assigned to one of a set of age classes. For example, it is often possible to distinguish first-year from older birds. In such cases, the population age structure can be regarded as a latent variable governed by a process prior, and the data as summaries of this latent structure. In this article, we consider the problem of uncovering the latent structure and estimating process parameters from summaries of age class information. We present a demographic analysis for the critically endangered migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana), based only on counts of first-year birds and of older birds. We estimate age and year-specific survival rates. We address the controversial issue of whether management action on the breeding grounds has influenced recruitment, relating recruitment rates to the number of seventh-year and older birds, and examining the pattern of variation through time in this rate.

  6. Campylobacter jejuni colonization and population structure in urban populations of ducks and starlings in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vathsala; Stevenson, Mark; Marshall, Jonathan; Fearnhead, Paul; Holland, Barbara R; Hotter, Grant; French, Nigel P

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. and the population structure of C. jejuni in European starlings and ducks cohabiting multiple public access sites in an urban area of New Zealand. The country's geographical isolation and relatively recent history of introduction of wild bird species, including the European starling and mallard duck, create an ideal setting to explore the impact of geographical separation on the population biology of C. jejuni, as well as potential public health implications. A total of 716 starling and 720 duck fecal samples were collected and screened for C. jejuni over a 12 month period. This study combined molecular genotyping, population genetics and epidemiological modeling and revealed: (i) higher Campylobacter spp. isolation in starlings (46%) compared with ducks (30%), but similar isolation of C. jejuni in ducks (23%) and starlings (21%), (ii) significant associations between the isolation of Campylobacter spp. and host species, sampling location and time of year using logistic regression, (iii) evidence of population differentiation, as indicated by FST, and host-genotype association with clonal complexes CC ST-177 and CC ST-682 associated with starlings, and clonal complexes CC ST-1034, CC ST-692, and CC ST-1332 associated with ducks, and (iv) greater genetic diversity and genotype richness in ducks compared with starlings. These findings provide evidence that host-associated genotypes, such as the starling-associated ST-177 and ST-682, represent lineages that were introduced with the host species in the 19th century. The isolation of sequence types associated with human disease in New Zealand indicate that wild ducks and starlings need to be considered as a potential public health risk, particularly in urban areas. We applied molecular epidemiology and population genetics to obtain insights in to the population structure, host-species relationships, gene flow and

  7. Visualizing spatial population structure with estimated effective migration surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Petkova, Desislava; Novembre, John; Stephens, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Genetic data often exhibit patterns broadly consistent with “isolation by distance” – a phenomenon where genetic similarity decays with geographic distance. In a heterogeneous habitat this may occur more quickly in some regions than others: for example, barriers to gene flow can accelerate differentiation between neighboring groups. We use the concept of “effective migration” to model the relationship between genetics and geography: in this paradigm, effective migration is low in regions where genetic similarity decays quickly. We present a method to visualize variation in effective migration across the habitat from geographically indexed genetic data. Our approach uses a population genetic model to relate effective migration rates to expected genetic dissimilarities. We illustrate its potential and limitations using simulations and data from elephant, human and A. thaliana populations. The resulting visualizations highlight important spatial features of population structure that are difficult to discern using existing methods for summarizing genetic variation. PMID:26642242

  8. Visualizing spatial population structure with estimated effective migration surfaces.

    PubMed

    Petkova, Desislava; Novembre, John; Stephens, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Genetic data often exhibit patterns broadly consistent with 'isolation by distance'-a phenomenon where genetic similarity decays with geographic distance. In a heterogeneous habitat, this may occur more quickly in some regions than in others: for example, barriers to gene flow can accelerate differentiation between neighboring groups. We use the concept of 'effective migration' to model the relationship between genetics and geography. In this paradigm, effective migration is low in regions where genetic similarity decays quickly. We present a method to visualize variation in effective migration across a habitat from geographically indexed genetic data. Our approach uses a population genetic model to relate effective migration rates to expected genetic dissimilarities. We illustrate its potential and limitations using simulations and data from elephant, human and Arabidopsis thaliana populations. The resulting visualizations highlight important spatial features of population structure that are difficult to discern using existing methods for summarizing genetic variation. PMID:26642242

  9. Does Structured Quizzing with Process Specific Feedback Lead to Learning Gains in an Active Learning Geoscience Classroom?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palsole, S.; Serpa, L. F.

    2013-12-01

    There is a great realization that efficient teaching in the geosciences has the potential to have far reaching effects in outreach to decision and policy makers (Herbert, 2006; Manduca & Mogk, 2006). This research in turn informs educators that the geosciences by the virtue of their highly integrative nature play an important role in serving as an entry point into STEM disciplines and helping developing a new cadre of geoscientists, scientists and a general population with an understanding of science. Keeping these goals in mind we set to design introductory geoscience courses for non-majors and majors that move away from the traditional lecture models which don't necessarily contribute well to knowledge building and retention ((Handelsman et al., 2007; Hake, 1997) to a blended active learning classroom where basic concepts and didactic information is acquired online via webquests, lecturettes and virtual field trips and the face to face portions of the class are focused on problem solving exercises. The traditional way to ensure that students are prepared for the in-class activity is to have the students take a quiz online to demonstrate basic competency. In the process of redesign, we decided to leverage the technology to build quizzes that are highly structured and map to a process (formation of divergent boundaries for example) or sets of earth processes that we needed the students to know before in-class activities. The quizzes can be taken multiple times and provide process specific feedback, thus serving as a heuristic to the students to ensure they have acquired the necessary competency. The heuristic quizzes were developed and deployed over a year with the student data driving the redesign process to ensure synchronicity. Preliminary data analysis indicates a positive correlation between higher student scores on in-class application exercises and time spent on the process quizzes. An assessment of learning gains also indicate a higher degree of self

  10. Structural basis of biopterin-induced inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I by GFRP, its feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Okada, Kengo; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2004-12-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI) is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, a key cofactor necessary for nitric oxide synthase and for the hydroxylases that are involved in the production of catecholamines and serotonin. In animals, the GTPCHI feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) binds GTPCHI to mediate feed-forward activation of GTPCHI activity in the presence of phenylalanine, whereas it induces feedback inhibition of enzyme activity in the presence of biopterin. Here, we have reported the crystal structure of the biopterin-induced inhibitory complex of GTPCHI and GFRP and compared it with the previously reported phenylalanine-induced stimulatory complex. The structure reveals five biopterin molecules located at each interface between GTPCHI and GFRP. Induced fitting structural changes by the biopterin binding expand large conformational changes in GTPCHI peptide segments forming the active site, resulting in inhibition of the activity. By locating 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine-responsive dystonia mutations in the complex structure, we found mutations that may possibly disturb the GFRP-mediated regulation of GTPCHI. PMID:15448133

  11. Demographic History, Population Structure, and Local Adaptation in Alpine Populations of Cardamine impatiens and Cardamine resedifolia

    PubMed Central

    Ometto, Lino; Li, Mingai; Bresadola, Luisa; Barbaro, Enrico; Neteler, Markus; Varotto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Species evolution depends on numerous and distinct forces, including demography and natural selection. For example, local adaptation and population structure affect the evolutionary history of species living along environmental clines. This is particularly relevant in plants, which are often characterized by limited dispersal ability and the need to respond to abiotic and biotic stress factors specific to the local environment. Here we study the demographic history and the possible existence of local adaptation in two related species of Brassicaceae, Cardamine impatiens and Cardamine resedifolia, which occupy separate habitats along the elevation gradient. Previous genome-wide analyses revealed the occurrence of distinct selective pressures in the two species, with genes involved in cold response evolving particularly fast in C. resedifolia. In this study we surveyed patterns of molecular evolution and genetic variability in a set of 19 genes, including neutral and candidate genes involved in cold response, across 10 populations each of C. resedifolia and C. impatiens from the Italian Alps (Trentino). We inferred the population structure and demographic history of the two species, and tested the occurrence of signatures of local adaptation in these genes. The results indicate that, despite a slightly higher population differentiation in C. resedifolia than in C. impatiens, both species are only weakly structured and that populations sampled at high altitude experience less gene flow than low-altitude ones. None of the genes showed signatures of positive selection, suggesting that they do not seem to play relevant roles in the current evolutionary processes of adaptation to alpine environments of these species. PMID:25933225

  12. Different perceptions of social dilemmas: Evolutionary multigames in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-09-01

    Motivated by the fact that the same social dilemma can be perceived differently by different players, we here study evolutionary multigames in structured populations. While the core game is the weak prisoner's dilemma, a fraction of the population adopts either a positive or a negative value of the sucker's payoff, thus playing either the traditional prisoner's dilemma or the snowdrift game. We show that the higher the fraction of the population adopting a different payoff matrix the more the evolution of cooperation is promoted. The microscopic mechanism responsible for this outcome is unique to structured populations, and it is due to the payoff heterogeneity, which spontaneously introduces strong cooperative leaders that give rise to an asymmetric strategy imitation flow in favor of cooperation. We demonstrate that the reported evolutionary outcomes are robust against variations of the interaction network, and they also remain valid if players are allowed to vary which game they play over time. These results corroborate existing evidence in favor of heterogeneity-enhanced network reciprocity, and they reveal how different perceptions of social dilemmas may contribute to their resolution.

  13. Argentine Population Genetic Structure: Large Variance in Amerindian Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Michael F.; Tian, Chao; Shigeta, Russell; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Silva, Gabriel; Belmont, John W.; Kittles, Rick; Gamron, Susana; Allevi, Alberto; Palatnik, Simon A.; Alvarellos, Alejandro; Paira, Sergio; Caprarulo, Cesar; Guillerón, Carolina; Catoggio, Luis J.; Prigione, Cristina; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; García, Mercedes A.; Perandones, Carlos E.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2011-01-01

    Argentine population genetic structure was examined using a set of 78 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to assess the contributions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry in 94 individuals members of this population. Using the Bayesian clustering algorithm STRUCTURE, the mean European contribution was 78%, the Amerindian contribution was 19.4%, and the African contribution was 2.5%. Similar results were found using weighted least mean square method: European, 80.2%; Amerindian, 18.1%; and African, 1.7%. Consistent with previous studies the current results showed very few individuals (four of 94) with greater than 10% African admixture. Notably, when individual admixture was examined, the Amerindian and European admixture showed a very large variance and individual Amerindian contribution ranged from 1.5 to 84.5% in the 94 individual Argentine subjects. These results indicate that admixture must be considered when clinical epidemiology or case control genetic analyses are studied in this population. Moreover, the current study provides a set of informative SNPs that can be used to ascertain or control for this potentially hidden stratification. In addition, the large variance in admixture proportions in individual Argentine subjects shown by this study suggests that this population is appropriate for future admixture mapping studies. PMID:17177183

  14. Feedbacks Between Wave Energy And Declining Coral Reef Structure: Implications For Coastal Morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, A. E.; Jenkins, C. J.; Moore, L. J.; Potts, D. C.; Burgess, P. M.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Elias, E.; Reidenbach, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The incident wave energy dissipated by the structural complexity and bottom roughness of coral reef ecosystems, and the carbonate sediment produced by framework-building corals, provide natural shoreline protection and nourishment, respectively. Globally, coral reef ecosystems are in decline as a result of ocean warming and acidification, which is exacerbated by chronic regional stressors such as pollution and disease. As a consequence of declining reef health, many reef ecosystems are experiencing reduced coral cover and shifts to dominance by macroalgae, resulting in a loss of rugosity and thus hydrodynamic roughness. As coral reef architecture is compromised and carbonate skeletons are eroded, wave energy dissipation and sediment transport patterns--along with the carbonate sediment budget of the coastal environment--may be altered. Using a Delft3D numerical model of the south-central Molokai, Hawaii, fringing reef, we simulate the effects of changing reef states on wave energy and sediment transport. To determine the temporally-varying effects of biotic and abiotic stressors such as storms and bleaching on the reef structure and carbonate production, we couple Delft3D with CarboLOT, a model that simulates growth and competition of carbonate-producing organisms. CarboLOT is driven by the Lotka-Volterra population ecology equations and niche suitability principles, and accesses the CarboKB database for region-specific, carbonate-producing species information on growth rates, reproduction patterns, habitat suitability, as well as organism geometries. Simulations assess how changing reef states--which alter carbonate sediment production and reef morphology and thus hydrodynamic roughness--impact wave attenuation and sediment transport gradients along reef-fronted beaches. Initial results suggest that along fringing reefs having characteristics similar to the Molokai fringing reef, projected sea level rise will likely outpace coral reef accretion, and the increased

  15. The strong-migration limit in geographically structured populations.

    PubMed

    Nagylaki, T

    1980-04-01

    Some strong-migration limits are established for geographically structured populations. A diploid monoecious population is subdivided into a finite number of colonies, which exchange migrants. The migration pattern is fixed and ergodic, but otherwise arbitrary. Generations are discrete and nonoverlapping; the analysis is restricted to a single locus. In all the limiting results, an effective population number Ne (less than or equal to NT) appears instead of the actual total population number NT. 1. If there is no selection, every allele mutates at rate u to types not preexisting in the population, and the (finite) subpopulation numbers Ni are very large, then the ultimate rate and pattern of convergence of the probabilities of allelic identity are approximately the same as for panmixia. If, in addition, the Ni are proportional to 1/u, as NT leads to infinity, the equilibrium probabilities of identity converge to the panmictic value. 2. With a finite number of alleles, any mutation pattern, an arbitrary selection scheme for each colony, and the mutation rates and selection of coefficients proportional to 1/NT, let Pj be the frequency of the allele Aj in the entire population, averaged with respect to the stationary distribution of the backward migration matrix M. As NT leads to infinity, the deviations of the allelic frequencies in each of the subpopulations from Pj converge to zero; the usual panmictic mutation-selection diffusion is obtained for Pj, with the selection intensities averaged with respect to the stationary distribution of M. In both models, Ne = NT and all effects of population subdivision disappear in the limit if, and only if, migration does not alter the subpopulation numbers. PMID:7365330

  16. Development of paradigms for the dynamics of structured populations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This is a technical progress report on the dynamics of predator-prey systems in a patchy environment. A new phenomenon that might contribute to outbreaks in systems of discrete patches has been determined using a discrete time model with both spatial and age structure. A model for a single species in a patchy environment with migration, local population growth and disasters with in patches has been formulated and a brief description is included.

  17. Population structure and minimum core genome typing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tian; Zhang, Wen; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Shao, Zhujun; Lan, Ruiting; Xu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important human pathogen causing Legionnaires’ disease. In this study, whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to study the characteristics and population structure of L. pneumophila strains. We sequenced and compared 53 isolates of L. pneumophila covering different serogroups and sequence-based typing (SBT) types (STs). We found that 1,896 single-copy orthologous genes were shared by all isolates and were defined as the minimum core genome (MCG) of L. pneumophila. A total of 323,224 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified among the 53 strains. After excluding 314,059 SNPs which were likely to be results of recombination, the remaining 9,165 SNPs were referred to as MCG SNPs. Population Structure analysis based on MCG divided the 53 L. pneumophila into nine MCG groups. The within-group distances were much smaller than the between-group distances, indicating considerable divergence between MCG groups. MCG groups were also supplied by phylogenetic analysis and may be considered as robust taxonomic units within L. pneumophila. Among the nine MCG groups, eight showed high intracellular growth ability while one showed low intracellular growth ability. Furthermore, MCG typing also showed high resolution in subtyping ST1 strains. The results obtained in this study provided significant insights into the evolution, population structure and pathogenicity of L. pneumophila. PMID:26888563

  18. Population structure and minimum core genome typing of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tian; Zhang, Wen; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Shao, Zhujun; Lan, Ruiting; Xu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important human pathogen causing Legionnaires' disease. In this study, whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to study the characteristics and population structure of L. pneumophila strains. We sequenced and compared 53 isolates of L. pneumophila covering different serogroups and sequence-based typing (SBT) types (STs). We found that 1,896 single-copy orthologous genes were shared by all isolates and were defined as the minimum core genome (MCG) of L. pneumophila. A total of 323,224 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified among the 53 strains. After excluding 314,059 SNPs which were likely to be results of recombination, the remaining 9,165 SNPs were referred to as MCG SNPs. Population Structure analysis based on MCG divided the 53 L. pneumophila into nine MCG groups. The within-group distances were much smaller than the between-group distances, indicating considerable divergence between MCG groups. MCG groups were also supplied by phylogenetic analysis and may be considered as robust taxonomic units within L. pneumophila. Among the nine MCG groups, eight showed high intracellular growth ability while one showed low intracellular growth ability. Furthermore, MCG typing also showed high resolution in subtyping ST1 strains. The results obtained in this study provided significant insights into the evolution, population structure and pathogenicity of L. pneumophila. PMID:26888563

  19. Newly rare or newly common: evolutionary feedbacks through changes in population density and relative species abundance, and their management implications

    PubMed Central

    Lankau, Richard A; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2011-01-01

    Environmental management typically seeks to increase or maintain the population sizes of desirable species and to decrease population sizes of undesirable pests, pathogens, or invaders. With changes in population size come long-recognized changes in ecological processes that act in a density-dependent fashion. While the ecological effects of density dependence have been well studied, the evolutionary effects of changes in population size, via changes in ecological interactions with community members, are underappreciated. Here, we provide examples of changing selective pressures on, or evolution in, species as a result of changes in either density of conspecifics or changes in the frequency of heterospecific versus conspecific interactions. We also discuss the management implications of such evolutionary responses in species that have experienced rapid increases or decreases in density caused by human actions. PMID:25567977

  20. Identification of genetic and epigenetic marks involved in population structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyu; Hutchison, Kent; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora; Morgan, Marilee; Sui, Jing; Calhoun, Vince

    2010-01-01

    Population structure is well known as a prevalent and important factor in genetic studies, but its relevance in epigenetics is unclear. Very little is known about the affected epigenetic markers and their connections with genetics. In this study we assessed the impact of population diversity on genome wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and DNA methylation levels in 196 participants from five ethnic groups, using principle and independent component analyses. Three population stratification factors (PSFs) were identified in the genomic SNP dataset, accounting for a relatively large portion of total variance (6%). In contrast, only one PSF was identified in genomic methylation dataset accounting for 0.2% of total variance. This methylation PSF, however, was significantly correlated with the largest SNP PSF (r = 0.72, p<1E-23). We then investigated the top contributing markers in these two linked PSFs. The SNP PSF predominantly consists of 8 SNPs from three genes, SLC45A2, HERC2 and CTNNA2, known to encode skin/hair/eye color. The methylation PSF includes 48 methylated sites in 44 genes coding for basic molecular functions, including transcription regulation, DNA binding, cytokine, and transferase activity. Among them, 8 sites are either hypo- or hyper-methylated correlating to minor alleles of SNPs in the SNP PSF. We found that the genes in SNP and methylation PSFs share common biological processes including sexual/multicellular organism reproduction, cell-cell signaling and cytoskeleton organization. We further investigated the transcription regulatory network operating at these genes and identified that most of genes closely interact with ID2, which encodes for a helix-loop-helix inhibitor of DNA binding. Overall, our results show a significant correlation between genetic and epigenetic population stratification, and suggest that the interrelationship between genetic and epigenetic population structure is mediated via complex multiple gene interactions

  1. Evolutionary dynamics of collective action in spatially structured populations.

    PubMed

    Peña, Jorge; Nöldeke, Georg; Lehmann, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Many models proposed to study the evolution of collective action rely on a formalism that represents social interactions as n-player games between individuals adopting discrete actions such as cooperate and defect. Despite the importance of spatial structure in biological collective action, the analysis of n-player games games in spatially structured populations has so far proved elusive. We address this problem by considering mixed strategies and by integrating discrete-action n-player games into the direct fitness approach of social evolution theory. This allows to conveniently identify convergence stable strategies and to capture the effect of population structure by a single structure coefficient, namely, the pairwise (scaled) relatedness among interacting individuals. As an application, we use our mathematical framework to investigate collective action problems associated with the provision of three different kinds of collective goods, paradigmatic of a vast array of helping traits in nature: "public goods" (both providers and shirkers can use the good, e.g., alarm calls), "club goods" (only providers can use the good, e.g., participation in collective hunting), and "charity goods" (only shirkers can use the good, e.g., altruistic sacrifice). We show that relatedness promotes the evolution of collective action in different ways depending on the kind of collective good and its economies of scale. Our findings highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for relatedness, the kind of collective good, and the economies of scale in theoretical and empirical studies of the evolution of collective action. PMID:26151588

  2. Polyvinylidene fluoride film sensors in collocated feedback structural control: application for suppressing impact-induced disturbances.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chien-Ching; Chuang, Kuo-Chih; Pan, Shan-Ying

    2011-12-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films are light, flexible, and have high piezoelectricity. Because of these advantages, they have been widely used as sensors in applications such as underwater investigation, nondestructive damage detection, robotics, and active vibration suppression. PVDF sensors are especially preferred over conventional strain gauges in active vibration control because the PVDF sensors are easy to cut into different sizes or shapes as piezoelectric actuators and they can then be placed as collocated pairs. In this work, to focus on demonstrating the dynamic sensing performance of the PVDF film sensor, we revisit the active vibration control problem of a cantilever beam using a collocated lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuator/PVDF film sensor pair. Before applying active vibration control, the measurement characteristics of the PVDF film sensor are studied by simultaneous comparison with a strain gauge. The loading effect of the piezoelectric actuator on the cantilever beam is also investigated in this paper. Finally, four simple, robust active vibration controllers are employed with the collocated PZT/PVDF pair to suppress vibration of the cantilever beam subjected to impact loadings. The four controllers are the velocity feedback controller, the integral resonant controller (IRC), the resonant controller, and the positive position feedback (PPF) controller. Suppression of impact disturbances is especially suitable for the purpose of demonstrating the dynamic sensing performance of the PVDF sensor. The experimental results also provide suggestions for choosing between the previously mentioned controllers, which have been proven to be effective in suppressing impact-induced vibrations. PMID:23443690

  3. Evolution of complex dynamics in spatially structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Johst, K.; Doebeli, M.; Brandl, R.

    1999-01-01

    Dynamics of populations depend on demographic parameters which may change during evolution. In simple ecological models given by one-dimensional difference equations, the evolution of demographic parameters generally leads to equilibrium population dynamics. Here we show that this is not true in spatially structured ecological models. Using a multi-patch metapopulation model, we study the evolutionary dynamics of phenotypes that differ both in their response to local crowding, i.e. in their competitive behaviour within a habitat, and in their rate of dispersal between habitats. Our simulation results show that evolution can favour phenotypes that have the intrinsic potential for very complex dynamics provided that the environment is spatially structured and temporally variable. These phenotypes owe their evolutionary persistence to their large dispersal rates. They typically coexist with phenotypes that have low dispersal rates and that exhibit equilibrium dynamics when alone. This coexistence is brought about through the phenomenon of evolutionary branching, during which an initially uniform population splits into the two phenotypic classes.

  4. An analysis of the basic population structure of Shanghai Municipality.

    PubMed

    Shen, A

    1984-01-01

    This paper analyzes the changes in Shanghai's population structure over the last 30 years in the 4 aspects of age structure, sex composition, urban and rural composition, and labor and employment structure. In 1953 those of the 0 to 6 age group accounted for 21.2% of the total population; in 1957 the group represented a proportion of 24.6%. Since the 1960s, especially after the 1970s, the family planning program gradually took effect, and the birthrate of the entire municipality fell drastically. The number of school-age children in 1979 was 1 1/2 times more than the same age group in 1953; there should be no worry that population control may result in a shortage of manpower to meet the needs of the work force and the armed forces either toward the end of this century or at the beginning of the next. The economy in China is underdeveloped, production and technology remain at a low level, average wages for employees are low, and for a long time the low living standard of the people has shown little sign of improvement. The problem is mainly manifest in the following areas: 1) distribution of the work force in heavy and light industries is not sufficiently rational, 2) the distribution of the work force between captial construction and transport and communications on the 1 hand and the national economy on the other is out of proportion, 3) the distribution of the work force between commerce, service trades, and public utilities on the 1 hand and the national economy on the other is disproportionated, and 4) the distribution of the work force between undertakings of culture, education, scientific research, health, and medical care on the 1 hand and economic construction on the other is improper. How to control population growth and adjust parts of the population structure to suit the national economic development poses a problem that calls for further in-depth study and analysis to resolve it step by step. PMID:12314770

  5. Efficient control of population structure in model organism association mapping.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Min; Zaitlen, Noah A; Wade, Claire M; Kirby, Andrew; Heckerman, David; Daly, Mark J; Eskin, Eleazar

    2008-03-01

    Genomewide association mapping in model organisms such as inbred mouse strains is a promising approach for the identification of risk factors related to human diseases. However, genetic association studies in inbred model organisms are confronted by the problem of complex population structure among strains. This induces inflated false positive rates, which cannot be corrected using standard approaches applied in human association studies such as genomic control or structured association. Recent studies demonstrated that mixed models successfully correct for the genetic relatedness in association mapping in maize and Arabidopsis panel data sets. However, the currently available mixed-model methods suffer from computational inefficiency. In this article, we propose a new method, efficient mixed-model association (EMMA), which corrects for population structure and genetic relatedness in model organism association mapping. Our method takes advantage of the specific nature of the optimization problem in applying mixed models for association mapping, which allows us to substantially increase the computational speed and reliability of the results. We applied EMMA to in silico whole-genome association mapping of inbred mouse strains involving hundreds of thousands of SNPs, in addition to Arabidopsis and maize data sets. We also performed extensive simulation studies to estimate the statistical power of EMMA under various SNP effects, varying degrees of population structure, and differing numbers of multiple measurements per strain. Despite the limited power of inbred mouse association mapping due to the limited number of available inbred strains, we are able to identify significantly associated SNPs, which fall into known QTL or genes identified through previous studies while avoiding an inflation of false positives. An R package implementation and webserver of our EMMA method are publicly available. PMID:18385116

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations: a review

    PubMed Central

    Perc, Matjaž; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Szolnoki, Attila; Floría, Luis M.; Moreno, Yamir

    2013-01-01

    Interactions among living organisms, from bacteria colonies to human societies, are inherently more complex than interactions among particles and non-living matter. Group interactions are a particularly important and widespread class, representative of which is the public goods game. In addition, methods of statistical physics have proved valuable for studying pattern formation, equilibrium selection and self-organization in evolutionary games. Here, we review recent advances in the study of evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on top of structured populations, including lattices, complex networks and coevolutionary models. We also compare these results with those obtained on well-mixed populations. The review particularly highlights that the study of the dynamics of group interactions, like several other important equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical processes in biological, economical and social sciences, benefits from the synergy between statistical physics, network science and evolutionary game theory. PMID:23303223

  7. Population structure of humpback whales in the western and central South Pacific Ocean as determined by vocal exchange among populations.

    PubMed

    Garland, Ellen C; Goldizen, Anne W; Lilley, Matthew S; Rekdahl, Melinda L; Garrigue, Claire; Constantine, Rochelle; Hauser, Nan Daeschler; Poole, M Michael; Robbins, Jooke; Noad, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    For cetaceans, population structure is traditionally determined by molecular genetics or photographically identified individuals. Acoustic data, however, has provided information on movement and population structure with less effort and cost than traditional methods in an array of taxa. Male humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) produce a continually evolving vocal sexual display, or song, that is similar among all males in a population. The rapid cultural transmission (the transfer of information or behavior between conspecifics through social learning) of different versions of this display between distinct but interconnected populations in the western and central South Pacific region presents a unique way to investigate population structure based on the movement dynamics of a song (acoustic) display. Using 11 years of data, we investigated an acoustically based population structure for the region by comparing stereotyped song sequences among populations and years. We used the Levenshtein distance technique to group previously defined populations into (vocally based) clusters based on the overall similarity of their song display in space and time. We identified the following distinct vocal clusters: western cluster, 1 population off eastern Australia; central cluster, populations around New Caledonia, Tonga, and American Samoa; and eastern region, either a single cluster or 2 clusters, one around the Cook Islands and the other off French Polynesia. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that each breeding aggregation represents a distinct population (each occupied a single, terminal node) in a metapopulation, similar to the current understanding of population structure based on genetic and photo-identification studies. However, the central vocal cluster had higher levels of song-sharing among populations than the other clusters, indicating that levels of vocal connectivity varied within the region. Our results demonstrate the utility and value of

  8. Diversification and Population Structure in Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Matthew W.; Soler, Alvaro; Cortés, Andrés J.

    2012-01-01

    Wild accessions of crops and landraces are valuable genetic resources for plant breeding and for conserving alleles and gene combinations in planta. The primary genepool of cultivated common beans includes wild accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris. These are of the same species as the domesticates and therefore are easily crossable with cultivated accessions. Molecular marker assessment of wild beans and landraces is important for the proper utilization and conservation of these important genetic resources. The goal of this research was to evaluate a collection of wild beans with fluorescent microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers and to determine the population structure in combination with cultivated beans of all known races. Marker diversity in terms of average number of alleles per marker was high (13) for the combination of 36 markers and 104 wild genotypes that was similar to the average of 14 alleles per marker found for the 606 cultivated genotypes. Diversity in wild beans appears to be somewhat higher than in cultivated beans on a per genotype basis. Five populations or genepools were identified in structure analysis of the wild beans corresponding to segments of the geographical range, including Mesoamerican (Mexican), Guatemalan, Colombian, Ecuadorian-northern Peruvian and Andean (Argentina, Bolivia and Southern Peru). The combined analysis of wild and cultivated accessions showed that the first and last of these genepools were related to the cultivated genepools of the same names and the penultimate was found to be distinct but not ancestral to the others. The Guatemalan genepool was very novel and perhaps related to cultivars of race Guatemala, while the Colombian population was also distinct. Results suggest geographic isolation, founder effects or natural selection could have created the different semi-discrete populations of wild beans and that multiple domestications and introgression were involved in creating the diversity of cultivated beans

  9. Complex Transition to Cooperative Behavior in a Structured Population Model

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Luciano; de Souza, Adauto J. F.; Ferreira, Fernando F.; Campos, Paulo R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Cooperation plays an important role in the evolution of species and human societies. The understanding of the emergence and persistence of cooperation in those systems is a fascinating and fundamental question. Many mechanisms were extensively studied and proposed as supporting cooperation. The current work addresses the role of migration for the maintenance of cooperation in structured populations. This problem is investigated in an evolutionary perspective through the prisoner's dilemma game paradigm. It is found that migration and structure play an essential role in the evolution of the cooperative behavior. The possible outcomes of the model are extinction of the entire population, dominance of the cooperative strategy and coexistence between cooperators and defectors. The coexistence phase is obtained in the range of large migration rates. It is also verified the existence of a critical level of structuring beyond that cooperation is always likely. In resume, we conclude that the increase in the number of demes as well as in the migration rate favor the fixation of the cooperative behavior. PMID:22761736

  10. Decompositions of Price's formula in an inhomogeneous population structure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P

    2009-01-01

    The central tool for the study of allele frequency change due to selection is the remarkably simple but powerful formula of Price [Nature 227 (1970) 520]. Here, I provide what might be called a structural analysis of this formula. The formula essentially accumulates the average allele frequency change over many instances of a fitness-determining interaction, but there are different ways of organizing this average and these lead to quite different computational algorithms. I present three of these: an analysis by population state, an analysis by recipient and an analysis by actor. A comparison of these can lead to a heightened understanding of the different factors behind selective allele frequency change. In particular, I pay attention to the effects of structural inhomogeneity on reproductive value (RV) and emphasize that Price's formula measures RV-weighted allele frequency change. I examine in detail a simple example as a crucial way of cementing the different theoretical pathways. My aim was to produce a simple transparent presentation and therefore I work with a simple population structure and have omitted a number of technical details that are found elsewhere. PMID:19120820