Science.gov

Sample records for por cryptosporidium parvum

  1. The Cryptosporidium parvum Kinome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hundreds of millions of people are infected with cryptosporidiosis annually, with immunocompromised individuals suffering debilitating symptoms and children in socioeconomically challenged regions at risk of repeated infections. There is currently no effective drug available. In order to facilitate the pursuit of anti-cryptosporidiosis targets and compounds, our study spans the classification of the Cryptosporidium parvum kinome and the structural and biochemical characterization of representatives from the CDPK family and a MAP kinase. Results The C. parvum kinome comprises over 70 members, some of which may be promising drug targets. These C. parvum protein kinases include members in the AGC, Atypical, CaMK, CK1, CMGC, and TKL groups; however, almost 35% could only be classified as OPK (other protein kinases). In addition, about 25% of the kinases identified did not have any known orthologues outside of Cryptosporidium spp. Comparison of specific kinases with their Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii orthologues revealed some distinct characteristics within the C. parvum kinome, including potential targets and opportunities for drug design. Structural and biochemical analysis of 4 representatives of the CaMK group and a MAP kinase confirms features that may be exploited in inhibitor design. Indeed, screening CpCDPK1 against a library of kinase inhibitors yielded a set of the pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives (PP1-derivatives) with IC50 values of < 10 nM. The binding of a PP1-derivative is further described by an inhibitor-bound crystal structure of CpCDPK1. In addition, structural analysis of CpCDPK4 identified an unprecedented Zn-finger within the CDPK kinase domain that may have implications for its regulation. Conclusions Identification and comparison of the C. parvum protein kinases against other parasitic kinases shows how orthologue- and family-based research can be used to facilitate characterization of promising drug targets and the search

  2. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone inactivation rates for Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocysts were determined with an in-vitro excystation method based on excysted sporozoite counts. Results were consistent with published animal infectivity data for the same C. parvum strain. The inactivation kinetics...

  3. AN EVALUATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM GENOTYPING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of 11 previously described species differentiation and genotyping PCR protocols for detection of Cryptosporidium parasites. Genomic DNA from three species of Crytosporidium parasites (genotype 1 and genotype 2 of C. parvum, C. muris, a...

  4. Detection of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner-Wiening, C; Kimmig, P

    1995-01-01

    PCR was used to detect and specifically identify a gene fragment from Cryptosporidium parvum. An 873-bp region of a 2,359-bp DNA fragment encoding a repetitive oocyst protein of C. parvum was shown to be specifically amplified in C. parvum. An excystation protocol before DNA extraction allowed the differentiation between live and dead Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. PMID:8534121

  5. Infection status of pigs with Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jae-Ran

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the infection status of pigs with Cryptosporidium parvum, 589 fecal samples were collected from pigs raised at farm in Chungcheongbuk-do and Chungcheongnam-do. Of the 589 pig fecal samples, 62 (10.5%) were positive for C. parvum. The area showing the highest positive rate was Dangjin-gun, Chungcheongnam-do (14.0%), and the lowest (0%) Salmi-myon, Chungcheongbuk-do. The positive rate of C. parvum in Judok-eup increased from 12.7% in the winter to 22.1% in the summer. The results of this study suggest that the pigs may be a source of human C. parvum infection. PMID:15060340

  6. Cryptosporidium parvum: From foal to veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Galuppi, R; Piva, S; Castagnetti, C; Sarli, G; Iacono, E; Fioravanti, M L; Caffara, M

    2016-03-30

    This paper describes the transmission of a zoonotic subtype of Cryptosporidium parvum between two foals hospitalized in an Equine Perinatology Unit (EPU) linked to an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in veterinary students. Fecal specimens of 36 mares (105 samples) and 28 foals (122 samples) were subjected to Ziehl-Neelsen staining, nested PCR of 18S rDNA. Two foals tested positive for Cryptosporidium; PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and subtyping by nested PCR of the 60kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene revealed C. parvum subtype IIdA23G1. The introduction of Cryptosporidium into the EPU is suspected to be in a foal showing no initial clinical signs that tested positive for C. parvum during an asymptomatic phase. A second foal, hospitalized afterwards for perinatal asphyxia syndrome complicated with failure of passive transfer and sepsis, showed severe watery diarrhea after 4 days of hospitalization and was positive for the same subtype. During this period, six students attending the EPU complained of abdominal pain and diarrhea and were positive for the same subtype of C. parvum. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of this subtype in foals and the first report of evidence of zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis from foals to human. PMID:26921039

  7. Long-Term Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrea, C.; Harter, T.; Hou, L.; Atwill, E. R.; Packman, A.; Woodrow-Mumford, K.; Maldonado, S.

    2005-12-01

    The protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum is a leading cause of waterborne disease. Subsurface transport and filtration in natural and artificial porous media are important components of the environmental pathway of this pathogen. It has been shown that the oocysts of C. parvum show distinct colloidal properties. We conducted a series of laboratory studies on sand columns (column length: 10 cm - 60 cm, flow rates: 0.7 m/d - 30 m/d, ionic strength: 0.01 - 100 mM, filter grain size: 0.2 - 2 mm, various solution chemistry). Breakthrough curves were measured over relatively long time-periods (hundreds to thousands of pore volumes). We show that classic colloid filtration theory is a reasonable tool for predicting the initial breakthrough, but it is inadequate to explain the significant tailing observed in the breakthrough of C. parvum oocyst through sand columns. We discuss the application of the Continuous Time Random Walk approach to account for the strong tailing that was observed in our experiments. The CTRW is generalized transport modeling framework, which includes the classic advection-dispersion equation (ADE), the fractional ADE, and the multi-rate mass transfer model as special cases. Within this conceptual framework, it is possible to distinguish between the contributions of pore-scale geometrical (physical) disorder and of pore-scale physico-chemical heterogeneities (e.g., of the filtration, sorption, desorption processes) to the transport of C. parvum oocysts.

  8. A highly divergent 33 kDa Cryptosporidium parvum antigen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies comparing the genome sequences of Cryptosporidium parvum with C. hominis identified a number of highly divergent genes that might reflect positive selection for host specificity. In the present study, a C. parvum sequence, namely cgd8-5370, whose amino acid sequence differs appreci...

  9. Gene expression during excystation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study describes transcription of mRNA from genes encoding metabolic or structural proteins during excystation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. RNA was harvested from C. parvum oocysts before excystation, and at 5, 10, and 15 min during excystation. Subtractive cDNA libraries were pre...

  10. Biology of Cryptosporidium parvum in pigs: from weaning to market.

    PubMed

    Guselle, N J; Appelbee, A J; Olson, M E

    2003-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is commonly identified as infecting domestic livestock and humans. Prevalence of C. parvum in pigs has been reported, however, the duration and infection pattern of naturally acquired Cryptosporidium infections in pigs has not been reported. This study was undertaken to investigate the age of oocyst shedding and duration of natural Cryptosporidium parvum infections in pigs from weaning to market weight. Fecal samples were collected from weaned Yorkshire-Landrace piglets (n=33) twice per week until Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected. Upon oocyst detection, fecal samples were collected three times per week and pigs were monitored throughout the study for diarrhea and examined after concentration and immunofluroescent staining. Cryptosporidium isolates were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction to amplify the HSP70 gene which was subsequently sequence analyzed. All 33 pigs shed oocysts some time during the study. The mean age of initial oocyst detection was 45.2 days post-weaning with the mean duration of infection 28.7 days. Mean number of Cryptosporidium oocysts was low and declined to zero prior to study completion. Episodes of diarrhea were not associated with oocyst excretion. Genetic sequences were obtained for 10 of the pigs. All of the 10 isolates aligned as the Cryptosporidium parvum 'pig' genotype. This study demonstrates that the age and duration of oocyst shedding in pigs infected with C. parvum porcine genotype is different from other livestock species. PMID:12651214

  11. Cryptosporidium parvum Infection Following Contact with Livestock

    PubMed Central

    Suler, Denis; Mullins, David; Rudge, Travis; Ashurst, John

    2016-01-01

    Context: Scours, or calf diarrhea, is an infectious gastrointestinal disease commonly found in the calves of dairy farms. It primarily presents with diarrhea that can be life threatening to the animal and is also contagious and threatening to the other livestock. Cryptosporidium is one of the major causes of scours and can be transmitted to humans via fecal-oral route, resulting in diarrheal illnesses. Cryptosporidiosis infection usually occurs as a waterborne outbreak with the potential to affect many people at once. Case Report: We report a case of a 24-year-old female farmer who presented to the emergency department with diarrhea after taking care of ill cattle with similar symptoms. Fecal cultures were positive for Cryptosporidium parvum. Given the patient was immunocompetent, no further treatment was warranted. Conclusion: Confirmed cases should be reported, however, treatment is only recommended in children and immunocompromised adults. Clinicians should educate patients on the importance of proper hygiene and handling techniques in order to decrease transmission and recurrence of the protozoan infection. PMID:27583243

  12. A HAPPY Map of Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Michael B.; Bankier, Alan T.; Dear, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed a HAPPY map of the apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. We have placed 204 markers on the 10.4-Mb genome, giving an average marker spacing of ∼50 kb, with an effective resolution of ∼40 kb. HAPPY mapping (an in vitro linkage technique based on screening approximately haploid amounts of DNA by the polymerase chain reaction) is fast and accurate and is not subject to the distortions inherent in cloning, meiotic recombination, or hybrid cell formation. In addition, little genomic DNA is needed as a substrate, and the AT content of the genome is largely immaterial, making it an ideal method for mapping otherwise intractable parasite genomes. The map, covering all eight chromosomes, consists of 10 linkage groups, each of which has been chromosomally assigned. We have verified the accuracy of the map by several methods, including the construction of a >140-kb PAC contig on chromosome VI. Less than 1% of our markers detect non-rDNA duplicated sequences. PMID:9872984

  13. Cryptosporidium parvum is not transmissible to fish, amphibians, or reptiles.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, T K; Fayer, R; Cranfield, M R

    1996-10-01

    A recent report suggested that an isolate of Cryptosporidium parvum had established infections in fish, amphibians, and reptiles and raises concern that animals other than mammals might be a potential source of waterborne Cryptosporidium oocysts. To test this possibility, viable C. parvum oocysts, infectious for neonatal BALB/c mice, were delivered by gastric intubation to bluegill sunfish, poison-dart frogs, African clawed frogs, bearded dragon lizards, and corn snakes. Histological sections of the stomach, jejunum, ileum, and cloaca prepared from tissues collected on days 7 and 14 postinoculation (PI) were negative for Cryptosporidium developmental stages. However, inoculum-derived oocysts were detectable by fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody in feces of inoculated animals from day 1 to day 12 PI in fish and frogs, and up to day 14 PI in lizards. Snakes did not defecate for 14 days PI. Impression smears taken at necropsy on days 7 and 14 PI revealed C. parvum oocysts in the lumen of the cloaca of 2 fish and 1 lizard on day 7 PI only. Because tissue stages of the pathogen were not found, it appears that C. parvum was not heterologously transmitted to lower vertebrates. Under certain circumstances, however, such as after the ingestion of C. parvum-infected prey, lower vertebrates may disseminate C. parvum oocysts in the environment. PMID:8885883

  14. A COMPARISON OF ENUMERATION TECHNIQUES FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of methods have been used to enumerate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from source or drinking waters. The reliability of these counting methods varies, in part, with suspension density, sample purity, and other factors. Frequently, the method of determination of suspens...

  15. THE INFECTIVITY OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background. Small numbers of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts can contaminate even treated drinking water, and ingestion of oocysts can cause diarrheal disease in normal as well as immunocompromised hosts. Since the number of organisms necessary to cause infection in humans is unkn...

  16. PROBES FOR THE SPECIFIC DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A probe set, consisting of two synthetic oligonucleotides each tagged with a fluorescent reporter molecule, has been developed for specific detection of Cryptosporidium parvum.Each probe strand detects ribosomal RNA from a range of isolates of this species, and the combination is...

  17. A sensitive method for detecting and genotyping Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts represent a considerable health risk to humans and animals because the parasite has a low infectious dose and usually exists in low numbers in environmental samples, which makes detection problematic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Cryspovirus as a target f...

  18. [Cryptosporidium parvum Gastroenteritis in a Patient with Renal Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Çetinkaya, Ülfet; Dursun, İsmail; Kuk, Salih; Şahin, İzzet; Yazar, Süleyman

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a case who starting abundant watery diarrhea on the 14th day of renal transplantation is presented. Stool sample was analyzed for Cryptosporidium spp. by carbol fuchsin staining method, copro-ELISA and nested polimeraze chain reaction (PCR). From sample found positive by Carbol-fuchsin staining method and Copro-ELISA, DNA sequence analysis was performed, gel-purified from amplicon obtained by nested PCR. As a result of DNA sequence analysis was determined to be Cryptosporidium parvum. Although C. parvum is a rare causative agent of gastroenteritis it can be cause serious clinical diarrhea solid organ transplantation patient. As a result, also C.parvum must be considered as a causative agent of diarrhea occurring after organ transplantation. PMID:26470932

  19. Molecular epidemiological analyses of Cryptosporidium parvum virus 1 (CSpV1), a symbiotic virus of Cryptosporidium parvum, in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Fumi; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Aita, Junya; Yaita, Seiko; Kinami, Aiko; Fujimoto, Katsuhisa; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Murakami, Shin; Horimoto, Taisuke; Kato, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    We show that Cryptosporidium parvum virus 1 (CSpV1), a member of the family Partitiviridae, genus Cryspovirus that can infect Cryptosporidium parvum, is a new candidate for high-resolution tool for tracing C. parvum. CSpV1 was detected in all C. parvum-positive samples tested. Phylogenetic analysis of dsRNA1 sequence from CSpV1 can distinguish infected areas of C. parvum on the national level. Sequences detected in samples from Iwate prefecture and other islands (Tanegashima, and Okinawa) belonged to a single clade. This system can differentiate the samples from Hokkaido and south part of Japan as well as from other countries. Samples from Iwate, Tanegashima, and Okinawa belonged to a single subclade, respectively. Therefore, the CSpV1 dsRNA sequences reflect the regional distribution of their host and have potential as a high-resolution tool to trace C. parvum IIaA15G2R1 subtype. PMID:26439535

  20. The Effect of pH on Stability and Sorption of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts by Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) are waterborne pathogens, which are released into the environment through infected human or animal feces. Their ability to survive outside their host organisms in harsh environmental conditions presents one of the most challenging tasks in resea...

  1. Cryptosporidium parvum, a potential cause of colic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Certad, Gabriela; Ngouanesavanh, Tramy; Guyot, Karine; Gantois, Nausicaa; Chassat, Thierry; Mouray, Anthony; Fleurisse, Laurence; Pinon, Anthony; Cailliez, Jean-Charles; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Creusy, Colette

    2007-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidiosis represents a major public health problem. This infection has been reported worldwide as a frequent cause of diarrhoea. Particularly, it remains a clinically significant opportunistic infection among immunocompromised patients, causing potentially life-threatening diarrhoea in HIV-infected persons. However, the understanding about different aspects of this infection such as invasion, transmission and pathogenesis is problematic. Additionally, it has been difficult to find suitable animal models for propagation of this parasite. Efforts are needed to develop reproducible animal models allowing both the routine passage of different species and approaching unclear aspects of Cryptosporidium infection, especially in the pathophysiology field. Results We developed a model using adult severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice inoculated with Cryptosporidium parvum or Cryptosporidium muris while treated or not with Dexamethasone (Dex) in order to investigate divergences in prepatent period, oocyst shedding or clinical and histopathological manifestations. C. muris-infected mice showed high levels of oocysts excretion, whatever the chemical immunosuppression status. Pre-patent periods were 11 days and 9.7 days in average in Dex treated and untreated mice, respectively. Parasite infection was restricted to the stomach, and had a clear preferential colonization for fundic area in both groups. Among C. parvum-infected mice, Dex-treated SCID mice became chronic shedders with a prepatent period of 6.2 days in average. C. parvum-inoculated mice treated with Dex developed glandular cystic polyps with areas of intraepithelial neoplasia, and also with the presence of intramucosal adenocarcinoma. Conclusion For the first time C. parvum is associated with the formation of polyps and adenocarcinoma lesions in the gut of Dex-treated SCID mice. Additionally, we have developed a model to compare chronic muris and parvum cryptosporidiosis using SCID mice

  2. Incorporation of exogenous uracil by Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Upton, S J; Tilley, M; Mitschler, R R; Oppert, B S

    1991-01-01

    Oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum were used to infect Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells. Cultures were incubated in a reduced-oxygen atmosphere in candle jars or in a 5% CO2-95% air atmosphere. At 72 h, parasites were quantitated microscopically and found to be enhanced 5.5-fold in the reduced-oxygen atmosphere. Using candle jars, we then determined that C. parvum was amenable to [3H]uracil incorporation assays and easily quantitated with this method. Images PMID:2056042

  3. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes. PMID:25542170

  4. Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium andersoni infection in naturally infected cattle of northwest Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mirzai, Yousef; Yakhchali, Mohammad; Mardani, Karim

    2014-01-01

    The protozoan intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium commonly infects cattle throughout the world and Iran. The present study was undertaken to determine the abundance and associated risk factors of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle herds of northwestern Iran. A total number of 246 fecal samples from 138 (56.1%) diarrheic (D) and 108 (43.9%) non-diarrheic (ND) cattle were randomly collected and examined by fecal smears stained with Ziehl-Neelsen. For molecular specification, DNA was extracted from collected Cryptosporidium oocysts and a fragment of 1325 bp in size from 18S rRNA gene was amplified. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection was 22.3% (55/246). The prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in examined calves less than 6 month-old was significantly higher than adult cattle. C. parvum and C. andersoni were identified in 20.3% (50/246) and 2.03% (5/246) of examined cattle, respectively. The highest prevalence of C. parvum infection was found in D calves < 6 month-old (13.4%, 33/246), while C. andersoni was only detected in ND cattle (8.9%, 22/246). There was significant difference in the prevalence between male than female cattle. There was no significant difference between prevalence and seasons of investigation. It was concluded that C. parvum was the prevalent species in younger animals compared to older ones as a potentially zoonotic agent in the region. PMID:25568693

  5. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis in human patients in Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abd El Kader, Nour M; Blanco, María-Alejandra; Ali-Tammam, Marwa; Abd El Ghaffar, Abd El Rahman B; Osman, Ahmed; El Sheikh, Nabila; Rubio, José Miguel; de Fuentes, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a significant cause of diarrheal disease in developing and industrialized nations. Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum are the main agents of cryptosporidiosis in humans. In Egypt, very little is known about genetic structure of Cryptosporidium spp. Therefore, this study was designed to examine samples from sporadic cases of cryptosporidiosis in Egyptians in order to identify the species involved in infection as well as the transmission dynamics and distribution of the parasite in the Great Cairo area. A total of 391 human faecal samples were collected, between May 2008 and March 2009, from ten public hospitals in Great Cairo. Initial screening by immunochromatographic detection kit "the Stick Crypto-Giardia; Operon" showed 23 possible positive cases. Twenty of them were confirmed by microscopic examination. PCR was performed by amplification of the oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene where 18 out of 23 samples were positive, one not detected by microscopy. Cryptosporidium genotyping was performed by RFLP analysis of PCR products of the diagnosis PCR. Only 15 samples rendered a digestion pattern. The genotyping distribution was nine cases showing C. hominis genotype, three showing C. parvum genotype and three showing mixed infection by C. hominis and C. parvum. The data showed an elevated prevalence of C. hominis (80.0%), the most anthroponotic species, suggesting a human-human transmission. Furthermore, the presence of up to 40% of samples infected with C. parvum shows that further investigations are required to determine the subgenotypes of C. parvum to clarify the mode of transmission in order to improve the control measures. PMID:21607688

  6. Gamma irradiation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts affects intracelluar levels of the viral symbiont CPV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown a dose-dependent effect of gamma irradiation on Cryptosporidium parvum development in neonatal mice and newborn calves. In mice, C. parvum oocysts exposed to 200 Gy showed nearly complete inability to develop as measured by C. parvum-specific quantitative PCR of ileal ti...

  7. Genetic modification of the diarrhoeal pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Sumiti; Pawlowic, Mattie C; Sateriale, Adam; Brooks, Carrie F; Studstill, Caleb J; Bar-Peled, Yael; Cipriano, Michael J; Striepen, Boris

    2015-07-23

    Recent studies into the global causes of severe diarrhoea in young children have identified the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium as the second most important diarrhoeal pathogen after rotavirus. Diarrhoeal disease is estimated to be responsible for 10.5% of overall child mortality. Cryptosporidium is also an opportunistic pathogen in the contexts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-caused AIDS and organ transplantation. There is no vaccine and only a single approved drug that provides no benefit for those in gravest danger: malnourished children and immunocompromised patients. Cryptosporidiosis drug and vaccine development is limited by the poor tractability of the parasite, which includes a lack of systems for continuous culture, facile animal models, and molecular genetic tools. Here we describe an experimental framework to genetically modify this important human pathogen. We established and optimized transfection of C. parvum sporozoites in tissue culture. To isolate stable transgenics we developed a mouse model that delivers sporozoites directly into the intestine, a Cryptosporidium clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, and in vivo selection for aminoglycoside resistance. We derived reporter parasites suitable for in vitro and in vivo drug screening, and we evaluated the basis of drug susceptibility by gene knockout. We anticipate that the ability to genetically engineer this parasite will be transformative for Cryptosporidium research. Genetic reporters will provide quantitative correlates for disease, cure and protection, and the role of parasite genes in these processes is now open to rigorous investigation. PMID:26176919

  8. Genetic modification of the diarrheal pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Vinayak, Sumiti; Pawlowic, Mattie C.; Sateriale, Adam; Brooks, Carrie F.; Studstill, Caleb J.; Bar-Peled, Yael; Cipriano, Michael J.; Striepen, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies into the global causes of severe diarrhea in young children have identified the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium as the second most important diarrheal pathogen after rotavirus1–3. Diarrheal disease is estimated to be responsible for 10.5% of overall child mortality4. Cryptosporidium is also an opportunistic pathogen in the context of HIV-AIDS and organ transplantation5,6. There is no vaccine and only a single approved drug that provides no benefit for those in gravest danger, malnourished children and immunocompromised patients7,8. Cryptosporidiosis drug and vaccine development is limited by the poor tractability of the parasite, which includes lack of continuous culture, facile animal models, and molecular genetic tools3,9. Here we describe an experimental framework to genetically modify this important human pathogen. We establish and optimize transfection of C. parvum sporozoites in tissue culture. To isolate stable transgenics we develop a mouse model that delivers sporozoites directly into the intestine, a Cryptosporidium CRISPR/Cas9 system, and in vivo selection for aminoglycoside resistance. We derive reporter parasites suitable for in vitro and in vivo drug screening, and we evaluate the basis of drug susceptibility by gene knock out. We anticipate the ability to genetically engineer the parasite will be transformative for Cryptosporidium research. Genetic reporters will provide quantitative correlates for disease, cure and protection and the role of parasite genes in these processes is now open to rigorous investigation. PMID:26176919

  9. Comparison of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium wrairi by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies and ability to infect severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chrisp, C E; Mason, P; Perryman, L E

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-three monoclonal antibodies raised to Cryptosporidium parvum and 12 raised to C. wrairi reacted with equal intensity with the heterologous species. Despite demonstration of a close immunologic relationship between these two species, C. wrairi did not induce persistent infection in severe combined immunodeficient mice as did C. parvum. PMID:7806379

  10. Environmental inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in waste stabilization ponds.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Roberto; Bécares, Eloy

    2008-11-01

    The survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a waste stabilization pond system in northwestern Spain and the effects of sunlight and the depth and type of pond on oocyst viability were evaluated using an assay based on the exclusion or inclusion of two fluorogenic vital dyes, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and propidium iodide (PI). All tested factors had significant effects (P < 0.01) over time on C. parvum oocyst viability. Sunlight exposure was the most influential factor for oocyst inactivation. A 40% reduction was observed after 4 days exposure to sunlight conditions compared with dark conditions. The type of pond also caused a significant reduction in C. parvum oocyst viability (P < 0.01). Inactivation rates reflected that the facultative pond was the most aggressive environment for oocysts placed both at the surface (presence of sunlight) and at the bottom (absence of sunlight) of the pond, followed by the maturation pond and the anaerobic pond. The mean inactivation rates of oocysts in the ponds ranged from 0.0159 to 0.3025 day(-1). PMID:18345476

  11. Attachment, persistence and infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in experimentally contaminated fruits and vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an environmentally resistant, abundant, and ubiquitous protozoan parasite that causes severe diarrheal disease in humans and livestock. Consumer dietary preference towards fresh and organically grown produce correlates with a heightened occurrence of foodborne outbreaks of ...

  12. EVALUATING IN VITRO INFECTIVITY FOR MEASURING UV DISINFECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS IN FINISHED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV technology to inactivate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts has become well established in the US. The challenge now is to effectively demonstrate UV reactor performance and disinfection capacity with various finished water matrices and under different operational conditions. In s...

  13. MOLECULAR CLONING AND ANALYSIS OF THE CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM AMINOPEPTIDASE N GENE. (R828035)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum proteases have been associated with release of infective sporozoites from oocysts, and their specific inhibition blocks parasite excystation in vitro. Additionally, proteases have been implicated in the processing of parasite adhesion molecules fo...

  14. MOLECULAR CLONING AND ANALYSIS OF THE CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM AMINOPEPTIDASE N GENE. (R829180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum proteases have been associated with release of infective sporozoites from oocysts, and their specific inhibition blocks parasite excystation in vitro. Additionally, proteases have been implicated in the processing of parasite adhesion molecules fo...

  15. AGING OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS STUDIED BY MALDI-TF MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an obligate protozoan parasite found in surface waters. It is the etiological agent for cryptosporidiosis, a parasitic infection that causes severe gastrointestinal illness which is potentially fatal among immuno-compromised individuals. This water borne...

  16. Sensitive quantitative detection/identification of infectious Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by signature lipid biomarker analysis

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C. |; Alugupalli, S.; Schrum, D.P.

    1997-08-01

    Unique signature lipid biomarkers were found in the acid-fast oocytes of Cryptosporidium parvum. This makes possible the rapid detection/identification and potential infectivity directly from drinking water membrane filtrates.

  17. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. xcystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. zone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine an...

  18. Rapid extraction of DNA From Escherichia coli and Cryptosporidium parvum for use in PCR.

    PubMed

    Higgins, J A; Jenkins, M C; Shelton, D R; Fayer, R; Karns, J S

    2001-11-01

    The Xtra Amp tube, Isocode paper, Instagene matrix, and PrepMan matrix methods were evaluated for their ability to rapidly extract PCR-quality DNAs from Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Cryptosporidium parvum. All methods provided satisfactory DNA from E. coli, and the Xtra Amp and Instagene reagents provided satisfactory DNA from C. parvum. PMID:11679362

  19. AGING OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS STUDIED BY MALDI-TOF MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite, and it causes a potentially fatal gastrointestinal illness. This water borne pathogen has been the subject of several high profile disease outbreaks in the US and abroad. C. parvum presents challenges for both compliance monitoring ...

  20. Development of a Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assay to Detect Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk of Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) contamination is a serious issue with respect to drinking water, as evidenced by the cryptosporidiosis outbreak in Milwaukee WI, in 1993, which involved over 400,000 infections and at least 54 deaths. Ground-water contamination by C...

  1. Fecundity of Cryptosporidium parvum is Correlated with Intracellular Levels of the Viral Symbiont CPV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the virulence and fecundity of Cryptosporidium parvum isolates have been observed by several researchers studying cryptosporidiosis. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there was a correlation between intracellular levels of the viral symbiont CPV in C. parvum and fe...

  2. A novel multiplex PCR coupled with Luminex assay for the simultaneous detection of Cryptosporidium spp., Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Nan; Gong, Pengtao; Cao, Lili; Li, Jianhua; Su, Libo; Li, Shuhong; Diao, Yumei; Wu, Kang; Li, He; Zhang, Xichen

    2010-10-11

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis are the most frequently identified enteric parasites associated with diarrhea-causing disease outbreaks, and many non-parvum species of Cryptosporidium also can replicate and cause illness in mammals including humans. In this study, we describe a novel multiplex PCR coupled with Luminex assay for the identification of Cryptosporidium spp., C. parvum and G. duodenalis in a rapid manner. The multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia was developed using three pairs of biotinylated primers which amplify 424, 223 and 267 bp products from the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snr) gene, 18S rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium and the beta-giardin gene of Giardia, respectively. The genus and species-specific capture probes linked to carboxylated Luminex microspheres hybridized to the multiplex PCR amplicons to enhance sensitivity and specificity. The conditions of multiplex PCR and Luminex hybridization reaction were optimized to enable the minimum detection limits of 5x10(-6), 5x10(-6), and 5x10(-6) ng DNAs (corresponding approximately to 0.1 oocyst/cyst). The Luminex approach proved to be 100% specific and accurate by testing a total of 240 fecal samples compared with microscopic examination of fecal smears and further modified acid-fast staining or iodine-staining observation. The established assay offers the potential for rapid detection of Cryptosporidium spp., C. parvum and G. duodenalis in fecal and environmental samples. PMID:20594647

  3. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on Cryptosporidium parvum infectivity.

    PubMed

    Slifko, T R; Raghubeer, E; Rose, J B

    2000-09-01

    The incidence of foodborne disease outbreaks caused by contaminated low-pH fruit juices is increasing. With recent mandatory pasteurization of apple juice and the industry's concerns of food safety, fruit juice processors are showing more interest in alternative nonthermal technologies that can kill >99.99% of microbial pathogens present in foods. The association of the coccidian protozoan, Cryptosporidium, with diarrheal disease outbreaks from contaminated tap water and fruit juice raises a safety concern in the food and beverage industries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on C. parvum oocysts. Oocysts were suspended in apple and orange juice and HHP treated at 5.5 x 10(8) Pa (80,000 psi) for 0, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 s. Oocyst viability was assessed by excystation using bile salts and trypsin while the cell culture foci detection method was used to assess infectivity. Results indicated that HHP inactivated C. parvum oocysts by at least 3.4 log10 after 30 s of treatment. No infectivity was detected in samples exposed to > or =60 s of HHP and >99.995% inactivation was observed. This study demonstrated that HHP efficiently rendered the oocysts nonviable and noninfectious after treatment at 5.5 x 10(8) Pa. PMID:10983803

  4. Cryptosporidium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of nearly 25 named species and numerous genotypes of Cryptosporidium, two are of special importance relative to human health and food safety: Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, the former with a predilection for humans and the latter a promiscuous species. Genetic tools have been es...

  5. Fecundity of Cryptosporidium parvum is correlated with intracellular levels of the viral symbiont CPV.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M C; Higgins, J; Abrahante, J E; Kniel, K E; O'Brien, C; Trout, J; Lancto, C A; Abrahamsen, M S; Fayer, R

    2008-07-01

    Differences in the virulence and fecundity of Cryptosporidium parvum isolates have been observed by several researchers studying cryptosporidiosis. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there was a correlation between intracellular levels of the viral symbiont CPV in C. parvum and fecundity of two isolates of the parasite, namely C. parvum Beltsville (B) and C. parvum Iowa (I). Dairy calves infected with 10(6)C. parvum-B excreted 5-fold more oocysts compared with calves infected with the same number of C. parvum-I oocysts. The increased fecundity of the former strain was corroborated by semi-quantitative PCR assay of DNA isolated from cell cultures infected with either C. parvum-B or C. parvum-I. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of viral RNA revealed a 3-fold greater number of CPV in C. parvum-B compared with C. parvum-I oocysts. These findings may indicate a role for CPV in fecundity and possibly virulence of C. parvum. PMID:18096164

  6. Prevalence of infection with Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis among international travellers

    PubMed Central

    Jelinek, T; Lotze, M; Eichenlaub, S; Loscher, T; Nothdurft, H

    1997-01-01

    Background—Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis are recognised as possible pathogens of traveller's diarrhoea. 
Aims—To identify the prevalence of C parvum and Cyc cayetanensis in travellers returning from developing countries. 
Patients—Nine hundred and seventy eight stool samples were taken from 795 patients returning from developing countries. 
Methods—Microscopy (iron-haematoxylin stain, SAF concentration, modified acid fast stain) and a commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit for the detection of Cryptosporidium antigen in stool. 
Results—Of the 795 patients in the study, 469 suffered from diarrhoea. Infection with Cyc cayetanensis could be detected in five subjects (1.1%) by acid fast stain, and 13 patients (2.8%) were infected with C parvum. On evaluation, the antigen capture ELISA turned out to be clearly less sensitive for detection of C parvum than microscopy. All patients with either C parvum or Cyc cayetanensis infection suffered from watery diarrhoea. 
Conclusions—C parvum and Cyc cayetanensis are not major causes of diarrhoea in international travellers. In cases of persistent watery diarrhoea, however, these pathogens should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis. 

 Keywords: diarrhoea; Cryptosporidium parvum; Cyclospora cayetanensis PMID:9462213

  7. Application of RT-PCR to study in vitro development of Cryptosporidium parvum and its viral symbiont CPV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis contain a double-stranded RNA viral symbiont termed CPV. Our research seeks to find a role for CPV in the pathogenicity and development of C. parvum. Cell cultures were infected with C. parvum sporozoites, and extracted at various times post-infection for DNA ...

  8. Quantification of hsp70 mRNA from the Cryptosporidium parvum in soil by reverse transcription real-time PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    As one of the leading causes of waterborne enteric disease, Cryptosporidium parvum poses significant threat to public health. Besides water, soil can also become an important environmental source of C. parvum once polluted. Detection of viable C. parvum in soil is a key issue whe...

  9. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in a Silicon Micromodel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Changyong; Hilpert, Markus; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B.; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2012-02-01

    Effective removal of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by granular filtration requires the knowledge of oocyst transport and deposition mechanisms, which can be obtained based on real time microscopic observation of oocyst transport in porous media. Attachment of oocysts to silica surface in a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) cell and in a micromodel, which has 2-dimensional (2-D) microscopic pore structures consisting of an array of cylindrical collectors, was studied and compared. Real time transport of oocysts in the micromodel was recorded to determine the attached oocyst distributions in transversal and longitudinal directions. In the micromodel, oocysts attached to the forward portion of clean collectors, where the flow velocity was lowest. After initial attachment, oocysts attached onto already attached oocysts. As a result, the collectors ripened and the region available for flow was reduced. Results of attachment and detachment experiments suggest that surface charge heterogeneity allowed for oocyst attachment. In addition to experiments, Lattice-Boltzmann simulations helped understanding the slightly non-uniform flow field and explained differences in the removal efficiency in the transversal direction. However, the hydrodynamic modeling could not explain differences in attachment in the longitudinal direction.

  10. Effects of Enterococcus faecalis CECT 7121 on Cryptosporidium parvum infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Del Coco, Valeria F; Sparo, Mónica D; Sidoti, Alicia; Santín, Mónica; Basualdo, Juan Angel; Córdoba, María Alejandra

    2016-08-01

    Cryptosporidium is an opportunistic protozoan parasite of humans and animals worldwide and causes diarrheal disease that is typically self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts but often life threatening to immunocompromised individuals. However, there is a lack of completely efficient therapy available. Probiotics have attracted the attention as potential antiparasite compounds against protozoa involved in intestinal infections. This study investigated the effects of administration of probiotic Enterococcus faecalis CECT 7121 on Cryptosporidium parvum infection in immunosuppressed mice. Effects on C. parvum infection at the intestinal mucosa were studied and scored at each portion of the gut. It was demonstrated that Ef CECT 7121 interfered with C. parvum infection when both probiotic and parasite were present in the same intestinal location suggesting that Ef CECT 7121 supplementation can alleviate the negative effects of C. parvum infection. PMID:27193238

  11. Inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a swine waste lagoon and spray field.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael B; Liotta, Janice L; Bowman, Dwight D

    2013-04-01

    Because of outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis in humans, some Cryptosporidium spp. have become a public health concern. Commercial swine operations can be a source of this protozoan parasite. Although the species distribution of Cryptosporidium is likely dominated by Cryptosporidium suis , a fraction may be comprised of other Cryptosporidium species infectious to humans such as Cryptosporidium parvum . To better understand the survival dynamics of Cryptosporidium spp., oocysts associated with swine operations, 2 experiments were performed to determine die-off rates of C. parvum oocysts in a swine waste lagoon (2009 and 2010) and its spray field (2010 and 2011). Sentinel chambers containing a lagoon effluent suspension of C. parvum oocysts were submerged in the lagoon, and triplicate chambers were removed over time; oocysts were extracted and assayed for viability. For comparative purposes, inactivation rates of Ascaris suum eggs contained in sentinel chambers were also determined. For 2 spray field experiments, air-dried and sieved surface soil was placed in sentinel chambers, hydrated, and inoculated with a lagoon effluent suspension of C. parvum oocysts. Sentinel chambers and control oocysts in PBS contained in microcentrifuge tubes were buried 1.5 cm below the soil surface in 3 blocks. Triplicate chambers and controls were removed over time; oocysts were extracted and assayed for viability. Based on the first order decay equation, days to reach 99% die-off (T(99)) were determined. T(99)-values determined for the 2 lagoon experiments were 13.1 and 20.1 wk, respectively. A T(99)-value for C. parvum in the spray field was significantly longer at 38.0 wk than the control oocysts in PBS at 29.0 wk. The waste lagoon and spray field system of manure management at this large-scale farrowing operation appeared to reduce the load of C. parvum oocysts before they can be hydrologically transported off the operation and reduces their likelihood of contaminating surface waters

  12. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum from two different Japanese prefectures, Okinawa and Hokkaido.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Aita, Junya; Masatani, Tatsunori; Suzuki, Moemi; Nitta, Yoshiki; Tamayose, Genta; Iso, Takehiro; Suganuma, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Matsuyama, Keita; Niikura, Tadamasa; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Yamakawa, Kazuhiro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Itagaki, Tadashi; Zakimi, Satoshi; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2015-04-01

    Infectious diarrhea is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal calves. Cryptosporidium parvum is one of the main pathogens associated with calf diarrhea. Although diarrhea is a symptom of infection with various pathogens, investigations to detect the types of pathogens have never been performed in Japan. This study investigated the prevalence of four major diarrhea-causing pathogens in calves: C. parvum, rotavirus, coronavirus, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (E. coli K99). Commercial immunochromatography testing of all four pathogens and molecular analysis of C. parvum with diarrhea in calves from southernmost Okinawa and northernmost Hokkaido, Japan, were conducted. The frequencies of C. parvum, rotavirus, coronavirus, and E. coli (K99) in Okinawa were 50%, 28%, 2.3%, and 4.7%, respectively. Watery fecal stools were significantly correlated with C. parvum (p<0.05). In oocyst calculations for C. parvum, no significant difference was observed between the single-infection cases and the mixed-infection cases with rotavirus. Interestingly, molecular analyses targeting small subunit ribosomal RNA as well as glycoprotein 60 (GP60) genes revealed that the C. parvum nucleotide sequences from the two prefectures were identical, indicating that C. parvum with a uniform characteristic is distributed throughout Japan. GP60 subtyping analysis identified C. parvum from Okinawa and Hokkaido as belonging to the IIaA15G2R1 subtype, a known zoonotic subtype. Hence, control of cryptosporidiosis is important not only for pre-weaned calves, but also for human health. PMID:25481361

  13. Bovine TLR2 and TLR4 mediate Cryptosporidium parvum recognition in bovine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengtao; Fu, Yunhe; Gong, Pengtao; Zheng, Jingtong; Liu, Li; Yu, Yuqiang; Li, Jianhua; Li, He; Yang, Ju; Zhang, Xichen

    2015-08-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) is an intestinal parasite that causes diarrhea in neonatal calves. It results in significant morbidity of neonatal calves and economic losses for producers worldwide. Innate resistance against C. parvum is thought to depend on engagement of pattern recognition receptors. However, the role of innate responses to C. parvum has not been elucidated in bovine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of TLRs in host-cell responses during C. parvum infection of cultured bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The expressions of TLRs in bovine intestinal epithelial cells were detected by qRT-PCR. To determine which, if any, TLRs may play a role in the response of bovine intestinal epithelial cells to C. parvum, the cells were stimulated with C. parvum and the expression of TLRs were tested by qRT-PCR. The expression of NF-κB was detected by western blotting. Further analyses were carried out in bovine TLRs transfected HEK293 cells and by TLRs-DN transfected bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed that bovine intestinal epithelial cells expressed all known TLRs. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 were up-regulated when bovine intestinal epithelial cells were treated with C. parvum. Meanwhile, C. parvum induced IL-8 production in TLR2 or TLR4/MD-2 transfected HEK293 cells. Moreover, C. parvum induced NF-κB activation and cytokine expression in bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The induction of NF-κB activation and cytokine expression by C. parvum were reduced in TLR2-DN and TLR4-DN transfected cells. The results showed that bovine intestinal epithelial cells expressed all known TLRs, and bovine intestinal epithelial cells recognized and responded to C. parvum via TLR2 and TLR4. PMID:26048276

  14. A new in vitro model using small intestinal epithelial cells to enhance infection of Cryptosporidium parvum

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand and study the infection of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, a more sensitive in vitro assay is required. In vivo, this parasite infects the epithelial cells of the microvilli layer in the small intestine. While cell infection models using colon,...

  15. Effect of Lot Variability on Ultraviolet Radiation Inactivation Kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficiency of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for the inactivation of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum. In these studies inactivation is measured as reduction in oocysts. A primary goal is to estimate the UV radiation required to achiev...

  16. EFFECT OF LOT VARIABILITY ON ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION INACTIVATION KINETICS OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary goal of this paper is to account for the effect of lot variability in determining the required ultraviolet (UV) radiation to inactivate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in mouse infectivity studies. The number of infectious oocysts (infective dose) per mouse is estima...

  17. A RAPID METHOD FOR PRODUCTION OF HIGH NUMBERS OF PURIFIED CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most procedures that have been described for purifying Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are designed to either identify the parasites in clinical specimens or isolate oocysts from a small volume of feces from infected animals. The present study describes a rapid method for purifying high numbers of C...

  18. Improved Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts propagation using dexamethasone suppressed CF-1 mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst production in dexamethasone suppressed CF-1 and C57BL/6 mice. Both models can yield 1 x 109 total oocysts over a 20 day production period; however, only 20 CF-1 mice are required to reliably achieve this goal compared...

  19. Changes in the Levels of Cryspovirus During In Vitro Development of Cryptosporidium parvum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to develop and utilize semi-quantitative RT-PCR and PCR assays for measuring the level of cryspovirus, the viral symbiont of Cryptosporidium parvum, during in vitro development of the protozoan. Cultures of human carcinoma cells (HCT-8) were inoculated with excysting C...

  20. Cryptosporidium parvum GP60 subtypes in dairy cattle from Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum from 73 dairy calves less than two months old from Buenos Aires province (Argentina) were molecularly characterized using sequence analysis of the GP60 gene. Seventy five sequences were obtained, and seven different subtypes were identified, all belonging to the IIa subtype f...

  1. PREVALENCE AND CONCENTRATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS IN BEEF CATTLE PADDOCK SOILS AND FORAGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an enteric coccidian protozoan that receives a great amount of interest because of its widespread occurrence in surface waters, its high degree of infectivity, and the difficulty of risk management associated with its presence and control. Information about environmental l...

  2. APPLICATION OF RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY TO ANALYSE THE CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST WALL AND SUTURE CONSTITUENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, associated with diarrheal disease in humans, livestock, companion animals, and wildlife, infects drinking water. Fecal contamination is the ultimate source of the oocyst, found in surface waters throughout the United States. The parasite has so far sho...

  3. Transport, Fate, and Infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts Released from Manure and Leached through Macroporous Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major mode of transmission of Cryptosporidium parvum, a widespread waterborne pathogen, is via contaminated drinking and recreational waters. Oocyst transport to surface water can occur by deposition of manure directly in the water or by wash off in surface runoff. Oocyst transport to groundwater ...

  4. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE AND MONOCHLORAMINE AT LOW TEMPERATURE. (R826830)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of Cryptosporidium parvum inactivation decreased with decreasing temperature (1¯20°C) for ozone and for monochloramine applied alone as well as after pre-treatment with ozone. Synergy was observed at all temperatures studied for the ozone/m...

  5. INTESTINAL AND PULMONARY INFECTION BY Cryptosporidium parvum IN TWO PATIENTS WITH HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    REINA, Fábio Tadeu Rodrigues; RIBEIRO, Camila Aparecida; de ARAÚJO, Ronalda Silva; MATTÉ, Maria Helena; CASTANHO, Roberto Esteves Pires; TANAKA, Ioshie Ibara; VIGGIANI, Ana Maria Ferreira Sornas; MARTINS, Luciamáre Perinetti Alves

    2016-01-01

    We describe two patients with HIV/AIDS who presented pulmonary and intestinal infection caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, with a fatal outcome. The lack of available description of changes in clinical signs and radiographic characteristics of this disease when it is located in the extra-intestinal region causes low prevalence of early diagnosis and a subsequent lack of treatment. PMID:27007564

  6. Coupled Factors Influencing the Transport and Retention of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts in Saturated Porous Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The coupled role of solution ionic strength (IS), system hydrodynamics and pore structure on the transport and retention of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst was investigated via batch, packed-bed column, and micromodel systems. The experiments were conducted over a wide range of IS (0.1-100 mM)...

  7. Effects of Surfactants on Cryptosporidium parvum Mobility in Agricultural Soils from Illinois and Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, C. J.; Koken, E.; Jacobson, A. R.; Powelson, D.

    2011-12-01

    The occurence of the parasitic protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum in rural and agricultural watersheds due to agricultural activities and wildlife is inevitable. Understanding the behavior of C. parvum oocysts in the environment is critical for the protection of public health and the environment. To better understand the mechanisms by which the pathogen moves through soils and contaminates water resources, we study their mobility under conditions representative of real-world scenarios, where both C. parvum and chemicals that affect their fate are present in soils. Surfactants occur widely in soils due to agricultural practices such as wastewater irrigation and the application of pesticides or soil wetting agents. They affect water tension and, consequently, soil infiltration processes and the air-water interfaces in soil pores where C. parvum may be retained. We investigate the effects of surfactants on the mobility of C. parvum oocysts in agricultural soils from Illinois and Utah under unsaturated flow conditions. As it is critical to examine C. parvum in natural settings, we also developed a quantification method using RT-PCR for monitoring C. parvum oocysts in environmental soil and water samples. We optimized physico-chemical parameters to disrupt C. parvum oocysts and extract their DNA, and developed isolation methods to separate C. parvum oocysts from colloids in natural soil samples. The results of this research will lead to the development of an accurate and sensitive molecular method for the monitoring of C. parvum oocysts in environmental soil and water samples, and will further our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the behavior of C. parvum oocysts in soils, in particular the role of vadose zone processes, sorption to soil and surfactants.

  8. Removal effect of the water purifier for home use against Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshihiro; Kajima, Junko; Fujino, Takashi

    2004-08-01

    The removal effects of the faucet mounted type water purifier for home use were examined against Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. The water purifier is composed of a layer of granular activated carbon and the hollow fiber membrane filter. The cartridges were unused, 25%, 50% and 75% flow down by Arizona-dust of U. S. A. Two respective cartridges were used of the examination. The faucet and the water purifier were connected by anti-pressure tube, and 3.0 x 10(7) oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum were injected into anti-pressure tube while water was running. Twenty liter of collected purified water was examined under the fluorescent microscope. Any oocysts in the purified water collected from all cartridges were not found. Therefore, we considered this purifier as an effective one in removing Cryptosporidium oocysts from drinking water. PMID:15353844

  9. Cryptosporidium parvum and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in American Mustangs and Chincoteague ponies.

    PubMed

    Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; McEvoy, John; Rost, Michael; Sherwood, Dawn; Holcomb, Kevin; Kváč, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of Cryptosporidium and microsporidia in feral horses, which have minimal contact with livestock and humans, is not currently known. We report the findings of a study on Cryptosporidium and microsporidia in 34 Mustangs and 50 Chincoteague ponies in the USA. Fecal samples were screened for presence of Cryptosporidium spp. by analysis of the small-subunit rRNA (SSU) and 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) genes, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon spp. by analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS). Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi were detected in 28/84 (33.3%) and 7/84 (8.3%) samples, respectively. Sequence analysis of SSU and ITS revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (n = 20) and E. bieneusi genotype horse 1 (n = 7), respectively. Subtyping of C. parvum isolates at the gp60 locus showed the presence of subtype IIaA17G2R1 in Mustangs and subtypes IIaA13G2R1 and IIaA15G2R1 in Chincoteague ponies. Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotype horse 1 was detected in Mustangs (n = 2) and Chincoteague ponies (n = 5). No Cryptosporidium or E. bieneusi positive animals had diarrhea. The finding that Mustangs and Chincoteague ponies are host to the zoonotic pathogen C. parvum suggests that their infrequent contact with humans and livestock is sufficient to maintain transmission; however, we should also consider the possibility that C. parvum is an established parasite of Mustangs and Chincoteague ponies that persists in these animals independently of contact with humans or livestock. PMID:26688100

  10. A COMPARISON OF FOUR FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY BASED METHODS FOR PURIFYING, DETECTING AND CONFIRMING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidiosis has been traced to drinking contaminated surface water, either not treated, or ineffectively treated. Testing to detect Cryptosporidium parvum in surface water has been suggested to help prevent future outbreaks. This study compared purifications and detection...

  11. CHANGES IN MOUSE CIRULATING LEUKOCYTE NUMBERS IN C57BL/6 MICE IMMUNOSUPPRESSED FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Iowa strain of Cryptosporidium parvum will not propagate in immunocompetent mice, but will successfully infect genetically immunocompromised Nude or SCID mice as well as immunocompetent mice which have been immunosuppressed with glucocorticoids. Using dexamethasone - tetracy...

  12. Quantitative Evaluation of Infectivity Change of Cryptosporidium parvum after Gamma Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo-Ung; Joung, Mikyo; Nam, Taekyoung; Park, Woo-Yoon

    2009-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a well-known waterborne and opportunistic intracellular protozoan parasite that causes diarrheal illness. In this study, we quantitatively investigated reduction of the infectivity of C. parvum after gamma irradiation and repair of the infectivity during incubation time after irradiation. C. parvum oocysts were subjected to gamma irradiation at various doses (1, 5, 10, and 25 kGy), and the in vitro infectivity was measured by real-time PCR every day up to 7 days after irradiation. The in vitro infectivity of C. parvum on human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cells (HCT-8) was effectively reduced (> 2 log10) by irradiation at 10 kGy or more. However, in the experiment to find out repair of the infectivity, recovery was not noted until day 7 post-incubation. PMID:19290085

  13. Identification of Cryptosporidium parvum Dihydrofolate Reductase Inhibitors by Complementation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Victoria Hertle; Vasquez, John; Nelson, Richard G.; Forney, John R.; Rosowsky, Andre; Sibley, Carol Hopkins

    2000-01-01

    There is a pressing need for drugs effective against the opportunistic protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum. Folate metabolic enzymes and enzymes of the thymidylate cycle, particularly dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), have been widely exploited as chemotherapeutic targets. Although many DHFR inhibitors have been synthesized, only a few have been tested against C. parvum. To expedite and facilitate the discovery of effective anti-Cryptosporidium antifolates, we have developed a rapid and facile method to screen potential inhibitors of C. parvum DHFR using the model eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We expressed the DHFR genes of C. parvum, Plasmodium falciparum, Toxoplasma gondii, Pneumocystis carinii, and humans in the same DHFR-deficient yeast strain and observed that each heterologous enzyme complemented the yeast DHFR deficiency. In this work we describe our use of the complementation system to screen known DHFR inhibitors and our discovery of several compounds that inhibited the growth of yeast reliant on the C. parvum enzyme. These same compounds were also potent or selective inhibitors of the purified recombinant C. parvum DHFR enzyme. Six novel lipophilic DHFR inhibitors potently inhibited the growth of yeast expressing C. parvum DHFR. However, the inhibition was nonselective, as these compounds also strongly inhibited the growth of yeast dependent on the human enzyme. Conversely, the antibacterial DHFR inhibitor trimethoprim and two close structural analogs were highly selective, but weak, inhibitors of yeast complemented by the C. parvum enzyme. Future chemical refinement of the potent and selective lead compounds identified in this study may allow the design of an efficacious antifolate drug for the treatment of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:10722506

  14. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum DNA in human feces by nested PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Balatbat, A B; Jordan, G W; Tang, Y J; Silva, J

    1996-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a coccidian protozoan that causes diarrhea in humans, often chronic and severe in patients with AIDS. Conventionally, diagnosis is made by concentration of stools followed by acid-fast staining (AF) or immunofluorescent staining. The threshold of detection in human stool specimens by these methods may require the presence of 50,000 (immunofluorescent staining) to 500,000 (AF) oocysts per g of stool. In this study, a nested PCR assay was developed to detect C. parvum DNA directly from stool specimens. After extraction of DNA from formalinized stool, a 400-bp fragment of C. parvum DNA was amplified with two 26-mer outer primers. The amplicon from this reaction was amplified with a second primer pair. With these nested primers, a 194-bp DNA fragment was amplified and confirmed as C. parvum DNA by internal probing with an enzyme-linked chemiluminescence system. This PCR-based test allowed the detection of 500 oocysts per g of stool or 100 ng of C. parvum DNA. Studies indicate that the primers utilized are specific for the DNA of C. parvum. DNA sequences were also detected in stool specimens from 4 of 28 patients previously reported negative by AF. In summary, a rapid, sensitive, and specific assay for the detection of C. parvum directly from stool specimens has been developed. This test has the potential for detecting asymptomatic infection, monitoring the response to therapy, and detecting the organism in environmental sources. PMID:8784586

  15. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by dot-blotting using monoclonal antibodies to CPV40 capsid protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were prepared against the 40 kDa capsid protein of Cryptosporidium parvum virus (CPV) by immunizing mice with purified recombinant CPV40 protein. By immunoblotting analysis, one MAb, designated MAbCPV40-1, bound to a 40 kDa protein in extracts of C. parvum oocysts, which...

  16. Intracellular levels of the viral symbiont CPV in Cryptosporidium parvum correlate with fecundity of the parasite in dairy calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous reports have cited differences in clinical signs and oocyst output among strains of Cryptosporidium parvum. The purpose of this study was to determine if levels of the C. parvum intracellular viral symbiont CPV correlated with observed clinical and parasitological differences. Calves infe...

  17. USE OF MICRO ASSAY TECHNOLOGY TO COMPARE GENE EXPRESSION OF MICE INFECTED OR NOT INFECTED WITH CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite that is a frequent cause of diarrheal disease in young calves. In laboratory models of infection, infant mice are susceptible to C. parvum infection, while normal adult mice are not. Various immunodeficient strains of mice are, however, susceptible to...

  18. Detection and molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium parvum in British European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus).

    PubMed

    Sangster, Lucy; Blake, Damer P; Robinson, Guy; Hopkins, Timothy C; Sa, Ricardo C C; Cunningham, Andrew A; Chalmers, Rachel M; Lawson, Becki

    2016-02-15

    Surveillance was conducted for the occurrence of protozoan parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium in European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) in Great Britain. In total, 108 voided faecal samples were collected from hedgehogs newly admitted to eight wildlife casualty treatment and rehabilitation centres. Terminal large intestinal (LI) contents from three hedgehog carcasses were also analysed. Information on host and location variables, including faecal appearance, body weight, and apparent health status, was compiled. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) targeting the 18S ribosomal RNA gene, confirmed by sequencing, revealed an 8% (9/111) occurrence of Cryptosporidium parvum in faeces or LI contents, with no significant association between the host or location variables and infection. Archived small intestinal (SI) tissue from a hedgehog with histological evidence of cryptosporidiosis was also positive for C. parvum by PCR and sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene. No other Cryptosporidium species were detected. PCR and sequencing of the glycoprotein 60 gene identified three known zoonotic C. parvum subtypes not previously found in hedgehogs: IIdA17G1 (n=4), IIdA19G1 (n=1) and IIdA24G1 (n=1). These subtypes are also known to infect livestock. Another faecal sample contained C. parvum IIcA5G3j which has been found previously in hedgehogs, and for which there is one published report in a human, but is not known to affect livestock. The presence of zoonotic subtypes of C. parvum in British hedgehogs highlights a potential public health concern. Further research is needed to better understand the epidemiology and potential impacts of Cryptosporidium infection in hedgehogs. PMID:26827859

  19. Identification of Cryptosporidium parvum Active Chemical Series by Repurposing the Open Access Malaria Box

    PubMed Central

    Bessoff, Kovi; Spangenberg, Thomas; Foderaro, Jenna E.; Jumani, Rajiv S.; Ward, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis are major etiologic agents of human cryptosporidiosis. The infection is typically self-limited in immunocompetent adults, but it can cause chronic fulminant diarrhea in immunocompromised patients and malnutrition and stunting in children. Nitazoxanide, the current standard of care for cryptosporidiosis, is only partially efficacious for children and is no more effective than a placebo for AIDS patients. Unfortunately, financial obstacles to drug discovery for diseases that disproportionately affect low-income countries and technical limitations associated with studies of Cryptosporidium biology impede the development of better drugs for treating cryptosporidiosis. Using a cell-based high-throughput screen, we queried the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) Open Access Malaria Box for activity against C. parvum. We identified 3 novel chemical series derived from the quinolin-8-ol, allopurinol-based, and 2,4-diamino-quinazoline chemical scaffolds that exhibited submicromolar potency against C. parvum. Potency was conserved in a subset of compounds from each scaffold with varied physicochemical properties, and two of the scaffolds identified exhibit more rapid inhibition of C. parvum growth than nitazoxanide, making them excellent candidates for further development. The 2,4-diamino-quinazoline and allopurinol-based compounds were also potent growth inhibitors of the related apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, and a good correlation was observed in the relative activities of the compounds in the allopurinol-based series against T. gondii and C. parvum. Taken together, these data illustrate the utility of the Open Access Malaria Box as a source of both potential leads for drug development and chemical probes to elucidate basic biological processes in C. parvum and other apicomplexan parasites. PMID:24566188

  20. Cryptosporidium parvum scavenges LDL-derived cholesterol and micellar cholesterol internalized into enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenman, Karen; Wanyiri, Jane W.; Bhat, Najma; Ward, Honorine D.; Coppens, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are responsible for devastating diarrhea in immunodeficient individuals. In the intestinal tract, the developmental stages of the parasite are confined to the apical surfaces of epithelial cells. Upon invasion, Cryptosporidium incorporates the microvillous membrane of the enterocyte to form the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and sequesters itself from the host cytoplasm by rearranging the host cytoskeleton. Cryptosporidium parvum has minimal anabolic capabilities and relies on transporters and salvage pathways to meet its basic metabolic requirements. The cholesterol salvage pathway is crucial for the development of protozoan parasites. In this study, we have examined the sources of cholesterol from C. parvum infecting enterocytes. We illustrated that the intracellular stages of Cryptosporidium as well as the oocysts shed by the host, contain cholesterol. Incubation of infected enterocytes in lipoprotein-free medium impairs parasite development and results in substantial decrease in cholesterol content associated with the PV. Among lipoproteins, LDL constitutes an important source of cholesterol for Cryptosporidium. Dietary cholesterol incorporated into micelles is internalized into enterocytes by the NPC1L1 transporter. We showed that C. parvum also obtains cholesterol from micelles in enterocytes. Pharmacological blockade of NPC1L1 function by ezetimibe or moderate down-regulation of NPC1L1 expression decreases parasite infectivity. These observations indicate that, despite its dual sequestration from the intestinal lumen and the host cytoplasm, C. parvum can, in fact, obtain cholesterol both from the gut’s lumen and the host cell. This study highlights the evolutionary advantages for epicellular pathogens to access to nutrients from the outside and inside of the host cell. PMID:23311949

  1. Expression of P23 of Cryptosporidium parvum in Toxoplasma gondii and evaluation of its protective effects.

    PubMed

    Shirafuji, Hiroaki; Xuan, Xuenan; Kimata, Isao; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Fukumoto, Shinya; Otsuka, Haruki; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2005-04-01

    In this study, P23 of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites, an immunodominant surface protein, was stably expressed in Toxoplasma gondii (Tg/P23) and its protective effects were evaluated in a mouse model. The molecular weight and antigenic property of P23 expressed by Tg/P23 were similar to those of the native P23. Mice immunized with lysed Tg/P23 tachyzoites produced specific neutralizing antibodies against C. parvum. These findings indicate that the T. gondii vector may provide a new tool for the production of a recombinant vaccine against cryptosporidiosis in animals. PMID:15986633

  2. Coinfection by Cryptosporidium parvum and porcine circovirus type 2 in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Núñez, A; McNeilly, F; Perea, A; Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Huerta, B; Allan, G; Carrasco, L

    2003-06-01

    Routine histopathological diagnosis of one representative 3-month-old pig from a group suffering from diarrhoea revealed a massive degree of parasitation by Cryptosporidium parvum, with a concomitant infection by porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), that was confirmed by immunohistochemical procedures. The areas of intestine where parasites were more numerous presented abundant PCV2 infected cells in mucosa and submucosa. The concurrence of C. parvum, a rare primary intestinal pathogen in post-weaning and growing pigs, and PCV2 infections suggest an increased susceptibility as a result of an immunosuppression state. PMID:12864903

  3. Comparison of techniques for detecting antigens of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum in faeces.

    PubMed Central

    Tee, G H; Moody, A H; Cooke, A H; Chiodini, P L

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To compare the use of commercial monoclonal antibody test systems--the Giardia CEL IF test and the Crypto CEL IF test--for the detection of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum antigens in faeces with conventional techniques. METHODS--Sensitivity and specificity were evaluated using preparations of cysts of G lamblia and purified oocysts of C parvum. Evaluation of 59 random faecal samples passing through the Department of Clinical Parasitology, Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London, was carried out for both organisms. RESULTS--The fluorescence staining techniques proved more sensitive than other tests routinely used for diagnosis. PMID:8331181

  4. In Vitro Interactions of Asian Freshwater Clam (Corbicula fluminea) Hemocytes and Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, T. K.; Fayer, R.; Cranfield, M. R.; Conn, D. B.

    1997-01-01

    Corbicula fluminea hemocytes phagocytosed infectious oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro. After 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min of incubation, averages of 35.8, 58.0, 69.7, 77.7, and 81.6% of the oocysts were phagocytosed by 24.3, 70.0, 78.5, 87.3, and 93.0% of the hemocytes, respectively. A single clam can retain by phagocytosis an average of 1.84 x 10(sup6) oocysts per ml of hemolymph. C. fluminea bivalves can serve as biological indicators of contamination of wastewaters and agricultural drainages with Cryptosporidium. PMID:16535656

  5. Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha): evidence from the St Lawrence River.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, T K; Marcogliese, D J; de Lafontaine, Y; Da Silva, A J; Mhangami-Ruwende, B; Pieniazek, N J

    2001-03-01

    Molluscan shellfish can recover and concentrate environmentally derived waterborne pathogens and can be used for the sanitary assessment of water quality. Oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum (genotype 1) were identified in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) from the St. Lawrence River, Quebec. Approximately 67 oocysts/ml of hemolymph and 129 oocysts/g of soft tissue were recovered. The adjusted concentration of oocysts per gram of tissue was 2.2 x 10(2), and approximately 4.4 x 10(2) oocysts were recovered from a single mussel. Zebra mussels can serve as biological indicators of waterborne contamination with Cryptosporidium. PMID:11293571

  6. Cryptosporidium parvum IId family: clonal population and dispersal from Western Asia to other geographical regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Longxian; Axén, Charlotte; Bjorkman, Camilla; Jian, Fuchun; Amer, Said; Liu, Aiqin; Feng, Yaoyu; Li, Guoquan; Lv, Chaochao; Zhao, Zifang; Qi, Meng; Dong, Haiju; Wang, Helei; Sun, Yanru; Ning, Changshen; Xiao, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 111 Cryptosporidium parvum IId isolates from several species of animals in China, Sweden, and Egypt were subtyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). One to eleven subtypes were detected at each of the 12 microsatellite, minisatellite, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci, forming 25 MLST subtypes. Host-adaptation and significant geographical segregation were both observed in the MLST subtypes. A clonal population structure was seen in C. parvum IId isolates from China and Sweden. Three ancestral lineages and the same RPGR sequence were shared by these isolates examined. Therefore, the present genetic observations including the higher nucleotide diversity of C. parvum IId GP60 sequences in Western Asia, as well as the unique distribution of IId subtypes (almost exclusively found in Asia, Europe, and Egypt) and in combination with the domestication history of cattle, sheep, and goats, indicated that C. parvum IId subtypes were probably dispersed from Western Asia to other geographical regions. More population genetic structure studies involving various C. parvum subtype families using high-resolution tools are needed to better elucidate the origin and dissemination of C. parvum in the world. PMID:24572610

  7. Cryptosporidium parvum Induces B7-H1 Expression in Cholangiocytes by Downregulating MicroRNA-513

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ai-Yu; Zhou, Rui; Hu, Guoku; Liu, Jun; Sosnowska, Danuta; Drescher, Kristen M.; Dong, Haidong; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Expression of B7 costimulatory molecules represents an important compartment of immune response of epithelial cells following microbial infection. We reported here that the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum induced B7-H1 expression in cultured human cholangiocytes. Induced expression of B7-H1 was identified in cells after exposure to infective C. parvum parasite or parasite lysate. Interestingly, microRNA-513 (miR-513) level was reduced in cells after exposure to C. parvum, resulting in a relief of 3′-untranslated region-mediated translational suppression of B7-H1. Overexpression of miR-513 through transfection of miR-513 precursor inhibited C. parvum-induced B7-H1 protein expression. Moreover, enhanced apoptotic cell death was identified in activated human T cells following co-culture with C. parvum-infected cholangiocytes. The apoptosis of activated T cells was partially blocked by a neutralizing antibody to B7-H1 or transfection of cholangiocytes with miR-513 precursor. These data suggest a role of miR-513 in regulating B7-H1 expression by cholangiocytes in response to C. parvum infection. PMID:19916867

  8. In vitro infection of Cryptosporidium parvum to four different cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yu, J R; Choi, S D; Kim, Y W

    2000-06-01

    To determine a suitable condition for in vitro infection model of Cryptosporidium parvum, four different cell lines, AGS, MDCK, HCT-8 and Caco-2, were used as host cell lines which were cultured at various concentrations of added supplements. These supplement include fetal bovine serum (FBS), sodium choleate, ascorbic acid, folic acid, calcium pantothenate, para-aminobenzoic acid and pyruvate and their effects on the cell lines which were infected with C. parvum were evaluated. The results of this study showed that the AGS cell line was most susceptible to C. parvum whereas the Caco-2 cells appeared to be least susceptible to C. parvum. In regards to the serum condition, 10% FBS was suitable for the growth of AGS and HCT-8 cells, and 1% FBS was good for the growth of the MDCK cells when they were inoculated with C. parvum. Vitamins had a positive effect on the AGS cells, and pyruvate also showed positive effects on all of the cell lines except for Caco-2. Modified medium for each cell line was prepared by adding appropriate amounts of each supplement which resulted in the highest parasite infection number. Modified media increased the number of parasites infected on AGS cells to 2.3-fold higher when compared to the control media. In this study, we found that the AGS cell line was a suitable host model for evaluating C. parvum in vitro study and the media contents for the optimal infection conditions were suggested. PMID:10905066

  9. Enhancing Cryptosporidium parvum recovery rates for improved water monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pavli, Pagona; Venkateswaran, Sesha; Bradley, Mark; Bridle, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Water monitoring is essential to ensure safe drinking water for consumers. However existing methods have several drawbacks, particularly with regard to the poor recovery of Cryptosporidium due to the inability to efficiently elute Cryptosporidium oocysts during the established detection process used by water utilities. Thus the development of new inexpensive materials that could be incorporated into the concentration and release stage that would control Cryptosporidium oocysts adhesion would be beneficial. Here we describe improved filter performance following dip-coating of the filters with a "bioactive" polyacrylate. Specifically 69% more oocysts were eluted from the filter which had been coated with a polymer than on the naked filter alone. PMID:26009471

  10. Molecular typing of Cryptosporidium parvum associated with a diarrhoea outbreak identifies two sources of exposure

    PubMed Central

    MATTSSON, J. G.; INSULANDER, M.; LEBBAD, M.; BJÖRKMAN, C.; SVENUNGSSON, B.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY An outbreak of cryptosporidiosis associated with exposure to outdoor swimming-pool water affected an estimated 800–1000 individuals. PCR products were obtained from faecal specimens from 30 individuals who tested positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts. RFLP and sequencing analyses showed that all individuals were infected with Cryptosporidium parvum. Among the infected individuals, five had just swum in an adjacent indoor pool during the same period, and had no identified contact with individuals linked to the outdoor pool. With the use of subgenotyping based on analysis of three mini- and microsatellite loci, MS1, TP14, and GP15, we could identify two sources of exposure. One subtype was associated with the outdoor pool and another with the indoor pool. These data demonstrate that the use of mini- and microsatellite loci as markers for molecular fingerprinting of C. parvum isolates are valuable in the epidemiological investigation of outbreaks. PMID:17961283

  11. Detection of Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Cockles (Cerastoderma edule)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Bautista, M.; Ortega-Mora, L. M.; Tabares, E.; Lopez-Rodas, V.; Costas, E.

    2000-01-01

    Infective Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were detected in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from a shellfish-producing region (Gallaecia, northwest Spain, bounded by the Atlantic Ocean) that accounts for the majority of European shellfish production. Shellfish were collected from bay sites with different degrees of organic pollution. Shellfish harboring C. parvum oocysts were recovered only from areas located near the mouths of rivers with a high density of grazing ruminants on their banks. An approximation of the parasite load of shellfish collected in positive sites indicated that each shellfish transported more than 103 oocysts. Recovered oocysts were infectious for neonatal mice, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis demonstrated a profile similar to that described for genotype C or 2 of the parasite. These results demonstrate that mussels and cockles could act as a reservoir of C. parvum infection for humans. Moreover, estuarine shellfish could be used as an indicator of river water contamination. PMID:10788352

  12. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    PubMed Central

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water. PMID:2339894

  13. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  14. Prevalence and molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium parvum in dairy calves in Punjab (India).

    PubMed

    Joute, J R; Gill, J P S; Singh, B B

    2016-09-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an important zoonotic protozoan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal tract of vertebrate animals and man. The current study was contemplated for molecular detection of Cryptosporidium species prevalent in dairy calves in Punjab, India. A total of 302 faecal samples were screened by modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Molecular characterisation was done using PCR followed by sequence analysis of the representative isolates. An overall prevalence of 26.15 % was obtained with the highest prevalence obtained in 0-30 day old calves in both diarrhoeic and non-diarrhoeic animals. PCR analysis revealed the expected bands at 1,325 and 835 bp from all the isolates for primary and secondary/nested PCR respectively. Ten representative samples were sequenced in both directions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of C. parvum in all the samples. The high rate of calves infected with C. parvum can act as a great source of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis which indicates a potential risk of zoonotic transmission from animal to human beings in Punjab (India). PMID:27605777

  15. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in raw milk by PCR and oligonucleotide probe hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, I; Ibrahim, A; Barta, J R; Griffiths, M W

    1996-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are potential contaminants of food. Suspected cases of food-borne cryptosporidiosis are rarely confirmed because of the limited numbers of oocysts in the samples and the lack of sensitive detection methods adaptable to food. PCR was investigated as a means of overcoming this problem. A PCR assay was designed for the specific amplification of a previously sequenced portion of an oocyst protein gene fragment of Cryptosporidium parvum (N. C. Lally, G. D. Baird, S. J. McQuay, F. Wright, and J. J. Oliver, Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 56:69-78, 1992) and compared with the primer set of Laxer et al. (M. A. Laxer, B. K. Timblin, and R. J. Patel, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 45:688-694, 1991). The PCR products were hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled internal probes and detected by chemiluminescence to enhance sensitivity. The two sets of primers were compared with regard to their sensitivity and specificity by using a variety of human and animal isolates of C. parvum and related parasites. Both assays enabled the detection of 1 to 10 oocysts in 20 ml of artificially contaminated raw milk. The assay based on the PCR set and probe of Laxer et al. detected DNAs from Eimeria acervulina and Giardia intestinalis. The new assay has good specificity for C. parvum bovine isolates and hence has a better potential for monitoring the prevalence of C. parvum in raw milk and other environmental samples. PMID:8795214

  16. ENHANCED PRODUCTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS IN IMMUNOSUPPRESSED MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently there has been an increase in the need for fresh C. parvum oocysts for engineering and biomedical research applications. In our laboratory the emphsis has shifted from the use of dairy calves to inbred C57BL/67n mice, primarily for reasons of ease of collection and proce...

  17. Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia intestinalis in calf diarrhoea in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Björkman, C; Svensson, C; Christensson, B; de Verdier, K

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study conducted in 75 herds was to investigate the presence and significance of Criptosporidium parvum and Giardia intestinalis in Swedish dairy calves in comparison with rotavirus, coronavirus and Escherichia coli K99+. The farmers were asked to collect faecal samples from each heifer calf that had diarrhoea between birth and 90 days of age, and also from a healthy calf of the same age. In total, 270 samples were collected and analysed. C. parvum, either alone or together with G. intestinalis and/or rotavirus, was detected in 16 (11%) and 6 (5%) of the samples from diarrhoeic and healthy calves, respectively. Even though a higher proportion of diarrhoeic calves shed C. parvum, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.067), possibly due to the low number of positive samples. G. intestinalis was found in 42 (29%) of the diarrhoea samples and in 29 (23%) of the samples from healthy calves. Rotavirus and coronavirus were demonstrated in 24% and 3% of the diarrhoea samples, respectively, whereas E. coli K99+ was only found in samples from 2 healthy calves. C. parvum and G. intestinalis were found in samples from calves 7 to 84 days of age and during all seasons. The results confirm that C. parvum is present in Swedish dairy herds and might have clinical significance. G. intestinalis was the most common agent found but the importance of this parasite remains unclear. Both parasites have suggested zoonotic potential and thus warrant further attention. In addition, rotavirus is a major pathogen in neonatal enteritis in Sweden, whereas coronavirus and E. coli K99+ seem to be of less importance. PMID:15074627

  18. Putative cis-Regulatory Elements Associated with Heat Shock Genes Activated During Excystation of Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Ana M.; Serrano, Myrna; Sheth, Nihar; Buck, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidiosis is a ubiquitous infectious disease, caused by the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, leading to acute, persistent and chronic diarrhea worldwide. Although the complications of this disease can be serious, even fatal, in immunocompromised patients of any age, they have also been found to lead to long term effects, including growth inhibition and impaired cognitive development, in infected immunocompetent children. The Cryptosporidium life cycle alternates between a dormant stage, the oocyst, and a highly replicative phase that includes both asexual vegetative stages as well as sexual stages, implying fine genetic regulatory mechanisms. The parasite is extremely difficult to study because it cannot be cultured in vitro and animal models are equally challenging. The recent publication of the genome sequence of C. hominis and C. parvum has, however, significantly advanced our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of this parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, our goal was to identify cis-regulatory elements associated with heat shock response in Cryptosporidium using a combination of in silico and real time RT-PCR strategies. Analysis with Gibbs-Sampling algorithms of upstream non-translated regions of twelve genes annotated as heat shock proteins in the Cryptosporidium genome identified a highly conserved over-represented sequence motif in eleven of them. RT-PCR analyses, described herein and also by others, show that these eleven genes bearing the putative element are induced concurrent with excystation of parasite oocysts via heat shock. Conclusions/Significance Our analyses suggest that occurrences of a motif identified in the upstream regions of the Cryptosporidium heat shock genes represent parts of the transcriptional apparatus and function as stress response elements that activate expression of these genes during excystation, and possibly at other stages in the life cycle of the parasite

  19. Arginine reduces Cryptosporidium parvum infection in undernourished suckling mice involving both nitric oxide synthase and arginase

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ibraim C.; Oliveira, Bruna B.; Slowikowski, Jacek J.; Coutinho, Bruna P.; Siqueira, Francisco Júlio W.S.; Costa, Lourrany B.; Sevilleja, Jesus Emmanuel; Almeida, Camila A.; Lima, Aldo A.M.; Warren, Cirle A.; Oriá, Reinaldo B.; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the role of L-arginine supplementation to undernourished and Cryptosporidium parvum-infected suckling mice. Methods The following regimens were initiated on the 4th day of life and given subcutaneously daily: either 200mM of L-arginine or PBS for the C. parvum-infected controls. L-arginine-treated mice were grouped to receive either 20mM of NG-nitroarginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME) or PBS. Infected mice received orally 106 excysted-C. parvum oocysts on day 6 and were euthanized on day 14th at the infection peak. Results L-arginine improved weight gain compared to the untreated infected controls. L-NAME profoundly impaired body weight gain as compared to all other groups. Cryptosporidiosis was associated with ileal crypt hyperplasia, villus blunting, and inflammation. L-arginine improved mucosal histology following infection. L-NAME abrogated these arginine-induced improvements. Infected control mice showed an intense arginase expression, which was even greater with L-NAME. L-arginine reduced parasite burden, an effect that was reversed by L-NAME. C. parvum infection increased urine NO3-/NO2- concentration when compared to uninfected controls, which was increased by L-arginine supplementation, an effect that was also reversed by L-NAME. Conclusion These findings show a protective role of L-arginine during C. parvum infection in undernourished mice with involvement of arginase I and nitric oxide synthase enzymatic actions. PMID:22261576

  20. Serological detection and epidemiology of Neospora caninum and Cryptosporidium parvum antibodies in cattle in southern Egypt.

    PubMed

    Fereig, Ragab M; AbouLaila, Mahmoud Rezk; Mohamed, Samy G A; Mahmoud, Hassan Y A H; Ali, Alsagher O; Ali, Asmaa F; Hilali, Mosaad; Zaid, Anis; Mohamed, Adel Elsayed Ahmed; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-10-01

    Neospora caninum and Cryptosporidium parvum are intracellular protozoan parasites that are distributed worldwide and of major economical concern in cattle industry. N. caninum can cause abortion storms and high culling rates, whereas C. parvum has zoonotic implications and can cause diarrhea in calves. There are currently no data on the prevalence of neosporosis and cryptosporidiosis in humans or animals in southern Egypt. Prevalence of these two infections was determined in a sample of cattle from two different areas in southern Egypt, Sohag and Qena, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A total 301 cattle were sampled, of which 18.9% were positive for N. caninum, 35.9% were positive for C. parvum and 10.0% were positive for both. Geographical location and breeding system were considered as potential risk factors for C. parvum infection. A higher prevalence of infection was identified on small scale farms, compared with larger, intensive systems, with a prevalence of 50.2% compared with 37.8%, respectively. Animals in Sohag had a significantly higher prevalence compared with Qena, with a seroprevalence of 46.1% compared with 31.6%, respectively. In brief, marked seroprevalence recorded in this study indicates a high incidence of N. caninum and C. parvum infections in cattle, and this necessitates the application of more effective strategies for combating these types of infections on farms in Egypt. PMID:27377768

  1. SHP-2 Mediates Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varughese, Eunice A.; Kasper, Susan; Anneken, Emily M.; Yadav, Jagjit S.

    2015-01-01

    The parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, induces human gastroenteritis through infection of host epithelial cells in the small intestine. During the initial stage of infection, C. parvum is reported to engage host mechanisms at the host cell-parasite interface to form a parasitophorous vacuole. We determined that upon infection, the larger molecular weight proteins in human small intestinal epithelial host cells (FHs 74 Int) appeared to globally undergo tyrosine dephosphorylation. In parallel, expression of the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) increased in a time-dependent manner. SHP-2 co-localized with the C. parvum sporozoite and this interaction increased the rate of C. parvum infectivity through SH2-mediated SHP-2 activity. Furthermore, we show that one potential target that SHP-2 acts upon is the focal adhesion protein, paxillin, which undergoes moderate dephosphorylation following infection, with inhibition of SHP-2 rescuing paxillin phosphorylation. Importantly, treatment with an inhibitor to SHP-2 and with an inhibitor to paxillin and Src family kinases, effectively decreased the multiplicity of C. parvum infection in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, our study reveals an important role for SHP-2 in the pathogenesis of C. parvum. Furthermore, while host proteins can be recruited to participate in the development of the electron dense band at the host cell-parasite interface, our study implies for the first time that SHP-2 appears to be recruited by the C. parvum sporozoite to regulate infectivity. Taken together, these findings suggest that SHP-2 and its down-stream target paxillin could serve as targets for intervention. PMID:26556238

  2. Three sample preparation protocols for polymerase chain reaction based detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Kostrzynska, M; Sankey, M; Haack, E; Power, C; Aldom, J E; Chagla, A H; Unger, S; Palmateer, G; Lee, H; Trevors, J T; De Grandis, S A

    1999-02-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite responsible for an increasing number of outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness worldwide. In this report, we describe development of sample preparation protocols for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection of C. parvum in fecal material and environmental water samples. Two of these methods were found adequate for isolation of Cryptosporidium DNA from filtered water pellet suspensions. The first involved several filtration steps, immunomagnetic separation and freeze-thaw cycles. The second method involved filtration, addition of EnviroAmp lysis reagent, freeze-thaw cycles and precipitation of the DNA with isopropanol. Using nested PCR, we detected 100 oocysts/ml of filtered water pellet suspension, with either of the above sample preparation procedures. Nested PCR increased sensitivity of the assay by two to three orders of magnitude as compared to the primary PCR. The detection limit for seeded fecal samples was 10-fold higher than for filtered environmental water pellet suspension. Nested PCR results showed 62.4 and 91.1% correlation with immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for fecal samples and filtered environmental water pellet suspensions, respectively. This correlation decreased to 47.2% and 44.4%, respectively, when only IFA positive samples were analyzed. However, in fecal samples contaminated with a high number (> 10(5)/g) of C. parvum oocysts, this correlation was 100%. PMID:10076632

  3. The Ultra-Structural Similarities between Cryptosporidium parvum and the Gregarines.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Using a transmission electron microscopy-based approach, this study details the striking similarities between Cryptosporidium parvum and the gregarines during in vitro axenic development at high ultra-structural resolution. C. parvum zoites displayed three unusual regions within uninucleated parasites: epimerite-like, protomerite-like, and the cell body; these regions exhibited a high degree of morphological similarity to gregarine-like trophozoites. The presence of a mucron-like bulging structure at the side of the free ovoid gregarine-like zoites was observed after 2 h of cultivation. An irregular pattern of epicytic-like folds were found to cover the surface of the parasites 24 h postcultivation. Some extracellular stages were paired in laterocaudal or side-side syzygy, with the presence of a fusion zone between some of these zoites. The present findings are in agreement with phylogenetic studies that have proposed a sister relationship with gregarines. Cryptosporidium appears to exhibit tremendous variety in cell structure depending on the surrounding environment, thereby mimicking the "primitive" gregarines in terms of the co-evolution strategy between the parasites and their environments. Given this degree of similarity, different aspects of the evolutionary biology of Cryptosporidium need to be examined, considering the knowledge gained from the study of gregarines. PMID:26173708

  4. Development of a nested-PCR assay for the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in finished water.

    PubMed

    Monis, P T; Saint, C P

    2001-05-01

    A nested-PCR assay, incorporating an internal positive control, was developed for Cryptosporidium monitoring in finished water. This assay was capable of reproducibly detecting 8 oocysts in spiked-filtered water samples collected from 5 South Australian water treatment plants. The RT-PCR assay of Kaucner and Stinear (Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64(5) (1998) 1743) was also evaluated for the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum. Initially, under our experimental conditions, a detection level of 27 oocysts was achieved for spiked reagent water samples. This level was improved to 5 oocysts by modification of the method. Untreated South Australian source waters concentrated by calcium carbonate flocculation were found to be highly inhibitory to the RT-PCR assay. Concentration of similar samples using Envirochek filters appeared to eliminate PCR inhibition. While both methods possessed similar sensitivities the nested-PCR assay was more reproducible, more cost effective, simpler to perform and could detect both viable and non-viable intact Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, which is an important consideration for plant operators. These factors make the nested-PCR assay the method of choice for screening large numbers of potable water samples, where a reliable low level of detection is essential. PMID:11329665

  5. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts through Vegetated Buffer Strips and Estimated Filtration Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Atwill, Edward R.; Hou, Lingling; Karle, Betsy M.; Harter, Thomas; Tate, Kenneth W.; Dahlgren, Randy A.

    2002-01-01

    Vegetated buffer strips were evaluated for their ability to remove waterborne Cryptosporidium parvum from surface and shallow subsurface flow during simulated rainfall rates of 15 or 40 mm/h for 4 h. Log10 reductions for spiked C. parvum oocysts ranged from 1.0 to 3.1 per m of vegetated buffer, with buffers set at 5 to 20% slope, 85 to 99% fescue cover, soil textures of either silty clay (19:47:34 sand-silt-clay), loam (45:37:18), or sandy loam (70:25:5), and bulk densities of between 0.6 to 1.7 g/cm3. Vegetated buffers constructed with sandy loam or higher soil bulk densities were less effective at removing waterborne C. parvum (1- to 2-log10 reduction/m) compared to buffers constructed with silty clay or loam or at lower bulk densities (2- to 3-log10 reduction/m). The effect of slope on filtration efficiency was conditional on soil texture and soil bulk density. Based on these results, a vegetated buffer strip comprised of similar soils at a slope of ≤20% and a length of ≥3 m should function to remove ≥99.9% of C. parvum oocysts from agricultural runoff generated during events involving mild to moderate precipitation. PMID:12406745

  6. Efficacy of using harmless Bacillus endospores to estimate the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mary; Clifford, Eoghan; O'Reilly, Edmond; Rowan, Neil J

    2013-06-01

    The need to use complex in vitro cell culture, expensive equipment, and highly-trained technicians that are available only to specialist laboratories has significantly limited studies assessing the potential of pulsed UV light (PUV) to inactivate the waterborne parasite Cryptosporidium parvum in drinking water. This constitutes the first study to report on the use of different non-pathogenic Bacillus endospores as potential surrogate organisms to indicate the PUV inactivation performance of a C. parvum oocyst suspended in water. Findings showed that PUV effectively inactivated approximately 5 log10 CFU/ml Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus pumilus endospores suspended in water at a UV dose of 9.72 μJ/cm(2) that also inactivated statistically similar levels of C. parvum oocysts (P < 0.05), as determined by combined in vitro HCT-8 cell culture and quantitative PCR. Specifically, this study demonstrated that B. megaterium exhibited greater or similar PUV-inactivation kinetic data compared to that of similarly treated C. parvum over the UV dose range 6.4 to 12.9 μJ/cm(2). Therefore, the former may be used as an indicator organism for safely investigating the PUV-inactivation performance of this chlorine-resistant, waterborne parasite at the waste-water treatment plant level. Findings presented will impact positively on future water quality studies and on public health. PMID:23145570

  7. ANTIPARASITIC ACTIVITY OF SILVER AND COPPER OXIDE NANOPARTICLES AGAINST ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA AND CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM CYSTS.

    PubMed

    Saad, Halim A; Soliman, Mohamed I; Azzam, Ahmed M; Mostafa, B

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have received more attention as antiparasitic agents. In the present study, silver and copper nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The antiparasitic activity of Ag and CuO nanoparticles were tested against two of the most environmentally spread parasites in Egypt (Entamoeba histolytica and Cryptosporidium parvum). The average sizes of synthesized Ag NPs and CuO NPs were 9 & 29 nm respectively and a significant reduction for cysts viability (p > 0.05) was observed for CuO NPs against E. histolytica cysts and Ag NPs against C. parvum oocysts. Moreover, LC50-3h of CuO NPs for E. histolytica and C. parvum were 0.13 and 0.72 mg/l, while Ag NPs recorded 0.34 and 0.54 mg/l respectively. Accordingly, these NPs could be suggested as a new nanoform agent for safe and effective treatment of E. histolytica and C. parvum parasites. PMID:26939237

  8. Perturbation of the intestinal microbiota of mice infected with Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Ras, Refaat; Huynh, Kevin; Desoky, Enas; Badawy, Ahmed; Widmer, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the interaction between the intestinal microbiota (microbiome) and enteric pathogens is of interest in the development of alternative treatments that do not rely on chemotherapy and do not lead to drug resistance. We undertook research in a rodent model of cryptosporidiosis to assess whether the bacterial gut microbiota is impacted by infection with the protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum. The profile of the faecal bacterial microbiota in infected and uninfected animals was compared using 16S amplicon sequencing. In four independent experiments, the intestinal microbiota of infected mice differed from that of uninfected animals, regardless of the C. parvum isolate used to infect mice. The use of replicated treatment groups demonstrated that microbiota divergence between treatments was driven by the infection and did not result from spontaneous changes in the intestinal ecosystem unrelated to the infection. Microbiota perturbation induced by C. parvum appeared to be reversible, as we observed a tendency for the phylogenetic distance between infected and uninfected mice to diminish after mice cleared the infection. As mice infected with C. parvum do not develop diarrhoea, these observations indicate that microbiota perturbation results from other mechanisms than an accelerated movement of gut content. PMID:25913477

  9. Cryptosporidium parvum: functional complementation of a parasite transcriptional coactivator CpMBF1 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G; LaGier, M J; Hirose, S; Keithly, J S

    2000-12-01

    We report here the identification of a novel multiprotein bridging factor type 1 from the apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum (CpMBF1), one of the opportunistic pathogens in AIDS patients. In slime molds, insects, and humans, MBF1-regulated systems have been associated with cell differentiation, which indicates that CpMBF1 could be responsible for the activation of similar systems in C. parvum during its complex life cycle. Because of the difficulties and high cost in obtaining sufficient and purified C. parvum material for molecular and biochemical analyses, well-characterized yeast genetic systems may be useful for investigating the functions of C. parvum genes. In this study, the function of CpMBF1 as an interconnecting element between a DNA-binding regulator and TATA-box-binding protein (TBP) was confirmed using a yeast complementation assay. Under conditions of histidine starvation, an MBF1-deficient strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was unable to activate the HIS3 gene, which encodes imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase (IGPDH), and thus became sensitive to 3-amino triazole, an inhibitor of this enzyme. Upon introduction of parasite CpMBF1 into S. cerevisiae, 3-amino triazole resistance of the MBF1-deficient strain was restored to wild-type levels, and Northern blot analysis revealed that CpMBF1 was able to activate HIS3 transcription in response to histidine starvation. PMID:11162372

  10. Coupled Effects of Vadose Zone Hydrodynamics and Anionic Surfactant Aerosol-22 on the Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, C. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Powelson, D.; Baveye, P.; Peng, Z.; Yu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a microbial pathogen that may be found in soil, surface and groundwater resources. We studied their transport behavior under conditions where both C. parvum oocysts and chemicals that may affect their mobility are present in soils. Surfactants occur widely in soils due to agricultural practices such as wastewater irrigation and application of agrichemicals. Surfactants decrease the surface tension of the soil solution, which may reduce the ability of C. parvum oocysts to be retained at gas-water interfaces. Understanding the fate and transport of C. parvum oocysts following land application of manure and use of surfactants in rural and agricultural watersheds is critical to assess the threat to water resources. We investigated the coupled effects of vadose zone hydrodynamics and an anionic surfactant Aerosol-22 on the transport of C. parvum oocysts in natural structured and non-structured agricultural or range soils from Illinois and Utah. Column transport experiments consisted of unsaturated flow subject to macropore and fingered flows resulting from simulated rainfall with and without surfactant. To assess the behavior of C. parvum oocysts in soils, the breakthrough and distribution of C. parvum oocysts in soil profiles were obtained using qPCR. We observed that surfactant enhanced the transport of C. parvum oocysts when preferential flow paths are present. However, when the interconnection between macropores is not established in the soils, surfactant limited the transport of C. parvum oocysts through the soil matrix by forming oocyst-surfactant-Ca flocs.

  11. Investigating Attachment Behaviors of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts Using Collision Efficiency in Laboratory Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Hou, L.; Atwill, R.; Packman, A. I.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    Cryptosporidium is one of the most common enteric parasites of humans and domestic animals, and a number of outbreaks of Cryprosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease caused by Cryptosporidium have been reported worldwide. Natural porous media has been demonstrated to be an effective filter for removing Cryptosporidium parvum from contaminated water and the amount of Cryptosporidium filtered is known to be highly dependent on physical and chemical conditions of the porous media and the water. Cryptosporidium deposition in saturated porous media involves two main steps: approach and attachment. In contrast to the approach mechanisms, attachment processes have not been systematically described to predict a priori because theories that represent attachment behavior (colloid stability) such as DLVO are insufficient to explain experimental data. For this reason, attachment efficiency is calculated based on empirical data, typically experimental breakthrough curves in laboratory columns or field experiments. In this study, collision (attachment) efficiencies (α) of C. parvum oocyst were calculated to test the effect of chemical property changes on the association of oocysts with sand grains. The breakthrough curve data obtained from twelve column experiments and three models were employed to calculate single collector efficiency (η) and α. The first ten experiments were conducted by changing ionic strength and pH, and mixing with natural sediments under the same physical properties (same η). Our experiment results show that iron coating or clay/suspended solids mixture drastically enhanced oocyst deposition. The experiments also showed that increase in ionic strength and decrease in pH enhanced the attachment efficiency. However, the experiment with 100mM NaCl resulted in low attachment efficiency and the experiment with pH 8.5 showed similar attachment efficiency to the one at pH 7. Based on the results from two additional experiments with different flow velocities, it

  12. Low-level detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in field water using optical microfluidic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Scott V.; Kwon, Hyuck-Jin; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2012-03-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a difficult-to-detect protozoan that causes diarrhea in the healthy adults and death in immunocompromised individuals. While it is easy to understand the transmission routes of Cryptosporidium, it is currently difficult to identify low concentrations of Cryptosporidium, especially when following EPA method 1623, which can easily require tens of liters of water to get a positive signal. The current detection method is unacceptable and severely inefficient when taking into account the time that goes into concentrating a sample, actual assays, and training associated with the assays. Using our method, it is possible to use only 15 μL of sample, which is an immunoagglutination assay that uses Mie scatter intensity changes to detect different Cryptosporidium concentrations. In addition to creating a standard curve using a clean sample matrix (i.e., phosphate buffered saline), field samples were collected from a chlorine treated swimming pool, a sump located on a farm, and a turtle pond. Each sample had different intensity changes but the trend represented within the data was the same. This assay has a detection limit of 100-101 oocysts/mL and can be done in as little as 10 minutes.

  13. PCR slippage across the ML-2 microsatellite of the Cryptosporidium MIC1 locus enables development of a PCR assay capable of distinguishing the zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum from other human infectious Cryptosporidium species.

    PubMed

    Webber, M A; Sari, I; Hoefel, D; Monis, P T; King, B J

    2014-08-01

    Cryptosporidium are ubiquitous and significant enteropathogens of all classes of vertebrates and a major cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Of the 24 recognized species, the zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum and the host-specific Cryptosporidium hominis cause the majority of cases of human cryptosporidiosis. Here, we report on structural and transcriptional variability between C. parvum and C. hominis at the MIC1 locus, which encodes a microneme localized thrombospondin-like domain containing protein previously demonstrated to be critical for host cell infection by C. parvum. We demonstrate, using reverse transcription quantitative PCR with the aid of genomic data from the EuPathDB site, that the transcribed product in C. hominis is both truncated and significantly down-regulated in the sporozoite. We hypothesize that CpMIC1 may be a genetic factor involved in facilitating the wider host range of C. parvum in comparison with the specific host range of C. hominis. Furthermore, we show that the presence of a microsatellite (ML-2) within the C. parvum MIC-1 locus enables the development of a PCR marker that can rapidly distinguish the zoonotic C. parvum from C. hominis and other significant human infectious Cryptosporidium species due to reproducible PCR slippage across the ML-2 microsatellite. Additionally, we demonstrate that this locus is tightly linked to the GP60 locus, a locus commonly used in the genetic characterization of C. parvum and C. hominis isolates. This marker should provide a robust and additional tool to aid in the rapid identification of C. parvum from other Cryptosporidium species. PMID:23954136

  14. Influence of Surface Characteristics on the Stability of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Butkus, Michael A.; Bays, J. Timothy; Labare, Michael P.

    2003-01-01

    Microelectrophoresis is a common technique for probing the surface chemistry of the Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst. Results of previous studies of the electrophoretic mobility of C. parvum oocysts in which microelectrophoresis was used are incongruent. In this work we demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis may also be used to probe the surface characteristics of C. parvum oocysts, and we related the surface chemistry of C. parvum oocysts to their stability in water. Capillary electrophoresis results indicated that oocysts which were washed in a phosphate buffer solution had neutrally charged surfaces. Inactivation of oocysts with formalin did not influence their electrophoretic mobility, while oocyst populations that were washed in distilled water consisted of cells with both neutral and negative surface charges. These results indicate that washing oocysts in low-ionic-strength distilled water can impart a negative charge to a fraction of the oocysts in the sample. Rapid coagulation experiments indicated that oocysts did not aggregate in a 0.5 M NaCl solution; oocyst stability in the salt solution may have been the result of Lewis acid-base forces, steric stabilization, or some other factor. The presence of sucrose and Percoll could not be readily identified on the surface of C. parvum oocysts by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, suggesting that these purification reagents may not be responsible for the stability of the uncharged oocysts. These findings imply that precipitate enmeshment may be the optimal mechanism of coagulation for removal of oocysts in water treatment systems. The results of this work may help elucidate the causes of variation in oocyst surface characteristics, may ultimately lead to improved removal efficiencies in full-scale water treatment systems, and may improve fate and transport predictions for oocysts in natural systems. PMID:12839749

  15. Neutrophils do not mediate the pathophysiological sequelae of Cryptosporidium parvum infection in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Zadrozny, Leah M; Stauffer, Stephen H; Armstrong, Martha U; Jones, Samuel L; Gookin, Jody L

    2006-10-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a minimally invasive protozoal pathogen of intestinal epithelium that results in villus atrophy, mucosal lipid peroxidation, diarrhea, and diminished barrier function. Influx of neutrophils is a consistent feature of human and animal cryptosporidiosis, and yet their contribution to the pathological sequelae of infection has not been investigated. Accordingly, we used an established neonatal piglet model of C. parvum infection to examine the role of neutrophils in disease pathogenesis by inhibiting their recruitment and activation in vivo using a monoclonal anti-CD18 antibody. Infected piglets were treated daily with anti-CD18 or isotype control immunoglobulin G and euthanized at peak infection, at which time neutrophil infiltrates, lipid peroxidation, severity of infection, and intestinal barrier function were quantified. C. parvum infection resulted in a significant increase in mucosal neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity that was prevented by treatment of piglets with anti-CD18 antibody. Neutrophil recruitment was dependent on mucosal superoxide formation (prevented by treatment of infected piglets with superoxide dismutase). Neutrophils did not contribute to peroxynitrite formation or peroxidative injury of C. parvum-infected mucosa and had no impact on the severity of epithelial infection, villus atrophy, or diarrhea. The presence of neutrophils in C. parvum-infected mucosa was associated with enhanced barrier function that could not be attributed to mucosal elaboration of prostaglandins or stimulation of their synthesis. These studies are the first to demonstrate that neutrophilic inflammation arising in response to infection by a noninvasive epithelial pathogen results in physiologic rather than pathological effects in vivo. PMID:16988224

  16. Neutrophils Do Not Mediate the Pathophysiological Sequelae of Cryptosporidium parvum Infection in Neonatal Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Zadrozny, Leah M.; Stauffer, Stephen H.; Armstrong, Martha U.; Jones, Samuel L.; Gookin, Jody L.

    2006-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a minimally invasive protozoal pathogen of intestinal epithelium that results in villus atrophy, mucosal lipid peroxidation, diarrhea, and diminished barrier function. Influx of neutrophils is a consistent feature of human and animal cryptosporidiosis, and yet their contribution to the pathological sequelae of infection has not been investigated. Accordingly, we used an established neonatal piglet model of C. parvum infection to examine the role of neutrophils in disease pathogenesis by inhibiting their recruitment and activation in vivo using a monoclonal anti-CD18 antibody. Infected piglets were treated daily with anti-CD18 or isotype control immunoglobulin G and euthanized at peak infection, at which time neutrophil infiltrates, lipid peroxidation, severity of infection, and intestinal barrier function were quantified. C. parvum infection resulted in a significant increase in mucosal neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity that was prevented by treatment of piglets with anti-CD18 antibody. Neutrophil recruitment was dependent on mucosal superoxide formation (prevented by treatment of infected piglets with superoxide dismutase). Neutrophils did not contribute to peroxynitrite formation or peroxidative injury of C. parvum-infected mucosa and had no impact on the severity of epithelial infection, villus atrophy, or diarrhea. The presence of neutrophils in C. parvum-infected mucosa was associated with enhanced barrier function that could not be attributed to mucosal elaboration of prostaglandins or stimulation of their synthesis. These studies are the first to demonstrate that neutrophilic inflammation arising in response to infection by a noninvasive epithelial pathogen results in physiologic rather than pathological effects in vivo. PMID:16988224

  17. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in recycled waters used for irrigation and first description of Cryptosporidium parvum and C. muris in Greece.

    PubMed

    Spanakos, Gregory; Biba, Anastasia; Mavridou, Athena; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2015-05-01

    Here, we present the first time findings regarding the occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in sewage waters and the first molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium species in Greece. Biological treatment plants from three regions in Greece have been investigated. The detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts was by modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid fast (MZN-AF) and by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFT) for Cryptosporidium and Giardia (oo)cysts, whereas nested PCR based on the SSU rDNA assay was used for molecular detection of Cryptosporidium followed by sequencing for the genetic characterization of the species. In total, 73 samples (37 raw sewage samples and 38 of treated water samples) were collected and analyzed. Of the 73 water samples, 4 samples were Cryptosporidium-positive by IFT and staining, 12 samples were Cryptosporidium-positive by nested PCR; 9 samples were Giardia-positive by IFT. We showed that Cryptosporidium cysts are found both in the input and the discharge of the biological treatment plants. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium based on the small subunit ribosomal DNA gene resulted in the determination of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium muris Greek isolates. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium and Giardia occurrence in wastewaters and the first molecular identification of Cryptosporidium species in Greek environments. As the treated water is used for irrigation, or it is discharged into the sea, our findings indicate that biological treatment facilities constitute a possible risk for public health because the related species are prevalent in humans; the results invite for further epidemiological investigations to evaluate the real public health risk in Greece. PMID:25687523

  18. MODELING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST INACTIVATION AND BROMATE IN A FLOW-THROUGH OZONE CONTACTOR TREATING NATURAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A reactive transport model was developed to simultaneously predict Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst inactivation and bromate formation during ozonation of natural water. A mechanistic model previously established to predict bromate formation in organic-free synthetic waters w...

  19. Experimental infection with Cryptosporidium parvum IIaA21G1R1 subtype in immunosuppressed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum subtype IIaA21G1R1 oocysts were used to infect dexamethasone immunosuppressed N: NIH Swiss mice. Histology showed developmental stages in the duodenum, proximal and distal jejunum, ileum, cecum and colon, with the small intestine remaining infected until day 35 post infection....

  20. A COMPARISON OF FOUR FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY-BASED METHODS FOR PURIFYING, DETECTING, AND CONFIRMING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidiosis has been traced to drinking contaminated surface water, which was either not treated or was ineffectively treated. Testing to detect Cryptosporidium parvum in surface water has been suggested to help prevent future outbreaks. In the present study, the same sampl...

  1. A BAYESIAN METHOD OF ESTIMATING KINETIC PARAMETERS FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this paper is to use Bayesian methods to estimate the kinetic parameters for the inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with chlorine dioxide or ozone which are characterized by the delayed Chick-Watson model, i.e., a lag phase or shoulder f...

  2. Significance of wall structure, macromolecular composition, and surface polymers to the survival and transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure and composition of the oocyst wall are primary factors determining the survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts outside the host. An external polymer matrix (glycocalyx) may mediate interactions with environmental surfaces and, thus, affect the transport of oocysts in water, soil, an...

  3. [The impact of nematode invasions on the pattern of Cryptosporidium parvum infection in wild rodents].

    PubMed

    Kuliś-Małkowska, Karolina

    2007-01-01

    Fragmentation of the environment by natural barriers (lakes, mountain ranges) and human activities (towns, major roads, agriculture) can lead to isolated subpopulations of hosts. The study was carried out in Mazury Lake District in North-East of Poland, the region rich in forests, lakes, rivers and canals, which are able to create passable such barriers. Population of bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis)--dominant woodland rodents--showed local differences in helminth communities in fragmented forest habitat. The sites were chosen on the basis of the similarity of their habitat structure and type, and isolation from one another. The impact of nematode (Heligmosomoididae) infections on co-occurrence and dynamic of Cryptosporidium parvum infection was studied in both rodent species Myodes glareolus (n=781) and Apodemusflavicollis (n=302) from three different habitats. Presented results clearly revealed that natural nematode invasion could facilitate the presence of chronic infections of Cryptosporidium parvum in wild rodent populations. Also, the intrinsic (host sex and year) as well as extrinsic (season and year of study) factors have obvious effect on dynamics of infections with both groups of parasites. However, there are also some evidences that steroids hormones associated with stress and reproduction may mediate trade-offs between physiology and immune function and can affect co-occurrence of both groups of parasites. PMID:18075159

  4. Selective and potent urea inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′ monophosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Kavitha, Mandapati; Zhang, Minjia; Liu, Xiaoping; Sharling, Lisa; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Striepen, Boris; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and related species are zoonotic intracellular parasites of the intestine. Cryptosporidium is a leading cause of diarrhea in small children around the world. Infection can cause severe pathology in children and immunocompromised patients. This waterborne parasite is resistant to common methods of water treatment and therefore a prominent threat to drinking and recreation water even in countries with strong water safety systems. The drugs currently used to combat these organisms are ineffective. Genomic analysis revealed that the parasite relies solely on inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) for the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Herein, we report a selective urea-based inhibitor of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) identified by high throughput screening. We performed a SAR study of these inhibitors with some analogues exhibiting high potency (IC50 < 2 nM) against CpIMPDH, excellent selectivity > 1000-fold versus human IMPDH type 2 and good stability in mouse liver microsomes. A subset of inhibitors also displayed potent antiparasitic activity in a Toxoplasma gondii model. PMID:22950983

  5. A Unique Hexokinase in Cryptosporidium parvum, an Apicomplexan Pathogen Lacking the Krebs Cycle and Oxidative Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yonglan; Zhang, Haili; Guo, Fengguang; Sun, Mingfei; Zhu, Guan

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum may cause virtually untreatable infections in AIDS patients, and is recently identified as one of the top four diarrheal pathogens in children in developing countries. Cryptosporidium differs from other apicomplexans (e.g., Plasmodium and Toxoplasma) by lacking many metabolic pathways including the Krebs cycle and cytochrome-based respiratory chain, thus relying mainly on glycolysis for ATP production. Here we report the molecular and biochemical characterizations of a hexokinase in C. parvum (CpHK). Our phylogenetic reconstructions indicated that apicomplexan hexokinases including CpHK were highly divergent from those of humans and animals (i.e., at the base of the eukaryotic clade). CpHK displays unique kinetic features that differ from those in mammals and Toxoplasma gondii (TgHK) in the preference towards various hexoses and its capacity to use ATP and other NTPs. CpHK also displays substrate inhibition by ATP. Moreover, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) could not only inhibit the CpHK activity, but also the parasite growth in vitro at concentrations nontoxic to host cells (IC50 = 0.54 mM). While the exact action of 2-deoxy-D-glucose on the parasite is subject to further verification, our data suggest that CpHK and the glycolytic pathway may be explored for developing anti-cryptosporidial therapeutics. PMID:25216472

  6. Identification of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts by an Artificial Neural Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, Kenneth W.; Oshima, Kevin H.; Pillai, Suresh D.

    2002-01-01

    Microscopic detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts is time-consuming, requires trained analysts, and is frequently subject to significant human errors. Artificial neural networks (ANN) were developed to help identify immunofluorescently labeled C. parvum oocysts. A total of 525 digitized images of immunofluorescently labeled oocysts, fluorescent microspheres, and other miscellaneous nonoocyst images were employed in the training of the ANN. The images were cropped to a 36- by 36-pixel image, and the cropped images were placed into two categories, oocyst and nonoocyst images. The images were converted to grayscale and processed into a histogram of gray color pixel intensity. Commercially available software was used to develop and train the ANN. The networks were optimized by varying the number of training images, number of hidden neurons, and a combination of these two parameters. The network performance was then evaluated using a set of 362 unique testing images which the network had never “seen” before. Under optimized conditions, the correct identification of authentic oocyst images ranged from 81 to 97%, and the correct identification of nonoocyst images ranged from 78 to 82%, depending on the type of fluorescent antibody that was employed. The results indicate that the ANN developed were able to generalize the training images and subsequently discern previously unseen oocyst images efficiently and reproducibly. Thus, ANN can be used to reduce human errors associated with the microscopic detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts. PMID:11872458

  7. Role of Immunoglobulin A Monoclonal Antibodies against P23 in Controlling Murine Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez, F. Javier; Riggs, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an important diarrhea-causing protozoan parasite of immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) has been implicated in resistance to mucosal infections with bacteria, viruses, and parasites, but little is known about the role of IgA in the control of C. parvum infection. We assessed the role of IgA during C. parvum infection in neonatal mice. IgA-secreting hybridomas were developed by using Peyer’s patch lymphocytes from BALB/c mice which had been orally inoculated with viable C. parvum oocysts. Six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were selected for further study based on indirect immunofluorescence assay reactivity with sporozoite and merozoite pellicles and the antigen (Ag) deposited on glass substrate by gliding sporozoites. Each MAb was secreted in dimeric form and recognized a 23-kDa sporozoite Ag in Western immunoblots. The Ag recognized comigrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with P23, a previously defined neutralization-sensitive zoite pellicle Ag. MAbs were evaluated for prophylactic or therapeutic efficacy against C. parvum, singly and in combinations, in neonatal BALB/c mice. A combination of two MAbs given prophylactically prior to and 12 h following oocyst challenge reduced the number of intestinal parasites scored histologically by 21.1% compared to the numbers in mice given an isotype-matched control MAb (P < 0.01). Individual MAbs given therapeutically in nine doses over a 96-h period following oocyst challenge increased efficacy against C. parvum infection. Four MAbs given therapeutically each reduced intestinal infection 34.4 to 42.2% compared to isotype-matched control MAb-treated mice (P < 0.05). One MAb reduced infection 63.3 and 72.7% in replicate experiments compared to isotype-matched control MAb-treated mice (P < 0.0001). We conclude that IgA MAbs directed to neutralization-sensitive P23 epitopes may have utility in passive immunization against murine C. parvum

  8. MicroRNA-221 controls expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in epithelial cells in response to Cryptosporidium parvum infection

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ai-Yu; Hu, Guoku; Zhou, Rui; Liu, Jun; Feng, Yaoyu; Soukup, Garrett A.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite that infects gastrointestinal epithelial cells and causes diarrheal disease in humans and animals globally. Pathological changes following C. parvum infection include crypt hyperplasia, a modest inflammatory reaction with increased infiltration of lymphocytes into intestinal mucosa. Expression of adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), on infected epithelial cell surfaces may facilitate adhesion and recognition of lymphocytes at infection sites. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules of 23 nucleotides that negatively regulate protein-coding gene expression via translational suppression or mRNA degradation. We recently reported that microRNA-221 (miR-221) regulates ICAM-1 translation through targeting the ICAM-1 3′-untranslated region (UTR). In this study, we tested the role of miR-221 in regulating ICAM-1 expression in epithelial cells in response to C. parvum infection using an in vitro model of human biliary cryptosporidiosis. Up-regulation of ICAM-1 at both message and protein levels was detected in epithelial cells following C. parvum infection. Inhibition of ICAM-1 transcription with actinomycin D could only partially block C. parvum-induced ICAM-1 expression at the protein level. Cryptosporidium parvum infection decreased miR-221 expression in infected epithelial cells. When cells were transfected with a luciferase reporter construct covering the miR-221 binding site in the ICAM-1 3′-UTR and then exposed to C. parvum, an enhanced luciferase activity was detected. Transfection of miR-221 precursor abolished C. parvum-stimulated ICAM-1 protein expression. In addition, expression of ICAM-1 on infected epithelial cells facilitated epithelial adherence of co-cultured Jurkat cells. These results indicate that miR-221-mediated translational suppression controls ICAM-1 expression in epithelial cells in response to C. parvum infection. PMID:21236259

  9. Fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts within soil, water, and plant environment.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Stephen J; Kalita, Prasanta K; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S

    2013-12-15

    Vegetative Filter Strips (VFS) have long been used to control the movement of agricultural nutrients and prevent them from reaching receiving waters. Earlier studies have shown that VFS also dramatically reduce both the kinetics and extent of Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocysts overland transport. In this study, we investigated possible mechanisms responsible for the ability of VFS to reduce oocyst overland transport. Measurement of the kinetics of C. parvum adhesion to individual sand, silt, and clay soil particles revealed that oocysts associate over time, albeit relatively slow, with clay but not silt or sand particles. Measurement of oocyst overland transport kinetics, soil infiltration depth, distance of travel, and adhesion to vegetation on bare and vegetated soil surfaces indicate that oocysts move more slowly, and penetrate the soil profile to a greater extent on a vegetated surface than on a bare soil surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate a small fraction of the oocysts become attached to vegetation at the soil-vegetation interface on VFS. These results suggest VFS function to reduce oocyst overland transport by primarily decreasing oocyst surface flow enough to allow penetration within the soil profile followed by subsequent adhesion to or entrapment within clay particle aggregates, and to a lesser extent, adhesion to the surface vegetation. PMID:24157412

  10. In vitro inhibitory effects of plant-derived by-products against Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Klaus; Kuliberda, Maxime; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Pacher, Thomas; Zitterl-Eglseer, Karin; Joachim, Anja; Hadacek, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Disposal of organic plant wastes and by-products from the food or pharmaceutical industries usually involves high costs. In the present study, 42 samples derived from such by-products were screened in vitro against Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite that may contaminate drinking water and cause diarrhoea. The novel bioassay was previously established in the microtitre plate format. Human ileocaecal adenocarcinoma (HCT-8) cell cultures were seeded with C. parvum oocysts and parasite development was monitored by an indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT) and microscopic assessment for clusters of secondary infection (CSI). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and potential detrimental effects on the host cells were determined. An ethanolic extract from olive (Olea europaea) pomace, after oil pressing and phenol recovery, reproducibly inhibited C. parvum development (MIC = 250-500 μg mL(-1), IC50 = 361 (279-438) μg mL(-1), IC90 = 467 (398-615) μg mL(-1)). Accordingly, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, trans-coniferyl alcohol and oleuropein were selected as reference test compounds, but their contributions to the observed activity of the olive pomace extract were insignificant. The established test system proved to be a fast and efficient assay for identifying anti-cryptosporidial activities in biological waste material and comparison with selected reference compounds. PMID:27627637

  11. Modeling Fate and Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts in Overland and Near- surface Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a manure-borne protozoan parasite which is common in the environment. It has been recognized as an important microbial contaminant of water and can cause infection and diarrhea in many mammalian hosts, including humans. The laboratory experiments carried out have demonstrated that recovery of C. parvum oocysts was significantly affected by climatic and surface conditions like slope, rainfall and surface cover. The objective of this study is to develop a model for simulating transport of C. parvum oocysts in overland and near-surface flow. Modeling can help understanding oocysts transport pathways. Accordingly, best management practices (BMP) can be developed. Transport of oocysts in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the oocysts in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay). Oocysts adsorption, advection and decay processes are considered. These processes are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in oocyst concentrations in solid and liquid phases. The model results are compared with experimental data to validate the model outcome. The model output reproduced observed recovery kinetics for 1.5% slope but not for higher slopes (3.0% and 4.5%).

  12. Cryptosporidium parvum infections in a cohort of veterinary students in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Kinross, P; Beser, J; Troell, K; Axén, C; Silverlås, C; Björkman, C; Lebbad, M; Winiecka-Krusnell, J; Lindh, J; Löfdahl, M

    2015-10-01

    In March 2013, a veterinary student tested positive for Cryptosporidium; four classmates reported similar gastrointestinal symptoms. We aimed to identify source(s) and risk factors for Cryptosporidium infection in university persons symptomatic between 21 January and 14 April 2013. Sixty-four (79%) students from a cohort of 81 fourth-year veterinary students completed questionnaires, identifying 13 cases; four were Cryptosporidium parvum GP60 subtype IIaA16G1R1b, two were IIdA24G1, seven did not submit stool samples. Thirteen cases attended the university's field clinic before symptom onset (13/37 attendees, 35%); 11 visited at least one of four farms where students recalled seeing calves with diarrhoea. C. parvum subtype IIaA16G1R1b was identified in calves at one of the farms. Entering pens of calves with diarrhoea [relative risk (RR) 7·6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·7-33·5] and eating in clinic cars (RR 9·1, 95% CI 1·3-65·8) were associated with being a case. Washing hands at least twice per farm visit (0 cases, P = 0·03) was protective. This outbreak investigation was notable for rapid and effective collaboration between public health, veterinary and environmental sectors, leading to swift identification of a microbiological and epidemiological link between cases, infected calves and their farms. We recommend frequent hand-washing using proper technique and dissuasion from eating in clinic cars to minimize possible exposure to contaminated surfaces. PMID:25633822

  13. Efficacy of two peroxygen-based disinfectants for inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed

    Quilez, Joaquin; Sanchez-Acedo, Caridad; Avendaño, Catalina; del Cacho, Emilio; Lopez-Bernad, Fernando

    2005-05-01

    Two commercial peroxygen-based disinfectants containing hydrogen peroxide plus either peracetic acid (Ox-Virin) or silver nitrate (Ox-Agua) were tested for their ability to inactivate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. Oocysts were obtained from naturally infected goat kids and exposed to concentrations of 2, 5, and 10% Ox-Virin or 1, 3, and 5% Ox-Agua for 30, 60, and 120 min. In vitro excystation, vital dyes (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide), and infectivity in neonatal BALB/c mice were used to assess the viability and infectivity of control and disinfectant-treated oocysts. Both disinfectants had a deleterious effect on the survival of C. parvum oocysts, since disinfection significantly reduced and in some cases eliminated their viability and infectivity. When in vitro assays were compared with an infectivity assay as indicators of oocyst inactivation, the excystation assay showed 98.6% inactivation after treatment with 10% Ox-Virin for 60 min, while the vital-dye assay showed 95.2% inactivation and the infectivity assay revealed 100% inactivation. Treatment with 3% Ox-Agua for 30 min completely eliminated oocyst infectivity for mice, although we were able to observe only 74.7% inactivation as measured by excystation assays and 24.3% with vital dyes (which proved to be the least reliable method for predicting C. parvum oocyst viability). These findings indicate the potential efficacy of both disinfectants for C. parvum oocysts in agricultural settings where soil, housing, or tools might be contaminated and support the argument that in comparison to the animal infectivity assay, vital-dye and excystation methods overestimate the viability of oocysts following chemical disinfection. PMID:15870337

  14. Efficacy of Two Peroxygen-Based Disinfectants for Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Quilez, Joaquin; Sanchez-Acedo, Caridad; Avendaño, Catalina; del Cacho, Emilio; Lopez-Bernad, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Two commercial peroxygen-based disinfectants containing hydrogen peroxide plus either peracetic acid (Ox-Virin) or silver nitrate (Ox-Agua) were tested for their ability to inactivate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. Oocysts were obtained from naturally infected goat kids and exposed to concentrations of 2, 5, and 10% Ox-Virin or 1, 3, and 5% Ox-Agua for 30, 60, and 120 min. In vitro excystation, vital dyes (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide), and infectivity in neonatal BALB/c mice were used to assess the viability and infectivity of control and disinfectant-treated oocysts. Both disinfectants had a deleterious effect on the survival of C. parvum oocysts, since disinfection significantly reduced and in some cases eliminated their viability and infectivity. When in vitro assays were compared with an infectivity assay as indicators of oocyst inactivation, the excystation assay showed 98.6% inactivation after treatment with 10% Ox-Virin for 60 min, while the vital-dye assay showed 95.2% inactivation and the infectivity assay revealed 100% inactivation. Treatment with 3% Ox-Agua for 30 min completely eliminated oocyst infectivity for mice, although we were able to observe only 74.7% inactivation as measured by excystation assays and 24.3% with vital dyes (which proved to be the least reliable method for predicting C. parvum oocyst viability). These findings indicate the potential efficacy of both disinfectants for C. parvum oocysts in agricultural settings where soil, housing, or tools might be contaminated and support the argument that in comparison to the animal infectivity assay, vital-dye and excystation methods overestimate the viability of oocysts following chemical disinfection. PMID:15870337

  15. A Cysteine Protease Inhibitor Rescues Mice from a Lethal Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nath-Chowdhury, Milli; Sajid, Mohammed; Marcus, Victoria; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Sakanari, Judy; Chow, Eric; Mackey, Zachary; Land, Kirkwood M.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; McKerrow, James H.; Arrowood, Michael J.; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, can stunt infant growth and can be lethal in immunocompromised individuals. The most widely used drugs for treating cryptosporidiosis are nitazoxanide and paromomycin, although both exhibit limited efficacy. To investigate an alternative approach to therapy, we demonstrate that the clan CA cysteine protease inhibitor N-methyl piperazine-Phe-homoPhe-vinylsulfone phenyl (K11777) inhibits C. parvum growth in mammalian cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, using the C57BL/6 gamma interferon receptor knockout (IFN-γR-KO) mouse model, which is highly susceptible to C. parvum, oral or intraperitoneal treatment with K11777 for 10 days rescued mice from otherwise lethal infections. Histologic examination of untreated mice showed intestinal inflammation, villous blunting, and abundant intracellular parasite stages. In contrast, K11777-treated mice (210 mg/kg of body weight/day) showed only minimal inflammation and no epithelial changes. Three putative protease targets (termed cryptopains 1 to 3, or CpaCATL-1, -2, and -3) were identified in the C. parvum genome, but only two are transcribed in infected mammals. A homology model predicted that K11777 would bind to cryptopain 1. Recombinant enzymatically active cryptopain 1 was successfully targeted by K11777 in a competition assay with a labeled active-site-directed probe. K11777 exhibited no toxicity in vitro and in vivo, and surviving animals remained free of parasites 3 weeks after treatment. The discovery that a cysteine protease inhibitor provides potent anticryptosporidial activity in an animal model of infection encourages the investigation and development of this biocide class as a new, and urgently needed, chemotherapy for cryptosporidiosis. PMID:24060869

  16. Cryptosporidium parvum induces an endoplasmic stress response in the intestinal adenocarcinoma HCT-8 cell line.

    PubMed

    Morada, Mary; Pendyala, Lakhsmi; Wu, Gang; Merali, Salim; Yarlett, Nigel

    2013-10-18

    Invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells (HCT-8) by Cryptosporidium parvum resulted in a rapid induction of host cell spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1 (hSSAT-1) mRNA, causing a 4-fold increase in SSAT-1 enzyme activity after 24 h of infection. In contrast, host cell SSAT-2, spermine oxidase, and acetylpolyamine oxidase (hAPAO) remained unchanged during this period. Intracellular polyamine levels of C. parvum-infected human epithelial cells were determined, and it was found that spermidine remained unchanged and putrescine increased by 2.5-fold after 15 h and then decreased after 24 h, whereas spermine decreased by 3.9-fold after 15 h. Concomitant with these changes, N(1)-acetylspermine and N(1)-acetylspermidine both increased by 115- and 24-fold, respectively. Increased SSAT-1 has previously been shown to be involved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to apoptosis. Several stress response proteins were increased in HCT-8 cells infected with C. parvum, including calreticulin, a major calcium-binding chaperone in the ER; GRP78/BiP, a prosurvival ER chaperone; and Nrf2, a transcription factor that binds to antioxidant response elements, thus activating them. However, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a protein involved in DNA repair and programmed cell death, was decreased. Cumulatively, these results suggest that the invasion of HCT-8 cells by C. parvum results in an ER stress response by the host cell that culminates in overexpression of host cell SSAT-1 and elevated N(1)-acetylpolyamines, which can be used by a parasite that lacks ornithine decarboxylase. PMID:23986438

  17. Effect of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide on Cryptosporidium parvum viability in fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Kniel, Kalmia E; Sumner, Susan S; Lindsay, David S; Hackney, Cameron R; Pierson, Merle D; Zajac, Anne M; Golden, David A; Fayer, Ronald

    2003-09-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum has historically been associated with waterborne outbreaks of diarrheal illness. Foodborne cryptosporidiosis has been associated with unpasteurized apple cider. Infectious oocysts are shed in the feces of common ruminants like cattle and deer in and near orchards. In this study, the ability of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) added to fruit juice to inhibit the survival of C. parvum was analyzed. Oocyst viability was analyzed by a cell culture infectivity assay with the use of a human ileocecal cell line (HCT-8) whose infectivity pattern is similar to that for human oral infectivity. Cell monolayers were infected with 10(6) treated oocysts or a series of 10-fold dilutions. Parasitic life stages were visualized through immunohistochemistry with 100 microscope fields per monolayer being counted. In vitro excystation assays were also used to evaluate these treatments. Organic acids and H2O2 were added to apple cider, orange juice, and grape juices on a weight/volume basis. Malic, citric, and tartaric acids at concentrations of 1 to 5% inhibited C. parvum's infectivity of HCT-8 cells by up to 88%. Concentrations ranging from 0.025 to 3% H2O2 were evaluated. The addition of 0.025% H2O2 to each juice resulted in a >5-log reduction of C. parvum infectivity as determined with a most-probable-number-based cell culture infectivity assay. As observed with differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, reduced infectivity may be mediated through effects on the oocyst wall that are caused by the action of H2O2 or related oxygen radicals. The addition of low concentrations of H2O2 can represent a valuable alternative to pasteurization. PMID:14503720

  18. Characterization of an Intestinal Epithelial Cell Receptor Recognized by the Cryptosporidium parvum Sporozoite Ligand CSL

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Rebecca C.; Schaefer, Deborah A.; Riggs, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is a leading cause of diarrhea in humans and neonatal calves. The absence of approved parasite-specific drugs, vaccines, and immunotherapies for cryptosporidiosis relates in part to limited knowledge on the pathogenesis of zoite attachment and invasion. We recently reported that the C. parvum apical complex glycoprotein CSL contains a zoite ligand for intestinal epithelial cells which is defined by monoclonal antibody (MAb) 3E2. In the present study, the host cell receptor for CSL was characterized. For these studies, a panel of epithelial and mesenchymal cell lines was examined for permissiveness to C. parvum and the ability to bind CSL. Cells of epithelial origin were significantly more permissive and bound significantly greater quantities of CSL than cells of mesenchymal origin. Caco-2 intestinal cells were selected from the epithelial panel for further characterization of the CSL receptor. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that CSL bound initially to the surface of Caco-2 cells and was rapidly internalized. The molecule bound by CSL was identified as an 85-kDa Caco-2 cell surface protein by radioimmunoprecipitation and CSL affinity chromatography. Sporozoite incubation with the isolated 85-kDa protein reduced binding of MAb 3E2. Further, attachment and invasion were significantly inhibited when sporozoites were incubated with the 85-kDa protein prior to inoculation onto Caco-2 cells. These observations indicate that the 85-kDa protein functions as a Caco-2 cell receptor for CSL. CSL also bound specifically to intestinal epithelium from calves, indicating receptor expression in a second important host species. Molecular characterization of the CSL receptor may lead to novel avenues for disrupting ligand-receptor interactions in the pathogenesis of C. parvum infection. PMID:11179341

  19. Overland and near-surface transport of Cryptosporidium parvum from vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Trask, Jennifer R; Kalita, Prasanta K; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Smith, Ronald D; Funk, Ted L

    2004-01-01

    Understanding microbial pathogen transport patterns in overland flow is important for developing best management practices for limiting microbial transport to water resources. Knowledge about the effectiveness of vegetative filter strips (VFS) to reduce pathogen transport from livestock confinement areas is limited. In this study, overland and near-surface transport of Cryptosporidium parvum has been investigated. Effects of land slopes, vegetation, and rainfall intensities on oocyst transport were examined using a tilting soil chamber with two compartments, one with bare ground and the other with brome (Bromus inermis Leyss.) vegetation. Three slope conditions (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5%) were used in conjunction with two rainfall intensities (25.4 and 63.5 mm/h) for 44 min using a rainfall simulator. The vegetative surface was very effective in reducing C. parvum in surface runoff. For the 25.4 mm/h rainfall, the total percent recovery of oocysts in overland flow from the VFS varied from 0.6 to 1.7%, while those from the bare ground condition varied from 4.4 to 14.5%. For the 63.5 mm/h rainfall, the recovery percentages of oocysts varied from 0.8 to 27.2% from the VFS, and 5.3 to 59% from bare-ground conditions. For all slopes and rainfall intensities, the total (combining both surface and near-surface) recovery of C. parvum oocysts was considerably less from the vegetated surface than those from the bare-ground conditions. These results indicate that the VFS can be a best management practice for controlling C. parvum in runoff from animal production facilities. PMID:15224935

  20. Specific serum and local antibody responses against Cryptosporidium parvum during medication of calves with halofuginone lactate.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, J E; Villacorta, I; Naciri, M; Vanopdenbosch, E

    1993-01-01

    Fecal and serum anti-Cryptosporidium parvum immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgM, and IgG were monitored by an enzyme immunoassay in C. parvum-infected calves after medication with halofuginone lactate. In a first experiment, four groups of five 1-day-old colostrum-fed calves were inoculated with 10(6) oocysts of C. parvum. They were medicated with 0, 30, 60, or 120 micrograms of halofuginone lactate per kg from days 2 to 8 postinfection (p.i.). Unmedicated calves passed large numbers of oocysts between 3 and 14 days p.i. Treatment with 30 micrograms/kg did not completely inhibit oocyst output during medication, whereas 60 and 120 micrograms/kg did. The latter groups passed only a reduced number of oocysts when the drug was withdrawn. In a second experiment, 3- to 6-day-old colostrum-fed calves were divided into three groups of 16 or 17 animals each. All animals had acquired C. parvum infection before arrival at the fattening unit. They were medicated with 0, 60, or 120 micrograms/kg for 7 days beginning on the day of arrival. Unmedicated calves passed large numbers of oocysts from 0 to 21 days. Medication stopped oocyst output at day 7, but some of the calves again passed low numbers of oocysts 7 days after withdrawal of the drug. Experimental infection of unmedicated calves was followed by a rise in local anti-C. parvum IgA and IgM titers. Rising coproantibody levels coincided with falling oocyst output. In halofuginone-medicated and experimentally infected calves, only specific anti-C. parvum IgM levels rose during the first 5 days p.i. Specific IgA levels increased in association with oocyst output after withdrawal of the drug in the 60- and 120-micrograms/kg groups. In naturally infected calves, on the other hand, both specific IgA and IgM levels rose further during medication. Although titers were lower than in unmedicated controls, no significant differences were observed. Both medicated and unmedicated calves were equally protected from a challenge with 10

  1. Leaching of Salmonella Senftenberg and Cryptosporidium Parvum in Intact Clay Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, T. B.; Forslund, A.; Dalsgaard, A.; Jacobsen, O.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2008-12-01

    Manure application on land has been associated with both environmental and public health problems, even when management is within the current guidelines. Outbreaks of infection have been associated with water or food, including processed fruits and vegetables, contaminated with animal manure. A wide range of pathogenic microorganisms can be found in animal waste, including bacteria, protozoan, and viruses. When animal waste is disposed on agricultural land different factors will influence the risk for contaminating the groundwater. 1) Animal waste application method, rate, volume and frequency will have an effect on contamination. 2) Survival of the pathogens in the soil will e.g. depend on soil water content, temperature and pH. Salmonella species can survive up to 332 days and Cryptosporidium species can remain viable for several years in the soil environment. In the present study we compared the transport between the pathogenic bacteria S. senftenberg and the pathogenic protozoan C. parvum in intact clay columns. Furthermore, we compared the effect from surface and sub-surface manure application on the transport potential. 15 intact clay columns were placed in an outdoor multi-column lysimeter for 36 days. Manure inoculated with S. senftenberg, C. parvum and chloride was added to the soil surface or injected 8 cm into the columns. Drainage water was collected from the soil columns and DNA was extracted to quantify S. senftenberg and C. parvum by quantitative PCR. In addition S. senftenberg was enumerated by plate counting. Acid yellow was applied to selected columns to visualize the pathway down through the soil column. The highest concentration of S. senftenberg was in the first drainage sample ranging from 100-10000 CFU/ml. Breakthrough curves for chloride and S. senftenberg indicates the importance of preferential flow as well as a faster transport for the bacteria compared to chloride. C. parvum is retained to a higher degree in the soil but is still found

  2. Viability and fate of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia in tubular anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Kinyua, Maureen N; Trimmer, John; Izurieta, Ricardo; Cunningham, Jeffrey; Ergas, Sarina J

    2016-06-01

    In many developing countries where pathogenic diseases of animal waste origin, such as giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis, are often prevalent, facilities are limited to treat livestock waste. However, household-scale anaerobic digesters are currently being promoted for bioenergy production from livestock manure. Since the effluent is often used as a fertilizer for food crops, it is critical to understand the effect of environmental conditions within household-scale digesters on the viability of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Giardia lamblia cysts. In this study, key environmental parameters affecting (oo)cyst inactivation were measured in four tubular anaerobic digesters, which are a type of household-scale digester promoted for treatment of swine waste in rural Costa Rica. Interviews and participant observations were used to understand digester operation and maintenance procedures. Ambient temperatures (21-24°C), near-neutral pH, total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) concentrations<250 mg/L and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) between 23 and 180 days were observed. Laboratory (oo)cysts inactivation studies were performed in bench-scale digesters, which were maintained under conditions similar to those observed in the field. Apparent first-order inactivation rate coefficients for Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum were 0.155 ± 0.041 and 0.054 ± 0.006 day(-1), respectively. Temperature and volatile fatty acids were the main factors contributing to Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia inactivation. A mathematical model was developed that predicts the concentration of (oo)cysts in the liquid effluent of tubular digesters like those observed in Costa Rica. A mathematical model was developed that predicts the concentration of (oo)cysts in the liquid effluent of tubular digesters like those observed in Costa Rica. Two dimensionless groups can be used to predict the performance of the digesters for inactivating pathogens; both dimensionless groups depend upon

  3. COMPARISON OF IMMUNOFLUORESCENT ANTIBODY ASSAY (IFA) AND IMMUNOMAGNETIC ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE (IM-ECL) IN DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM IN KARST WATER SAMPLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA) and immunomagnetic electrochemiluminescence (IM-ECL) were used for comparison of the percent of recovery of Cryptosporidium parvum in environmental water samples obtained from a spring draining a karst basin. The monoclonal antibodies to C. parvum, isotype IgG3...

  4. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum infections in weaned piglets and fattening porkers in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Izumiyama, S; Furukawa, I; Kuroki, T; Yamai, S; Sugiyama, H; Yagita, K; Endo, T

    2001-02-01

    Fecal samples from 232 weaned piglets (1 and 3 months old) and 252 fattening porkers (6 months old) in 8 stock-raising farms located in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, from June 1998 to June 2000 were examined to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection. Detection of oocysts was performed using the ethyl acetate fecal concentration method and immunofluorescent staining. C. parvum oocysts were identified in 77 (33.2%) 1-3 months old weaned piglets from four farms. The odds of excreting among 1-3 months old piglets were more than 100 times greater than among 6 months old porkers (95% confidence interval: 17-902). This strongly suggests that weaned piglets are important reservoirs of pathogenic microbes whose potential contamination of drinking water has epidemiological implications for human health. PMID:11326125

  5. In vitro effect on Cryptosporidium parvum of short-term exposure to cathelicidin peptides.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Del Prete, Maria Simona; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Circo, Raffaella; Zanetti, Margherita; Scalise, Giorgio

    2003-04-01

    Two laboratory methods, a cell culture system and double fluorogenic staining, were used to study the viability and infective ability of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites and oocysts after short-term exposure to four cathelicidin peptides. The compounds, SMAP-29, BMAP-28, PG-1 and Bac7(1-35), exerted a strong cytotoxic effect on sporozoites, but did not affect the viability and function of oocysts consistently. Overall, in the sporozoite series, a percentage of the viable population decreased rapidly to less than detectable levels after 15 and 60 min exposure to the peptides at concentrations of 100 and 10 micro g/mL, respectively. In the oocyst series, no compound produced complete inhibition of parasite growth: 60-85% of the oocyst population was viable after 180 min exposure at 100 micro g/mL. SMAP-29 exerted the highest activity against both sporozoites and oocysts. PMID:12654759

  6. miR-27b Targets KSRP to Coordinate TLR4-Mediated Epithelial Defense against Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Gong, Ai-Yu; Eischeid, Alex N.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal epithelium and causes a diarrheal disease. Toll-like receptor (TLR)- and NF-κB-mediated immune responses from epithelial cells, such as production of antimicrobial peptides and generation of reactive nitrogen species, are important components of the host's defense against cryptosporidial infection. Here we report data demonstrating a role for miR-27b in the regulation of TLR4/NF-κB-mediated epithelial anti-Cryptosporidium parvum responses. We found that C. parvum infection induced nitric oxide (NO) production in host epithelial cells in a TLR4/NF-κB-dependent manner, with the involvement of the stabilization of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA. C. parvum infection of epithelial cells activated NF-κB signaling to increase transcription of the miR-27b gene. Meanwhile, downregulation of KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) was detected in epithelial cells following C. parvum infection. Importantly, miR-27b targeted the 3′-untranslated region of KSRP, resulting in translational suppression. C. parvum infection decreased KSRP expression through upregulating miR-27b. Functional manipulation of KSRP or miR-27b caused reciprocal alterations in iNOS mRNA stability in infected cells. Forced expression of KSRP and inhibition of miR-27b resulted in an increased burden of C. parvum infection. Downregulation of KSRP through upregulating miR-27b was also detected in epithelial cells following LPS stimulation. These data suggest that miR-27b targets KSRP and modulates iNOS mRNA stability following C. parvum infection, a process that may be relevant to the regulation of epithelial anti-microbial defense in general. PMID:22615562

  7. Evidence for mucin-like glycoproteins that tether sporozoites of Cryptosporidium parvum to the inner surface of the oocyst wall.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Banerjee, Sulagna; Steffen, Martin; O'Connor, Roberta M; Ward, Honorine D; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, which are spread by the fecal-oral route, have a single, multilayered wall that surrounds four sporozoites, the invasive form. The C. parvum oocyst wall is labeled by the Maclura pomifera agglutinin (MPA), which binds GalNAc, and the C. parvum wall contains at least two unique proteins (Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein 1 [COWP1] and COWP8) identified by monoclonal antibodies. C. parvum sporozoites have on their surface multiple mucin-like glycoproteins with Ser- and Thr-rich repeats (e.g., gp40 and gp900). Here we used ruthenium red staining and electron microscopy to demonstrate fibrils, which appear to attach or tether sporozoites to the inner surface of the C. parvum oocyst wall. When disconnected from the sporozoites, some of these fibrillar tethers appear to collapse into globules on the inner surface of oocyst walls. The most abundant proteins of purified oocyst walls, which are missing the tethers and outer veil, were COWP1, COWP6, and COWP8, while COWP2, COWP3, and COWP4 were present in trace amounts. In contrast, MPA affinity-purified glycoproteins from C. parvum oocysts, which are composed of walls and sporozoites, included previously identified mucin-like glycoproteins, a GalNAc-binding lectin, a Ser protease inhibitor, and several novel glycoproteins (C. parvum MPA affinity-purified glycoprotein 1 [CpMPA1] to CpMPA4). By immunoelectron microscopy (immuno-EM), we localized mucin-like glycoproteins (gp40 and gp900) to the ruthenium red-stained fibrils on the inner surface wall of oocysts, while antibodies to the O-linked GalNAc on glycoproteins were localized to the globules. These results suggest that mucin-like glycoproteins, which are associated with the sporozoite surface, may contribute to fibrils and/or globules that tether sporozoites to the inner surface of oocyst walls. PMID:19949049

  8. Cryptosporidium parvum induces SIRT1 expression in host epithelial cells through downregulating let-7i

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongguan; Lei, Ningfei; Gong, Ai-Yu; Chen, Xian-Ming; Hu, Guoku

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells along human gastrointestinal mucosal surface express pathogen-recognizing receptors and actively participate in the regulation of inflammatory reactions in response to microbial infection. The NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-1 (SIRT1), one member of the sirtuin family of proteins and an NAD-dependent deacetylase has been implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular processes, including inflammation, longevity, and metabolism. In this study, we demonstrated that infection of cultured human biliary epithelial cells (H69 cholangiocytes) with a parasitic protozoan, Cryptosporidium parvum, induced SIRT1 expression at the protein level without a change in SIRT1 mRNA content. Using real-time PCR and Northern blot analyses, we found that C. parvum infection decreased the expression of let-7i in infected H69 cells. Down-regulation of let-7i caused relief of miRNA-mediated translational suppression of SIRT1 and consequently, resulted in an increased SIRT1 protein level in infected H69 cell cultures. Moreover, gain- and loss-of-function studies revealed that let-7i could modulate NF-κB activation through modification of SIRT1 protein expression. Thus, our data suggest that let-7i regulates SIRT1 expression in human biliary epithelial cells in response to microbial challenge, suggesting a new role of let-7i in the regulation of NF-κB-mediated epithelial innate immune response. PMID:24862934

  9. Recombinant bovine herpesvirus-1 expressing p23 protein of Cryptosporidium parvum induces neutralizing antibodies in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Xuan, Xuenan; Kimata, Isao; Iseki, Motohiro; Kodama, Yoshikatsu; Nagane, Noriko; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Yasunobu; Mikami, Takeshi; Otsuka, Haruki

    2003-04-01

    In order to develop a vaccine against cryptosporidiosis in cattle, we constructed a recombinant bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) expressing an immunodominant surface protein, p23, of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites. In the recombinant virus, the p23 gene under the control of a CAG promoter and a gene coding for an enhanced green fluorescent protein were integrated into the gG gene of BHV-1. Despite a low frequency of homologous recombination, cloning of the recombinants was easy because of the specific fluorescence of the plaques formed by recombinants. These plaques were among the plaques of the nonfluorescent parental virus. All clones selected for fluorescence also contained the p23 gene. In MDBK cells infected with the recombinant BHV-1, the antibody against the p23 protein recognized the p23 protein as an approximately 23-kDa specific band in Western blotting analysis. Rabbits immunized with the recombinant produced IgG against the p23 protein. It was also demonstrated that the sera of immunized rabbits reduced infection of C. parvum sporozoites in HCT-8 cells. The serum of an immunized rabbit reduced infection compared with the normal rabbit serum control. These results indicate that the recombinant BHV-1 induces neutralizing antibodies in rabbits. PMID:12760641

  10. Murine infection model for maintenance and amplification of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Petry, F; Robinson, H A; McDonald, V

    1995-01-01

    Propagation of Cryptosporidium parvum is problematic because in vitro development of the parasite is poor and animals are only briefly susceptible as neonates. At present oocysts of the parasite are usually procured by passage in neonatal sheep or cattle. In the present study, large numbers of oocysts of C. parvum could be isolated following infection of dexamethasone-treated adult C57BL/6 mice. The amount of immunosuppressive drug and the regimen of administration were critical for successful maintenance of the parasite, however. Routinely, 10 mice (age, 8 to 12 weeks) were injected four times on alternate days with 1.0 mg of dexamethasone, and the last injection was given on the same day as oral inoculation with 10(6) oocysts. By using a simplified procedure for oocyst purification from mouse feces, approximately 10(9) oocysts were obtained. This model is inexpensive and comparatively safe to handle, and the numbers of animals inoculated can be varied to obtain the required number of oocysts. Thus, this murine infection model would be a suitable alternative to the use of neonatal calves or sheep for efficient oocyst propagation. PMID:7665672

  11. Simplified methods for obtaining purified oocysts from mice and for growing Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meloni, B P; Thompson, R C

    1996-10-01

    Seven- to 8-day-old Arc/Swiss mice were infected with 100,000-120,000 Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. At 8 days postinfection (PI) the jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon, and rectum were removed. Using a simple extraction procedure and purification by Ficoll gradient centrifugation, we rountinely obtained between 3-6 million and up to 15 million purified oocysts per mouse. For in vitro cultivation, purified oocysts were pretreated in a low pH (2.5-3) 0.5% trypsin solution for 20 min, resuspended in supplemented RPMI-1640 containing glucose 0.1 g (5.55 mM), sodium bicarbonate 0.3 g, bovine bile 0.02 g, folic acid 25 micrograms, 4-aminobenzoic acid 100 micrograms, calcium pantothenate 50 micrograms, ascorbic acid 875 micrograms, penicillin G 10,000 U and streptomycin 0.01 g per 100 ml, and 1% fetal bovine serum (pH 7.4 before filtration), and used to inoculate confluent monolayers of the human adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-8. Incubation was in a candle jar at 37 C. We tested numerous supplements to RPMI-1640, different pHs, and atmospheric conditions and found the parameters described above produced the greatest parasite numbers in vitro. We obtained significantly superior growth of C. parvum grown in HCT-8 cells using the conditions described above than in culture conditions described previously. PMID:8885885

  12. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil columns following applications of raw and separated liquid slurries.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Heidi H; Enemark, Heidi L; Olsen, Annette; Amin, M G Mostofa; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2012-09-01

    The potential for the transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a 4-week period, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method, although recovery rates were low (<1%). Soil columns with injected liquid slurry leached 73 and 90% more oocysts compared to columns with injected and surface-applied raw slurries, respectively. Among leachate samples containing oocysts, 44/72 samples yielded viable oocysts as determined by a dye permeability assay (DAPI [4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole]/propidium iodide) with the majority (41%) of viable oocysts found in leachate from soil columns with added liquid slurry. The number of viable oocysts was positively correlated (r = 0.63) with the total number of oocysts found. Destructively sampling of the soil columns showed that type of slurry and irrigation played a role in the vertical distribution of oocysts, with more oocysts recovered from soil columns added liquid slurry irrespective of the irrigation status. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether the application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for groundwater contamination compared to application of raw slurry. PMID:22706058

  13. Local Peroxynitrite Formation Contributes to Early Control of Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gookin, Jody L.; Allen, Jessica; Chiang, Sophia; Duckett, Laurel; Armstrong, Martha U.

    2005-01-01

    In intestinal inflammation, mucosal injury is often exacerbated by the reaction of NO with neutrophil-derived superoxide to form the potent oxidant peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite also has antimicrobial properties that aid in the killing mechanism of macrophages and neutrophils. Cryptosporidium parvum parasitizes intestinal epithelium, resulting in loss of epithelial cells and mucosal inflammation. Synthesis of NO is significantly increased and arises from the induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by the infected epithelium. Inhibition of iNOS results in intensified epithelial parasitism and oocyst excretion. We hypothesized that formation of peroxynitrite is restricted to sites of iNOS expression by the epithelium and contributes to host defense in C. parvum infection. Accordingly, the location and biological effects of peroxynitrite formation were examined in neonatal piglets infected with C. parvum. Infected piglets were treated daily with a selective iNOS inhibitor [L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)-lysine] or one of two peroxynitrite scavengers [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4′-pyridyl)porphyrinato iron(III) or uric acid] or received vehicle. At peak infection, peroxynitrite formation was restricted to sites of iNOS expression by parasitized epithelium and lamina propria of the apical villi. Peroxynitrite formation was dependent on iNOS activity and was inhibited by treatment with peroxynitrite scavengers. Scavengers increased the number of intracellular parasites and the number of infected epithelial cells present per villus and significantly exacerbated oocyst excretion. Recovery from infection was not delayed by ongoing treatment with scavenger. The present results are the first to demonstrate an in vivo role for peroxynitrite formation in acute mucosal defense against a noninvasive intestinal epithelial pathogen. PMID:15972479

  14. Local peroxynitrite formation contributes to early control of Cryptosporidium parvum infection.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Allen, Jessica; Chiang, Sophia; Duckett, Laurel; Armstrong, Martha U

    2005-07-01

    In intestinal inflammation, mucosal injury is often exacerbated by the reaction of NO with neutrophil-derived superoxide to form the potent oxidant peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite also has antimicrobial properties that aid in the killing mechanism of macrophages and neutrophils. Cryptosporidium parvum parasitizes intestinal epithelium, resulting in loss of epithelial cells and mucosal inflammation. Synthesis of NO is significantly increased and arises from the induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by the infected epithelium. Inhibition of iNOS results in intensified epithelial parasitism and oocyst excretion. We hypothesized that formation of peroxynitrite is restricted to sites of iNOS expression by the epithelium and contributes to host defense in C. parvum infection. Accordingly, the location and biological effects of peroxynitrite formation were examined in neonatal piglets infected with C. parvum. Infected piglets were treated daily with a selective iNOS inhibitor [L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)-lysine] or one of two peroxynitrite scavengers [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4'-pyridyl)porphyrinato iron(III) or uric acid] or received vehicle. At peak infection, peroxynitrite formation was restricted to sites of iNOS expression by parasitized epithelium and lamina propria of the apical villi. Peroxynitrite formation was dependent on iNOS activity and was inhibited by treatment with peroxynitrite scavengers. Scavengers increased the number of intracellular parasites and the number of infected epithelial cells present per villus and significantly exacerbated oocyst excretion. Recovery from infection was not delayed by ongoing treatment with scavenger. The present results are the first to demonstrate an in vivo role for peroxynitrite formation in acute mucosal defense against a noninvasive intestinal epithelial pathogen. PMID:15972479

  15. TLR4 PROMOTES CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM CLEARANCE IN A MOUSE MODEL OF BILIARY CRYPTOSPORIDIOSIS

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Steven P.; Tietz Bogert, Pamela S.; Chen, Xianming; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2011-01-01

    Cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining intrahepatic bile ducts, express multiple toll-like receptors (TLRs) and thus have the capacity to recognize and respond to microbial pathogens. In previous work we demonstrated that TLR4, which is activated by gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is upregulated in cholangiocytes in response to infection with Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro and contributes to NFkB activation. Here, using an in vivo model of biliary cryptosporidiosis we addressed the functional role of TLR4 in C. parvum infection dynamics and hepatobiliary pathophysiology. We observed that C57BL mice clear the infection by three weeks post-infection. In contrast, parasites were detected in bile and stool in TLR4 deficient mice at four weeks post-infection. The liver enzymes, alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST), and the proinflammatory cytokines Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α, Interferon (IFN)-γ, and Interleukin (IL)-6 peaked at one to two weeks postinfection and normalized by four weeks in infected C57BL mice. C57BL mice also demonstrated increased cholangiocyte proliferation (PCNA staining) at one-week post-infection, which was resolved by two weeks post-infection. In contrast, TLR4 deficient mice showed persistently elevated serum ALT and AST, elevated hepatic IL-6 levels, and histological evidence of hepatocyte necrosis, increased inflammatory cell infiltration, and cholangiocyte proliferation through four weeks post-infection. These data suggest that a TLR4-mediated response is required for efficient eradication of biliary C. parvum infection in vivo, and lack of this pattern recognition receptor contributes to an altered inflammatory response and an increase in hepatobiliary pathology. PMID:21506806

  16. Recovery of Waterborne Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts by Freshwater Benthic Clams (Corbicula fluminea)

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Fayer, Ronald; Cranfield, Michael R.; Conn, David Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Asian freshwater clams, Corbicula fluminea, exposed for 24 h to 38 liters of water contaminated with infectious Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (1.00 × 106 oocysts/liter; approximately 1.9 × 105 oocysts/clam) were examined (hemolymph, gills, gastrointestinal [GI] tract, and feces) on days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14 postexposure (PE). No oocysts were detected in the water 24 h after the contamination event. The percentage of oocyst-containing clams varied from 20 to 100%, depending on the type of tissue examined and the technique used—acid-fast stain (AFS) or immunofluorescent antibody (IFA). The oocysts were found in clam tissues and feces on days 1 through 14 PE; the oocysts extracted from the tissues on day 7 PE were infectious for neonatal BALB/c mice. Overall, the highest number of positive samples was obtained when gills and GI tracts were processed with IFA (prevalence, 97.5%). A comparison of the relative oocyst numbers indicated that overall, 58.3% of the oocysts were found in clam tissues and 41.7% were found in feces when IFA was used; when AFS was used, the values were 51.9 and 48.1%, respectively. Clam-released oocysts were always surrounded by feces; no free oocysts or oocysts disassociated from fecal matter were observed. The results indicate that these benthic freshwater clams are capable of recovery and sedimentation of waterborne C. parvum oocysts. To optimize the detection of C. parvum oocysts in C. fluminea tissue, it is recommended that gill and GI tract samples be screened with IFA (such as that in the commercially available MERIFLUOR test kit). PMID:9464376

  17. Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts using medium- and low-pressure ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Craik, S A; Weldon, D; Finch, G R; Bolton, J R; Belosevic, M

    2001-04-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation from low- and medium-pressure mercury arc lamps on Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts was studied using a collimated beam apparatus. Experiments were conducted using parasites suspended in both filtered surface water and phosphate buffered laboratory water. Inactivation of oocysts was measured as reduction in infectivity using a CD-1 neonatal mouse model and was found to be a non-linear function of UV dose over the range of germicidal doses tested (0.8-119 mJ/cm2). Oocyst inactivation increased rapidly with UV dose at doses less than 25 mJ/cm2 with two and three log-units inactivation at approximately 10 and 25 mJ/cm2, respectively. The cause of significant leveling-off and tailing in the UV inactivation curve at higher doses was not determined. Maximum measured oocyst inactivation ranged from 3.4 to greater than 4.9 log-units and was dependent on different batches of parasites. Water type and temperature, the concentration of oocysts in the suspension, and the UV irradiance did not have significant impacts on oocyst inactivation. When compared on the basis of germicidal UV dose, the oocysts were equally sensitive to low- and medium-pressure UV radiation. With respect to Cryptosporidium, both low- and medium-pressure ultraviolet radiation are attractive alternatives to conventional chemical disinfection methods in drinking water treatment. PMID:11317885

  18. Evaluation of DNA encoding acidic ribosomal protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum as a potential vaccine candidate for cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Alvaro; Priest, Jeffrey W.; Ehigiator, Humphrey N.; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R.

    2011-01-01

    The Cryptosporidium parvum acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2) is an important immunodominant marker in C. parvum infection. In this study, the CpP2 antigen was evaluated as a vaccine candidate using a DNA vaccine model in adult C57BL/6 IL-12 knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding CpP2 (CpP2-DNA) cloned into the pUMVC4b vector induced a significant anti-CpP2 IgG antibody response that was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Compared to control KO mice immunized with plasmid alone, CpP2-immunized mice demonstrated specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation as well as enhanced IFN-γ production to recombinant CpP2. Further, parasite loads in CpP2 DNA-immunized mice were compared to control mice challenged with C. parvum oocysts. Although a trend in reduction of infection was observed in the CpP2 DNA-immunized mice, differences between groups were not statistically significant. These results suggest that a DNA vaccine encoding the C. parvum P2 antigen is able to provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and has the potential to generate protective immunity against C. parvum infection but may require using alternative vectors or adjuvant to generate a more potent and balanced response. PMID:21968447

  19. CpABC, a Cryptosporidium parvum ATP-binding cassette protein at the host–parasite boundary in intracellular stages

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Margaret E.; Riojas, Ynolde A.; Wu, Teresa W.; Le Blancq, Sylvie M.

    1999-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Cryptosporidium parvum develops inside a vacuole at the apex of its epithelial host cell. The developing parasite is separated from the host cell cytoplasm by a zone of attachment that consists of an extensively folded membranous structure known as the feeder organelle. It has been proposed that the feeder organelle is the site of regulation of transport of nutrients and drugs into the parasite. In this report, we localize an ≈200-kDa integral membrane protein, CpABC, from Cryptosporidium parvum to the host–parasite boundary, possibly the feeder organelle. The predicted amino acid sequence of CpABC has significant structural similarity with the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator and the multidrug resistance protein subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins. This is an example of a parasite-encoded transport protein localized at the parasite–host interface of an intracellular protozoan. PMID:10318953

  20. Real-time, sensitive electrical detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts based on chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    It Wong, Jen; Wang, Lu; Shi, Yumeng; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing; Dong, Xiaochen; Ying Yang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a common intestinal parasitic protozoan that causes gastroenteritis in man and animals. It poses high risks to drinking water supply because of its ubiquitous distribution in water and their oocysts are resistant to harsh environment conditions. In this work, we demonstrated the use of large-size chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene films configured as field-effect device for rapid electrical detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (Cp. oocysts). The presence of Cp. oocysts causes the change in the transport characteristics of the antibody-functionalized graphene device, which can be measured in terms of the dependence of the drain current on the sweep of the gate voltage or the real-time drain current data under a constant gate voltage. The high sensor sensitivity of 25 oocysts per milliliter solution and good specificity were evaluated, indicating it a promising candidate for detecting waterborne pathogens in water quality control.

  1. Effect of cyanuric acid on the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum under hyperchlorination conditions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jennifer L; Arrowood, Michael J; Lu, Xin; Hlavsa, Michele C; Beach, Michael J; Hill, Vincent R

    2015-06-16

    Cyanuric acid (CYA) is a chlorine stabilizer used in swimming pools to limit UV degradation of chlorine, thus reducing chlorine use and cost. However, CYA has been shown to decrease the efficacy of chlorine disinfection. In the event of a diarrheal incident, CDC recommends implementing 3-log10 inactivation conditions for Cryptosporidium (CT value = 15 300 mg·min/L) to remediate pools. Currently, CYA's impact on Cryptosporidium inactivation is not fully determined. We investigated the impact of multiple concentrations of CYA on C. parvum inactivation (at 20 and 40 mg/L free chlorine; average pH 7.6; 25 °C). At 20 mg/L free chlorine, average estimated 3-log10 CT values were 17 800 and 31 500 mg·min/L with 8 and 16 mg/L CYA, respectively, and the average estimated 1-log10 CT value was 76 500 mg·min/L with 48 mg/L CYA. At 40 mg/L free chlorine, 3-log10 CT values were lower than those at 20 mg/L, but still higher than those of free chlorine-only controls. In the presence of ∼100 mg/L CYA, average 0.8- and 1.4-log10 reductions were achieved by 72 h at 20 and 40 mg/L free chlorine, respectively. This study demonstrates CYA significantly delays chlorine inactivation of Cryptosporidium oocysts, emphasizing the need for additional pool remediation options following fecal incidents. PMID:26042636

  2. Effect of tillage and rainfall on transport of manure-applied Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Norma E; Wang, Ping; Lejeune, Jeff; Shipitalo, Martin J; Ward, Lucy A; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Dick, Warren A

    2009-01-01

    Most waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have been attributed to agricultural sources due to the high prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in animal wastes and manure spreading on farmlands. No-till, an effective conservation practice, often results in soil having higher water infiltration and percolation rates than conventional tillage. We treated six undisturbed no-till and six tilled soil blocks (30 by 30 by 30 cm) with 1 L liquid dairy manure containing 10(5) C. parvum oocysts per milliliter to test the effect of tillage and rainfall on oocyst transport. The blocks were subjected to rainfall treatments consisting of 5 mm or 30 mm in 30 min. Leachate was collected from the base of the blocks in 35-mL increments using a 64-cell grid lysimeter. Even before any rain was applied, approximately 300 mL of water from the liquid manure (30% of that applied) was transported through the no-till soil, but none through the tilled blocks. After rain was applied, a greater number and percentage of first leachate samples from the no-till soil blocks compared to the tilled blocks tested positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts. In contrast to leachate, greater numbers of oocysts were recovered from the tilled soil, itself, than from the no-till soil. Although tillage was the most important factor affecting oocyst transport, rainfall timing and intensity were also important. To minimize transport of Cryptosporidium in no-till fields, manure should be applied at least 48 h before heavy rainfall is anticipated or methods of disrupting the direct linkage of surface soil to drains, via macropores, need to be used. PMID:19875795

  3. Towards standard methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum on lettuce and raspberries. Part 1: development and optimization of methods.

    PubMed

    Cook, N; Paton, C A; Wilkinson, N; Nichols, R A B; Barker, K; Smith, H V

    2006-06-15

    No standard method is available for detecting protozoan parasites on foods such as soft fruit and salad vegetables. We report on optimizing methods for detecting Cryptosporidium parvum on lettuce and raspberries. These methods are based on four basic stages: extraction of oocysts from the foodstuffs, concentration of the extract and separation of the oocysts from food materials, staining of the oocysts to allow their visualization, and identification of oocysts by microscopy. The concentration and separation steps are performed by centrifugation, followed by immunomagnetic separation using proprietary kits. Oocyst staining is also performed using proprietary reagents. The performance parameters of the extraction steps were extensively optimized, using artificially contaminated samples. The fully developed methods were tested several times to determine their reliability. The method to detect C. parvum on lettuce recovered 59.0+/-12.0% (n=30) of artificially contaminated oocysts. The method to detect C. parvum on raspberries recovered 41.0+/-13.0% (n=30) of artificially contaminated oocysts. PMID:16529835

  4. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel is effective in a murine model of experimental Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Al-Mathal, Ebtisam M; Alsalem, Afaf M

    2012-07-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a major health issue for neonatal calves, is caused by the parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, which is highly resistant to drug treatments. To date, many anti-parasitic drugs have been tested, but only a few have been shown to be partially effective in treating cryptosporidiosis. Previous studies have indicated that pomegranate (Punica granatum) possesses anti-plasmodium, anti-cestode, and anti-nematode activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of P. granatum peel on suckling mice infected with experimental C. parvum. At 4days of age, 72 neonatal albino mice were randomly divided into five groups: G1: healthy controls, G2: infected/untreated controls, G3: uninfected/distilled water-treated, G4: uninfected/P. granatum peel-treated, and G5: infected/P. granatum peel-treated. Mice were experimentally-infected by oral administration of 1×10(3)C. parvum oocysts per animal. On day 7 post-inoculation (pi), treated mice received an aqueous suspension of P. granatum peel orally (3g/kg body weight). The presence of diarrhea, oocyst shedding, and weight gain/loss, and the histopathology of ileal sections were examined. Infected mice treated with the P. granatum peel suspension showed improvement in all parameters examined. Additionally, these mice did not exhibit any clinical symptoms and no deaths occurred. Oocyst shedding was very significantly reduced in the P. granatum-treated mice by day 14 pi (P<.05), and was completely eliminated by day 28 pi. The mean weight gain of the P. granatum-treated mice was significantly higher than that of the infected/untreated controls throughout the study (P<.01). Histopathological analysis of ileal sections further supported the clinical and parasitological findings. The histological architecture of villi from the P. granatum-treated mice on day 14 pi showed visible improvement in comparison with the infected/untreated controls, including renewed brush borders, reduced numbers of C. parvum

  5. Cryptosporidium parvum Among Coprolites from La Cueva de los Muertos Chiquitos (600-800 CE), Rio Zape Valley, Durango, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Johnica J; Reinhard, Karl J

    2016-08-01

    :  In the present study, 90 coprolites from La Cueva de los Muertos Chiquitos (CMC) were subjected to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests for 3 diarrhea-inducing protozoan parasites, Entamoeba histolytica , Giardia duodenalis , and Cryptosporidium parvum , to determine whether these parasites were present among the people who utilized this cave 1,200-1,400 yr ago. These people, the Loma San Gabriel, developed as a culture out of the Archaic Los Caracoles population and lived throughout much of present-day Durango and Zacatecas in Mexico. The Loma San Gabriel persisted through a mixed subsistence strategy of hunting-gathering and agricultural production. The results of ELISA testing were negative for both E. histolytica and G. duodenalis across all coprolites. A total of 66/90 (∼73% prevalence) coprolites tested positive or likely positive for C. parvum . The high prevalence of C. parvum among CMC coprolites contributes to our growing knowledge of the pathoecology among the Loma San Gabriel who utilized CMC. Herein, we report the successful recovery of C. parvum coproantigens from prehistoric coprolites. The recovery of these coproantigens demonstrates the existence of C. parvum in Mesoamerica before European contact in the 1400s. PMID:27098916

  6. Obtaining hyperimmune anti-Cryptosporidium parvum ovine colostrum. A study of the humoral immune response in immunized sheep.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gómez, S; Alvarez-Sánchez, M A; Rojo-Vázquez, F A

    2006-01-01

    Three ewes were immunized five times over a 2-month period prior to giving birth by intramuscular injection, oral administration and intramammary infusion of antigen and viable or freeze-dried Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst solution emulsified with Freund's complete and incomplete adjuvant. Two animals served as controls and another two as adjuvant controls. Serum was collected at first immunization and thereafter every 2 to 4 weeks. Colostrum and milk were collected as well. All samples were assayed for C. parvum-specific antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methodology, and Western blotting was used to recognize the C. parvum antigens. Hyperimmunization resulted in a progressive and significant increase in specific anti-C. parvum serum IgG, IgA and IgM titres, with the highest values noted at the point of lambing. Titres decreased slightly in milk, although they were in all cases higher than those in the control animals. Moreover, some 30 bands of C. parvum were recognized. PMID:16292678

  7. Efficacy of Nitazoxanide against Cryptosporidium parvum in Cell Culture and in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Theodos, Cynthia M.; Griffiths, Jeffrey K.; D’Onfro, Jennifer; Fairfield, Alexandra; Tzipori, Saul

    1998-01-01

    Nitazoxanide (NTZ), a drug currently being tested in human clinical trials for efficacy against chronic cryptosporidiosis, was assessed in cell culture and in two animal models. The inhibitory activity of NTZ was compared with that of paromomycin (PRM), a drug that is partially effective against Cryptosporidium parvum. A concentration of 10 μg of NTZ/ml (32 μM) consistently reduced parasite growth in cell culture by more than 90% with little evidence of drug-associated cytotoxicity, in contrast to an 80% reduction produced by PRM at 2,000 μg/ml (3.2 mM). In contrast to its efficacy in vitro, NTZ at either 100 or 200 mg/kg of body weight/day for 10 days was ineffective at reducing the parasite burden in C. parvum-infected, anti-gamma-interferon-conditioned SCID mice. Combined treatment with NTZ and PRM was no more effective than treatment with PRM alone. Finally, NTZ was partially effective at reducing the parasite burden in a gnotobiotic piglet diarrhea model when given orally for 11 days at 250 mg/kg/day but not at 125 mg/kg/day. However, the higher dose of NTZ induced a drug-related diarrhea in piglets that might have influenced its therapeutic efficacy. As we have previously reported, PRM was effective at markedly reducing the parasite burden in piglets at a dosage of 500 mg/kg/day. Our results indicate that of all of the models tested, the piglet diarrhea model most closely mimics the partial response to NTZ treatment reported to occur in patients with chronic cryptosporidiosis. PMID:9687390

  8. Effects of select medium supplements on in vitro development of Cryptosporidium parvum in HCT-8 cells.

    PubMed

    Upton, S J; Tilley, M; Brillhart, D B

    1995-02-01

    Surface-sterilized oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum were applied to subconfluent monolayers of human adenocarcinoma (HCT-8) cells grown on coverslips in six-well cluster plates. Parasite-infected cultures were then incubated in RPMI 1640 with 10% fetal bovine serum, 15 mM HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) buffer, and antibiotics at 37 degrees C in a 5% CO2-95% air incubator for 2 h to allow sporozoites to excyst and enter cells. After cultures were washed free of debris, fresh cell culture media containing select supplements were added and cultures were reincubated. Parasite growth was assessed 66 h later by counting the number of parasite developmental stages in 25 random x 100 oil fields by Nomarski interference-contrast microscopy. Four vitamin supplements, calcium pantothenate, L-ascorbic acid, folic acid, and 4-(para)-aminobenzoic acid, each resulted in a significant increase in parasite numbers in vitro. The addition of insulin and the sugars glucose, galactose, and maltose also had a positive effect on parasite growth, although the effect was less pronounced than with any of the vitamins. Using the above information, we developed a supplemental medium formulation consisting of RPMI 1640 with 10% fetal bovine serum, 15 mM HEPES, 50 mM glucose, and 35 micrograms of ascorbic acid, 1.0 micrograms of folic acid, 4.0 micrograms of 4-aminobenzoic acid, 2.0 micrograms of calcium pantothenate, 0.1 U of insulin, 100 U of penicillin G, 100 micrograms of streptomycin, and 0.25 microgram of amphotericin B (Fungizone) per ml (pH 7.4). The growth of c. parvum in this medium was found to be enhanced approximately 10-fold compared with that in control medium without additional glucose, insulin, or vitamins. PMID:7714194

  9. Transport, fate, and infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts released from manure and leached through macroporous soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Douglas G.; Kuczynska, Ewa; Fayer, Ron

    2009-09-01

    A major mode of transmission of Cryptosporidium parvum, a widespread waterborne pathogen, is via contaminated drinking and recreational waters. Oocyst transport to surface water can occur by deposition of manure directly in the water or by wash off in surface runoff. Oocyst transport to groundwater is less straightforward and requires that the oocysts move through soil and bedrock to reach the water table. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative concentration and infectivity of C. parvum oocysts released from manure and leached through columns of undisturbed, macroporous karst soil. Modeling the fate of oocysts in this system over time can provide baseline data for evaluating real world events. Substantially more oocysts leached from undisturbed soil columns than disturbed soil columns. Oocyst survival studies using BALB/c neonatal suckling mice showed that about 85% of oocysts were infective at the beginning of leaching experiments. The oocyst infectivity decreased to about 20% after 12 weeks of leaching from soil columns maintained at 10°C. Cool (10°C) temperatures appear to increase survivability and maintain infectivity of many oocysts for 3 months or longer. Cool temperatures also appear to increase rates of release of oocysts from manure and leaching through soil. This study demonstrated that leaching is an important mechanism of oocyst transport in karst soils where infiltration capacities are high and long, continuous macropores exist. Karst groundwater systems might be especially vulnerable to contamination by leached oocysts, because of the prevalence of shallow soils and rapid groundwater movement. Oocysts leaching from soils into the epikarst could accumulate and remain viable for months until hydrological conditions are right for flushing the oocysts into the conduit flow system.

  10. Genotyping and subtyping Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis carried by flies on dairy farms in Henan, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium and Giardia are important causes of diarrhea diseases in humans and animals worldwide, and both of them are transmitted by the fecal–oral route, either by direct contact or by the ingestion of contaminated food or water. The role of flies in the mechanical transmission of Cryptosporidium and Giardia has been receiving increasing attention. To date, no information is available in China about the occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in flies. We here investigated Cryptosporidium and Giardia in flies on dairy farms in Henan Province, China, at the genotype and subtype levels. Methods Eight hundred flies were randomly collected from two dairy farms from July 2010 to September 2010 and were divided evenly into 40 batches. The fly samples were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia with nested PCR. Cryptosporidium was genotyped and subtyped by analyzing the DNA sequences of small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) and 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) genes, respectively. The identity of Giardia was determined by sequence analyzing of the triosephosphate isomerase (tpi), glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), and β-giardin (bg) genes. Results Forty batches of flies had 10% of contamination with Cryptosporidium or Giardia, with a mixed infection of the two parasites in one batch of flies. The Cryptosporidium isolates were identified as C. parvum at the SSU rRNA locus, and all belonged to subtype IIdA19G1 at the gp60 locus. The Giardia isolates were all identified as assemblage E of G. duodenalis at the tpi, gdh, and bg loci. One novel subtype of assemblage E was identified based on the gdh and bg loci. Conclusions This is the first molecular study of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in flies identified at both genotype and subtype levels. SSU rRNA and gp60 sequences of C. parvum in flies was 100% homologous with those derived from humans, suggesting flies act as an epidemiological vector of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis. The variable PCR efficiencies

  11. Surface complexation of carboxylate adheres Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts to the hematite-water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gao, X.; Metge, D.W.; Ray, C.; Harvey, R.W.; Chorover, J.

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of viable Cryptosporidium parvum ??ocysts at the hematite (??-Fe2O3)-water interface was examined over a wide range in solution chemistry using in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Spectra for hematite-sorbed ??ocysts showed distinctchangesin carboxylate group vibrations relative to spectra obtained in the absence of hematite, indicative of direct chemical bonding between carboxylate groups and Fe metal centers of the hematite surface. The data also indicate that complexation modes vary with solution chemistry. In NaCl solution, ??ocysts are bound to hematite via monodentate and binuclear bidentate complexes. The former predominates at low pH, whereas the latter becomes increasingly prevalent with increasing pH. In a CaCl2 solution, only binuclear bidentate complexes are observed. When solution pH is above the point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) of hematite, ??ocyst surface carboxylate groups are bound to the mineral surface via outer-sphere complexes in both electrolyte solutions. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  12. Confirmed detection of Cyclospora cayetanesis, Encephalitozoon intestinalis and Cryptosporidium parvum in water used for drinking.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Scot E; John, David; Eliopolus, James; Gerba, Charles P; Naranjo, Jaime; Klein, Robert; López, Beatriz; de Mejía, Maricruz; Mendoza, Carlos E; Pepper, Ian L

    2003-09-01

    Human enteropathogenic microsporidia (HEM), Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cayetanesis, and Giardia lamblia are associated with gastrointestinal disease in humans. To date, the mode of transmission and environmental occurrence of HEM (Encephalitozoon intestinalis and Enterocytozoon bieneusi) and Cyclospora cayetanesis have not been fully elucidated due to lack of sensitive and specific environmental screening methods. The present study was undertaken with recently developed methods, to screen various water sources used for public consumption in rural areas around the city of Guatemala. Water concentrates collected in these areas were subjected to community DNA extraction followed by PCR amplification, PCR sequencing and computer database homology comparison (CDHC). All water samples screened in this study had been previously confirmed positive for Giardia spp. by immunofluorescent assay (IFA). Of the 12 water concentrates screened, 6 showed amplification of microsporidial SSU-rDNA and were subsequently confirmed to be Encephalitozoon intestinalis. Five of the samples allowed for amplification of Cyclospora 18S-rDNA; three of these were confirmed to be Cyclospora cayetanesis while two could not be identified because of inadequate sequence information. Thus, this study represents the first confirmed identification of Cyclospora cayetanesis and Encephalitozoon intestinalis in source water used for consumption. The fact that the waters tested may be used for human consumption indicates that these emerging protozoa may be transmitted by ingestion of contaminated water. PMID:15384722

  13. Comparison of oocyst shedding and the serum immune response to Cryptosporidium parvum in cattle and pigs.

    PubMed

    Quílez, J; Ares-Mazás, E; Sánchez-Acedo, C; del Cacho, E; Clavel, A; Causapé, A C

    1996-01-01

    A comparison was made between oocyst shedding and the presence of specific serum IgG antibodies to Cryptosporidium parvum in 108 bovines and 90 pigs. Oocysts were detected by a commercial immunofluorescence assay in feces from 26.8% of bovines and 34.4% of pigs, whereas positive titers as determined by an indirect fluorescent antibody method were found in sera from 12.9% and 48.9% of the respective animals. Infection was significantly most frequent in suckling calves (82.7%) and weaned piglets (87.5%). By contrast, the numbers of seropositives were highest in weaned calves (17.1%) and fattening pigs (76.6%). The results of coprological and serological analysis corresponded in 65.7% of bovines and 56.7% of pigs. When used to diagnose the shedding of cryptosporidial oocysts, the detection of specific IgG antibodies had a sensitivity ranging from 10.3% (cattle) to 58.1% (pigs) and a specificity of 86.1% (cattle) and 55.9% (pigs). PMID:8832734

  14. Seasonal Retention and Release of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts by Environmental Biofilms in the Laboratory ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wolyniak, E. A.; Hargreaves, B. R.; Jellison, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a genus of waterborne protozoan parasites that causes significant gastrointestinal disease in humans. These parasites can accumulate in environmental biofilms and be subsequently released to contaminate water supplies. Natural microbial assemblages were collected each season from an eastern Pennsylvania stream and used to grow biofilms in laboratory microcosms in which influx, efflux, and biofilm retention were determined from daily oocyst counts. For each seasonal biofilm, oocysts attached to the biofilm quickly during oocyst dosing. Upon termination of oocyst dosing, the percentage of oocysts retained within the biofilm decreased to a new steady state within 5 days. Seasonal differences in biofilm retention of oocysts were observed. The spring biofilm retained the greatest percentage of oocysts, followed (in decreasing order) by the winter, summer, and fall biofilms. There was no statistically significant correlation between the percentage of oocysts attached to the biofilm and (i) any measured stream water quality parameter (including temperature, pH, conductivity, and dissolved organic carbon concentration) or (ii) experimental temperature. Seasonal differences in oocyst retention persisted when biofilms were tested with stream water from a different season. These data suggest that seasonal variation in the microbial community and resulting biofilm architecture may be more important to oocyst transport in this stream site than water quality. The biofilm attachment and detachment dynamics of C. parvum oocysts have implications for public health, and the drinking water industry should recognize that the potential exists for pathogen-free water to become contaminated during the distribution process as a result of biofilm dynamics. PMID:20023100

  15. Differential Gene Expression and Protein Localization of Cryptosporidium parvum Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fengguang; Zhang, Haili; Payne, Harold Ross; Zhu, Guan

    2016-03-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is unable to synthesize fatty acids de novo, but possesses three long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (CpACS) isoforms for activating fatty acids. We have recently shown that these enzymes could be targeted to kill the parasite in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that the CpACS genes were differentially expressed during the parasite life cycle, and their proteins were localized to different subcellular structures by immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopies. Among them, CpACS1 displayed as an apical protein in sporozoites and merozoites, but no or little presence during the intracellular merogony until the release of merozoites, suggesting that CpACS1 probably functioned mainly during the parasite invasion and/or early stage of intracellular development. Both CpACS2 and CpACS3 proteins were present in all parasite life cycle stages, in which CpACS2 was present in the parasite and the parasitophorous vacuole membranes (PVM), whereas CpACS3 was mainly present in the parasite plasma membranes with little presence in the PVM. These observations suggest that CpACS2 and CpACS3 may participate in scavenging and transport of fatty acids across the PVM and the parasite cytoplasmic membranes, respectively. PMID:26411755

  16. Impact of zooplankton grazing on the excystation, viability, and infectivity of the protozoan pathogens Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Connelly, S J; Wolyniak, E A; Dieter, K L; Williamson, C E; Jellison, K L

    2007-11-01

    Very little is known about the ability of the zooplankton grazer Daphnia pulicaria to reduce populations of Giardia lamblia cysts and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in surface waters. The potential for D. pulicaria to act as a biological filter of C. parvum and G. lamblia was tested under three grazing pressures (one, two, or four D. pulicaria grazers per 66 ml). (Oo)cysts (1 x 10(4) per 66 ml) were added to each grazing bottle along with the algal food Selenastrum capricornutum (6.6 x 10(4) cells per 66 ml) to stimulate normal grazing. Bottles were rotated (2 rpm) to prevent settling of (oo)cysts and algae for 24 h (a light:dark cycle of 16 h:8 h) at 20 degrees C. The impact of D. pulicaria grazing on (oo)cysts was assessed by (i) (oo)cyst clearance rates, (ii) (oo)cyst viability, (iii) (oo)cyst excystation, and (iv) oocyst infectivity in cell culture. Two D. pulicaria grazers significantly decreased the total number of C. parvum oocysts by 52% and G. lamblia cysts by 44%. Furthermore, two D. pulicaria grazers significantly decreased C. parvum excystation and infectivity by 5% and 87%, respectively. Two D. pulicaria grazers significantly decreased the viability of G. lamblia cysts by 52%, but analysis of G. lamblia excystation was confounded by observed mechanical disruption of the cysts after grazing. No mechanical disruption of the C. parvum oocysts was observed, presumably due to their smaller size. The data provide strong evidence that zooplankton grazers have the potential to substantially decrease the population of infectious C. parvum and G. lamblia in freshwater ecosystems. PMID:17873076

  17. The Effect of the Anionic Surfactant Aerosol-80 on the Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts through Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Powelson, D.; Darnault, C.

    2012-12-01

    Transport of the pathogenic protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum through soils threatens ground and surface waters. C. parvum may be introduced into soils in the manure of infected calves. The presence of other chemicals in the soil applied as or with amendments, may affect the transport of the C. parvum oocysts. Surfactants, which are used in many herbicide formulations, decrease water tension and may disrupt the air-water interface where oocysts are thought to accumulate. We investigate the effect of the anionic surfactant Aerosol-80, at two concentrations, on the transport of C. parvum oocysts by unsaturated flow through "undisturbed" soil columns from Illinois and Utah. Following each experiment oocysts in the leachate and distributed throughout the soil profile are quantified by real time PCR. We find that the presence of the surfactant accelerates the transport of the oocysts through preferential flow paths. On the other hand, when connected macropores are not present in the soils, the presence of the surfactant retards the transport of the oocysts through the soil matrix by straining oocyst-surfactant-Ca flocs. Surfactant efficacy is affected by soil type.

  18. Electron microscopic observation of the early stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual multiplication and development in in vitro axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    The stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual exogenous development were investigated at high ultra-structural resolution in cell-free culture using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Early C. parvum trophozoites were ovoid in shape, 1.07 × 1.47 μm(2) in size, and contained a large nucleus and adjacent Golgi complex. Dividing and mature meronts containing four to eight developing merozoites, 2.34 × 2.7 μm(2) in size, were observed within the first 24h of cultivation. An obvious peculiarity was found within the merozoite pellicle, as it was composed of the outer plasma membrane with underlying middle and inner membrane complexes. Further novel findings were vacuolization of the meront's residuum and extension of its outer pellicle, as parasitophorous vacuole-like membranes were also evident. The asexual reproduction of C. parvum was consistent with the developmental pattern of both eimerian coccidia and Arthrogregarinida (formerly Neogregarinida). The unique cell-free development of C. parvum described here, along with the establishment of meronts and merozoite formation, is the first such evidence obtained from in vitro cell-free culture at the ultrastructural level. PMID:26587578

  19. An Outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum across England & Scotland Associated with Consumption of Fresh Pre-Cut Salad Leaves, May 2012

    PubMed Central

    McKerr, Caoimhe; Adak, Goutam K.; Nichols, Gordon; Gorton, Russell; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Kafatos, George; Cosford, Paul; Charlett, Andre; Reacher, Mark; Pollock, Kevin G.; Alexander, Claire L.; Morton, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background We report a widespread foodborne outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum in England and Scotland in May 2012. Cases were more common in female adults, and had no history of foreign travel. Over 300 excess cases were identified during the period of the outbreak. Speciation and microbiological typing revealed the outbreak strain to be C. parvum gp60 subtype IIaA15G2R1. Methods Hypothesis generation questionnaires were administered and an unmatched case control study was undertaken to test the hypotheses raised. Cases and controls were interviewed by telephone. Controls were selected using sequential digit dialling. Information was gathered on demographics, foods consumed and retailers where foods were purchased. Results Seventy-four laboratory confirmed cases and 74 controls were included in analyses. Infection was found to be strongly associated with the consumption of pre-cut mixed salad leaves sold by a single retailer. This is the largest documented outbreak of cryptosporidiosis attributed to a food vehicle. PMID:26017538

  20. Revisiting the reference genomes of human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species: reannotation of C. parvum Iowa and a new C. hominis reference

    PubMed Central

    Isaza, Juan P.; Galván, Ana Luz; Polanco, Victor; Huang, Bernice; Matveyev, Andrey V.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Manque, Patricio; Buck, Gregory A.; Alzate, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis are the most relevant species of this genus for human health. Both cause a self-limiting diarrhea in immunocompetent individuals, but cause potentially life-threatening disease in the immunocompromised. Despite the importance of these pathogens, only one reference genome of each has been analyzed and published. These two reference genomes were sequenced using automated capillary sequencing; as of yet, no next generation sequencing technology has been applied to improve their assemblies and annotations. For C. hominis, the main challenge that prevents a larger number of genomes to be sequenced is its resistance to axenic culture. In the present study, we employed next generation technology to analyse the genomic DNA and RNA to generate a new reference genome sequence of a C. hominis strain isolated directly from human stool and a new genome annotation of the C. parvum Iowa reference genome. PMID:26549794

  1. Revisiting the reference genomes of human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species: reannotation of C. parvum Iowa and a new C. hominis reference.

    PubMed

    Isaza, Juan P; Galván, Ana Luz; Polanco, Victor; Huang, Bernice; Matveyev, Andrey V; Serrano, Myrna G; Manque, Patricio; Buck, Gregory A; Alzate, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis are the most relevant species of this genus for human health. Both cause a self-limiting diarrhea in immunocompetent individuals, but cause potentially life-threatening disease in the immunocompromised. Despite the importance of these pathogens, only one reference genome of each has been analyzed and published. These two reference genomes were sequenced using automated capillary sequencing; as of yet, no next generation sequencing technology has been applied to improve their assemblies and annotations. For C. hominis, the main challenge that prevents a larger number of genomes to be sequenced is its resistance to axenic culture. In the present study, we employed next generation technology to analyse the genomic DNA and RNA to generate a new reference genome sequence of a C. hominis strain isolated directly from human stool and a new genome annotation of the C. parvum Iowa reference genome. PMID:26549794

  2. Survival of Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Seawater and Eastern Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in the Chesapeake Bay

    PubMed Central

    Fayer, Ronald; Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Lewis, Earl J.; Trout, James M.; Farley, C. Austin

    1998-01-01

    Oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum placed in artificial seawater at salinities of 10, 20, and 30 ppt at 10°C and at 10 ppt at 20°C were infectious after 12 weeks. Those placed in seawater at 20 ppt and 30 ppt at 20°C were infectious for 8 and 4 weeks, respectively. These findings suggested that oocysts could survive in estuarine waters long enough to be removed by filter feeders such as oysters. Thereafter, 30 Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, were collected with a dredge or with hand tongs at each of six sites within Maryland tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay in May and June and in August and September of 1997. Hemocytes and gill washings from all oysters were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts by immunofluorescence microscopy utilizing a commercially available kit containing fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Giardia was not detected by this method from any of the 360 oysters examined. Presumptive identification of Cryptosporidium oocysts was made in either hemocytes or gill washings of oysters from all six sites both times that surveys were conducted. In addition, during August and September, for each of the six sites, hemocytes from the 30 oysters were pooled and gill washings from the oysters were pooled. Each pool was delivered by gastric intubation to a litter of neonatal mice to produce a bioassay for oocyst infectivity. Intestinal tissue from two of three mice that received gill washings from oysters collected at a site near a large cattle farm and shoreline homes with septic tanks was positive for developmental stages of C. parvum. These findings demonstrate for the first time that oysters in natural waters harbor infectious C. parvum oocysts and can serve as mechanical vectors of this pathogen. PMID:9501446

  3. Benzoylbenzimidazole-based selective inhibitors targeting Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongsheng; Ojo, Kayode K.; Johnson, Steven M.; Larson, Eric T.; He, Penqing; Geiger, Jennifer A.; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; White, A. Clinton; Parsons, Marilyn; Merritt, Ethan A.; Maly, Dustin J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Fan, Erkang

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinase-1 (CDPK1) from Cryptosporidium parvum (CpCDPK1) and Toxoplasma gondii (TgCDPK1) have become attractive targets for discovering selective inhibitors to combat infections caused by these protozoa. We used structure-based design to improve a series of benzoylbenzimidazole-based compounds in terms of solubility, selectivity, and potency against CpCDPK1 and TgCDPK1. The best inhibitors show inhibitory potencies below 50 nM and selectivity well above 200-fold over two human kinases with small gatekeeper residues. PMID:22795629

  4. Evaluation and optimization of a reusable hollow fiber ultrafilter as a first step in concentrating Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from water.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, R C; Oshima, K H

    2001-08-01

    Experiments with a small-scale hollow fiber ultrafiltration system (50,000 MWCO) was used to characterize the filtration process and identify conditions that optimize the recovery of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from 2 L samples of water. Seeded experiments were conducted using deionized water as well as four environmental water sources (tap, ground, Arkansas river, and Rio Grande river; 0-30.9NTU). Optimal and consistent recovery of spiked oocysts was observed (68-81%), when the membrane was sanitized with a 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution and then blocked with 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS). PMID:11456179

  5. Comparison of In Vitro Cell Culture and a Mouse Assay for Measuring Infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Rochelle, Paul A.; Marshall, Marilyn M.; Mead, Jan R.; Johnson, Anne M.; Korich, Dick G.; Rosen, Jeffrey S.; De Leon, Ricardo

    2002-01-01

    In vitro cell cultures were compared to neonatal mice for measuring the infectivity of five genotype 2 isolates of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocyst doses were enumerated by flow cytometry and delivered to animals and cell monolayers by using standardized procedures. Each dose of oocysts was inoculated into up to nine replicates of 9 to 12 mice or 6 to 10 cell culture wells. Infections were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining in CD-1 mice, by reverse transcriptase PCR in HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells, and by immunofluorescence microscopy in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Infectivity was expressed as a logistic transformation of the proportion of animals or cell culture wells that developed infection at each dose. In most instances, the slopes of the dose-response curves were not significantly different when we compared the infectivity models for each isolate. The 50% infective doses for the different isolates varied depending on the method of calculation but were in the range from 16 to 347 oocysts for CD-1 mice and in the ranges from 27 to 106, 31 to 629, and 13 to 18 oocysts for HCT-8, Caco-2, and MDCK cells, respectively. The average standard deviations for the percentages of infectivity for all replicates of all isolates were 13.9, 11.5, 13.2, and 10.7% for CD-1 mice, HCT-8 cells, Caco-2 cells, and MDCK cells, respectively, demonstrating that the levels of variability were similar in all assays. There was a good correlation between the average infectivity for HCT-8 cells and the results for CD-1 mice across all isolates for untreated oocysts (r = 0.85, n = 25) and for oocysts exposed to ozone and UV light (r = 0.89, n = 29). This study demonstrated that in vitro cell culture was equivalent to the “gold standard,” mouse infectivity, for measuring the infectivity of C. parvum and should therefore be considered a practical and accurate alternative for assessing oocyst infectivity and inactivation. However, the high levels of variability displayed by all

  6. Efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide as a sanitizer against Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cayetanensis, and Encephalitozoon intestinalis on produce.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Ynes R; Mann, Amy; Torres, Maria P; Cama, Vitaliano

    2008-12-01

    The efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide to reduce parasite and bacterial burden in produce was studied. Basil and lettuce leaves were inoculated with Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis oocysts, Encephalitozoon intestinalis spores, and a cocktail of two isolates of nalidixic acid-resistant Escherichia coli O157:H7. The inoculated samples were then treated for 20 min with gaseous chlorine dioxide at 4.1 mg/liter. Cryptosporidium had a 2.6 and 3.31 most-probable-number log reduction in basil and lettuce, respectively. Reduction of Encephalitozoon in basil and lettuce was 3.58 and 4.58 CFU/g respectively. E. coli loads were significantly reduced (2.45 to 3.97 log), whereas Cyclospora sporulation was not affected by this treatment. PMID:19244892

  7. Efficacy of levulinic acid-sodium dodecyl sulfate against Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Ynes R; Torres, Maria P; Tatum, Jessica M

    2011-01-01

    Foodborne parasites are characterized as being highly resistant to sanitizers used by the food industry. In 2009, a study reported the effectiveness of levulinic acid in combination with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in killing foodborne bacteria. Because of their innocuous properties, we studied the effects of levulinic acid and SDS at various concentrations appropriate for use in foods, on the viability of Cryptosporidium parvum and Encephalitozoon intestinalis. The viability of Cryptosporidium and E. intestinalis was determined by in vitro cultivation using the HCT-8 and RK-13 cell lines, respectively. Two Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates were also used in the present study: strain 932 (a human isolate from a 1992 Oregon meat outbreak) and strain E 0018 (isolated from calf feces). Different concentrations and combinations of levulinic acid and SDS were tested for their ability to reduce infectivity of C. parvum oocysts (10(5)), E. intestinalis spores (10(6)), and E. coli O157:H7 (10(7)/ml) when in suspension. Microsporidian spores were treated for 30 and 60 min at 20 ± 2°C. None of the combinations of levulinic acid and SDS were effective at inactivating the spores or oocysts. When Cryptosporidium oocysts were treated with higher concentrations (3% levulinic acid-2% SDS and 2% levulinic acid-1% SDS) for 30, 60, and 120 min, viability was unaffected. E. coli O157:H7, used as a control, was highly sensitive to the various concentrations and exposure times tested. SDS and levulinic acid alone had very limited effect on E. coli O157:H7 viability, but in combination they were highly effective at 30 and 60 min of incubation. In conclusion, Cryptosporidium and microsporidia are not inactivated when treated for various periods of time with 2% levulinic acid-1% SDS or 3% levulinic acid-2% SDS at 20°C, suggesting that this novel sanitizer cannot be used to eliminate parasitic contaminants in foods. PMID:21219777

  8. Cryptosporidium parvum genotype IIa and Giardia duodenalis assemblage A in Mytilus galloprovincialis on sale at local food markets.

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, Annunziata; Papini, Roberto; Marangi, Marianna; Koehler, Anson V; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-02-01

    To date, there has been no study to establish the genotypic or subgenotypic identities of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in edible shellfish. Here, we explored the genetic composition of these protists in Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mediterranean mussel) purchased from three markets in the city of Foggia, Italy, from May to December 2012. Samples from the digestive glands, gills and haemolymph were tested by nested PCR, targeting DNA regions within the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene of Cryptosporidium, and the triose-phosphate isomerase (tpi) and β-giardin genes of Giardia. In total, Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected in 66.7% of mussels (M. galloprovincialis) tested. Cryptosporidium was detected mostly between May and September 2012. Sequencing of amplicons showed that 60% of mussels contained Cryptosporidium parvum genotype IIa (including subgenotypes A15G2R1, IIaA15G2 and IIaA14G3R1), 23.3% Giardia duodenalis assemblage A, and 6.6% had both genetic types. This is the first report of these types in fresh, edible shellfish, particularly the very commonly consumed M. galloprovincialis from highly frequented fish markets. These genetic types of Cryptosporidium and Giardia are known to infect humans and thus likely to represent a significant public health risk. The poor observance of hygiene rules by vendors, coupled to the large numbers of M. galloprovincialis sold and the eating habits of consumers in Italy, call for more effective sanitary measures pertaining to the selling of fresh shellfish in street markets. PMID:24334090

  9. Towards standard methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum on lettuce and raspberries. Part 2: validation.

    PubMed

    Cook, N; Paton, C A; Wilkinson, N; Nichols, R A B; Barker, K; Smith, H V

    2006-06-15

    We report the results of interlaboratory collaborative trials of methods to detect oocysts of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum on lettuce and raspberries. The trials involved eight expert laboratories in the United Kingdom. Samples comprised 30 g lettuce, and 60 g raspberries. Lettuce samples were artificially contaminated at three levels: low (8.5-14.2 oocysts), medium (53.5-62.6 oocysts), and high (111.3-135.0 oocysts). Non-contaminated lettuce samples were also tested. The method had an overall sensitivity (correct identification of all artificially contaminated lettuce samples) of 89.6%, and a specificity (correct identification of non-contaminated samples) of 85.4%. The total median percentage recovery (from all artificially contaminated samples) produced by the method was 30.4%. The method was just as reproducible between laboratories, as repeatable within a laboratory. Raspberry samples were artificially contaminated at three levels: low (8.5-26.8 oocysts), medium (29.7-65.7 oocysts), and high (53.9-131.3 oocysts). Non-contaminated raspberry samples were also tested. The method had an overall sensitivity (correct identification of all artificially contaminated raspberry samples) of 95.8%, and a specificity (correct identification of non-contaminated samples) of 83.3%. The total median percentage recovery (from all artificially contaminated samples) produced by the method was 44.3%. The method was just as reproducible between laboratories, as repeatable within a laboratory. The results of the collaborative trial indicate that these assays can be used effectively in analytical microbiological laboratories. PMID:16546283

  10. Efficacy of wash solutions in recovering Cyclospora cayetanensis, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Toxoplasma gondii from basil.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Venessa; Torres, Maria; Ortega, Ynés R

    2014-08-01

    Parasitic diseases can be acquired by ingestion of contaminated raw or minimally processed fresh produce (herbs and fruits). The sensitivity of methods used to detect parasites on fresh produce depends in part on the efficacy of wash solutions in removing them from suspect samples. In this study, six wash solutions (sterile E-Pure water, 3% levulinic acid-3% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 1 M glycine, 0.1 M phosphate-buffered saline, 0.1% Alconox, and 1% HCl-pepsin) were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing Cyclospora cayetanensis, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Toxoplasma gondii from basil. One hundred or 1,000 oocysts of these parasites were inoculated onto the adaxial surfaces of 25 g of basil leaves, placed in stomacher bags, and stored for 1 h at 21°C or 24 h at 4°C. Leaves were hand washed in each wash solution for 1 min. DNA was extracted from the wash solutions and amplified using PCR for the detection of all parasites. Oocysts inoculated at a concentration of 1,000 oocysts per 25 g of basil were detected in all wash solutions. At an inoculum concentration of 100 oocysts per 25 g, oocysts were detected in 18.5 to 92.6% of the wash solutions. The lowest variability in recovering oocysts from basil inoculated with 100 oocysts was observed in 1% HCl-pepsin wash solution. Oocyst recovery rates were higher at 1 h than at 24 h postinoculation. Unlike most bacteria, parasites cannot be enriched; therefore, an optimal recovery process for oocysts from suspected foods is critical. The observations in this study provide guidance concerning the selection of wash solutions giving the highest retrieval of parasite oocysts. PMID:25198596

  11. Detection of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum Antigens in Human Fecal Specimens Using the ColorPAC Combination Rapid Solid-Phase Qualitative Immunochromatographic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Lynne S.; Shimizu, Robyn Y.

    2000-01-01

    The ColorPAC Giardia/Cryptosporidium (Becton Dickinson) is a solid-phase qualitative immunochromatographic assay that detects and distinguishes between Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum in human stool. Agreement between the Alexon-Trend ProSpecT Giardia Rapid EIA and the ColorPAC assay was 166 of 172 (96.5%). Agreement between the Alexon-Trend ProSpecT Cryptosporidium Rapid EIA and the ColorPAC assay was 169 of 171 (98.8%). No cross-reactions were seen with other parasites or human cells. PMID:10699038

  12. Biotin- and Glycoprotein-Coated Microspheres as Surrogates for Studying Filtration Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum in a Granular Limestone Aquifer Medium.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, M E; Blaschke, A P; Toze, S; Sidhu, J P S; Ahmed, W; van Driezum, I H; Sommer, R; Kirschner, A K T; Cervero-Aragó, S; Farnleitner, A H; Pang, L

    2015-07-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium are waterborne protozoa of great health concern. Many studies have attempted to find appropriate surrogates for assessing Cryptosporidium filtration removal in porous media. In this study, we evaluated the filtration of Cryptosporidium parvum in granular limestone medium by the use of biotin- and glycoprotein-coated carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (CPMs) as surrogates. Column experiments were carried out with core material taken from a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, Australia. For the experiments with injection of a single type of particle, we observed the total removal of the oocysts and glycoprotein-coated CPMs, a 4.6- to 6.3-log10 reduction of biotin-coated CPMs, and a 2.6-log10 reduction of unmodified CPMs. When two different types of particles were simultaneously injected, glycoprotein-coated CPMs showed a 5.3-log10 reduction, while the uncoated CPMs displayed a 3.7-log10 reduction, probably due to particle-particle interactions. Our results confirm that glycoprotein-coated CPMs are the most accurate surrogates for C. parvum; biotin-coated CPMs are slightly more conservative, while unmodified CPMs are markedly overly conservative for predicting C. parvum removal in granular limestone medium. The total removal of C. parvum observed in our study suggests that granular limestone medium is very effective for the filtration removal of C. parvum and could potentially be used for the pretreatment of drinking water and aquifer storage recovery of recycled water. PMID:25888174

  13. Biotin- and Glycoprotein-Coated Microspheres as Surrogates for Studying Filtration Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum in a Granular Limestone Aquifer Medium

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, A. P.; Toze, S.; Sidhu, J. P. S.; Ahmed, W.; van Driezum, I. H.; Sommer, R.; Kirschner, A. K. T.; Cervero-Aragó, S.; Farnleitner, A. H.; Pang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium are waterborne protozoa of great health concern. Many studies have attempted to find appropriate surrogates for assessing Cryptosporidium filtration removal in porous media. In this study, we evaluated the filtration of Cryptosporidium parvum in granular limestone medium by the use of biotin- and glycoprotein-coated carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (CPMs) as surrogates. Column experiments were carried out with core material taken from a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, Australia. For the experiments with injection of a single type of particle, we observed the total removal of the oocysts and glycoprotein-coated CPMs, a 4.6- to 6.3-log10 reduction of biotin-coated CPMs, and a 2.6-log10 reduction of unmodified CPMs. When two different types of particles were simultaneously injected, glycoprotein-coated CPMs showed a 5.3-log10 reduction, while the uncoated CPMs displayed a 3.7-log10 reduction, probably due to particle-particle interactions. Our results confirm that glycoprotein-coated CPMs are the most accurate surrogates for C. parvum; biotin-coated CPMs are slightly more conservative, while unmodified CPMs are markedly overly conservative for predicting C. parvum removal in granular limestone medium. The total removal of C. parvum observed in our study suggests that granular limestone medium is very effective for the filtration removal of C. parvum and could potentially be used for the pretreatment of drinking water and aquifer storage recovery of recycled water. PMID:25888174

  14. The Cryptosporidium parvum C-Type Lectin CpClec Mediates Infection of Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Interactions with Sulfated Proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Ludington, Jacob G; Ward, Honorine D

    2016-05-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium causes significant diarrheal disease worldwide. Effective anticryptosporidial agents are lacking, in part because the molecular mechanisms underlying Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions are poorly understood. Previously, we identified and characterized a novel Cryptosporidium parvum C-type lectin domain-containing mucin-like glycoprotein, CpClec. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms underlying interactions of CpClec with intestinal epithelial cells by using an Fc-tagged recombinant protein. CpClec-Fc displayed Ca(2+)-dependent, saturable binding to HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells and competitively inhibited C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells. Binding of CpClec-Fc was specifically inhibited by sulfated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparin and heparan sulfate. Binding was reduced after the removal of heparan sulfate and following the inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation in HCT-8 cells. Like CpClec-Fc binding, C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells were inhibited by glycosaminoglycans and were reduced after heparan sulfate removal or inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation. Lastly, CpClec-Fc binding and C. parvum sporozoite attachment were significantly decreased in CHO cell mutants defective in glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Together, these results indicate that CpClec is a novel C-type lectin that mediates C. parvum attachment and infection via Ca(2+)-dependent binding to sulfated proteoglycans on intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26975991

  15. Activity of DL-alpha-Difluoromethylarginine and Polyamine Analogues against Cryptosporidium parvum Infection in a T-Cell Receptor Alpha-Deficient Mouse Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The in vivo effectiveness of a series of conformationally restricted polyamine analogs alone and in combination with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) towards a T-cell receptor-alpha deficient mouse model infection of Cryptosporidium parvum was tested. Polyamine analogues were constructed from ...

  16. Evaluation of recombinant P23 protein as a vaccine for passive immunization of newborn calves against Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Askari, N; Shayan, P; Mokhber-Dezfouli, M R; Ebrahimzadeh, E; Lotfollahzadeh, S; Rostami, A; Amininia, N; Ragh, M J

    2016-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a zoonotic protozoan disease that affects the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans. Diarrhoea as the most important indication of the infection leads to high economic losses in livestock industries and is a life threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. In the absence of the effective drugs, vaccine has an effective role in the prevention of infection. For this purpose we developed a vaccine utilizing recombinant P23 protein and immunized pregnant cows four times from 70 days to parturition every 2 weeks. After parturition, each calf received his dam colostrum and challenged with 1 × 10(7) Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts at 12 h of age. Results showed that in contrast with the control group, the antibody titre in the sera and first milking colostra of the immunized cows significantly increased and calves fed hyperimmune colostrum did not show cryptosporidiosis signs. Moreover, enriched colostrum not only reduced significantly the amount of oocyst excretion but also delayed its onset. Our study showed that recombinant P23 protein could be used for passive immunization of newborn calves against Cryptosporidium parvum. PMID:27012710

  17. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum detected in Japanese black and Holstein calves in Iwate Prefecture and Tanegashima Island, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan

    PubMed Central

    AITA, Junya; ICHIKAWA-SEKI, Madoka; KINAMI, Aiko; YAITA, Seiko; KUMAGAI, Yoshihiro; NISHIKAWA, Yoshifumi; ITAGAKI, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in 43 out of 77 calves from two farms in Iwate Prefecture and nine farms on Tanegashima Island, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. The DNA fragments of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene were amplified by a nested PCR from 43 oocyst-positive as well as one oocyst-negative samples. All of them were precisely identified as C. parvum by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of the 18S rRNA gene. C. parvum oocyst-positive calves ranged in age from 6 to 13 days old and significantly have watery diarrhea (P<0.05). Sequences of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) in 43 Cryptosporidium oocyst-positive samples were identical to that of the zoonotic IIaA15G2R1 subtype. We therefore suggest that calves could be potential sources of C. parvum infections in humans. PMID:25819544

  18. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum detected in Japanese black and Holstein calves in Iwate Prefecture and Tanegashima Island, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Aita, Junya; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Kinami, Aiko; Yaita, Seiko; Kumagai, Yoshihiro; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in 43 out of 77 calves from two farms in Iwate Prefecture and nine farms on Tanegashima Island, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. The DNA fragments of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene were amplified by a nested PCR from 43 oocyst-positive as well as one oocyst-negative samples. All of them were precisely identified as C. parvum by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of the 18S rRNA gene. C. parvum oocyst-positive calves ranged in age from 6 to 13 days old and significantly have watery diarrhea (P<0.05). Sequences of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) in 43 Cryptosporidium oocyst-positive samples were identical to that of the zoonotic IIaA15G2R1 subtype. We therefore suggest that calves could be potential sources of C. parvum infections in humans. PMID:25819544

  19. HIV-1 Tat Protein Suppresses Cholangiocyte Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression and Defense against Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Steven P.; Small, Aaron J.; Gajdos, Gabriella B.; Badley, Andrew D.; Chen, Xian-Ming; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2009-01-01

    Biliary cryptosporidiosis is associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cholangiopathy and occurs almost exclusively in adult patients with AIDS. Infection of biliary epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) with Cryptosporidium parvum induces Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 expression and stimulates a TLR-dependent response against infection. Here, we tested whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat affects TLR expression and, hence, anti–C. parvum defense responses. Using an in vitro model of human biliary cryptosporidiosis, we found that recombinant Tat protein increased TLR4 mRNA expression in both uninfected and C. parvum–infected cholangiocytes. Conversely, Tat decreased TLR4 protein levels and suppressed C. parvum–induced TLR4 protein expression. Using actinomycin to inhibit transcription, we found that Tat increased the half-life of TLR4 mRNA from ~25 to 60 min, and RNA gel-shift assays demonstrated direct binding of Tat to TLR4 mRNA. In vitro transcription/translation studies suggested that Tat does not affect transcription but does decrease TLR4 translation. Importantly, more parasites were found in Tat-treated cells than in control cells 48h after infection. These findings suggest that Tat inhibits cholangiocyte TLR4protein expression through translational inhibition. These events appear to diminish the ability of cholangiocytes to initsiate an innate immune response to C. parvum. We suggest that these findings may contribute to the unusual susceptibility of HIV-infected individuals to biliary cryptosporidiosis. PMID:19265483

  20. Modeling Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst inactivation and bromate in a flow-through ozone contactor treating natural water.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Elovitz, Michael S; von Gunten, Urs; Shukairy, Hiba M; Mariñas, Benito J

    2007-01-01

    A reactive transport model was developed to simultaneously predict Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst inactivation and bromate formation during ozonation of natural water. A mechanistic model previously established to predict bromate formation in organic-free synthetic waters was coupled with an empirical ozone decay model and a one-dimensional axial dispersion reactor (ADR) model to represent the performance of a lab-scale flow-through ozone bubble-diffuser contactor. Dissolved ozone concentration, bromate concentration (in flow-through experiments only), hydroxyl radical exposure and C. parvum oocyst survival were measured in batch and flow-through experiments performed with filtered Ohio River water. The model successfully represented ozone concentration and C. parvum oocyst survival ratio in the flow-through reactor using parameters independently determined from batch and semi-batch experiments. Discrepancies between model prediction and experimental data for hydroxyl radical concentration and bromate formation were attributed to unaccounted for reactions, particularly those involving natural organic matter, hydrogen peroxide and carbonate radicals. Model simulations including some of these reactions resulted in closer agreement between predictions and experimental observations for bromate formation. PMID:17123571

  1. Effectiveness of Standard UV Depuration at Inactivating Cryptosporidium parvum Recovered from Spiked Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas)▿

    PubMed Central

    Sunnotel, O.; Snelling, W. J.; McDonough, N.; Browne, L.; Moore, J. E.; Dooley, J. S. G.; Lowery, C. J.

    2007-01-01

    When filter-feeding shellfish are consumed raw, because of their ability to concentrate and store waterborne pathogens, they are being increasingly associated with human gastroenteritis and have become recognized as important pathogen vectors. In the shellfish industry, UV depuration procedures are mandatory to reduce pathogen levels prior to human consumption. However, these guidelines are based around more susceptible fecal coliforms and Salmonella spp. and do not consider Cryptosporidium spp., which have significant resistance to environmental stresses. Thus, there is an urgent need to evaluate the efficiency of standard UV depuration against the survival of Cryptosporidium recovered from shellfish. Our study found that in industrial-scale shellfish depuration treatment tanks, standard UV treatment resulted in a 13-fold inactivation of recovered, viable C. parvum oocysts from spiked (1 × 106 oocysts liter −1) Pacific oysters. Depuration at half power also significantly reduced (P < 0.05; ninefold) the number of viable oocysts recovered from oysters. While UV treatment resulted in significant reductions of recovered viable oocysts, low numbers of viable oocysts were still recovered from oysters after depuration, making their consumption when raw a public health risk. Our study highlights the need for increased periodic monitoring programs for shellfish harvesting sites, improved depuration procedures, and revised microbial quality control parameters, including Cryptosporidium assessment, to minimize the risk of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:17574996

  2. Use of a common laboratory glassware detergent improves recovery of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis from lettuce, herbs and raspberries.

    PubMed

    Shields, Joan M; Lee, Michelle Minjung; Murphy, Helen R

    2012-02-01

    The success of any protocol designed to detect parasitic protozoa on produce must begin with an efficient initial wash step. Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis oocysts were seeded onto herbs, lettuces and raspberries, eluted with one of four wash solutions and the recovered number of oocysts determined via fluorescent microscopy. Recovery rates for fluorescein thiosemicarbazide labeled C. parvum oocysts seeded onto spinach and raspberries and washed with de-ionized water were 38.4 ± 10.1% and 34.9 ± 6.2%, respectively. Two alternative wash solutions viz. 1M glycine, pH 5.5 and a detachment solution were tested also using labeled C. parvum seeded spinach and raspberries. No statistically significant difference was noted in the recovery rates. However, a wash solution containing 0.1% Alconox, a laboratory glassware detergent, resulted in a significant improvement in oocyst recovery. 72.6 ± 6.6% C. parvum oocysts were recovered from basil when washed with 0.1% Alconox compared to 47.9 ± 5.8% using detachment solution. Also, C. cayetanensis oocysts were seeded onto lettuces, herbs and raspberries and the recovery using de-ionized water were compared to 0.1% Alconox wash: basil 17.5 ± 5.0% to 76.1 ± 14.0%, lollo rosso lettuce 38.3 ± 5.5% to 72.5 ± 8.1%, Tango leaf lettuce 45.9 ± 5.4% to 71.1 ± 7.8% and spring mix (mesclun) 39.8 ± 0.7% to 80.2 ± 11.3%, respectively. These results suggest that the use of Alconox in a wash solution significantly improves recovery resulting in the detection of these parasitic protozoa on high risk foods. PMID:22094179

  3. Long-term survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in seawater and in experimentally infected mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis).

    PubMed

    Tamburrini, A; Pozio, E

    1999-05-01

    Transmission of infectious oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum via surface- and drinking-water supplies has been reported and many surface waters flow into the sea, potentially causing runoff of animal-infected faeces. Eating raw mussels is a common practice in many countries, increasing the public's risk of acquiring enteric pathogens. The aims of the present study were to estimate how long C. parvum oocysts remain infectious in artificial seawater, to determine if the oocysts are retained in mussel tissues (Mytilus galloprovincialis), and how long they maintain their infectivity. Oocysts were incubated in artificial seawater at 6-8 degrees C under moderate oxygenation and the infectivity of oocysts was tested five times, over a 12 month period after incubation in seawater, in BALB/c mice. Each pup was inoculated per os with 10(5) oocysts and killed 5 days p.i. Oocysts remained infectious for 1 year. Forty mussels held in an aquarium containing artificial seawater filtered out more than 4 x 10(8) oocysts in a 24 h period. Oocysts were detected in the gill washing up to 3 days p.i., in the haemolymph up to 7 days p.i., and in the intestinal tract up to 14 days p.i. Oocysts collected from the gut of mussels 7 and 14 days p.i. were observed to have infected mice. These results suggest that C. parvum oocysts can survive in seawater for at least 1 year and can be filtered out by benthic mussels, retaining their infectivity up to 14 days, so seawater and molluscs are a potential source of C. parvum infection for humans. PMID:10404265

  4. Effect of storage media, temperature, and time on preservation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts for PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, L F; Gajadhar, A A

    2009-03-23

    The effect of storage media, temperature, and time on suitability of oocysts for use in subsequent molecular studies was examined. Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were stored for 3, 6, 9, or 12 months in sterile dH(2)O, 70 or 95% ethanol, (room temperature [RT], 4, -20, and -70 degrees C), 10% formalin (RT and 4 degrees C), PBS, TE buffer, antibiotic-antimycotic (A-A) solution (4, -20 and -70 degrees C), 2% sulphuric acid, 2.5% potassium dichromate (4 degrees C), and gDNA from 10(4) oocysts was extracted in triplicate and subjected to PCR. To determine the effect of storage media on PCR sensitivity, gDNA from 10(4), 10(2), and 10(0) oocysts stored for 15 months in the media listed above at RT or 4 degrees C was also extracted in triplicate and subjected to PCR. At RT, ethanol was suitable for up to 15 months, while gDNA from oocysts stored in dH(2)O amplified inconsistently after 3 months. At 4 degrees C, all tested media except dH(2)O and formalin were suitable for storage of 10(4) oocysts up to 15 months, but only 70% ethanol, A-A solution, 2% sulphuric acid and 2.5% potassium dichromate supported amplification of gDNA from fewer than 100 oocysts. At -20 degrees C, 95% ethanol, PBS, or TE were suitable for up to 9 months, while 70% ethanol and A-A solution were effective up to 12 months, and gDNA from oocysts stored in dH(2)O was inconsistently amplified after 6 months. Storage at -70 degrees C for up to 12 months was effective regardless of media type. Oocysts stored in formalin at RT or 4 degrees C could not be amplified by PCR despite washing prior to gDNA extraction. To maintain gDNA quality suitable for PCR, it is recommended that coccidian oocysts be stored at -70 degrees C in dH(2)O, ethanol, PBS, TE or A-A solution, at 4 degrees C in A-A or ethanol, or at RT in ethanol where refrigerated storage is unavailable. PMID:19128883

  5. Preferential Flow and Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts Through Vadose Zone: Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, C. J.; Darnault, C. J.; Garnier, P.; Kim, Y.; Oveson, K.; Jenkins, M.; Ghiorse, W.; Baveye, P.; Parlange, J.; Steenhuis, T.

    2001-12-01

    Oocysts of the protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum, when they contaminate drinking water supplies, can cause outbreaks of Cryptosporidiosis, a common waterborne disease. Of the different pathways by which oocysts can wind up in drinking water, one has received very little attention to date; because soils are often considered to be perfect filters, the transport of oocysts through the subsoil to groundwater by preferential flow is generally ignored. To evaluate its significance, three set of laboratory experiments investigated transport of oocysts through vadose zone. Experiment set I was carried out in a vertical 50 cm-long column filled with silica sand, under conditions known to foster fingered flow. Experiment set II investigates the effect of gas-water interfaces by modifying the hydrodynamical conditions in the sand columns with water-repellent sand barriers. Experiment III involved undisturbed soil columns subjected to macropores flow. The sand and soil columns were subjected to artificial rainfall and were allowed to reach steady-state. At that point, feces of contaminated calves were applied at the surface, along with a known amount of KCl to serve as tracer, and rainfall was continued at the same rate. The breakthrough of oocysts and Cl-, monitored in the effluent, demonstrate the importance of preferential flow - fingered flow and macropore flow - on the transport of oocysts through vadose zone. Peak oocyst concentrations were not appreciably delayed, compared to Cl-, and in some cases, occurred even before the Cl- peak. However, the numbers of oocysts present in the effluents were still orders of magnitude higher than the 5 to 10 oocysts per liter that are considerable sufficient to cause cryptosporidiosis in healthy adults. The transport of oocysts was simulated based on a partitioning the soil profile in both a distribution zone and a preferential zone, In particular, the model simulates accurately the markedly asymmetric breakthrough patterns, and the

  6. Sensitive and Rapid Detection of Viable Giardia Cysts and Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Large-Volume Water Samples with Wound Fiberglass Cartridge Filters and Reverse Transcription-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kaucner, Christine; Stinear, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    We recently described a reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for detecting low numbers of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts spiked into clarified environmental water concentrates. We have now modified the assay for direct analysis of primary sample concentrates with simultaneous detection of viable C. parvum oocysts, Giardia cysts, and a novel type of internal positive control (IPC). The IPC was designed to assess both efficiency of mRNA isolation and potential RT-PCR inhibition. Sensitivity testing showed that low numbers of organisms, in the range of a single viable cyst and oocyst, could be detected when spiked into 100-μl packed pellet volumes of concentrates from creek and river water samples. The RT-PCR was compared with an immunofluorescence (IF) assay by analyzing 29 nonspiked environmental water samples. Sample volumes of 20 to 1,500 liters were concentrated with a wound fiberglass cartridge filter. Frequency of detection for viable Giardia cysts increased from 24% by IF microscopy to 69% by RT-PCR. Viable C. parvum oocysts were detected only once by RT-PCR (3%) in contrast to detection of viable Cryptosporidium spp. in four samples by IF microscopy (14%), suggesting that Cryptosporidium species other than C. parvum were present in the water. This combination of the large-volume sampling method with RT-PCR represents a significant advance in terms of protozoan pathogen monitoring and in the wider application of PCR technology to this field of microbiology. PMID:9572946

  7. [1N,12N]Bis(Ethyl)-cis-6,7-Dehydrospermine: a New Drug for Treatment and Prevention of Cryptosporidium parvum Infection of Mice Deficient in T-Cell Receptor Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Waters, W. R.; Frydman, B.; Marton, L. J.; Valasinas, A.; Reddy, V. K.; Harp, J. A.; Wannemuehler, M. J.; Yarlett, N.

    2000-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum infection of T-cell receptor alpha (TCR-α)-deficient mice results in a persistent infection. In this study, treatment with a polyamine analogue (SL-11047) prevented C. parvum infection in suckling TCR-α-deficient mice and cleared an existing infection in older mice. Treatment with putrescine, while capable of preventing infection, did not clear C. parvum from previously infected mice. These findings provide further evidence that polyamine metabolic pathways are targets for new anticryptosporidial chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:10991882

  8. Comparison of immunofluorescence assay and immunomagnetic electrochemiluminescence in detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in karst water samples.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Ewa; Boyer, Douglas G; Shelton, Daniel R

    2003-04-01

    Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunomagnetic electrochemiluminescence (IM-ECL) were used for comparison of the percent recovery of Cryptosporidium parvum in environmental water samples obtained from a spring draining a karst basin. The monoclonal antibodies to C. parvum, isotype IgG3 were used for optimization of the IM-ECL protocol. The combination of biotinylated and TAG-labeled anti-C. parvum antibodies with the streptavidin beads gave a linear regression slope for log ECL vs. log fresh oocysts of 0.79 (from 5 to 5,000 oocysts), which indicates a constant ECL signal per oocyst. Standard curves gave a dynamic range of 5 to 5,000 oocysts/ml (fresh) and 10 to 100,000 cells/ml (4-month-old oocysts) with the maximum limit of linear detection higher than 100,000. The linear slope of 4-month-old oocysts decreased to 0.62, which indicates that ECL signal is a function of oocyst age. The experiment associated with bead storage time shows that even after 4 months of storage of the biotinylated antibodies, the complex retains the ability for binding the oocysts and generating the ECL signal. Based on the IFA results in the experiment evaluating different protocols for oocysts recovery from karst water samples, the most efficient protocol involved dispersion, followed by flotation and immunomagnetic separation (IMS) (24% recovery). The ECL results obtained in that experiment were very similar to the results obtained in the IFA method, which indicates that the IM-ECL method is accurate. Results of the IFA in the study of the prevalence of C. parvum in the groundwater showed that oocysts were present in 78% of 1 L water samples with average number of oocysts of 6.4+/-5.5 and ranged from 0 (13 samples) to 23.3 (2 samples). The ECL signal generated from these water samples ranged from 3,771 to 622 (average 1,620+/-465). However, the background value estimated in groundwater samples with low number of oocysts detected by IFA was highly variable and elevated (from 3,702 to

  9. Spinacia oleracea L. leaf stomata harboring Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts: A potential threat for food safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientific literature documents the prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in irrigation waters and on fresh produce. In the present study spinach leaves were experimentally exposed to Cryptosporidium oocysts which were subsequently irrigated with clean water daily for 5 days. As determined by confoc...

  10. Inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in swine waste lagoon and spray field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis in humans, Cryptosporidium has become a public health concern. Commercial swine operations can be a source of this protozoan parasite. Although the species distribution of Cryptosporidium is likely dominated by C. suis, a fraction may be comprised of the zoo...

  11. NF-kappaB p65-Dependent Transactivation of miRNA Genes following Cryptosporidium parvum Infection Stimulates Epithelial Cell Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Gong, Ai-Yu; Drescher, Kristen M.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal epithelium and causes diarrheal disease worldwide. Innate epithelial immune responses are key mediators of the host's defense to C. parvum. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Using an in vitro model of human cryptosporidiosis, we analyzed C. parvum-induced miRNA expression in biliary epithelial cells (i.e., cholangiocytes). Our results demonstrated differential alterations in the mature miRNA expression profile in cholangiocytes following C. parvum infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Database analysis of C. parvum-upregulated miRNAs revealed potential NF-κB binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We demonstrated that mir-125b-1, mir-21, mir-30b, and mir-23b-27b-24-1 cluster genes were transactivated through promoter binding of the NF-κB p65 subunit following C. parvum infection. In contrast, C. parvum transactivated mir-30c and mir-16 genes in cholangiocytes in a p65-independent manner. Importantly, functional inhibition of selected p65-dependent miRNAs in cholangiocytes increased C. parvum burden. Thus, we have identified a panel of miRNAs regulated through promoter binding of the NF-κB p65 subunit in human cholangiocytes in response to C. parvum infection, a process that may be relevant to the regulation of epithelial anti-microbial defense in general. PMID:19997496

  12. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat protein enhances Cryptosporidium parvum-induced apoptosis in cholangiocytes via a Fas ligand-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Steven P; Small, Aaron J; Nelson, Jeremy B; Badley, Andrew D; Chen, Xian-Ming; Gores, Gregory J; Larusso, Nicholas F

    2007-02-01

    While Cryptosporidium parvum infection of the intestine has been reported in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, biliary infection is seen primarily in adult AIDS patients and is associated with development of AIDS cholangiopathy. However, the mechanisms of pathogen-induced AIDS cholangiopathy remain unclear. Since we previously demonstrated that the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system is involved in paracrine-mediated C. parvum cytopathicity in cholangiocytes, we also tested the potential synergistic effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transactivator of transcription (Tat)-mediated FasL regulation on C. parvum-induced apoptosis in cholangiocytes by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence analysis, and immunogold electron microscopy. H69 cells do not express CXCR4 and CCR5, which are receptors required for direct HIV-1 viral infection. However, recombinant biologically active HIV-1-associated Tat protein increased FasL expression in the cytoplasm of cholangiocytes without a significant increase in apoptosis. We found that C. parvum-induced apoptosis was associated with translocation of intracellular FasL to the cell membrane surface and release of full-length FasL from infected H69 cells. Tat significantly (P < 0.05) increased C. parvum-induced apoptosis in bystander cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, Tat enhanced both C. parvum-induced FasL membrane translocation and release of full-length FasL. In addition, the FasL neutralizing antibody NOK-1 and the caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-fmk both blocked C. parvum-induced apoptosis in cholangiocytes. The data demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat enhances C. parvum-induced cholangiocyte apoptosis via a paracrine-mediated, FasL-dependent mechanism. Our results suggest that concurrent active HIV replication, with associated production of Tat protein, and C. parvum infection synergistically increase cholangiocyte apoptosis and thus jointly contribute to

  13. The fine structure of sexual stage development and sporogony of Cryptosporidium parvum in cell-free culture.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-05-01

    The sexual stages and new oocysts development of Cryptosporidium parvum were investigated in a cell-free culture system using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sexual development was extremely rapid after inoculation of oocysts into the medium. The process began within 1/2-12 h and was completed with new oocyst formation 120 h post-inoculation. The macrogamonts were bounded by two membranes and had amylopectin granules and two distinct types of wall-forming bodies. The microgamonts had a large nucleus showing lobe projections and condensation of chromatin, giving rise to peripherally budding microgametes. The microgametes contained a large area of granular substance containing groups of microtubules surrounding the electron-dense nucleus. In some instances, the dividing microgamy was observed in cell-free cultures with no preceding merogonic process. Fertilization was observed with the bullet-shaped microgamete penetrating an immature macrogamont at 24 and 216 h. The new thin- and thick-walled oocysts had a large residuum with polysaccharide granules and sporogony noted inside these oocysts. Novel immature four-layer walled thick oocysts with irregular knob-like protrusions on the outer layer resembling the immature Eimeria oocysts were also observed. The present study confirms the gametogony and sporogony of C. parvum in cell-free culture and describes their ultra-structure for the first time. PMID:26935529

  14. Stress-Induced Hsp70 Gene Expression and Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts by Chlorine-Based Oxidants▿

    PubMed Central

    Bajszár, George; Dekonenko, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Our research on the mechanisms of action of chlorine-based oxidants on Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water revealed a dual-phase effect: (i) response to oxidative stress, which was demonstrated by induced expression of the Hsp70 heat shock gene, and (ii) oocyst inactivation as a result of long-term exposure to oxidants. The relative biocidal effects of sodium hypochlorite (bleach) and electrolytically generated mixed oxidant solution (MOS) on C. parvum oocysts were compared at identical free chlorine concentrations. Oocyst inactivation was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) amplification of the heat-induced Hsp70 mRNA and compared with tissue culture infectivity. According to both assays, within the range between 25 and 250 mg/liter free chlorine and with 4 h contact time, MOS exhibits a higher efficacy in oocyst inactivation than hypochlorite. Other RNA-based viability assays, aimed at monitoring the levels of β-tubulin mRNA and 18S rRNA, showed relatively slow decay rates of these molecules following disinfection by chlorine-based oxidants, rendering these molecular diagnostic viability markers inappropriate for disinfection efficacy assessment. PMID:20118357

  15. Immunogenicity of orally administrated recombinant Lactobacillus casei Zhang expressing Cryptosporidium parvum surface adhesion protein P23 in mice.

    PubMed

    Geriletu; Xu, Rihua; Jia, Honglin; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Xuan, Xuenan; Zhang, Heping

    2011-05-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum, an intestinal apicomplexan parasite, is a significant cause of diarrheal diseases in both humans and animals. What is more, there is no promising strategy for controlling cryptosporidiosis. In this study, the P23 immunodominant surface protein of C. parvum sporozoites was stably expressed in the Lactobacillus casei Zhang strain and its immunogenicity was evaluated in a mouse model. The molecular weight (23 kDa) and immunogenicity of p23 gene expressed by L. casei Zhang were similar to that of the native P23 protein. Oral immunization with control L. casei Zhang and recombinant L. casei Zhang-p23 activated the mucosal immune system to elicit serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgA in mice. Furthermore, the expression of cytokines such as IL-4, IL-6, and IFN-γ in splenocytes of mice was detected by real-time PCR after oral immunization. P23-specific immunocyte activation was also verified. These findings indicate that the live L. casei Zhang vector may be a new tool for the production of mucosal vaccines against cryptosporidiosis in animals. PMID:21336991

  16. Hydrologic and vegetative removal of Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii Surrogate microspheres in coastal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Jennifer N; Daniels, Miles E; Watson, Fred G; Oates, Stori C; Miller, Melissa A; Conrad, Patricia A; Shapiro, Karen; Hardin, Dane; Dominik, Clare; Melli, Ann; Jessup, David A; Miller, Woutrina A

    2013-03-01

    Constructed wetland systems are used to reduce pollutants and pathogens in wastewater effluent, but comparatively little is known about pathogen transport through natural wetland habitats. Fecal protozoans, including Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii, are waterborne pathogens of humans and animals, which are carried by surface waters from land-based sources into coastal waters. This study evaluated key factors of coastal wetlands for the reduction of protozoal parasites in surface waters using settling column and recirculating mesocosm tank experiments. Settling column experiments evaluated the effects of salinity, temperature, and water type ("pure" versus "environmental") on the vertical settling velocities of C. parvum, G. lamblia, and T. gondii surrogates, with salinity and water type found to significantly affect settling of the parasites. The mesocosm tank experiments evaluated the effects of salinity, flow rate, and vegetation parameters on parasite and surrogate counts, with increased salinity and the presence of vegetation found to be significant factors for removal of parasites in a unidirectional transport wetland system. Overall, this study highlights the importance of water type, salinity, and vegetation parameters for pathogen transport within wetland systems, with implications for wetland management, restoration efforts, and coastal water quality. PMID:23315738

  17. Deposition of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in porous media: a synthesis of attachment efficiencies measured under varying environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonjeong; Atwill, E Robert; Hou, Lingling; Packman, Aaron I; Harter, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    An extensive set of column experiments was performed with freshly harvested Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts to evaluate the effects of solution chemistry, surface coatings, interactions with other suspended particles, and pore fluid velocity on the fate and transport of this widely occurring waterborne pathogen in sandy porous media. We synthesized our data set with a comprehensive literature survey of similar experiments, to compute attachment (collision) efficiencies (α) used in colloid filtration theory (CFT) using three models for the single collector efficiency (η) across a wide range of experimental conditions. Most prior experiments have observed the transport of surface-treated, sterile C. parvum oocyst in porous media. Our column data confirm for freshly harvested oocysts that the presence of iron coatings on the sand medium and the presence of suspended illite clay drastically enhance oocyst deposition. Increasing ionic strength and decreasing pH also systematically enhance the attachment efficiency. Attachment efficiency decreases only at a very high ionic strength, most likely as a result of steric repulsion and possibly other changes in oocyst surface properties. Attachment efficiencies vary with fluid flow rate but without showing specific trends. We found that the computed attachment efficiency across all reported experiments could be reliably estimated using a regression model based on parameters related to ionic strength and pH. The regression model performed better with the Nelson-Ginn η model and Tufenkji-Elimelech η model than with the Rajagopalan-Tien η model. When CFT is used in environmental assessments, the proposed regression model provides a practical estimator for attachment efficiencies of C. parvum oocyst deposition in porous media for a variety of environmental conditions unfavorable to attachment. PMID:22861686

  18. Binding mode of inhibitors and Cryptosporidium parvum IMP dehydrogenase: A combined ligand- and receptor-based study.

    PubMed

    Li, R-J; Wang, Y-L; Wang, Q-H; Huang, W-X; Wang, J; Cheng, M-S

    2015-01-01

    A combined ligand- and target-based approach was used to analyse the interaction models of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (CpIMPDH) with selective inhibitors. First, a ligand-based pharmacophore model was generated from 20 NAD(+) competitive CpIMPDH inhibitors with the HipHop module. The characteristic of the NAD(+) binding site of CpIMPDH was then described, and the binding modes of the representative inhibitors were studied by molecular docking. The combination of the pharmacophore model and the docking results allowed us to evaluate the pharmacophore features and structural information of the NAD(+) binding site of CpIMPDH. This research supports the proposal of an interaction model inside the NAD(+) binding site of CpIMPDH, consisting of four key interaction points: two hydrophobic-aromatic groups, a hydrophobic-aliphatic group and a hydrogen bond donor. This study also provides guidance for the design of more potent CpIMPDH inhibitors for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. PMID:25978645

  19. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding epitopes shared by 15- and 60-kilodalton proteins of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, M C; Fayer, R; Tilley, M; Upton, S J

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA (CP15/60) encoding epitopes of Cryptosporidium parvum 15- and 60-kDa sporozoite proteins was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli toward the goal of developing an immunogen for producing high-titer anticryptosporidial colostrum. Antisera prepared in rats to native C. parvum 15-kDa protein and used to identify the CP15/60 bacteriophage clone recognized both 15- and 60-kDa in vitro translation products derived from sporozoite RNA. Antisera specific for recombinant CP15/60 antigen recognized native 15- and 60-kDa C. parvum sporozoite proteins by immunoblotting and identified both surface and internal antigens on C. parvum sporozoites by immunofluorescence staining. Northern (RNA) and Southern blot hybridization experiments using sporozoite RNA and DNA indicated that CP15/60 DNA is transcribed as a single 1.4-kb RNA species from a single-copy gene. Recombinant CP15/60 antigen was recognized by hyperimmune colostrum from cows immunized with C. parvum oocyst-sporozoite protein and by convalescent-phase sera from C. parvum-infected calves. Images PMID:7684726

  20. Bioaccumulation and elimination of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in experimentally exposed Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) held in static tank aquaria.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jessica E; McClure, J T; McClure, Carol; Spears, Jonathan; Davidson, Jeff; Greenwood, Spencer J

    2014-03-01

    A variety of human enteropathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites, have been shown to bioaccumulate in suspension-feeding bivalve shellfish. Cryptosporidium parvum is a zoonotic protozoan parasite that has been detected in many shellfish species within both fecally contaminated and clean oyster growing areas across the globe. For this study, C. parvum oocysts (1000 and 10,000) were spiked into 10 L of water in static tank systems housing Crassostrea virginica. Oysters were either held in the contaminated aquaria for 7 days of exposure or were exposed for 24h and subsequently placed in a clean static tank system for the remainder of the trial. Individual oysters, fecal material, and tank water were analyzed for oocysts up to 7 days post-exposure via direct immunofluorescence. Oysters held under chronic exposure conditions gradually accumulated oocysts (1.5 or 34.4 oocysts/oyster/day for low or high dose exposure groups, respectively) between days 1 and 7, with an exponential uptake in oocysts observed within the first 24h post-exposure (mean uptake of 29.6 or 241.9 oocysts/oyster, respectively). Oysters that were transferred to clean water after 24h were capable of slowly depurating oocysts, following a linear trend. During chronic exposure trials 48-49% of the total spiked inoculum was recovered from oyster tissue, whereas 4.8-5.9% and 38-40% was recovered from tank water and from fecal material at day 7, respectively. In acute exposure trials, 30-31% of the total tank inoculum was found in oysters, suggesting that chronically exposed oysters were likely re-filtering some oocysts. Examinations of oyster fecal material from acute exposures revealed that 72-82% of oocysts recovered were already excreted at the time of oyster transfer (day 1), with only 18-28% being excreted during the static depuration phase. These data support that although most C. parvum oocysts are removed by C. virginica oysters within 24h, elimination after this point occurs slowly

  1. Pilot-Scale Pulsed UV Light Irradiation of Experimentally Infected Raspberries Suppresses Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Immunocompetent Suckling Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, L; Hubert, B; Favennec, L; Villena, I; Ballet, J J; Agoulon, A; Orange, N; Gargala, G

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., a significant cause of foodborne infection, have been shown to be resistant to most chemical food disinfectant agents and infective for weeks in irrigation waters and stored fresh vegetal produce. Pulsed UV light (PL) has the potential to inactivate Cryptosporidium spp. on surfaces of raw or minimally processed foods or both. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PL on viability and in vivo infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts present on raspberries, a known source of transmission to humans of oocyst-forming apicomplexan pathogens. The skin of each of 20 raspberries was experimentally inoculated with five 10-μl spots of an oocyst suspension containing 6 × 10(7) oocysts per ml (Nouzilly isolate). Raspberries were irradiated by PL flashes (4 J/cm(2) of total fluence). This dose did not affect colorimetric or organoleptic characteristics of fruits. After immunomagnetic separation from raspberries, oocysts were bleached and administered orally to neonatal suckling mice. Seven days after infection, mice were euthanized, and the number of oocysts in the entire small intestine was individually assessed by immunofluorescence flow cytometry. Three of 12 and 12 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10 and 100 oocysts isolated from nonirradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Four of 12 and 2 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Oocyst counts were lower in animals inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries (92 ± 144 and 38 ± 82, respectively) than in animals infected with 100 oocysts from nonirradiated raspberries (35,785 ± 66,221, P = 0.008). PL irradiation achieved oocyst reductions of 2 and 3 log for an inoculum of 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts, respectively. The present pilot-scale evaluation suggests that PL is an effective mode of decontamination for raspberries and prompts further applicability

  2. NF-kappaB-mediated expression of iNOS promotes epithelial defense against infection by Cryptosporidium parvum in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Chiang, Sophia; Allen, Jessica; Armstrong, Martha U; Stauffer, Stephen H; Finnegan, Colleen; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Cryptosporidium sp. parasitizes intestinal epithelium, resulting in enterocyte loss, villous atrophy, and malabsorptive diarrhea. We have shown that mucosal expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) is increased in infected piglets and that inhibition of iNOS in vitro has no short-term effect on barrier function. NO exerts inhibitory effects on a variety of pathogens; nevertheless, the specific sites of iNOS expression, pathways of iNOS induction, and mechanism of NO action in cryptosporidiosis remain unclear. Using an in vivo model of Cryptosporidium parvum infection, we have examined the location, mechanism of induction, specificity, and consequence of iNOS expression in neonatal piglets. In acute C. parvum infection, iNOS expression predominated in the villous epithelium, was NF-kappaB dependent, and was not restricted to infected enterocytes. Ongoing treatment of infected piglets with a selective iNOS inhibitor resulted in significant increases in villous epithelial parasitism and oocyst excretion but was not detrimental to maintenance of mucosal barrier function. Intensified parasitism could not be attributed to attenuated fluid loss or changes in epithelial proliferation or replacement rate, inasmuch as iNOS inhibition did not alter severity of diarrhea, piglet hydration, Cl- secretion, or kinetics of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled enterocytes. These findings suggest that induction of iNOS represents a nonspecific response of the epithelium that mediates enterocyte defense against C. parvum infection. iNOS did not contribute to the pathogenic sequelae of C. parvum infection. PMID:16123198

  3. Elongation Factor-1α Is a Novel Protein Associated with Host Cell Invasion and a Potential Protective Antigen of Cryptosporidium parvum *

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Makoto; Teramoto-Kimata, Isao; Uni, Shigehiko; Lillehoj, Hyun S.; Matsuda, Haruo; Furuya, Masaru; Tani, Hiroyuki; Sasai, Kazumi

    2013-01-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa comprises obligate intracellular parasites that infect vertebrates. All invasive forms of Apicomplexa possess an apical complex, a unique assembly of organelles localized to the anterior end of the cell and involved in host cell invasion. Previously, we generated a chicken monoclonal antibody (mAb), 6D-12-G10, with specificity for an antigen located in the apical cytoskeleton of Eimeria acervulina sporozoites. This antigen was highly conserved among Apicomplexan parasites, including other Eimeria spp., Toxoplasma, Neospora, and Cryptosporidium. In the present study, we identified the apical cytoskeletal antigen of Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) and further characterized this antigen in C. parvum to assess its potential as a target molecule against cryptosporidiosis. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated that the reactivity of 6D-12-G10 with C. parvum sporozoites was similar to those of anti-β- and anti-γ-tubulins antibodies. Immunoelectron microscopy with the 6D-12-G10 mAb detected the antigen both on the sporozoite surface and underneath the inner membrane at the apical region of zoites. The 6D-12-G10 mAb significantly inhibited in vitro host cell invasion by C. parvum. MALDI-TOF/MS and LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides revealed that the mAb 6D-12-G10 target antigen was elongation factor-1α (EF-1α). These results indicate that C. parvum EF-1α plays an essential role in mediating host cell entry by the parasite and, as such, could be a candidate vaccine antigen against cryptosporidiosis. PMID:24085304

  4. BLIND TRIALS EVALUATING IN VITRO INFECTIVITY OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS USING CELL CULTURE IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An optimized cell culture-immunofluorescence (IFA) procedure, using the HCT-8 cell line, was evaluated in 'blind' trials to determine the sensitivity and reproducibility for measuring infectivity of flow cytometry prepared inocula of C. parvum oocysts. In separate trials, suspens...

  5. A Cellular Micro-RNA, let-7i, Regulates Toll-like Receptor 4 Expression and Contributes to Cholangiocyte Immune Responses against Cryptosporidium parvum Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xian-Ming; Splinter, Patrick L.; O'Hara, Steven P.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important pathogen recognition molecules and are key to epithelial immune responses to microbial infection. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate TLR expression in epithelia are obscure. Micro-RNAs play important roles in a wide range of biological events through post-transcriptional suppression of target mRNAs. Here we report that human biliary epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) express let-7 family members, micro-RNAs with complementarity to TLR4 mRNA. We found that let-7 regulates TLR4 expression via post-transcriptional suppression in cultured human cholangiocytes. Infection of cultured human cholangiocytes with Cryptosporidium parvum, a parasite that causes intestinal and biliary disease, results in decreased expression of primary let-7i and mature let-7 in a MyD88/NF-κB-dependent manner. The decreased let-7 expression is associated with C. parvum-induced up-regulation of TLR4 in infected cells. Moreover, experimentally induced suppression or forced expression of let-7i causes reciprocal alterations in C. parvum-induced TLR4 protein expression, and consequently, infection dynamics of C. parvum in vitro. These results indicate that let-7i regulates TLR4 expression in cholangiocytes and contributes to epithelial immune responses against C. parvum infection. Furthermore, the data raise the possibility that micro-RNA-mediated post-transcriptional pathways may be critical to host-cell regulatory responses to microbial infection in general. PMID:17660297

  6. MicroRNA-98 and let-7 Regulate Expression of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling-4 in Biliary Epithelial Cells in Response to Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoku; Zhou, Rui; Liu, Jun; Gong, Ai-Yu; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the cytokine-inducible Src homology 2 protein (CIS) and suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins (SOCS) represents an important element of host cell reactions in response to pathogen infection. We previously demonstrated that Cryptosporidium parvum infection downregulates miR-98 and let-7 to induce CIS expression in biliary epithelial cells. We reported here that downregulation of miR-98 and let-7 also coordinates epithelial expression of SOCS4 following C. parvum infection. Targeting of SOCS4 3'-untranslated region by miR-98 or let-7 resulted in translational repression. Functional manipulation of miR-98 caused reciprocal alterations in SOCS4 protein expression. Transfection of miR-98 precursor abolished C. parvum-stimulated SOCS4 upregulation. Moreover, expression of SOCS4 in epithelial cells showed an inhibitory effect on phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins induced by C. parvum. These data suggest an important role for miRNAs in the coordinated regulation of CIS/SOCS expression in epithelial cells in response to C. parvum infection. PMID:20486857

  7. Evaluation of the Triage Micro Parasite Panel for Detection of Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, and Cryptosporidium parvum in Patient Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Susan E.; Suarez, Clarisa A.; Duran, Yolanda; Poppiti, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A study comparing the Triage Micro Parasite Panel (Biosite Diagnostics, Inc., San Diego, Calif.) to conventional O&P examination (O&P) was performed using patient fecal specimens. Five hundred twenty-three stool samples were compared. Nineteen specimens were found to be positive by Triage, and 29 were found to be positive by O&P. Seven specimens were positive for Giardia lamblia, four were positive for Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, and three were positive for Cryptosporidium parvum as determined by both methods. There was one false positive by Triage (C. parvum) and four false negatives by O&P (two G. lamblia, one E. histolytica/E. dispar, and one C. parvum). The Triage test accurately detected all 18 specimens that contained one of the three organisms that it was designed to detect. The Triage test is a rapid, easy-to-use enzyme immunoassay for the detection of G. lamblia, E. histolytica/E. dispar, and C. parvum in fresh or fresh-frozen fecal specimens. These data suggest that the Triage test can be used as a screen for the immediate testing of stool specimens for these three pathogenic parasites. If Triage test results are negative, O&P can be performed if parasitic infections other than G. lamblia, E. histolytica/E. dispar, or C. parvum are suspected. PMID:11136793

  8. Inhibition of Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 (CDPK1) In Vitro by Pyrazolopyrimidine Derivatives Does Not Correlate with Sensitivity of Cryptosporidium parvum Growth in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B.; Rutaganira, Florentine U.; Long, Shaojun; Tang, Keliang; Shokat, Kevan M.; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a serious diarrheal disease in immunocompromised patients and malnourished children, and treatment is complicated by a lack of adequate drugs. Recent studies suggest that the natural occurrence of a small gatekeeper residue in serine threonine calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1) of Cryptosporidium parvum might be exploited to target this enzyme and block parasite growth. Here were explored the potency with which a series of pyrazolopyrimidine analogs, which are selective for small gatekeeper kinases, inhibit C. parvum CDPK1 and block C. parvum growth in tissue culture in vitro. Although these compounds potently inhibited kinase activity in vitro, most had no effect on parasite growth. Moreover, among those that were active against parasite growth, there was a very poor correlation with their 50% inhibitory concentrations against the enzyme. Active compounds also had no effect on cell invasion, unlike the situation in Toxoplasma gondii, where these compounds block CDPK1, prevent microneme secretion, and disrupt cell invasion. These findings suggest that CPDK1 is not essential for C. parvum host cell invasion or growth and therefore that it is not the optimal target for therapeutic intervention. Nonetheless, several inhibitors with low micromolar 50% effective concentrations were identified, and these may affect other essential targets in C. parvum that are worthy of further exploration. PMID:26552986

  9. Point-of-Use Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum from Water: Independent Effects of Disinfection by Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Ions and by Physical Filtration in Ceramic Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Lydia S; Su, Yi-Hsuan; Guerrant, Richard L; Swami, Nathan S; Smith, James A

    2015-11-01

    Ceramic water filters (CWFs) impregnated with silver nanoparticles are a means of household-level water treatment. CWFs remove/deactivate microbial pathogens by employing two mechanisms: metallic disinfection and physical filtration. Herein we report on the independent effects of silver salt and nanoparticles on Cryptosporidium parvum and the removal of C. parvum by physical filtration in porous ceramic filter media. Using a murine (mouse) model, we observed that treatment of oocysts with silver nitrate and proteinate-capped silver nanoparticles resulted in decreased infection relative to untreated oocysts. Microscopy and excystation experiments were conducted to support the disinfection investigation. Heat and proteinate-capped silver-nanoparticle treatment of oocysts resulted in morphological modifications and decreased excystation rates of sporozoites. Subsequently, disk-shaped ceramic filters were produced to investigate the transport of C. parvum. Two factors were varied: sawdust size and clay-to-sawdust ratio. Five disks were prepared with combinations of 10, 16, and 20 mesh sawdust and sawdust percentage that ranged from 9 to 11%. C. parvum removal efficiencies ranged from 1.5 log (96.4%) to 2.1 log (99.2%). The 16-mesh/10% sawdust had the greatest mean reduction of 2.1-log (99.2%), though there was no statistically significant difference in removal efficiency. Based on our findings, physical filtration and silver nanoparticle disinfection likely contribute to treatment of C. parvum for silver impregnated ceramic water filters, although the contribution of physical filtration is likely greater than silver disinfection. PMID:26398590

  10. Cholangiocyte Myosin IIB Is Required for Localized Aggregation of Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 1 to Sites of Cryptosporidium parvum Cellular Invasion and Facilitates Parasite Internalization ▿

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Steven P.; Gajdos, Gabriella B.; Trussoni, Christy E.; Splinter, Patrick L.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2010-01-01

    Internalization of the obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, results in the formation of a unique intramembranous yet extracytoplasmic niche on the apical surfaces of host epithelial cells, a process that depends on host cell membrane extension. We previously demonstrated that efficient C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) requires host cell actin polymerization and localized membrane translocation/insertion of Na+/glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) and of aquaporin 1 (Aqp1), a water channel, at the attachment site. The resultant localized water influx facilitates parasite cellular invasion by promoting host-cell membrane protrusion. However, the molecular mechanisms by which C. parvum induces membrane translocation/insertion of SGLT1/Aqp1 are obscure. We report here that cultured human cholangiocytes express several nonmuscle myosins, including myosins IIA and IIB. Moreover, C. parvum infection of cultured cholangiocytes results in the localized selective aggregation of myosin IIB but not myosin IIA at the region of parasite attachment, as assessed by dual-label immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Concordantly, treatment of cells with the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML-7 or the myosin II-specific inhibitor blebbistatin or selective RNA-mediated repression of myosin IIB significantly inhibits (P < 0.05) C. parvum cellular invasion (by 60 to 80%). Furthermore ML-7 and blebbistatin significantly decrease (P < 0.02) C. parvum-induced accumulation of SGLT1 at infection sites (by approximately 80%). Thus, localized actomyosin-dependent membrane translocation of transporters/channels initiated by C. parvum is essential for membrane extension and parasite internalization, a phenomenon that may also be relevant to the mechanisms of cell membrane protrusion in general. PMID:20457792

  11. Evaluating the transport of bacillus spores as a potential surrogate for Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USEPA has recommended the use of aerobic spores as an indicator for Cryptosporidium oocysts when determining groundwater under the direct influence of surface water. Surface properties, interaction energies, transport, retention, and release behavior of B. subtilis spores were measured over a r...

  12. Cryptosporidium parvum pig genotype II diagnosed in pigs from the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs may represent a source of Cryptosporidium sp. infection to humans. The objective of this study was to identify the species present in pigs from the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and verify what risks pigs represent in transmission of human cryptosporidiosis, since there is no such informati...

  13. Infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts after storage of experimentally contaminated apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation water has been associated with contamination of fresh fruits and vegetables with pathogenic microorganisms infectious for humans. The objective of the present study was to experimentally determine if apples contaminated with waterborne oocysts of Cryptosporidium might represent a food saf...

  14. Effects of Enterococcus faecalis CECT 7121 on Cryptosporidium parvum infection in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium is an opportunistic protozoan parasite of humans and animals worldwide, causes diarrheal disease that is typically self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts but often life-threatening to immunocompromised individuals. However, there is a lack of completely efficient therapy available. P...

  15. Influence of temperature on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst infectivity in river water samples as detected by tissue culture assay.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Nicholas J; Weir, Susan C; Carreno, Ramon A; Trevors, Jack T; Lee, Hung

    2002-06-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were stored in 1-ml aliquots of filtered river water at -20, 4, 10, and 21-23 C in the dark. Oocysts were also added to filter-sterilized river water samples and stored at 21-23 C. The infectivity of oocysts stored under different conditions was assayed at weekly intervals through infection of human adenocarcinoma ileocecal (HCT-8) cell monolayers. Wells containing between 10 and 100 foci of infection were enumerated by immunofluorescent microscopy, and the number of infective oocysts was calculated. No infectious oocysts were detected after 1 wk at -20 C. The number of infective oocysts stored at 4 C decreased 5-fold, and the number of those stored at 10 C decreased 2.5-fold after 14 wk. The infectivity of oocysts stored in potassium dichromate (positive control) at 4 C decreased 2-fold over 14 wk. The number of infective oocysts in filter-sterilized and non-filter-sterilized river water stored at 21-23 C decreased by 3.3 and 2.6 log units, respectively, over 12 wk, and no foci of infection were detected at 14 wk. The results show that as temperature increased from 4 to 23 C, the duration of oocyst infectivity decreased. PMID:12099446

  16. Functional characterization of a fatty acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) from the apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Bin; Cai, Xiaomin; Zhu, Guan

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY We have identified and conducted functional analysis of a fatty acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) gene from the opportunistic protist Cryptosporidium parvum. The CpACBP1 gene encodes a protein of 268 aa that is 3X larger than the typical ACBP proteins (i.e., ∼90 aa) of humans and animals. Sequence analysis indicated that CpACBP1 consists of an N-terminal ACBP domain (∼90 aa) and a C-terminal ankrin repeat sequence (∼170 aa). The entire CpACBP1 ORF was engineered into a maltose-binding protein fusion system and expressed as a recombinant protein for functional analysis. Acyl CoA-binding assays clearly revealed that the preferred binding substrate for CpACBP1 was palmitoyl-CoA. RT-PCR, Western blotting and immuno-labeling analyses clearly showed that the CpACBP1 gene was mainly expressed in the intracellular developmental stages and the level increases during the parasite development. Immunofluorescence microscopy shows that CpACBP1 is associated with the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), which implies that this protein may be involved in the lipid remodeling in the PVM or the transport of fatty acids across the membrane. PMID:16849800

  17. Bobel-24 Activity against Cryptosporidium parvum in Cell Culture and in a SCID Mouse Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Cristina; Fenoy, Soledad; Simón, Fernando; del Aguila, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    The anticryptosporidial activity of Bobel-24 (2,4,6-triiodophenol) was studied for the first time, resulting in a reduction of the in vitro growth of Cryptosporidium of up to 99.6%. In a SCID mouse model of chronic cryptosporidiosis, significant differences (P < 0.05) in oocyst shedding were observed in animals treated with 125 mg/kg/day. These results merit further investigation of Bobel-24 as a chemotherapeutic option for cryptosporidiosis. PMID:18160525

  18. NADPH oxidase, MPO, NE, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and Ca2+ influx are essential for Cryptosporidium parvum-induced NET formation.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Caro, Tamara; Lendner, Matthias; Daugschies, Arwid; Hermosilla, Carlos; Taubert, Anja

    2015-10-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum causes a zoonotic infection with worldwide distribution. Besides humans, cryptosporidiosis affects a wide range of animals leading to significant economic losses due to severe enteritis in neonatal livestock. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation has been demonstrated as an important host effector mechanism of PMN acting against several invading pathogens. In the present study, C. parvum-mediated NET formation was investigated in human and bovine PMN in vitro. We here demonstrate that C. parvum sporozoites indeed trigger NET formation in a time-dependent manner. Thereby, the classical characteristics of NETs were demonstrated by co-localization of extracellular DNA with histones, neutrophil elastase (NE) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). A significant reduction of NET formation was measured following treatments of PMN with NADPH oxidase-, NE- and MPO-inhibitors, confirming the key role of these enzymes in C. parvum-induced NETs. Additionally, sporozoite-triggered NETosis revealed as dependent on intracellular Ca(++) concentration and the ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK-mediated signaling pathway. Moreover, sporozoite-triggered NET formation led to significant parasite entrapment since 15% of the parasites were immobilized in NET structures. Consequently, PMN-pre-exposed sporozoites showed significantly reduced infectivity for epithelial host cells confirming the capability of NETs to prevent active parasite invasion. Besides NETs, we here show that C. parvum significantly up-regulated CXCL8, IL6, TNF-α and of GM-CSF gene transcription upon sporozoite confrontation, indicating a pivotal role of PMN not only in the bovine and human system but most probably in other final hosts for C. parvum. PMID:26026247

  19. Bovine antibody against Cryptosporidium parvum elicits a circumsporozoite precipitate-like reaction and has immunotherapeutic effect against persistent cryptosporidiosis in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, M W; Cama, V A; Leary, H L; Sterling, C R

    1994-01-01

    Control of cryptosporidiosis is currently hampered by the absence of drugs or vaccines proven consistently effective against Cryptosporidium parvum. On the basis of observations that anti-C. parvum antibody has therapeutic effect against cryptosporidiosis, cows were immunized with C. parvum to produce hyperimmune colostral antibody. An antibody-rich fraction was prepared and differentiated from control (nonhyperimmune) antibody by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescence assay, immunoelectron microscopy, and in vitro neutralizing titer against DEAE-cellulose-isolated C. parvum sporozoites. Oocyst, purified sporozoite, and merozoite antigens recognized by hyperimmune antibody were defined by Western blot (immunoblot). Hyperimmune antibody recognized antigens common to oocysts, sporozoites, and merozoites, as well as stage-specific antigens. Upon incubation with hyperimmune antibody, sporozoites underwent distinct morphologic changes characterized by progressive formation and eventual release of membranous sporozoite surface antigen-antibody complexes, similar to the malaria circumsporozoite precipitate reaction. The infectivity of sporozoites having undergone this reaction was neutralized. The reaction was minimal or absent on sporozoites incubated with control antibody. To determine therapeutic effect in vivo, persistent C. parvum infection was established in adult severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice by oral inoculation with 10(7) oocysts. At 5 weeks postinfection, infected mice were treated for 10 days with hyperimmune or control antibody by inclusion in drinking water and daily gavage. Fecal oocyst shedding and infection scores in the gastrointestinal tract and gall bladder/common bile duct in hyperimmune antibody-treated mice were significantly lower than those in the control antibody-treated mice. Hyperimmune bovine antibody prepared against C. parvum may provide a first-generation therapy for control of cryptosporidiosis. Additionally

  20. Survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in the presence of hydrated lime.

    PubMed

    Zintl, A; Keogh, B; Ezzaty-Mirhashemi, M; De Waal, T; Scholz, D; Mulcahy, G

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the effects of hydrated lime on the survival of Cryptosporidium oocysts, the percentage viability of oocysts was assessed using fluorescent in situ hybridisation. In the absence of lime and with lime at a concentration of 1 per cent, there was a gradual decline in oocyst viability during the 10-day trial. Although the addition of 5 or 10 per cent lime caused the total number of oocysts to decrease, there appeared to be an increase in the proportion of potentially viable oocysts. PMID:20208077

  1. Intra-Species Diversity and Panmictic Structure of Cryptosporidium parvum Populations in Cattle Farms in Northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ramo, Ana; Quílez, Joaquín; Monteagudo, Luis; Del Cacho, Emilio; Sánchez-Acedo, Caridad

    2016-01-01

    The intra-herd and intra-host genetic variability of 123 Cryptosporidium parvum isolates was investigated using a multilocus fragment typing approach with eleven variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci and the GP60 gene. Isolates were collected from intensively farmed diarrheic pre-weaned calves originating from 31 dairy farms in three adjoining regions in northern Spain (País Vasco, Cantabria and Asturias). The multilocus tool demonstrated an acceptable typeability, with 104/123 samples amplifying at all twelve loci. The ML2, TP14, GP60 and the previously un-described minisatellite at locus cgd2_3850 were the most discriminatory markers, while others may be dismissed as monomorphic (MSB) or less informative (CP47, ML1 and the novel minisatellites at loci Cgd1_3670 and Cgd6_3940). The 12-satellite typing tool provided a Hunter-Gaston index (HGDI) of 0.987 (95% CI, 0.982–0.992), and differentiated a total of 70 multilocus subtypes (MLTs). The inclusion of only the four most discriminatory markers dramatically reduced the number of MLTs (n: 44) but hardly reduced the HGDI value. A total of 54 MLTs were distinctive for individual farms, indicating that cryptosporidiosis is an endemic condition on most cattle farms. However, a high rate of mixed infections was detected, suggesting frequent meiotic recombination. Namely, multiple MLTs were seen in most farms where several specimens were analyzed (90.5%), with up to 9 MLTs being found on one farm, and individual specimens with mixed populations being reported on 11/29 farms. Bayesian Structure analysis showed that over 35% of isolates had mixed ancestry and analysis of evolutionary descent using the eBURST algorithm detected a high rate (21.4%) of MLTs appearing as singletons, indicating a high degree of genetic divergence. Linkage analysis found evidence of linkage equilibrium and an overall panmictic structure within the C. parvum population in this discrete geographical area. PMID:26848837

  2. A fast method for detecting Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in real world samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Shona; McClelland, Lindy; Maier, John

    2005-04-01

    Contamination of drinking water with pathogenic microorganisms such as Cryptosporidium has become an increasing concern in recent years. Cryptosporidium oocysts are particularly problematic, as infections caused by this organism can be life threatening in immunocompromised patients. Current methods for monitoring and analyzing water are often laborious and require experts to conduct. In addition, many of the techniques require very specific reagents to be employed. These factors add considerable cost and time to the analytical process. Raman spectroscopy provides specific molecular information on samples, and offers advantages of speed, sensitivity and low cost over current methods of water monitoring. Raman spectroscopy is an optical method that has demonstrated the capability to identify and differentiate microorganisms at the species and strain levels. In addition, this technique has exhibited sensitivities down to the single organism detection limit. We have employed Raman spectroscopy and Raman Chemical Imaging, in conjunction with chemometric techniques, to detect small numbers of oocysts in the presence of interferents derived from real-world water samples. Our investigations have also indicated that Raman Chemical Imaging may provide chemical and physiological information about an oocyst sample which complements information provided by the traditional methods. This work provides evidence that Raman imaging is a useful technique for consideration in the water quality industry.

  3. Commercial Assay for Detection of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum Antigens in Human Fecal Specimens by Rapid Solid-Phase Qualitative Immunochromatography

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Lynne S.; Shimizu, Robyn Y.; Novak, Susan; Carroll, Marilyn; Chan, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The ImmunoCard STAT! Cryptosporidium/Giardia rapid assay (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) is a solid-phase qualitative immunochromatographic assay that detects and distinguishes between Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum in aqueous extracts of human fecal specimens (fresh, frozen, unfixed, or fixed in 5 or 10% formalin or sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin). By using specific antibodies, antigens specific for these organisms are isolated and immobilized on a substrate. After the addition of appropriate reagents, a positive test is detected visually by the presence of a gray-black color bar (regardless of the intensity) next to the organism name printed on the test device. A control is included in the device. Steps include tube preparation (buffer, patient specimen, conjugates A and B), testing (addition of sample onto the test device), and visual reading (total time, 12 min). Test performance was evaluated with known positive and negative stool specimens (170 specimens positive for Giardia and 231 specimens negative for Giardia) (85 specimens positive for Cryptosporidium and 316 specimens negative for Cryptosporidium); they were tested with trichrome, iron-hematoxylin, or modified acid-fast stains or the Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Giardia/Cryptosporidium Merifluor combination reagent; specimens with discrepant results were retested by using the Merifluor combination reagent. On the basis of the results of the reference methods, the sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values were as follows: for G. lamblia, 93.5, 100, 100, and 95.5%, respectively; for C. parvum, 98.8, 100, 100, and 99.7%, respectively. False-negative results for G. lamblia were obtained with specimens with low parasite numbers (n = 7) or specimens containing trophozoites only (n = 3); one specimen with a false-negative result contained numerous cysts. The one specimen false negative for C. parvum was confirmed to be positive by immunofluorescence. No cross

  4. Role of collector alternating charged patches on transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst in a patchwise charged heterogeneous micromodel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Changyong; Hu, Dehong; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B.; Mylon, Steven E.; Kong, Rong; Bhargava, Rohit; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-02-04

    The role of collector surface charge heterogeneity on transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst and carboxylate microsphere in 2-dimensional micromodels was studied. The cylindrical silica collectors within the micromodels were coated with 0, 10, 20, 50 and 100% Fe2O3 patches. The experimental values of average single collector removal efficiencies (η) of the Fe2O3 patches and on the entire collectors were determined. In the presence of significant (>3500 kT) Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) energy barrier between the microspheres and the silica collectors at pH 5.8 and 8.1, the values of η determined for Fe2O3 patches were significantly less (p < 0.05, t-test) than that obtained for collectors coated entirely with Fe2O3. However, η on Fe2O3 patches for microspheres at pH 4.4 and for oocysts at pH 5.8 and 8.1, where the DLVO energy barrier was relatively small (ca. 200-360 kT), were significantly greater (p < 0.05, t-test) than that on the collectors coated entirely with Fe2O3. The dependence of η determined for Fe2O3 patches on the DLVO energy barrier indicated the importance of periodic favorable and unfavorable electrostatic interactions between colloids and collectors with alternating Fe2O3 and silica patches. Differences between experimentally determined η and that predicted by a patchwise geochemical heterogeneous model was observed, but can be explained by the model’s lack of consideration for the spatial distribution of charge heterogeneity on the collector surface and colloid migration on patchwise heterogeneous collectors.

  5. Aging of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in river water and their susceptibility to disinfection by chlorine and monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Chauret, C; Nolan, K; Chen, P; Springthorpe, S; Sattar, S

    1998-12-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were aged in waters from both the St. Lawrence River and the Ottawa River. In situ survival experiments were carried out by incubating the oocysts in either dialysis cassettes or microtubes floated into an overflow tank. A significant portion of the oocysts survived in the test waters for several weeks. Oocyst survival in the St. Lawrence River was better in membrane-filtered (0.2 microm-pore diameter) water than in unfiltered water, suggesting that biological antagonism may play a role in the environmental fate of the parasite. Oocysts aged in river waters under in situ conditions and control oocysts kept refrigerated in synthetic water (100 ppm as CaCO3); pH 7.0) were subjected to the same disinfection protocol. Aged oocysts were at least as resistant as, if not more resistant than, the control oocysts to disinfection. This indicates that the oocysts surviving in the water environment may be just as difficult to inactivate by potable water disinfection as freshly shed oocysts. Therefore, water treatment should not be based on the assumption that environmental oocysts may be more easily inactivated than freshly shed oocysts. First-order kinetics die-off rates varied from one river to another (from 0.013 to 0.039 log(10).day(-1)) and from one experiment to another with water from the same river collected at different times. Calculation of the die-off rates based on either in vitro excystation or in vitro excystation in combination with total counts (overall die-off rates) showed that the assessment of oocyst viability by microscopic methods must account for the total oocyst loss observed during long-term inactivation assays of river waters. PMID:10383227

  6. Detection of Viable Cryptosporidium parvum in Soil by Reverse Transcription–Real-Time PCR Targeting hsp70 mRNA ▿

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhanbei; Keeley, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of high-quality mRNA from Cryptosporidium parvum is a key step in PCR detection of viable oocysts in environmental samples. Current methods for monitoring oocysts are limited to water samples; therefore, the goal of this study was to develop a rapid and sensitive procedure for Cryptosporidium detection in soil samples. The efficiencies of five RNA extraction methods were compared (mRNA extraction with the Dynabeads mRNA Direct kit after chemical and physical sample treatments, and total RNA extraction methods using the FastRNA Pro Soil-Direct, PowerSoil Total RNA, E.Z.N.A. soil RNA, and Norgen soil RNA purification kits) for the direct detection of Cryptosporidium with oocyst-spiked sandy, loamy, and clay soils by using TaqMan reverse transcription-PCR. The study also evaluated the presence of inhibitors by synthesis and incorporation of an internal positive control (IPC) RNA into reverse transcription amplifications, used different facilitators (bovine serum albumin, yeast RNA, salmon DNA, skim milk powder, casein, polyvinylpyrrolidone, sodium hexametaphosphate, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi) to mitigate RNA binding on soil components, and applied various treatments (β-mercaptoethanol and bead beating) to inactivate RNase and ensure the complete lysis of oocysts. The results of spiking studies showed that Salmonella cells most efficiently relieved binding of RNA. With the inclusion of Salmonella during extraction, the most efficient mRNA method was Dynabeads, with a detection limit of 6 × 102 oocysts g−1 of sandy soil. The most efficient total RNA method was PowerSoil, with detection limits of 1.5 × 102, 1.5 × 103, and 1.5 × 104 C. parvum oocysts g−1 soil for sandy, loamy, and clay samples, respectively. PMID:21803904

  7. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia among Young Children with and without Diarrhea in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Tellevik, Marit G.; Moyo, Sabrina J.; Blomberg, Bjørn; Hjøllo, Torunn; Maselle, Samuel Y.; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Background Although enteroparasites are common causes of diarrheal illness, few studies have been performed among children in Tanzania. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia among young children in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and identify risk factors for infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed an unmatched case-control study among children < 2 years of age in Dar es Salaam, recruited from August 2010 to July 2011. Detection and identification of protozoans were done by PCR techniques on DNA from stool specimens from 701 cases of children admitted due to diarrhea at the three study hospitals, and 558 controls of children with no history of diarrhea during the last month prior to enrollment. The prevalence of C. parvum/hominis was 10.4% (84.7% C. hominis), and that of G. lamblia 4.6%. E. histolytica was not detected. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium was significantly higher in cases (16.3%) than in controls (3.1%; P < 0.001; OR = 6.2; 95% CI: 3.7–10.4). G. lamblia was significantly more prevalent in controls (6.1%) than in cases (3.4%; P = 0.027; OR = 1.8; 95% CI: 1.1–3.1). Cryptosporidium infection was found more often in HIV-positive (24.2%) than in HIV-negative children (3.9%; P < 0.001; OR = 7.9; 95% CI: 3.1–20.5), and was also associated with rainfall (P < 0.001; OR = 2.41; 95% CI: 1.5–3.8). Among cases, stunted children had significantly higher risk of being infected with Cryptosporidium (P = 0.011; OR = 2.12; 95% CI: 1.2–3.8). G. lamblia infection was more prevalent in the cool season (P = 0.004; OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3–3.8), and more frequent among cases aged > 12 months (P = 0.003; OR = 3.5; 95% CI: 1.5–7.8). Among children aged 7–12 months, those who were breastfed had lower prevalence of G. lamblia infection than those who had been weaned (P = 0.012). Conclusions Cryptosporidium infection is common among young Tanzanian children with diarrhea

  8. GIS-based analysis of the fate of waste-related pathogens Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia and Escherichia coli in a tropical canal network.

    PubMed

    Diallo, Mamadou B C; Anceno, Alfredo J; Tawatsupa, Benjawan; Tripathi, Nitin K; Wangsuphachart, Voranuch; Shipin, Oleg V

    2009-03-01

    Urban canals play a major socio-economic role in many tropical countries and, particularly, Thailand. One of the overlooked functions that they perform is a significant attenuation of waste-related pathogens posing considerable health risk, as well as pollution attenuation in general. The study dealt with a comparison of three canals receiving: (i) municipal, (ii) mainly industrial and (iii) mainly agricultural wastewater, listed in order of progressively decreasing organic loading. The occurrence and fate of waterborne Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia and Escherichia coli were monitored in the canals by both real-time PCR and conventionally for 12 months. The pathogens are etiological agents of an estimated 38% and 47% of diarrhea cases worldwide and in Thailand, respectively. The geographic information system (GIS) was used to evaluate and map point and, particularly, non-point pollution sources which allowed differentiating the canal sections in terms of predominant pathogen sources. The flowthrough canals, which can be viewed as waste stabilization ponds, were found to be efficiently removing the pathogens at the following generalized specific rates: 0.3 (C. parvum), 1.2 (G. lamblia), 1.8 (E. coli) log10/km.d in the dry season. The rates decreased in the rainy season for E. coli and G. lamblia, but increased for C. parvum which indicated different removal mechanisms. Data suggest that E. coli and G. lamblia were mainly removed through sedimentation and sunlight (UV) irradiation, while the likely mechanism for C. parvum was predation. Overall, the specific pathogen removal rates positively correlated with the canal organic loading rates in the rainy season. As an important result, an estimate of the municipal pollution mitigation by over 2280 km canals in the Greater Bangkok suggests that concomitant to the pathogens at least 36-95 tons of BOD5 is being removed daily, thereby saving the receiving Chao Phraya River and Bight of Bangkok, by far exceeding

  9. Use of a Sentinel System for Field Measurements of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Inactivation in Soil and Animal Waste

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, M. B.; Walker, M. J.; Bowman, D. D.; Anthony, L. C.; Ghiorse, W. C.

    1999-01-01

    A small-volume sentinel chamber was developed to assess the effects of environmental stresses on survival of sucrose-Percoll-purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil and animal wastes. Chambers were tested for their ability to equilibrate with external chemical and moisture conditions. Sentinel oocysts were then exposed to stresses of the external environment that affected their viability (potential infectivity), as indicated by results of a dye permeability assay. Preliminary laboratory experiments indicated that temperatures between 35 and 50°C and decreases in soil water potential (−0.003 to −3.20 MPa) increased oocyst inactivation rates. The effects of two common animal waste management practices on oocyst survival were investigated on three dairy farms in Delaware County, N.Y., within the New York City watershed: (i) piling wastes from dairy youngstock (including neonatal calves) and (ii) spreading wastes as a soil amendment on an agricultural field. Sentinel containers filled with air-dried and sieved (2-mm mesh) youngstock waste or field soil were wetted and inoculated with 2 million oocysts in an aqueous suspension and then placed in waste piles on two different farms and in soil within a cropped field on one farm. Controls consisted of purified oocysts in either phosphate-buffered saline or distilled water contained in sealed microcentrifuge tubes. Two microdata loggers recorded the ambient temperature at each field site. Sentinel experiments were conducted during the fall and winter (1996 to 1997) and winter (1998). Sentinel containers and controls were removed at 2- to 4-week intervals, and oocysts were extracted and tested by the dye permeability assay. The proportions of potentially infective oocysts exposed to the soil and waste pile material decreased more rapidly than their counterpart controls exposed to buffer or water, indicating that factors other than temperature affected oocyst inactivation in the waste piles and soil. The effect

  10. Oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) arrests Cryptosporidium parvum growth in vitro and prevents lethal infection in interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Sonzogni-Desautels, Karine; Renteria, Axel E.; Camargo, Fabio V.; Di Lenardo, Thomas Z.; Mikhail, Alexandre; Arrowood, Michael J.; Fortin, Anny; Ndao, Momar

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a species of protozoa that causes cryptosporidiosis, an intestinal disease affecting many mammals including humans. Typically, in healthy individuals, cryptosporidiosis is a self-limiting disease. However, C. parvum can cause a severe and persistent infection that can be life-threatening for immunocompromised individuals, such as AIDS patients. As there are no available treatments for these patients that can cure the disease, there is an urgent need to identify treatment options. We tested the anti-parasitic activity of the alkylphosphocholine oleylphosphocholine (OlPC), an analog of miltefosine, against C. parvum in in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro experiments using C. parvum infected human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cells (HCT-8 cells) showed that OlPC has an EC50 of 18.84 nM. Moreover, no cell toxicity has been seen at concentrations ≤50 μM. C57BL/6 interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice, were infected by gavage with 4000 C. parvum oocysts on Day 0. Oral treatments, with OlPC, miltefosine, paromomycin or PBS, began on Day 3 post-infection for 10 days. Treatment with OlPC, at 40 mg/kg/day resulted in 100% survival, complete clearance of parasite in stools and a 99.9% parasite burden reduction in the intestines at Day 30. Doses of 30 and 20 mg/kg/day also demonstrated an increased survival rate and a dose-dependent parasite burden reduction. Mice treated with 10 mg/kg/day of miltefosine resulted in 50% survival at Day 30. In contrast, control mice, treated with PBS or 100 mg/kg/day of paromomycin, died or had to be euthanized between Days 6 and 13 due to severe illness. Results of parasite burden were obtained by qPCR and cross-validated by both flow cytometry of stool oocysts and histological sections of the ileum. Together, our results strongly support that OlPC represents a potential candidate for the treatment of C. parvum infections in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26441906

  11. Presence of Cryptosporidium scrofarum, C. suis and C. parvum subtypes IIaA16G2R1 and IIaA13G1R1 in Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    García-Presedo, Ignacio; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; González-Warleta, Marta; Mezo, Mercedes; Gómez-Bautista, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Castro-Hermida, José Antonio

    2013-09-23

    The aim of the present study was to identify the species of Cryptosporidium infecting Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Galicia (NW, Spain). A sampling of 209 wild boars shot in different game preserves was carried out during the hunting season in 2009-2010. All samples were examined for Cryptosporidium infection, using both immunological and molecular tools. Cryptosporidium oocysts in faecal samples were identified using a direct immunofluorescence technique with monoclonal antibodies (DFA). The presence of Cryptosporidium DNA was determined using nested PCR involving amplification of a fragment of the small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA). A total of 35 (16.7%) samples tested positive with both techniques. However, sequencing was only possible in 27 samples. Cryptosporidium scrofarum, Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were identified in 19, 5 and 3 of the samples, respectively. Moreover, C. scrofarum was detected as a dominant species infecting all age groups (juveniles, sub adults and adults). Sequence analyses of the glycoprotein (GP60) gene revealed the presence of C. parvum subtypes IIaA16G2R1 in 2 juveniles and IIaA13G1R1 in 1 sub adult wild boar. These species and subtypes have previously been described in human patients, indicating that isolates from asymptomatic wild boars might have zoonotic potential. This is the first report of the presence of C. scrofarum, C. suis and C. parvum subtypes IIaA16G2R1 and IIaA13G1R1 in wild boars (S. scrofa) in Spain. PMID:23643454

  12. First molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from bovines (Bos taurus and Bubalus bubalis) in Sri Lanka: unexpected absence of C. parvum from pre-weaned calves

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium and Giardia has important implications for investigating their epidemiology and underpins their control. We undertook the first molecular epidemiological survey of domestic bovids in selected regions of Sri Lanka to establish whether they excreted Cryptosporidium and/or Giardia with zoonotic potential. Methods Faecal samples were collected from dairy calves (n = 340; Bos taurus; < 3 months of age; weekly sampling for six weeks) and water buffaloes (n = 297; Bubalus bubalis; <6 months and ≥6 months of age; one sampling) from seven different farms in Sri Lanka. Genomic DNAs were extracted from individual faecal samples and then tested for the presence of parasite DNA using a PCR-based mutation scanning-targeted sequencing-phylogenetic approach, employing genetic markers within the small subunit of nuclear ribosomal RNA and 60 kDa glycoprotein genes (designated pSSU and pgp60, respectively) for Cryptosporidium, and within the triose phosphate isomerise (ptpi) gene for Giardia. Results Based on pSSU sequence data, C. bovis, C. ryanae and six new genotypes that were genetically similar but not identical to C. andersoni (n = 1), C. bovis (n = 1), C. ryanae (n = 3) and C. suis (n = 1) were recorded in cattle. For pSSU, two other, new genotypes were defined in water buffalo, which were genetically most similar to Cryptosporidium genotypes recorded previously in this host species in other countries including Australia. Consistent with the findings for pSSU, no species or genotypes of Cryptosporidium with zoonotic potential were detected using pgp60. Based on ptpi sequence data, G. duodenalis assemblages A and E were detected in four and 137 samples from cattle, respectively, and assemblage E in two samples from water buffaloes. Conclusions The present study showed that C. parvum, the most commonly reported zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium recognised in bovine calves globally, was not

  13. Leaching of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts, Escherichia coli, and a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Bacteriophage through Intact Soil Cores following Surface Application and Injection of Slurry▿

    PubMed Central

    Forslund, Anita; Markussen, Bo; Toenner-Klank, Lise; Bech, Tina B.; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Increasing amounts of livestock manure are being applied to agricultural soil, but it is unknown to what extent this may be associated with contamination of aquatic recipients and groundwater if microorganisms are transported through the soil under natural weather conditions. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate how injection and surface application of pig slurry on intact sandy clay loam soil cores influenced the leaching of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage 28B, Escherichia coli, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. All three microbial tracers were detected in the leachate on day 1, and the highest relative concentration was detected on the fourth day (0.1 pore volume). Although the concentration of the phage 28B declined over time, the phage was still found in leachate at day 148. C. parvum oocysts and chloride had an additional rise in the relative concentration at a 0.5 pore volume, corresponding to the exchange of the total pore volume. The leaching of E. coli was delayed compared with that of the added microbial tracers, indicating a stronger attachment to slurry particles, but E. coli could be detected up to 3 months. Significantly enhanced leaching of phage 28B and oocysts by the injection method was seen, whereas leaching of the indigenous E. coli was not affected by the application method. Preferential flow was the primary transport vehicle, and the diameter of the fractures in the intact soil cores facilitated transport of all sizes of microbial tracers under natural weather conditions. PMID:21948848

  14. Detection of Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, and Cryptosporidium parvum Antigens in Human Fecal Specimens Using the Triage Parasite Panel Enzyme Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Lynne S.; Shimizu, Robyn Y.; Bernard, Caroline N.

    2000-01-01

    The Triage parasite panel (BIOSITE Diagnostics, San Diego, Calif.) is a new qualitative enzyme immunoassay (EIA) panel for the detection of Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, and Cryptosporidium parvum in fresh or fresh, frozen, unfixed human fecal specimens. By using specific antibodies, antigens specific for these organisms are captured and immobilized on a membrane. Panel performance was evaluated with known positive and negative stool specimens (a total of 444 specimens) that were tested by the standard ova and parasite (O&P) examination as the “gold standard,” including staining with both trichrome and modified acid-fast stains. Specimens with discrepant results between the reference and Triage methods were retested by a different method, either EIA or immunofluorescence. A number of samples with discrepant results with the Triage device were confirmed to be true positives. After resolution of discrepant results, the number of positive specimens and the sensitivity and specificity results were as follows: for G. lamblia, 170, 95.9%, and 97.4%, respectively; for E. histolytica/E. dispar, 99, 96.0%, and 99.1%, respectively; and for C. parvum, 60, 98.3%, and 99.7%, respectively. There was no cross-reactivity with other parasites found in stool specimens, including eight different protozoa (128 challenges) and three different helminths (83 challenges). The ability to perform the complete O&P examination should remain an option for those patients with negative parasite panel results but who are still symptomatic. PMID:10970380

  15. THE EFFICACY OF THREE MEDICINAL PLANTS; GARLIC, GINGER AND MIRAZID AND A CHEMICAL DRUG METRONIDAZOLE AGAINST CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM: II-HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES.

    PubMed

    Abouel-Nour, Mohamed F; El-Shewehy, Dina Magdy M; Hamada, Shadia F; Morsy, Tosson A

    2016-04-01

    Cryptosporidiosis parvum is a zoonotic protozoan parasite infects intestinal epithelial cells of man and animals causing a major health problem. This study was oriented to evaluate the protective and curative capacity of garlic, ginger and mirazid in comparison with metronidazole drug (commercially known) against Cryptosporidium in experimental mice. Male Swiss Albino mice experimentally infected with C. parvum were treated with medicinal plants extracts (Ginger, Mirazid, and Garlic) as compared to chemical drug Metronidazole. Importantly, C. parvum-infected mice treated with ginger, Mirazid, garlic and metronidazole showed a complete elimination in shedding oocysts by 9th day PI. The reduction and elimination of shedding oocysts in response to the treatments might be attributable to a direct effect on parasite growth in intestines, sexual phases production and/or the formation of oocysts. The results were evaluated histopathological examination of ideum section of control mice (uninfected, untreated) displayed normal architecture of the villi. Examiination of infected mice ileum section (infected, untreated) displayed histopathological alterations from uninfected groups. Examination of ileum section prepared from mice treated with garlic, ginger, mirazid, and metronidazole displayed histopathological alterations from that of the control groups, and showed marked histologic correction in the pattern with the four regimes used in comparison to control mice. Garlic successfully eradicated oocysts of infected mice from stool and intestine. Supplementation of ginger to infected mice markedly corrected elevation in the inflammatory risk factors and implied its potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory capabilities. Infected mice treated with ginger, mirazid, garlic and metronidazole showed significant symptomatic improvements during treatment. PMID:27363055

  16. Two-year monitoring of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia occurrence in a recreational and drinking water reservoir using standard microscopic and molecular biology techniques.

    PubMed

    Helmi, Karim; Skraber, Sylvain; Burnet, Jean-Baptiste; Leblanc, Laurence; Hoffmann, Lucien; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2011-08-01

    Starting in 2006, a monitoring of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum occurrence was conducted for 2 years in the largest drinking water reservoir of Luxembourg (Esch-sur-Sûre reservoir) using microscopy and qPCR techniques. Parasite analyses were performed on water samples collected from three sites: site A located at the inlet of the reservoir, site B located 18 km downstream site A, at the inlet of the drinking water treatment plant near the dam of the reservoir and site C where the finished drinking water is injected in the distribution network. Results show that both parasites are present in the reservoir throughout the year with a higher occurrence of G. lamblia cysts compared to C. parvum oocysts. According to our results, only 25% of the samples positive by microscopy were confirmed by qPCR. (Oo)cyst concentrations were 10 to 100 times higher at site A compared to site B and they were positively correlated to the water turbidity and negatively correlated to the temperature. Highest (oo)cyst concentrations were observed in winter. In contrast, no relationship between the concentrations of (oo)cysts in the reservoir and rain events could be established. Though a correlation has been observed between both parasites and faecal indicators in the reservoir, some discrepancies highlight that the latter do not represent a reliable tool to predict the presence/absence of these pathogenic protozoa. In summer 2007, the maximal risk of parasite infection per exposure event for swimmers in the reservoir was estimated to be 0.0015% for C. parvum and 0.56% for G. lamblia. Finally, no (oo)cysts could be detected in large volumes of finished drinking water. PMID:20890786

  17. Structure of a CutA1 divalent-cation tolerance protein from Cryptosporidium parvum, the protozoal parasite responsible for cryptosporidiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Abendroth, Jan; Clitfon, Mathew C.; Zhang, Yanfeng; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Staker, Bart L.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Mylera, Peter J.

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites from the Cryptosporidium species. Infection is associated with mild to severe diarrhea that usually resolves spontaneously in healthy human adults, but may lead to severe complications in young children and in immunocompromised patients. The genome of Cryptosporidium parvum contains a gene, CUTA_CRYPI, that may play a role in regulating the intracellular concentration of copper, a toxic element if left unchecked. Here we report the crystal structure for this CutA1 protein, Cp-CutA1, is reported at 2.0 Å resolution (4E98). As observed for other CutA1 structures, the 117-residue protein is a trimer with a core ferrodoxin-like fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows little unfolding of Cp-CutA1 up to 353 K. This robustness is corroborated by ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectra at 333 K that is characteristic of a folded protein, suggesting NMR spectroscopy may be a useful tool to further probe the function of the CutA1 proteins. While robust, Cp-CutA1 is not as stable as the homologous protein from a hyperthermophile, perhaps due to a wide β-bulgein β2 that protrudes P48 and S49 outside the β-sheet.

  18. Structure of a CutA1 divalent-cation tolerance protein from Cryptosporidium parvum, the protozoal parasite responsible for cryptosporidiosis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Abendroth, Jan; Clitfon, Mathew C.; Zhang, Yanfeng; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Staker, Bart L.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Mylera, Peter J.

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites from the Cryptosporidium species. Infection is associated with mild to severe diarrhea that usually resolves spontaneously in healthy human adults, but may lead to severe complications in young children and in immunocompromised patients. The genome of Cryptosporidium parvum contains a gene, CUTA_CRYPI, that may play a role in regulating the intracellular concentration of copper, a toxic element if left unchecked. Here we report the crystal structure for this CutA1 protein, Cp-CutA1, is reported at 2.0 Å resolution (4E98). As observed for other CutA1 structures, the 117-residue protein is a trimer withmore » a core ferrodoxin-like fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows little unfolding of Cp-CutA1 up to 353 K. This robustness is corroborated by ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectra at 333 K that is characteristic of a folded protein, suggesting NMR spectroscopy may be a useful tool to further probe the function of the CutA1 proteins. While robust, Cp-CutA1 is not as stable as the homologous protein from a hyperthermophile, perhaps due to a wide β-bulgein β2 that protrudes P48 and S49 outside the β-sheet.« less

  19. Application of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR in assessing drug efficacy against the intracellular pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaomin; Woods, Keith M; Upton, Steve J; Zhu, Guan

    2005-11-01

    We report here on a quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay for assessing drug efficacy against the intracellular pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum. The qRT-PCR assay detects 18S rRNA transcripts from both parasites, that is, the cycle threshold for 18S rRNA from parasites (C(T)([P18S])) and host cells (C(T)([H18S])), and evaluates the relative expression between parasite and host rRNA levels (i.e., deltaC(T) = C(T)([P18S]) - C(T)([H18S])) to minimize experimental and operational errors. The choice of qRT-PCR over quantitative PCR (qPCR) in this study is based on the observations that (i) the relationship between the logarithm of infected parasites (log[P]) and the normalized relative level of rRNA (deltadeltaC(T)) is linear, with a fourfold dynamic range, by qRT-PCR but sigmoidal (nonlinear) by qPCR; and (ii) the level of RNA represents that of live parasites better than that of DNA, because the decay of RNA (99% in approximately 3 h) in dead parasites is faster than that of DNA (99% in approximately 24 to 48 h) under in vitro conditions. The reliability of the qRT-PCR method was validated by testing the efficacies of nitazoxanide and paromomycin on the development of two strains of C. parvum (IOWA and KSU-1) in HCT-8 cells in vitro. Both compounds displayed dose-dependent inhibitions. The observed MIC50 values for nitazoxanide and paromomycin were 0.30 to 0.45 micro/ml and 89.7 to 119.0 microg/ml, respectively, comparable to the values reported previously. Using the qRT-PCR assay, we have also observed that pyrazole could inhibit C. parvum development in vitro (MIC50 = 15.8 mM), suggesting that the recently discovered Cryptosporidium alcohol dehydrogenases may be explored as new drug targets. PMID:16251280

  20. Evaluation of Four RNA Extraction Methods for Gene Expression Analyses of Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii Oocys

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii are important coccidian parasites that have caused waterborne and foodborne disease outbreaks worldwide. Techniques like subtractive hybridization, microarrays, and quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction (...

  1. Expression of Cryptosporidium parvum Cpa135/CpCCP1 chimeras in Giardia duodenalis: organization of the protein domains affects the protein secretion pathway.

    PubMed

    Lalle, Marco; Rosati, Maria Adelaide; Bien, Justina; Hehl, Adrian B; Pozio, Edoardo; Tosini, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Cpa135 is a multidomain antigenic protein secreted at the sporozoite stage of the Apicomplexa protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum. Previous studies have shown that the protozoan flagellate parasite Giardia duodenalis is a suitable system for the heterologous expression of secreted proteins of Apicomplexa. Here, we designed three different Cpa135 variants fused to a C-terminal HA tag in order to test their expression in G. duodenalis under the control of the inducible promoter of the cyst wall protein 1 gene (cwp1). The three Cpa135 chimeras encompassed different portions of the protein; CpaG encodes the entire polypeptide of 1574 amino acids (aa); CpaGΔC includes the first 826 aa at the N-terminus; and CpaGΔN consists in of the final 833 aa at the C-terminus. Immunoblot experiments showed that CpaG and CpaGΔN maintained the epitopes recognized by anti-C. parvum-specific human serum. The intracellular localization and transport of the three Cpa135 variants were studied by immunofluorescence in combination with G. duodenalis-specific antibodies. CpaGΔC was mainly accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum and the intact form was also excreted in the medium. Differently, the Cpa135 chimeras possessing an intact C-terminus (CpaG and CpaGΔN) were transported towards the forming cyst wall possibly and were not detected in the medium. Furthermore, the full-length CpaG was incorporated into the cyst wall. The data presented suggest that the C-terminus of Cpa135, which includes a cysteine reach domain, could influence the secretion of the chimeric proteins. PMID:21112325

  2. Die-off rates of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a swine lagoon and in a spray field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Because of several large-scale outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis in humans, Cryptosporidium has become a public health concern. Commercial swine operations apply large volumes of effluent from lagoons to spray fields as a waste management practice. This effluent is a source of Cryptosporidi...

  3. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Harvey, Ronald W; Metge, David W; Ryan, Joseph N; Chorover, Jon; Eberl, D D

    2010-10-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-μm microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ∼4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was

  4. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohanram, A.; Ray, C.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Ryan, J.N.; Chorover, J.; Eberl, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-??m microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ~4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was observed

  5. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2009-06-08

    The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate) and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate) proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD) state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2{angstrom} resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate occupies an unexpected site not seen before and the phosphate binding loop remains in the substrate-free conformation

  6. Intra-Species Genetic Diversity and Clonal Structure of Cryptosporidium parvum in Sheep Farms in a Confined Geographical Area in Northeastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Ramo, Ana; Monteagudo, Luis V; Del Cacho, Emilio; Sánchez-Acedo, Caridad; Quílez, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    A multilocus fragment typing approach including eleven variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci and the GP60 gene was used to investigate the intra-farm and intra-host genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium parvum in sheep farms in a confined area in northeastern Spain. Genomic DNA samples of 113 C. parvum isolates from diarrheic pre-weaned lambs collected in 49 meat-type sheep farms were analyzed. Loci exhibited various degrees of polymorphism, the finding of 7-9 alleles in the four most variable and discriminatory markers (ML2, Cgd6_5400, Cgd6_3940, and GP60) being remarkable. The combination of alleles at the twelve loci identified a total of 74 multilocus subtypes (MLTs) and provided a Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index of 0.988 (95% CI, 0.979-0.996). The finding that most MLTs (n = 64) were unique to individual farms evidenced that cryptosporidial infection is mainly transmitted within sheep flocks, with herd-to-herd transmission playing a secondary role. Limited intra- host variability was found, since only five isolates were genotypically mixed. In contrast, a significant intra-farm genetic diversity was seen, with the presence of multiple MLTs on more than a half of the farms (28/46), suggesting frequent mutations or genetic exchange through recombination. Comparison with a previous study in calves in northern Spain using the same 12-loci typing approach showed differences in the identity of major alleles at most loci, with a single MLT being shared between lambs and calves. Analysis of evolutionary descent by the algorithm eBURST indicated a high degree of genetic divergence, with over 41% MLTs appearing as singletons along with a high number of clonal complexes, most of them linking only two MLTs. Bayesian Structure analysis and F statistics also revealed the genetic remoteness of most C. parvum isolates and no ancestral population size was chosen. Linkage analysis evidenced a prevalent pattern of clonality within the parasite population. PMID:27176718

  7. Intra-Species Genetic Diversity and Clonal Structure of Cryptosporidium parvum in Sheep Farms in a Confined Geographical Area in Northeastern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ramo, Ana; Monteagudo, Luis V.; Del Cacho, Emilio; Sánchez-Acedo, Caridad

    2016-01-01

    A multilocus fragment typing approach including eleven variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci and the GP60 gene was used to investigate the intra-farm and intra-host genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium parvum in sheep farms in a confined area in northeastern Spain. Genomic DNA samples of 113 C. parvum isolates from diarrheic pre-weaned lambs collected in 49 meat-type sheep farms were analyzed. Loci exhibited various degrees of polymorphism, the finding of 7–9 alleles in the four most variable and discriminatory markers (ML2, Cgd6_5400, Cgd6_3940, and GP60) being remarkable. The combination of alleles at the twelve loci identified a total of 74 multilocus subtypes (MLTs) and provided a Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index of 0.988 (95% CI, 0.979−0.996). The finding that most MLTs (n = 64) were unique to individual farms evidenced that cryptosporidial infection is mainly transmitted within sheep flocks, with herd-to-herd transmission playing a secondary role. Limited intra- host variability was found, since only five isolates were genotypically mixed. In contrast, a significant intra-farm genetic diversity was seen, with the presence of multiple MLTs on more than a half of the farms (28/46), suggesting frequent mutations or genetic exchange through recombination. Comparison with a previous study in calves in northern Spain using the same 12-loci typing approach showed differences in the identity of major alleles at most loci, with a single MLT being shared between lambs and calves. Analysis of evolutionary descent by the algorithm eBURST indicated a high degree of genetic divergence, with over 41% MLTs appearing as singletons along with a high number of clonal complexes, most of them linking only two MLTs. Bayesian Structure analysis and F statistics also revealed the genetic remoteness of most C. parvum isolates and no ancestral population size was chosen. Linkage analysis evidenced a prevalent pattern of clonality within the parasite population. PMID:27176718

  8. Quantitative RT-PCR assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of drugs against the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haili; Zhu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously developed a qRT-PCR assay to assess drug efficacy on the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro by detecting the levels of parasite 18S rRNA. This approach displayed up to four orders of magnitude of linear dynamic range and was much less labor-intensive than the traditional microscopic methods. However, conventional qRT-PCR protocol is not very amendable to high-throughput analysis when total RNA needs to be purified by lengthy, multi-step procedures. Recently, several commercial reagents are available for preparing cell lysates that could be directly used in downstream qRT-PCR analysis (e.g., Ambion Cell-to-cDNA kit and Bio-Rad iScript sample preparation reagent). Using these reagents, we are able to adapt the qRT-PCR assay into high-throughput screening of drugs in vitro (i.e., 96-well and 384-well formats for the cultivation of parasites and qRT-PCR detection, respectively). This qRT-PCR protocol is able to give a >150-fold linear dynamic range using samples isolated from cells infected with various numbers of parasites. The new assay is also validated by the NIH-recommended intra-plate, inter-plate, and inter-day uniformity tests. The robustness and effectiveness of the assay are also confirmed by evaluating the anti-cryptosporidial efficacy of paromomycin and by a small scale screening of compounds. PMID:26441920

  9. Cryptosporidiosis outbreak in visitors of a UK industry-compliant petting farm caused by a rare Cryptosporidium parvum subtype: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Utsi, L; Smith, S J; Chalmers, R M; Padfield, S

    2016-04-01

    A case-control study was conducted to investigate an outbreak of 46 cases of cryptosporidiosis in visitors to a petting farm in England. Details of exposures on the farm were collected for 38 cases and 39 controls, recruited through snowball sampling. Multivariable logistic regression identified that cases were 5·5 times more likely than controls to have eaten without washing their hands [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·51-19·9, P = 0·01] and 10 times less likely to report being informed of risk of infection on arrival (odds ratio 0·10, 95% CI 0·01-0·71, P = 0·02). An uncommon Cryptosporidium parvum gp60 subtype (IIaA19G1R1) was identified in a lamb faecal sample and all subtyped cases (n = 22). We conclude that lack of verbal advice and non-compliance with hand washing are significantly associated with a risk of cryptosporidiosis on open farms. These findings highlight the public health importance of effectively communicating risk to petting farm visitors in order to prevent future outbreaks of zoonotic infections. PMID:26424385

  10. Effect of ferric oxyhydroxide grain coatings on the transport of bacteriophage PRD1 and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in saturated porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Bogatsu, Y.G.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Elimelech, M.

    2005-01-01

    To test the effect of geochemical heterogeneity on microorganism transport in saturated porous media, we measured the removal of two microorganisms, the bacteriophage PRD1 and oocysts of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, in flow-through columns of quartz sand coated by different amounts of a ferric oxyhydroxide. The experiments were conducted over ranges of ferric oxyhydroxide coating fraction of ?? = 0-0.12 for PRD1 and from ?? = 0-0.32 for the oocysts at pH 5.6-5.8 and 10-4 M ionic strength. To determine the effect of pH on the transport of the oocysts, experiments were also conducted over a pH range of 5.7-10.0 at a coating fraction of ?? = 0.04. Collision (attachment) efficiencies increased as the fraction of ferric oxyhydroxide coated quartz sand increased, from ?? = 0.0071 to 0.13 over ?? = 0-0.12 for PRD1 and from ?? = 0.059 to 0.75 over ?? = 0-0.32 for the oocysts. Increasing the pH from 5.7 to 10.0 resulted in a decrease in the oocyst collision efficiency as the pH exceeded the expected point of zero charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings. The collision efficiencies correlated very well with the fraction of quartz sand coated by the ferric oxyhydroxide for PRD1 but not as well for the oocysts. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  11. Influence of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a ferric oxyhydroxide-coated quartz sand saturated porous medium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Landkamer, L.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effect of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a geochemically heterogeneous saturated porous medium, we measured the breakthrough and collision efficiencies of oocysts as a function of dissolved organic matter concentration in a flow-through column containing ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand. We characterized the surface properties of the oocysts and ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand using microelectrophoresis and streaming potential, respectively, and the amount of organic matter adsorbed on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand as a function of the concentration of dissolved organic matter (a fulvic acid isolated from Florida Everglades water). The dissolved organic matter had no significant effect on the zeta potential of the oocysts. Low concentrations of dissolved organic matter were responsible for reversing the charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand surface from positive to negative. The charge reversal and accumulation of negative charge on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand led to increases in oocyst breakthrough and decreases in oocyst collision efficiency with increasing dissolved organic matter concentration. The increase in dissolved organic matter concentration from 0 to 20 mg L-1 resulted in a two-fold decrease in the collision efficiency. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Structure of a CutA1 divalent-cation tolerance protein from Cryptosporidium parvum, the protozoal parasite responsible for cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Abendroth, Jan; Clifton, Matthew C.; Robinson, Howard; Zhang, Yanfeng; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Staker, Bart L.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the Cryptosporidium genus. Infection is associated with mild to severe diarrhea that usually resolves spontaneously in healthy human adults, but may lead to severe complications in young children and in immunocompromised patients. The genome of C. parvum contains a gene, CUTA_CRYPI, that may play a role in regulating the intracellular concentration of copper, which is a toxic element in excess. Here, the crystal structure of this CutA1 protein, Cp-CutA1, is reported at 2.0 Å resolution. As observed for other CutA1 structures, the 117-residue protein is a trimer with a core ferrodoxin-like fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows little, in any, unfolding of Cp-CutA1 up to 353 K. This robustness is corroborated by 1H–15N HSQC spectra at 333 K, which are characteristic of a folded protein, suggesting that NMR spectroscopy may be a useful tool to further probe the function of the CutA1 proteins. While robust, Cp-CutA1 is not as stable as the homologous protein from a hyperthermophile, perhaps owing to a wide β-bulge in β2 that protrudes Pro48 and Ser49 outside the β-sheet. PMID:25945704

  13. X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome associated with Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptococcus neoformans infections: the first case with molecular diagnosis in Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Hyung Seok; Lee, Min Young; Iseki, Motohiro; Lee, Jae Ho; Song, Chang Hwa; Park, Jeong Kyu; Hwang, Tai Ju; Kook, Hoon

    2002-01-01

    X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHIM) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder, caused by mutations of the gene encoding CD40 ligand (CD40L; CD154). We report the clinical manifestations and mutational analysis of the CD40L gene observed in a male patient from a XHIM family. Having hypogammaglobulinemia and elevated IgM, the 3-yr-old boy exhibited the characteristic clinical features of XHIM. The patient suffered from frequent respiratory infections, and chronic enteritis caused by Cryptosporidium parvum. In addition, a lymph node biopsy and a culture from this sample revealed C. neoformans infection. Activated lymphocytes from the patient failed to express CD40L on their surface as assessed by flow cytometry and a missence mutation (W140R) was found at the XHIM hotspot in his CD40L cDNA to confirm the diagnosis. Genetic analysis of the mother and sister showed a heterozygote pattern, indicating carrier status. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the molecular diagnosis of an XHIM patient in Korea. PMID:11850600

  14. Cryptosporidium parvum in calves: kinetics and immunoblot analysis of specific serum and local antibody responses (immunoglobulin A [IgA], IgG, and IgM) after natural and experimental infections.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, J E; Villacorta, I; Vanopdenbosch, E; Vandergheynst, D; Naciri, M; Ares-Mazás, E; Yvoré, P

    1992-01-01

    Fecal and serum anti-Cryptosporidium parvum immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgM, and IgG were monitored by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after experimental and natural infection of calves with C. parvum. Although all experimentally infected calves showed high levels of colostral antibodies in the feces, they acquired C. parvum infection. Three of five animals died. Calves which acquired natural infection showed only diarrhea. Levels of colostral coproantibodies dropped quickly. Experimental infection was followed by a rise in local anti-C. parvum IgM levels from day 5 postinfection (p.i.). IgM peaked at day 14 p.i. and then disappeared quickly. Anti-C. parvum IgA levels rose between days 7 and 14 p.i. and decreased slowly. Rising levels of coproantibodies coincided with falling oocyst output. Fecal anti-C. parvum IgG levels rose slightly during oocyst output, and IgG disappeared 3 weeks p.i. Similar kinetics were established in naturally infected calves. Although fecal anti-C. parvum IgA levels declined slowly, reinfections were established 5, 7, and 14 weeks after the primary contact. Serum anti-C. parvum IgG levels rose during maximal oocyst excretion, whereas serum anti-C. parvum IgA levels peaked later than did local IgA levels. Challenge reinfection of naturally infected calves at day 112 was not followed by clinical signs or oocyst output or by a secondary antibody response. Sequential Western immunoblotting with fecal extracts revealed up to 32 different parasite antigens. Convalescent-phase sera recognized up to 23 antigens. Fecal IgA reacted intensely with antigens with relative molecular weights (M(r)) of approximately 11,000 and 15,000. These antigens were not recognized by convalescent-phase serum IgG. Both local IgA and serum IgG also showed strong reactions with 23,000- and 44,000-M(r) antigens and with several antigens of between 66,200 and 200,000 M(r). Most bands remained detectable for at least 16 weeks p.i. Images PMID:1587597

  15. Comparison of the Triage Micro Parasite Panel and Microscopy for the Detection of Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, Giardia lamblia, and Cryptosporidium parvum in Stool Samples Collected in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Swierczewski, Brett; Odundo, Elizabeth; Ndonye, Janet; Kirera, Ronald; Odhiambo, Cliff; Oaks, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, and Cryptosporidium parvum are three of the most important parasitic causes of acute diarrhea worldwide. Laboratory diagnosis of these parasites is usually done by ova and parasite examination (O&P examination) via microscopy. The sensitivity and specificity of O&P examination varies among laboratories and can be labor intensive and time consuming. The Triage Micro Parasite Panel (BioSite, San Diego, California) is an enzyme immunoassay kit that can detect E. histolytica/E. dispar, G. lamblia, and C. parvum simultaneously using fresh or frozen stool. The present study evaluated the Triage Micro Parasite Panel in detecting E. histolytica/E. dispar, G. lamblia, and C. parvum compared to O&P examination in 266 stool samples collected at medical facilities in Kenya. The sensitivity and specificity results for the Triage Micro Parasite Panel were: for E. histolytica/E. dispar: 100%, 100%, G. lamblia: 100%, 100% and C. parvum: 73%, 100%. There was no evidence of cross reactivity using the kit with other parasites identified in the stool specimens. These results indicate that the Triage Micro Parasite Panel is a highly sensitive kit that can be used for screening purposes in large scale studies or outbreak investigations or as a possible alternative to O&P examination. PMID:22848229

  16. THE WIDE GEOGRAPHIC RANGE OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM BOVIS AND THE DEER-LIKE GENOTYPE IN BOVINES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies in the United States reported that of preweaned dairy calves infected with Cryptosporidium ~85% were infected with zoonotic C. parvum whereas of postweaned calves infected with Cryptosporidium, only 1% were infected with C. parvum. Cryptosporidium bovis (syn. Cryptosporidium bovine ...

  17. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 3. Use of microspheres to estimate the transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Osborn, C.L.; Ryan, J.N.; Cunningham, K.J.; Landkamer, L.

    2008-01-01

    The vulnerability of a municipal well in the Northwest well field in southeastern Florida to potential contamination by Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts was assessed in a large-scale, forced-gradient (convergent) injection and recovery test. The field study involved a simultaneous pulse introduction of a nonreactive tracer (SF6, an inert gas) and oocyst-sized (1.6, 2.9, and 4.9 ??m diameter) carboxylated polystyrene microspheres into karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer characterized by a complex triple (matrix, touching-vug, and conduit) porosity. Fractional recoveries 97 m down gradient were inversely related to diameter and ranged from 2.9% for the 4.9 ??m microspheres to 5.8% for 1.6 ??m microspheres. Their centers of mass arrived at the pumping well approximately threefold earlier than that of the nonreactive tracer SF6 (gas), underscoring the need for use of colloid tracers and field-scale tracer tests for these kinds of evaluations. In a modified triaxial cell using near in situ chemical conditions, 2.9 and 4.9 ??m microspheres underestimated by fourfold to sixfold the attachment potential of the less electronegative 2.9-4.1 ??m oocysts in the matrix porosity of limestone core samples. The field and laboratory results collectively suggested that it may take 200-300 m of transport to ensure even a 1-log unit removal of oocysts, even though the limestone surfaces exhibited a substantive capability for their sorptive removal. The study further demonstrated the utility of microspheres as oocyst surrogates in field-scale assessments of well vulnerability in limestone, provided that differences in attachment behaviors between oocysts and microspheres are taken into account. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Influence of organic carbon loading, sediment associated metal oxide content and sediment grain size distributions upon Cryptosporidium parvum removal during riverbank filtration operations, Sonoma County, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Aiken, G.R.; Anders, R.; Lincoln, G.; Jasperse, J.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy for removing Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts of poorly sorted, Fe- and Al-rich, subsurface sediments collected from 0.9 to 4.9 and 1.7-13.9??m below land surface at an operating riverbank filtration (RBF) site (Russian River, Sonoma County, CA). Both formaldehyde-killed oocysts and oocyst-sized (3????m) microspheres were employed in sediment-packed flow-through and static columns. The degree of surface coverage of metal oxides on sediment grain surfaces correlated strongly with the degrees of oocyst and microsphere removals. In contrast, average grain size (D50) was not a good indicator of either microsphere or oocyst removal, suggesting that the primary mechanism of immobilization within these sediments is sorptive filtration rather than physical straining. A low specific UV absorbance (SUVA) for organic matter isolated from the Russian River, suggested that the modest concentration of the SUVA component (0.8??mg??L-1) of the 2.2??mg??L-1 dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is relatively unreactive. Nevertheless, an amendment of 2.2??mg??L-1 of isolated river DOC to column sediments resulted in up to a 35.7% decrease in sorption of oocysts and (or) oocyst-sized microspheres. Amendments (3.2????M) of the anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) also caused substantive decreases (up to 31.9 times) in colloid filtration. Although the grain-surface metal oxides were found to have a high colloid-removal capacity, our study suggested that any major changes within the watershed that would result in long-term alterations in either the quantity and (or) the character of the river's DOC could alter the effectiveness of pathogen removal during RBF operations.

  19. Interactions of Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, Vaccinal Poliovirus Type 1, and Bacteriophages φX174 and MS2 with a Drinking Water Biofilm and a Wastewater Biofilm▿

    PubMed Central

    Helmi, Karim; Skraber, Sylvain; Gantzer, Christophe; Willame, Raphaël; Hoffmann, Lucien; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2008-01-01

    Biofilms colonizing surfaces inside drinking water distribution networks may provide a habitat and shelter to pathogenic viruses and parasites. If released from biofilms, these pathogens may disseminate in the water distribution system and cause waterborne diseases. Our study aimed to investigate the interactions of protozoan parasites (Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia [oo]cysts) and viruses (vaccinal poliovirus type 1, φX174, and MS2) with two contrasting biofilms. First, attachment, persistence, and detachment of the protozoan parasites and the viruses were assessed with a drinking water biofilm. This biofilm was allowed to develop inside a rotating annular reactor fed with tap water for 7 months prior to the inoculation. Our results show that viable parasites and infectious viruses attached to the drinking water biofilm within 1 h and persisted within the biofilm. Indeed, infectious viruses were detected in the drinking water biofilm up to 6 days after the inoculation, while viral genome and viable parasites were still detected at day 34, corresponding to the last day of the monitoring period. Since viral genome was detected much longer than infectious particles, our results raise the question of the significance of detecting viral genomes in biofilms. A transfer of viable parasites and viruses from the biofilm to the water phase was observed after the flow velocity was increased but also with a constant laminar flow rate. Similar results regarding parasite and virus attachment and detachment were obtained using a treated wastewater biofilm, suggesting that our observations might be extrapolated to a wide range of environmental biofilms and confirming that biofilms can be considered a potential secondary source of contamination. PMID:18281435

  20. Humoral antibody response and oocyst shedding after experimental infection of histocompatible newborn and weaned piglets with Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Arnault, I; Répérant, J M; Naciri, M

    1994-01-01

    Experimental inoculations (mono- and multi-inoculations) with C parvum isolated from a diarrheic child and maintained on calves, were performed on 2 histocompatible miniature (d/d haplotype) weaned 4-week-old piglets and 2 newborn piglets. In each group, 1 piglet received water at the moment of inoculation and served as a negative control. Our results showed that the piglet strain used was resistant to cryptosporidiosis. No clinical sign or oocyst shedding were observed in newborn piglets. A very weak shedding was noticed on day 6 (D6) post-inoculation in inoculated weaned piglets. Using ELISA, inoculated weaned piglets showed a peak of G, M and total antibodies on D10. Specific IgA antibody production peaked on D20. During the experiment on newborn piglets, no peak of specific IgA production was detected. Using immunoblotting, sera of both inoculated weaned piglets and one inoculated newborn piglet were shown to recognize a 14.5-16.5 kDa protein. A 23 kDa antigen was recognized by all 3 uninoculated and inoculated weaned piglets. A difference between mono and multi-inoculations was not clearly demonstrated. Age did not play any role. This pig strain does not seem to be a good model to induce acute cryptosporidiosis. PMID:8087146

  1. Solar radiation induces non-nuclear perturbations and a false start to regulated exocytosis in Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    King, Brendon J; Hoefel, Daniel; Wong, Pao Ee; Monis, Paul T

    2010-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion, climate warming and acidification of aquatic ecosystems have resulted in elevated levels of solar radiation reaching many aquatic environments with an increased deleterious impact on a wide range of living organisms. While detrimental effects on living organisms are thought to occur primarily through DNA damage, solar UV can also damage cellular proteins, lipids and signalling pathways. Cryptosporidium, a member of the eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa, contain numerous vesicular secretory organelles and their discharge via regulated exocytosis is essential for the successful establishment of infection. Using flow cytometric techniques we demonstrate that solar UV rapidly induces sporozoite exocytosis resulting in a significant reduction in the ability of sporozoites to attach and invade host cells. We found that solar UV induced sporozoite membrane depolarization, resulting in reduced cellular ATP and increased cytosolic calcium. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in the internal granularity of sporozoites, indicative of apical organelle discharge, which was confirmed by analysis of sporozoites with an exocytosis-sensitive dye. The precise timing of apical organelle discharge in the presence of a compatible host cell is critical for sporozoite attachment and invasion. Our results demonstrate for the first time how solar UV radiation can interfere with exocytosis, a fundamental cellular process in all eukaryotic cells. We contend that not only may the forecast increases in solar radiation in both aquatic and terrestrial environments significantly affect members of the Apicomplexa, solar UV-induced membrane depolarizations resulting in cytosolic calcium perturbation may affect a wider range of eukaryotic organisms through antagonistic effects on a myriad of calcium dependant cellular functions. PMID:20668710

  2. Is real-time PCR-based diagnosis similar in performance to routine parasitological examination for the identification of Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium parvum/Cryptosporidium hominis and Entamoeba histolytica from stool samples? Evaluation of a new commercial multiplex PCR assay and literature review.

    PubMed

    Laude, A; Valot, S; Desoubeaux, G; Argy, N; Nourrisson, C; Pomares, C; Machouart, M; Le Govic, Y; Dalle, F; Botterel, F; Bourgeois, N; Cateau, E; Leterrier, M; Le Pape, P; Morio, F

    2016-02-01

    Microscopy is the reference standard for routine laboratory diagnosis in faecal parasitology but there is growing interest in alternative methods to overcome the limitations of microscopic examination, which is time-consuming and highly dependent on an operator's skills and expertise. Compared with microscopy, DNA detection by PCR is simple and can offer a better turnaround time. However, PCR performances remain difficult to assess as most studies have been conducted on a limited number of positive clinical samples and used in-house PCR methods. Our aim was to evaluate a new multiplex PCR assay (G-DiaParaTrio; Diagenode Diagnostics), targeting Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium parvum/Cryptosporidium hominis and Entamoeba histolytica. To minimize the turnaround time, PCR was coupled with automated DNA extraction (QiaSymphony; Qiagen). The PCR assay was evaluated using a reference panel of 185 samples established by routine microscopic examination using a standardized protocol including Ziehl-Neelsen staining and adhesin detection by ELISA (E. histolytica II; TechLab). This panel, collected from 12 French parasitology laboratories, included 135 positive samples for G. intestinalis (n = 38), C. parvum/C. hominis (n = 26), E. histolytica (n = 5), 21 other gastrointestinal parasites, together with 50 negative samples. In all, the G-DiaParaTrio multiplex PCR assay identified 38 G. intestinalis, 25 C. parvum/C. hominis and five E. histolytica leading to sensitivity/specificity of 92%/100%, 96%/100% and 100%/100% for G. intestinalis, C. parvum/C. hominis and E. histolytica, respectively. This new multiplex PCR assay offers fast and reliable results, similar to microscopy-driven diagnosis for the detection of these gastrointestinal protozoa, allowing its implementation in routine clinical practice. PMID:26548509

  3. COMPARISON OF FILTRATION METHODS FOR PRIMARY RECOVERY OF CRYPTOSPORIIDUM PARVUM FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waterborne disease outbreaks from contaminated drinking water have been linked to the protozoan parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum. To improve monitoring for this agent, the USEPA developed Method 1622 for isolation and detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water. Method 1622 i...

  4. Investigations of the relationship between use of in vitro cell culture-quantitative PCR and a mouse-based bioassay for evaluating critical factors affecting the disinfection performance of pulsed UV light for treating Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in saline.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mary; Farrell, Hugh; Cormican, Martin; Rowan, Neil

    2010-03-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an enteric coccidian parasite that is recognised as a frequent cause of water-borne disease in humans. We report for the first time on use of the in vitro HCT-8 cell culture-quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay and the in vivo SCID-mouse bioassay for evaluating critical factors that reduce or eliminate infectivity of C. parvum after irradiating oocysts in saline solution under varying operational conditions with pulsed UV light. Infections post UV treatments were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy and by quantitative PCR in cell culture, and by IF staining of faeces and by hematoxylin and eosin staining of intestinal villi in mice. There was a good agreement between using cell culture-qPCR and the mouse assay for determining reduction or elimination of C. parvum infectivity as a consequence of varying UV operating conditions. Reduction in infectivity depended on the intensity of lamp discharge energy applied, amount of pulsing and population size of oocysts (P < or = 0.05). Conventional radiometer was unable to measure fluence or UV dose in saline samples due to the ultra-short non-continuous nature of the high-energy light pulses. Incorporation of humic acid at a concentration above that found in surface water (i.e., < or =10 ppm) did not significantly affect PUV disinfection capability irrespective of parameters tested (P < or = 0.05). These observations show that use of this HCT-8 cell culture assay is equivalent to using the 'gold standard' mouse-based infectivity assay for determining disinfection performances of PUV for treating C. parvum in saline solution. PMID:20096310

  5. A multiplex PCR to simultaneously distinguish Cryptosporidium species of veterinary and public health concern in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four species of Cryptosporidium are routinely found in cattle: Cryptosporidium parvum, C. bovis, C. ryanae, and C. andersoni. It is important to determine the species of Cryptosporidium in infected cattle because C. parvum is the only serious pathogen, for humans as well as cattle. Identification of...

  6. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in Captive Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Ryan, Una M.; Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Limor, Josef; Li, Lixia; Kombert, Mark; Junge, Randy; Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Zhou, Ling; Arrowood, Michael J.; Koudela, Břetislav; Modrý, David; Lal, Altaf A.

    2004-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium in reptiles was analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene. A total of 123 samples were analyzed, of which 48 snake samples, 24 lizard samples, and 3 tortoise samples were positive for Cryptosporidium. Nine different types of Cryptosporidium were found, including Cryptosporidium serpentis, Cryptosporidium desert monitor genotype, Cryptosporidium muris, Cryptosporidium parvum bovine and mouse genotypes, one C. serpentis-like parasite in a lizard, two new Cryptosporidium spp. in snakes, and one new Cryptosporidium sp. in tortoises. C. serpentis and the desert monitor genotype were the most common parasites and were found in both snakes and lizards, whereas the C. muris and C. parvum parasites detected were probably the result of ingestion of infected rodents. Sequence and biologic characterizations indicated that the desert monitor genotype was Cryptosporidium saurophilum. Two host-adapted C. serpentis genotypes were found in snakes and lizards. PMID:14766569

  7. THE EFFICACY OF THREE MEDICINAL PLANTS: GARLIC, GINGER AND MIRAZID AND A CHEMICAL DRUG METRONIDAZOLE AGAINST CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM. I-IMMUNOLOGICAL RESPONSE.

    PubMed

    Abouel-Nour, Mohamed F; EL-Shewehy, Dina Magdy M; Hamada, Shadia F; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidisis parvum is a zoonotic protozoan parasite infects intestinal epithelial cells causing a major health problem for man and animals. Experimentally the immunologic mediated elimination of C. parvum requires CD4+ T cells and IFN-gamma. But, the innate immune responses also have a significant protective role in both man and animals. the mucosal immune response to C. parvum in C57BL/6 neonatal and GKO mice shows a concomitant Thl and Th2 cytokine mRNA expression, with a crucial role for IFN-gamma in the resolution of the infection. NK cells and IFN-gamma have been shown to be important components in immunity in T and B cell-deficient mice, but IFN-gamma-dependent resistance is demonstrated in alymphocytic mice. Epithelial cells may play a vital role in immunity as once infected these cells have increased expression of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines and demonstrate anti-infection killing mechanisms. C. parvum immunological response was used to evaluate the efficacy of anti-cryptosporidisis agents of Garlic, Ginger, Mirazid and Metronidazole in experimentally infected mice. PMID:26939233

  8. Use of carboxylated microspheres to assess transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts at the Russian River water supply facility, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Anders, R.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Seymour, D.; Jasperse, J.

    2007-01-01

    Carboxylated microspheres were employed as surrogates to assess the transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvumoocysts during forced- and natural-gradient tests conducted in July and October 2004. The tests involved poorly-sorted, near-surface sediments where groundwater is pumped from an alluvial aquifer underlying the Russian River, Sonoma County, CA. In an off channel infiltration basin and within the river, a mixture (2-, 3-, and 5- ??m diameters) of fluorescently-labeled carboxylated microspheres and bromide tracers were used in two injection and recovery test to assess sediment removal efficiency for the microspheres. Bottom sediments varied considerably in their filtration efficiency for Cryptosporidium.

  9. Effects of sediment-associated extractable metals, degree of sediment grain sorting, and dissolved organic carbon upon cryptosporidium parvum removal and transport within riverbank filtration sediments, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Aiken, G.R.; Anders, R.; Lincoln, G.; Jasperse, J.; Hill, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    Oocysts of the protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum are of particular concern for riverbank filtration (RBF) operations because of their persistence, ubiquity, and resistance to chlorine disinfection. At the Russian River RBF site (Sonoma County, CA), transport of C. parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized (3 ??m) carboxylate-modified microspheres through poorly sorted (sorting indices, ??1, up to 3.0) and geochemically heterogeneous sediments collected between 2 and 25 m below land surface (bls) were assessed. Removal was highly sensitive to variations in both the quantity of extractable metals (mainly Fe and Al) and degree of grain sorting. In flow-through columns, there was a log-linear relationship (r2 = 0.82 at p < 0.002) between collision efficiency (??, the probability that colloidal collisions with grain surfaces would result in attachment) and extractable metals, and a linear relationship (r2 = 0.99 at p < 0.002) between ?? and ??1. Collectively, variability in extractable metals and grain sorting accounted for ???83% of the variability in ?? (at p < 0.0002) along the depth profiles. Amendments of 2.2 mg L-1 of Russian River dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reduced ?? for oocysts by 4-5 fold. The highly reactive hydrophobic organic acid (HPOA) fraction was particularly effective in re-entraining sediment-attached microspheres. However, the transport-enhancing effects of the riverine DOC did not appear to penetrate very deeply into the underlying sediments, judging from high ?? values (???1.0) observed for oocysts being advected through unamended sediments collected at ???2 m bls. This study suggests that in evaluating the efficacy of RBF operations to remove oocysts, it may be necessary to consider not only the geochemical nature and size distribution of the sediment grains, but also the degrees of sediment sorting and the concentration, reactivity, and penetration of the source water DOC. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. METHODS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SP. AND GIARDIA SP.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There have been several waterborne outbreaks of giardiasis caused by infection with Giardia lamblia, and cryptosporidiosis, caused by infection with Cryptosporidium parvum. These outbreaks have created a need to detect these organisms in source and finished drinking water. The pr...

  11. Effect of dissolved organic carbon on the transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and carboxylate-modified microspheres advected through temperate humic and tropical volcanic agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Metge, David W; Barber, Larry B; Ryan, Joseph N; Harvey, Ronald W

    2012-02-21

    Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and microspheres in two disparate (a clay- and Fe-rich, volcanic and a temperate, humic) agricultural soils were studied in the presence and absence of 100 mg L(-1) of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) at pH 5.0-6.0. Transport of carboxylate-modified, 1.8 μm microspheres in soil columns was highly sensitive to the nature of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), whereas oocysts transport was more affected by soil mineralogy. SDBS increased transport of microspheres from 48% to 87% through the tropical soil and from 43% to 93% in temperate soil. In contrast, SRHA reduced transport of microspheres from 48% to 28% in tropical soil and from 43% to 16% in temperate soil. SDBS also increased oocysts transport through the temperate soil 5-fold, whereas no oocyst transport was detected in tropical soil. SRHA had only a nominal effect in increasing oocysts transport in tropical soil, but caused a 6-fold increase in transport through the temperate soil. Amendments of only 4 mg L(-1) SRHA and SDBS decreased oocyst hydrophobicity from 66% to 20% and from 66% to 5%, respectively. However, SDBS increased microsphere hydrophobicity from 16% to 33%. Soil fines, which includes clays, and SRHA, both caused the oocysts zeta potential (ζ) to become more negative, but caused the highly hydrophilic microspheres to become less negatively charged. The disparate behaviors of the two colloids in the presence of an ionic surfactant and natural organic matter suggest that microspheres may not be suitable surrogates for oocysts in certain types of soils. These results indicate that whether or not DOC inhibits or promotes transport of oocysts and microspheres in agricultural soils and by how much, depends not only on the surface characteristics of the colloid, but the nature of the DOC and the soil mineralogy. PMID:21711011

  12. Cryptosporidium Pathogenicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Maha; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Tyler, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of medical and veterinary importance that causes gastroenteritis in a variety of vertebrate hosts. Several studies have reported different degrees of pathogenicity and virulence among Cryptosporidium species and isolates of the same species as well as evidence of variation in host susceptibility to infection. The identification and validation of Cryptosporidium virulence factors have been hindered by the renowned difficulties pertaining to the in vitro culture and genetic manipulation of this parasite. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in identifying putative virulence factors for Cryptosporidium. This progress has been accelerated since the publication of the Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis genomes, with the characterization of over 25 putative virulence factors identified by using a variety of immunological and molecular techniques and which are proposed to be involved in aspects of host-pathogen interactions from adhesion and locomotion to invasion and proliferation. Progress has also been made in the contribution of host factors that are associated with variations in both the severity and risk of infection. Here we provide a review comprised of the current state of knowledge on Cryptosporidium infectivity, pathogenesis, and transmissibility in light of our contemporary understanding of microbial virulence. PMID:23297262

  13. FINGERPRINTING OF C. PARVUM BY MATRIX ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum, an enteric protozoan pathogen, are responsible for the worst microbial waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis in recent history. The 1993 outbreak in Milwaukee, WI, sickened approximately 403,000 individuals, resulting in the hospitalizatio...

  14. USE OF LONG ACTING STEROID METHYLPREDNISOLONE ACETATE FOR THE PROLONGATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SP. IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current protocols for Cryptosporidium sp. propagation in mice vary according to the strain and age of mouse as well as the species of Cryptosporidium. Cryptosporidium muris is a natural parasite of mice, but only neonatal mice are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Published C...

  15. COMPARISON OF TISSUE CULTURE AND ANIMAL MODELS FOR ASSESSMENT OF CRYPTOSPRIDIUM PARVUM INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from three different disinfection studies using both cell culture and mouse infectivity to assess Cryptosporidium parvum inactivation were evaluated in a total of 35 comparison including process controls and treated samples. C. parvum infectivity in the in vitro FDM-MPN assa...

  16. Molecular Genotyping of Viable Cryptosporidium Oocysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium is a chlorination-resistant protozoan parasite that causes a self-limiting diarrheal disease in the immunocompetent or severe chronic diarrhea in the immunocompromised. Two species, C. parvum and C. hominis, cause most cases of cryptosporidiosis in humans, while C...

  17. Infectivity of the cervine genotype of Cryptosporidium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidiosis is a diarrheal disease of humans and animals caused by parasites in the genus Cryptosporidium, a genus comprising 19 valid species and 40 genotypes. Most human infections are caused by C. hominis and C. parvum. To a lesser extent infections with C. meleagridis, C. felis, C. canis, ...

  18. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM IN CATTLE FROM OBSERVING TO UNDERSTANDING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a zoonotic pathogen transmissible from a variety of animals to humans and is a considerable public health concern. Dairy cattle have been identified in numerous reports as a major source of environmental contamination with this pathogen. However, virtually all reports have ...

  19. MALDI-MIS INVESTIGATIONS OF DRINKING WATER PATHOGENS--GIARDIA AND CRYPTOSPORIDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protozoan parasites, Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia, have been responsible for numerous waterborne outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in the United States. The 1993 cryptosporidiosis outbreak in Milwaukee affected approximately 400,000 people and resulted in o...

  20. SPECIES AND GENUS DIFFERENTIATION OF PARASITES (GIARDIA AND CRYPTOSPORIDIUM) BY MALDI - MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protozoan parasites, Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia, have been responsible for numerous waterborne outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in the United States. The 1993 cryptosporidiosis outbreak in Milwaukee affected approximately 400,000 people and resulted in o...

  1. Removal Efficiencies and Attachment Coefficients for Cryptosporidium in Sandy Alluvial Riverbank Sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riverbank filtration has been shown to be effective at removing viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and, therefore, drinking water systems that employ riverbank filtration may receive additional treatment credits beyond that which they can obtain using traditional engineering a...

  2. Surveillance Systems for Waterborne Cryptosporidium: US EPA method 1523 and Beyond

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waterborne cryptosporidiosis remains a significant public health concern in countries around the world. Many species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium contaminate drinking water sources, but C. parvum and C. hominis remain the two predominant species known to cause waterborne dis...

  3. Common occurrence of Cryptosporidium hominis in horses and donkeys.

    PubMed

    Jian, Fuchun; Liu, Aiqin; Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Sumei; Qi, Meng; Zhao, Wei; Shi, Yadong; Wang, Jianling; Wei, Jiujian; Zhang, Longxian; Xiao, Lihua

    2016-09-01

    Extensive genetic variation is observed within the genus Cryptosporidium and the distribution of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes in humans and animals appears to vary by geography and host species. To better understand the genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in horses and donkeys, we characterized five horse-derived and 82 donkey-derived Cryptosporidium isolates from five provinces or autonomous regions (Sichuan, Gansu, Henan, Inner Mongolia and Shandong) in China at the species/genotype and subtype levels. Three Cryptosporidium species/genotypes were identified based on the analysis of the SSU rRNA gene, including Cryptosporidium parvum (n=22), the Cryptosporidium horse genotype (n=4), and Cryptosporidium hominis (n=61). The identification of C. hominis was confirmed by sequence analysis of the HSP70 and actin genes. Subtyping using sequence analysis of the 60kDa glycoprotein gene identified 21 C. parvum isolates as subtype IIdA19G1, the four horse genotype isolates as subtypes VIaA15G4 (n=2) and VIaA11G3 (n=2), and the 61 C. hominis isolates as IkA16G1 (n=59) and IkA16 (n=2). The common finding of C. hominis reaffirms the heterogeneity of Cryptosporidium spp. in horses and donkeys and is possibly a reflection of endemic transmission of C. hominis in these animals. Data of the study suggest that horses and donkeys as companion animals may potentially transmit Cryptosporidium infections to humans. PMID:27264727

  4. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. within a Remote Population of Soay Sheep on St. Kilda Islands, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, L.; Craig, B. H.; Jones, B.

    2013-01-01

    This is the first report to characterize the genotypes and subtypes of Cryptosporidium species infecting a geographically isolated population of feral Soay sheep (Ovis aries) on Hirta, St. Kilda, Scotland, during two distinct periods: (i) prior to a population crash and (ii) as host numbers increased. Cryptosporidium DNA was extracted by freeze-thawing of immunomagnetically separated (IMS) bead-oocyst complexes, and species were identified following nested-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)/PCR sequencing at two Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA loci. Two hundred fifty-five samples were analyzed, and the prevalent Cryptosporidium species in single infections were identified as C. hominis (11.4% of all samples tested), C. parvum (9%), C. xiaoi (12.5%), and C. ubiquitum (6.7%). Cryptosporidium parvum was also present with other Cryptosporidium species in 27.1% of all samples tested. Cryptosporidium parvum- and C. hominis-positive isolates were genotyped using two nested-PCR assays that amplify the Cryptosporidium glycoprotein 60 gene (GP60). GP60 gene analysis showed the presence of two Cryptosporidium genotypes, namely, C. parvum IIaA19G1R1 and C. hominis IbA10G2. This study reveals a higher diversity of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes than was previously expected. We suggest reasons for the high diversity of Cryptosporidium parasites within this isolated population and discuss the implications for our understanding of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:23354707

  5. Distribution and Clinical Manifestations of Cryptosporidium Species and Subtypes in HIV/AIDS Patients in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Adamu, Haileeyesus; Petros, Beyene; Zhang, Guoqing; Kassa, Hailu; Amer, Said; Ye, Jianbin; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidiosis is an important cause for chronic diarrhea and death in HIV/AIDS patients. Among common Cryptosporidium species in humans, C. parvum is responsible for most zoonotic infections in industrialized nations. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of C. parvum and role of zoonotic transmission in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology in developing countries remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this cross-sectional study, 520 HIV/AIDS patients were examined for Cryptosporidium presence in stool samples using genotyping and subtyping techniques. Altogether, 140 (26.9%) patients were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. by PCR-RFLP analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene, belonging to C. parvum (92 patients), C. hominis (25 patients), C. viatorum (10 patients), C. felis (5 patients), C. meleagridis (3 patients), C. canis (2 patients), C. xiaoi (2 patients), and mixture of C. parvum and C. hominis (1 patient). Sequence analyses of the 60 kDa glycoprotein gene revealed a high genetic diversity within the 82 C. parvum and 19 C. hominis specimens subtyped, including C. parvum zoonotic subtype families IIa (71) and IId (5) and anthroponotic subtype families IIc (2), IIb (1), IIe (1) and If-like (2), and C. hominis subtype families Id (13), Ie (5), and Ib (1). Overall, Cryptosporidium infection was associated with the occurrence of diarrhea and vomiting. Diarrhea was attributable mostly to C. parvum subtype family IIa and C. hominis, whereas vomiting was largely attributable to C. hominis and rare Cryptosporidium species. Calf contact was identified as a significant risk factor for infection with Cryptosporidium spp., especially C. parvum subtype family IIa. Conclusions/Significance Results of the study indicate that C. parvum is a major cause of cryptosporidiosis in HIV-positive patients and zoonotic transmission is important in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology in Ethiopia. In addition, they confirm that different Cryptosporidium species and

  6. BIALLELIC POLYMORPHISM IN THE INTRON REGION OF B-TUBULIN GENE OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARASITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nucleotide sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified intron region of the Cryptosporidium parvum B-tubulin gene in 26 human and 15 animal isolates revealed distinct genetic polymorphism between the human and bovine genotypes. The separation of 2 genotypes of C. parvum is...

  7. AGING OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUUM OOCYSTS STUDIED BY MALDI-TOF MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite, and it causes a potentially fatal gastrointestinal illness. This water borne pathogen has been the subject of several high profile disease outbreaks in the US and abroad. C. parvum presents challenges for both compliance monitorin...

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium species in livestock in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Mirhashemi, Marzieh Ezzaty; Zintl, Annetta; Grant, Tim; Lucy, Frances; Mulcahy, Grace; De Waal, Theo

    2016-01-30

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan that can cause gastro-intestinal illness with diarrhoea in a wide range of hosts. In fact some species of Cryptosporidium can infect the broad range of hosts. The current paper is focused to investigate monthly prevalence and diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. during the spring and early summer (March-June) in 2009 and 2010 in farms with no history of cryptosporidiosis. Animal samples were analyzed to elucidate the prevalence of Cryptosporidium in two regions, West and the East catchments in Ireland. Our investigation demonstrates the prevalence ranges from 14% to 26% an early summer peak (June) was observed. Based on the findings of this study Cryptosporidium ryanae (in cattle, horses), and Cryptosporidium bovis/xiaoi followed by Cryptosporidium parvum (in sheep) were found to be the predominant species in asymptomatic cases. The circulation of other Cryptosporidium species such as C. parvum, C. bovis, C. ubiquitum, C. andersoni and Cryptosporidium horse and pig genotypes in livestock was investigated. PMID:26801590

  9. Cryptosporidium ryanae n.sp. (Apicomplexa:Cryptosporidiidae)in cattle (Bos Taurus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new species, Cryptosporidium ryanae, is described from cattle. Oocysts of C. ryanae, previously identified as the Cryptosporidium deer-like genotype and recorded as such in GenBank (AY587166, EU203216, DQ182597, AY741309, and DQ871345), are morphologically similar to those of C. parvum and C. bovi...

  10. Wide distribution of Cryptosporidium bovis and the deer-like genotype in bovines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently reported that on 14 dairy farms from Vermont to Florida ~85% of pre-weaned dairy calves were infected with zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum whereas only 1-2% of post-weaned calves and 1-2 year-old heifers were infected with this species. Cryptosporidium bovis and the deer-like genotype w...

  11. Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in membrane-filtered municipal wastewater used for irrigation.

    PubMed

    Lonigro, A; Pollice, A; Spinelli, R; Berrilli, F; Di Cave, D; D'Orazi, C; Cavallo, P; Brandonisio, O

    2006-12-01

    A wastewater tertiary treatment system based on membrane ultrafiltration and fed with secondary-treated municipal wastewater was evaluated for its Giardia cyst and Cryptosporidium oocyst removal efficiency. Giardia duodenalis (assemblages A and B) and Cryptosporidium parvum were identified in feed water but were found in filtered water only during occasional failure of the filtration system. PMID:17056696

  12. Molecular identification of Giardia and Cryptosporidium from dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Sotiriadou, Isaia; Pantchev, Nikola; Gassmann, Doreen; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to diagnose the presence of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in household animals using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence analysis. One hundred faecal samples obtained from 81 dogs and 19 cats were investigated. The Cryptosporidium genotypes were determined by sequencing a fragment of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, while the Giardia Assemblages were determined through analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) locus. Isolates from five dogs and two cats were positive by PCR for the presence of Giardia, and their sequences matched the zoonotic Assemblage A of Giardia. Cryptosporidium spp. isolated from one dog and one cat were both found to be C. parvum. One dog isolate harboured a mixed infection of C. parvum and Giardia Assemblage A. These findings support the growing evidence that household animals are potential reservoirs of the zoonotic pathogens Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. for infections in humans. PMID:23477297

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in livestock animals and humans in the Ismailia province of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Yosra A; Krücken, Jürgen; Nöckler, Karsten; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Zessin, Karl-H

    2013-03-31

    The zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium was studied in one of the most densely populated provinces of Egypt regarding livestock and people. In a representative survey, faecal samples from cattle, buffalo and stool samples from diarrhoeic children (<10 years) were investigated. Parameters assumed to be related to cryptosporidiosis were recorded for animals and children. Animal samples (804) were examined by the Copro-antigen RIDA(®)QUICK test, followed by PCRs targeting the 18S rDNA and gp60 genes for antigen-positive and 10% randomly selected negative samples. All 165 human samples were tested by both methods. The overall estimated prevalence of Cryptosporidium in ruminants was 32.2%, without significant difference between animal species. PCR identified 65.7% Cryptosporidium parvum, 11.8% Cryptosporidium ryanae, 4.1% Cryptosporidium bovis, and combinations of C. parvum plus C. ryanae (11.2%), C. parvum plus C. bovis (5.3%) and of C. parvum plus Cryptosporidium andersoni (1.8%), also without significant differences in species occurrence between cattle and buffalos. The human Cryptosporidium spp. prevalence was 49.1%, of which 60.5% were Cryptosporidium hominis, 38.2% C. parvum and 1.2% C. parvum plus C. bovis. Analysis of gp60 variants allocated C. parvum found in animals to the zoonotic subtype family IIa (18.9%, subtype IIaA15G1R1 only) and to IId (81.1%, mostly IIdA20G1). In humans 50% were classified as subtype family IIa (IIaA15G1R1 and IIaA15G2R1) and 50% were IIdA20G1. C. andersoni occurred only in cattle older than 1 year. In contrast, mono-infections with one of the three single Cryptosporidium species and the three combinations with C. parvum were more prevalent in cattle and buffaloes younger than 1 year, particularly in those younger than 3 months, and were predominantly subtype family IId. In human samples no Cryptosporidium were identified in children younger than 7 months. Neither place of residence nor the source of drinking-water had measurable

  14. Cryptosporidium meleagridis: Infectivity in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; Langer-Curry, Rebecca C.; Akiyoshi, Donna E.; Widmer, Giovanni; Tzipori, Saul

    2011-01-01

    Most Cryptosporidium infections in humans are caused by C. parvum or C. hominis. However, genotyping techniques have identified infections caused by unusual Cryptosporidium species. Cryptosporidium meleagridis has been identified in ≤ 1% of persons with diarrhea, although prevalence is higher in developing nations. We examined the infectivity of C. meleagridis in healthy adults. Five volunteers were challenged with 105 C. meleagridis oocysts and monitored six weeks for fecal oocysts and clinical manifestations. Four volunteers had diarrhea; three had detectable fecal oocysts; and one infected volunteer remained asymptomatic. Fecal DNA from two volunteers was amplified by using a polymerase chain reaction specific for the Cryptosporidium small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Nucleotide sequence of these amplicons was diagnostic for C. meleagridis. All infections were self-limited; oocysts were cleared within ≤ 12 days of challenge. These studies establish that healthy adults can be infected and become ill from ingestion of C. meleagridis oocysts. PMID:21813841

  15. Cryptosporidium Taxonomy: Recent Advances and Implications for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Fayer, Ronald; Ryan, Una; Upton, Steve J.

    2004-01-01

    There has been an explosion of descriptions of new species of Cryptosporidium during the last two decades. This has been accompanied by confusion regarding the criteria for species designation, largely because of the lack of distinct morphologic differences and strict host specificity among Cryptosporidium spp. A review of the biologic species concept, the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN), and current practices for Cryptosporidium species designation calls for the establishment of guidelines for naming Cryptosporidium species. All reports of new Cryptosporidium species should include at least four basic components: oocyst morphology, natural host specificity, genetic characterizations, and compliance with the ICZN. Altogether, 13 Cryptosporidium spp. are currently recognized: C. muris, C. andersoni, C. parvum, C. hominis, C. wrairi, C. felis, and C. cannis in mammals; C. baïleyi, C. meleagridis, and C. galli in birds; C. serpentis and C. saurophilum in reptiles; and C. molnari in fish. With the establishment of a framework for naming Cryptosporidium species and the availability of new taxonomic tools, there should be less confusion associated with the taxonomy of the genus Cryptosporidium. The clarification of Cryptosporidium taxonomy is also useful for understanding the biology of Cryptosporidium spp., assessing the public health significance of Cryptosporidium spp. in animals and the environment, characterizing transmission dynamics, and tracking infection and contamination sources. PMID:14726456

  16. Molecular and phylogenetic approaches for assessing sources of Cryptosporidium contamination in water.

    PubMed

    Ruecker, Norma J; Matsune, Joanne C; Wilkes, Graham; Lapen, David R; Topp, Edward; Edge, Thomas A; Sensen, Christoph W; Xiao, Lihua; Neumann, Norman F

    2012-10-15

    The high sequence diversity and heterogeneity observed within species or genotypes of Cryptosporidium requires phylogenetic approaches for the identification of novel sequences obtained from the environment. A long-term study on Cryptosporidium in the agriculturally-intensive South Nation River watershed in Ontario, Canada was undertaken, in which 60 sequence types were detected. Of these sequence types 33 were considered novel with no identical matches in GenBank. Detailed phylogenetic analysis identified that most sequences belonged to 17 previously described species: Cryptosporidium andersoni, Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium ubiquitum, Cryptosporidium meleagridis, muskrat I, muskrat II, deer mouse II, fox, vole, skunk, shrew, W12, W18, W19 and W25 genotypes. In addition, two new genotypes were identified, W27 and W28. C. andersoni and the muskrat II genotype were most frequently detected in the water samples. Species associated with livestock made up 39% of the total molecular detections, while wildlife associated species and genotypes accounted for 55% of the Cryptosporidium identified. The human pathogenic species C. hominis and C. parvum had an overall prevalence of 1.6% in the environment, indicating a small risk to humans from the Cryptosporidium present in the watershed. Phylogenetic analysis and knowledge of host-parasite relationships are fundamental in using Cryptosporidium as a source-tracking or human health risk assessment tool. PMID:22841595

  17. DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN SOURCE AND FINISHED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have occurred with the most notable being the 1993 episode in Milwaukee. As a result, the past decade has seen a massive effort expended on the development of methods to detect Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in source and finish...

  18. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM VIRULENCE DETERMINANTS-ARE WE THERE YET? (R828035)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to Cryptosporidium parvum in healthy individuals results in transient infection that may be asymptomatic or can result in self-limited diarrhoea. In contrast, acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients with cryptosporidiosis can experience severe manifestatio...

  19. TESTING METHODS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SPP. IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large waterborne outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.A. in 1993 prompted a search for ways to prevent large-scale waterborne outbreaks of protozoan parasitoses. Methods for detecting Cryptosporidium parvum play an integral role in strategies that lead to...

  20. UTILITY OF SURROGATES FOR MEASURING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYST INFECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water industry must assess whether Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in source and finished water are viable and/or infectious. Initial approaches measuring the infectious nature of C. parvum oocysts have focused on in vitro excystation and in vitro vital dye staining. Recen...

  1. UTILITY OF SURROGATES FOR MEASURING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS INFECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water industry must assess whether Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in source and finished water are viable and/or infectious. Initial approaches measuring the infectious nature of C. parvum oocysts have focused on in vitro excystation and in vitro vital dye staining. Recen...

  2. Cryptosporidium sp. infections in green turtles, Chelonia mydas, as a potential source of marine waterborne oocysts in the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graczyk, T.K.; Balazs, G.H.; Work, T.M.; Aguirre, A.A.; Ellis, D.M.; Murakawa, S.K.K.; Morris, R.

    1997-01-01

    For the first time, Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were identified in fecal and intestinal samples from free-ranging marine turtles, Chelonia mydas, from the Hawaiian Islands. The oocysts produced positive reactions with commercial test kits recommended for the detection of human-infectious waterborne oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum.

  3. Cryptosporidium sp. Infections in Green Turtles, Chelonia mydas, as a Potential Source of Marine Waterborne Oocysts in the Hawaiian Islands

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, T. K.; Balazs, G. H.; Work, T.; Aguirre, A. A.; Ellis, D. M.; Murakawa, S.; Morris, R.

    1997-01-01

    For the first time, Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were identified in fecal and intestinal samples from free-ranging marine turtles, Chelonia mydas, from the Hawaiian Islands. The oocysts produced positive reactions with commercial test kits recommended for the detection of human-infectious waterborne oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum. PMID:16535658

  4. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium Isolates Obtained from Humans in France

    PubMed Central

    Guyot, K.; Follet-Dumoulin, A.; Lelièvre, E.; Sarfati, C.; Rabodonirina, M.; Nevez, G.; Cailliez, J. C.; Camus, D.; Dei-Cas, E.

    2001-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is usually considered the agent of human cryptosporidiosis. However, only in the last few years, molecular biology-based methods have allowed the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes, and only a few data are available from France. In the present work, we collected samples of whole feces from 57 patients from France (11 immunocompetent patients, 35 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]-infected patients, 11 immunocompromised but non-HIV-infected patients) in whom Cryptosporidium oocysts were recognized by clinical laboratories. A fragment of the Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA gene encompassing the hypervariable region was amplified by PCR and sequenced. The results revealed that the majority of the patients were infected with cattle (29 of 57) or human (18 of 57) genotypes of Cryptosporidium parvum. However, a number of immunocompromised patients were infected with C. meleagridis (3 of 57), C. felis (6 of 57), or a new genotype of C. muris (1 of 57). This is the first report of the last three species of Cryptosporidium in humans in France. These results indicate that immunocompromised individuals are susceptible to a wide range of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. PMID:11574558

  5. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in pet chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) in China.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meng; Luo, Nannan; Wang, Haiyan; Yu, Fuchang; Wang, Rongjun; Huang, Jianying; Zhang, Longxian

    2015-10-01

    Cryptosporidium and Enterocytozoon bieneusi are the most prevalent protist pathogens responsible for inducing human and animal diseases worldwide. The aim of the present work was to determine the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in pet chinchillas in China. One hundred forty fecal samples were collected from four cities: Beijing, Zhengzhou, Anyang and Guiyang. They were then examined with PCR amplification of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) of Cryptosporidium spp. and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal RNA of E. bieneusi. The infection rates for Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi were 10.0% and 3.6%, respectively. Sequence analysis of SSU rRNA gene products identified two Cryptosporidium spp., Cryptosporidium ubiquitum (n=13) and Cryptosporidium parvum (n=1). Subtyping with the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene showed that all C. ubiquitum isolates belonged to zoonotic subtype family XIId, while the subtype of the C. parvum isolate could not be identified. Two E. bieneusi genotypes were identified in five samples, zoonotic genotypes BEB6 (n=3) and D (n=2). This is the first report of C. ubiquitum and C. parvum, and E. bieneusi in chinchillas. This result indicates that pet chinchillas may be a potential source of human infection with Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi. PMID:25988830

  6. Cryptosporidium Species and Subtypes and Clinical Manifestations in Children, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cama, Vitaliano A.; Bern, Caryn; Roberts, Jacqueline; Cabrera, Lilia; Sterling, Charles R.; Ortega, Ynes; Gilman, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether clinical manifestations are associated with genotypes or subtypes of Cryptosporidium spp., we studied a 4-year longitudinal birth cohort of 533 children in Peru. A total of 156 infection episodes were found in 109 children. Data from first infections showed that C. hominis was associated with diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, general malaise, and increased oocyst shedding intensity and duration. In contrast, C. parvum, C. meleagridis, C. canis, and C. felis were associated with diarrhea only. C. hominis subtype families were identified (Ia, Ib, Id, and Ie); all were associated with diarrhea. Ib was also associated with nausea, vomiting, and general malaise. All C. parvum specimens belonged to subtype family IIc. Analysis of risk factors did not show associations with specific Cryptosporidium spp. genotypes or subtypes. These findings strongly suggest that Cryptosporidium spp. and subtypes are linked to different clinical manifestations in children. PMID:18826821

  7. Transmission dynamics of Cryptosporidium infection in a natural population of non-human primates at Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Ekanayake, Dilrukshi K; Welch, David Mark; Kieft, Rudo; Hajduk, Stephen; Dittus, Wolfgang P J

    2007-11-01

    Infections from Cryptosporidium parvum are of interest not only to public health, but also to wildlife conservation, particularly when humans and livestock encroach on nature and thereby increase the risk of cross-species transmissions. To clarify this risk, we used polymerase chain reaction to examine the hypervariable region of the C. parvum 18S rRNA gene in feces from three monkey species. Samples were isolated from regions where disease transmission between monkeys, livestock, and humans was likely (soiled habitat) or unlikely (clean habitat). Monkey individuals, their social groups, and different species shared multiple genotypes/isolates of C. parvum. Ecological and molecular analyses suggested that Cryptosporidium infection among Toque macaques in soiled habitats was mainly the bovine genotype C. parvum. Monkeys inhabiting clean habitat, particularly gray and purple-faced langurs, lacked Cryptosporidium species/types associated with bovines. Livestock apparently was a main source of infection for wild primates. PMID:17984333

  8. First Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. Infecting Buffalo Calves in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Monally C C; Widmer, Giovanni; Zucatto, Anaiza S; Viol, Milena A; Inácio, Sandra V; Nakamura, Alex A; Coelho, Willian M D; Perri, Silvia H V; Meireles, Marcelo V; Bresciani, Katia D S

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of determining the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp., 222 fecal samples were collected from Murrah buffalo calves aged up to 6 mo. Fecal DNA was genotyped with a nested polymerase chain reaction targeting the 18S rRNA gene and sequencing of the amplified fragment. Nested 18S PCR was positive for 48.2% of the samples. Sequence analysis showed that the most frequent species in these animals was Cryptosporidium ryanae, which was present in buffalo calves as young as 5 d. The zoonotic species Cryptosporidium parvum was detected in one animal. An uncommon Cryptosporidium 18S genotype was found in buffaloes. PMID:25941018

  9. Epidemiology and public health significance of Cryptosporidium isolated from cattle, buffaloes, and humans in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M A; Abdel-Ghany, A E; Abdel-Latef, G K; Abdel-Aziz, S A; Aboelhadid, S M

    2016-06-01

    The epidemiology and public health significance of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes were investigated in Beni-Suef Governorate, Egypt. A total of 610 animal fecal samples (480 from cattle and 130 from buffaloes) beside 290 stool samples from humans were collected in the period between January and December 2014. Based on the microscopic examination, the overall estimated prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. in cattle, buffaloes, and humans was 10.2, 12.3, and 19 %, respectively. The highest detection rates were in calves less than 2 months of age (17.1 %) and diarrheic animals (13.0 %). Likewise in humans, the highest prevalence of Cryptosporidium was in infants (31.3 %) and diarrheic individuals (21.1 %). The gender distribution in humans denoted that Cryptosporidium was reported more frequently in males (21.7 %) than females (14.5 %). Based on the molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and gp60 genes were successfully amplified in 36 out of 50 samples subjected to genotyping. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the COWP fragments revealed that Cryptosporidium parvum was the only species detected in cattle (12 isolates) and buffaloes (4 isolates), while in humans, the detected species were Cryptosporidium hominis (15 isolates) and C. parvum (5 isolates). Sequence analysis of the gp60 gene identified the subtype IIdA20G1 within C. parvum isolated from both animals and humans. The common occurrence of zoonotic subtypes of C. parvum in cattle and buffaloes highlights the potential role of these animals as significant reservoirs of infection to humans. Also, the presence of C. hominis and C. parvum in humans indicates that both anthroponotic and zoonotic pathways are expected. PMID:27044415

  10. Identity and public health potential of Cryptosporidium spp. in water buffalo calves in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amer, Said; Zidan, Shereif; Feng, Yaoyu; Adamu, Haileeyesus; Li, Na; Xiao, Lihua

    2013-01-16

    Little is known about the diversity and public health significance of Cryptosporidium species in water buffaloes. In this study, we examined the distribution of Cryptosporidium spp. in water buffalo calves in Egypt. Rectal fecal specimens from 179 calves and 359 adults were screened microscopically for Cryptosporidium oocysts using modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain. Cryptosporidium spp. in 17 microscopy-positive specimens from calves were genotyped by DNA sequence analysis of the small-subunit rRNA gene, and Cryptosporidium parvum was subtyped by sequence analysis of the 60 kDa glycoprotein gene. Cryptosporidium ryanae was found in 10 specimens and C. parvum in 7 specimens, with the former belonging to the newly identified C. ryanae buffalo variant and the latter belonging to the subtypes IIdA20G1 (in 5 specimens) and IIaA15G1R1 (in 2 specimens). The prevailing occurrence of C. ryanae and the subtype family IId of C. parvum and the absence of C. bovis and C. andersoni represent some features of Cryptosporidium transmission in water buffaloes in Egypt. PMID:22963712

  11. A new genotype of Cryptosporidium from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehan; He, Tingmei; Zhong, Zhijun; Zhang, Hemin; Wang, Rongjun; Dong, Haiju; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Deng, Jiabo; Peng, Guangneng; Zhang, Longxian

    2013-10-01

    Fifty-seven fecal samples were collected from giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in the China Conservation and Research Centre for the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) in Sichuan and examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts by Sheather's sugar flotation technique. An 18-year-old male giant panda was Cryptosporidium positive, with oocysts of an average size of 4.60×3.99 μm (n=50). The isolate was genetically analyzed using the partial 18S rRNA, 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and actin genes. Multi-locus genetic characterization indicated that the present isolate was different from known Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. The closest relative was the Cryptosporidium bear genotype, with 11, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the 18S rRNA, HSP70, and actin genes, respectively. Significant differences were also observed in the COWP gene compared to Cryptosporidium mongoose genotype. The homology to the bear genotype at the 18S rRNA locus was 98.6%, which is comparable to that between Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis (99.2%), or between Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium andersoni (99.4%). Therefore, the Cryptosporidium in giant pandas in this study is considered as a new genotype: the Cryptosporidium giant panda genotype. PMID:23810821

  12. Identification of Cryptosporidium Species in Fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France.

    PubMed

    Certad, Gabriela; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Gantois, Nausicaa; Hammouma-Ghelboun, Ourida; Pottier, Muriel; Guyot, Karine; Benamrouz, Sadia; Osman, Marwan; Delaire, Baptiste; Creusy, Colette; Viscogliosi, Eric; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Aliouat-Denis, Cecile Marie; Follet, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, a protozoan parasite that can cause severe diarrhea in a wide range of vertebrates including humans, is increasingly recognized as a parasite of a diverse range of wildlife species. However, little data are available regarding the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in wild aquatic environments, and more particularly in edible freshwater fish. To evaluate the prevalence of Cryptosporidiumspp. in fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France, 41 entire fish and 100 fillets (cuts of fish flesh) were collected from fishery suppliers around the lake. Nested PCR using degenerate primers followed by sequence analysis was used. Five fish species were identified as potential hosts of Cryptosporidium: Salvelinus alpinus, Esox lucius, Coregonus lavaretus, Perca fluviatilis, and Rutilus rutilus. The presence of Cryptosporidium spp. was found in 15 out of 41 fish (37%), distributed as follows: 13 (87%) C. parvum, 1 (7%) C. molnari, and 1 (7%) mixed infection (C. parvum and C. molnari). C. molnari was identified in the stomach, while C. parvum was found in the stomach and intestine. C. molnari was also detected in 1 out of 100 analyzed fillets. In order to identify Cryptosporidium subtypes, sequencing of the highly polymorphic 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) was performed. Among the C. parvum positive samples, three gp60 subtypes were identified: IIaA15G2R1, IIaA16G2R1, and IIaA17G2R1. Histological examination confirmed the presence of potential developmental stages of C. parvum within digestive epithelial cells. These observations suggest that C. parvum is infecting fish, rather than being passively carried. Since C. parvum is a zoonotic species, fish potentially contaminated by the same subtypes found in terrestrial mammals would be an additional source of infection for humans and animals, and may also contribute to the contamination of the environment with this parasite. Moreover, the risk of human transmission is strengthened by the

  13. Identification of Cryptosporidium Species in Fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France

    PubMed Central

    Certad, Gabriela; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Gantois, Nausicaa; Hammouma-Ghelboun, Ourida; Pottier, Muriel; Guyot, Karine; Benamrouz, Sadia; Osman, Marwan; Delaire, Baptiste; Creusy, Colette; Viscogliosi, Eric; Aliouat-Denis, Cecile Marie; Follet, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, a protozoan parasite that can cause severe diarrhea in a wide range of vertebrates including humans, is increasingly recognized as a parasite of a diverse range of wildlife species. However, little data are available regarding the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in wild aquatic environments, and more particularly in edible freshwater fish. To evaluate the prevalence of Cryptosporidiumspp. in fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France, 41 entire fish and 100 fillets (cuts of fish flesh) were collected from fishery suppliers around the lake. Nested PCR using degenerate primers followed by sequence analysis was used. Five fish species were identified as potential hosts of Cryptosporidium: Salvelinus alpinus, Esox lucius, Coregonus lavaretus, Perca fluviatilis, and Rutilus rutilus. The presence of Cryptosporidium spp. was found in 15 out of 41 fish (37%), distributed as follows: 13 (87%) C. parvum, 1 (7%) C. molnari, and 1 (7%) mixed infection (C. parvum and C. molnari). C. molnari was identified in the stomach, while C. parvum was found in the stomach and intestine. C. molnari was also detected in 1 out of 100 analyzed fillets. In order to identify Cryptosporidium subtypes, sequencing of the highly polymorphic 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) was performed. Among the C. parvum positive samples, three gp60 subtypes were identified: IIaA15G2R1, IIaA16G2R1, and IIaA17G2R1. Histological examination confirmed the presence of potential developmental stages of C. parvum within digestive epithelial cells. These observations suggest that C. parvum is infecting fish, rather than being passively carried. Since C. parvum is a zoonotic species, fish potentially contaminated by the same subtypes found in terrestrial mammals would be an additional source of infection for humans and animals, and may also contribute to the contamination of the environment with this parasite. Moreover, the risk of human transmission is strengthened by the

  14. A new heterogeneous family of telomerically encoded Cryptosporidium proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Maha; Hunter, Paul R; McDonald, Vincent; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M; Tyler, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is predominantly caused by two closely related species of protozoan parasites the zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum and anthroponotic Cryptosporidium hominis which diverge phenotypically in respect to host range and virulence. Using comparative genomics we identified two genes displaying overt heterogeneity between species. Although initial work suggested both were species specific, Cops-1 for C. parvum and Chos-1 for C. hominis, subsequent study identified an abridged ortholog of Cops-1 in C. hominis. Cops-1 and Chos-1 showed limited, but significant, similarity to each other and share common features: (i) telomeric location: Cops-1 is the last gene on chromosome 2, whilst Chos-1 is the first gene on chromosome 5, (ii) encode circa 50-kDa secreted proteins with isoelectric points above 10, (iii) are serine rich, and (iv) contain internal nucleotide repeats. Importantly, Cops-1 sequence contains specific SNPs with good discriminatory power useful epidemiologically. C. parvum-infected patient sera recognized a 50-kDa protein in antigen preparations of C. parvum but not C. hominis, consistent with Cops-1 being antigenic for patients. Interestingly, anti-Cops-1 monoclonal antibody (9E1) stained oocyst content and sporozoite surface of C. parvum only. This study provides a new example of protozoan telomeres as rapidly evolving contingency loci encoding putative virulence factors. PMID:23467513

  15. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium in a wastewater treatment plant in North Germany.

    PubMed

    Ajonina, Caroline; Buzie, Christopher; Ajonina, Irene U; Basner, Alexander; Reinhardt, Heiko; Gulyas, Holger; Liebau, Eva; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is one of the most common human parasitic protozoa and is responsible for many waterborne outbreaks in several industrialized countries. The oocyst, which is the infective form, is known to be highly resistant to wastewater treatment procedures and represents a potential hazard to human populations through contaminated raw or treated wastewater. In this investigation, the occurrence of Cryptosporidium in wastewater samples was monitored and removal efficiency was assessed. Treated (effluent) and untreated (influent) wastewater samples were collected seasonally over a period of 2 years. Oocysts were repeatedly detected in influent and effluent samples collected from the treatment plant during all sampling seasons, with a mean concentration of 782 oocysts/L. The seasonal distribution showed that oocysts are predominant during autumn and winter. Molecular analyses via the small (18S) subunit of rRNA amplification and subsequent sequencing with an objective of characterizing the oocysts revealed that Cryptosporidium parvum was the dominant Cryptosporidium parasite present in wastewater. PMID:23095153

  16. Cryptosporidium infection in a veal calf cohort in France: molecular characterization of species in a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Feces from 142 animals were collected on 15 farms in the region of Brittany, France. Each sample was directly collected from the rectum of the animal and identified with the ear tag number. Animals were sampled three times, at 5, 15 and 22 weeks of age. After DNA extraction from stool samples, nested PCR was performed to amplify partial 18S-rDNA and 60 kDa glycoprotein genes of Cryptosporidium. The parasite was detected on all farms. One hundred out of 142 calves (70.4%) were found to be parasitized by Cryptosporidium. Amplified fragments were sequenced for Cryptosporidium species identification and revealed the presence of C. parvum (43.8%), C. ryanae (28.5%), and C. bovis (27%). One animal was infected with Cryptosporidium ubiquitum. The prevalence of these species was related to the age of the animal. C. parvum caused 86.7% of Cryptosporidium infections in 5-week-old calves but only 1.7% in 15-week-old animals. The analysis of the results showed that animals could be infected successively by C. parvum, C. ryanae, and C. bovis for the study period. C. parvum gp60 genotyping identifies 6 IIa subtypes of which 74.5% were represented by IIaA15G2R1. This work confirms previous studies in other countries showing that zoonotic C. parvum is the dominant species seen in young calves. PMID:22136667

  17. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in dairy cattle in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuhuang; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Zhenjie; Li, Junqiang; Wang, Chenrong; Zhao, Jinfeng; Hu, Suhui; Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Longxian; Wang, Ming

    2016-03-30

    822 fecal samples from cattle in six areas of Beijing were examined with microscopy for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts. The overall infection rates for Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis were 2.55% and 1.09%, respectively. Cryptosporidium was only detected in calves and heifers, whereas G. duodenalis was found in all age groups. Cryptosporidium spp. were characterized with a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequence analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. Two Cryptosporidium species were identified: Cryptosporidium parvum (n=12) and Cryptosporidium andersoni (n=9). Six C. parvum isolates were successfully subtyped with the gp60 gene and three subtypes were detected: IIdA19G1 (n=1), IIdA17G1 (n=1), and IIdA15G1 (n=4). Subtype IIdA17G1 is reported for the first time in cattle worldwide. Nine G. duodenalis isolates were analyzed by sequencing the triosephosphate isomerase (tpi) gene, and only G. duodenalis assemblage E was identified. Therefore, the predominance of C. parvum detected in calves was identical to that found in the Xinjiang Uyghur and Ningxia Hui Autonomous Regions, but differed considerably from that in Henan, Heilongjiang, and Shannxi Provinces. In contrast, the predominance of G. duodenalis assemblage E was more or less similar to its predominance in other areas of China or countries. Our findings confirm the unique character of the C. parvum IId subtypes in China. More systematic studies are required to better understand the transmission of Cryptosporidium and G. duodenalis in cattle in China. PMID:26921041

  18. Cryptosporidium Priming Is More Effective than Vaccine for Protection against Cryptosporidiosis in a Murine Protein Malnutrition Model

    PubMed Central

    Bartelt, Luther A.; Bolick, David T.; Kolling, Glynis L.; Zaenker, Edna I.; Lara, Ana M.; Noronha, Francisco Jose; Cowardin, Carrie A.; Moore, John H.; Turner, Jerrold R.; Warren, Cirle A.; Buck, Gregory A.; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a major cause of severe diarrhea, especially in malnourished children. Using a murine model of C. parvum oocyst challenge that recapitulates clinical features of severe cryptosporidiosis during malnutrition, we interrogated the effect of protein malnutrition (PM) on primary and secondary responses to C. parvum challenge, and tested the differential ability of mucosal priming strategies to overcome the PM-induced susceptibility. We determined that while PM fundamentally alters systemic and mucosal primary immune responses to Cryptosporidium, priming with C. parvum (106 oocysts) provides robust protective immunity against re-challenge despite ongoing PM. C. parvum priming restores mucosal Th1-type effectors (CD3+CD8+CD103+ T-cells) and cytokines (IFNγ, and IL12p40) that otherwise decrease with ongoing PM. Vaccination strategies with Cryptosporidium antigens expressed in the S. Typhi vector 908htr, however, do not enhance Th1-type responses to C. parvum challenge during PM, even though vaccination strongly boosts immunity in challenged fully nourished hosts. Remote non-specific exposures to the attenuated S. Typhi vector alone or the TLR9 agonist CpG ODN-1668 can partially attenuate C. parvum severity during PM, but neither as effectively as viable C. parvum priming. We conclude that although PM interferes with basal and vaccine-boosted immune responses to C. parvum, sustained reductions in disease severity are possible through mucosal activators of host defenses, and specifically C. parvum priming can elicit impressively robust Th1-type protective immunity despite ongoing protein malnutrition. These findings add insight into potential correlates of Cryptosporidium immunity and future vaccine strategies in malnourished children. PMID:27467505

  19. Cryptosporidium and Giardia as foodborne zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Smith, H V; Cacciò, S M; Cook, N; Nichols, R A B; Tait, A

    2007-10-21

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are major causes of diarrhoeal disease in humans, worldwide and are major causes of protozoan waterborne diseases. Both Cryptosporidium and Giardia have life cycles which are suited to waterborne and foodborne transmission. There are 16 'valid'Cryptosporidium species and a further 33+ genotypes described. Parasites which infect humans belong to the Giardia duodenalis "type", and at least seven G. duodenalis assemblages are recognised. Cryptosporidium parvum is the major zoonotic Cryptosporidium species, while G. duodenalis assemblages A and B have been found in humans and most mammalian orders. In depth studies to determine the role of non-human hosts in the transmission of Cryptosporidium and Giardia to humans are required. The use of harmonised methodology and standardised and validated molecular markers, together with sampling strategies that provide sufficient information about all contributors to the environmental (oo)cyst pool that cause contamination of food and water, are recommended. Standardised methods for detecting (oo)cysts in water are available, as are optimised, validated methods for detecting Cryptosporidium in soft fruit and salad vegetables. These provide valuable data on (oo)cyst occurrence, and can be used for species and subspecies typing using appropriate molecular tools. Given the zoonotic potential of these organisms, epidemiological, source and disease tracking investigations involve multidisciplinary teams. Here, the role of the veterinarian is paramount, particularly in understanding the requirement for adopting comprehensive sampling strategies for analysing both sporadic and outbreak samples from all potential non-human contributors. Comprehensive sampling strategies increase our understanding of parasite population biology and structure and this knowledge can be used to determine what level of discrimination is required between isolates. Genetic exchange is frequent in C. parvum populations, leading to

  20. Genotypes of Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ojuromi, Oladele T; Duan, Liping; Izquierdo, Fernando; Fenoy, Soledad M; Oyibo, Wellington A; Del Aguila, Carmen; Ashafa, Anofi O T; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2016-07-01

    Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi has improved our understanding of the transmission of both organisms in humans. In this study, to infer possible infection sources, Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in fecal specimens from 90 HIV-infected patients attending antiretroviral clinics in Lagos, Nigeria were detected and genotyped by PCR and DNA sequencing. Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi were identified in four and five patients, respectively, including the occurrence of subtype IeA11T3G3 of Cryptosporidium hominis in two patients, subtype IIcA5G3k of Cryptosporidium parvum in one patient, and Type IV of E. bieneusi in four patients. Among the remaining positive patients, one had mixed infection of Cryptosporidium meleagridis and C. hominis and one had mixed E. bieneusi genotypes. These data highlight a possible difference in major transmission routes (anthroponotic vs. zoonotic) between Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in HIV+ patients in the study area. PMID:26662459

  1. Cryptosporidium species detected in calves and cattle in Dagoretti, Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kang'ethe, Erastus K; Mulinge, Erastus K; Skilton, Robert A; Njahira, Moses; Monda, Joseph G; Nyongesa, Concepta; Mbae, Cecilia K; Kamwati, Stanley K

    2012-09-01

    A total of 1,734 cattle faecal samples from 296 dairy-keeping households were collected from urban settings in Nairobi, Kenya. Modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining method and an immunofluorescence assay were used to identify those samples with Cryptosporidium oocyst infection. Oocysts from positive faecal samples were isolated by Sheather's sucrose flotation method and picked from the concentrate using cover slips. Genomic DNA was extracted from 124 of the faecal samples that were positive for Cryptosporidium and was used as template for nested PCR of the 18S rRNA gene. Twenty-five samples (20 %) were PCR-positive for Cryptosporidium, and 24 of the PCR products were successfully cloned and sequenced. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis identified 17 samples (68 %) as Cryptosporidium parvum-like, four samples (16 %) as Cryptosporidium ryanae, three samples (12 %) as Cryptosporidium andersoni and one sample (4 %) as Cryptosporidium hominis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genotyping study to report C. parvum-like, C. andersoni and C. hominis in cattle from Kenya. The results of this study show Cryptosporidium infections in calves and cattle may be potential zoonotic reservoirs of the parasite that infects humans. PMID:22797974

  2. Detection of viable Cyptosporidium parvum in soil by reverse transcription real time PCR targeting hsp70 mRNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extraction of high-quality mRNA from Cryptosporidium parvum is a key step in PCR detection of viable oocysts in environmental samples. Current methods for monitoring oocysts are limited to water samples; therefore, the goal of this study was to develop a rapid and sensitive proce...

  3. Giardia and Cryptosporidium in cetaceans on the European Atlantic coast.

    PubMed

    Reboredo-Fernández, Aurora; Ares-Mazás, Elvira; Martínez-Cedeira, José A; Romero-Suances, Rafael; Cacciò, Simone M; Gómez-Couso, Hipólito

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was investigated in cetacean specimens stranded on the northwestern coast of Spain (European Atlantic coast) by analysis of 65 samples of large intestine from eight species. The parasites were identified by direct immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and by PCR amplification of the β-giardin gene, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and the SSU-rDNA gene of Giardia and the SSU-rDNA gene of Cryptosporidium. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in 7 (10.8 %) and 9 samples (13.8 %), respectively. In two samples, co-infection with both parasites was observed. Giardia duodenalis assemblages A, C, D and F, and Cryptosporidium parvum were identified. This is the first report of G. duodenalis in Balaenoptera acutorostrata, Kogia breviceps and Stenella coeruleoalba and also the first report of Cryptosporidium sp. in B. acutorostrata and of C. parvum in S. coeruleoalba and Tursiops truncatus. These results extend the known host range of these waterborne enteroparasites. PMID:25418072

  4. Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium in Goats across Four Provincial Level Areas in China

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Rongsheng; Wang, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Yuxuan; Chen, Yongjun; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Zhaoguo

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence, species and subtypes of Cryptosporidium in goats from Guangdong Province, Hubei Province, Shandong Province, and Shanghai City of China. Six hundred and four fecal samples were collected from twelve goat farms, and the overall infection rate was 11.4% (69/604). Goats infected with Cryptosporidium were found in eleven farms across four provincial areas, and the infection rate ranged from 2.9% (1/35) to 25.0% (9/36). Three Cryptosporidium species were identified. Cryptosporidium xiaoi (45/69, 65.2%) was the dominant species, followed by C. parvum (14/69, 20.3%) and C. ubiquitum (10/69, 14.5%). The infection rate of Cryptosporidium spp. was varied with host age and goat kids were more susceptible to be infected than adult goats. Subtyping C. parvum and C. ubiquitum positive samples revealed C. parvum subtype IIdA19G1 and C. ubiquitum subtype XIIa were the most common subtypes. Other C. parvum subtypes were detected as well, such as IIaA14G2R1, IIaA15G1R1, IIaA15G2R1 and IIaA17G2R1. All of these subtypes have also been detected in humans, suggesting goats may be a potential source of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis. This was the first report of C. parvum subtypes IIaA14G2R1, IIaA15G1R1 and IIaA17G2R1 infecting in goats and the first molecular identification of C. parvum and its subtypes in Chinese goats. PMID:25343501

  5. Characteristics of Cryptosporidium Transmission in Preweaned Dairy Cattle in Henan, China▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongjun; Wang, Helei; Sun, Yanru; Zhang, Longxian; Jian, Fuchun; Qi, Meng; Ning, Changshen; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence and public health significance of cryptosporidiosis in preweaned calves in China, 801 fecal samples from eight farms in seven areas in Henan Province were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts. The overall infection rate of Cryptosporidium was 21.5%, with the farm in Xinxiang having the highest prevalence (40%). No significant difference in infection rates was observed between seasons. Cryptosporidium spp. were characterized by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and DNA sequencing of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. The SSU rRNA-based PCR identified four Cryptosporidium species, including Cryptosporidium parvum (54/172), C. bovis (65/172), C. ryanae (19/172), and C. andersoni (12/172), and the occurrence of infections with mixed species (22/172). The earliest detection of C. bovis was in calves of 1 week of age, showing that the prepatent period was shorter than the previously stated 10 to 12 days. Infections with C. parvum peaked in summer, whereas C. bovis dominated in autumn and winter. There was no apparent difference in the age of cattle infected with either C. parvum or C. bovis. Sequencing analysis of the gp60 gene showed all 67 C. parvum samples belonged to subtype IIdA19G1. These findings suggested that the transmission of Cryptosporidium spp. in preweaned calves in Henan, China, appeared to be different from other areas both at genotype and subtype levels. Further molecular epidemiologic studies (including samples from both calves and humans) are needed to elucidate the transmission dynamics and public significance of C. parvum in cattle in China. PMID:21177898

  6. Prevalence and characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy cattle in Nile River delta provinces, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amer, Said; Zidan, Shereif; Adamu, Haileeyesus; Ye, Jianbin; Roellig, Dawn; Xiao, Lihua; Feng, Yaoyu

    2013-11-01

    Molecular characterizations of Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy cattle in industrialized nations have mostly shown a dominance of Cryptosporidium parvum, especially its IIa subtypes in pre-weaned calves. Few studies, however, have been conducted on the distribution of Cryptosporidium species and C. parvum subtypes in various age groups of dairy cattle in developing countries. In this study, we examined the prevalence and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium in dairy cattle in four Nile River delta provinces in Egypt. Modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast microscopy was used to screen for Cryptosporidium oocysts in 1974 fecal specimens from animals of different ages on 12 farms. Positive fecal specimens were identified from all studied farms with an overall prevalence of 13.6%. By age group, the infection rates were 12.5% in pre-weaned calves, 10.4% in post-weaned calves, 22.1% in heifers, and 10.7% in adults. PCR-RFLP and DNA sequence analyses of microscopy-positive fecal specimens revealed the presence of four major Cryptosporidium species. In pre-weaned calves, C. parvum was most common (30/69 or 43.5%), but Cryptosporidium ryanae (13/69 or 18.8%), Cryptosporidium bovis (7/69 or 10.2%), and Cryptosporidium andersoni (7/69 or 10.2%) were also present at much higher frequencies seen in most industrialized nations. Mixed infections were seen in 12/69 (17.4%) of genotyped specimens. In contrast, C. andersoni was the dominant species (193/195 or 99.0%) in post-weaned calves and older animals. Subtyping of C. parvum based on sequence analysis of the 60kDa glycoprotein gene showed the presence of subtypes IIdA20G1 in nine specimens, IIaA15G1R1 in 27 specimens, and a rare subtype IIaA14G1R1r1b in one specimen. The common occurrence of non-C. parvum species and IId subtypes in pre-weaned calves is a distinct feature of cryptosporidiosis transmission in dairy cattle in Egypt. The finding of the same two dominant IIa and IId C. parvum subtypes recently found in humans in

  7. Flow cytometric detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in human stool samples.

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, L M; Dang, H; Okhuysen, P C; Chappell, C L

    1997-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an important pathogen that causes diarrhea in virtually all human populations. Improved diagnostic methods are needed to understand the risk factors, modes of transmission, and impact of cryptosporidiosis. In the present study, we fluorescently labeled and counted C. parvum oocysts by flow cytometry (FC) and developed a simple and efficient method of processing human stool samples for FC analysis. Formed stool (suspended in phosphate-buffered saline) from an asymptomatic, healthy individual was seeded with known concentrations of oocysts, and oocysts were labeled with a cell wall-specific monoclonal antibody and detected by FC. The method described herein resulted in a mean oocyst recovery rate of 45% +/- 16% (median, 42%), which consistently yielded a fourfold increase in sensitivity compared to direct fluorescent-antibody assay of seeded stool samples. However, in many instances, FC detected as few as 10(3) oocysts per ml. Thus, FC provides a reproducible and sensitive method for C. parvum oocyst detection. PMID:9230372

  8. First report of Cryptosporidium species in farmed and wild buffalo from the Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Alireza; Phasey, Jordan; Boland, Tony; Ryan, Una

    2016-03-01

    A molecular epidemiological survey of Cryptosporidium from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the Northern Territory in Australia was conducted. Fecal samples were collected from adult farmed (n = 50) and wild buffalo (n = 50) and screened using an 18S quantitative PCR (qPCR). Positives were typed by sequence analysis of 18S nested PCR products. The qPCR prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in farmed and wild buffalo was 30 and 12 %, respectively. Sequence analysis identified two species: C. parvum and C. bovis, with C. parvum accounting for ~80 % of positives typed from the farmed buffalo fecal samples compared to 50 % for wild buffalo. Subtyping at the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) locus identified C. parvum subtypes IIdA19G1 (n = 4) and IIdA15G1 (n = 1) in the farmed buffalo and IIaA18G3R1 (n = 2) in the wild buffalo. The presence of C. parvum, which commonly infects humans, suggests that water buffaloes may contribute to contamination of rivers and waterways with human infectious Cryptosporidium oocysts, and further research on the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in buffalo populations in Australia is required. PMID:26758449

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A CT EQUATION FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite, has been implicated in a number of waterborne disease outbreaks. It is difficult to inactivate using free chlorine, but appears to be inactivated by ozone. Therefore, the USEPA has promulgated the Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatm...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A CT EQUATION FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite, has been implicated in a number of disease outbreaks. It is difficult to inactivate using free chlorine, but appears to be inactivated by ozone. Therefore, the USEPA has promulgated the Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, w...

  11. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF HUMAN DOSE-RESPONSE DATA. (R829180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three dose–response studies were conducted with healthy volunteers using different Cryptosporidium parvum isolates (IOWA, TAMU, and UCP). The study data were previously analyzed for median infectious dose (ID50) using a simple cumulative percent endpoi...

  12. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF HUMAN DOSE-RESPONSE DATA. (R828035)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three dose¯response studies were conducted with healthy volunteers using different Cryptosporidium parvum isolates (IOWA, TAMU, and UCP). The study data were previously analyzed for median infectious dose (ID50) using a simple cumulative perce...

  13. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium Species and Giardia duodenalis from Symptomatic Cambodian Children

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Catrin E.; Elwin, Kristin; Phot, Nget; Seng, Chanthou; Mao, Saroeun; Suy, Kuong; Kumar, Varun; Nader, Johanna; Bousfield, Rachel; Perera, Sanuki; Bailey, J. Wendi; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Parry, Christopher M.; Chalmers, Rachel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In a prospective study, 498 single faecal samples from children aged under 16 years attending an outpatient clinic in the Angkor Hospital for Children, northwest Cambodia, were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts using microscopy and molecular assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 2.2% (11/498) of samples using microscopy and in 7.7% (38/498) with molecular tests. Giardia duodenalis cysts were detected in 18.9% (94/498) by microscopy and 27.7% (138/498) by molecular tests; 82% of the positive samples (by either method) were from children aged 1–10 years. Cryptosporidium hominis was the most common species of Cryptosporidium, detected in 13 (34.2%) samples, followed by Cryptosporidium meleagridis in 9 (23.7%), Cryptosporidium parvum in 8 (21.1%), Cryptosporidium canis in 5 (13.2%), and Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium ubiquitum in one sample each. Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum positive samples were subtyped by sequencing the GP60 gene: C. hominis IaA16R6 and C. parvum IIeA7G1 were the most abundant subtypes. Giardia duodenalis was typed using a multiplex real-time PCR targeting assemblages A and B. Assemblage B (106; 76.8% of all Giardia positive samples) was most common followed by A (12.3%) and mixed infections (5.1%). Risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium were malnutrition (AOR 9.63, 95% CI 1.67–55.46), chronic medical diagnoses (AOR 4.51, 95% CI 1.79–11.34) and the presence of birds in the household (AOR 2.99, 95% CI 1.16–7.73); specifically C. hominis (p = 0.03) and C. meleagridis (p<0.001) were associated with the presence of birds. The use of soap was protective against Giardia infection (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58–0.95). Conclusions/Significance This is the first report to describe the different Cryptosporidium species and subtypes and Giardia duodenalis assemblages in Cambodian children. The variety of Cryptosporidium species detected indicates both

  14. Investigating source water Cryptosporidium concentration, species and infectivity rates during rainfall-runoff in a multi-use catchment.

    PubMed

    Swaffer, Brooke A; Vial, Hayley M; King, Brendon J; Daly, Robert; Frizenschaf, Jacqueline; Monis, Paul T

    2014-12-15

    Protozoan pathogens present a significant human health concern, and prevention of contamination into potable networks remains a key focus for drinking water providers. Here, we monitored the change in Cryptosporidium concentration in source water during high flow events in a multi-use catchment. Furthermore, we investigated the diversity of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes present in the source water, and delivered an oocyst infectivity fraction. There was a positive and significant correlation between Cryptosporidium concentration and flow (ρ = 0.756) and turbidity (ρ = 0.631) for all rainfall-runoff events, despite variable source water pathogen concentrations. Cell culture assays measured oocyst infectivity and suggested an overall source water infectious fraction of 3.1%. No infectious Cryptosporidium parvum or Cryptosporidium hominis were detected, although molecular testing detected C. parvum in 7% of the samples analysed using PCR-based molecular techniques. Twelve Cryptosporidium species/genotypes were identified using molecular techniques, and were reflective of the host animals typically found in remnant vegetation and agricultural areas. The inclusion of molecular approaches to identify Cryptosporidium species and genotypes highlighted the diversity of pathogens in water, which originated from various sources across the catchment. We suggest this mixing of runoff water from a range of landuses containing diverse Cryptosporidium hosts is a key explanation for the often-cited difficulty forming strong pathogen-indicator relationships. PMID:25306487

  15. Short report: possible Cryptosporidium muris infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, T; Hosea, D; Ranuh, I G; Uga, S; Yanagi, T; Kohno, S

    2000-01-01

    Oocysts of cryptosporidia whose morphology resembled that of Cryptosporidium muris were found in the stool of 2 healthy girls in Surabaya, Indonesia. The oocysts were predominantly oval and measured 7.75+/-0.17 x 5.55+/-0.13 microm (mean+/-SD). The number of oocysts excreted were more than 10(5) per gram of stool. The oocysts were well stained with fluorescein-conjugated monoclonal antibody to Cryptosporidium. The specimens from both girls containing the oocysts showed a positive result by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for the genus Cryptosporidium, but a negative result by the PCR using primers specific for C. parvum. The 2 girls passed oocysts for 5 and 6 days, respectively. They did not complain of any symptoms during the passage of oocysts. PMID:10761726

  16. Cryptosporidium ryanae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in cattle (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Fayer, Ronald; Santín, Mónica; Trout, James M

    2008-10-01

    A new species, Cryptosporidium ryanae, is described from cattle. Oocysts of C. ryanae, previously identified as the Cryptosporidium deer-like genotype and recorded as such in GenBank (AY587166, EU203216, DQ182597, AY741309, and DQ871345), are similar to those of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium bovis but smaller. This genotype has been reported to be prevalent in cattle worldwide. Oocysts obtained from a calf for the present study are the smallest Cryptosporidium oocysts reported in mammals, measuring 2.94-4.41micromx2.94-3.68microm (mean=3.16micromx3.73microm) with a length/width shape index of 1.18 (n=40). The pre-patent period for two Cryptosporidium-naïve calves fed C. ryanae oocysts was 11 days and the patent period was 15-17 days. Oocysts were not infectious for BALB/c mice or lambs. Fragments of the SSU-rDNA, HSP-70, and actin genes amplified by PCR were purified and PCR products were sequenced. Multi-locus analysis of the three unlinked loci demonstrated the new species to be distinct from all other species and also demonstrated a lack of recombination, providing further evidence of species status. Based on morphological, molecular and biological data, this geographically widespread parasite found only in Bos taurus calves is recognized as a new species and is named C. ryanae. PMID:18583057

  17. Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Hofmannová, Lada; Hlásková, Lenka; Květoňová, Dana; Vítovec, Jiří; McEvoy, John; Sak, Bohumil

    2014-03-17

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. is proposed to reflect its specificity for hedgehogs under natural and experimental conditions. Oocysts of C. erinacei are morphologically indistinguishable from Cryptosporidium parvum, measuring 4.5-5.8 μm (mean=4.9 μm) × 4.0-4.8 μm (mean=4.4 μm) with a length to width ratio of 1.13 (1.02-1.35) (n=100). Oocysts of C. erinacei obtained from a naturally infected European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) were infectious for naïve 8-week-old four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris); the prepatent period was 4-5 days post infection (DPI) and the patent period was longer than 20 days. C. erinacei was not infectious for 8-week-old SCID and BALB/c mice (Mus musculus), Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), or golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, 60 kDa glycoprotein, actin, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, thrombospondin-related adhesive protein of Cryptosporidium-1, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. erinacei is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species. PMID:24529828

  18. Identification of a high diversity of Cryptosporidium species genotypes and subtypes in a pediatric population in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Síle F; Smith, Huw V; Kirwan, Patrick; Nichols, Rosely A B; Asaolu, Samuel O; Connelly, Lisa; Holland, Celia V

    2010-04-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to determine the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in 1,636 children in Nigeria. Oocyst prevalence ranged from 15.6% to 19.6% over one year. Cryptosporidium hominis (34), C. parvum (25), C. parvum/C. hominis (4), C. meleagridis (5), Cryptosporidium rabbit genotype (5), Cryptosporidium cervine genotype (3), and C. canis (1) were identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Glycoprotein 60 subgenotyping showed that 28 amplifiable C. hominis isolates consisted of 12 subtypes that belonged to 5 subtype families (Ia, Ib, Id, Ie, and 1 novel subtype family, Ih) and 23 amplifiable C. parvum isolates consisted of 6 subtypes that belonged to 4 subtype families (IIa, IIc, Iii, and IIm). Three C. meleagridis isolates sub-genotyped by sequence analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene fragment were type 1. This study is the first one to genetically characterize Cryptosporidium species and subtypes in Nigeria and highlights the presence of a high Cryptosporidium diversity in this pediatric population. PMID:20348508

  19. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. from fecal samples of birds kept in captivity in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Alex Akira; Simões, Daniel Castendo; Antunes, Rômulo Godik; da Silva, Deuvânia Carvalho; Meireles, Marcelo Vasconcelos

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in birds kept in captivity in Brazil. A total of 966 samples from 18 families of birds was collected and stored in 5% potassium dichromate solution at 4 degrees C until processing. Oocysts were purified in Sheather sugar solution following extraction of genomic DNA. Molecular analyses were performed using nested-PCR for amplification of fragments of the 18S subunit of rRNA gene and of the actin gene. Amplification of Cryptosporidium DNA fragments was obtained in 47 (4.86%) samples. Sequencing of amplified fragments and phylogenetic analyses allowed the identification of Cryptosporidium baileyi in a black vulture (Coragyps atratus), a domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and a saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola); Cryptosporidium galli in canaries (Serinus canaria), a cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus) and lesser seed-finches (Oryzoborus angolensis); Cryptosporidium meleagridis in a domestic chicken (G. g. domesticus); Cryptosporidium parvum in a cockatiel (N. hollandicus); Cryptosporidium avian genotype I in a canary (S. canaria) and an Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus); Cryptosporidium avian genotype II in ostriches (Struthio camelus) and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III in a cockatiel (N. hollandicus) and a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicolis). PMID:19683397

  20. Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Asma, I; Sim, B L H; Brent, R D; Johari, S; Yvonne Lim, A L

    2015-06-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a particular concern in immunocompromised individuals where symptoms may be severe. The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium infections in HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia in order to identify risk factors and facilitate control measures. A modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid fast staining method was used to test for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in the stools of 346 HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia. Standard coproscopical methods were used to identify infections with other protozoan or helminths parasites. To identify the species of Cryptosporidium, DNA was extracted and nested-PCR was used to amplify a portion of the SSU rRNA gene. A total of 43 (12.4%) HIV-infected patients were found to be infected with Cryptosporidium spp. Of the 43 Cryptosporidium-positive HIV patients, 10 (23.3%) also harboured other protozoa, and 15 (34.9%) had both protozoa and helminths. The highest rates of cryptosporidiosis were found in adult males of Malay background, intravenous drug users, and those with low CD4 T cell counts (i.e., < 200 cells/mm3). Most were asymptomatic and had concurrent opportunistic infections mainly with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. DNA sequence analysis of 32 Cryptosporidium isolates identified C. parvum (84.3%), C. hominis (6.3%), C. meleagridis (6.3%), and C. felis (3.1%). The results of the present study revealed a high prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients. The results also confirmed the potential significance of zoonotic transmission of C. parvum in HIV infected patients, as it was the predominant species found in this study. However, these patients were found to be susceptible to a wide range of Cryptosporidium species. Epidemiological and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium isolates provides clinicians and researchers with further information regarding the origin of the infection, and may enhance treatment and control

  1. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM METALLOAMINOPEPTIDASE INHIBITORS PREVENT IN VITRO EXCYSTATION. (R824759)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. Euclidization in the Almagestum parvum.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The Almagestum parvum, a summary of Ptolemy's Almagest written around the year 1200, provided a new stylistic framework for the content of theAlmagest's first six books. The author of the Almagestum parvum used a narrower range of types of mathematical writing and supplied his work with principles, which were listed at the beginning of each book and which were followed by propositions and demonstrations. Specific values were to a large extent replaced by general quantities, which would stand for a class of particulars. These and similar changes in the Almagestum parvum reveal the author's concern with reshaping astronomy into a discipline in the mold of Euclid's Elements, which emphasized the generality of propositions and proofs and connected Ptolemaic astronomy to the "mathematical toolbox" available in the Middle Ages. The Almagestum parvum was an influential part of a larger trend of understanding Ptolemaic astronomy in a non-Ptolemaic style. PMID:26415354

  3. Cryptosporidium source tracking in the Potomac River watershed.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenli; Chen, Plato; Villegas, Eric N; Landy, Ronald B; Kanetsky, Charles; Cama, Vitaliano; Dearen, Theresa; Schultz, Cherie L; Orndorff, Kenneth G; Prelewicz, Gregory J; Brown, Miranda H; Young, Kim Roy; Xiao, Lihua

    2008-11-01

    To better characterize Cryptosporidium in the Potomac River watershed, a PCR-based genotyping tool was used to analyze 64 base flow and 28 storm flow samples from five sites in the watershed. These sites included two water treatment plant intakes, as well as three upstream sites, each associated with a different type of land use. The uses, including urban wastewater, agricultural (cattle) wastewater, and wildlife, posed different risks in terms of the potential contribution of Cryptosporidium oocysts to the source water. Cryptosporidium was detected in 27 base flow water samples and 23 storm flow water samples. The most frequently detected species was C. andersoni (detected in 41 samples), while 14 other species or genotypes, almost all wildlife associated, were occasionally detected. The two common human-pathogenic species, C. hominis and C. parvum, were not detected. Although C. andersoni was common at all four sites influenced by agriculture, it was largely absent at the urban wastewater site. There were very few positive samples as determined by Environmental Protection Agency method 1623 at any site; only 8 of 90 samples analyzed (9%) were positive for Cryptosporidium as determined by microscopy. The genotyping results suggest that many of the Cryptosporidium oocysts in the water treatment plant source waters were from old calves and adult cattle and might not pose a significant risk to human health. PMID:18776033

  4. Distribution and Genetic Characterizations of Cryptosporidium spp. in Pre-Weaned Dairy Calves in Northeastern China’s Heilongjiang Province

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fengkun; Zhang, Longxian; Cao, Jianping; Zhang, Xiaoli; Ling, Hong; Liu, Aiqin; Shen, Yujuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium spp. are common parasites of humans and animals. Farm animals, especially pre-weaned calves, are considered to be one of main animal reservoir hosts of Cryptosporidium in the transmission of human cryptosporidiosis. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution and genotypes of Cryptosporidium spp. in pre-weaned calves using molecular tools and to assess zoonotic transmission and elucidate the public health significance in northeastern China. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 151 fecal specimens from pre-weaned calves were collected in Heilongjiang Province and were screened for Cryptosporidium by PCR. The average prevalence of Cryptosporidium was 47.68% (72/151). Cryptosporidium spp. were characterized by DNA sequencing of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Based on the SSU rRNA gene, five Cryptosporidium spp. were identified, including C. bovis (n = 34), C. andersoni (n = 26), C. ryanae (n = 5), C. meleagridis (n = 5) and C. parvum (n = 2). The SSU rRNA nucleotide sequences were identical to each other, respectively, within C. ryanae, C. parvum, C. meleagridis and C. andersoni. Four types of C. bovis were found in the SSU rRNA gene, with two novel types. The gp60 gene was successfully sequenced in one C. parvum isolate and three C. meleagridis isolates, with IIdA19G1 for C. parvum and IIIeA22G2R1 for C. meleagridis. Conclusion/Significance Molecular analysis indicates that Cryptosporidium spp. are endemic in pre-weaned calves in Heilongjiang Province. The findings of C. parvum and C. meleagridis suggested the possibility of zoonotic transmission and public health significance. The transmission dynamics of C. parvum and C. meleagridis needed to be clarified by further molecular epidemiologic studies from humans and animals. Whether calves could act as the natural reservoirs of C. meleagridis needed to be confirmed by more systematic experimental infection

  5. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Wild Ducks along the Rio Grande River Valley in Southern New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Ryan C.; Rock, Channah M.; Oshima, Kevin H.

    2002-01-01

    Fecal samples were taken from wild ducks on the lower Rio Grande River around Las Cruces, N. Mex., from September 2000 to January 2001. Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts were purified from 69 samples by sucrose enrichment followed by cesium chloride (CsCl) gradient centrifugation and were viewed via fluorescent-antibody (FA) staining. For some samples, recovered cysts and oocysts were further screened via PCR to determine the presence of Giardia lamblia and Crytosporidium parvum. The results of this study indicate that 49% of the ducks were carriers of Cryptosporidium, and the Cryptosporidium oocyst concentrations ranged from 0 to 2,182 oocysts per g of feces (mean ± standard deviation, 47.53 ± 270.3 oocysts per g); also, 28% of the ducks were positive for Giardia, and the Giardia cyst concentrations ranged from 0 to 29,293 cysts per g of feces (mean ± standard deviation, 436 ± 3,525.4 cysts per g). Of the 69 samples, only 14 had (oo)cyst concentrations that were above the PCR detection limit. Samples did test positive for Cryptosporidium sp. However, C. parvum and G. lamblia were not detected in any of the 14 samples tested by PCR. Ducks on their southern migration through southern New Mexico were positive for Cryptosporidium and Giardia as determined by FA staining, but C. parvum and G. lamblia were not detected. PMID:11772622

  6. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in wild ducks along the Rio Grande River valley in southern New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Ryan C; Rock, Channah M; Oshima, Kevin H

    2002-01-01

    Fecal samples were taken from wild ducks on the lower Rio Grande River around Las Cruces, N. Mex., from September 2000 to January 2001. Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts were purified from 69 samples by sucrose enrichment followed by cesium chloride (CsCl) gradient centrifugation and were viewed via fluorescent-antibody (FA) staining. For some samples, recovered cysts and oocysts were further screened via PCR to determine the presence of Giardia lamblia and Crytosporidium parvum. The results of this study indicate that 49% of the ducks were carriers of Cryptosporidium, and the Cryptosporidium oocyst concentrations ranged from 0 to 2,182 oocysts per g of feces (mean +/- standard deviation, 47.53 +/- 270.3 oocysts per g); also, 28% of the ducks were positive for Giardia, and the Giardia cyst concentrations ranged from 0 to 29,293 cysts per g of feces (mean +/- standard deviation, 436 +/- 3,525.4 cysts per g). Of the 69 samples, only 14 had (oo)cyst concentrations that were above the PCR detection limit. Samples did test positive for Cryptosporidium sp. However, C. parvum and G. lamblia were not detected in any of the 14 samples tested by PCR. Ducks on their southern migration through southern New Mexico were positive for Cryptosporidium and Giardia as determined by FA staining, but C. parvum and G. lamblia were not detected. PMID:11772622

  7. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy cattle from farms in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fu

    2012-01-01

    Fecal samples of 2,056 dairy cattle from 14 farms were collected in three geographical regions of China and stained using a modified acid-fast staining technique to identify Cryptosporidium oocysts. A total of 387 (18.82%) positive samples were identified and further analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers designed to amplify DNA fragments from the small subunit ribosomal RNA. The PCR products were sequenced and the sequences were deposited in the GenBank database under accession numbers EU369377-84 and GU070730-33. Phylogenetic analysis was performed and a distances matrix generated from these sequences confirmed the existence of Cryptosporidium (C.) parvum 'mouse' genotype, C. bovis, C. andersoni, C. hominis, and C. serpentis in cattle. These results represent the first report on the prevalence and genetic identification of Cryptosporidium species, and may contribute to a better understanding of the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in cattle in China. PMID:22437531

  8. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in children from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Olivia; González-Díaz, Mariana; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Cano, Manuel; Durazo, María; Bernal, Rosa M; Hernandez, Jesús; Xiao, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a parasitic disease caused by Cryptosporidium spp. In immunocompetent individuals, it usually causes an acute and self-limited diarrhea; in infants, infection with Cryptosporidium spp. can cause malnutrition and growth retardation, and declined cognitive ability. In this study, we described for the first time the distribution of C. parvum and C. hominis subtypes in 12 children in Mexico by sequence characterization of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene of Cryptosporidium. Altogether, 7 subtypes belonging to 4 subtype families of C. hominis (Ia, Ib, Id and Ie) and 1 subtype family of C. parvum (IIa) were detected, including IaA14R3, IaA15R3, IbA10G2, IdA17, IeA11G3T3, IIaA15G2R1 and IIaA16G1R1. The frequency of the subtype families and subtypes in the samples analyzed in this study differed from what was observed in other countries. PMID:24755606

  9. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in Children from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Olivia; González-Díaz, Mariana; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Cano, Manuel; Durazo, María; Bernal, Rosa M.; Hernandez, Jesús; Xiao, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a parasitic disease caused by Cryptosporidium spp. In immunocompetent individuals, it usually causes an acute and self-limited diarrhea; in infants, infection with Cryptosporidium spp. can cause malnutrition and growth retardation, and declined cognitive ability. In this study, we described for the first time the distribution of C. parvum and C. hominis subtypes in 12 children in Mexico by sequence characterization of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene of Cryptosporidium. Altogether, 7 subtypes belonging to 4 subtype families of C. hominis (Ia, Ib, Id and Ie) and 1 subtype family of C. parvum (IIa) were detected, including IaA14R3, IaA15R3, IbA10G2, IdA17, IeA11G3T3, IIaA15G2R1 and IIaA16G1R1. The frequency of the subtype families and subtypes in the samples analyzed in this study differed from what was observed in other countries. PMID:24755606

  10. Seasonal variation in the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium infection in dairy cattle in the New York City Watershed.

    PubMed

    Szonyi, Barbara; Bordonaro, Rebecca; Wade, Susan E; Mohammed, Hussni O

    2010-07-01

    We conducted cross-sectional studies in the New York City Watershed to ensure a valid estimate of the risk associated with Cryptosporidium infection in dairy herds. Our aims were to obtain species-specific estimates of the prevalence of Cryptosporidium in dairy cattle and to investigate seasonal variations in prevalence. We validated our empirical estimates using a Bayesian approach. Samples were collected on 32 study farms, once in each of 3 different seasons using an age-stratified sampling design. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum-like species and Cryptosporidium andersoni among the 1911 animals tested by the flotation method was 5% and 1%, respectively. Among preweaned calves (<65 days of age), the prevalence of C. parvum-like species was twice as high in the summer (26%) compared with the winter (11%). Herd prevalence showed the same seasonal trend. Preweaned calves were also shedding C. andersoni at an average intensity of 20 oocysts per gram of feces. We did not detect C. parvum-like oocysts in cattle older than 5 months. Sequencing of a portion of the 18s rRNA gene revealed that in the summer, 42% of the C. parvum-like oocysts shed by preweaned calves were zoonotic, compared with >74% during the rest of the year. Both empirical and stochastic methods revealed a summer peak in the prevalence of C. parvum-like oocysts in preweaned calves. Determining whether seasonal variation in the prevalence and proportion of Cryptosporidium species shed by preweaned calves is due to management practices or ecological factors will have important implications for effective control of this parasite. PMID:20397026

  11. Prevalence and Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium in Yaks in Qinghai Province of China

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Rongsheng; Wang, Xiaojuan; Li, Chunhua; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Peng; Li, Zhengfeng; Lei, Mengtong; Cai, Jinzhong; Chen, Zhaoguo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, species and subtypes of Cryptosporidium infecting yaks in the Qinghai Province of Northwestern China. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. was detected by microscopy and nested-PCR. A total of 586 fecal samples were collected from yaks in 6 counties, of which 142 (24.2%) samples tested positive for Cryptosporidium. The small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene of fifty-five samples were amplified and sequenced successfully and demonstrated that Cryptosporidium bovis (31/55, 56.4%) was the most common species, followed by C. parvum (16/55, 29.1%) and C. ryanae (5/55, 9.0%). Mixed infections of C. parvum and C. bovis (n = 2), C. ryanae and C. bovis (n = 1) were also detected. All three species were found in yaks ranging in age from <1 year, 1–2 years, to >2 years. Cryptosporidium was most commonly detected in spring (28.4%), followed by summer (20.9%), then winter (17.5%). Cryptosporidium parvum positive samples were subtyped using the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Subtypes IIaA15G2R1 (n = 8), IIaA16G2R1 (n = 2), IIaA14G1R1 (n = 1), IIaA14G2R1 (n = 1) and IIaA16G3R1 (n = 1) were detected. All of these subtypes are zoonotic, and may pose a potential threat to human health. PMID:24086416

  12. Cryptosporidium excystation and invasion: getting to the guts of the matter.

    PubMed

    Smith, Huw V; Nichols, Rosely A B; Grimason, Anthony M

    2005-03-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum excystation and host cell invasion have been characterized in some detail ultrastructurally. However, until recently, the biochemical and molecular basis of host-parasite interactions and parasite- and host-specific molecules involved in excystation, motility and host cell invasion have been poorly understood. This article describes our understanding of Cryptosporidium excystation and the events leading to host cell invasion, and draws from information available about these processes in other apicomplexans. Many questions remain but, once the specific mechanisms are identified, they could prove to be novel targets for drug delivery. PMID:15734661

  13. The Structural Basis of Cryptosporidium-Specific IMP Dehydrogenase Inhibitor Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, Iain S.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Riera, Thomas V.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Zhang, Minjia; Cuny, Gregory D.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2010-03-29

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a potential biowarfare agent, an important AIDS pathogen, and a major cause of diarrhea and malnutrition. No vaccines or effective drug treatment exist to combat Cryptosporidium infection. This parasite relies on inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) to obtain guanine nucleotides, and inhibition of this enzyme blocks parasite proliferation. Here, we report the first crystal structures of CpIMPDH. These structures reveal the structural basis of inhibitor selectivity and suggest a strategy for further optimization. Using this information, we have synthesized low-nanomolar inhibitors that display 10{sup 3} selectivity for the parasite enzyme over human IMPDH2.

  14. A Screening Pipeline for Antiparasitic Agents Targeting Cryptosporidium Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharling, Lisa; Liu, Xiaoping; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Maurya, Sushil K.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Striepen, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Background The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is responsible for significant disease burden among children in developing countries. In addition Cryptosporidiosis can result in chronic and life-threatening enteritis in AIDS patients, and the currently available drugs lack efficacy in treating these severe conditions. The discovery and development of novel anti-cryptosporidial therapeutics has been hampered by the poor experimental tractability of this pathogen. While the genome sequencing effort has identified several intriguing new targets including a unique inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), pursuing these targets and testing inhibitors has been frustratingly difficult. Methodology and Principal Findings Here we have developed a pipeline of tools to accelerate the in vivo screening of inhibitors of C. parvum IMPDH. We have genetically engineered the related parasite Toxoplasma gondii to serve as a model of C. parvum infection as the first screen. This assay provides crucial target validation and a large signal window that is currently not possible in assays involving C. parvum. To further develop compounds that pass this first filter, we established a fluorescence-based assay of host cell proliferation, and a C. parvum growth assay that utilizes automated high-content imaging analysis for enhanced throughput. Conclusions and Significance We have used these assays to evaluate C. parvum IMPDH inhibitors emerging from our ongoing medicinal chemistry effort and have identified a subset of 1,2,3-triazole ethers that exhibit excellent in vivo selectivity in the T. gondii model and improved anti-cryptosporidial activity. PMID:20706578

  15. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. Isolated From Immunocompromised Patients and Children

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Abdollah; Rashno, Zahra; Samarbafzadeh, Alireza; Khademvatan, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cryptosporidium is known to be one of the most important causes of diarrhea in children and immunocompromised patients. Genotype characterization of Cryptosporidium species in each region would help in the treatment of this disease, as well as to locate the source of infection and to prevent the disease. Objectives: This current research was conducted in order to analyze the molecular characterization of isolated Cryptosporidium spp. in the Southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: In this survey, 390 fecal samples were collected from immunocompromised individuals and children under five-years-of-age. Parasitic infection was evaluated using wet mount preparation, formalin ether, a modified acid fast staining method and microscopic examination. Finally, a PCR-RFLP assay was performed on the extracted DNA collected from fecal samples that were positive for Cryptosporidium by the acid fast method. Results: Among the 390 fecal samples, 16 cases (4.1%) were infected with Cryptosporidium. Molecular and genotype characterization found the following protozoan species; 11 Cryptosporidium parvum (68.8%), 4 C. hominis (25%), and one case of C. meleagridis (6.2%). Conclusions: The present study emphasized the public health importance of Cryptosporidium spp. in the study area. In addition, it seems that zoonotic species are the most important causes of infection in the region. As far as we are aware this the first report of a C. meleagridis infection in Iran. PMID:25147696

  16. Identification and differentiation of Cryptosporidium species by capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Power, Michelle L; Holley, Marita; Ryan, Una M; Worden, Paul; Gillings, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidium species generally lack distinguishing morphological traits, and consequently, molecular methods are commonly used for parasite identification. Various methods for Cryptosporidium identification have been proposed, each with their advantages and disadvantages. In this study, we show that capillary electrophoresis coupled with single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) is a rapid, simple and cost-effective method for the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Species could be readily differentiated based on the SSCP mobility of amplified 18S rRNA gene molecules. Clones that differed by single-nucleotide polymorphisms could be distinguished on CE-SSCP mobility. Profiles of species known to have heterogenic copies of 18S rRNA gene contained multiple peaks. Cloning and sequencing of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium fayeri and Cryptosporidium possum genotype 18S rRNA gene amplicons confirmed that these multiple peaks represented type A and type B 18S rRNA gene copies. CE-SSCP provides a reliable and sensitive analysis for epidemiological studies, environmental detection and diversity screening. PMID:21087296

  17. Comparison of Method 1623 and Cell Culture-PCR for Detection of Cryptosporidium spp. in Source Waters

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, Mark W.; Di Giovanni, George D.; Clancy, Jennifer L.; Bukhari, Zia; Bukhari, Shan; Rosen, Jeffrey S.; Sobrinho, Jose; Frey, Michelle M.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of Cryptosporidium occurrence in six watersheds by method 1623 and the integrated cell culture-PCR (CC-PCR) technique provided an opportunity to evaluate these two methods. The average recovery efficiencies were 58.5% for the CC-PCR technique and 72% for method 1623, but the values were not significantly different (P = 0.06). Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 60 of 593 samples (10.1%) by method 1623. Infectious oocysts were detected in 22 of 560 samples (3.9%) by the CC-PCR technique. There was 87% agreement between the total numbers of samples positive as determined by method 1623 and CC-PCR for four of the sites. The other two sites had 16.3 and 24% correspondence between the methods. Infectious oocysts were detected in all of the watersheds. Overall, approximately 37% of the Cryptosporidium oocysts detected by the immunofluorescence method were viable and infectious. DNA sequence analysis of the Cryptosporidium parvum isolates detected by CC-PCR showed the presence of both the bovine and human genotypes. More than 90% of the C. parvum isolates were identified as having the bovine or bovine-like genotype. The estimates of the concentrations of infectious Cryptosporidium and the resulting daily and annual risks of infection compared well for the two methods. The results suggest that most surface water systems would require, on average, a 3-log reduction in source water Cryptosporidium levels to meet potable water goals. PMID:12571019

  18. Molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in cats (Felis catus) in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Ying, Joyce Lau Jie; Monis, Paul; Ryan, Una

    2015-08-01

    Little is known of the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in domestic cats in Western Australia and their potential role as zoonotic reservoirs for human infection. In the present study, a total of 345 faecal samples from four different sources were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia by PCR and genotyped by sequence analysis. Oocyst numbers and cyst numbers for Cryptosporidium and Giardia respectively were also determined using quantitative PCR assays. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected in 9.9% (95% CI 6.7-13.0) and 10.1% (95% CI 7.0-13.3) of cats in Western Australia respectively. Sequence analysis at the 18S rRNA locus identified five Cryptosporidium species/genotypes; C. felis (n = 8), C. muris (n = 1), C. ryanae (n = 1), Cryptosporidium rat genotype III (n = 5) and a novel genotype most closely related to Cryptosporidium rat genotype III in one isolate. This is the first report of C. ryanae and Cryptosporidium rat genotype III in cats. For Giardia, assemblage F the most commonly identified species, while only 1 assemblage sequence was detected. Since most human cases of cryptosporidiosis are caused by C. parvum and C. hominis and human cases of giardiasis are caused by G. duodenalis assemblage A and B, the domestic cats in the present study are likely to be of low zoonotic risk to pet owners in Perth. Risk analyses identified that elderly cats (more than 6 years) were more prone to Cryptosporidium and Giardia infections than kittens (less than 6 months) (P = 0.009). Clinical symptoms were not associated with the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia infections in cats. PMID:25959691

  19. Peri-parturient rise of Cryptosporidium oocysts in cows: new insights provided by duplex quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Valérie; Berzano, Marco; Speybroeck, Niko; Berkvens, Dirk; Mulcahy, Grace M; Murphy, Thomas M

    2012-10-26

    In order to clarify if a peri-parturient rise of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts occurs in cows, faecal samples from 42 cows on two farms were collected. These samples were taken during the pre-parturient, the peri-parturient and the post-parturient periods. Two methods were used to detect the oocysts, a nested-PCR coupled with sequencing and a duplex real-time PCR (qPCR) that quantified Cryptosporidium spp. DNA concentration. The qPCR results were adjusted using a hierarchical Bayesian model taking into account within and between run variation. Generalised Estimating Equation models (GEE) were used to determine if peri-parturient cows were at greater risk of being infected than pre- or post-parturient cows. Fourteen dairy cows exhibited a peri-parturient and post-parturient rise in the excretion of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts, other than the zoonotic C. parvum. The cows in the suckler beef farm were the only ones infected with the zoonotic species C. parvum at calving. Due to the low concentration of oocysts excreted mainly from species other than C. parvum, it would appear unlikely that cows act as a source of infection for their calves or contribute significantly to environmental contamination. PMID:22681972

  20. First molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from Bubalus bubalis (water buffalo) in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Abeywardena, Harshanie; Jex, Aaron R; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Haydon, Shane R; Stevens, Melita A; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a molecular epidemiological survey of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from Bubalus bubalis (water buffalo) on two extensive farms (450 km apart) in Victoria, Australia. Faecal samples (n=476) were collected from different age groups of water buffalo at two time points (six months apart) and tested using a PCR-based mutation scanning-targeted sequencing-phylogenetic approach, employing markers within the small subunit of ribosomal RNA (designated pSSU) and triose phosphate isomerase (ptpi) genes. Based on pSSU data, Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium bovis and Cryptosporidium genotypes 1, 2 (each 99% similar genetically to Cryptosporidium ryanae) and 3 (99% similar to Cryptosporidium suis) were detected in two (0.4%), one (0.2%), 38 (8.0%), 16 (3.4%) and one (0.2%) of the 476 samples tested, respectively. Using ptpi, Giardia duodenalis assemblages A and E were detected in totals of 56 (11.8%) and six (1.3%) of these samples, respectively. Cryptosporidium was detected on both farms, whereas Giardia was detected only on farm B, and both genera were detected in 1.5% of all samples tested. The study showed that water buffaloes on these farms excreted C. parvum and/or G. duodenalis assemblage A, which are consistent with those found in humans, inferring that these particular pathogens are of zoonotic significance. Future work should focus on investigating, in a temporal and spatial manner, the prevalence and intensity of such infections in water buffaloes in various geographical regions in Australia and in other countries. PMID:23886616

  1. Adhesive-tape recovery combined with molecular and microscopic testing for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts on experimentally contaminated fresh produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum suspended in water were applied to the surface of apples, cucumbers, peaches, and tomatoes at concentrations of 100, 50 or 10 oocysts within circles drawn with a permanent marker. Approximately 18 hr later, skin containing uncontaminated and contaminated circles from each prod...

  2. Assessment of Zoonotic Transmission of Giardia and Cryptosporidium between Cattle and Humans in Rural Villages in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ehsan, Amimul M.; Geurden, Thomas; Casaert, Stijn; Parvin, Sonia M.; Islam, Taohidul M.; Ahmed, Uddin M.; Levecke, Bruno; Vercruysse, Jozef; Claerebout, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Giardia and Cryptosporidium are important causes of diarrhoea in Bangladesh. The high prevalence of both parasites in humans and cattle in rural Bangladesh and the common use of water ponds by village inhabitants and their animals suggest a potential for zoonotic transmission. Direct transmission of Giardia and Cryptosporidium between cattle and their handlers and indirect transmission through water ponds was investigated. Faecal/stool samples were collected from 623 calves and 125 calf handlers in a cross-sectional survey. In two villages, water samples were collected monthly from water ponds and faecal/stool samples were collected monthly from inhabitants and their cattle. Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in water samples and in faecal/stool samples and positive samples were genotyped, to determine their human or animal origin. The prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in calves was 22% and 5% respectively. In calf handlers, the prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was 11.2% and 3.2% respectively. Both in the cross-sectional survey and in the longitudinal study in the villages, G. duodenalis assemblage E was most prevalent in calves, while in humans assemblage AII, BIII and BIV were found. In cattle, Cryptosporidium parvum, C. bovis and C. andersoni were identified, but no Cryptosporidium sequences were obtained from humans. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in 14/24 and 12/24 water samples respectively. G. duodenalis assemblage E and BIV (-like), as well as C. andersoni and C. hominis were identified. Although the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in both water ponds suggests that water-borne transmission of Giardia and Cryptosporidium is possible, the genotyping results indicate that there is no significant direct or indirect (water-borne) transmission of Giardia between cattle and people in this area of rural Bangladesh. No conclusions could be drawn for Cryptosporidium, because of the low number of sequences that

  3. Prevalence and Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium Spp. In Diarrheic Children from Gonbad Kavoos City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    SHARBATKHORI, Mitra; NAZEMALHOSSEINI MOJARAD, Ehsan; TAGHIPOUR, Niloofar; PAGHEH, Abdol Sattar; MESGARIAN, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cryptosporidium is an intestinal protozean parasite causing waterborne and foodborne outbreaks of diarrheal diseases. The present study was performed in order to find prevalence and subtypes of Cryptosporidium among children with diarrhea in Gonbad Kavoos City, Northern Iran. Methods: Diarrheic samples were collected from 547 children. The initial parasitological diagnosis was made based on detection of oocysts using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast staining method. The positive microscopically samples were selected for sequence analysis of partial 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Results: Out of 547 collected samples, 27 (4.94%) were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts. Fifteen from 27 positive samples successfully amplified in PCR. Sequences analysis of gp60 gene in 15 Cryptosporidium isolates revealed that all of them (100%) were C. parvum. The results showed three subtypes of IIa subtype family (7 cases) including IIaA16G2R1, IIaA17G1R1, IIaA22G3R1 and one subtype of IId subtype family (8 cases). The most common allele was IId A17G1d (53.3%). Conclusion: The predominance of zoonotic subtype families of C. parvum species (IIa, IId) in the present study is in concordance with previous studies in Iran and emphasizes the significance of zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis in the country. PMID:26622299

  4. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium scrofarum on commercial swine farms in the Czech Republic and its associations with age and husbandry practices.

    PubMed

    Němejc, Karel; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Kernerová, Naděžda; Rost, Michael; Cama, Vitaliano A; Kváč, Martin

    2013-03-01

    From 2009 to 2011, the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. was investigated on 22 farms in the Czech Republic. A total of 1,620 individual faecal samples of pigs of all age categories (pre-weaned, starters, pre-growers, growers, and sows) were evaluated for presence of Cryptosporidium spp. by standard microscopy and molecular tools. Genotyping was done through PCR amplification and characterization of the SSU rRNA (species-specific protocols) and GP60 loci. Cryptosporidium spp. was found on 16 of 22 farms with a range 0.9-71.4 %. Overall, 194 (12 %) specimens were positive by microscopy and 353 (21.8 %) by PCR. While RFLP and direct sequencing of the PCR-amplified products showed presence of Cryptosporidium suis (142), Cryptosporidium scrofarum (195), Cryptosporidium muris (3) and 13 samples had mixed infections with C. suis and C. scrofarum, species-specific molecular tools identified C. suis (224), C. scrofarum (208), Cryptosporidium parvum subtype IIa A16G1R1b (1), and C. muris (3). In addition, a total of 82 pigs had concurrent infections with C. suis and C. scrofarum. The analysis by age showed that C. suis was primarily detected among pre-weaned, whereas C. scrofarum was mostly detected among starters, especially those weaned at a younger age. Moreover, C. scrofarum never has been detected in animals younger than 6 weeks of age. Also, piglets weaned at 3 weeks of age were twice more likely to be infected with C. scrofarum than piglets weaned at an older age. Pigs raised on straw bedding were more likely to have Cryptosporidium than pigs raised on slats/slurry systems. The infections with different species were not associated with loose faeces or intensity of oocyst shedding, even when comparing different age groups. PMID:23271566

  5. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium scrofarum on commercial swine farms in the Czech Republic and its associations with age and husbandry practices

    PubMed Central

    Němejc, Karel; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Kernerová, Naděžda; Rost, Michael; Cama, Vitaliano A.; Kváč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    From 2009 to 2011, the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. was investigated on 22 farms in the Czech Republic. A total of 1,620 individual faecal samples of pigs of all age categories (pre-weaned, starters, pre-growers, growers, and sows) were evaluated for presence of Cryptosporidium spp. by standard microscopy and molecular tools. Genotyping was done through PCR amplification and characterization of the SSU rRNA (species-specific protocols) and GP60 loci. Cryptosporidium spp. was found on 16 of 22 farms with a range 0.9–71.4 %. Overall, 194 (12 %) specimens were positive by microscopy and 353 (21.8 %) by PCR. While RFLP and direct sequencing of the PCR-amplified products showed presence of Cryptosporidium suis (142), Cryptosporidium scrofarum (195), Cryptosporidium muris (3) and 13 samples had mixed infections with C. suis and C. scrofarum, species-specific molecular tools identified C. suis (224), C. scrofarum (208), Cryptosporidium parvum subtype IIa A16G1R1b (1), and C. muris (3). In addition, a total of 82 pigs had concurrent infections with C. suis and C. scrofarum. The analysis by age showed that C. suis was primarily detected among pre-weaned, whereas C. scrofarum was mostly detected among starters, especially those weaned at a younger age. Moreover, C. scrofarum never has been detected in animals younger than 6 weeks of age. Also, piglets weaned at 3 weeks of age were twice more likely to be infected with C. scrofarum than piglets weaned at an older age. Pigs raised on straw bedding were more likely to have Cryptosporidium than pigs raised on slats/slurry systems. The infections with different species were not associated with loose faeces or intensity of oocyst shedding, even when comparing different age groups. PMID:23271566

  6. Prevalence and Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium Species in Dairy Calves in Central Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Wegayehu, Teklu; Karim, Robiul; Anberber, Manyazewal; Adamu, Haileeyesus; Erko, Berhanu; Zhang, Longxian; Tilahun, Getachew

    2016-01-01

    The burden of cryptosporidiosis due to Cryptosporidium parvum is well documented in HIV-positive patients in Ethiopia. However, the role of animals in zoonotic transmission of the disease is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and genotypes of Cryptosporidium species in dairy calves; to assess the role of cattle in zoonotic transmission in central Ethiopia. A total of 449 fecal samples were collected and screened using modified Ziehl-Neelson staining method and PCR targeting the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium was 9.4% (42/449) and 15.8% (71/449) as detected by microscopy and nested PCR, respectively. The prevalence of infection varied significantly across the study areas with the higher prevalence being observed in Chancho 25.4% (30/118). Crossbred calves had significantly higher prevalence of Cryptosporidium than indigenous zebu. Genotyping results revealed the presence of C. andersoni (76.1%), C. bovis (19.7%) and C. ryanae (4.2%). The occurrence of these Cryptosporidium species appeared to be age-related. C. andersoni constituted 92.1% of the Cryptosporidium infection in calves older than 3 months. Sequence analysis also showed the existence of intra-species variation at SSU rRNA gene. Findings of the current study indicate that cattle may not be an important source of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis in central Ethiopia. Further molecular studies are needed to support this observation from other part of the country. PMID:27135243

  7. Prevalence and Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium Species in Dairy Calves in Central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Wegayehu, Teklu; Karim, Robiul; Anberber, Manyazewal; Adamu, Haileeyesus; Erko, Berhanu; Zhang, Longxian; Tilahun, Getachew

    2016-01-01

    The burden of cryptosporidiosis due to Cryptosporidium parvum is well documented in HIV-positive patients in Ethiopia. However, the role of animals in zoonotic transmission of the disease is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and genotypes of Cryptosporidium species in dairy calves; to assess the role of cattle in zoonotic transmission in central Ethiopia. A total of 449 fecal samples were collected and screened using modified Ziehl-Neelson staining method and PCR targeting the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium was 9.4% (42/449) and 15.8% (71/449) as detected by microscopy and nested PCR, respectively. The prevalence of infection varied significantly across the study areas with the higher prevalence being observed in Chancho 25.4% (30/118). Crossbred calves had significantly higher prevalence of Cryptosporidium than indigenous zebu. Genotyping results revealed the presence of C. andersoni (76.1%), C. bovis (19.7%) and C. ryanae (4.2%). The occurrence of these Cryptosporidium species appeared to be age-related. C. andersoni constituted 92.1% of the Cryptosporidium infection in calves older than 3 months. Sequence analysis also showed the existence of intra-species variation at SSU rRNA gene. Findings of the current study indicate that cattle may not be an important source of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis in central Ethiopia. Further molecular studies are needed to support this observation from other part of the country. PMID:27135243

  8. Mussels (Perna perna) as bioindicator of environmental contamination by Cryptosporidium species with zoonotic potential.

    PubMed

    Mariné Oliveira, Geisi Ferreira; do Couto, Melissa Carvalho Machado; de Freitas Lima, Marcelo; do Bomfim, Teresa Cristina Bergamo

    2016-04-01

    Sources of contamination such as animal feces runoff, organic fertilizer application, and the release of partially treated or untreated sewage can lead to the contamination of aquatic environments by Cryptosporidium spp. The quality of mussels as food is closely related to the sanitary conditions of the marine environment where these bivalves are found. Marine mollusks are filter feeders that are able to retain Cryptosporidium oocysts in their tissue, thus functioning as bioindicators. A total of 72 pooled mussel samples of the species Perna perna were collected at two sites (A and B) in the municipality of Mangaratiba, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Sampling involved removal of 30 mussels, from each collection site every month for one year. The 30 mussels from each sampling were then allocated into three groups of 10. Two Cryptosporidium spp. genes (18S and GP60) were targeted for DNA amplification from the samples obtained. After purification, all of the products obtained were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were performed. Of the 72 samples analyzed using the nested-PCR for the 18S gene target, 29.2% were positive for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. Of these samples, 52.4% were collected at site A (ie 11/21) and 47.6% at site B (ie 10/21). The 18S genes of all the samples considered positive for Cryptosporidium spp. were sequenced, and the following three species were identified: Cryptosporidium parvum, C. meleagridis, and C. andersoni. Three distinct C. parvum subtypes (IIaA19G2R2; IIaA20G2R2; IIaA20G3R2) were identified using the GP60 gene. More studies to evaluate the zoonotic potential of this species should be performed as both sampling locations contain human and/or animal fecal contaminants. PMID:26977402

  9. Mussels (Perna perna) as bioindicator of environmental contamination by Cryptosporidium species with zoonotic potential

    PubMed Central

    Mariné Oliveira, Geisi Ferreira; do Couto, Melissa Carvalho Machado; de Freitas Lima, Marcelo; do Bomfim, Teresa Cristina Bergamo

    2016-01-01

    Sources of contamination such as animal feces runoff, organic fertilizer application, and the release of partially treated or untreated sewage can lead to the contamination of aquatic environments by Cryptosporidium spp. The quality of mussels as food is closely related to the sanitary conditions of the marine environment where these bivalves are found. Marine mollusks are filter feeders that are able to retain Cryptosporidium oocysts in their tissue, thus functioning as bioindicators. A total of 72 pooled mussel samples of the species Perna perna were collected at two sites (A and B) in the municipality of Mangaratiba, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Sampling involved removal of 30 mussels, from each collection site every month for one year. The 30 mussels from each sampling were then allocated into three groups of 10. Two Cryptosporidium spp. genes (18S and GP60) were targeted for DNA amplification from the samples obtained. After purification, all of the products obtained were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were performed. Of the 72 samples analyzed using the nested-PCR for the 18S gene target, 29.2% were positive for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. Of these samples, 52.4% were collected at site A (ie 11/21) and 47.6% at site B (ie 10/21). The 18S genes of all the samples considered positive for Cryptosporidium spp. were sequenced, and the following three species were identified: Cryptosporidium parvum, C. meleagridis, and C. andersoni. Three distinct C. parvum subtypes (IIaA19G2R2; IIaA20G2R2; IIaA20G3R2) were identified using the GP60 gene. More studies to evaluate the zoonotic potential of this species should be performed as both sampling locations contain human and/or animal fecal contaminants. PMID:26977402

  10. Cryptosporidium (Crypto) Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cryptosporidium Tracking in the United States CryptoNet Healthy Water Links Healthy Water Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water Global ... you requested has moved to Illness & Symptoms. Healthy Water Links Healthy Water Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water Global ...

  11. Cryptosporidium: Prevention - Immunocompromised Persons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cryptosporidium Tracking in the United States CryptoNet Healthy Water Links Healthy Water Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water Global ... diarrhea, have it tested for Crypto. Avoid swallowing water when swimming in the ocean, lakes, rivers, or ...

  12. Cryptosporidium, organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite found in contaminated water. It has been increasingly recognized as the cause of outbreaks of diarrhea when water supplies become contaminated. In normal individuals, it is a ...

  13. PAIRED CITY CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SEROSURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1996, serological responses to two Cryptosporidium antigens were determined for 200 Las Vegas (LV), Nevada, and 200 Albuquerque, New Mexico, blood donors to evaluate associations between endemic infections, water exposures, and other risk factors. LV uses chlorinated filtered...

  14. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium in Children in an Urban Informal Settlement of Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mbae, Cecilia; Mulinge, Erastus; Waruru, Anthony; Ngugi, Benjamin; Wainaina, James; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Globally Cryptosporidium and Giardia species are the most common non-bacterial causes of diarrhoea in children and HIV infected individuals, yet data on their role in paediatric diarrhoea in Kenya remains scant. This study investigated the occurrence of Cryptosporidium species, genotypes and subtypes in children, both hospitalized and living in an informal settlement in Nairobi. Methods This was a prospective cross-sectional study in which faecal specimen positive for Cryptosporidium spp. by microscopy from HIV infected and uninfected children aged five years and below presenting with diarrhoea at selected outpatient clinics in Mukuru informal settlements, or admitted to the paediatric ward at the Mbagathi District Hospital were characterized. The analysis was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the 18srRNA gene for species identification and PCR-sequencing of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene for subtyping. Results C. hominis was the most common species of Cryptosporidium identified in125/151(82.8%) of the children. Other species identified were C. parvum 18/151(11.9%), while C. felis and C. meleagridis were identified in 4 and 2 children, respectively. Wide genetic variation was observed within C. hominis, with identification of 5 subtype families; Ia, Ib, Id, Ie and If and 21 subtypes. Only subtype family IIc was identified within C. parvum. There was no association between species and HIV status or patient type. Conclusion C. hominis is the most common species associated with diarrhoea in the study population. There was high genetic variability in the C. hominis isolates with 22 different subtypes identified, whereas genetic diversity was low within C. parvum with only one subtype family IIc identified. PMID:26691531

  15. Molecular seasonal, age and gender distributions of Cryptosporidium in diarrhoeic Egyptians: distinct endemicity.

    PubMed

    El-Badry, A A; Al-Antably, A S A; Hassan, M A; Hanafy, N A; Abu-Sarea, E Y

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a worldwide gastrointestinal disease caused by the protozoan Cryptosporidium parasite. It has a broad range of seasonal and age-related prevalence. We aimed to study the molecular prevalence and seasonality of Cryptosporidium over a period of 1 year in a cohort of Egyptian diarrhoeic patients. Stool samples were collected from 865 diarrhoeic patients attending outpatient clinics of Cairo University hospitals, from all age groups over a 12-month period, examined microscopically for faecal Cryptosporidium oocysts by the acid-fast staining method and for copro-DNA detection using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) assays. PCR-positive samples were characterised molecularly by nPCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to determine Cryptosporidium genotypes. Cryptosporidium copro-DNA was detected in 19.5% of the collected samples throughout the year, with a major peak in summer (August) and a small rise in spring (April). Infection was mainly C. hominis (95.8%) followed by C. parvum (3.0%), affecting all age groups, with predominance in the pre-school age group, and decrease with age. There were statistically significant associations between the detection of Cryptosporidium and season, diarrhoea, patient age and drinking water, while gender, contact with animals and presence of mucus in stool showed no association. Cryptosporidium in diarrhoeic Egyptians was of distinct endemicity, with the bi-model mostly influenced by population dynamics, with a clear high prevalence in pre-school children and predominating anthroponotic (C. hominis) transmission throughout the year. The obtained results highlight Cryptosporidium as a water contaminant and an important cause of health problems in Egypt, necessitating further studies of the risk factors. PMID:26440040

  16. Prevalence and Genotyping of Cryptosporidium spp. in Farm Animals in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    MAHFOUZ, Magdy Elsayed; MIRA, Nabila; AMER, Said

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we examined the prevalence and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium in buffalo, dairy cattle and sheep in different farms at Kafr El Sheikh Province, Egypt. Rectal fecal samples, including 466 samples from buffalo, 1697 from cattle and 120 from sheep, were collected from different ages and screened by modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast microscopy for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts. All studied farms were positives with an overall prevalence of 1.29% in buffalo (4.17% in claves versus 0.48% in adults), 7.07% in cattle (6.90% in calves versus 10.20% and 6.10% in heifers and adults, respectively) and 2.50% in sheep (4.40% in lambs versus 1.30% in adults). PCR-RFLP analyses of small-subunit rRNA genes from positive specimens revealed the occurrence of C. parvum and C. ryanae in buffalo; C. parvum, C. ryanae, C. bovis and C. andersoni in cattle and only C. xiaoi in sheep. Genotypes distribution showed that C. ryanae was the dominant species (60.0%) followed by C. parvum (40.0%) in buffalo calves. Meanwhile, in cattle calves, C. parvum was the commonest species (74.23%) followed by C. ryanae (16.10%) and C. bovis (9.70%). Subtyping of C. parvum based on sequence analysis of the polymorphic 60 kDa glycoprotein gene locus showed the presence of subtypes IIdA20G1 and IIaA15G1R1 in both buffalo and cattle calves, addressing the potential role of calves in zoonotic cryptosporidiosis in Egypt. PMID:25649937

  17. [Investigation of the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. in different water sources in Mersin province, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Aslan, Gönül; Bayram, Gül; Otağ, Feza; Direkel, Sahin; Taylan Özkan, Ayşegül; Ceber, Kemal; Emekdaş, Gürol

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an intracellular protozoon that causes enteritis in human and animals. Contaminated water and food are the major sources for the transmission of oocysts via oral-fecal route. It is reported that the prevalence of cryptosporidiosis is higher in developing countries than developed countries because of inefficient sanitation and disinfection facilities for drinking water. The most frequently detected species is Cryptosporidium parvum leading to high morbidity in healthy subjects and also fatal infections in immunocompromised patients. The acid-fast staining method is widely used in the diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis. Nowadays, Cryptosporidium could easily be detected in water supplies and asymptomatic carriers by molecular techniques to obtain epidemiological data. In this study it was aimed to detect and identify Cryptosporidium oocysts in different water sources in Mersin province, Turkey. A total of 135 water samples (70 taps, 50 wells and 15 sewage) collected from city center (n= 25) and from Tarsus (n= 32), Mezitli (n= 33) and Karaduvar (n= 45) counties between March 2007 and May 2009 were included in the study. Water samples in 10 liter volumes, were filtered by 0.45 µm pore-sized membrane filter vacuum/ pressure pumping technique. Cryptosporidium oocysts in filtrates were detected by modified cold Kinyoun acid-fast stain (MCK) technique and also identified and typed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. MCK yielded three and PCR yielded seven positive results. All the strains were identified as C.parvum by PCR-RFLP method. All of the three MCK-positive samples were also found positive with PCR, however four PCR positive samples were MCK-negative. Thus, the prevalence of C.parvum was estimated as 5.2% (7/135) in our region. Of seven positive samples, one was a sewage water sample collected from the city center, while the remaining (two tap water, two well water and two sewage water samples

  18. Age-related detection and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium scrofarum in pre- and post-weaned piglets and adult pigs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yui, Takeshi; Nakajima, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Norishige; Kon, Marina; Abe, Niichiro; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Shibahara, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of Cryptosporidium in pigs in Japan by immunofluorescence staining of fecal samples and characterization of isolates by multilocus sequencing. The 344 animals sampled on eight farms included pre-weaned piglets (<1 month old; n = 55), weaned piglets (1-2 months old; n = 65), finished pigs (2-4 months old, n = 105) and of 4-6 months old (n = 67), sows (n = 36), and boars (n = 16). Average prevalence of Cryptosporidium on farms was 32.6%, ranging from 4.9 to 58.1%, decreasing with animal age (prevalences of <1 month old, 1-2 months old, 2-4 months old, 4-6 months old, sows, and boars were 27.3, 47.7, 41.9, 22.4, 11.1, 18.8%, respectively). Piglets (<1 and 1-2 months old) showing signs of diarrhea shed relatively more oocysts (5.28 in average log scale of oocysts per gram) in feces than piglets with normal or loose stools (those of 4.90). Thirty seven successful sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene among 62 examined samples revealed that all of the identified isolates were Cryptosporidium suis or Cryptosporidium scrofarum, which are generally specific to pigs, and that other species, such as zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum, were absent. Interestingly, C. suis was frequently found in piglets younger than 2 months old, while C. scrofarum infection was more prevalent in older pigs which also showed increased prevalence of mixed C. suis and C. scrofarum infections. Sequencing of actin gene loci revealed the existence of variants of both Cryptosporidium species in pigs in Japan. Although the number of pigs examined in this study was relatively low, our results suggest that Cryptosporidium infection is widespread among pigs in Japan. In addition, the possibility of age-related specificity and pathogenicity in pig infections is also suggested. PMID:24189974

  19. The Burden of Cryptosporidium Diarrheal Disease among Children < 24 Months of Age in Moderate/High Mortality Regions of Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, Utilizing Data from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS)

    PubMed Central

    Nasrin, Dilruba; Blackwelder, William C.; Wu, Yukun; Farag, Tamer H.; Panchalingam, Sandra; Sur, Dipika; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Saha, Debasish; Adegbola, Richard; Alonso, Pedro L.; Breiman, Robert F.; Bassat, Quique; Tamboura, Boubou; Sanogo, Doh; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Manna, Byomkesh; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Kanungo, Suman; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Qureshi, Shahida; Quadri, Farheen; Hossain, Anowar; Das, Sumon K.; Antonio, Martin; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Mandomando, Inacio; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Acácio, Sozinho; Omore, Richard; Oundo, Joseph O.; Ochieng, John B.; Mintz, Eric D.; O’Reilly, Ciara E.; Berkeley, Lynette Y.; Livio, Sofie; Tennant, Sharon M.; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Nataro, James P.; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Mishcherkin, Vladimir; Zhang, Jixian; Liu, Jie; Houpt, Eric R.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Myron M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of Cryptosporidium as a pediatric enteropathogen in developing countries is recognized. Methods Data from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS), a 3-year, 7-site, case-control study of moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) and GEMS-1A (1-year study of MSD and less-severe diarrhea [LSD]) were analyzed. Stools from 12,110 MSD and 3,174 LSD cases among children aged <60 months and from 21,527 randomly-selected controls matched by age, sex and community were immunoassay-tested for Cryptosporidium. Species of a subset of Cryptosporidium-positive specimens were identified by PCR; GP60 sequencing identified anthroponotic C. parvum. Combined annual Cryptosporidium-attributable diarrhea incidences among children aged <24 months for African and Asian GEMS sites were extrapolated to sub-Saharan Africa and South Asian regions to estimate region-wide MSD and LSD burdens. Attributable and excess mortality due to Cryptosporidium diarrhea were estimated. Findings Cryptosporidium was significantly associated with MSD and LSD below age 24 months. Among Cryptosporidium-positive MSD cases, C. hominis was detected in 77.8% (95% CI, 73.0%-81.9%) and C. parvum in 9.9% (95% CI, 7.1%-13.6%); 92% of C. parvum tested were anthroponotic genotypes. Annual Cryptosporidium-attributable MSD incidence was 3.48 (95% CI, 2.27–4.67) and 3.18 (95% CI, 1.85–4.52) per 100 child-years in African and Asian infants, respectively, and 1.41 (95% CI, 0.73–2.08) and 1.36 (95% CI, 0.66–2.05) per 100 child-years in toddlers. Corresponding Cryptosporidium-attributable LSD incidences per 100 child-years were 2.52 (95% CI, 0.33–5.01) and 4.88 (95% CI, 0.82–8.92) in infants and 4.04 (95% CI, 0.56–7.51) and 4.71 (95% CI, 0.24–9.18) in toddlers. We estimate 2.9 and 4.7 million Cryptosporidium-attributable cases annually in children aged <24 months in the sub-Saharan Africa and India/Pakistan/Bangladesh/Nepal/Afghanistan regions, respectively, and ~202,000 Cryptosporidium

  20. Comparison of propidium monoazide-quantitative PCR and reverse transcription quantitative PCR for viability detection of fresh Cryptosporidium oocysts following disinfection and after long-term storage in water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum were used to evaluate applicability of two quantitative PCR (qPCR) viability detection methods in raw surface water and disinfection treated water. Propidium monoazide-qPCR targeting hsp70 gene was compared to reverse transcription (RT)-...

  1. Identifying host sources, human health risk and indicators of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in a Canadian watershed influenced by urban and rural activities.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Michele I; Ong, Corinne S L; Prystajecky, Natalie A; Isaac-Renton, Judith L; Huck, Peter M

    2012-06-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia were characterized in a watershed in southern Ontario, Canada, over a 2½ year period. River samples were collected every two weeks, primarily near a municipal drinking water treatment plant intake. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were frequently detected with an overall occurrence rate of 88 and 97%, respectively. Giardia concentrations were higher than Cryptosporidium, with median values of 80 cysts 100 L(-1) and 12 oocysts 100 L(-1), respectively. Although pathogens rarely show a significant relationship with fecal or water quality indicators, this study determined that Cryptosporidium, but not Giardia, was significantly correlated with Escherichia coli, turbidity and river flow. There was no correlation between the two types of protozoa, and only Giardia showed a seasonal trend with higher concentrations at cold water temperatures. Cryptosporidium genotyping of all samples found that farm animals and wildlife were an important contributor of oocysts in the watershed, and that Cryptosporidium strains/genotypes of medium to high risk for human infection (C. hominis, C. parvum and C. ubiquitum) were detected in 16% of samples. This study was able to identify Cryptosporidium host sources and human health risk, and to identify differences between Cryptosporidium and Giardia occurrence in the watershed. PMID:22717756

  2. Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in domestic pigs (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Kváč, Martin; Kestřánová, Michaela; Pinková, Martina; Květoňová, Dana; Kalinová, Jana; Wagnerová, Pavla; Kotková, Michaela; Vítovec, Jiří; Ditrich, Oleg; McEvoy, John; Stenger, Brianna; Sak, Bohumil

    2012-01-01

    We describe the morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium pig genotype II and propose the species name Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. to reflect its prevalence in adult pigs worldwide. Oocysts of C. scrofarum are morphologically indistinguishable from C. parvum, measuring 4.81–5.96 µm (mean = 5.16) × 4.23–5.29 µm (mean = 4.83) with a length to width ratio of 1.07 ± 0.06 (n = 400). Oocysts of C. scrofarum obtained from a naturally infected pig were infectious for 8-week-old pigs but not 4-week-old pigs. The prepatent period in 8-week-old Cryptosporidium-naive pigs was 4–6 days and the patent period was longer than 30 days. The infection intensity of C. scrofarum in pigs was generally low, in the range 250-4000 oocysts per gram of faeces. Infected pigs showed no clinical signs of cryptosporidiosis and no pathology was detected. Cryptosporidium scrofarum was not infectious for adult SCID mice, adult BALB c mice, Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha), yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis), or guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Phylogenetic analyses based on Small subunit rRNA, actin, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. scrofarum is genetically distinct from all known Cryptosporidium species. PMID:23021264

  3. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium genotypes in pre and post-weaned pigs in Australia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Johanna; Buddle, Ross; Reid, Simon; Armson, Anthony; Ryan, Una M

    2008-07-01

    A total of 289 pig faecal samples were collected from pre-weaned and post-weaned piglets and sows from 1 indoor and 3 outdoor piggeries located in the south-west region of Western Australia and screened at the 18S rRNA locus for the presence of Cryptosporidium. An overall prevalence of 22.1% (64/289) was identified. Cryptosporidium was more prevalent in post-weaned animals (p<0.05); 32.7% (51/156) versus 10.6% (13/123) for pre-weaned animals. Sequence analysis identified Cryptosporidium suis in all pre-weaned isolates genotyped (7/13). In post-weaned pigs that were genotyped (n=38), the non-zoonotic Cryptosporidium species, pig genotype II was identified in 32 samples and C. suis in 6 samples. The zoonotic species Cryptosporidium parvum was not detected, suggesting that domestic pigs do not pose a significant public health risk. Pig genotype II was significantly (p<0.05) associated with 'normal' stools, indicating an asymptomatic nature in the porcine host. PMID:18486131

  4. Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in domestic pigs (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Kestřánová, Michaela; Pinková, Martina; Květoňová, Dana; Kalinová, Jana; Wagnerová, Pavla; Kotková, Michaela; Vítovec, Jiří; Ditrich, Oleg; McEvoy, John; Stenger, Brianna; Sak, Bohumil

    2013-01-31

    We describe the morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium pig genotype II and propose the species name Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. to reflect its prevalence in adult pigs worldwide. Oocysts of C. scrofarum are morphologically indistinguishable from C. parvum, measuring 4.81-5.96 μm (mean=5.16)×4.23-5.29 μm (mean=4.83) with a length to width ratio of 1.07±0.06 (n=400). Oocysts of C. scrofarum obtained from a naturally infected pig were infectious for 8-week-old pigs but not 4-week-old pigs. The prepatent period in 8-week-old Cryptosporidium-naive pigs was 4-6 days and the patent period was longer than 30 days. The infection intensity of C. scrofarum in pigs was generally low, in the range 250-4000 oocysts per gram of feces. Infected pigs showed no clinical signs of cryptosporidiosis and no pathology was detected. Cryptosporidium scrofarum was not infectious for adult SCID mice, adult BALB/c mice, Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha), yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis), or guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, actin, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. scrofarum is genetically distinct from all known Cryptosporidium species. PMID:23021264

  5. Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae): Molecular and Biological Evidence of Cryptic Species within Gastric Cryptosporidium of Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kváč, Martin; Havrdová, Nikola; Hlásková, Lenka; Daňková, Tereza; Kanděra, Jiří; Ježková, Jana; Vítovec, Jiří; Sak, Bohumil; Ortega, Ynes; Xiao, Lihua; Modrý, David; Chelladurai, Jeba Rose Jennifer Jesudoss; Prantlová, Veronika; McEvoy, John

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium muris strain TS03 are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. is proposed. Cryptosporidium proliferans obtained from a naturally infected East African mole rat (Tachyoryctes splendens) in Kenya was propagated under laboratory conditions in rodents (SCID mice and southern multimammate mice, Mastomys coucha) and used in experiments to examine oocyst morphology and transmission. DNA from the propagated C. proliferans isolate, and C. proliferans DNA isolated from the feces of an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Central African Republic, a donkey (Equus africanus) in Algeria, and a domestic horse (Equus caballus) in the Czech Republic were used for phylogenetic analyses. Oocysts of C. proliferans are morphologically distinguishable from C. parvum and C. muris HZ206, measuring 6.8–8.8 (mean = 7.7 μm) × 4.8–6.2 μm (mean = 5.3) with a length to width ratio of 1.48 (n = 100). Experimental studies using an isolate originated from T. splendens have shown that the course of C. proliferans infection in rodent hosts differs from that of C. muris and C. andersoni. The prepatent period of 18–21 days post infection (DPI) for C. proliferans in southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha) was similar to that of C. andersoni and longer than the 6–8 DPI prepatent period for C. muris RN66 and HZ206 in the same host. Histopatologicaly, stomach glands of southern multimammate mice infected with C. proliferans were markedly dilated and filled with necrotic material, mucus, and numerous Cryptosporidium developmental stages. Epithelial cells of infected glands were atrophic, exhibited cuboidal or squamous metaplasia, and significantly proliferated into the lumen of the stomach, forming papillary structures. The epithelial height and stomach weight were six-fold greater than in non-infected controls. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, Cryptosporidium oocyst

  6. Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae): Molecular and Biological Evidence of Cryptic Species within Gastric Cryptosporidium of Mammals.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Havrdová, Nikola; Hlásková, Lenka; Daňková, Tereza; Kanděra, Jiří; Ježková, Jana; Vítovec, Jiří; Sak, Bohumil; Ortega, Ynes; Xiao, Lihua; Modrý, David; Chelladurai, Jeba Rose Jennifer Jesudoss; Prantlová, Veronika; McEvoy, John

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium muris strain TS03 are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. is proposed. Cryptosporidium proliferans obtained from a naturally infected East African mole rat (Tachyoryctes splendens) in Kenya was propagated under laboratory conditions in rodents (SCID mice and southern multimammate mice, Mastomys coucha) and used in experiments to examine oocyst morphology and transmission. DNA from the propagated C. proliferans isolate, and C. proliferans DNA isolated from the feces of an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Central African Republic, a donkey (Equus africanus) in Algeria, and a domestic horse (Equus caballus) in the Czech Republic were used for phylogenetic analyses. Oocysts of C. proliferans are morphologically distinguishable from C. parvum and C. muris HZ206, measuring 6.8-8.8 (mean = 7.7 μm) × 4.8-6.2 μm (mean = 5.3) with a length to width ratio of 1.48 (n = 100). Experimental studies using an isolate originated from T. splendens have shown that the course of C. proliferans infection in rodent hosts differs from that of C. muris and C. andersoni. The prepatent period of 18-21 days post infection (DPI) for C. proliferans in southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha) was similar to that of C. andersoni and longer than the 6-8 DPI prepatent period for C. muris RN66 and HZ206 in the same host. Histopatologicaly, stomach glands of southern multimammate mice infected with C. proliferans were markedly dilated and filled with necrotic material, mucus, and numerous Cryptosporidium developmental stages. Epithelial cells of infected glands were atrophic, exhibited cuboidal or squamous metaplasia, and significantly proliferated into the lumen of the stomach, forming papillary structures. The epithelial height and stomach weight were six-fold greater than in non-infected controls. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall

  7. Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in Captive Non-Human Primates in Qinling Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shuai-Zhi; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Shao, Jun-Feng; Fang, Yan-Qin; Tian, Ge-Ru; Zhang, Long-Xian; Wang, Rong-Jun; Wang, Hai-Yan; Qi, Meng; Yu, San-Ke

    2015-01-01

    Non-human primates (NHPs) are confirmed as reservoirs of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi. In this study, 197 fresh fecal samples from 8 NHP species in Qinling Mountains, northwestern China, were collected and examined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method. The results showed that 35 (17.8%) samples were positive for tested parasites, including Cryptosporidium spp. (3.0%), G. intestinalis (2.0%), and E. bieneusi (12.7%). Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 6 fecal samples of Macaca mulatta, and were identified as C. parvum (n=1) and C. andersoni (n=5). Subtyping analysis showed Cryptosporidium spp. belonged to the C. andersoni MLST subtype (A4, A4, A4, and A1) and C. parvum 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) subtype IId A15G2R1. G. intestinalis assemblage E was detected in 3 M. mulatta and 1 Saimiri sciureus. Intra-variations were observed at the triose phosphate isomerase (tpi), beta giardin (bg), and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) loci, with 3, 1, and 2 new subtypes found in respective locus. E. bieneusi was found in Cercopithecus neglectus (25.0%), Papio hamadrayas (16.7%), M. mulatta (16.3%), S. sciureus (10%), and Rhinopithecus roxellana (9.5%), with 5 ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genotypes: 2 known genotypes (D and BEB6) and 3 novel genotypes (MH, XH, and BSH). These findings indicated the presence of zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in NHPs in Qinling Mountains. This is the first report of C. andersoni in NHPs. The present study provided basic information for control of cryptosporidiosis, giardiasis, and microsporidiosis in human and animals in this area. PMID:26323837

  8. Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in Captive Non-Human Primates in Qinling Mountains.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuai-Zhi; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Shao, Jun-Feng; Fang, Yan-Qin; Tian, Ge-Ru; Zhang, Long-Xian; Wang, Rong-Jun; Wang, Hai-Yan; Qi, Meng; Yu, San-Ke

    2015-08-01

    Non-human primates (NHPs) are confirmed as reservoirs of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi. In this study, 197 fresh fecal samples from 8 NHP species in Qinling Mountains, northwestern China, were collected and examined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method. The results showed that 35 (17.8%) samples were positive for tested parasites, including Cryptosporidium spp. (3.0%), G. intestinalis (2.0%), and E. bieneusi (12.7%). Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 6 fecal samples of Macaca mulatta, and were identified as C. parvum (n=1) and C. andersoni (n=5). Subtyping analysis showed Cryptosporidium spp. belonged to the C. andersoni MLST subtype (A4, A4, A4, and A1) and C. parvum 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) subtype IId A15G2R1. G. intestinalis assemblage E was detected in 3 M. mulatta and 1 Saimiri sciureus. Intra-variations were observed at the triose phosphate isomerase (tpi), beta giardin (bg), and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) loci, with 3, 1, and 2 new subtypes found in respective locus. E. bieneusi was found in Cercopithecus neglectus (25.0%), Papio hamadrayas (16.7%), M. mulatta (16.3%), S. sciureus (10%), and Rhinopithecus roxellana (9.5%), with 5 ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genotypes: 2 known genotypes (D and BEB6) and 3 novel genotypes (MH, XH, and BSH). These findings indicated the presence of zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in NHPs in Qinling Mountains. This is the first report of C. andersoni in NHPs. The present study provided basic information for control of cryptosporidiosis, giardiasis, and microsporidiosis in human and animals in this area. PMID:26323837

  9. Nitric oxide synthase stimulates prostaglandin synthesis and barrier function in C. parvum-infected porcine ileum.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Duckett, Laurel L; Armstrong, Martha U; Stauffer, Stephen H; Finnegan, Colleen P; Murtaugh, Michael P; Argenzio, Robert A

    2004-09-01

    Cell culture models implicate increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis as a cause of mucosal hyperpermeability in intestinal epithelial infection. NO may also mediate a multitude of subepithelial events, including activation of cyclooxygenases. We examined whether NO promotes barrier function via prostaglandin synthesis using Cryptosporidium parvum-infected ileal epithelium in residence with an intact submucosa. Expression of NO synthase (NOS) isoforms was examined by real-time RT-PCR of ileal mucosa from control and C. parvum-infected piglets. The isoforms mediating and mechanism of NO action on barrier function were assessed by measuring transepithelial resistance (TER) and eicosanoid synthesis by ileal mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers in the presence of selective and nonselective NOS inhibitors and after rescue with exogenous prostaglandins. C. parvum infection results in induction of mucosal inducible NOS (iNOS), increased synthesis of NO and PGE2, and increased mucosal permeability. Nonselective inhibition of NOS (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) inhibited prostaglandin synthesis, resulting in further increases in paracellular permeability. Baseline permeability was restored in the absence of NO by exogenous PGE2. Selective inhibition of iNOS [L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine] accounted for approximately 50% of NOS-dependent PGE2 synthesis and TER. Using an entire intestinal mucosa, we have demonstrated for the first time that NO serves as a proximal mediator of PGE2 synthesis and barrier function in C. parvum infection. Expression of iNOS by infected mucosa was without detriment to overall barrier function and may serve to promote clearance of infected enterocytes. PMID:15155179

  10. Clams (Corbicula fluminea) as bioindicators of fecal contamination with Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. in freshwater ecosystems in California.

    PubMed

    Miller, Woutrina A; Atwill, Edward R; Gardner, Ian A; Miller, Melissa A; Fritz, Heather M; Hedrick, Ronald P; Melli, Ann C; Barnes, Nicole M; Conrad, Patricia A

    2005-05-01

    This study evaluated clams as bioindicators of fecal protozoan contamination using three approaches: (i) clam tissue spiking experiments to compare several detection techniques; (ii) clam tank exposure experiments to evaluate clams that had filtered Cryptosporidium oocysts from inoculated water under a range of simulated environmental conditions; (iii) sentinel clam outplanting to assess the distribution and magnitude of fecal contamination in three riverine systems in California. Our spiking and tank experiments showed that direct fluorescent antibody (DFA), immunomagnetic separation (IMS) in combination with DFA, and PCR techniques could be used to detect Cryptosporidium in clam tissues. The most analytically sensitive technique was IMS concentration with DFA detection of oocysts in clam digestive gland tissues, which detected 10 oocysts spiked into a clam digestive gland 83% of the time. In the tank experiment, oocyst dose and clam collection time were significant predictors for detecting Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in clams. In the wild clam study, Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected in clams from all three study regions by IMS-DFA analysis of clam digestive glands, with significant variation by sampling year and season. The presence of C. parvum DNA in clams from riverine ecosystems was confirmed with PCR and DNA sequence analysis. PMID:15862580

  11. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium identified in clinical samples from cities in Brazil and Argentina.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago; Velásquez, Jorge Néstor; Cunha, Flavia de Souza; Pantano, María Laura; Sodré, Fernando Campos; Silva, Sidnei da; Astudillo, Osvaldo Germán; Peralta, José Mauro; Carnevale, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The identification and characterisation of Cryptosporidium genotypes and subtypes are fundamental to the study of cryptosporidiosis epidemiology, aiding in prevention and control strategies. The objective was to determine the genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium in samples obtained from hospitals of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. Samples were analysed by microscopy and TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for Cryptosporidium detection, genotyped by nested-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 18S rRNA gene and subtyped by DNA sequencing of the gp60 gene. Among the 89 samples from Rio de Janeiro, Cryptosporidium spp were detected in 26 by microscopy/TaqMan PCR. In samples from Buenos Aires,Cryptosporidium was diagnosed in 15 patients of the 132 studied. The TaqMan PCR and the nested-PCR-RFLP detected Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, and co-infections of both species. In Brazilian samples, the subtypes IbA10G2 and IIcA5G3 were observed. The subtypes found in Argentinean samples were IbA10G2, IaA10G1R4, IaA11G1R4, and IeA11G3T3, and mixed subtypes of Ia and IIa families were detected in the co-infections. C. hominis was the species more frequently detected, and subtype family Ib was reported in both countries. Subtype diversity was higher in Buenos Aires than in Rio de Janeiro and two new subtypes were described for the first time. PMID:26814641

  12. Prevalence of and management factors contributing to Cryptosporidium sp. infection in pre-weaned and post-weaned calves in Johor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhid, Aida; Robertson, Ian; Ng, Josephine; Ryan, Una

    2011-02-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to identify species and determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium sp. shedding in pre-weaned and post-weaned dairy calves and to identify management factors that may be contributing to disease. A total of 240 calf faecal samples were collected from 16 farms in two districts in Johor, Malaysia, and screened by PCR. The overall Cryptosporidium prevalence was 27.1%. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in pre-weaned calves was 32.4% for C. parvum, 26.5% for C. bovis, followed by C. andersoni (20.6%), C. ryanae (11.8%) and mixed sp. (8.8%). The prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in post-weaned calves was 35% for C. bovis followed by C. andersoni and C. ryanae (30% each) and mixed sp. (5%). Subtyping analysis of 8 of the 11 C. parvum isolates at the gp60 locus identified five isolates as IIdA15G1, one as IIa18A3R1 and two isolates as IIa17G2R1. Management factors that increased the risk of Cryptosporidium infection included having other cattle farms close by, feeding calves with saleable milk, keeping pre-weaned calves in pens with slatted floors and keeping post-weaned calves in pens with a sand floor. PMID:21050848

  13. Immune response of newborn BALB/c mice to Cryptosporidium infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Nasser; Pashaei-Asl, Roghiyeh; Ahmadian, Masomeh; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Shahabi, Saed; Vazini, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite which causes diarrheal in human and animals worldwide. Infection transmission has reported through oral-fecal by infectious objects through foods and drinks. In this study we explored the immune response pathway in animal model for C. parvum to develop the new treatment way. Oocysts collected from fecal positive for C. parvum and diluted about 1:5 in sucrose solution. New born BALB/c mice (3 days) divided to 2 different groups. Control group hadn't received any oocyst, the test groups received 5 × 10(5) oocysts. 5 mice selected for each control group and 11 mice chosen for each test group. Blood collected from heart bleeds in days of 6, 9, 12 and 16. Protein concentrations determined by bio-photometer. Dot blotting used to find out total antibody concentrations oocyst antigen. Among the test and the control groups, blots appeared in test group which means antibody production, but not any blot observed in the control groups. The non-characteristic proteins in serum were measured by the biophotometer. In this study, we investigated antibody serum production against C. parvum oocysts in new born BALB/c mice. The detected antibody through dot blot technique was our aims which had conjugated to our characteristic antiserum. The recorded numbers for the controls by biophotometer related to the non characteristic proteins in serum. The results of this study can used to produce polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies against cryptosporidiosis. PMID:27605838

  14. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategymore » for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.« less

  15. Cryptosporidium and Cryptosporidiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This 2nd edition of the book “Cryptosporidium and Cryptosporidiosis” has been greatly revised and expanded. Included are the following chapters and subject areas. Chapter 1 discusses general biological issues. It traces the history of discovery of the genus and species, updates the taxonomy, describ...

  16. First report of zoonotic Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in golden takins (Budorcas taxicolor bedfordi).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guang-Hui; Du, Shuai-Zhi; Wang, Hui-Bao; Hu, Xiong-Feng; Deng, Ming-Jun; Yu, San-Ke; Zhang, Long-Xian; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-08-01

    Genetic study of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis and Enterocytozoon bieneusi at species/assemblage/genotype/subtype level facilitates understanding their mechanical transmissions and underpins their control. A total of 191 fresh faecal samples were collected from golden takins in China and examined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Cryptosporidium spp. was detected in 15 faecal samples (7.9%), including Cryptosporidium parvum (2/15) and Cryptosporidium andersoni (13/15). MLST tool identified C. andersoni subtypes (A1, A4, A4, A1) and (A4, A4, A4, A1), and C. parvum gp60 gene subtype IId A19G1. The prevalence of G. intestinalis infection was 8.9% (17/191) and assemblage analysis identified 14 assemblage E and three assemblage B. Intra-variations were observed at triose phosphate isomerase (tpi), beta giardin (bg) and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) loci within the assemblage E, showing seven, three and three new subtypes in respective locus. Ten and one multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were present in assemblages E and B, respectively. E. bieneusi infection was positive in 14.7% (28/191) of the examined specimens, with three genotypes known (BEB6, D and I) and four novel internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genotypes (TEB1-TEB4). The present study revealed, for the first time, the presence of zoonotic C. parvum IId A19G1, G. intestinalis assemblage B and E. bieneusi genotype D and four novel genotypes in golden takins in China. These findings expand the host range of three zoonotic pathogens and have important implications for controlling cryptosporidiosis, giardiasis and microsporidiosis in humans and animals. PMID:26190449

  17. Household Socioeconomic and Demographic Correlates of Cryptosporidium Seropositivity in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel J.; Oloya, James; Ezeamama, Amara E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium are parasitic protozoa that infect humans, domestic animals, and wildlife globally. In the United States, cryptosporidiosis occurs in an estimated 750,000 persons annually, and is primarily caused by either of the Cryptosporidium parvum genotypes 1 and 2, exposure to which occurs through ingestion of food or water contaminated with oocytes shed from infected hosts. Although most cryptosporidiosis cases are caused by genotype 1 and are of human origin, the zoonotic sources of genotype 2, such as livestock, are increasingly recognized as important for understanding human disease patterns. Social inequality could mediate patterns of human exposure and infection by placing individuals in environments where food or water contamination and livestock contact is high or through reducing the availability of educational and sanitary resources required to avoid exposure. Methodology/Principal Findings We here analyzed data from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999 and 2000, and related seropositivity to Cryptosporidium parvum to correlates of social inequality at the household and individual scale. After accounting for the complex sampling design of NHANES and confounding by individual demographics and household conditions, we found impaired household food adequacy was associated with greater odds of Cryptosporidium seropositivity. Additionally, we identified individuals of non-white race and ethnicity and those born outside the United States as having significantly greater risk than white, domestic-born counterparts. Furthermore, we provide suggestive evidence for direct effects of family wealth on Cryptosporidium seropositivity, in that persons from low-income households and from families close to the poverty threshold had elevated odds of seropositivity relative to those in high-income families and in households far above the poverty line. Conclusions/Significance These results refute assertions that

  18. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium sp. isolated from northern Alaskan caribou (Rangifer tarandus).

    PubMed

    Siefker, C; Rickard, L G; Pharr, G T; Simmons, J S; O'Hara, T M

    2002-02-01

    Cryptosporidium sp. was found in 3 out of 49 caribou (Rangifer tarandus) from northern Alaska. Segments of both the 18S ribosomal RNA and the heat shock protein genes were amplified from the caribou isolate and compared with that obtained from an isolate from a wild white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Virginia as well as other species and isolates available from GenBank. Analyses showed the white-tailed deer isolate to be identical with the C. parvum cattle genotype; however, the caribou isolate represents a new genotype closely related to C. serpentis, C. muris, and C. andersoni. Giardia sp. was not detected in any of the caribou samples nor was Cryptosporidium sp. or Giardia sp. detected in any of the 42 moose (Alces alces) samples examined. PMID:12053974

  19. Prevalence and Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium Isolates from Common Brushtail Possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) Adapted to Urban Settings▿

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Nichola J.; Deane, Elizabeth M.; Power, Michelle L.

    2008-01-01

    The common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is one of the most abundant native marsupials in urban Australia, having successfully adapted to utilize anthropogenic resources. The habituation of possums to food and shelter available in human settlements has facilitated interaction with people, pets, and zoo animals, increasing the potential for transmission of zoonotic Cryptosporidium pathogens. This study sought to examine the identity and prevalence of Cryptosporidium species occurring in possums adapted to urban settings compared to possums inhabiting remote woodlands far from urban areas and to characterize the health of the host in response to oocyst shedding. Findings indicated that both populations were shedding oocysts of the same genotype (brushtail possum 1 [BTP1]) that were genetically and morphologically distinct from zoonotic species and genotypes and most closely related to Cryptosporidium species from marsupials. The urban population was shedding an additional five Cryptosporidium isolates that were genetically distinct from BTP1 and formed a sister clade with Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis. Possums that were shedding oocysts showed no evidence of pathogenic changes, including elevated levels of white blood cells, diminished body condition (body mass divided by skeletal body length), or reduced nutritional state, suggesting a stable host-parasite relationship typical of Cryptosporidium species that are adapted to the host. Overall, Cryptosporidium occurred with a higher prevalence in possums from urban habitat (11.3%) than in possums from woodland habitat (5.6%); however, the host-specific nature of the genotypes may limit spillover infection in the urban setting. This study determined that the coexistence of possums with sympatric populations of humans, pets, and zoo animals in the urban Australian environment is unlikely to present a threat to public health safety. PMID:18641156

  20. Concentration and Detection of Cryptosporidium Oocysts in Surface Water Samples by Method 1622 Using Ultrafiltration and Capsule Filtration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, O. D., III; Sobsey, M.D.; Heaney, C.D.; Schaefer, F. W., III; Francy, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is known to occur widely in both source and drinking water and has caused waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis. To improve monitoring, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency developed method 1622 for isolation and detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water. Method 1622 is performance based and involves filtration, concentration, immunomagnetic separation, fluorescent-antibody staining and 4???,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) counterstaining, and microscopic evaluation. The capsule filter system currently recommended for method 1622 was compared to a hollow-fiber ultrafilter system for primary concentration of C. parvum oocysts in seeded reagent water and untreated surface waters. Samples were otherwise processed according to method 1622. Rates of C. parvum oocyst recovery from seeded 10-liter volumes of reagent water in precision and recovery experiments with filter pairs were 42% (standard deviation [SD], 24%) and 46% (SD, 18%) for hollow-fiber ultrafilters and capsule filters, respectively. Mean oocyst recovery rates in experiments testing both filters on seeded surface water samples were 42% (SD, 27%) and 15% (SD, 12%) for hollow-fiber ultrafilters and capsule filters, respectively. Although C. parvum oocysts were recovered from surface waters by using the approved filter of method 1622, the recovery rates were significantly lower and more variable than those from reagent grade water. In contrast, the disposable hollow-fiber ultrafilter system was compatible with subsequent method 1622 processing steps, and it recovered C. parvum oocysts from seeded surface waters with significantly greater efficiency and reliability than the filter suggested for use in the version of method 1622 tested.

  1. Cryptosporidium genotypes in children and calves living at the wildlife or livestock interface of the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Abu Samra, Nada; Jori, Ferran; Cacciò, Simone M; Frean, John; Poonsamy, Bhavani; Thompson, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium infection is one of the most common causes of parasitic diarrhoea worldwide in cattle and humans. In developing countries, human cryptosporidiosis is most prevalent during early childhood and links between zoonotic infection and animal related activities have been demonstrated. This study investigated the prevalence and species/genotype distribution of Cryptosporidium among children (< 5 years) and calves (< 6 months) living in a rural farming area adjacent to the Kruger National Park in South Africa, where interactions between humans and wild and domestic animals are known to occur. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 8/143 stool samples of children recruited within the hospital system (5.6%; 95% CI 2.4%, 10.7%) and in 2/352 faecal samples of calves (0.6%; 95% CI 0.1%, 2.0%) using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen (MZN) staining technique. Microscopy positive samples from children were further analysed by PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene and identified as Cryptosporidium hominis (3/4) and Cryptosporidium meleagridis (1/4). Regardless of the microscopy outcome, randomly selected samples (n = 36) from calves 0-4 months of age were amplified and sequenced at the 18S rRNA gene using nested PCR. Two calves tested positive (5.6%; 95% CI 1.7%, 18.7%), and revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium bovis. The detection of only two zoonotic species (C. parvum in one calf and C. meleagridis in one child) suggests that zoonotic cryptosporidiosis is not currently widespread in our study area; however, the potential exists for amplification of transmission in an immunocompromised population. PMID:27247067

  2. Cryptosporidium tyzzeri and Cryptosporidium pestis: which name is valid?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The validity of the name Cryptosporidium tyzzeri has been questioned because this name was previously used for a Cryptosporidium species in chickens in the original description by E. E. Tyzzer in 1929 which was later given the name by N.D. Levine in 1961. To further complicate matters, this specie...

  3. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium identified in clinical samples from cities in Brazil and Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago; Velásquez, Jorge Néstor; Cunha, Flavia de Souza; Pantano, María Laura; Sodré, Fernando Campos; da Silva, Sidnei; Astudillo, Osvaldo Germán; Peralta, José Mauro; Carnevale, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The identification and characterisation of Cryptosporidiumgenotypes and subtypes are fundamental to the study of cryptosporidiosis epidemiology, aiding in prevention and control strategies. The objective was to determine the genetic diversity ofCryptosporidium in samples obtained from hospitals of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. Samples were analysed by microscopy and TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays forCryptosporidium detection, genotyped by nested-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 18S rRNA gene and subtyped by DNA sequencing of the gp60 gene. Among the 89 samples from Rio de Janeiro, Cryptosporidium spp were detected in 26 by microscopy/TaqMan PCR. In samples from Buenos Aires,Cryptosporidium was diagnosed in 15 patients of the 132 studied. The TaqMan PCR and the nested-PCR-RFLP detected Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, and co-infections of both species. In Brazilian samples, the subtypes IbA10G2 and IIcA5G3 were observed. The subtypes found in Argentinean samples were IbA10G2, IaA10G1R4, IaA11G1R4, and IeA11G3T3, and mixed subtypes of Ia and IIa families were detected in the co-infections. C. hominis was the species more frequently detected, and subtype family Ib was reported in both countries. Subtype diversity was higher in Buenos Aires than in Rio de Janeiro and two new subtypes were described for the first time. PMID:26814641

  4. Novel Cryptosporidium bat genotypes III and IV in bats from the USA and Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Hořická, Anna; Sak, Bohumil; Prediger, Jitka; Salát, Jiří; Širmarová, Jana; Bartonička, Tomáš; Clark, Mark; Chelladurai, Jeba Rose Jennifer Jesudoss; Gillam, Erin; McEvoy, John

    2015-10-01

    Bats from the families Rhinolophidae (n = 90) and Vespertilionidae (n = 191) in the USA and Czech Republic were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium by microscopic and molecular analysis of faecal samples collected from rectum of dissected animals and from the ground beneath roosting sites. Cryptosporidium oocysts were not detected in any of the 281 faecal specimens examined using the aniline-carbol-methyl violet staining method. Nested PCR amplification, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the small ribosomal subunit rRNA and actin genes were used to identify isolates and infer evolutionary relationships. Cryptosporidium parvum was identified in a western small-footed bat (Myotis ciliolabrum) from the USA and a common pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) from the Czech Republic. Two novel genotypes were identified and named Cryptosporidium bat genotype III and IV. Bat genotype III was found in two big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) from the USA. Bat genotype IV was detected in two common pipistrelle bats from the Czech Republic. PMID:26255170

  5. Cryptosporidium muris: Infectivity and Illness in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; Langer-Curry, Rebecca C.; Lupo, Philip J.; Widmer, Giovanni; Tzipori, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Although Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis cause the majority of human cryptosporidiosis cases, other Cryptosporidium species are also capable of infecting humans, particularly when individuals are immunocompromised. Ten C. muris cases have been reported, primarily in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients with diarrhea. However, asymptomatic cases were reported in two HIV-negative children, and in another case, age and immune status were not described. This study examines the infectivity of C. muris in six healthy adults. Volunteers were challenged with 105 C. muris oocysts and monitored for 6 weeks for infection and/or illness. All six patients became infected. Two patients experienced a self-limited diarrheal illness. Total oocysts shed during the study ranged from 6.7 × 106 to 4.1 × 108, and the number was slightly higher in volunteers with diarrhea (2.8 × 108) than asymptomatic shedders (4.4 × 107). C. muris-infected subjects shed oocysts longer than occurred with other species studied in healthy volunteers. Three volunteers shed oocysts for 7 months. Physical examinations were normal, with no reported recurrence of diarrhea or other gastrointestinal complaints. Two persistent shedders were treated with nitazoxanide, and the infection was resolved. Thus, healthy adults are susceptible to C. muris, which can cause mild diarrhea and result in persistent, asymptomatic infection. PMID:25311695

  6. Elevation and vegetation determine Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

    PubMed

    Montecino-Latorre, Diego; Li, Xunde; Xiao, Chengling; Atwill, Edward R

    2015-08-01

    Wildlife are increasingly recognized as important biological reservoirs of zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium that might contaminate water and cause human exposure to this protozoal parasite. The habitat range of the yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) overlaps extensively with the watershed boundaries of municipal water supplies for California communities along the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological study to estimate the fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium oocysts by yellow-bellied marmots and to quantify the environmental loading rate and determine risk factors for Cryptosporidium fecal shedding in this montane wildlife species. The observed proportion of Cryptosporidium positive fecal samples was 14.7% (33/224, positive number relative to total number samples) and the environmental loading rate was estimated to be 10,693 oocysts animal(-1) day(-1). Fecal shedding was associated with the elevation and vegetation status of their habitat. Based on a portion of the 18s rRNA gene sequence of 2 isolates, the Cryptosporidium found in Marmota flaviventris were 99.88%-100% match to multiple isolates of C. parvum in the GenBank. PMID:25834788

  7. Elevation and vegetation determine Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Montecino-Latorre, Diego; Li, Xunde; Xiao, Chengling; Atwill, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife are increasingly recognized as important biological reservoirs of zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium that might contaminate water and cause human exposure to this protozoal parasite. The habitat range of the yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) overlaps extensively with the watershed boundaries of municipal water supplies for California communities along the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological study to estimate the fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium oocysts by yellow-bellied marmots and to quantify the environmental loading rate and determine risk factors for Cryptosporidium fecal shedding in this montane wildlife species. The observed proportion of Cryptosporidium positive fecal samples was 14.7% (33/224, positive number relative to total number samples) and the environmental loading rate was estimated to be 10,693 oocysts animal-1 day-1. Fecal shedding was associated with the elevation and vegetation status of their habitat. Based on a portion of the 18s rRNA gene sequence of 2 isolates, the Cryptosporidium found in Marmota flaviventris were 99.88%–100% match to multiple isolates of C. parvum in the GenBank. PMID:25834788

  8. Development and Evaluation of Three Real-Time PCR Assays for Genotyping and Source Tracking Cryptosporidium spp. in Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Neumann, Norman F.; Ruecker, Norma; Alderisio, Kerri A.; Sturbaum, Gregory D.; Villegas, Eric N.; Chalmers, Rachel; Monis, Paul; Feng, Yaoyu

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking source water can present a serious public health risk. To rapidly and effectively assess the source and human-infective potential of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water, sensitive detection and correct identification of oocysts to the species level (genotyping) are essential. In this study, we developed three real-time PCR genotyping assays, two targeting the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (18S-LC1 and 18S-LC2 assays) and one targeting the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90) gene (hsp90 assay), and evaluated the sensitivity and Cryptosporidium species detection range of these assays. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and melt curve analysis, the 18S-LC1 and hsp90 assays could differentiate common human-pathogenic species (C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. meleagridis), while the 18S-LC2 assay was able to differentiate nonpathogenic species (such as C. andersoni) from human-pathogenic ones commonly found in source water. In sensitivity evaluations, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays could detect as few as 1 Cryptosporidium oocyst per sample. Thus, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays might be used in environmental monitoring, whereas the 18S-LC1 genotyping assay could be useful for genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. in clinical specimens or wastewater samples. PMID:26092455

  9. Development and Evaluation of Three Real-Time PCR Assays for Genotyping and Source Tracking Cryptosporidium spp. in Water.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Neumann, Norman F; Ruecker, Norma; Alderisio, Kerri A; Sturbaum, Gregory D; Villegas, Eric N; Chalmers, Rachel; Monis, Paul; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2015-09-01

    The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking source water can present a serious public health risk. To rapidly and effectively assess the source and human-infective potential of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water, sensitive detection and correct identification of oocysts to the species level (genotyping) are essential. In this study, we developed three real-time PCR genotyping assays, two targeting the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (18S-LC1 and 18S-LC2 assays) and one targeting the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90) gene (hsp90 assay), and evaluated the sensitivity and Cryptosporidium species detection range of these assays. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and melt curve analysis, the 18S-LC1 and hsp90 assays could differentiate common human-pathogenic species (C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. meleagridis), while the 18S-LC2 assay was able to differentiate nonpathogenic species (such as C. andersoni) from human-pathogenic ones commonly found in source water. In sensitivity evaluations, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays could detect as few as 1 Cryptosporidium oocyst per sample. Thus, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays might be used in environmental monitoring, whereas the 18S-LC1 genotyping assay could be useful for genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. in clinical specimens or wastewater samples. PMID:26092455

  10. Detection and molecular characterization of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) stranded along the Galician coast (Northwest Spain).

    PubMed

    Reboredo-Fernández, A; Gómez-Couso, H; Martínez-Cedeira, J A; Cacciò, S M; Ares-Mazás, E

    2014-05-28

    The ubiquitous protozoan parasites Giardia and Cryptosporidium have been detected from many species of captive and free-living wildlife, representing most mammalian orders. Twenty species of marine mammals have been reported to inhabit Galician waters and the region has one of the highest rates of stranding in Europe. Evidence from stranding, reported by-catches and sightings, suggests that the common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) is the most abundant cetacean on the Galician coast (Northwest Spain). The objective of this study was to detect and molecularly characterize isolates of Giardia and Cryptosporidium obtained from common dolphins stranded in this area. Between 2005 and 2012, sections of large intestine from 133 common dolphins stranded along the Galician coast were collected by the personnel of the Galician Stranding Network (Coordinadora para o Estudo dos Mamíferos Mariños, CEMMA). Using direct immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and PCR amplification and sequencing of the SSU-rDNA, β-giardin genes and the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in 8 (6.0%) and 12 samples (9.0%), respectively. In two samples, co-infection by both parasites was observed. The molecular characterization revealed the presence of Giardia duodenalis assemblages A (genotypes A1 and A2) and B and Cryptosporidium parvum in these samples. This constitutes the first study in which the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium has been investigated in common dolphins on the European Atlantic coast, and it is also the first report of C. parvum in this host. Our findings indicate that these animals could act as reservoir of these waterborne parasites or could be victims of the contamination originated by anthropogenic activities. PMID:24704342

  11. Development of particulate drug formulation against C. parvum: Formulation, characterization and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Blanco-García, Estefanía; Guerrero-Callejas, Florentina; Blanco-Méndez, José; Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Luzardo-Álvarez, Asteria

    2016-09-20

    This research aims towards developing an alternative therapy against Cryptosporidium parvum using bioadhesive paromomycin and diloxanide furoate-loaded microspheres. Microspheres were prepared using chitosan and poly(vinyl alcohol) and two types of cyclodextrins (β-CD and DM-β-CD) for the potential use of treating cryptosporidiosis. This pathogen is associated with gastrointestinal illness in humans and animals. Microparticle formulations were characterized in terms of size, surface charge, drug release and morphology. In vivo bioadhesion properties of CHI/PVA microspheres were also evaluated in mice. Finally, the in vivo efficacy of CHI/PVA microspheres against C. parvum was tested in neonatal mouse model. In this work, microspheres prepared by spray-drying showed spherical shape, diameters between 6.67±0.11 and 18.78±0.07μm and positively surface charged. The bioadhesion studies demonstrated that MS remained attached at +16h (post-infection) to the intestinal cells as detected by fluorescence. This finding was crucial taking use of the fact that the parasite multiplication occurs between 16 and 20h post-infection. The efficacy of treatment was determined by calculating the number of oocysts recovered from the intestinal tract of mice after 7days of post-infection. Mice receiving orally administered microspheres with and without drug exhibited significantly lower parasite loads compared with the control mice. Ultrastructural observations by TEM bring to light the uptake of smallest particles by enterocytes associated with conspicuous changes in enterocytic cells. Completely recovery of cell morphology was detected after 24h of first inoculation with MS. CHI/PVA microspheres appear to be a safe and simple system to be used in an anticryptosporidial treatment. The distinctive features of neonatal mice requires further work to determine the suppressive effect of this particulate delivery system on C. parvum attachment in other animal models. PMID:27381880

  12. Genotyping of Cryptosporidium Species and Their Clinical Manifestations in Patients with Renal Transplantation and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Asmita; Ghoshal, Ujjala; Agarwal, Vikas; Ghoshal, Uday Chand

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we aimed to determine (i) frequency of Cryptosporidium species among patients with renal transplantation (RT) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and (ii) relationship of the nature, severity, and duration of symptoms with different species and load of Cryptosporidium. Stool samples from 70 (42 RT and 28 HIV) and 140 immunocompromised patients with and without cryptosporidiosis by modified Kinyoun's staining were subjected to qPCR-melting curve analysis for identification of parasite species. qPCR detected one microscopically negative sample to be positive for cryptosporidiosis. C. hominis, C. parvum, and mixed infection were detected in 50/71 (70.4%), 19/71 (26.8%), and 2/71 (2.8%) patients, respectively. Patients with cryptosporidiosis had higher stool frequency (median, IQR: 4, 3–6/d versus 3, 2–4/d; P = 0.017) and watery stool (52/71 [73%] versus 64/139 [46%]; P = 0.003). Parasite load (median, IQR: Log10 6.37 (5.65–7.12), Log10 5.81 (4.26–6.65); P = 0.046) and nausea/vomiting (29/50 [58%] versus 5/19 [26%]; P = 0.032) were more frequent with C. hominis than with C. parvum infection. Thus, Cryptosporidium spp. (mainly C. hominis) is a common cause of diarrhoea in RT and HIV patients. PMID:26981284

  13. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in wild mammals in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Abu Samra, Nada; Jori, Ferran; Samie, Amidou; Thompson, Peter

    2011-01-10

    This study determined the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in faecal samples from elephant (Loxodonta africana), buffalo (Syncerus caffer) and impala (Aepyceros melampus) in the Kruger National Park (KNP) and an adjacent game reserve in South Africa. Two of the study areas were in close proximity to rural communities on the western KNP boundary and the third study area was located in the centre of the KNP. Fresh stool samples (n=445) were collected and tested using an immunofluorescent antibody test (IFA) for Cryptosporidium parvum. A total of 278 of these were randomly selected (approximately 90 samples per wildlife species) and tested with the modified Ziehl Neelsen staining technique (ZN) for Cryptosporidium spp. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. was highest in elephants (25.8% [95% confidence interval: 17.3, 35.9]), compared to buffalo (5.5% [1.8, 12.4]) and impala (4.3% [1.2, 10.5]). C. parvum showed similar patterns, being most prevalent in elephants (4.2% [1.5, 8.8]), compared to buffalo (1.4% [0.2, 5.1]) and impala (1.9% [0.4, 5.3]). 29 samples, including ZN positive and IFA positive samples, were retested using a real time PCR (rtPCR) technique. Of the 28 ZN-positive samples, 14 (50%) were positive with rtPCR and of the 9 IFA-positive samples 6 (67%) were confirmed positive by rtPCR. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts was significantly higher in both of the two study areas adjacent to the western KNP boundary compared to the area in the centre of the KNP (OR=3.2 [1.2, 9.0]; P=0.024). Our study demonstrates for the first time the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. in wildlife in South Africa. The transmission of this parasite between wildlife, domestic animals and humans is a plausible hypothesis and represents a potential risk for immunodeficient human populations. PMID:21075528

  14. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in diarrhoeic patients in the Qikiqtani Region, Nunavut, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Asma; Goldfarb, David M.; Slinger, Robert; Dixon, Brent R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the prevalences of infection with the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in humans appear to be relatively high in the Canadian North, their transmission patterns are poorly understood. Objective To determine the detection rate and the molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in diarrhoeic patients in the Qikiqtani (Baffin Island) Region of Nunavut, Canada, in order to better understand the burden of illness and the potential mechanisms of transmission. Study design/methods Diarrhoeal stool specimens (n=108) submitted to the Qikiqtani General Hospital for clinical testing were also tested for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis using epifluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses were performed on PCR-positive specimens to determine the species, genotypes and sub-genotypes of the parasites. Results Cryptosporidium was detected in 15.7% of the diarrhoeic patients, while Giardia was detected in 4.6%. DNA sequencing of a fragment of the small subunit rRNA gene indicated that all of the Cryptosporidium amplicons had a 100% homology to C. parvum, and a gp60 assay showed that all aligned with C. parvum sub-genotype IIa. Microsatellite analysis revealed 3 cases of sub-genotype IIaA15G2R1, 2 of IIaA15G1R and 1 case each of sub-genotypes IIaA16G1R1 and IIaA15R1. For Giardia, results based on the amplification of both the 16S rRNA gene and the gdh gene were generally in agreement, and both DNA sequencing and RFLP demonstrated the presence of the G. duodenalis Assemblage B genotype. Conclusions Both C. parvum and G. duodenalis Assemblage B were present in human diarrhoeal stool specimens from Nunavut, which was suggestive of zoonotic transmission, although human-to-human transmission cannot be ruled out. To fully understand the public health significance of the different

  15. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium infections in pigs in Aragón (northeastern Spain).

    PubMed

    Quílez, J; Sánchez-Acedo, C; Clavel, A; del Cacho, E; López-Bernad, F

    1996-12-01

    Faecal samples from 620 pigs randomly selected from 27 farms throughout Aragón were examined to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infections. Detection of oocysts was performed using the ethyl-acetate stool concentration method and the modified Ziehl-Neelsen technique. Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were identified in 136 (21.9%) pigs from 21 (77.8%) farms. Infected animals ranged from 1 to 6 months old and oocysts were not detected in suckling piglets or adults. Infection rates were significantly higher in weaned, 1-2 month old piglets (59.2%) than in fattening, 2-6 month old pigs (34.3%) (P < 0.001). Cryptosporidial infections were asymptomatic in most of the pigs (90.4%) and usually of low intensity, since 92.6% of the infected pigs excreted few oocysts (0-1 oocysts per field at x 200 magnifications). Although 24.1% of weaned and 5.6% of fattening pigs infected by C. parvum had diarrhoea, it was not found to be statistically associated with infection. In fact, infection rates were higher in non-diarrhoeic than in diarrhoeic pigs, in both weaned (64.7% and 46.7%, respectively) and fattening pigs (34.3% and 33.3%). PMID:9011017

  16. Multiplex PCR for the detection and quantification of zoonotic taxa of Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma in wastewater and mussels.

    PubMed

    Marangi, Marianna; Giangaspero, Annunziata; Lacasella, Vita; Lonigro, Antonio; Gasser, Robin B

    2015-04-01

    Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii are important parasitic protists linked to water- and food-borne diseases. The accurate detection of these pathogens is central to the diagnosis, tracking, monitoring and surveillance of these protists in humans, animals and the environment. In this study, we established a multiplex real-time PCR (qPCR), coupled to high resolution melting (HRM) analysis, for the specific detection and quantification of each G. duodenalis (assemblage A), C. parvum and T. gondii (Type I). Once optimised, this assay was applied to the testing of samples (n = 232) of treated wastewater and mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). Of 119 water samples, 28.6% were test-positive for G. duodenalis, C. parvum and/or both pathogens; of 113 mussel samples, 66.6% were test-positive for G. duodenalis, C. parvum and/or both pathogens, and 13.2% were test-positive for only T. gondii. The specificity of all amplicons produced was verified by direct sequencing. The oo/cysts numbers (per 5 μl of DNA sample) ranged from 10 to 64. The present multiplex assay achieved an efficiency of 100% and a R(2) value of >0.99. Current evidence indicates that this assay provides a promising tool for the simultaneous detection and quantitation of three key protist taxa. PMID:25591902

  17. Effect of Daily Temperature Fluctuation during the Cool Season on the Infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xunde; Atwill, Edward R.; Dunbar, Lissa A.; Tate, Kenneth W.

    2010-01-01

    The present work calculated the rate of inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts attributable to daily oscillations of low ambient temperatures. The relationship between air temperature and the internal temperature of bovine feces on commercial operations was measured, and three representative 24-h thermal regimens in the ∼15°C, ∼25°C, and ∼35°C ranges were chosen and emulated using a thermocycler. C. parvum oocysts suspended in deionized water were exposed to the temperature cycles, and their infectivity in mice was tested. Oral inoculation of 103 treated oocysts per neonatal BALB/c mouse (∼14 times the 50% infective dose) resulted in time- and temperature-dependent reductions in the proportion of infected mice. Oocysts were completely noninfectious after 14 24-h cycles with the 30°C regimen and after 70 24-h cycles with the 20°C regimen. In contrast, oocysts remained infectious after 90 24-h cycles with the 10°C regimens. The estimated numbers of days needed for a 1-log10 reduction in C. parvum oocyst infectivity were 4.9, 28.7, and 71.5 days for the 30, 20, and 10°C thermal regimens, respectively. The loss of infectivity of oocysts induced by these thermal regimens was due in part to partial or complete in vitro excystation. PMID:20023095

  18. Chitosan and metal salt coagulant impacts on Cryptosporidium and microsphere removal by filtration.

    PubMed

    Brown, Trevor J; Emelko, Monica B

    2009-02-01

    Maintenance of appropriate chemical pretreatment is a critical component of ensuring proper filtration performance. Pilot-scale in-line filtration studies were performed to investigate the relative impacts of chitosan, alum, and FeCl(3) coagulation on the removal of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres by granular media filtration. Similar removals of oocysts and microspheres were achieved when optimal coagulant doses were utilized. Sub-optimal alum and FeCl(3) coagulation resulted in a deterioration filter effluent turbidity (0.2-0.3NTU) and total particle counts (30-100 total particles > or =2microm/mL) that were accompanied by reduced (by approximately 2-3-log) median oocyst and microsphere removals by filtration. At all doses investigated, chitosan coagulation resulted in excellent turbidity and particle reductions by filtration. Nonetheless, chitosan coagulation at doses of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0mg/L did not result in appreciable improvements in C. parvum oocyst removal relative to complete coagulation failure (median oocyst removals were < approximately 1-log). As well, oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres appear to be reasonable indicators of C. parvum oocyst removal by in-line filtration preceded by alum and FeCl(3) coagulation, but not chitosan coagulation. PMID:18996552

  19. Prevalence and risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium spp. infection in young domestic livestock in India.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Prem Sagar; Rakesh, Radhamma Lakshmipathy; Pradeep, Balaraju; Kumar, Saroj; Kundu, Krishnendu; Garg, Rajat; Ram, Hira; Kumar, Ashok; Banerjee, Partha Sarathi

    2013-04-01

    A total of 938 faecal samples (461 cattle calves, 264 buffalo calves, 55 lambs, 116 kids and 42 piglets) from different livestock farms and individual small holdings in six targeted states of India were collected and screened by modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and its association with age, sex, season and faecal consistency in domesticated animals. Overall, 16.2 % of the animals were positive for Cryptosporidium infection with prevalence of 16.3, 24.2, 1.8, 3.5 and 19.1 % in cattle calves, buffalo calves, lambs, kids and piglets, respectively. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher (p<0.05) in bovines (19.3 % cattle and 33.7 % buffalo) below 1 month of age than in animals between 1 and 3 months of age. But in piglets, it was higher in the age group of 1 to 3 months (22.6 %) than in younger animals (9.1 %). Also, higher prevalence (p>0.05) was recorded in females than in males. Seasons had a significant effect (p<0.05) on the prevalence of infection in large ruminants, with the highest prevalence in monsoon (cattle 28.8 % and buffalo 36.6 %) followed by pre-monsoon and post-monsoon season. However, in case of sheep and goats, the prevalence was higher (p>0.05) in post-monsoon than in monsoon season. A high degree of association was noticed between Cryptosporidium infection and diarrhoea in ruminants screened during the present study. But, in case of pigs, the prevalence was higher in non-diarrhoeic than in diarrhoeic animals. Genotyping of Cryptosporidium spp. based on nested PCR amplification of partial 18S rRNA and its subsequent digestion with SspI, VspI and MboII restriction enzymes revealed prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum in representative number of positive samples of cattle, buffalo and goats. PMID:23132135

  20. Detection and quantification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in environmental surfaces of an Equine Perinatology Unit.

    PubMed

    Piva, Silvia; Caffara, Monica; Pasquali, Frédérique; Castagnetti, Carolina; Iacono, Eleonora; Massella, Elisa; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Galuppi, Roberta

    2016-09-01

    The presence of Cryptosporidium in institutions such as veterinary teaching hospitals, where students and staff are in frequent contact with animals, could represent a serious public health risk. In this study the detection and quantification of the Cryptosporidium oocysts present on the environmental surfaces of an Equine Perinatology Unit (EPU) were investigated. During 3 foaling seasons 175 samples obtained by swabbing an area of the floor and walls of boxes and utility rooms of EPU with sterile gauze, in 3 different moments. Samples were collected at the end of foaling season (July), after washing procedures (September) and after washing and disinfecting procedures, at the beginning of a new foaling season (December). All the samples were subjected to nested-PCR, followed by genotyping and sub-typing methods and to qPCR, allowing the oocyst quantification. Cryptosporidium spp. was detected in 14 samples, of which 11 were from walls and three were from floors. The highest number of oocysts was found in a sample collected from the floor of one utility room used for setting up therapies and treatments. In most cases, oocyst numbers, estimated by qPCR, were reduced or eliminated after washing and disinfecting procedures. The genotyping and sub-typing methods allowed identification of 2 subtypes of C. parvum (IIaA15G2R1 and IIdA23G1) and 1 of Cryptosporidium horse genotype (VIaA15G4) that were described in foals hospitalized at the EPU in the same years. The results of the present study show that qPCR can be used to evaluate Cryptosporidium contamination of environmental surfaces of a veterinary teaching hospital and the efficacy of the disinfection procedures. PMID:27544254

  1. Molecular identification of Cryptosporidium isolates from exotic pet animals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Abe, Niichiro; Matsubara, Katsuki

    2015-04-30

    The Cryptosporidium horse genotype, a zoonotic protozoan parasite first found in a Prezewalski wild horse, has not been found in any other mammal but calves, horses, and humans. Hedgehogs, popular exotic pet animals in Japan, are a reservoir of two zoonotic Cryptosporidum: C. parvum and C. erinacei (previously known as the hedgehog genotype). Recently, after finding Cryptosporidium infection in a four-toed hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris), we identified the isolate genetically as the Cryptosporidium horse genotype. Its subtype (VIbA13) was the same as that of an isolate from a pet shop employee with severe clinical symptoms, as reported previously from sequencing analysis of the partial Cryptosporidum 60kDa glycoprotein gene sequence. The occurrence of this genotype in hedgehog indicates that the horse genotype has broad host specificity. This report is the first of a study identifying isolates from pet reptiles genetically in Japan. The study identified a new host (Teratoscincus scincus) in C. serpentis lizard genotype by sequencing analysis of partial SSU rRNA and actin genes. PMID:25801359

  2. Sources and species of cryptosporidium oocysts in the Wachusett Reservoir watershed.

    PubMed

    Jellison, Kristen L; Hemond, Harold F; Schauer, David B

    2002-02-01

    Understanding the behavior of Cryptosporidium oocysts in the environment is critical to developing improved watershed management practices for protection of the public from waterborne cryptosporidiosis. Analytical methods of improved specificity and sensitivity are essential to this task. We developed a nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay that allows detection of a single oocyst in environmental samples and differentiates the human pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum from other Cryptosporidium species. We tested our method on surface water and animal fecal samples from the Wachusett Reservoir watershed in central Massachusetts. We also directly compared results from our method with those from the immunofluorescence microscopy assay recommended in the Information Collection Rule. Our results suggest that immunofluorescence microscopy may not be a reliable indicator of public health risk for waterborne cryptosporidiosis. Molecular and environmental data identify both wildlife and dairy farms as sources of oocysts in the watershed, implicate times of cold water temperatures as high-risk periods for oocyst contamination of surface waters, and suggest that not all oocysts in the environment pose a threat to public health. PMID:11823192

  3. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Humans, Domestic Animals, and Village Water Sources in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Miles E.; Shrivastava, Arpit; Smith, Woutrina A.; Sahu, Priyadarshi; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Misra, Pravas R.; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Clasen, Thomas; Jenkins, Marion W.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia are zoonotic enteric protozoa of significant health concern where sanitation, hygiene, and water supplies are inadequate. We examined 85 stool samples from diarrhea patients, 111 pooled fecal samples by species across seven domestic animal types, and water from tube wells (N = 207) and ponds (N = 94) across 60 villages in coastal Odisha, India, for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts to measure occurrence, concentration/shedding, and environmental loading rates. Oocysts/cysts were detected in 12% of diarrhea patients. Detection ranged from 0% to 35% for Cryptosporidium and 0% to 67% for Giardia across animal hosts. Animal loading estimates indicate the greatest contributors of environmental oocysts/cysts in the study region are cattle. Ponds were contaminated with both protozoa (oocysts: 37%, cysts: 74%), as were tube wells (oocysts: 10%, cysts: 14%). Future research should address the public health concern highlighted from these findings and investigate the role of domestic animals in diarrheal disease transmission in this and similar settings. PMID:26123963

  4. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Humans, Domestic Animals, and Village Water Sources in Rural India.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Miles E; Shrivastava, Arpit; Smith, Woutrina A; Sahu, Priyadarshi; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Clasen, Thomas; Jenkins, Marion W

    2015-09-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia are zoonotic enteric protozoa of significant health concern where sanitation, hygiene, and water supplies are inadequate. We examined 85 stool samples from diarrhea patients, 111 pooled fecal samples by species across seven domestic animal types, and water from tube wells (N = 207) and ponds (N = 94) across 60 villages in coastal Odisha, India, for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts to measure occurrence, concentration/shedding, and environmental loading rates. Oocysts/cysts were detected in 12% of diarrhea patients. Detection ranged from 0% to 35% for Cryptosporidium and 0% to 67% for Giardia across animal hosts. Animal loading estimates indicate the greatest contributors of environmental oocysts/cysts in the study region are cattle. Ponds were contaminated with both protozoa (oocysts: 37%, cysts: 74%), as were tube wells (oocysts: 10%, cysts: 14%). Future research should address the public health concern highlighted from these findings and investigate the role of domestic animals in diarrheal disease transmission in this and similar settings. PMID:26123963

  5. Effective Concentration and Detection of Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and the Microsporidia from Environmental Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Joseph A.; Gordy, John; Snyder, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., and members of Microsporidia are enteropathogenic parasites of humans and animals, producing asymptomatic to severe intestinal infections. To circumvent various impediments associated with current detection methods, we tested a method providing multistage purification and separation in a single, confined step. Standard real-time PCR was used as a detection method. Samples spiked with C. parvum and G. intestinalis were split for comparison to standard Method 1623. Results were equivalent to immunomagnetic procedures for Cryptosporidium, and Giardia. Overall percent recovery for Cryptosporidium with Method 1623 averaged 26.89% (std 21.44%; min = 0%; max = 73%) and was similar but less variable for qPCR method at an estimated average of 27.67 (std 17.65%; min = 5%; max = 63%). For Giardia, Method 1623 had an overall average recovery of 27.11% (std 17.98%; min = 1%; max = 58%), while multistage purification and qPCR had an estimated lower overall recovery at 18.58% (std 13.95%; min = 0%; max = 35%). Microsporidia were also readily detected with an estimated recovery of 46.81% overall (std 17.66%; min = 18%; max = 70%) for E. intestinalis and 38.90% (std 14.36%; min = 13%; max = 62%) for E. bieneusi. PMID:25295196

  6. Seasonality of Cryptosporidium oocyst detection in surface waters of Meru, Kenya as determined by two isolation methods followed by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Muchiri, John M.; Ascolillo, Luke; Mugambi, Mutuma; Mutwiri, Titus; Ward, Honorine D.; Naumova, Elena N.; Egorov, Andrey I.; Cohen, Seth; Else, James G.; Griffiths, Jeffrey K.

    2009-01-01

    Meru, Kenya has watersheds which are shared by wildlife, humans and domesticated animals. These surface waters can be contaminated by the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium. To quantify the seasonality and prevalence of Cryptosporidium in Meru regional surface waters, we used a calcium carbonate flocculation (CCF) and sucrose floatation method, and a filtration and immunomagnetic bead separation method, each of which used PCR for Cryptosporidium detection and genotyping. Monthly water samples were collected from January through June in 2003 and 2004, bracketing two April-May rainy seasons. We detected significant seasonality with 8 of 9 positive samples from May and June (p < 0.0014), which followed peak rainy season precipitation and includes some of the subsequent dry season. Six of 9 positive samples revealed C. parvum, and 3 contained C. andersoni. None contained C. hominis. Our results indicate that Meru surface waters are Cryptosporidium-contaminated at the end of rainy seasons, consistent with the timing of human infections reported by others from East Africa and contrasting with the onset of rainy season peak incidence reported from West Africa. PMID:18957776

  7. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in a public water-treatment system, Paraná, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jonatas Campos; Martins, Felippe Danyel Cardoso; Ferreira Neto, José Maurício; Santos, Maíra Moreira Dos; Garcia, João Luis; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico; Kuroda, Emília Kiyomi; Freire, Roberta Lemos

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in a public water-treatment system. Samples of raw and treated water were collected and concentrated using the membrane filtration technique. Direct Immunofluorescence Test was performed on the samples. DNA extraction using a commercial kit was performed and the DNA extracted was submitted to a nested-PCR reaction (n-PCR) and sequencing. In the immunofluorescence, 2/24 (8.33%) samples of raw water were positive for Giardia spp.. In n-PCR and sequencing, 2/24 (8.33%) samples of raw water were positive for Giardia spp., and 2/24 (8.33%) samples were positive for Cryptosporidium spp.. The sequencing showed Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis DNA. In raw water, there was moderate correlation among turbidity, color and Cryptosporidium spp. and between turbidity and Giardia spp.. The presence of these protozoans in the water indicates the need for monitoring for water-treatment companies. PMID:26291147

  8. Unusual Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotypes and Cryptosporidium hominis subtypes in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Akinbo, Frederick O; Okaka, Christopher E; Omoregie, Richard; Adamu, Haileeyesus; Xiao, Lihua

    2013-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons are commonly infected with Cryptosporidium species and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in both developed and developing countries, particularly patients with CD4+ cell counts below 200 cells/μL; 285 HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were enrolled in this study, and both stool and blood specimens were collected from participants. The stool specimens were analyzed and typed for E. bieneusi and Cryptosporidium spp. by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. CD4 count was analyzed using flow cytometry. E. bieneusi and Cryptosporidium were detected in 18 (6.3%) and 4 (1.4%) patients, respectively. The E. bieneusi detected mostly belonged to a new genotype group that, thus far, has only been found in a few humans: genotype Nig4 in 2 patients and two new genotypes related to Nig4 in 12 patients. The Cryptosporidium detected included C. hominis (two patients), C. parvum (one patient), and C. felis (one patient), with the two C. hominis infections belonging to an unusual subtype family. Additional studies are required to determine whether some E. bieneusi genotypes and C. hominis subtypes are more prevalent in HIV patients on HAART. PMID:23629938

  9. Microsporidia and Cryptosporidium in horses and donkeys in Algeria: detection of a novel Cryptosporidium hominis subtype family (Ik) in a horse.

    PubMed

    Laatamna, Abd Elkarim; Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Xiao, Lihua; Rost, Michael; McEvoy, John; Saadi, Ahmed Rachid; Aissi, Meriem; Kváč, Martin

    2015-03-15

    A total of 219 and 124 individual fecal samples of horses and donkeys, respectively, were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp., Encephalitozoon spp., and Enterocytozoon bieneusi DNA by genus-specific nested PCR. Isolates were genotyped by sequence analysis of SSU rRNA, GP60, TRAP-C1, COWP, and HSP70 loci in Cryptosporidium, and the ITS region in microsporidia. Cryptosporidium spp. was detected on 3/18 horse farms and 1/15 farms where donkeys were kept. Overall, five (2.3%) horse and two (1.6%) donkey specimens were PCR positive for Cryptosporidium. Genotyping at SSU and GP60 loci revealed that three isolates from horses and donkeys were C. parvum subtype family IIaA16G1R1, one isolate from a horse was, C. muris RN66, and one isolate from a donkey was C. muris TS03. An isolate from a horse shared 99.4% and 99.3% similarity with Cryptosporidium hominis and C. cuniculus, respectively, at the SSU locus. This isolate shared 100% identity with C. hominis at the TRAP-C1, COWP, and HSP70 loci, and it was from the novel gp60 subtype family IkA15G1. Microsporidia were found on 6/18 horse and 2/15 donkey farms. E. bieneusi was identified in 6.8% (15/219) and 1.6% (2/124), and Encephalitozoon cuniculi was identified in 1.8% (4/219) and 1.6% (2/124), of horses and donkeys, respectively. Three genotypes of E. cuniculi (I, II and III) were detected in horses, and E. cuniculi genotype II was detected in donkeys. Four genotypes of E. bieneusi (horse1, horse 2, CZ3, D) were described in horses. An additional five horses and two donkeys were positive for E. bieneusi, but the isolated were not genotyped. Neither Cryptosporidium nor microsporidia prevalence were affected by sex, age, type of breeding, or whether the host was a horse or a donkey. PMID:25638716

  10. Infection rate of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in cashmere, dairy and meat goats in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xian-Qi; Tian, Ge-Ru; Ren, Guan-Jing; Yu, Zheng-Qing; Lok, James Barron; Zhang, Long-Xian; Wang, Xue-Ting; Song, Jun-Ke; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2016-07-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, microsporidiosis, and giardiasis contribute significantly to the high burden of zoonotic diarrhea worldwide. Goats constitute an important species in animal agriculture by providing cashmere wool, meat, and dairy products for human consumption. However, zoonotic pathogens with the potential to cause morbidity and to degrade production have been reported frequently in goats recently. The present study examined 629 fecal specimens from goats, including 315 cashmere goats, 170 dairy goats and 144 meat goats, in multiple cities of Shaanxi and Henan provinces, northwestern and central China, to investigate the infection rate and species/assemblages/genotypes of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi. Of these samples, 274 (43.6%) were positive for three zoonotic pathogens, including 80 (12.7%), 104 (16.5%) and 179 (28.5%) for G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi, respectively. Infections with G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi existed in meat, dairy and cashmere goats, with the highest infection rate of each pathogen being observed in meat goats. DNA sequencing of the SSU rRNA gene from 104 Cryptosporidium-positive specimens revealed existence of Cryptosporidium xiaoi, and the zoonotic parasites Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium ubiquitum. Genotyping of G. duodenalis based on the triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) gene identified parasites from zoonotic assemblage A in four cashmere goats and the animal-adapted assemblage E in a group of 76 goats that included cashmere, dairy and meat animals. Polymorphisms in the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer characterized E. bieneusi genotype CHG1 and a novel genotype named as SX1 in both dairy and cashmere goats, genotypes CHS7 and COSI in meat goats, the genotype CHG2 in dairy goats, and the human-pathogenic genotype BEB6 in dairy and meat goats. This is the first detailed study to compare infection rate of the zoonotic protozoan pathogens

  11. Molecular analysis of 18S rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium parasites from patients living in Iran, Malawi, Nigeria and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Salman; Kalantari, Narges

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium species are one of the most common causes of gastrointestinal infection in humans around the world. This study has aimed to investigate the hyper variable region of the 18S rRNA gene in Cryptosporidium for exact parasite identification. DNA was extracted from 26 fecal samples from which initially Cryptosporidium oocysts were identified by Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast , Auramine phenol and ELISA techniques. Nested PCR, targeting the most polymorphic region of the 18S rRNA gene and genotyping was performed by restriction endonuclease digestion of the PCR product followed by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenic analysis. Among 26 isolates analyzed, three species of Cryptosporidium were identified; 38.5% of the isolates were C. hominis while 53.8% of the isolates were C. parvum and 7.7% of the isolates were C. meleagridis, which the last two species have the potentially zoonotic transmission. The only 11T subtype of C. hominis was demonstrated. These strains clustered distinctly into either human or animal origin regardless of the geographical origin, age, or immunity status of the patients. In summary, this work is the first report of C. meleagridis infecting human in Iran. Moreover, it suggested that multi-locus study of Cryptosporidium species in developing countries would be necessary to determine the extent of transmission of cryptosporidiosis in the populations. PMID:24551771

  12. Cryptosporidiosis in Haiti: surprisingly low level of species diversity revealed by molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium oocysts from surface water and groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Céline; Balthazard-Accou, Ketty; Clervil, Elmyre; Diallo, Aïssata; Da Costa, Cécilia; Emmanuel, Evens; Totet, Anne; Agnamey, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium sp. has emerged as one of the most important water contaminants, causing waterborne outbreaks of diarrhoeal diseases worldwide. In Haiti, cryptosporidiosis is a frequent cause of diarrhoea in children under the age of five years, HIV-infected individuals, and people living in low socioeconomic conditions, mainly due to the consumption of water or food polluted by Cryptosporidium oocysts. The aim of this study was to detect and identify Cryptosporidium oocysts present in 12 water samples collected in Port-au-Prince and 4 water samples collected in Cap Haïtien. Initial detection consisted of immunomagnetic separation – immunofluorescence assay (IMS-IFA), which was confirmed by nested PCR, targeting the most polymorphic region of the 18S rRNA gene in 15/16 samples. Genotyping was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and DNA sequencing. Under our working conditions, neither nested PCR-RFLP nor direct DNA sequencing revealed the expected species diversity, as only Cryptosporidium parvum was identified in the water samples studied. This study highlights the difficulty of detecting mixed populations of Cryptosporidium species in environmental samples. PMID:24252814

  13. Giardia duodenalis genotypes and Cryptosporidium species in humans and domestic animals in Côte d'Ivoire: occurrence and evidence for environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Berrilli, Federica; D'Alfonso, Rossella; Giangaspero, Annunziata; Marangi, Marianna; Brandonisio, Olga; Kaboré, Yolande; Glé, Christoph; Cianfanelli, Cristina; Lauro, Renato; Di Cave, David

    2012-03-01

    Giardia duodenalis genotypes and Cryptosporidium species were studied in humans and free-ranging animals living in closed enclaves in Côte d'Ivoire. Three hundred and seven stool samples were tested from humans, and 47 from freely roaming domestic animals (dogs, goats, ducks, chickens). Molecular characterization of the isolates was performed by sequence analysis of a portion of the SSU-rDNA for Giardia and the COWP gene for Cryptosporidium, and a β-giardin SYBR-green real-time PCR was also used to confirm the assignment of Giardia isolates to Assemblages. In humans, genotyping of Giardia assigned many of the sequences (43/56 by the SSU-rDNA gene, and 36/61 by the β-giardin gene) to Assemblage B. The animal species harboured only zoonotic Assemblages A and B, except for dogs, in which host specific Assemblages C and D were also detected. Cryptosporidium meleagridis, C. parvum and C. hominis were detected in humans, while among the animals only chickens were found positive for oocysts, identified as C. meleagridis and C. parvum. The results provide further evidence about the role of free-ranging domestic animals living closely with humans in the environmental dissemination and potential transmission of these anthropozoonotic pathogens to humans. PMID:22265078

  14. Host responses to Cryptosporidium infection.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Nordone, Shila K; Argenzio, Robert A

    2002-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a clinically and economically important infection whose pathogenic effect begins with colonization of the intestinal epithelium. Despite intensive efforts, a consistently effective therapy for the infection has yet to be identified. Morbidity and mortality results from ongoing loss of absorptive epithelium, which leads to villous atrophy and malabsorption and release of inflammatory mediators that stimulate electrolyte secretion and diarrhea. With further clarification of the mechanisms underlying enterocyte malfunction in Cryptosporidium infection, it should be possible to design rational nutritional and pharmacologic therapies to enhance nutrient and water absorption, promote the clearance of infected enterocytes, and restore normal villus architecture and mucosal barrier function. PMID:11822801

  15. High-throughput genotyping assay for the large-scale genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium parasites from human and bovine samples.

    PubMed

    Abal-Fabeiro, J L; Maside, X; Llovo, J; Bello, X; Torres, M; Treviño, M; Moldes, L; Muñoz, A; Carracedo, A; Bartolomé, C

    2014-04-01

    The epidemiological study of human cryptosporidiosis requires the characterization of species and subtypes involved in human disease in large sample collections. Molecular genotyping is costly and time-consuming, making the implementation of low-cost, highly efficient technologies increasingly necessary. Here, we designed a protocol based on MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for the high-throughput genotyping of a panel of 55 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) selected as markers for the identification of common gp60 subtypes of four Cryptosporidium species that infect humans. The method was applied to a panel of 608 human and 63 bovine isolates and the results were compared with control samples typed by Sanger sequencing. The method allowed the identification of species in 610 specimens (90·9%) and gp60 subtype in 605 (90·2%). It displayed excellent performance, with sensitivity and specificity values of 87·3 and 98·0%, respectively. Up to nine genotypes from four different Cryptosporidium species (C. hominis, C. parvum, C. meleagridis and C. felis) were detected in humans; the most common ones were C. hominis subtype Ib, and C. parvum IIa (61·3 and 28·3%, respectively). 96·5% of the bovine samples were typed as IIa. The method performs as well as the widely used Sanger sequencing and is more cost-effective and less time consuming. PMID:24238396

  16. Assessment of drugs against Cryptosporidium parvum using a simple in vitro screening method.

    PubMed

    Armson, A; Meloni, B P; Reynoldson, J A; Thompson, R C

    1999-09-15

    A rapid semi-quantitative screening method was devised for assessing the anticryptosporidial and cytotoxic effects of putative chemotherapeutic compounds. The method is suitable as an initial rapid screening procedure from which compounds demonstrating anticryptosporidial activity can be identified for further analysis. It has the advantages of speed, low cost and concurrent assessment of anticryptosporidial and cytotoxic effects and allows accurate determination of minimum lethal concentrations. Of the 71 compounds screened, six completely inhibited cryptosporidial growth at 1 microM (monensin, salinomycin, alborixin, lasalocid, trifluralin and nicarbazin) and a further eight showed significant anticryptosporidial activity at 1 or 20 microM (halquinol, bleomycin, suramin, mitomycin, doxycycline hydrochloride, toltrazuril, chloroquine phosphate and teniposide). Twelve compounds were found to have some degree of cytotoxicity at 1 microM and a further 12 at 20 microM. PMID:10499272

  17. SEQUENCE OF THE GENE ENCODING HSP90E FROM CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM. (R825148)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  18. PRESENCE OF DSRNAS IN HUMAN AND CALF ISOLATES OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM. (R825148)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. EFFECT OF LACTOBACILLUS AND BIFIDOBACTERIUM ON CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY. (R826138)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. FECAL ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS. (R828035)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. ASSESSING THE REMOVAL OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS AND CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new batch device that simulates the conditions in water and wastewater treatment plant and enables the study of low-concentration feeds is described. The application of this appartus to the monitoring of the contaminants is demonstrated, using kaolin particles and Cryptosporidi...

  2. PATHOGENESIS OF HUMAN AND BOVINE CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM IN GNOTOBIOTIC PIGS. (R826138)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. PATHOGENESIS OF BOVINE (GENOTYPE 2) CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM STRAINS IN NEONATAL AND AGED GNOTOBIOTIC PIGS (R826138)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. [Laboratory-based evaluation of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to detect Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia lamblia cyst in stool specimens].

    PubMed

    Nago, Tamami T; Tokashiki, Yoshino T; Kisanuki, Kyoko; Nakasone, Isamu; Yamane, Nobuhisa

    2010-08-01

    To establish an alternative and more sensitive test method to detect oocyst of Cryptosporidium parvum and cyst of Giardia lamblia in clinical stool specimens, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was evaluated. Minimum cell concentrations at which LAMP assay could detect C. parvum oocyst and G. lamblia cyst were determined as 6.25 x 10(-1) and 3.12 x 10(-1) cells/assay when the stool specimens were spiked with the respective parasites. The results indicated 400 times higher sensitivities or more when compared to the microscopic readings. Twenty and nineteen diarrhea stool specimens spiked with C. parvum oocyst or G. lamblia cyst were assayed by LAMP. The results indicated that 14 (70%) and 16 (84%) samples successfully resulted in positive readings. But the remaining 6 and 3 samples were read as negative probably due to residual stool color. However, further dilutions of DNA extraction samples and addition of bovine serum albumin to LAMP reaction mixture showed positive effects on the occurrence of false-negative readings. With these results, we can conclude that the LAMP assay provides us an accurate and highly sensitive test method to detect C. parvum oocyst and cyst of G. lamblia, in place of labor-intensive and experience-dependent microscopic examination, in clinical laboratories. PMID:20860168

  5. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.

  6. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM INACTIVATION AND REMOVAL RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench- and pilot-scale tests were performed to assess the ability of conventional treatment, ozonation and chlorine dioxide to remove and inactivate Cryptosporidium oocysts. The impacts of coagulant type, coagulant dose, raw water quality, filter loading rates and filter media w...

  7. The General Biology of Cryptosporidium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Cryptosporidium infect all classes of vertebrate animals. Of the sixteen valid species and nearly forty genotypes, three species are responsible for the majority of economic losses to livestock and morbidity and mortality to humans. This chapter summari...

  8. Expression of Cpgp40/15 in Toxoplasma gondii: a surrogate system for the study of Cryptosporidium glycoprotein antigens.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, R M; Kim, K; Khan, F; Ward, H D

    2003-10-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a waterborne enteric coccidian that causes diarrheal disease in a wide range of hosts. Development of successful therapies is hampered by the inability to culture the parasite and the lack of a transfection system for genetic manipulation. The glycoprotein products of the Cpgp40/15 gene, gp40 and gp15, are involved in C. parvum sporozoite attachment to and invasion of host cells and, as such, may be good targets for anticryptosporidial therapies. However, the function of these antigens appears to be dependent on the presence of multiple O-linked alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine (alpha-GalNAc) determinants. A eukaryotic expression system that would produce proteins bearing glycosylation patterns similar to those found on the native C. parvum glycoproteins would greatly facilitate the molecular and functional characterization of these antigens. As a unique approach to this problem, the Cpgp40/15 gene was transiently expressed in Toxoplasma gondii, and the expressed recombinant glycoproteins were characterized. Antisera to gp40 and gp15 reacted with the surface membranes of tachyzoites expressing the Cpgp40/15 construct, and this reactivity colocalized with that of antiserum to the T. gondii surface protein SAG1. Surface membrane localization was dependent on the presence of the glycophosphatidylinositol anchor attachment site present in the gp15 coding sequence. The presence of terminal O-linked alpha-GalNAc determinants on the T. gondii recombinant gp40 was confirmed by reactivity with Helix pomatia lectin and the monoclonal antibody 4E9, which recognizes alpha-GalNAc residues, and digestion with alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. In addition to appropriate localization and glycosylation, T. gondii apparently processes the gp40/15 precursor into the gp40 and gp15 component glycopolypeptides, albeit inefficiently. These results suggest that a surrogate system using T. gondii for the study of Cryptosporidium biology may be useful. PMID:14500524

  9. Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis as pathogenic contaminants of water in Galicia, Spain: the need for safe drinking water.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hermida, José Antonio; González-Warleta, Marta; Mezo, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to detect the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in drinking water treatments plants (DWTPs) in Galicia (NW Spain) and to identify which species and genotype of these pathogenic protozoans are present in the water. Samples of untreated water (surface or ground water sources) and of treated drinking water (in total, 254 samples) were collected from 127 DWTPs and analysed by an immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and by PCR. Considering the untreated water samples, Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 69 samples (54.3%) by IFAT, and DNA of this parasite was detected in 57 samples (44.8%) by PCR, whereas G. duodenalis was detected in 76 samples (59.8%) by IFAT and in 56 samples (44.0%) by PCR. Considering the treated drinking water samples, Cryptosporidium spp. was detected in 52 samples (40.9%) by IFAT, and the parasite DNA was detected in 51 samples (40.1%) by PCR, whereas G. duodenalis was detected in 58 samples (45.6%) by IFAT and in 43 samples (33.8%) by PCR. The percentage viability of the (oo)cysts ranged between 90.0% and 95.0% in all samples analysed. Cryptosporidium andersoni, C. hominis, C. parvum and assemblages A-I, A-II, E of G. duodenalis were identified. The results indicate that Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis are widespread in the environment and that DWTPs are largely ineffective in reducing/inactivating these pathogens in drinking water destined for human and animal consumption in Galicia. In conclusion, the findings suggest the need for better monitoring of water quality and identification of sources of contamination. PMID:25270421

  10. Occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts in the river water of two recreational areas in Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Azman, J; Init, I; Wan Yusoff, W S

    2009-12-01

    This study is the first report on the occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts in recreational rivers water from Malaysia. It was carried out in water samples at two rivers, 'Sungai Congkak' and 'Sungai Batu', located in Selangor State. The occurrence of both Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum (oo)cysts was higher in Sungai Congkak (50% or 15/30 and 10% or 3/30 respectively) than Sungai Batu (16% or 5/30 and 3.3% or 1/30 respectively). The mean density of cysts/L was 0.72 in Sungai Congkak and 0.023 in Sungai Batu, and that of oocysts/L was 0.023 in Sungai Congkak and 0.0033 in Sungai Batu, showing that the occurrence of Giardia was higher and more frequent than Cryptosporidium in both rivers. Sungai Congkak also showed higher faecal coliforms count (ranging from 0.48x10³ to 73x10³ CFU/100 mL) than Sungai Batu (0.41x10³ to 16x10³ CFU/100 mL). On the other hand, the Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts and faecal coliforms were more concentrated at the downstream station, followed by midstream and upstream stations which might be due to human factors where settlements and recreation areas were located around and between midstream and downstream stations. The (oo)cysts and faecal coliforms also increased during public holidays due to the significantly higher number of visitors (bathers) compared with the week days. All the parameters (physical, faecal coliforms and rainfall) did not show consistent significant correlation (based on r values of Pearson correlation analysis) with both protozoa, therefore these parameters are not suitable as indicator for the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts in both rivers. PMID:20237443

  11. Quantitative analysis of Cryptosporidium growth in in vitro culture--the impact of parasite density on the success of infection.

    PubMed

    Paziewska-Harris, Anna; Singer, Martin; Schoone, Gerard; Schallig, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important waterborne pathogen for which no treatment or vaccination is available. This study set out to quantify DNA replication of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro. Cryptosporidium DNA could be detected at up to 60 % of input level in both host-cell-free and host cell containing cultures 6 days after infection with living sporozoites, but was lost within 2 days in cultures inoculated with UV-inactivated sporozoites. Total DNA increased between days 2 and 6, evidence of successful DNA replication in both cell-free and host-cell-containing cultures. Overall however, only a small fraction (up to 5 %) of parasite DNA could be found associated with host cells or bound to plastic of the cell-free cultures, and the majority of parasite DNA was present in the cell culture medium, separable by simple decantation. After 2 days, in host-cell-containing cultures, the parasite DNA could be concentrated by slow centrifugation, suggesting that it was associated with intact parasite cells, but at 6 days, the majority could not be centrifuged and is therefore thought to have represented copies associated with dead and degraded parasites. In cell-free cultures and in larger plates, the majority of DNA was in this form. Performance of the parasite was best in small culture plates, and least in the largest plate sizes. We interpret these results as suggesting that Cryptosporidium sporozoites first bind to the host cell monolayer or to the plasticware, but then by 2 days, there has been a substantial release of parasites back into the medium. Host-cell-free cultures also supported modest replication and may have represented DNA synthesis in cells beginning merogony. The role of the host cells is unclear, as so much of the parasite DNA is released into the medium. Host cells may provide a feeder role, conditioning the medium for Cryptosporidium development. PMID:26435485

  12. Transport of Cryptosporidium oocysts in porous media: Role of straining and physicochemical filtration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tufenkji, N.; Miller, G.F.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Elimelech, M.

    2004-01-01

    The transport and filtration behavior of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in columns packed with quartz sand was systematically examined under repulsive electrostatic conditions. An increase in solution ionic strength resulted in greater oocyst deposition rates despite theoretical predictions of a significant electrostatic energy barrier to deposition. Relatively high deposition rates obtained with both oocysts and polystyrene latex particles of comparable size at low ionic strength (1 mM) suggest that a physical mechanism may play a key role in oocyst removal. Supporting experiments conducted with latex particles of varying sizes, under very low ionic strength conditions where physicochemical filtration is negligible, clearly indicated that physical straining is an important capture mechanism. The results of this study indicate that irregularity of sand grain shape (verified by SEM imaging) contributes considerably to the straining potential of the porous medium. Hence, both straining and physicochemical filtration are expected to control the removal of C. parvum oocysts in settings typical of riverbank filtration, soil infiltration, and slow sand filtration. Because classic colloid filtration theory does not account for removal by straining, these observations have important implications with respect to predictions of oocyst transport.

  13. Human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species bioanalytical detection method with single oocyst detection capability.

    PubMed

    Connelly, John T; Nugen, Sam R; Borejsza-Wysocki, Wlodek; Durst, Richard A; Montagna, Richard A; Baeumner, Antje J

    2008-05-01

    A bioanalytical detection method for specific detection of viable human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species, C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. meleagridis is described. Oocysts were isolated from water samples via immunomagnetic separation, and mRNA was extracted with oligo-dT magnetic beads, amplified using nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), and then detected in a nucleic acid hybridization lateral flow assay. The amplified target sequence employed was hsp70 mRNA, production of which is stimulated via a brief heat shock. The described method was capable of detecting one oocyst in 10 μL using flow-cytometer-counted samples. Only viable oocysts were detected, as confirmed using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide (DAPI/PI) staining. The detection system was challenged by detecting oocysts in the presence of large numbers of common waterborne microorganisms and packed pellet material filtered from environmental water samples. When the method was compared with EPA Method 1622 for C. parvum detection, highly comparable results were obtained. Since the described detection system yields unambiguous results within 4.5 h, it is an ideal method for monitoring the safety of drinking water. PMID:18311563

  14. Serological responses to Cryptosporidium antigens among women using riverbank-filtered water, conventionally filtered surface water and groundwater in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Frost, Floyd; Craun, Gunther; Mihály, Kádár; György, Berencsi; Calderon, Rebecca; Muller, Tm

    2005-03-01

    We compared serological responses to Cryptosporidium parvum antigens using surplus sera from females undergoing routine screening for pregnancy from three counties in Hungary where bank-filtered surface water, conventionally filtered and disinfected surface water, and groundwater from either a karst or confined aquifer are commonly used for drinking water. The primary purpose was to determine whether the prevalence and intensity of serological responses, indicators of prior Cryptosporidium infection were similar for these populations. Women using groundwater from a confined aquifer had significantly lower mean serological responses for both the 15/17-kDa and 27-kDa (p < 0.0001) antigen groups than women using conventionally filtered and disinfected surface water or karst well water. This is suggestive of less frequent infections. Women using bank-filtered water also had lower mean responses for both antigen groups. Among women using bank-filtered water, the mean intensity of response for both antigen groups was almost one-third of the mean response observed for women using conventionally filtered and disinfected surface water. These findings suggest that riverbank filtration may be an effective alternative to conventional treatment for reducing Cryptosporidium exposures and infection from surface drinking water sources. PMID:15952455

  15. Recovery of waterborne oocysts of Cryptosporidium from water samples by the membrane-filter dissolution method.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, T K; Cranfield, M R; Fayer, R

    1997-01-01

    The cellulose-acetate membrane (CAM)-filter dissolution method implemented into a Millipore Glass Microanalysis system was used for recovery of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts seeded into 25 l of drinking water in polyethylene carboy aspirator bottles. CAM-entrapped oocysts were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. From 65 to 94 oocysts/l (mean 75 oocysts/l), 34.7% overall of the inoculated oocysts, were unrecovered as determined after the water had been drained from the bottle, rinsed with 1 l of eluting fluid (EF), and CAM-filtered. Efficiency rates of oocyst recovery ranged from 24.0% to 64.0% (mean 44.1%), without the use of EF and from 72.1% to 82.3% (mean 78.8%) when EF was used. To ensure a high recovery efficiency of Cryptosporidium oocysts from sampled water by the CAM-filter dissolution method, it is recommended that 1 l of EF per 25 l of water be used. PMID:9039693

  16. A chemical approach for the mitigation of Prymnesium parvum blooms.

    PubMed

    Umphres, George D; Roelke, Daniel L; Netherland, Michael D

    2012-12-01

    Known as Golden Algae in popular media, the harmful algal bloom causing organism Prymnesium parvum secretes increased amounts of toxic chemicals called prymnesins when stressed, resulting in major fish kills in Texas. Although many options exist for mitigation of blooms, a feasible protocol for control of blooms on large-scale impoundments has yet to be identified. Chemical control of P. parvum using six different enzyme inhibiting aquatic herbicides was explored in laboratory experiments. Of the six chemicals screened, one (flumioxazin) was selected for further study due to a significant decrease in P. parvum cell numbers with increasing chemical concentration. It was applied to natural plankton communities during in-situ experiments (Lake Granbury, Texas). The first experiment was conducted during a period of P. parvum bloom initiation (March) and the second experiment conducted during a post bloom period (April). Experiments were carried out in 20 L polycarbonate carboys covered in 30% shade cloth to simulate natural light, temperature and turbulence conditions. Through cell counts via light-microscopy, the chemical flumioxazin was found to cause significant decreases in P. parvum, but no significant differences in zooplankton abundance during the period of bloom initiation. However, significant decreases in adult copepods were observed during the post bloom period, with no significant decreases in P. parvum most likely due to decreased light penetration and inhibition of the photosensitive mode of action. PMID:22960102

  17. Water stress exacerbates the severity of Botryosphaeria dieback in grapevines infected by Neofusicoccum parvum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botryosphaeria dieback (causal fungus Neofusicoccum parvum) is a detrimental grapevine trunk disease, causing internal wood degradation, killing shoots, and reducing yields. We examined the interactive effects of drought and N. parvum infection, common vineyard stresses, on wood-lesion development. ...

  18. Detection of Cyclospora, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia in ready-to-eat packaged leafy greens in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brent; Parrington, Lorna; Cook, Angela; Pollari, Frank; Farber, Jeffrey

    2013-02-01

    Numerous foodborne outbreaks of diarrheal illness associated with the consumption of produce contaminated with protozoan parasites have been reported in North America in recent years. The present study reports on the presence of Cyclospora, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia in precut salads and leafy greens purchased at retail in Ontario, Canada. A total of 544 retail samples were collected between April 2009 and March 2010 and included a variety of salad blends and individual leafy greens. Most of these products were grown in the United States, with some from Canada and Mexico. Parasites were eluted and concentrated before detection by PCR and immunofluorescence microscopy. DNA sequences were aligned with reference sequences in GenBank. Cyclospora spp. were identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism in nine (1.7 % ) samples and by DNA sequence analysis. Cryptosporidium spp. were identified in 32 (5.9%) samples; 29 were sequenced and aligned with the zoonotic species Cryptosporidium parvum. Giardia duodenalis was identified in 10 (1.8%) samples, and of the 9 samples successfully sequenced, 7 aligned with G. duodenalis assemblage B and 2 with assemblage A, both of which are also zoonotic. The presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts was confirmed in some of the PCR-positive samples using microscopy, while Cyclospora -like oocysts were observed in most of the Cyclospora PCR-positive samples. The relatively high prevalence of these parasites in packaged salads and leafy greens establishes a baseline for further studies and suggests a need for additional research with respect to the possible sources of contamination of these foods, the determination of parasite viability and virulence, and means to reduce foodborne transmission to humans. PMID:23433379

  19. Quantification of viable Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in wastewater using propidium monoazide quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alonso, José L; Amorós, Inmaculada; Guy, Rebecca A

    2014-07-01

    Real-time PCR (qPCR) is a rapid tool to quantify pathogens in the aquatic environment; however, it quantifies all pathogens, including both viable and nonviable. Propidium monoazide (PMA) is a membrane-impairment dye that penetrates only membrane-damaged cells. Once inside the cell, PMA is covalently cross-linked to DNA through light photoactivation, and PCR amplification is strongly inhibited. The goal of this study was to evaluate PMA-qPCR assays for rapid quantification of viable and heat-treated Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in wastewater. We observed a reduction in detection of heat-treated Giardia duodenalis cysts of 83.2, 89.9, 98.2, or 97% with PMA-qPCR assays amplifying a 75 base-pair (bp) β-giardin target, 77-bp triosephosphate isomerase (tpi), 133-bp glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), and 143-bp β-giardin gene target, respectively. Thus, the exclusion of dead cysts was more effective when qPCR assays that produced larger amplicons were used. The PMA treatment of Cryptosporidium oocysts plus/minus heat treatment abolished the fluorescent signal for dead oocysts with a PMA-qPCR assay amplifying a Cryptosporidium parvum (150-bp) oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene. The PMA-qPCR 143-bp β-giardin assay for Giardia and the PMA-qPCR 150-bp COWP assay for Cryptosporidium accurately quantified live oo(cysts), and failed to detect dead oo(cysts), when phosphate-buffered saline and tertiary effluent wastewater were spiked with concentrations of 10(3) or 10(2) dead oo(cysts), respectively. Therefore, these assays are suitable for the detection of viable parasites that are typically present in tertiary wastewater effluents at concentrations of <10(3) oo(cysts)/l and can provide rapid risk assessments of environmental water. PMID:24781028

  20. The development and implementation of a method using blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) as biosentinels of Cryptosporidium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii contamination in marine aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Sarah E; Keely, Scott P; Ware, Michael W; Schable, Nancy; See, Mary Jean; Gregorio, Dominic; Zou, Xuan; Su, Chunlei; Dubey, J P; Villegas, Eric N

    2015-12-01

    Surveillance monitoring for microbial water quality typically involves collecting single discrete grab samples for analyzing only one contaminant. While informative, current approaches suffer from poor recoveries and only provide a limited snapshot of the microbial contaminants only at the time of collection. To overcome these limitations, bivalves have been proposed as effective biosentinels of water quality particularly for their ability to efficiently concentrate and retain microbial contaminants for long periods of time. In this study, we examined the use of indigenous blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) as biosentinels to monitor for the presence of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium water. An efficient method to extract oocyst DNA from various mussel tissues followed by PCR-based detection of these pathogens was developed, which resulted in the detection down to 10 oocysts. This method was then used to conduct a small survey in Point Lobos and Morro Bay, California to determine prevalence T. gondii and Cryptosporidium. Results revealed that mussels from Morro Bay were contaminated with T. gondii (33 %), while mussels from Point Lobos were contaminated with T. gondii (54 %) and Cryptosporidium (26.9 %) oocysts. Phylogenetic analysis using the SSU rRNA gene identified two novel Cryptosporidium parvum-like genotypes. Overall, this study demonstrated the application of using native California Mytilus spp. as biosentinels for pathogen contamination along the central California shorelines. More importantly, T. gondii and Cryptosporidium were found at higher prevalence rates in Morro Bay and in Point Lobos, an area not previously reported to be contaminated with these pathogens. PMID:26358104

  1. Review of Cervi Cornu Parvum Pharmacopuncture in Korean Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Jin; Hwangbo, Min; Kwon, Kang; Seo, Hyung-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The endpoint of this review is to investigate existing studies of Cervi cornu parvum(CCP) pharmacopuncture within Korean medicine journals in order to present a better research method in the future. Methods: We searched all the papers through six Korean electrical databases that included the title of " Cervi cornu parvum pharmacopuncture" or " Cervi cornu parvum aqua-acupuncture". Articles that had been published until December 2012 were largely divided into experimental studies and clinical studies. Results: Fifty-three (53) experimental studies and six clinical studies were found. The number of published articles has been constantly increasing. Many of the experimental studies demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects for arthritis, and most of the clinical studies dealt with musculoskeletal problems. Conclusion: Various therapeutically significant effects of the CCP pharmacopuncture have been found through this review; however, more systematic clinical studies on the CCP pharmacopuncture seem to be necessary to substantially support its clinical effects. PMID:25780662

  2. DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN WATER MATRICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the advent and recognition of waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis great effort has been expended on development of methods for detecting Cryptosporidium oocysts in water. Oocysts recovery rates using a method originally developed for detecting Giardia cysts ranged fr...

  3. Elimination of viruses, phages, bacteria and Cryptosporidium by a new generation Aquaguard point-of-use water treatment unit.

    PubMed

    Grabow, W O; Clay, C G; Dhaliwal, W; Vrey, M A; Müller, E E

    1999-09-01

    The elimination of human viruses, phages, bacteria and Cryptosporidium oocysts by a new generation commercial Aquaguard purifier for the domestic treatment of drinking water, has been evaluated. The unit basically consists of a candle prefilter, activated carbon filter and ultraviolet irradiation compartment. Drinking water seeded with selected laboratory test strains of resistant micro-organisms was passed through the unit. Similar tests were carried out with sewage-contaminated river water and secondary treated waste water containing naturally occurring organisms. Test procedures were based on internationally accepted principles for the evaluation of point-of-use water treatment units, including a standard test protocol of the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Reduction in numbers of seeded test organisms at several log levels higher than those expected in water for which the unit is intended, was determined by the cultivation of viable organisms. In the case of seeded viruses and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts the qualitative absence of nucleic acid was determined by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). At the design flow rate of one litre per minute, numbers of polio, hepatitis A, adeno types 2 and 41, rota SA11, human rota and astro viruses, as well as somatic and MS2 coliphage