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Sample records for por mycobacterium kansasii

  1. Mycobacterium kansasii pulmonary diseases in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jae-Joon; Park, Young-Kil; Lew, Woo Jin; Bai, Gill-Han; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young-Soo

    2005-12-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is one of the most common cause of pulmonary diseases due to nontuberculous mycobacteria. We investigated the changing in the number of isolation of M. kansasii and the clinical characteristics of M. kansasii pulmonary disease in Korea. Through searching the database of the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis, we identified the cases of isolated M. kansasii from 1992 to 2002. The number of M. kansasii isolation had increased from once in 1992 to 62 in 2002. Fifteen patients with M. kansasii pulmonary disease were identified during the period January 1997 to December 2002. Twelve patients (80%) were male and fourteen (93%) were from highly industrialized areas. The most common symptom was a cough. Seven patients (47%) had a cavitary lesion and right upper lobe was most commonly involved. Patients responded well to isoniazid and rifampicin based regimens both bacteriologically and radiographically. In conclusion, M. kansasii isolation has increased, especially in highly industrialized areas, as well as other nontuberculous mycobacteria in Korea. PMID:16361804

  2. Immune Responses in Cattle Inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle were inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii to compare antigen-specific immune responses to varied patterns of mycobacterial disease. Disease expression ranged from colonization with associated pathology (M. bovis), colonization without path...

  3. [Chemotherapy of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, S

    1996-09-01

    A very favorable outcome after chemotherapy of 122 cases of M. kansasii lung disease was reported by Dr. Mizutani, who emphasized RFP as the "Key drug", and concluded that three-drug combination (not two-drug), including RFP (RFP.INH.EB or SM) for 1 year, could be a standard regimen for M. kansasii lung disease at the time of the moment. In addition, the following itemes were discussed. (1) In cases resistant to RFP, one could possibly replace RFP by TH, one of new quinolones (NQ), or the new macrolide (NM) (clarithromycin, CAM). (2) In low grade resistant cases to INH (0.1 microgram /ml) or EB (2.5 micrograms/ml), the replacement of the drugs may not be necessary, however, in higher-grade resistance to INH or EB, many cases were looked for the change of drugs according the results of the questionnaire done by the author. The present status of basic preclinical evaluations of new drugs were presented by Dr. Tomioka, who summarized in vitro and in vivo antimycobacterial activities of NMs and NQs. The most potent activity among NMs was demonstrated in CAM, which is probably the candidate for M. kansasii and possibly for M. avium complex (MAC) disease, followed by roxithromycin (RXM) and azithromycin (AZM) in sequence. NQs including the ones under development were generally potent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. kansasii and M. fortuitum. NQs were not potent enough for MAC. In addition, the author discussed more suitable in vitro techniques which should reflect in vivo evaluations, and proposed the observation of in vitro bactericidal activity using both Cmax (maximal in vivo concentration) and C (0-8h) (the average concentration during 8 hours after administration) of drugs, and also the assessment of bactericidal activities of drugs in macrophages as better choices. As additional comments, the results of in vitro activities of NQs and NMs against MAC were supplemented by two authors, Dr. Tsuyuguchi and Dr. Kawahara. The assessment using 7 H 9 liquid medium by

  4. Clinical Significance of Mycobacterium kansasii Isolates from Respiratory Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, Su-Young; Chung, Myung Jin; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The clinical significance of Mycobacterium kansasii respiratory isolates is uncertain. The aims of this study were to determine the clinical relevance of M. kansasii isolates and to identify the clinical features and outcomes of M. kansasii lung disease. We reviewed the medical records of 104 patients from whom at least one respiratory M. kansasii isolate was obtained from January 2003 to July 2014 at Samsung Medical Center, South Korea. Of these 104 patients, 54 (52%) met the diagnostic criteria for nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease; among them, 41 (76%) patients received antibiotic treatment for a median time of 15.0 months (interquartile range [IQR], 7.0–18.0 months). The remaining 13 (24%) without overt disease progression were observed for a median period of 24.0 months (IQR, 5.0–34.5 months). Patients with M. kansasii lung disease exhibited various radiographic findings of lung disease, including the fibrocavitary form (n = 24, 44%), the nodular bronchiectatic form (n = 17, 32%), and an unclassifiable form (n = 13, 24%). The fibrocavitary form was more common in patients who received treatment (n = 23, 56%), while the nodular bronchiectatic form was more common in patients with M. kansasii lung disease who did not receive treatment (n = 9, 70%). None of the patients with a single sputum isolate (n = 18) developed M. kansasii disease over a median follow-up period of 12.0 months (IQR, 4.0–26.5 months). In total, 52% of all patients with M. kansasii respiratory isolates exhibited clinically significant disease. Moreover, patients with M. kansasii lung disease displayed diverse radiographic findings in addition to the fibrocavitary form. The nodular bronchiectatic form was more common in patients with M. kansasii lung disease with an indolent clinical course. Thus, since the clinical significance of a single M. kansasii respiratory isolate is not definite, strict adherence to recommended diagnostic criteria is advised. PMID:26431540

  5. Fatal aortic pseudoaneurysm from disseminated Mycobacterium kansasii infection: case report.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, Laleh; Reddy, Sujan C; Mosunjac, Mario; Kraft, Colleen S; Guarner, Jeannette

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a photochromogenic, slow-growing mycobacterium species that can cause pulmonary infection in patients with predisposing lung diseases, as well as extrapulmonary or disseminated disease in immunosuppressed patients. We describe a patient with a myelodysplastic syndrome, disseminated M kansasii infection, and ruptured aortic aneurysm. He had a recent diagnosis of mycobacterium cavitary lung lesions and was transferred to our facility for possible surgical intervention of an aortic aneurysm. Few hours after admission, the patient suddenly collapsed and died despite resuscitation efforts. A complete autopsy was performed and showed ruptured ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm with hemopericardium, disseminated necrotizing and nonnecrotizing granulomas with acid-fast bacilli in the aortic wall, lungs, heart, liver, spleen, and kidneys. Further genetic studies were consistent with monocytopenia and mycobacterial infection syndrome. PMID:25537975

  6. Mycobacterium kansasii causing chronic monoarticular synovitis in a patient with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Menashe, Leo; Kerr, Leslie Dubin; Hermann, George

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a nontuberculous mycobacterium that primarily causes pulmonary disease in AIDS patients, however it has also been known, rarely, to result in skeletal infection. When skeletal infection occurs, the time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis is up to 5 years in previously reported cases. We describe a 48-year-old woman with HIV/AIDS who presented with chronic, isolated left knee pain and swelling of over two decades which had recently worsened. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated marked subarticular erosions, synovial thickening, and bone marrow edema, which had progressed compared with prior imaging done seven years earlier. Synovial biopsy grew Mycobacterium kansasii. Following the presentation of our case, clinical and imaging findings, including the differential diagnosis, of monoarticular arthritis caused by Mycobacterium kansasii are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26629306

  7. Mycobacterium kansasii: antibiotic susceptibility and PCR-restriction analysis of clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    da Silva Telles, Maria Alice; Chimara, Erica; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine; Riley, Lee W

    2005-10-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is the second most common cause of non-tuberculosis mycobacterial diseases in Sao Paulo, Brazil. An important component of the management of infections caused by this organism is antibiotic susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the drug susceptibility profiles and genotypes of clinical isolates of M. kansasii obtained from patients with or without an infection that met the American Thoracic Society's case definition criteria of M. kansasii disease. One hundred and sixty-nine clinical isolates of M. kansasii collected between 1993 and 1998 in Sao Paulo, Brazil, were tested consecutively. The isolates were genotyped by PCR restriction-enzyme pattern analysis (PRA). Most of the M. kansasii strains were susceptible to isoniazid, streptomycin, rifabutin, rifampicin, clarithromycin, ethionamide, amikacin, clofazimine and cycloserine, and resistant to ethambutol, ciprofloxacin and doxycycline. Of 169 isolates, 167 belonged to the type I PRA genotype and one each belonged to type II and III genotypes. There was no correlation between PRA subtype and M. kansasii disease according to the American Thoracic Society case definition. Clinical trials may be needed to better correlate MIC values with treatment outcomes to identify appropriate parameters for drug-resistance testing of M. kansasii. PMID:16157553

  8. MKAN27435 Is Required for the Biosynthesis of Higher Subclasses of Lipooligosaccharides in Mycobacterium kansasii

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Vijayashankar; Pang, Poh-choo; Haslam, Stuart M.; Veerapen, Natacha; Minnikin, David E.; Dell, Anne; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Bhatt, Apoorva

    2015-01-01

    Lipooligosaccharides are glycolipids found in the cell wall of many mycobacterial species including the opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium kansasii. The genome of M. kansasii ATCC12478 contains a cluster with genes orthologous to Mycobacterium marinum LOS biosynthesis genes. To initiate a genetic dissection of this cluster and demonstrate its role in LOS biosynthesis in M. kansasii, we chose MKAN27435, a gene encoding a putative glycosyltransferase. Using Specialized Transduction, a phage-based gene knockout tool previously used to generate null mutants in other mycobacteria, we generated a MKAN27435 null mutant. The mutant strain was found to be defective in the biosynthesis of higher LOS subspecies, viz LOS-IV, LOS-V, LOS-VI and LOS-VII. Additionally, a range of low abundance species were detected in the mutant strain and mass spectroscopic analysis indicated that these were shunt products generated from LOS-III by the addition of up to six molecules of a pentose. PMID:25893968

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium kansasii Strains 1010001454, 1010001458, 1010001468, 1010001493, 1010001495, and 1010001469, Isolated from Environmental Sources.

    PubMed

    Strapagiel, Dominik; Borówka, Paulina; Marciniak, Błażej; Bakuła, Zofia; van Ingen, Jakko; Safianowska, Aleksandra; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jarosław; Jagielski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii belongs to the nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and causes opportunistic infections with both pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of six environmental M. kansasii strains, designated 1010001495 (type I), 1010001469 (type II), 1010001468 (type III), 1010001458 (type IV), 1010001454 (type V), and 1010001493 (type V), originally isolated in five different European countries. PMID:27257194

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium kansasii Strains 1010001454, 1010001458, 1010001468, 1010001493, 1010001495, and 1010001469, Isolated from Environmental Sources

    PubMed Central

    Strapagiel, Dominik; Borówka, Paulina; Marciniak, Błażej; Bakuła, Zofia; Safianowska, Aleksandra; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii belongs to the nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and causes opportunistic infections with both pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of six environmental M. kansasii strains, designated 1010001495 (type I), 1010001469 (type II), 1010001468 (type III), 1010001458 (type IV), 1010001454 (type V), and 1010001493 (type V), originally isolated in five different European countries. PMID:27257194

  11. Cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum and kansasii in an IgA-deficient man

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has steadily increased over the past decades, especially in immunocompromised patients. Case presentation We present a patient with IgA-deficiency and mixed cutaneous infection by two slowly growing mycobacteria, Mycobacterium (M.) haemophilum and M. kansasii. Conclusions Cutaneous M. haemophilum infections most often result from HIV or transplantation-associated immunosuppression. Rarely, M. haemophilum may also infect healthy patients or iatrogenically immunosuppressed patients without transplantation. M. kansasii is one of the most frequent NTM and large awareness exists about its involvement in human diseases. Mycobacterial diagnosis of cutaneous infections should be considered in long-lasting skin lesions. PMID:21269422

  12. Mycobacteriosis in a black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) caused by Mycobacterium kansasii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, P.B.; Bender, L.C.; Garner, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    An eviscerated hunter-harvested female black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) was submitted to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. The deer was emaciated, devoid of adipose tissue, and the parietal surface of the thoracic cavity contained multiple granulomas. Acid-fast bacteria were detected histologically from the granulomas and were isolated and identified as Mycobacterium kansasii, a nontuberculous mycobacterium sporadically reported to cause tuberculosis-like disease in a variety of vertebrates. This was the first report of symptomatic disease caused by M. kansasii in free-ranging deer. This case indicates that atypical mycobacteria can cause tuberculosis-like disease in free-ranging deer and illustrates the importance of identifying causative agents of tuberculosis-like disease in wildlife. Copyright 2005 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.

  13. Mycobacterium kansasii infection in a bontebok (Damaliscus pygaragus dorcas) herd: diagnostic challenges in differentiating from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michele; Terrell, Scott; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Rena; Harris, Beth; Thomsen, Bruce V; Fontenot, Deidre; Stetter, Mark; Neiffer, Don; Fleming, Greg

    2011-09-01

    Two adult female bontebok (Damaliscus pygarus dorcas) were euthanized because of signs of pneumonia and weakness (case 1), and a nonresponsive lameness with draining fistula (case 2). Necropsy findings were similar in both cases and consisted of disseminated granulomatous lesions in the liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs, pleural surfaces, and multiple lymph nodes. Mycobacterium kansasii was isolated from both cases after multiple attempts on a variety of samples by two laboratories. The remaining four animals in the herd were tested for antibody responses using the Chembio ElephantTB STAT-PAK, DPP VetTB kits, and multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA), for immune reaction using the intradermal tuberculin test, and by tracheal wash cultures, and thoracic radiographs. Banked serum samples collected in 2005 and obtained from the original institution, revealed 1/9 (11.11%) seropositive animals using the three immunoassays. Retesting the current herd in 2008 showed 2/6 (33.33%) seropositive animals by the three tests, with MAPIA demonstrating antibody reactivity to MPB83 and MPB70 proteins. Inconsistent intradermal tuberculin test results, cross-reactivity in serologic assays designed for tuberculosis detection, difficulty in obtaining definitive identification by culture, and inability to identify a source of infection created challenges in distinguishing the atypical mycobacteriosis due to M. kansasii from the initially suspected tuberculous infection in this herd. Owing to regulatory considerations, differences in host-to-host transmission, and source of infection between Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria, correct diagnosis is crucial for management of these diseases in wildlife species. PMID:22950320

  14. [THE GENETIC EXAMINATION OF BRONCHIAL LAVAGE ENABLES THE PROMPT DIAGNOSIS OF PULMONARY MYCOBACTERIUM KANSASII--A CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahide; Ageshio, Fumitaka; Kagawa, Hiroyuki; Oshitani, Yohei; Fujikawa, Takeya; Saito, Haruko; Sako, Hajime; Yano, Yukihiro; Kitada, Seigo; Maekura, Ryoji

    2015-08-01

    A 59-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchial asthma presented at our hospital with an abnormal shadow on the chest radiograph, which was obtained as part of a routine medical examination. Computed tomography of the chest revealed two nodules in the right upper lung with the longest diameter measuring 29 mm and 10 mm, respectively. A granulomatous disease was strongly suspected based on the histological features of the transbronchial lung biopsy specimen. Results of smear examination for mycobacteria and genetic examination of the bronchial lavage aspirate by the transcription reverse transcription concerted (TRC) reaction method for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC), were both negative. However, three days after the bronchoscopic examination, an additional genetic examination by the TRC method confirmed the diagnosis of M. kansasii infection. About two weeks later, the culture results were positive and M. kansasii infection was re-confirmed with the DNA probe method. The patient responded well to treatment with a combination of isoniazid, rifampicin, and ethambutol. In Japan, among the nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, the prevalence of pulmonary M.kansasii disease is second only to infection with MAC. However, it is often difficult to distinguish this disease from pulmonary tuberculosis. In this patient, a genetic examination with the TRC method enabled a prompt diagnosis of M. kansasii infection. The TRC method appears to be a useful tool for diagnosing nontubercular mycobacterial infections. PMID:26665518

  15. Comparative in vitro activities of linezolid, telithromycin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and four conventional antimycobacterial drugs against Mycobacterium kansasii.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Fernando; Calatayud, Laura; Santín, Miguel; Martín, Rogelio

    2004-12-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is one of the most pathogenic and frequent nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from humans. Patients with adverse drug reactions, resistant isolates, or suboptimal response require alternative treatment regimens. One hundred forty-eight consecutive clinical isolates of M. kansasii were tested for antimicrobial susceptibilities by the BACTEC 460 system (NCCLS) with two different inoculation protocols, one conventional and one alternative. In the alternative protocol, the inoculum 12B vial was incubated until the growth index was between 250 and 500. Four conventional antimycobacterial drugs (isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, and ethambutol) were studied with standard critical concentrations. The in vitro activities of linezolid, telithromycin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin were determined by measuring radiometric MICs. All isolates tested were identified as M. kansasii genotype I and were resistant to isoniazid at a concentration of 0.4 mug/ml. One hundred twenty isolates (81.1%) were inhibited by 1 microg of isoniazid per ml. A high level of resistance to isoniazid (>10 microg/ml) was observed in six isolates (4.1%). Only five strains (3.4%) were resistant to rifampin (>1 microg/ml). All isolates studied were susceptible to streptomycin and ethambutol. The MICs at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited (in micrograms per milliliter) were as follows: linezolid, 1 (range, < or =0.25 to 2); telithromycin, >16 (range, 4 to >16); clarithromycin, 0.5 (range, < or =0.03 to 1); levofloxacin, 0.12 (range, 0.12 to 0.25); and moxifloxacin, 0.06 (range, < or =0.06 to 0.12). The susceptibility testing results with both inoculation protocols showed perfect correlation. In conclusion, all M. kansasii isolates showed decreased susceptibility to isoniazid, but resistance to rifampin was infrequent. Quinolones, especially moxifloxacin, were the most active antimicrobial agents tested, followed by clarithromycin. Linezolid also showed good

  16. Pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii Infection Mimicking Malignancy on the 18F-FDG PET Scan in a Patient Receiving Etanercept: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Amlani, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old male presented with chest pain, malaise, generalized weakness, and weight loss. He had been receiving etanercept injection for rheumatoid arthritis. Chest X-ray revealed a right upper lobe mass. Chest computed tomography (CT) showed a right apical mass, highly suggestive of a Pancoast tumor. The thoracic fluorine-18 fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scan demonstrated significantly high metabolic pulmonary lesions with the standardized uptake value (SUV) of 12.5, consistent with lung cancer. The patient underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). BAL cytology was negative for malignant cells. BAL acid fast bacilli (AFB) smears were positive, and Mycobacterium kansasii was eventually isolated. He received a 12-month course of rifampin, isoniazid, and ethambutol. Interval resolution of pulmonary lesions was noted on follow-up serial CT chest studies. There has been increasing incidence of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections reported in patients treated with the antitumor necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) agents. Infectious foci have an increased glucose metabolism which potentially causes a high FDG uptake on the 18F-FDG PET scan, leading to undue anxiety and cost to the patients. This is the first reported case of pulmonary M. kansasii infection with a positive thoracic 18F-FDG PET study mimicking malignancy in a patient on etanercept. PMID:25389506

  17. Isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium kansasii in an HIV-positive patient, and possible development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy: case report.

    PubMed

    Despotovic, A; Savic, B; Salemovic, D; Ranin, J; Jevtovic, Dj

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are rare but important causes of infection in HIV-positive individuals. A 28-year-old HIV-positive male presented with a high fever, non-productive cough, right subcostal pain, splenomegaly, a very low CD4 count, elevated C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and a normal white blood cell count. The suspicion of tuberculosis (TB) was very high, and sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli. Standard quadruple anti-TB therapy was initiated, but once culture of the sample revealed Mycobacterium kansasii, pyrazinamide was withdrawn. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was initiated soon after, consisting of abacavir/lamivudine and efavirenz. The patient's general condition deteriorated 2 weeks after HAART initiation, which could have been due to the development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). The patient recovered and was discharged in good condition. However, the results of resistance testing of the isolated organism arrived after discharge, and showed isoniazid and streptomycin resistance. This is the first case report of M. kansasii infection from Serbia and shows the difficulties encountered during the course of treatment. PMID:26603644

  18. Rapid Drug Tolerance and Dramatic Sterilizing Effect of Moxifloxacin Monotherapy in a Novel Hollow-Fiber Model of Intracellular Mycobacterium kansasii Disease

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shashikant; Pasipanodya, Jotam; Sherman, Carleton M.; Meek, Claudia; Leff, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is the second most common mycobacterial cause of lung disease. Standard treatment consists of rifampin, isoniazid, and ethambutol for at least 12 months after negative sputum. Thus, shorter-duration therapies are needed. Moxifloxacin has good MICs for M. kansasii. However, good preclinical models to identify optimal doses currently are lacking. We developed a novel hollow fiber system model of intracellular M. kansasii infection. We indexed the efficacy of the standard combination regimen, which was a kill rate of −0.08 ± 0.05 log10 CFU/ml/day (r2 = 0.99). We next performed moxifloxacin dose-effect and dose-scheduling studies at a half-life of 11.1 ± 6.47 h. Some systems also were treated with the efflux pump inhibitor reserpine. The highest moxifloxacin exposure, as well as lower exposures plus reserpine, sterilized the cultures by day 7. This suggests that efflux pump-mediated tolerance at low ratios of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24) to MICs is an early bacterial defense mechanism but is overcome by higher exposures. The highest rate of moxifloxacin monotherapy sterilization was −0.82 ± 0.15 log10 CFU/ml/day (r2 = 0.97). The moxifloxacin exposure associated with 80% of maximal kill (EC80) was an AUC0–24/MIC of 317 (the non-protein-bound moxifloxacin AUC0–24/MIC was 158.5). We performed Monte Carlo simulations of 10,000 patients in order to identify the moxifloxacin dose that would achieve or exceed the EC80. The simulations revealed an optimal moxifloxacin dose of 800 mg a day. The MIC susceptibility breakpoint at this dose was 0.25 mg/liter. Thus, moxifloxacin, at high enough doses, is suitable to study in patients for the potential to add rapid sterilization to the standard regimen. PMID:25645830

  19. Disparate Host Immunity to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Antigens in Calves Inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, M. kansasii, and M. bovis

    PubMed Central

    Waters, W. R.; Bannantine, J. P.; Palmer, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The cross-reactivity of mycobacterial antigens in immune-based diagnostic assays has been a major concern and a criticism of the current tests that are used for the detection of paratuberculosis. In the present study, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins were evaluated for antigenic specificity compared to a whole-cell sonicate preparation (MPS). Measures of cell-mediated immunity to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens were compared in calves inoculated with live M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium (M. avium), Mycobacterium kansasii, or Mycobacterium bovis. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses to MPS were observed in all calves that were exposed to mycobacteria compared to control calves at 4 months postinfection. Pooled recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins also elicited nonspecific IFN-γ responses in inoculated calves, with the exception of calves infected with M. bovis. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins failed to elicit antigen-specific responses for the majority of immune measures; however, the expression of CD25 and CD26 was upregulated on CD4, CD8, gamma/delta (γδ) T, and B cells for the calves that were inoculated with either M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. avium after antigen stimulation of the cells. Stimulation with MPS also resulted in the increased expression of CD26 on CD45RO+ CD25+ T cells from calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium. Although recombinant proteins failed to elicit specific responses for the calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the differences in immune responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens were dependent upon mycobacterial exposure. The results demonstrated a close alignment in immune responses between calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and those inoculated with M. avium that were somewhat disparate from the responses in calves infected with M. bovis, suggesting

  20. Uveitis with occult choroiditis due to Mycobacterium kansasii: limitations of interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) tests (case report and mini-review on ocular non-tuberculous mycobacteria and IGRA cross-reactivity).

    PubMed

    Kuznetcova, Tatiana I; Sauty, Alain; Herbort, Carl P

    2012-10-01

    Ocular tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose but should be suspected when uveitis fails to respond to inflammation suppressive therapy. Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) represent a substantial help to diagnose suspected ocular tuberculosis especially in non-endemic areas. Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) is able to detect clinically silent choroiditis that, when associated with a positive IGRA test, should lead the clinician to suspect ocular tuberculosis, warranting specific therapy. The fact that IGRA tests can also react with some atypical strains of mycobacteria is not always known. We report here a case with resistant post-operative inflammation that presented with occult ICGA-detected choroiditis and a positive IGRA test that was most probably due to the non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) Mycobacterium kansasii. A 66 year-old man presented with a resistant cystoid macular oedema (CMO) in his left eye after combined cataract and epiretinal membrane surgery. At entry, his best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.5 for far and near OS. Intraocular inflammation measured by laser flare photometry was elevated in the left eye (54.4 ph/ms) and also in the right eye (50.9 ph/ms). Four subTenon's injections of 40 mg of triamcinolone did not produce any substantial improvement. Therefore a complete uveitis work-up was performed. Fluorescein angiography showed CMO OS and ICGA showed numerous hypofluorescent dots and fuzziness of choroidal vessels in both eyes. Among performed laboratory tests, the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold test was positive. After a pulmonological examination disclosing a right upper lobe infiltrate, the patient was started on a triple anti-tuberculous therapy. Bronchial aspirate, obtained during bronchoscopy, was Ziehl-positive and culture grew M. kansasii. Nine months later, BCVA OS increased to 1.0 and flare decreased to 40.2 ph/ms. The CMO OS resolved angiographically and did not recur with a macula still slightly thickened on OCT

  1. Disparate host immunity to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, M. kansasii and M. bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-reactivity of mycobacterial antigens in immune-based diagnostic assays has been a major concern and criticism of current tests for the detection of paratuberculosis. In the present study, host immune responses to antigen preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), consis...

  2. Cloning and sequencing of the gene for alpha antigen from Mycobacterium avium and mapping of B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, N; Matsuo, K; Yamaguchi, R; Yamazaki, A; Tasaka, H; Yamada, T

    1993-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of alpha antigen secreted from Mycobacterium avium (A-alpha) was determined. The gene encodes 330 amino acids, including 40 amino acids for the signal peptide, followed by 290 amino acids for the mature protein with a molecular mass of 30,811 Da. This is the first sequence of A-alpha. Comparisons between A-alpha and alpha antigens of Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and Mycobacterium kansasii showed highly homologous regions which suggested a conserved functional domain and two less-homologous regions. Serological analysis of recombinant A-alpha, expressed by a series of deletion constructs, indicated the possibility that A-alpha carries at least six B-cell epitopes. The three antigenic determinants were common to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. kansasii, and M. avium. The results also suggested the possibility that there are three species-specific epitopes. Images PMID:7681039

  3. Partial characterization of a major autolysin from Mycobacterium phlei.

    PubMed

    Li, Z S; Beveridge, T J; Betts, J; Clarke, A J

    1999-01-01

    Autolytic enzyme profiles of fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria were examined using SDS-PAGE zymography with incorporated mycobacterial peptidoglycan sacculi as substrate. Each species tested (Mycobacterium phlei, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium aurum, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium kansasii) appeared to produce a different set of enzymes on the basis of differing number and molecular masses. A major autolysin from M. phlei was purified to apparent homogeneity by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, preparative gel electrophoresis and Mono Q FPLC. This enzyme had an estimated molecular mass of 38 kDa, an isoelectric point of 5.5 and a pH optimum of pH 7.5. Digestion of purified peptidoglycan by the enzyme resulted in the appearance of reducing sugars, suggesting that the 38 kDa autolysin is a beta-glycosidase. Partial internal amino acid sequence of the autolysin was determined and should facilitate identification, cloning and overexpression of the encoding gene. PMID:10206696

  4. A metabolomics approach to characterise and identify various Mycobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Ilse; Loots, Du Toit

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the potential use of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), in combination with multivariate statistical data processing, to build a model for the classification of various tuberculosis (TB) causing, and non-TB Mycobacterium species, on the basis of their characteristic metabolite profiles. A modified Bligh-Dyer extraction procedure was used to extract lipid components from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium bovis, and Mycobacterium kansasii cultures. Principle component analyses (PCA) of the GC-MS generated data showed a clear differentiation between all the Mycobacterium species tested. Subsequently, the 12 compounds best describing the variation between the sample groups were identified as potential metabolite markers, using PCA and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These metabolite markers were then used to build a discriminant classification model based on Bayes' theorem, in conjunction with multivariate kernel density estimation. This model subsequently correctly classified 2 "unknown" samples for each of the Mycobacterium species analysed, with probabilities ranging from 72 to 100%. Furthermore, Mycobacterium species classification could be achieved in less than 16 h, and the detection limit for this approach was 1×10(3)bacteriamL(-1). This study proves the capacity of a GC-MS, metabolomics pattern recognition approach for its possible use in TB diagnostics and disease characterisation. PMID:22301369

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of vitamin B12-related metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Douglas B.; Comas, Iñaki; de Carvalho, Luiz P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of genome sequences from clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with phylogenetically-related pathogens Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium leprae reveals diversity amongst genes associated with vitamin B12-related metabolism. Diversity is generated by gene deletion events, differential acquisition of genes by horizontal transfer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with predicted impact on protein function and transcriptional regulation. Differences in the B12 synthesis pathway, methionine biosynthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and DNA repair and replication are consistent with adaptations to different environmental niches and pathogenic lifestyles. While there is no evidence of further gene acquisition during expansion of the M. tuberculosis complex, the emergence of other forms of genetic diversity provides insights into continuing host-pathogen co-evolution and has the potential to identify novel targets for disease intervention. PMID:25988174

  6. Comprehensive multicenter evaluation of a new line probe assay kit for identification of Mycobacterium species and detection of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mitarai, Satoshi; Kato, Seiya; Ogata, Hideo; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mizuno, Kazue; Toyota, Emiko; Sejimo, Akiko; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Yoshida, Shiomi; Saito, Takefumi; Moriya, Ataru; Fujita, Akira; Sato, Shuko; Matsumoto, Tomoshige; Ano, Hiromi; Suetake, Toshinori; Kondo, Yuji; Kirikae, Teruo; Mori, Toru

    2012-03-01

    We evaluated a new line probe assay (LiPA) kit to identify Mycobacterium species and to detect mutations related to drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A total of 554 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (n = 316), Mycobacterium avium (n = 71), Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 51), Mycobacterium kansasii (n = 54), and other Mycobacterium species (n = 62) were tested with the LiPA kit in six hospitals. The LiPA kit was also used to directly test 163 sputum specimens. The results of LiPA identification of Mycobacterium species in clinical isolates were almost identical to those of conventional methods. Compared with standard drug susceptibility testing results for the clinical isolates, LiPA showed a sensitivity and specificity of 98.9% and 97.3%, respectively, for detecting rifampin (RIF)-resistant clinical isolates; 90.6% and 100%, respectively, for isoniazid (INH) resistance; 89.7% and 96.0%, respectively, for pyrazinamide (PZA) resistance; and 93.0% and 100%, respectively, for levofloxacin (LVX) resistance. The LiPA kit could detect target species directly in sputum specimens, with a sensitivity of 85.6%. Its sensitivity and specificity for detecting RIF-, PZA-, and LVX-resistant isolates in the sputum specimens were both 100%, and those for detecting INH-resistant isolates were 75.0% and 92.9%, respectively. The kit was able to identify mycobacterial bacilli at the species level, as well as drug-resistant phenotypes, with a high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22205814

  7. Differentiation of slowly growing Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, by gene amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Plikaytis, B B; Plikaytis, B D; Yakrus, M A; Butler, W R; Woodley, C L; Silcox, V A; Shinnick, T M

    1992-01-01

    A two-step assay combining a gene amplification step and a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was developed to differentiate the Mycobacterium species that account for greater than 90% of potentially pathogenic isolates and greater than 86% of all isolates in clinical laboratories in the United States. These species are M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. kansasii, and M. gordonae. With lysates of pure cultures as the template, two oligonucleotide primers that amplified an approximately 1,380-bp portion of the hsp65 gene from all 139 strains of 19 Mycobacterium species tested, but not from the 19 non-Mycobacterium species tested, were identified. Digestion of the amplicons from 126 strains of the six most commonly isolated Mycobacterium species with the restriction enzymes BstNI and XhoI in separate reactions generated restriction fragment patterns that were distinctive for each of these species, except for those of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, which were not distinguishable. By including size standards in each sample, the restriction fragment profiles could be normalized to a fixed distance and the similarities of patterns could be calculated by using a computer-aided comparison program. The availability of this data base should enable the identification of an unknown Mycobacterium strain to the species level by a comparison of the restriction fragment pattern of the unknown with the data base of known patterns. Images PMID:1352786

  8. Use of MALDI-TOF MS for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Species Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mediavilla-Gradolph, María Concepción; De Toro-Peinado, Inmaculada; Bermúdez-Ruiz, María Pilar; García-Martínez, María de los Ángeles; Ortega-Torres, María; Montiel Quezel-Guerraz, Natalia; Palop-Borrás, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results obtained for identification by MALDI-TOF of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated in clinical samples with those obtained by GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS (common mycobacteria/additional species). A total of 66 Mycobacterium isolates from various clinical specimens (mainly respiratory) were tested in this study. They were identified using MALDI-TOF Bruker from strains isolated in Lowenstein, following the recommended protocol of heat inactivation and extraction, and were simultaneously analyzed through hybridization by GenoType Mycobacterium from liquid culture MGIT. Our results showed that identification by MALDI-TOF was correct in 98.4% (65/66) of NTM isolated in our clinical practice (M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. abscessus, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. mucogenicum, M. kansasii, and M. scrofulaceum). MALDI-TOF was found to be an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective system for identification of mycobacteria species. PMID:26106617

  9. Circulating Mycobacterium bovis Peptides and Host Response Proteins as Biomarkers for Unambiguous Detection of Subclinical Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Elise A.; Janagama, Harish K.; Ribeiro-Lima, Joao; Vulchanova, Lucy; Seth, Meetu; Yang, My; Kurmi, Kiran; Waters, W. Ray; Thacker, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis remains one of the most damaging diseases to agriculture, and there is also a concern for human spillover. A critical need exists for rapid, thorough, and inexpensive diagnostic methods capable of detecting and differentiating Mycobacterium bovis infection from other pathogenic and environmental mycobacteria at multiple surveillance levels. In a previous study, Seth et al. (PLoS One 4:e5478, 2009, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0005478) identified 32 host peptides that specifically increased in the blood serum of M. bovis-infected animals). In the current study, 16 M. bovis proteins were discovered in the blood serum proteomics data sets. A large-scale validation analysis was undertaken for selected host and M. bovis proteins using a cattle serum repository containing M. bovis (n = 128), Mycobacterium kansasii (n = 10), and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (n = 10), cases exposed to M. bovis (n = 424), and negative controls (n = 38). Of the host biomarkers, vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) showed the greatest sensitivity and specificity for M. bovis detection. Circulating M. bovis proteins, specifically polyketide synthetase 5, detected M. bovis-infected cattle with little to no seroreactivity against M. kansasii- and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected animals. These data indicate that host and pathogen serum proteins can serve as reliable biomarkers for tracking M. bovis infection in animal populations. PMID:24478485

  10. Comparative Genomics and Proteomic Analysis of Four Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Species and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex: Occurrence of Shared Immunogenic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gcebe, Nomakorinte; Michel, Anita; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Rutten, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The Esx and PE/PPE families of proteins are among the most immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and have thus been the focus of research to develop vaccines and immunological tests for diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis, mainly caused by Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively. In non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), multiple copies of genes encoding homologous proteins have mainly been identified in pathogenic Mycobacterium species phylogenically related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Only ancestral copies of these genes have been identified in nonpathogenic NTM species like Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium sp. KMS, Mycobacterium sp. MCS, and Mycobacterium sp. JLS. In this study we elucidated the genomes of four nonpathogenic NTM species, viz Mycobacterium komanii sp. nov., Mycobacterium malmesburii sp. nov., Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, and Mycobacterium fortuitum ATCC 6841. These genomes were investigated for genes encoding for the Esx and PE/PPE (situated in the esx cluster) family of proteins as well as adjacent genes situated in the ESX-1 to ESX-5 regions. To identify proteins actually expressed, comparative proteomic analyses of purified protein derivatives from three of the NTM as well as Mycobacterium kansasii ATCC 12478 and the commercially available purified protein derivatives from Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium was performed. The genomic analysis revealed the occurrence in each of the four NTM, orthologs of the genes encoding for the Esx family, the PE and PPE family proteins in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis. The identification of genes of the ESX-1, ESX-3, and ESX-4 region including esxA, esxB, ppe68, pe5, and pe35 adds to earlier reports of these genes in nonpathogenic NTM like M. smegmatis, Mycobacterium sp. JLS and Mycobacterium KMS. This report is also the first to identify esxN gene situated within the ESX-5 locus in M. nonchromogenicum. Our proteomics analysis

  11. Analysis of culture filtrate and cell wall-associated antigens of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Mutharia, L M; Moreno, W; Raymond, M

    1997-01-01

    Proteins secreted by Mycobacterium species have been suggested as major immune targets in the early phase of infection. In this study, we sought to identify specific antigens in culture filtrates and in soluble cell extracts of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. The release of antigens into the culture medium during growth of the bacilli and the distribution of specific epitopes within the Mycobacterium species were investigated by immunoblot analysis with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against M. paratuberculosis antigens. MAb B6A interacted with a cellular antigen with an apparent molecular mass of 34.5 kDa in lysates of M. paratuberculosis. MAb B6A did not interact with lysates from any other mycobacterial species, suggesting recognition of an M. paratuberculosis species-specific epitope. MAb FL1-A1 reacted with an antigen of 44.3 kDa in M. paratuberculosis and a 9-kDa antigen in Mycobacterium kansasii. MAb PII-B1 reacted with concanavalin A (ConA)-binding cellular and filtrate molecules of M. paratuberculosis and with lysates of Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium 18. The affinity-purified glycosylated antigens migrated as a diffuse band of between 35 and 45.6 kDa and reacted strongly with ovine and bovine paratuberculosis serum and polyclonal serum against M. tuberculosis lipoarabinomannan antigens. These glycoconjugates were the earliest antigens detected in culture filtrates of M. paratuberculosis. Deglycosylation of the ConA-binding molecules with alpha-mannosidase enzyme abolished the reaction with MAb PII-B1 and with bovine but not ovine paratuberculosis serum, suggesting selective immunogenicity in the different animal species. PMID:9009287

  12. Evaluation of the GenoType Mycobacteria Direct assay for the simultaneous detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and four atypical mycobacterial species in smear-positive respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Seagar, A-Louise; Prendergast, Carmel; Emmanuel, F Xavier; Rayner, Alan; Thomson, Susan; Laurenson, Ian F

    2008-05-01

    A novel, commercially available reverse hybridization assay [GenoType Mycobacteria Direct (GTMD), version 2.0; Hain Lifescience] was evaluated for the direct detection of five clinically relevant mycobacterial species [Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium malmoense, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium intracellulare] from 54 smear-positive respiratory specimens and the findings were compared with culture results. Three approaches were used for specimen preparation using either whole or 'split' sample volumes and N-acetyl-l-cysteine/3 % NaOH or 4 % NaOH as decontamination chemicals. Forty-three out of 52 samples in which RNA amplification was successful gave GTMD results that concurred with the identification of the cultured isolate. All cases of MTBC were detected. Twenty-two samples contained M. tuberculosis complex, seven had M. kansasii, four had M. malmoense, seven contained atypical mycobacteria other than those detectable using the GTMD assay and three specimens contained no viable mycobacteria. The assay is easy to use and can be completed in one working day. Results interpretation is facilitated by the inclusion of an internal amplification control with each sample to allow identification of specimens containing amplification inhibitors. A positive GTMD result will quickly identify patients with MTBC infection or provide specific identification of four other atypical mycobacteria from the same specimen. This allows more rapid drug susceptibility testing, treatment, and public health and infection control decisions. PMID:18436594

  13. Detection of Mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium Subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex by a Novel Tetraplex Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses. PMID:25588660

  14. Analysis of mycolic acid cleavage products and cellular fatty acids of Mycobacterium species by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M A; Moss, C W; Silcox, V A; Good, R C

    1986-04-01

    After growth and experimental conditions were established, the mycolic acid cleavage products, constituent fatty acids, and alcohols of representative strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum complex, M. kansasii, M. gordonae, and M. avium complex were determined by capillary gas chromatography. Reproducible cleavage of mycolic acid methyl esters to tetracosanoic (24:0) or hexacosanoic (26:0) acid methyl esters was achieved by heating the sample in a high-temperature muffle furnace. The major constituent fatty acids in all species were hexadecanoic (16:0) and octadecenoic (18:1 omega 9-c, oleic) acids. With the exception of M. gordonae, 10-methyloctadecanoic acid was found in all species; moreover, M. gordonae was the only species tested which contained 2-methyltetradecanoic acid. M. kansasii was characterized by the presence of 2,4-dimethyltetradecanoic acid, M. avium complex by 2-eicosanol, and M. tuberculosis by 26:0 mycolic acid cleavage product. The mycolic acid cleavage product in the other five species tested was 24:0. Although a limited number of strains and species were tested, preliminary results indicate that this gas chromatographic method can be used to characterize mycobacterial cultures by their mycolic acid cleavage products and constituent fatty acid and alcohol content. PMID:3084554

  15. Identification of specific metabolites in culture supernatant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using metabolomics: exploration of potential biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna KP; Lam, Ching-Wan; Curreem, Shirly OT; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lau, Candy CY; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Ngan, Antonio HY; To, Kelvin KW; Chan, Jasper FW; Hung, Ivan FN; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick CY

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have reported the use of metabolomics for Mycobacterium species differentiation, little is known about the potential of extracellular metabolites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) as specific biomarkers. Using an optimized ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–quadruple time of flight–mass spectrometry (UHPLC–ESI–Q–TOF–MS) platform, we characterized the extracellular metabolomes of culture supernatant of nine MTB strains and nine non-tuberculous Mycobacterium (NTM) strains (four M. avium complex, one M. bovis Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG), one M. chelonae, one M. fortuitum and two M. kansasii). Principal component analysis readily distinguished the metabolomes between MTB and NTM. Using multivariate and univariate analysis, 24 metabolites with significantly higher levels in MTB were identified. While seven metabolites were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), the other 17 metabolites were unidentified by MS/MS against database matching, suggesting that they may be potentially novel compounds. One metabolite was identified as dexpanthenol, the alcohol analog of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), which was not known to be produced by bacteria previously. Four metabolites were identified as 1-tuberculosinyladenosine (1-TbAd), a product of the virulence-associated enzyme Rv3378c, and three previously undescribed derivatives of 1-TbAd. Two derivatives differ from 1-TbAd by the ribose group of the nucleoside while the other likely differs by the base. The remaining two metabolites were identified as a tetrapeptide, Val-His-Glu-His, and a monoacylglycerophosphoglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) (16∶0/0∶0), respectively. Further studies on the chemical structure and biosynthetic pathway of these MTB-specific metabolites would help understand their biological functions. Studies on clinical samples from tuberculosis patients are required to explore for their potential role as diagnostic

  16. Identification of specific metabolites in culture supernatant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using metabolomics: exploration of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Lam, Ching-Wan; Curreem, Shirly O T; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lau, Candy C Y; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Ngan, Antonio H Y; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Hung, Ivan F N; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have reported the use of metabolomics for Mycobacterium species differentiation, little is known about the potential of extracellular metabolites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) as specific biomarkers. Using an optimized ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadruple time of flight-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS) platform, we characterized the extracellular metabolomes of culture supernatant of nine MTB strains and nine non-tuberculous Mycobacterium (NTM) strains (four M. avium complex, one M. bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), one M. chelonae, one M. fortuitum and two M. kansasii). Principal component analysis readily distinguished the metabolomes between MTB and NTM. Using multivariate and univariate analysis, 24 metabolites with significantly higher levels in MTB were identified. While seven metabolites were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), the other 17 metabolites were unidentified by MS/MS against database matching, suggesting that they may be potentially novel compounds. One metabolite was identified as dexpanthenol, the alcohol analog of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), which was not known to be produced by bacteria previously. Four metabolites were identified as 1-tuberculosinyladenosine (1-TbAd), a product of the virulence-associated enzyme Rv3378c, and three previously undescribed derivatives of 1-TbAd. Two derivatives differ from 1-TbAd by the ribose group of the nucleoside while the other likely differs by the base. The remaining two metabolites were identified as a tetrapeptide, Val-His-Glu-His, and a monoacylglycerophosphoglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) (16∶0/0∶0), respectively. Further studies on the chemical structure and biosynthetic pathway of these MTB-specific metabolites would help understand their biological functions. Studies on clinical samples from tuberculosis patients are required to explore for their potential role as diagnostic biomarkers. PMID

  17. Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Cassetty, Christopher T; Sanchez, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with nodules on his right hand after a history of Mycobacterium marinum infection recently treated with rifampin and clarithromycin. The patient has an aquarium with Betta fish (Siamese fighting fish). PMID:15748591

  18. Mycobacterium avium subspecies Paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome sequence has now defined the complete catalog of genes that make Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis what it is. Although similarity searches and bioinformatics analyses have assigned potential function to hundreds of genes in this pathogen, the future challenge is to begin to sys...

  19. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease in cattle and other domesticated and wild ruminant species. The organism and disease were first described over a century ago, and despite the considerable morbidity and mortality associated with Map infection...

  20. Mycobacterium chelonae Is an Ubiquitous Atypical Mycobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Gouveia, Miguel; Gameiro, Ana; Ramos, Leonor; Cardoso, José Carlos; Brites, Maria Manuel; Tellechea, Óscar; Figueiredo, Américo

    2015-01-01

    The type of cutaneous infection varies mainly according to the patient's immune status, and the disseminated form is mostly found in the context of immunosuppression. We report the case of a 62-year-old male who was under long-term systemic corticosteroid therapy and presented with a 7-month history of multiple painless cutaneous lesions at various stages of development: papules, nodules, pustules and hemorrhagic crusts, as well as small erosions and ulcers distributed over the limbs and scalp. Cutaneous biopsy showed a suppurative granulomatous infiltrate with abscess formation. Fite stain revealed numerous extracellular bacilli, suggesting mycobacterial infection, particularly by atypical mycobacteria. Culture of a skin sample revealed Mycobacterium chelonae. The patient started multidrug therapy and showed clinical improvement despite of resistance to one of the antibiotics. This striking presentation underlines the role of immunosuppression with corticotherapy as a major risk factor for these infections. Multidrug therapy is advised and antibiogram is essential in directing treatment. PMID:26351432

  1. Rapid presumptive identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-bovis complex by radiometric determination of heat stable urease

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, J.H.; Pruden, E.L.; Cox, F.R.

    1983-12-01

    Simple and rapid Bactec methodologies for the determination of neat (unaltered) and heat stable urease activity of mycobacteria are presented. Clinical isolates (63) and stock cultures (32)--consisting of: M. tuberculosis (19), M. bovis (5), M. kansasii (15), M. marinum (4), M. simiae (3), M. scrofulaceum (16), M. gordonae (6), M. szulgai (6), M. flavescens (1), M. gastri (1), M. intracellulare (6), M. fortuitum-chelonei complex (12), and M. smegmatis (1)--were tested for neat urease activity by Bactec radiometry. Mycobacterial isolates (50-100 mg wet weight) were incubated at 35 degrees C for 30 minutes with microCi14C-urea. Urease-positive mycobacteria gave Bactec growth index (GI) values greater than 100 units, whereas urease-negative species gave values less than 10 GI units. Eighty-three isolates possessing neat urease activity were heated at 80 degrees C for 30 minutes followed by incubation at 35 degrees C for 30 minutes with 1 microCi14C-urea. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-bovis complex demonstrated heat-stable urease activity (GI more than 130 units) and could be distinguished from mycobacteria other than tuberculosis (MOTT), which gave GI values equal to or less than 40 units.

  2. Uric acid utilization by Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, J O; George, K L; Parker, B C; Gruft, H

    1983-01-01

    Forty-nine human and environmental isolates of Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum were tested for their ability to grow on uric acid and a number of its degradation products. Nearly all (88 to 90%) strains used uric acid or allantoin as a sole nitrogen source; fewer (47 to 69%) used allantoate, urea, or possibly ureidoglycollate. Enzymatic activities of one representative isolate demonstrated the existence of a uric acid degradation pathway resembling that in other aerobic microorganisms. PMID:6863220

  3. Morphological characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a MODS culture for an automatic diagnostics through pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Alva, Alicia; Aquino, Fredy; Gilman, Robert H; Olivares, Carlos; Requena, David; Gutiérrez, Andrés H; Caviedes, Luz; Coronel, Jorge; Larson, Sandra; Sheen, Patricia; Moore, David A J; Zimic, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis control efforts are hampered by a mismatch in diagnostic technology: modern optimal diagnostic tests are least available in poor areas where they are needed most. Lack of adequate early diagnostics and MDR detection is a critical problem in control efforts. The Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS) assay uses visual recognition of cording patterns from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) to diagnose tuberculosis infection and drug susceptibility directly from a sputum sample in 7-10 days with a low cost. An important limitation that laboratories in the developing world face in MODS implementation is the presence of permanent technical staff with expertise in reading MODS. We developed a pattern recognition algorithm to automatically interpret MODS results from digital images. The algorithm using image processing, feature extraction and pattern recognition determined geometrical and illumination features used in an object-model and a photo-model to classify TB-positive images. 765 MODS digital photos were processed. The single-object model identified MTB (96.9% sensitivity and 96.3% specificity) and was able to discriminate non-tuberculous mycobacteria with a high specificity (97.1% M. avium, 99.1% M. chelonae, and 93.8% M. kansasii). The photo model identified TB-positive samples with 99.1% sensitivity and 99.7% specificity. This algorithm is a valuable tool that will enable automatic remote diagnosis using Internet or cellphone telephony. The use of this algorithm and its further implementation in a telediagnostics platform will contribute to both faster TB detection and MDR TB determination leading to an earlier initiation of appropriate treatment. PMID:24358227

  4. Morphological Characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a MODS Culture for an Automatic Diagnostics through Pattern Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Alicia; Aquino, Fredy; Gilman, Robert H.; Olivares, Carlos; Requena, David; Gutiérrez, Andrés H.; Caviedes, Luz; Coronel, Jorge; Larson, Sandra; Sheen, Patricia; Moore, David A. J.; Zimic, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis control efforts are hampered by a mismatch in diagnostic technology: modern optimal diagnostic tests are least available in poor areas where they are needed most. Lack of adequate early diagnostics and MDR detection is a critical problem in control efforts. The Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS) assay uses visual recognition of cording patterns from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) to diagnose tuberculosis infection and drug susceptibility directly from a sputum sample in 7–10 days with a low cost. An important limitation that laboratories in the developing world face in MODS implementation is the presence of permanent technical staff with expertise in reading MODS. We developed a pattern recognition algorithm to automatically interpret MODS results from digital images. The algorithm using image processing, feature extraction and pattern recognition determined geometrical and illumination features used in an object-model and a photo-model to classify TB-positive images. 765 MODS digital photos were processed. The single-object model identified MTB (96.9% sensitivity and 96.3% specificity) and was able to discriminate non-tuberculous mycobacteria with a high specificity (97.1% M. avium, 99.1% M. chelonae, and 93.8% M. kansasii). The photo model identified TB-positive samples with 99.1% sensitivity and 99.7% specificity. This algorithm is a valuable tool that will enable automatic remote diagnosis using Internet or cellphone telephony. The use of this algorithm and its further implementation in a telediagnostics platform will contribute to both faster TB detection and MDR TB determination leading to an earlier initiation of appropriate treatment. PMID:24358227

  5. Mycobacterium ulcerans disease.

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Johnson, R. Christian; Phillips, Richard; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark H.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Portaels, Françoise; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Asiedu, Kingsley

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) is an important health problem in several west African countries. It is prevalent in scattered foci around the world, predominantly in riverine areas with a humid, hot climate. We review the epidemiology, bacteriology, transmission, immunology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of infections. M. ulcerans is an ubiquitous micro-organism and is harboured by fish, snails, and water insects. The mode of transmission is unknown. Lesions are most common on exposed parts of the body, particularly on the limbs. Spontaneous healing may occur. Many patients in endemic areas present late with advanced, severe lesions. BCG vaccination yields a limited, relatively short-lived, immune protection. Recommended treatment consists of surgical debridement, followed by skin grafting if necessary. Many patients have functional limitations after healing. Better understanding of disease transmission and pathogenesis is needed for improved control and prevention of Buruli ulcer. PMID:16283056

  6. Vaccination of mice against Mycobacterium leprae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N B; Lowe, A C; Rees, R J; Colston, M J

    1989-01-01

    Intradermal immunization with killed Mycobacterium leprae renders mice immune to infection with viable M. leprae. This protection is long lasting and systemic in that immunization in the left flank results in protection in both the left and right footpads. Immunization with Mycobacterium vaccae was ineffective in protecting mice against M. leprae infection, while Mycobacterium bovis BCG provided partial protection. Mycobacterium habana TMC 5135 (now known as Mycobacterium simiae) was found to be as effective as M. leprae in protecting mice against footpad infection. PMID:2643581

  7. Mycobacterium saopaulense sp. nov., a rapidly growing mycobacterium closely related to members of the Mycobacterium chelonae--Mycobacterium abscessus group.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Whipps, Christopher M; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Chimara, Erica; Droz, Sara; Tortoli, Enrico; de Freitas, Denise; Cnockaert, Margo; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi; Vandamme, Peter; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso

    2015-12-01

    Five isolates of non-pigmented, rapidly growing mycobacteria were isolated from three patients and,in an earlier study, from zebrafish. Phenotypic and molecular tests confirmed that these isolates belong to the Mycobacterium chelonae-Mycobacterium abscessus group, but they could not be confidently assigned to any known species of this group. Phenotypic analysis and biochemical tests were not helpful for distinguishing these isolates from other members of the M. chelonae–M.abscessus group. The isolates presented higher drug resistance in comparison with other members of the group, showing susceptibility only to clarithromycin. The five isolates showed a unique PCR restriction analysis pattern of the hsp65 gene, 100 % similarity in 16S rRNA gene and hsp65 sequences and 1-2 nt differences in rpoB and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences.Phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated dataset including 16S rRNA gene, hsp65, and rpoB sequences from type strains of more closely related species placed the five isolates together, as a distinct lineage from previously described species, suggesting a sister relationship to a group consisting of M. chelonae, Mycobacterium salmoniphilum, Mycobacterium franklinii and Mycobacterium immunogenum. DNA–DNA hybridization values .70 % confirmed that the five isolates belong to the same species, while values ,70 % between one of the isolates and the type strains of M. chelonae and M. abscessus confirmed that the isolates belong to a distinct species. The polyphasic characterization of these isolates, supported by DNA–DNA hybridization results,demonstrated that they share characteristics with M. chelonae–M. abscessus members, butconstitute a different species, for which the name Mycobacterium saopaulense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is EPM10906T (5CCUG 66554T5LMG 28586T5INCQS 0733T). PMID:26358475

  8. Occurrence of Mycobacterium bovis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in raw and pasteurized milk in the northwestern region of Paraná, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sgarioni, Sônia Aparecida; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Prince, Karina Andrade; de Andrade Leite, Sergio Roberto; Filho, Dirceu Vedovello; Siqueira, Vera Lucia Dias; Caleffi-Ferracioli, Katiany Rizzieri; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    Milk is widely consumed in Brazil and can be the vehicle of agent transmission. In this study, was evaluated the occurrence of Mycobacterium bovis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in raw and pasteurized milk consumed in the northwestern region of Paraná, Brazil. Fifty-two milk samples (20 pasteurized and 32 raw) from dairy farms near the municipality of Maringa, Parana State, Brazil were collected. Milk samples were decontaminated using 5% oxalic acid method and cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media at 35 °C and 30 °C, with and without 5–10% CO2. Mycobacteria isolates were identified by morphological features, PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis (PCR-PRA) and Mycolic acids analysis. Thirteen (25%) raw and 2 (4%) pasteurized milk samples were positive for acid fast bacilli growth. Nine different species of NTM were isolated (M. nonchromogenicum, M. peregrinum, M. smegmatis, M. neoaurum, M. fortuitum, M. chelonae, M. flavescens, M. kansasii and M. scrofulaceum). M. bovis was not detected. Raw and pasteurized milk may be considered one source for NTM human infection. The paper reinforces the need for intensification of measures in order to avoid the milk contamination and consequently prevent diseases in the south of Brazil. PMID:25242962

  9. Identification of Two Novel Mycobacterium avium Allelic Variants in Pig and Human Isolates from Brazil by PCR-Restriction Enzyme Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Briones, Marcelo R. S.; Sircili, Marcelo Palma; Balian, Simone Carvalho; Mores, Nelson; Ferreira-Neto, José Soares

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is composed of environmental mycobacteria found widely in soil, water, and aerosols that can cause disease in animals and humans, especially disseminated infections in AIDS patients. MAC consists of two closely related species, M. avium and M. intracellulare, and may also include other, less-defined groups. The precise differentiation of MAC species is a fundamental step in epidemiological studies and for the evaluation of possible reservoirs for MAC infection in humans and animals. In this study, which included 111 pig and 26 clinical MAC isolates, two novel allelic M. avium PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (PRA) variants were identified, differing from the M. avium PRA prototype in the HaeIII digestion pattern. Mutations in HaeIII sites were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Identification of these isolates as M. avium was confirmed by PCR with DT1-DT6 and IS1245 primers, nucleic acid hybridization with the AccuProbe system, 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing, and biochemical tests. The characterization of M. avium PRA variants can be useful in the elucidation of factors involved in mycobacterial virulence and routes of infection and also has diagnostic significance, since they can be misidentified as M. simiae II and M. kansasii I if the PRA method is used in the clinical laboratory for identification of mycobacteria. PMID:10405407

  10. Occurrence of Mycobacterium bovis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in raw and pasteurized milk in the northwestern region of Paraná, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sgarioni, Sônia Aparecida; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Prince, Karina Andrade; de Andrade Leite, Sergio Roberto; Filho, Dirceu Vedovello; Siqueira, Vera Lucia Dias; Caleffi-Ferracioli, Katiany Rizzieri; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    Milk is widely consumed in Brazil and can be the vehicle of agent transmission. In this study, was evaluated the occurrence of Mycobacterium bovis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in raw and pasteurized milk consumed in the northwestern region of Paraná, Brazil. Fifty-two milk samples (20 pasteurized and 32 raw) from dairy farms near the municipality of Maringa, Parana State, Brazil were collected. Milk samples were decontaminated using 5% oxalic acid method and cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media at 35 °C and 30 °C, with and without 5-10% CO2. Mycobacteria isolates were identified by morphological features, PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis (PCR-PRA) and Mycolic acids analysis. Thirteen (25%) raw and 2 (4%) pasteurized milk samples were positive for acid fast bacilli growth. Nine different species of NTM were isolated (M. nonchromogenicum, M. peregrinum, M. smegmatis, M. neoaurum, M. fortuitum, M. chelonae, M. flavescens, M. kansasii and M. scrofulaceum). M. bovis was not detected. Raw and pasteurized milk may be considered one source for NTM human infection. The paper reinforces the need for intensification of measures in order to avoid the milk contamination and consequently prevent diseases in the south of Brazil. PMID:25242962

  11. Treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Beekmann, Susan E.; Polgreen, Philip M.; Mackey, Kate; Winthrop, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is often resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs, and data supporting effective drugs or dosing regimens are limited. To better identify treatment approaches and associated toxicities, we collected a series of case reports from the Emerging Infections Network. Side effects were common and often led to changing or discontinuing therapy. PMID:26890211

  12. The Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing

  13. Support from Phylogenomic Networks and Subspecies Signatures for Separation of Mycobacterium massiliense from Mycobacterium bolletii

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Joon Liang; Choo, Siew Woh

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus subspecies classification has important clinical implications. We used phylogenomic network and amino acid analyses to provide evidence for the separation of Mycobacterium bolletii and Mycobacterium massiliense into two distinct subspecies which can potentially be differentiated rapidly by their protein signatures. PMID:26157149

  14. [Coinfection of Mycobacterium malmoense and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a patient with acquired inmune deficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mederos Cuervo, Lilian María; Reyes Pérez, Angélica; Valdes Alonso, Lidunka; Rodríguez Delgado, Francisco; Sardiñas Aragón, Misleydis; Martínez Romero, María Rosarys; Díaz Romero, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented of coinfection with Mycobacterium malmoense and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a Cuban patient with AIDS which produced respiratory and liver disease respectively. Cultures done from sputum samples showed the presence of a non-pigmented, slow growing mycobacterial strain belonging to Runyon group III and identified as Mycobacterium malmoense. From cultures of liver tissue removed laparoscopically, a strain was isolated and subsequently identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Anatomapathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculosis, the patient received specific treatment and had a favorable clinical course. This report of a rare case of coinfection of Mycobacterium describes the first report of hepatic tuberculosis in a patient with AIDS in Cuba. PMID:25597735

  15. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my. PMID:26666970

  16. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V. R.; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my PMID:26666970

  17. Methylation of GPLs in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Patterson, John H.; Taig, Ellen; Sargeant, Tobias; McConville, Malcolm J.; Billman-Jacobe, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Several species of mycobacteria express abundant glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) on the surfaces of their cells. The GPLs are glycolipids that contain modified sugars including acetylated 6-deoxy-talose and methylated rhamnose. Four methyltransferases have been implicated in the synthesis of the GPLs of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium. A rhamnosyl 3-O-methytransferase and a fatty acid methyltransferase of M. smegmatis have been previously characterized. In this paper, we characterize the methyltransferases that are responsible for modifying the hydroxyl groups at positions 2 and 4 of rhamnose and propose the biosynthetic sequence of GPL trimethylrhamnose formation. The analysis of M. avium genes through the creation of specific mutants is technically difficult; therefore, an alternative approach to determine the function of putative methyltransferases of M. avium was undertaken. Complementation of M. smegmatis methyltransferase mutants with M. avium genes revealed that MtfC and MtfB of the latter species have 4-O-methyltransferase activity and that MtfD is a 3-O-methyltransferase which can modify rhamnose of GPLs in M. smegmatis. PMID:15466031

  18. Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Daniel C; Sandoval-Sus, Jose; Razzaq, Kanwal; Young, Lary

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium infection caused by non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTBM) organisms is becoming more common. Although NTBM osteomyelitis is unusual, it can occur in otherwise healthy individuals, but it is also associated with immunocompromised states, such as steroidal therapy and AIDS, and may be observed following trauma. Mycobacterium avium is reported to be the most common causative agent, and Mycobacterium abscessus has only been described in two cases. We report the case of a 44-year-old man with history of hepatitis C diagnosed with osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine caused by M abscessus. We present a literature review of NTBM osteomyelitis and a discussion of its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23925676

  19. Mycobacterium arupense in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamal, Zainab; Jordan, Mary; Hachem, Ray Y.; Alawami, Hussain M.; Alburki, Abdussalam M.; Yousif, Ammar; Deshmukh, Poonam; Jiang, Ying; Chaftari, Ann-Marie; Raad, Issam I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium arupense is a slow-growing, nonchromogenic, acid-fast bacillus. Its clinical spectrum, epidemiology, and frequency of colonization versus true infection remain unknown. We evaluated the clinical significance of M arupense and positive cultures from cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed records of all cancer patients treated at our institution between 2007 and 2014 to identify those who had positive cultures for M arupense. Mycobacterium arupense was identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. A total of 53patients had positive cultures, 100% of which were isolated from respiratory specimens. Of these, 7 patients met the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America criteria for a definitive diagnosis of M arupense infection, 14 cases were considered to be probable infections, and 29 cases were considered to be possible infections. Of the included patients, 13 received therapy for M arupense infection and 40 did not. The outcomes of treated and untreated patients did not differ significantly. No relapses of M arupense infection. In addition, there were no M arupense-related deaths in either group. In cancer patients, M arupense appears to be mostly a commensal organism rather than a pathogen. Patients who did or did not receive treatment had similar outcomes. Validation of these findings in a larger prospective trial is warranted. PMID:27057825

  20. Mycobacterium arupense, Mycobacterium heraklionense, and a Newly Proposed Species, "Mycobacterium virginiense" sp. nov., but Not Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, as Species of the Mycobacterium terrae Complex Causing Tenosynovitis and Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wengenack, Nancy L; Eke, Uzoamaka A; Benwill, Jeana L; Turenne, Christine; Wallace, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Mycobacterium terrae complex has been recognized as a cause of tenosynovitis, with M. terrae and Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum reported as the primary etiologic pathogens. The molecular taxonomy of the M. terrae complex causing tenosynovitis has not been established despite approximately 50 previously reported cases. We evaluated 26 isolates of the M. terrae complex associated with tenosynovitis or osteomyelitis recovered between 1984 and 2014 from 13 states, including 5 isolates reported in 1991 as M. nonchromogenicum by nonmolecular methods. The isolates belonged to three validated species, one new proposed species, and two novel related strains. The majority of isolates (20/26, or 77%) belonged to two recently described species: Mycobacterium arupense (10 isolates, or 38%) and Mycobacterium heraklionense (10 isolates, or 38%). Three isolates (12%) had 100% sequence identity to each other by 16S rRNA and 99.3 to 100% identity by rpoB gene region V sequencing and represent a previously undescribed species within the M. terrae complex. There were no isolates of M. terrae or M. nonchromogenicum, including among the five isolates reported in 1991. The 26 isolates were susceptible to clarithromycin (100%), rifabutin (100%), ethambutol (92%), and sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (70%). The current study suggests that M. arupense, M. heraklionense, and a newly proposed species ("M. virginiense" sp. nov.; proposed type strain MO-233 [DSM 100883, CIP 110918]) within the M. terrae complex are the major causes of tenosynovitis and osteomyelitis in the United States, with little change over 20 years. Species identification within this complex requires sequencing methods. PMID:26962085

  1. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae.

    PubMed

    Dippenaar, Anzaan; Parsons, Sven David Charles; Sampson, Samantha Leigh; van der Merwe, Ruben Gerhard; Drewe, Julian Ashley; Abdallah, Abdallah Musa; Siame, Kabengele Keith; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas Claudius; van Helden, Paul David; Pain, Arnab; Warren, Robin Mark

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi. PMID:26542221

  2. First Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium gordonae Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, T.; Blagodatskikh, K.; Varlamov, D.; Sochivko, D.; Larionova, E.; Andreevskaya, S.; Andrievskaya, I.; Chernousova, L.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of the clinically relevant species Mycobacterium gordonae. The clinical isolate Mycobacterium gordonae 14-8773 was obtained from the sputum of a patient with mycobacteriosis. PMID:27365356

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium brumae ATCC 51384

    PubMed Central

    D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium brumae type strain ATCC 51384. This is the first draft genome sequence of M. brumae, a nonpathogenic, rapidly growing, nonchromogenic mycobacterium, with immunotherapeutic capacities. PMID:27125480

  4. Genomic insights into the emerging human pathogen Mycobacterium massiliense.

    PubMed

    Tettelin, Hervé; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Daugherty, Sean C; Hine, Erin; Riley, David R; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Sengamalay, Naomi; Shefchek, Kent; Su, Qi; Tallon, Luke J; Conville, Patricia; Olivier, Kenneth N; Holland, Steven M; Fraser, Claire M; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium massiliense (Mycobacterium abscessus group) is an emerging pathogen causing pulmonary disease and skin and soft tissue infections. We report the genome sequence of the type strain CCUG 48898. PMID:22965080

  5. Disseminated folliculitis by Mycobacterium fortuitum in an immunocompetent woman*

    PubMed Central

    Macente, Sara; Helbel, Cesar; Souza, Simone Felizardo Rocha; Siqueira, Vera Lúcia Dias; Padua, Rubia Andreia Falleiros; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous fast-growing mycobacterium which is frequently acquired from environmental sources such as soil and water. Since it is an opportunist pathogen, it is associated with trauma, surgery or immunodeficiency. The current report describes a case of Mycobacterium fortuitum-caused disseminated lesions on the skin of an immunocompetent patient. PMID:23539012

  6. Mycobacterium heraklionense sp. nov.: A case series

    PubMed Central

    NEONAKIS, IOANNIS K.; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; GITTI, ZOE

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium heraklionense sp. nov. (M. heraklionense) is a novel non-tuberculous mycobacterium belonging to the Mycobacterium terrae complex that has recently been described. It has a world-wide distribution. Recently, a case of tenosynovitis in an immunocompetent individual caused by M. heraklionense was reported, indicating that it has the ability to cause diseases. In the present study, in order to provide a more detailed profile of this mycobacterium and to obtain a more complete overall picture of its clinical significance, we report all available data regarding the initial 12 cases of its isolation. Of the 12 patients, 5 (42%) eventually died within a period of 3 months following the isolation of the mycobacterium. However, any connection between the presence of M. heraklionense and these deaths could not be documented. These 5 patients were all males with a mean age of 74.6 years suffering from serious underlying diseases, which most probably were the cause of death. Additional data from possible new cases of M. heraklionense isolation are anticipated. PMID:26622497

  7. Proposal to elevate Mycobacterium avium complex ITS sequevar MAC-Q to Mycobacterium vulneris sp. nov.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, J; Boeree, M J; Kösters, K; Wieland, A; Tortoli, E; Dekhuijzen, P N R; van Soolingen, D

    2009-09-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) consists of four recognized species, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium colombiense, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera, and a variety of other strains that may be members of undescribed taxa. We report on two isolates of a scotochromogenic, slowly growing, non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species within the M. avium complex from a lymph node and an infected wound after a dogbite of separate patients in The Netherlands. The extrapulmonary infections in immunocompetent patients suggested a high level of virulence. These isolates were characterized by a unique nucleotide sequence in the 16S rRNA gene, 99% similar to Mycobacterium colombiense, and the MAC-Q 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. Sequence analyses of the hsp65 gene revealed 97% similarity to M. avium. The rpoB gene sequence was 98% similar to M. colombiense. Phenotypically, the scotochromogenicity, positive semi-quantitative catalase and heat-stable catalase tests, negative tellurite reductase and urease tests and susceptibility to hydroxylamine and oleic acid set these isolates apart from related species. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of cell-wall mycolic acid content revealed a unique pattern, related to that of M. avium and M. colombiense. Together, these findings supported a separate species status within the Mycobacterium avium complex. We propose elevation of scotochromogenic M. avium complex strains sharing this 16S gene and MAC-Q ITS sequence to separate species status, for which the name Mycobacterium vulneris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NLA000700772T (=DSM 45247T=CIP 109859T). PMID:19620376

  8. Chitin promotes Mycobacterium ulcerans growth.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza, Daniel; Chevillon, Christine; Colwell, Rita; Babonneau, Jérémie; Marion, Estelle; Marsollier, Laurent; Guégan, Jean-François

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans(MU) is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, an emerging human infectious disease. However, both the ecology and life cycle of MU are poorly understood. The occurrence of MU has been linked to the aquatic environment, notably water bodies affected by human activities. It has been hypothesized that one or a combination of environmental factor(s) connected to human activities could favour growth of MU in aquatic systems. Here, we testedin vitrothe growth effect of two ubiquitous polysaccharides and five chemical components on MU at concentration ranges shown to occur in endemic regions. Real-time PCR showed that chitin increased MU growth significantly providing a nutrient source or environmental support for thebacillus, thereby, providing a focus on the association between MU and aquatic arthropods. Aquatic environments with elevated population of arthropods provide increased chitin availability and, thereby, enhanced multiplication of MU. If calcium very slightly enhanced MU growth, iron, zinc, sulphate and phosphate did not stimulate MU growth, and at the concentration ranges of this study would limit MU population in natural ecosystems. PMID:27020062

  9. Detection of Mycobacterium avium in pet birds

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Silvia Neri; Sakamoto, Sidnei Miyoshi; de Paula, Cátia Dejuste; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Matushima, Eliana Reiko

    2009-01-01

    The present study is a report on the presence of Mycobacterium avium in four birds of the psittaciform order kept as pets. Anatomopathological diagnosis showed lesions suggestive of the agent and presence of alcohol-acid resistant bacilli (AARB) shown by the Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The identification of Mycobacterium avium was performed by means of PRA (PCR Restriction Analysis). DNA was directly extracted from tissue of the lesions and blocked in paraffin. The role of this agent in pet bird infection is discussed, as well as its zoonotic potential. PMID:24031356

  10. Evaluation of two line probe assays for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance, and non-TB Mycobacteria in HIV-infected individuals with suspected TB.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Kendall, Michelle A; Wu, Xingye; Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Jentsch, Ute; Swindells, Susan; Qasba, Sarojini S; Sanchez, Jorge; Havlir, Diane V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Sanne, Ian M; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2014-04-01

    Limited performance data from line probe assays (LPAs), nucleic acid tests used for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance are available for HIV-infected individuals, in whom paucibacillary TB is common. In this study, the strategy of testing sputum with GenoType MTBDRplus (MTBDR-Plus) and GenoType Direct LPA (Direct LPA) was compared to a gold standard of one mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture. HIV-positive (HIV(+)) individuals with suspected TB from southern Africa and South America with <7 days of TB treatment had 1 sputum specimen tested with Direct LPA, MTBDR-Plus LPA, smear microscopy, MGIT, biochemical identification of mycobacterial species, and culture-based drug-susceptibility testing (DST). Of 639 participants, 59.3% were MGIT M. tuberculosis culture positive, of which 276 (72.8%) were acid-fast bacillus (AFB) smear positive. MTBDR-Plus had a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 100%, with sensitivities of 44.1% in AFB smear-negative versus 94.6% in AFB smear-positive specimens. For specimens that were positive for M. tuberculosis by MTBDR-Plus, the sensitivity and specificity for rifampin resistance were 91.7% and 96.6%, respectively, and for isoniazid (INH) they were 70.6% and 99.1%. The Direct LPA had a sensitivity of 88.4% and a specificity of 94.6% for M. tuberculosis detection, with a sensitivity of 72.5% in smear-negative specimens. Ten of 639 MGIT cultures grew Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium kansasii, half of which were detected by Direct LPA. Both LPA assays performed well in specimens from HIV-infected individuals, including in AFB smear-negative specimens, with 72.5% sensitivity for M. tuberculosis identification with the Direct LPA and 44.1% sensitivity with MTBDR-Plus. LPAs have a continued role for use in settings where rapid identification of INH resistance and clinically relevant NTM are priorities. PMID:24430455

  11. Photodynamic inactivation of the models Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce-Micah, R.; Gamm, U.; Hüttenberger, D.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2009-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of bacterial strains presents an attractive potential alternative to antibiotic therapies. Success is dependent on the effective accumulation in bacterial cells of photochemical substances called photosensitizers, which are usually porphyrins or their derivatives. The kinetics of porphyrin synthesis after treatment with the precursor ALA and the accumulation of the Chlorin e6 and the following illumination were studied. The goal was to estimate effectivity of the destructive power of these PS in vitro in respect of the physiological states of Mycobacteria. So the present results examine the cell destruction by PDI using ALA-induced Porphyrins and Chlorin e6 accumulated in Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis, which serve as models for the important pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium bovis. We could show that both Mycobacterium after ALA and Chlorin e6 application were killed by illumination with light of about 662 nm. A reduction of about 97% could be reached by using a lightdose of 70 mW/cm2.

  12. Pathway Profiling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne T.; VanderVen, Brian C.; Sherman, David R.; Russell, David G.; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, imports and metabolizes host cholesterol during infection. This ability is important in the chronic phase of infection. Here we investigate the role of the intracellular growth operon (igr), which has previously been identified as having a cholesterol-sensitive phenotype in vitro and which is important for intracellular growth of the mycobacteria. We have employed isotopically labeled low density lipoproteins containing either [1,7,15,22,26-14C]cholesterol or [1,7,15,22,26-13C]cholesterol and high resolution LC/MS as tools to profile the cholesterol-derived metabolome of an igr operon-disrupted mutant (Δigr) of M. tuberculosis. A partially metabolized cholesterol species accumulated in the Δigr knock-out strain that was absent in the complemented and parental wild-type strains. Structural elucidation by multidimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the accumulated metabolite to be methyl 1β-(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α-(3′-propanoic acid)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone. Heterologously expressed and purified FadE28-FadE29, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase encoded by the igr operon, catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 2′-propanoyl-CoA ester side chains in substrates with structures analogous to the characterized metabolite. Based on the structure of the isolated metabolite, enzyme activity, and bioinformatic annotations, we assign the primary function of the igr operon to be degradation of the 2′-propanoate side chain. Therefore, the igr operon is necessary to completely metabolize the side chain of cholesterol metabolites. PMID:22045806

  13. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  14. Peritoneal tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium caprae

    PubMed Central

    Nebreda, T.; Álvarez-Prida, E.; Blanco, B.; Remacha, M.A.; Samper, S.; Jiménez, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis in humans due to Mycobacterium caprae is very low and is almost confined to Europe. We report a case of a previously healthy 41-year-old Moroccan with a 6 month history of abdominal pain, weight loss, fatigue and diarrhea. A diagnosis of peritoneal tuberculosis due to M. caprae was made. PMID:27134824

  15. Mycobacterium bovis: Wildlife reservoirs and spillover hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in animals and sometimes humans. Many countries have long standing programs to eradicate tuberculosis in livestock, principally cattle. As disease prevalence in cattle decreases, eradication efforts are impeded by passage of M. bovis from wildlife res...

  16. Mycobacterium bovis: Characteristics of wildlife reservoir hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in animals and sometimes humans. Many countries have long-standing programs to eradicate tuberculosis in livestock, principally cattle. As disease prevalence in cattle decreases, eradication efforts are impeded by passage of M. bovis from wildlife to ...

  17. Diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis continues to be a major animal health problem, having adverse impacts on socioeconomic conditions, public health and trade of animals and animal products. Worldwide it has been estimated that approximately 50 million cattle are infected with M. ...

  18. Immunopathogenesis of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerosol and intratracheal inoculation routes are commonly used for experimental biology purposes to infect cattle with virulent Mycobacterium bovis, each resulting primarily in a respiratory tract infection including lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes. Disease severity is dose and time dependent...

  19. The Mycobacterium phlei Genome: Expectations and Surprises

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sarbashis; Pettersson, B. M. Fredrik; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Ramesh, Malavika; Dasgupta, Santanu; Bhattacharya, Alok; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium phlei, a nontuberculosis mycobacterial species, was first described in 1898–1899. We present the complete genome sequence for the M. phlei CCUG21000T type strain and the draft genomes for four additional strains. The genome size for all fiveis 5.3 Mb with 69.4% Guanine-Cytosine content. This is ≈0.35 Mbp smaller than the previously reported M. phlei RIVM draft genome. The size difference is attributed partly to large bacteriophage sequence fragments in the M. phlei RIVM genome. Comparative analysis revealed the following: 1) A CRISPR system similar to Type 1E (cas3) in M. phlei RIVM; 2) genes involved in polyamine metabolism and transport (potAD, potF) that are absent in other mycobacteria, and 3) strain-specific variations in the number of σ-factor genes. Moreover, M. phlei has as many as 82 mce (mammalian cell entry) homologs and many of the horizontally acquired genes in M. phlei are present in other environmental bacteria including mycobacteria that share similar habitat. Phylogenetic analysis based on 693 Mycobacterium core genes present in all complete mycobacterial genomes suggested that its closest neighbor is Mycobacterium smegmatis JS623 and Mycobacterium rhodesiae NBB3, while it is more distant to M. smegmatis mc2 155. PMID:26941228

  20. Radioimmunoassay of tuberculoprotein derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, E; Wu, N

    1980-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for constituent of the purified-protein derivative obtained from cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Crossreacting immunoreactive material was detected in cultures of other mycobacterial species, but no immunoreactivity was present in cultures of various fungal and bacterial species. The development of specific radioimmunoassays for tuberculoproteins offers a new research and diagnostic approach. Images PMID:6933481

  1. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host response

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Cole, Stewart T.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Rubin, Eric; Nathan, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances reported at a recent international meeting highlight insights and controversies in the genetics of M. tuberculosis and the infected host, the nature of protective immune responses, adaptation of the bacillus to host-imposed stresses, animal models, and new techniques. PMID:15939785

  3. Mycobacterium marinum: a potential immunotherapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wei-wei; Wang, Qian-qiu; Liu, Wei-da; Shen, Jian-ping; Wang, Hong-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to investigate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium marinum infection in vitro and the potential of M. marinum as an immunotherapy for M. tuberculosis infection. Methods The potential human immune response to certain bacillus infections was investigated in an immune cell-bacillus coculture system in vitro. As a potential novel immunotherapy, M. marinum was studied and compared with two other bacilli, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and live attenuated M. tuberculosis. We examined the changes in both the bacilli and immune cells, especially the time course of the viability of mycobacteria in the coculture system and host immune responses including multinuclear giant cell formation by Wright-Giemsa modified staining, macrophage polarization by cell surface antigen expression, and cytokines/chemokine production by both mRNA expression and protein secretion. Results The M. marinum stimulated coculture group showed more expression of CD209, CD68, CD80, and CD86 than the BCG and M. tuberculosis (an attenuated strain, H37Ra) groups, although the differences were not statistically significant. Moreover, the M. marinum group expressed more interleukin (IL)-1B and IL-12p40 on day 3 (IL-1B: P = 0.003 and 0.004, respectively; IL-12p40: P = 0.001 and 0.011, respectively), a higher level of CXCL10 on day 1 (P = 0.006 and 0.026, respectively), and higher levels of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL) 8 and chemokine (C motif) ligand (XCL) 1 on day 3 (CXCL8: P = 0.012 and 0.014, respectively; XCL1: P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively). The M. marinum stimulated coculture group also secreted more tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β, and IL-10 on day 1 (TNF-α: P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively; IL-1β: P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively; IL-10: P = 0.002 and 0.019, respectively) and day 3 (TNF-α: P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively; IL-1β: P = 0.000 and 0.001, respectively; IL-10: P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively). In addition, the

  4. Mycobacterium microti: More diverse than previously thought.

    PubMed

    Smith, N H; Crawshaw, T; Parry, J; Birtles, R J

    2009-08-01

    Mycobacterium microti is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex of bacteria. This species was originally identified as a pathogen of small rodents and shrews and was associated with limited diversity and a much reduced spoligotype pattern. More recently, specific deletions of chromosomal DNA have been shown to define this group of organisms, which can be identified by the absence of chromosomal region RD1(mic). We describe here the molecular characteristics of 141 strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated in Great Britain over a 14-year period. All strains have characteristic loss of some spoligotype spacers and characteristic alleles at the ETR-E and ETR-F variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci, and a sample of these strains was deleted for regions RD7, RD9, and RD1(mic) but intact for regions RD4 and RD12. We therefore identified these strains as M. microti and show that they have much more diverse spoligotype patterns and VNTR types than previously thought. The most common source of these strains was domestic cats, and we show that the molecular types of M. microti are geographically localized in the same way that molecular types of Mycobacterium bovis are geographically localized in cattle in the United Kingdom. We describe the pathology of M. microti infection in cats and suggest that the feline disease is a spillover from a disease maintained in an unknown wild mammal, probably field voles. The location of the cats with M. microti infection suggests that they do not overlap geographically with the strains of Mycobacterium bovis in Great Britain. PMID:19535520

  5. Mycobacterium microti: More Diverse than Previously Thought▿

    PubMed Central

    Smith, N. H.; Crawshaw, T.; Parry, J.; Birtles, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium microti is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex of bacteria. This species was originally identified as a pathogen of small rodents and shrews and was associated with limited diversity and a much reduced spoligotype pattern. More recently, specific deletions of chromosomal DNA have been shown to define this group of organisms, which can be identified by the absence of chromosomal region RD1mic. We describe here the molecular characteristics of 141 strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated in Great Britain over a 14-year period. All strains have characteristic loss of some spoligotype spacers and characteristic alleles at the ETR-E and ETR-F variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci, and a sample of these strains was deleted for regions RD7, RD9, and RD1mic but intact for regions RD4 and RD12. We therefore identified these strains as M. microti and show that they have much more diverse spoligotype patterns and VNTR types than previously thought. The most common source of these strains was domestic cats, and we show that the molecular types of M. microti are geographically localized in the same way that molecular types of Mycobacterium bovis are geographically localized in cattle in the United Kingdom. We describe the pathology of M. microti infection in cats and suggest that the feline disease is a spillover from a disease maintained in an unknown wild mammal, probably field voles. The location of the cats with M. microti infection suggests that they do not overlap geographically with the strains of Mycobacterium bovis in Great Britain. PMID:19535520

  6. Characterisation of porin genes from Mycobacterium fortuitum and their impact on growth

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Highly pathogenic mycobacteria like Mycobacterium tuberculosis are characterised by their slow growth and their ability to reside and multiply in the very hostile phagosomal environment and a correlation between the growth rate of mycobacteria and their pathogenicity has been hypothesised. Here, porin genes from M. fortuitum were cloned and characterised to address their impact on the growth rate of fast-growing and pathogenic mycobacteria. Results Two genes encoding porins orthologous to MspA from M. smegmatis, porM1 and porM2, were cloned from M. fortuitum strains, which were originally isolated from human patients. Both porin genes were at least partially able to complement the mutations of a M. smegmatis mutant strain lacking the genes mspA and mspC with respect to the growth rate. PorM1 and porM2 were present in different strains of M. fortuitum including the type strain. Comparative expression analysis of porM genes revealed divergent porin expression among analysed M. fortuitum strains. Repression of the expression of porins by antisense technique decreased the growth rates of different M. fortuitum. The effects of over-expression of porM1 as well as porM2 varied depending on the strain and the concentration of antibiotic added to the medium and indicated that PorM1 and PorM2 enhance the growth of M. fortuitum strains, but also the diffusion of the antibiotic kanamycin into the cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates the important role of porin expression in growth as well as antibiotic susceptibility of the opportunistic bacterium M. fortuitum. PMID:19203364

  7. Mapping of T cell epitopes of the 30-kDa {alpha} antigen of Mycobacterium bovis strain bacillus Calmette-Guerin in Purified Protein Derivative (PPD)-positive individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.F.; Wallis, R.S.; Ellner, J.J.

    1995-05-01

    The fibronectin-binding 30-kDa {alpha} Ag is a major secretory protein of growing mycobacteria that stimulates in vitro lymphocyte blastogenesis in most healthy purified protein derivative-positive individuals, but only a minority of patients with active tuberculosis. T cell epitopes of the {alpha} Ag were assessed using blastogenic responses of PBMC from 12 healthy purified protein derivative-positive subjects to a set of synthetic peptides based on the 325-amino acid sequence of the {alpha} Ag of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Because epitope-specific precursor cells are infrequent and randomly distributed, we used Poisson analysis to determine positive responses to 10 {mu}g/ml of each peptide in 12 replicate culture wells. Seven immunodominant regions of the {alpha} Ag were identified. Each subject responded to at least one of the two most dominant epitopes, which correspond to amino acids 131-155 and 233-257 (from N terminus). Peptides of these two epitopes induced production of IFN-{gamma} by sorted CD4{sup +} T cells. The immuno-dominant peptides may have use as components of a vaccine and as tools to study the evolution of the immune response to M. tuberculosis. The two most dominant epitopes both occur in regions of the {alpha} Ag that differ from those of the atypical pathogens M. avium and M. kansasii. In addition, the M. bovis epitope of amino acids 133-155 differs from that of M. tuberculosis by a single amino acid. It may be possible to exploit the sequence differences for development of diagnostic tests with increased specificity. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium peregrinum Strain CSUR P2098

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, Shady; Rascovan, Nicolás; Robert, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium peregrinum is a nonpigmented rapid growing nontuberculosis species belonging to the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The draft genome of M. peregrinum type I CSUR P2098 comprises 7,109,836 bp exhibiting a 66.23% G+C content, 6,894 protein-coding genes, and 100 predicted RNA genes. Its genome analysis suggests this species differs from Mycobacterium senegalense. PMID:26543113

  9. Mycobacterium paraintracellulare sp. nov., for the genotype INT-1 of Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Hong; Won, Yu-Seop; Jeon, Che Ok; Jeong, Joseph; Lee, Seon Ho; Lim, Ji-Hun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Chang Ki; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-08-01

    Three mycobacterial strains, isolated from independent Korean patients with pulmonary infections, belonging to the Mycobacterium intracellulare genotype 1 (INT-1) were characterized using a polyphasic approach. The sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the INT-1 strains were identical to those of Mycobacterium intracellulare ATCC 13950T. However, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis targeting five housekeeping genes (hsp65, rpoB, argG, gnd and pgm) revealed the phylogenetic separation of these strains from M. intracellulare ATCC 13950T. DNA-DNA hybridization values of >70 % confirmed that the three isolates belong to the same species, while the values of <70 % between one of them and the type strains of M. intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera confirmed their belonging to a distinct species. In addition, phenotypic characteristics such as positive growth on MacConkey agar and in acidic broth culture, unique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS profiles of lipids, and unique mycolic acids profiles further supported the taxonomic status of these strains as representatives of a novel species of the Mycobacterium avium complex named Mycobacterium paraintracellulare. The type strain is MOTT64T (=KCTC 29084T=JCM 30622T). PMID:27189351

  10. Insights from the complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium marinum on the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Stinear, Timothy P.; Seemann, Torsten; Harrison, Paul F.; Jenkin, Grant A.; Davies, John K.; Johnson, Paul D.R.; Abdellah, Zahra; Arrowsmith, Claire; Chillingworth, Tracey; Churcher, Carol; Clarke, Kay; Cronin, Ann; Davis, Paul; Goodhead, Ian; Holroyd, Nancy; Jagels, Kay; Lord, Angela; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Quail, Michael A.; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Walker, Danielle; White, Brian; Whitehead, Sally; Small, Pamela L.C.; Brosch, Roland; Ramakrishnan, Lalita; Fischbach, Michael A.; Parkhill, Julian; Cole, Stewart T.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum, a ubiquitous pathogen of fish and amphibia, is a near relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis in humans. The genome of the M strain of M. marinum comprises a 6,636,827-bp circular chromosome with 5424 CDS, 10 prophages, and a 23-kb mercury-resistance plasmid. Prominent features are the very large number of genes (57) encoding polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthases (NRPSs) and the most extensive repertoire yet reported of the mycobacteria-restricted PE and PPE proteins, and related-ESX secretion systems. Some of the NRPS genes comprise a novel family and seem to have been acquired horizontally. M. marinum is used widely as a model organism to study M. tuberculosis pathogenesis, and genome comparisons confirmed the close genetic relationship between these two species, as they share 3000 orthologs with an average amino acid identity of 85%. Comparisons with the more distantly related Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis reveal how an ancestral generalist mycobacterium evolved into M. tuberculosis and M. marinum. M. tuberculosis has undergone genome downsizing and extensive lateral gene transfer to become a specialized pathogen of humans and other primates without retaining an environmental niche. M. marinum has maintained a large genome so as to retain the capacity for environmental survival while becoming a broad host range pathogen that produces disease strikingly similar to M. tuberculosis. The work described herein provides a foundation for using M. marinum to better understand the determinants of pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:18403782

  11. Membranous glomerulonephritis associated with Mycobacterium shimoidei pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Kushida, Yoshio; Bandoh, Shuji; Ishii, Tomoya; Haba, Reiji; Tadokoro, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Takahama, Takayuki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 83 Final Diagnosis: Membranous glomerulonephritis Symptoms: Producting cough Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: Membranous glomerulonephritis can occur secondarily from infectious diseases. There are no reports describing membranous glomerulonephritis caused by non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection. However, several cases with membranous glomerulonephritis due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported. Mycobacterium shimoidei is an uncommon pathogen, and less than 20 cases with this species have been reported. A therapeutic regimen for this infection has not been established yet. Case Report: An 83-year-old Japanese man presented with productive cough for 6 months. Computed tomography scan showed multiple cavities in the bilateral pulmonary fields. Acid-fast bacilli were evident in his sputum by Ziehl-Neelsen staining (Gaffky 3). PCR amplifications for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare were all negative. Finally, Mycobacterium shimoidei was identified by rpoB sequencing and 16S rRNA sequencing. Urine examination showed a sub-nephrotic range of proteinuria and histology of the kidney showed membranous glomerulonephritis. Antimycobacterial treatment with clarithromycin, rifampicin, and ethambutol dramatically improved not only the pulmonary disease, but also the proteinuria. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, the presented case is the first report showing non-tuberculous mycobacterium-induced secondary membranous glomerulonephritis. A combination with clarithromycin, ethambutol, and rifampicin might be effective for treatment of Mycobacterium shimoidei infection. PMID:24367720

  12. Phylogenomics of Mycobacterium Nitrate Reductase Operon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinqin; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    NarGHJI operon encodes a nitrate reductase that can reduce nitrate to nitrite. This process enhances bacterial survival by nitrate respiration under anaerobic conditions. NarGHJI operon exists in many bacteria, especially saprophytic bacteria living in soil which play a key role in the nitrogen cycle. Most actinomycetes, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possess NarGHJI operons. M. tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that expands in macrophages and has the ability to persist in a non-replicative form in granuloma lifelong. Nitrogen and nitrogen compounds play crucial roles in the struggle between M. tuberculosis and host. M. tuberculosis can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions to enhance its survival. In this article, we reviewed the mechanisms regulating nitrate reductase expression and affecting its activity. Potential genes involved in regulating the nitrate reductase expression in M. tuberculosis were identified. The conserved NarG might be an alternative mycobacterium taxonomic marker. PMID:25980349

  13. Mycobacterium fortuitum lipoid pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, M K; Garber, J B; Fowlkes, N; Grooters, A M; Royal, A B; Gaunt, S D

    2015-03-01

    A 1-year old female spayed German Shepherd dog was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnea. Pyogranulomatous inflammation and green globoid structures were present on aspirates of the affected lung. Impression smears and histopathology confirmed pyogranulomatous pneumonia, with large amounts of lipid corresponding to the green structures noted cytologically, and identified poorly staining bacterial rods within lipid vacuoles. Special stains confirmed the presence of acid-fast bacterial rods, and polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing identified the organism as Mycobacterium fortuitum. M. fortuitum pneumonia is well described in humans and has previously been reported in 4 dogs and 1 cat. Lipid was a prominent cytologic and histologic feature, as is often described in humans and in the single feline case report. Additionally, this case highlights the variable cytologic appearance of lipid, as well as Mycobacterium spp, which are classically nonstaining with Wright-Giemsa. PMID:24788402

  14. Comparative Mycobacterium tuberculosis spoligotype distribution in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Ramos-Alvarez, Jessica; Molina-Torres, Carmen A; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Rendón, Adrian; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, we studied the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from patients according to their gender, age, and geographic location in Mexico. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in regard to age or gender. We found that spoligo international type 53 (SIT53) is more frequent in the northern states and that SIT119 predominates in central Mexico. PMID:24850349

  15. Comparative Mycobacterium tuberculosis Spoligotype Distribution in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Alvarez, Jessica; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Rendón, Adrian; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from patients according to their gender, age, and geographic location in Mexico. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in regard to age or gender. We found that spoligo international type 53 (SIT53) is more frequent in the northern states and that SIT119 predominates in central Mexico. PMID:24850349

  16. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging. PMID:25779326

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Manipulator of Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Vanessa C.; Chuturgoon, Anil A.; Moodley, Devapregasan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is one of the most successful pathogens in human history and remains a global health challenge. MTB has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade the immune response sufficiently to survive within the macrophage in a bacterial-immunological equilibrium, yet causes sufficient immunopathology to facilitate its transmission. This review highlights MTB as the driver of disease pathogenesis and presents evidence of the mechanisms by which MTB manipulates the protective immune response into a pathological productive infection. PMID:26927066

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium vulneris DSM 45247T

    PubMed Central

    Croce, Olivier; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium vulneris DSM 45247T strain, an emerging, opportunistic pathogen of the Mycobacterium avium complex. The genome described here is composed of 6,981,439 bp (with a G+C content of 67.14%) and has 6,653 protein-coding genes and 84 predicted RNA genes. PMID:24812218

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium vulneris DSM 45247T.

    PubMed

    Croce, Olivier; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium vulneris DSM 45247(T) strain, an emerging, opportunistic pathogen of the Mycobacterium avium complex. The genome described here is composed of 6,981,439 bp (with a G+C content of 67.14%) and has 6,653 protein-coding genes and 84 predicted RNA genes. PMID:24812218

  20. Update on Medicinal Plants with Potency on Mycobacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Tsouh Fokou, Patrick Valere; Nyarko, Alexander Kwadwo; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Tchokouaha Yamthe, Lauve Rachel; Ofosuhene, Mark; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease has been a serious threat for people living in rural remote areas. Due to poverty or availability of traditional medicine these populations rely on herbal remedies. Currently, data on the anti-Mycobacterium ulcerans activity of plants, so far considered community-based knowledge, have been scientifically confirmed, concomitantly with some medicinal plants used to treat infectious diseases in general. Products derived from plants usually responsible for the biological properties may potentially control Mycobacterium ulcerans disease; numerous studies have aimed to describe the chemical composition of these plant antimicrobials. Thus, the present work provides the first compilation of medicinal plants that demonstrated inhibitory potential on Mycobacterium ulcerans. This work shows that the natural products represent potential alternatives to standard therapies for use as curative medicine for Mycobacterium ulcerans disease. PMID:26779539

  1. First isolation of Mycobacterium spp. in Mullus spp. in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sevim, P; Ozer, S; Rad, F

    2015-01-01

    Ichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. poses health risks both to fish and humans. In this study, the presence of ichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. was investigated in red mullet (Mullus barbatus barbatus) and surmullet (Mullus surmuletus), widely caught species in the Mediterranean and the Aegean Sea. A total of 208 fish samples, provided from fishermen of Mersin province (Turkey) were studied. Using conventional methods, Mycobacterium spp. was isolated and identified at the genus level by PCR and at the species level by PCR-RFLP. Thirteen Mycobacterium spp. were detected in 13 (6.25%) fish samples. Four mycobacteria were identified as M. genavense, three as M. fortuitum, three as M. scrofulaceum, one as M. marinum, one as M. vaccae and one as M. aurum. No signs of mycobacteriosis were observed in fish samples. Findings of this study can contribute to future studies of onichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. in seafood. PMID:27175166

  2. Tenosynovitis caused by a novel nontuberculous Mycobacterium species initially misidentified as a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Simner, Patricia J; Hyle, Emily P; Buckwalter, Seanne P; Branda, John A; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Franklin, Jameelah; Toney, Nadege C; de Man, Tom J B; Wallace, Richard J; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Wengenack, Nancy L

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of tenosynovitis caused by a novel, slowly growing, nonchromogenic, nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM). Originally misidentified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, the NTM cross-reacts with the M. tuberculosis complex nucleic acid hybridization probe, a M. tuberculosis gamma interferon release assay, and is closely related to M. tuberculosis by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:25253791

  3. Carbapenems and Rifampin Exhibit Synergy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Amit; Makkar, Nayani; Pandey, Pooja; Parrish, Nicole; Singh, Urvashi

    2015-01-01

    An effective regimen for treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is comprised of multiple drugs that inhibit a range of essential cellular activities in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The effectiveness of a regimen is further enhanced if constituent drugs act with synergy. Here, we report that faropenem (a penem) or biapenem, doripenem, or meropenem (carbapenems), which belong to the β-lactam class of antibiotics, and rifampin, one of the drugs that forms the backbone of TB treatment, act with synergy when combined. One of the reasons (carba)penems are seldom used for treatment of TB is the high dosage levels required, often at the therapeutic limits. The synergistic combination of rifampin and these (carba)penems indicates that (carba)penems can be administered at dosages that are therapeutically relevant. The combination of faropenem and rifampin also limits the frequency of resistant mutants, as we were unable to obtain spontaneous mutants in the presence of these two drugs. The combinations of rifampin and (carba)penems were effective not only against drug-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis but also against drug-resistant clinical isolates that are otherwise resistant to rifampin. A combination of doripenem or biapenem and rifampin also exhibited synergistic activity against Mycobacterium abscessus. Although the MICs of these three drugs alone against M. abscessus are too high to be of clinical relevance, their concentrations in combinations are therapeutically relevant; therefore, they warrant further evaluation for clinical utility to treat Mycobacterium abscessus infection, especially in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:26259792

  4. Carbapenems and Rifampin Exhibit Synergy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Amit; Makkar, Nayani; Pandey, Pooja; Parrish, Nicole; Singh, Urvashi; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2015-10-01

    An effective regimen for treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is comprised of multiple drugs that inhibit a range of essential cellular activities in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The effectiveness of a regimen is further enhanced if constituent drugs act with synergy. Here, we report that faropenem (a penem) or biapenem, doripenem, or meropenem (carbapenems), which belong to the β-lactam class of antibiotics, and rifampin, one of the drugs that forms the backbone of TB treatment, act with synergy when combined. One of the reasons (carba)penems are seldom used for treatment of TB is the high dosage levels required, often at the therapeutic limits. The synergistic combination of rifampin and these (carba)penems indicates that (carba)penems can be administered at dosages that are therapeutically relevant. The combination of faropenem and rifampin also limits the frequency of resistant mutants, as we were unable to obtain spontaneous mutants in the presence of these two drugs. The combinations of rifampin and (carba)penems were effective not only against drug-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis but also against drug-resistant clinical isolates that are otherwise resistant to rifampin. A combination of doripenem or biapenem and rifampin also exhibited synergistic activity against Mycobacterium abscessus. Although the MICs of these three drugs alone against M. abscessus are too high to be of clinical relevance, their concentrations in combinations are therapeutically relevant; therefore, they warrant further evaluation for clinical utility to treat Mycobacterium abscessus infection, especially in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:26259792

  5. Mycobacterium simiae and Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare mixed infection in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lévy-Frébault, V; Pangon, B; Buré, A; Katlama, C; Marche, C; David, H L

    1987-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome was diagnosed in a 43-year-old man, born and living in Congo. The patient presented a disseminated infection caused by mycobacteria which were recovered from blood, jejunal fluid, and duodenal and rectal biopsies. Identification, according to conventional tests and mycolate profile determination, showed that Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare and M. simiae were both involved. Images PMID:3793869

  6. Noncanonical SMC protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis restricts maintenance of Mycobacterium fortuitum plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Panas, Michael W.; Jain, Paras; Yang, Hui; Mitra, Shimontini; Biswas, Debasis; Wattam, Alice Rebecca; Letvin, Norman L.; Jacobs, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Research on tuberculosis and leprosy was revolutionized by the development of a plasmid transformation system in the fast-growing surrogate, Mycobacterium smegmatis. This transformation system was made possible by the successful isolation of a M. smegmatis mutant strain mc2155, whose efficient plasmid transformation (ept) phenotype supported the replication of Mycobacterium fortuitum pAL5000 plasmids. In this report, we identified the EptC gene, the loss of which confers the ept phenotype. EptC shares significant amino acid sequence homology and domain structure with the MukB protein of Escherichia coli, a structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein. Surprisingly, M. smegmatis has three paralogs of SMC proteins: EptC and MSMEG_0370 both share homology with Gram-negative bacterial MukB; and MSMEG_2423 shares homology with Gram-positive bacterial SMCs, including the single SMC protein predicted for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. Purified EptC was shown to bind ssDNA and stabilize negative supercoils in plasmid DNA. Moreover, an EptC–mCherry fusion protein was constructed and shown to bind to DNA in live mycobacteria, and to prevent segregation of plasmid DNA to daughter cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of impaired plasmid maintenance caused by a SMC homolog, which has been canonically known to assist the segregation of genetic materials. PMID:25197070

  7. Conditional Gene Expression in Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Mélanie; Singh, Anil Kumar; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Nassif, Xavier; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging human pathogen responsible for lung infections, skin and soft-tissue infections and disseminated infections in immunocompromised patients. It may exist either as a smooth (S) or rough (R) morphotype, the latter being associated with increased pathogenicity in various models. Genetic tools for homologous recombination and conditional gene expression are desperately needed to allow the study of M. abscessus virulence. However, descriptions of knock-out (KO) mutants in M. abscessus are rare, with only one KO mutant from an S strain described so far. Moreover, of the three major tools developed for homologous recombination in mycobacteria, only the one based on expression of phage recombinases is working. Several conditional gene expression tools have recently been engineered for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis, but none have been tested yet in M. abscessus. Based on previous experience with genetic tools allowing homologous recombination and their failure in M. abscessus, we evaluated the potential interest of a conditional gene expression approach using a system derived from the two repressors system, TetR/PipOFF. After several steps necessary to adapt TetR/PipOFF for M. abscessus, we have shown the efficiency of this system for conditional expression of an essential mycobacterial gene, fadD32. Inhibition of fadD32 was demonstrated for both the S and R isotypes, with marginally better efficiency for the R isotype. Conditional gene expression using the dedicated TetR/PipOFF system vectors developed here is effective in S and R M. abscessus, and may constitute an interesting approach for future genetic studies in this pathogen. PMID:22195042

  8. TB Screening Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... a risk that the first TST is a false-negative reaction, a second skin test is given ... species, for example Mycobacterium kansasii , will give a false-positive TST or IGRA result for TB. Positive ...

  9. Aquatic Snails, Passive Hosts of Mycobacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Marsollier, Laurent; Sévérin, Tchibozo; Aubry, Jacques; Merritt, Richard W.; Saint André, Jean-Paul; Legras, Pierre; Manceau, Anne-Lise; Chauty, Annick; Carbonnelle, Bernard; Cole, Stewart T.

    2004-01-01

    Accumulative indirect evidence of the epidemiology of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections causing chronic skin ulcers (i.e., Buruli ulcer disease) suggests that the development of this pathogen and its transmission to humans are related predominantly to aquatic environments. We report that snails could transitorily harbor M. ulcerans without offering favorable conditions for its growth and replication. A novel intermediate link in the transmission chain of M. ulcerans becomes likely with predator aquatic insects in addition to phytophage insects. Water bugs, such as Naucoris cimicoides, a potential vector of M. ulcerans, were shown to be infected specifically by this bacterium after feeding on snails experimentally exposed to M. ulcerans. PMID:15466578

  10. Mycobacterium marinum osteomyelitis of the first metatarsal.

    PubMed

    López Zabala, Ibon; Poggio Cano, Daniel; García-Elvira, Rubén; Asunción Márquez, Jordi

    2012-11-01

    Mycobacterium marinum (MM) infections secondary to injuries occurring in the aquatic environment have been widely described in literature, especially in immunosuppressed patients. The most frequent locations are the hands and forearms in patients exposed to water. The infection usually presents as a granuloma affecting superficial structures. However, due to the difficulty of diagnosis and the chronic course of the condition, deeper structures may eventually become affected. Late presentation of deep-seated infections in bones in the foot is exceptional. We report a case of osteomyelitis of the first metatarsal bone caused by MM after accidental puncture injury by a sea urchin requiring surgical treatment in a not immunosuppressed patient. PMID:26662782

  11. Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A minireview.

    PubMed

    Alnimr, Amani M

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis play important roles in understanding various aspects of tuberculosis pathogenesis and in the testing of novel therapeutic regimens. By simulating the latent tuberculosis infection, in which the bacteria exist in a non-replicative state, the models demonstrate reduced susceptibility to antimycobacterial agents. This minireview outlines the models available for simulating latent tuberculosis both in vitro and in several animal species. Additionally, this minireview discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these models for investigating the bacterial subpopulations and susceptibilities to sterilization by various antituberculosis drugs. PMID:26413043

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis wears what it eats

    PubMed Central

    Russell, David G.; VanderVen, Brian C.; Lee, Wonsik; Abramovitch, Robert B.; Kim, Mijeong; Homolka, Susanne; Niemann, Stefan; Rohde, Kyle H.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most pernicious of human pathogens. Current vaccines are ineffective and drugs, although efficacious, require prolonged treatment with constant medical oversight. Overcoming these problems requires a greater appreciation of M. tuberculosis in the context of its host. Upon infection of either macrophages in culture or animal models, the bacterium re-aligns its metabolism in response to the new environments it encounters. Understanding these environments, and the stresses that they place on M. tuberculosis, should provide insights invaluable for the development of new chemo- and immuno-therapeutic strategies. PMID:20638643

  13. Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A minireview

    PubMed Central

    Alnimr, Amani M.

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis play important roles in understanding various aspects of tuberculosis pathogenesis and in the testing of novel therapeutic regimens. By simulating the latent tuberculosis infection, in which the bacteria exist in a non-replicative state, the models demonstrate reduced susceptibility to antimycobacterial agents. This minireview outlines the models available for simulating latent tuberculosis both in vitro and in several animal species. Additionally, this minireview discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these models for investigating the bacterial subpopulations and susceptibilities to sterilization by various antituberculosis drugs. PMID:26413043

  14. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  15. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection. PMID:26511731

  16. Strain Variation in Mycobacterium marinum Fish Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ucko, M.; Colorni, A.; Kvitt, H.; Diamant, A.; Zlotkin, A.; Knibb, W. R.

    2002-01-01

    A molecular characterization of two Mycobacterium marinum genes, 16S rRNA and hsp65, was carried out with a total of 21 isolates from various species of fish from both marine and freshwater environments of Israel, Europe, and the Far East. The nucleotide sequences of both genes revealed that all M. marinum isolates from fish in Israel belonged to two different strains, one infecting marine (cultured and wild) fish and the other infecting freshwater (cultured) fish. A restriction enzyme map based on the nucleotide sequences of both genes confirmed the divergence of the Israeli marine isolates from the freshwater isolates and differentiated the Israeli isolates from the foreign isolates, with the exception of one of three Greek isolates from marine fish which was identical to the Israeli marine isolates. The second isolate from Greece exhibited a single base alteration in the 16S rRNA sequence, whereas the third isolate was most likely a new Mycobacterium species. Isolates from Denmark and Thailand shared high sequence homology to complete identity with reference strain ATCC 927. Combined analysis of the two gene sequences increased the detection of intraspecific variations and was thus of importance in studying the taxonomy and epidemiology of this aquatic pathogen. Whether the Israeli M. marinum strain infecting marine fish is endemic to the Red Sea and found extremely susceptible hosts in the exotic species imported for aquaculture or rather was accidentally introduced with occasional imports of fingerlings from the Mediterranean Sea could not be determined. PMID:12406715

  17. Targeting the histidine pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Juleane; Nunes, José Eduardo S; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Machado, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to a single bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The increasing prevalence of this disease, the emergence of multi-, extensively, and totally drug-resistant strains, complicated by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, and the length of tuberculosis chemotherapy have led to an urgent and continued need for the development of new and more effective antitubercular drugs. Within this context, the L-histidine biosynthetic pathway, which converts 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate to L-histidine in ten enzymatic steps, has been reported as a promising target of antimicrobial agents. This pathway is found in bacteria, archaebacteria, lower eukaryotes, and plants but is absent in mammals, making these enzymes highly attractive targets for the drug design of new antimycobacterial compounds with selective toxicity. Moreover, the biosynthesis of L-histidine has been described as essential for Mtb growth in vitro. Accordingly, a comprehensive overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis histidine pathway enzymes as attractive targets for the development of new antimycobacterial agents is provided, mainly summarizing the previously reported inhibition data for Mtb or orthologous proteins. PMID:24111909

  18. Mycobacterium spp. in wild game in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Pate, Mateja; Zajc, Urška; Kušar, Darja; Žele, Diana; Vengušt, Gorazd; Pirš, Tina; Ocepek, Matjaž

    2016-02-01

    Wildlife species are an important reservoir of mycobacterial infections that may jeopardise efforts to control and eradicate bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis. Slovenia is officially free of bTB, but no data on the presence of mycobacteria in wild animals has been reported. In this study, samples of liver and lymph nodes were examined from 306 apparently healthy free-range wild animals of 13 species in Slovenia belonging to the families Cervidae, Suidae, Canidae, Mustelidae and Bovidae. Mycobacteria were isolated from 36/306 (11.8%) animals (red deer, roe deer, fallow deer, wild boar and jackal) and identified by PCR, commercial diagnostic kits and sequencing. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria identified in five species were Mycobacterium peregrinum, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, M. intracellulare, M. confluentis, M. fortuitum, M. terrae, M. avium subsp. avium, M. celatum, M. engbaekii, M. neoaurum, M. nonchromogenicum and M. vaccae. PMID:26639827

  19. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections. PMID:26020393

  20. Efficacies of selected disinfectants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Best, M; Sattar, S A; Springthorpe, V S; Kennedy, M E

    1990-10-01

    The activities of 10 formulations as mycobactericidal agents in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-contaminated suspensions (suspension test) and stainless steel surfaces (carrier test) were investigated with sputum as the organic load. The quaternary ammonium compound, chlorhexidine gluconate, and an iodophor were ineffective in all tests. Ethanol (70%) was effective against M. tuberculosis only in suspension in the absence of sputum. Povidone-iodine was not as efficacious when the test organism was dried on a surface as it was in suspension, and its activity was further reduced in the presence of sputum. Sodium hypochlorite required a higher concentration of available chlorine to achieve an effective level of disinfection than did sodium dichloroisocyanurate. Phenol (5%) was effective under all test conditions, producing at least a 4-log10 reduction in CFU. The undiluted glutaraldehyde-phenate solution was effective against M. tuberculosis and a second test organism, Mycobacterium smegmatis, even in the presence of dried sputum, whereas the diluted solution (1:16) was only effective against M. smegmatis in the suspension test. A solution of 2% glutaraldehyde was effective against M. tuberculosis. This investigation presents tuberculocidal efficacy data generated by methods simulating actual practices of routine disinfection. PMID:2121783

  1. Porins increase copper susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L; Haeili, Mehri; Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Copper resistance mechanisms are crucial for many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, during infection because the innate immune system utilizes copper ions to kill bacterial intruders. Despite several studies detailing responses of mycobacteria to copper, the pathways by which copper ions cross the mycobacterial cell envelope are unknown. Deletion of porin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis leads to a severe growth defect on trace copper medium but simultaneously increases tolerance for copper at elevated concentrations, indicating that porins mediate copper uptake across the outer membrane. Heterologous expression of the mycobacterial porin gene mspA reduced growth of M. tuberculosis in the presence of 2.5 μM copper by 40% and completely suppressed growth at 15 μM copper, while wild-type M. tuberculosis reached its normal cell density at that copper concentration. Moreover, the polyamine spermine, a known inhibitor of porin activity in Gram-negative bacteria, enhanced tolerance of M. tuberculosis for copper, suggesting that copper ions utilize endogenous outer membrane channel proteins of M. tuberculosis to gain access to interior cellular compartments. In summary, these findings highlight the outer membrane as the first barrier against copper ions and the role of porins in mediating copper uptake in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis. PMID:24013632

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is resistant to streptolydigin.

    PubMed

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L; Niederweis, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) undermine tuberculosis (TB) control. Streptolydigin is a broadly effective antibiotic which inhibits RNA polymerase, similarly to rifampicin, a key drug in current TB chemotherapeutic regimens. Due to a vastly improved chemical synthesis streptolydigin and derivatives are being promoted as putative TB drugs. The microplate Alamar Blue assay revealed that Streptococcus salivarius and Mycobacterium smegmatis were susceptible to streptolydigin with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 1.6 mg/L and 6.25 mg/L, respectively. By contrast, the MICs of streptolydigin and two derivatives, streptolydiginone and dihydrostreptolydigin, against Mtb were ≥ 100 mg/L demonstrating that Mtb is resistant to streptolydigin in contrast to previous reports. Further, a porin mutant of M. smegmatis is resistant to streptolydigin indicating that porins mediate uptake of streptolydigin across the outer membrane. Since the RNA polymerase is a validated drug target in Mtb and porins are required for susceptibility of M. smegmatis, the absence of MspA-like porins probably contributes to the resistance of Mtb to streptolydigin. This study shows that streptolydigin is not a suitable drug in TB treatment regimens. PMID:23591156

  3. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  4. Inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Hesham M.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of gamma irradiation on the inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese that prepared from artificially inoculated milk samples was studied. Irradiation at dose of 2 kGy was sufficient for the complete inactivation of these mycobacteria as they were not detected in the treated samples during storage at 4±1 °C for 15 days. Moreover, irradiation of cheese samples, that were prepared from un-inoculated milk, at this effective dose had no significant effects on their gross composition and contents from riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid, while significant decreases in vitamin A and thiamin were observed. In addition, irradiation of cheese samples had no significant effects on their pH and nitrogen fractions contents, except for the contents of ammonia, which showed a slight, but significant, increases due to irradiation. The analysis of cheese fats indicated that irradiation treatment induced significant increase in their oxidation parameters and contents from free fatty acids; however, the observed increases were relatively low. On the other hand, irradiation of cheese samples induced no significant alterations on their sensory properties. Thus, irradiation dose of 2 kGy can be effectively applied to ensure the safety of soft cheese with regards to these harmful mycobacteria.

  5. Mycobacterium thermoresistibile as a source of thermostable orthologs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas E; Liao, Reiling; Phan, Isabelle; Myler, Peter J; Grundner, Christoph

    2012-07-01

    The genus Mycobacterium comprises major human pathogens such as the causative agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and many environmental species. Tuberculosis claims ~1.5 million lives every year, and drug resistant strains of Mtb are rapidly emerging. To aid the development of new tuberculosis drugs, major efforts are currently under way to determine crystal structures of Mtb drug targets and proteins involved in pathogenicity. However, a major obstacle to obtaining crystal structures is the generation of well-diffracting crystals. Proteins from thermophiles can have better crystallization and diffraction properties than proteins from mesophiles, but their sequences and structures are often divergent. Here, we establish a thermophilic mycobacterial model organism, Mycobacterium thermoresistibile (Mth), for the study of Mtb proteins. Mth tolerates higher temperatures than Mtb or other environmental mycobacteria such as M. smegmatis. Mth proteins are on average more soluble than Mtb proteins, and comparison of the crystal structures of two pairs of orthologous proteins reveals nearly identical folds, indicating that Mth structures provide good surrogates for Mtb structures. This study introduces a thermophile as a source of protein for the study of a closely related human pathogen and marks a new approach to solving challenging mycobacterial protein structures. PMID:22544630

  6. Lipids of 'Mycobacterium habana', a synonym of Mycobacterium simiae with vaccine potential.

    PubMed

    Mederos, L M; Valdivia, J A; Valero-Guillén, P L

    2006-01-01

    'Mycobacterium habana' was proposed as a distinct species within the genus Mycobacterium; however, it is actually a synonym of Mycobacterium simiae and included in the serotype I of this species. The potential use of 'M. habana' as a vaccine in both leprosy and tuberculosis has led to the analysis of its lipid composition in an attempt to define distinctive markers that could be used in the quality control of true strains of this bacterium. Lipids of taxonomic value (fatty and mycolic acids) are similar in 'M. habana' and M. simiae; nevertheless, they clearly differ on the basis of glycopeptidolipid (GPL) composition. Thus, contrary to M. simiae, most strains of 'M. habana' can be defined by the presence of three polar compounds, designated GPL-I, GPL-II and GPL-III, easily determined by thin-layer chromatography, and characterized, respectively, by the content of l-fucose, 2,4-di-O-Me-d-glucuronic acid, and 4-O-Me-d-glucuronic acid, as epitopes. PMID:16632407

  7. [Mastitis due to Mycobacterium fortuitum in an HIV negative patient].

    PubMed

    Palmero, Domingo J; Ambroggi, Marta G; Poggi, Susana E

    2004-01-01

    A case of a 39 year old HIV negative female patient with a Mycobacterium fortuitum mastitis without previous pathogenic history is reported. She was treated on the bases of drug-susceptibility testing and bibliographic empirical evidence with kanamycin, doxicicline, ciprofloxacin and trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol. A complete remission of her lesions was obtained after 15 months of treatment. Lesions due to this rapidly growing mycobacterium, diagnosis and treatment are commented. PMID:15637832

  8. [Isolation frequency of the Mycobacterium genus in urine samples].

    PubMed

    Mederos, Lilian M; Sardiñas, Misleidis; García, Grechen; Martínez, María Rosarys; Reyes, Angélica; Díaz, Raúl

    2015-10-01

    Kidney infections caused by Mycobacterium genus are torpid and chronic evolution. In this study were analyzed 177 urine samples (included 110 from HIV patients) received between January 2006 and July 2014 in the National Reference Laboratory of Tuberculosis at Tropical Medicine Institute "Pedro Kourí" (IPK). The results were 17 isolates Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 30 isolates of nontuberculous mycobacteria were detected. This study confirms the diagnostic importance of these infections especially in HIV/AIDS patients. PMID:26633121

  9. Treatment of Mycobacterium marinum with lymecycline: new therapeutic alternative?

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Maria Gertrudes Fernandes Pereira; Neugebauer, Samuel Antônio; Almeida Junior, Hiram Larangeira; Mota, Laís Marques

    2015-01-01

    Skin infections by Mycobacterium marinum are quite rare in our environment and, therefore, little studied. The majority of the lesions appear three weeks after traumas in aquariums, beaches and fish tanks. Lymph node drainage and systematization of the disease are rare and most lesions disappear in about three years. This case aims to show the effectiveness of the treatment used (lymecycline 150 mg/orally/day). This medication may be a new therapeutic option for the treatment of Mycobacterium marinum. PMID:25672310

  10. Contrasting persistence strategies in Salmonella and Mycobacterium

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Long-term survival of persistent bacterial pathogens in mammalian hosts critically depends on their ability to avoid elimination by innate and adaptive immune responses. The persistent human pathogens that cause typhoid fever and tuberculosis exemplify alternative strategies for survival in the host: immune evasion and immune adaptation, respectively. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi evades host innate immune responses and inflammation by expressing factors that interfere with its detection as a Gram-negative bacterium, enabling persistent colonization of an immunologically privileged niche, the gallbladder. In contrast, Mycobacterium tuberculosis has adapted to survive within phagocytic cells, which typically eliminate invading microbes, by deploying stress resistance mechanisms that counteract the harsh environment of the phagolysosome. PMID:20056478

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis supports protein tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kusebauch, Ulrike; Ortega, Corrie; Ollodart, Anja; Rogers, Richard S.; Sherman, David R.; Moritz, Robert L.; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation determines growth and adaptive decisions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). At least 11 two-component systems and 11 Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) mediate phosphorylation on Asp, His, Ser, and Thr. In contrast, protein phosphorylation on Tyr has not been described previously in Mtb. Here, using a combination of phospho-enrichment and highly sensitive mass spectrometry, we show extensive protein Tyr phosphorylation of diverse Mtb proteins, including STPKs. Several STPKs function as dual-specificity kinases that phosphorylate Tyr in cis and in trans, suggesting that dual-specificity kinases have a major role in bacterial phospho-signaling. Mutation of a phosphotyrosine site of the essential STPK PknB reduces its activity in vitro and in live Mtb, indicating that Tyr phosphorylation has a functional role in bacterial growth. These data identify a previously unrecognized phosphorylation system in a human pathogen that claims ∼1.4 million lives every year. PMID:24927537

  12. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  13. PCR identification of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, E A; Williams, D L; Frothingham, R

    1997-01-01

    The attenuated bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine strain is derived from a virulent strain of Mycobacterium bovis. BCG is difficult to differentiate from other strains of M. bovis and other members of the M. tuberculosis complex by conventional methods. Recently, a genomic region designated RD1 was found to be present in all virulent M. bovis and M. tuberculosis strains tested but deleted from all BCG strains tested. With this information, a multiplex PCR method was developed to detect the RD1 deletion. A large collection of BCG and other M. tuberculosis complex strains from diverse host and geographic origins was tested. RD1 was deleted in 23 of 23 BCG strains. RD1 was present in 129 of 129 other M. tuberculosis complex strains. This multiplex PCR method can be used as a tool for the rapid and specific identification of BCG. PMID:9041390

  14. Growth studies on Mycobacterium BCG: oxygen preference.

    PubMed

    Moore, D F; James, A M

    1982-01-01

    Growth of Mycobacterium BCG, (BCG), in semi-solid Dubos medium (containing glucose) was microaerophilic; the organisms were less microaerophilic in semi-solid glycerol-free medium (containing only amino acid nutrients). In Marks medium (containing glycerol) BCG grew aerobically at the air/liquid interface. Non-mycobacterial species showed changes from microaerophilic to aerobic growth much more readily than did BCG. Aeration characteristics of culture media were evaluated by measuring the oxygen transfer rates (OTR). OTR values were affected by the concentration of carbohydrates in the medium and varied inversely with volume. The growth of BCG in both static shaken liquid cultures substantiated the results of the oxygen preference experiments. PMID:6761555

  15. Survival rate of airborne Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Gannon, B W; Hayes, C M; Roe, J M

    2007-04-01

    Despite years of study the principle transmission route of bovine tuberculosis to cattle remains unresolved. The distribution of pathological lesions, which are concentrated in the respiratory system, and the very low dose of Mycobacterium bovis needed to initiate infection from a respiratory tract challenge suggest that the disease is spread by airborne transmission. Critical to the airborne transmission of a pathogenic microorganism is its ability to survive the stresses incurred whilst airborne. This study demonstrates that M. bovis is resistant to the stresses imposed immediately after becoming airborne, 94% surviving the first 10 min after aerosolisation. Once airborne the organism is robust, its viability decreasing with a half-life of approximately 1.5 hours. These findings support the hypothesis that airborne transmission is the principle route of infection for bovine tuberculosis. PMID:17045316

  16. Case report of fatal Mycobacterium tilburgii infection.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Timur; Bakkaloglu, Oguz K; Ince, Burak; Tufan, Fatih; Kose, Murat; Poda, Mehves; Tascioglu, Didem; Koksalan, O Kaya; Saka, Bulent; Erten, Nilgun; Buyukbabani, Nesimi; Kilicaslan, Zeki; Tascioglu, Cemil

    2015-07-01

    There are few reports concerning Mycobacterium tilburgii infection in humans because this bacterium is non-cultivatable. Herein, using new molecular techniques, we report the case of an immunocompromised patient with fatal disseminated lymphadenitis that was caused by M. tilburgii.26 years old Caucasian HIV negative female patient presented with abdominal pain. Her clinical assessment revealed disseminated lymphadenitis, that was acid fast bacilli positive. Further molecular evaluation showed the causative agent as M. tilburgii. Despite anti mycobacterial therapy and careful management of intervening complications patient died because of an intraabdominal sepsis. This is the first fatal M. tilburgii infection in the literature. This case points the importance of careful management of patient's immune status and intervening infections besides implementation of effective drug treatment. PMID:25818194

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiansong; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Chen, Zhiwei

    2016-05-01

    Following HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) continues to be the second most deadly infectious disease in humans. The global TB prevalence has become worse in recent years due to the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug resistant (XDR) strains, as well as co-infection with HIV. Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has nearly been used for a century in many countries, it does not protect adult pulmonary tuberculosis and even causes disseminated BCG disease in HIV-positive population. It is impossible to use BCG to eliminate the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection or to prevent TB onset and reactivation. Consequently, novel vaccines are urgently needed for TB prevention and immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the TB prevalence, interaction between M. tb and host immune system, as well as recent progress of TB vaccine research and development. PMID:27156616

  18. Pulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium malmoense.

    PubMed

    Alberts, W M; Chandler, K W; Solomon, D A; Goldman, A L

    1987-06-01

    Mycobacterium malmoense was isolated from pulmonary material from 4 patients. Two patients had repeatedly positive smears and cultures along with roentgenographic progression of pulmonary disease in the absence of another pathogen. These 2 patients therefore meet the criteria for diagnosis of pulmonary mycobacteriosis. Isolation of the organism may represent colonization in a third patient, and M. malmoense has been isolated from a fourth patient on 2 occasions. It is not yet definite, however, that the pulmonary process is due to mycobacterial disease. Although uncommon, pulmonary disease caused by this organism has been reported from Europe. Only 1 prior case of pulmonary disease caused by M. malmoense, however, has been reported in the United States. PMID:3592410

  19. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cytochrome P450 System

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Hugues; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a leading cause of human mortality. The emergence of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent, that are resistant to the major frontline antitubercular drugs increases the urgency for the development of new therapeutic agents. Sequencing of the M. tuberculosis genome revealed the existence of twenty cytochrome P450 enzymes, some of which are potential candidates for drug targeting. The recent burst of studies reporting microarray-based gene essentiality and transcriptome analyses under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions highlight the importance of selected P450 isoforms for M. tuberculosis viability and pathogenicity. Current knowledge of the structural and biochemical properties of the M. tuberculosis P450 enzymes and their putative redox partners is reviewed, with an emphasis on findings related to their physiological function(s) as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:19635450

  20. Consequences of genomic diversity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2014-12-01

    The causative agent of human tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), comprises seven phylogenetically distinct lineages associated with different geographical regions. Here we review the latest findings on the nature and amount of genomic diversity within and between MTBC lineages. We then review recent evidence for the effect of this genomic diversity on mycobacterial phenotypes measured experimentally and in clinical settings. We conclude that overall, the most geographically widespread Lineage 2 (includes Beijing) and Lineage 4 (also known as Euro-American) are more virulent than other lineages that are more geographically restricted. This increased virulence is associated with delayed or reduced pro-inflammatory host immune responses, greater severity of disease, and enhanced transmission. Future work should focus on the interaction between MTBC and human genetic diversity, as well as on the environmental factors that modulate these interactions. PMID:25453224

  1. Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infections in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Hung, Chien-Ching; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex comprises a group of rapidly growing, multidrug-resistant, nontuberculous mycobacteria that are responsible for a wide spectrum of skin and soft tissue diseases, central nervous system infections, bacteremia, and ocular and other infections. M. abscessus complex is differentiated into 3 subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. The 2 major subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, have different erm(41) gene patterns. This gene provides intrinsic resistance to macrolides, so the different patterns lead to different treatment outcomes. M. abscessus complex outbreaks associated with cosmetic procedures and nosocomial transmissions are not uncommon. Clarithromycin, amikacin, and cefoxitin are the current antimicrobial drugs of choice for treatment. However, new treatment regimens are urgently needed, as are rapid and inexpensive identification methods and measures to contain nosocomial transmission and outbreaks. PMID:26295364

  2. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N. Beth; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (basonym M. paratuberculosis) is the etiologic agent of a severe gastroenteritis in ruminants known as Johne's disease. Economic losses to the cattle industry in the United States are staggering, reaching $1.5 billion annually. A potential pathogenic role in humans in the etiology of Crohn's disease is under investigation. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, and disease control measures of this important veterinary pathogen. We emphasize molecular genetic aspects including the description of markers used for strain identification, diagnostics, and phylogenetic analysis. Recent important advances in the development of animal models and genetic systems to study M. paratuberculosis virulence determinants are also discussed. We conclude with proposals for the applications of these models and recombinant technology to the development of diagnostic, control, and therapeutic measures. PMID:11432810

  3. Reducing human exposure to Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O

    2013-08-01

    In light of the increasing prevalence of Mycobacterium avium pulmonary disease and the challenges of treating patients with M. avium infection, consideration of measures to reduce exposure is warranted. Because M. avium inhabits water and soil, humans are surrounded by that opportunistic pathogen. Because infection has been linked to the presence of M. avium in household plumbing, increasing hot water temperature, reducing aerosol (mist) exposures in bathrooms and showers, and installing filters that prevent the passage of mycobacteria will likely reduce M. avium exposure. Granular activated carbon (charcoal) filters support the growth of M. avium and should be avoided. When gardening, avoid the inhalation of soil dusts by using a mask or wetting the soil because peat-rich potting soils have high numbers of mycobacteria. PMID:23952861

  4. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  5. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Torrey, Heather L; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  6. Mycobacterium leprae: genes, pseudogenes and genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, which has afflicted human populations for millenia, results from infection with Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with an exceptionally long generation time. Considerable insight into the biology and drug resistance of the leprosy bacillus has been obtained from genomics. M. leprae has undergone reductive evolution and pseudogenes now occupy half of its genome. Comparative genomics of four different strains revealed remarkable conservation of the genome (99.995% identity) yet uncovered 215 polymorphic sites, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms, and a handful of new pseudogenes. Mapping these polymorphisms in a large panel of strains defined 16 single nucleotide polymorphism-subtypes that showed strong geographical associations and helped retrace the evolution of M. leprae. PMID:21162636

  7. Comparative Genomic Hybridizations Reveal Genetic Regions within the Mycobacterium avium Complex That Are Divergent from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Isolates†

    PubMed Central

    Paustian, Michael L.; Kapur, Vivek; Bannantine, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is genetically similar to other members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), some of which are nonpathogenic and widespread in the environment. We have utilized an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis whole-genome microarray representing over 95% of the predicted coding sequences to examine the genetic conservation among 10 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates, two isolates each of Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, and a single isolate each of both Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Genomic DNA from each isolate was competitively hybridized with DNA from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K10, and open reading frames (ORFs) were classified as present, divergent, or intermediate. None of the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates had ORFs classified as divergent. The two M. avium subsp. avium isolates had 210 and 135 divergent ORFs, while the two M. avium subsp. silvaticum isolates examined had 77 and 103 divergent ORFs. Similarly, 130 divergent ORFs were identified in M. intracellulare. A set of 97 ORFs were classified as divergent or intermediate in all of the nonparatuberculosis MAC isolates tested. Many of these ORFs are clustered together on the genome in regions with relatively low average GC content compared with the entire genome and contain mobile genetic elements. One of these regions of sequence divergence contained genes homologous to a mammalian cell entry (mce) operon. Our results indicate that closely related MAC mycobacteria can be distinguished from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by multiple clusters of divergent ORFs. PMID:15774884

  8. First Pulmonary Case Reported in Argentina of Infection with Mycobacterium szulgai, a Rare Pathogen▿

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, M.; Feola, M.; Lenge, L.; Rey, R.; Hoffman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium szulgai is a rare pathogen. Nontuberculous mycobacteria usually produce disease in people with some kind of immunosuppression or another predisposing condition. A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium szulgai infection is described. PMID:17596359

  9. DETECTION,QUANTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS IN DRINKING WATER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), including Mycobacterium avium and M. intracellulare, are clinically relevant and cause a myriad of opportunistic infections. Children, the elderly, and persons with previous lung conditions or immune system dysfunction...

  10. Disseminated Mycobacterium lentiflavum responsible for hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis in a man with a history of heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G; Hraiech, S; Dizier, S; Weiller, P J; Ene, N; Serratrice, J; Secq, V; Ambrosi, P; Drancourt, M; Roch, A; Papazian, L

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium lentiflavum is a nontuberculous, slowly growing mycobacterium usually recognized as a contaminant. Here, we report a case of disseminated M. lentiflavum infection responsible for hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis in a heart-transplanted man. PMID:24871221

  11. Whole genome analyses of marine fish pathogenic isolate, Mycobacterium sp. 012931.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Satoru; Kabayama, Jun; Hwang, Seong Don; Nho, Seong Won; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Takeyama, Haruko; Mori, Tetsushi; Aoki, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium is a genus within the order Actinomycetales that comprises of a large number of well-characterized species, several of which includes pathogens known to cause serious disease in human and animal. Here, we report the whole genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. strain 012931 isolated from the marine fish, yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata). Mycobacterium sp. 012931 is a fish pathogen causing serious damage to aquaculture farms in Japan. DNA dot plot analysis showed that Mycobacterium sp. 012931 was more closely related to Mycobacterium marinum when compared across several Mycobacterium species. However, little conservation of the gene order was observed between Mycobacterium sp. 012931 and M. marinum genome. The annotated 5,464 genes of Mycobacterium sp. 012931 was classified into 26 subsystems. The insertion/deletion gene analysis shows Mycobacterium sp. 012931 had 643 unique genes that were not found in the M. marinum strains. In the virulence, disease, and defense subsystem, both insertion and deletion genes of Mycobacterium sp. 012931 were associated with the PPE gene cluster of Mycobacteria. Of seven plcB genes in Mycobacterium sp. 012931, plcB_2 and plcB_3 showed low identities with those of M. marinum strains. Therefore, Mycobacterium sp. 012931 has differences on genetic and virulence from M. marinum and may induce different interaction mechanisms between host and pathogen. PMID:24879010

  12. Mycobacterium terrae: a potential surrogate for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a standard disinfectant test.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, P A; Babb, J R; Fraise, A P

    1998-03-01

    The susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare to the disinfections used for spillage and heat sensitive instruments has received much attention in recent years. The use of clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and M. avium-intracellulare as test organisms is considered unsuitable for standard tests due to their hazardous nature (category 3 pathogens and slow growth rates). This has led to much debate in standards committees on the selection and use of a possible surrogate which would be safer and more practical to use and yet mimic the susceptibility of clinical isolates. This study compared the susceptibility of one possible surrogate Mycobacterium terrae NCTC 10856, with that of clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis H37 Rv and M. avium-intracellulare using a quantitative suspension test. The instrument and environmental disinfectants tested were a chlorine-releasing agent, sodium dichloroisocyanyurate (NaDCC) at 1000 ppm and 10,000 ppm av. Cl, chlorine dioxide at 1100 ppm av. ClO2 (Tristel, HayMan MediChem), 0.35% peracetic acid (NuCidex, Johnson & Johnson), 70% industrial methylated spirit (IMS), 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde (Asep, Galen), 10% succine dialdehyde and formaldehyde mixture (Gigasept, Schulke and Mayr). Results showed that the clinical isolate of M. avium-intracellulare was the most resistant of the three test organisms. M. terrae, which is not a category 3 pathogen, was slightly more resistant than M. tuberculosis and this would appear to be a suitable surrogate for establishing tuberculocidal activity. However, with an increase in the clinical significance of M. avium-intracellulare, particularly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and immunocompromised patients, a more resistant surrogate is required. In the absence of such a surrogate, testing with M. avium-intracellulare in a clinical laboratory equipped for handling category 3 pathogens is still advised to establish mycobactericidal activity. PMID

  13. Multiple small RNAs identified in Mycobacterium bovis BCG are also expressed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    DiChiara, Jeanne M.; Contreras-Martinez, Lydia M.; Livny, Jonathan; Smith, Dorie; McDonough, Kathleen A.; Belfort, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem, infecting millions of people each year. The causative agent of TB, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world’s most ancient and successful pathogens. However, until recently, no work on small regulatory RNAs had been performed in this organism. Regulatory RNAs are found in all three domains of life, and have already been shown to regulate virulence in well-known pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio cholera. Here we report the discovery of 34 novel small RNAs (sRNAs) in the TB-complex M. bovis BCG, using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. Putative homologues of many of these sRNAs were also identified in M. tuberculosis and/or M. smegmatis. Those sRNAs that are also expressed in the non-pathogenic M. smegmatis could be functioning to regulate conserved cellular functions. In contrast, those sRNAs identified specifically in M. tuberculosis could be functioning in mediation of virulence, thus rendering them potential targets for novel antimycobacterials. Various features and regulatory aspects of some of these sRNAs are discussed. PMID:20181675

  14. Evidences for anti-mycobacterium activities of lipids and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Afzal; Singh, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most widespread and deadly airborne disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The two-pronged lethal effect on the bacteria using lipids/surfactants and anti-tubercular drugs may render the miniaturization of dose owing to synergistic and tandem effect of both. The current research has been focused on screening and evaluating various lipids/surfactants possessing inherent anti-mycobacterium activity that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. In vitro anti-mycobacterium activity was evaluated using agar well diffusion method. Furthermore, time-concentration dependent killing and DNA/RNA content release studies were performed to correlate the findings. The exact mechanism of bacterial killing was further elucidated by electron/atomic force microscopy studies. Finally, to negate any toxicity, in vitro hemolysis and toxicity studies were performed. The study revealed that capmul MCM C-8, labrasol and acconon C-80 possessed highest in vitro anti-mycobacterium activity. Electron/atomic force microscopy results confirmed in vitro studies and verified the killing of Mycobacterium owing to the release of cytoplasmic content after cell wall fragmentation and disruption. Moreover, the least hemolysis and hundred percent survivals rate of mice using the excipients demonstrated the safety aspects of explored excipients that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. The present study concluded the safe, efficient and synergistic activity of the explored excipients and anti-tubercular drugs in controlling the menace of tuberculosis. PMID:26712622

  15. Iron Acquisition in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; Moolji, Jalal; Dufort, Alex; Staffa, Alfredo; Domenech, Pilar; Reed, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a host-adapted pathogen that evolved from the environmental bacterium M. avium subsp. hominissuis through gene loss and gene acquisition. Growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the laboratory is enhanced by supplementation of the media with the iron-binding siderophore mycobactin J. Here we examined the production of mycobactins by related organisms and searched for an alternative iron uptake system in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Through thin-layer chromatography and radiolabeled iron-uptake studies, we showed that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is impaired for both mycobactin synthesis and iron acquisition. Consistent with these observations, we identified several mutations, including deletions, in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genes coding for mycobactin synthesis. Using a transposon-mediated mutagenesis screen conditional on growth without myobactin, we identified a potential mycobactin-independent iron uptake system on a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genomic island, LSPP15. We obtained a transposon (Tn) mutant with a disruption in the LSPP15 gene MAP3776c for targeted study. The mutant manifests increased iron uptake as well as intracellular iron content, with genes downstream of the transposon insertion (MAP3775c to MAP3772c [MAP3775-2c]) upregulated as the result of a polar effect. As an independent confirmation, we observed the same iron uptake phenotypes by overexpressing MAP3775-2c in wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. These data indicate that the horizontally acquired LSPP15 genes contribute to iron acquisition by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, potentially allowing the subsequent loss of siderophore production by this pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many microbes are able to scavenge iron from their surroundings by producing iron-chelating siderophores. One exception is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a fastidious, slow-growing animal pathogen whose growth

  16. Portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, POR-006 SKID D storage plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, O.D.

    1997-09-04

    This document provides a storage plan for portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, AND POR-006 SKID D. The exhausters will be stored until they are needed by the TWRS (Tank Waste Remediation Systems) Saltwell Pumping Program. The storage plan provides criteria for portable exhauster storage, periodic inspections during storage, and retrieval from storage.

  17. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Jiwon; Saier, Milton H.

    2012-01-01

    The co-emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial strains and the HIV pandemic has made tuberculosis a leading public health threat. The causative agent is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu), a facultative intracellular parasite. Mycobacterium leprae (Mle), a related organism that causes leprosy, is an obligate intracellular parasite. Given that different transporters are required for bacterial growth and persistence under a variety of growth conditions, we conducted comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of these two organisms. A minimal set of genes required for intracellular and extracellular life were identified. Drug efflux systems utilizing primary active transport mechanisms have been preferentially retained in Mle and still others preferentially lost. Transporters associated with environmental adaptation found in Mtu were mostly lost in Mle. These findings provide starting points for experimental studies that may elucidate the dependencies of pathogenesis on transport for these two pathogenic mycobacteria. They also lead to suggestions regarding transporters that function in intra- versus extra-cellular growth. PMID:22179038

  18. Identification of proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis missing in attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains.

    PubMed

    Mattow, J; Jungblut, P R; Schaible, U E; Mollenkopf, H J; Lamer, S; Zimny-Arndt, U; Hagens, K; Müller, E C; Kaufmann, S H

    2001-08-01

    A proteome approach, combining high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) with mass spectrometry, was used to compare the cellular protein composition of two virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with two attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), in order to identify unique proteins of these strains. Emphasis was given to the identification of M. tuberculosis specific proteins, because we consider these proteins to represent putative virulence factors and interesting candidates for vaccination and diagnosis of tuberculosis. The genome of M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv comprises nearly 4000 predicted open reading frames. In contrast, the separation of proteins from whole mycobacterial cells by 2-DE resulted in silver-stained patterns comprising about 1800 distinct protein spots. Amongst these, 96 spots were exclusively detected either in the virulent (56 spots) or in the attenuated (40 spots) mycobacterial strains. Fifty-three of these spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry, of which 41 were identified, including 32 M. tuberculosis specific spots. Twelve M. tuberculosis specific spots were identified as proteins, encoded by genes previously reported to be deleted in M. bovis BCG. The remaining 20 spots unique for M. tuberculosis were identified as proteins encoded by genes that are not known to be missing in M. bovis BCG. PMID:11565788

  19. Mycobacterium bovis infection in human beings.

    PubMed

    Grange, J M

    2001-01-01

    The causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis, is also responsible for some cases of tuberculosis in human beings. Although recognized for over a century, this form of human tuberculosis has been a source of considerable misunderstanding and controversy. Questions still remain concerning the relative virulence of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis in human beings, the risk of human disease after infection, the immunological consequences of infection that does not proceed to disease, the occurrence of human-to-human transmission of M. bovis and the health risk of diseased human beings to cattle. The advent of the HIV/AIDS pandemic raises new questions of the epidemiological impact of immunosuppression on the transmission of M. bovis to and between human beings. Although largely eradicated in the developed nations, bovine tuberculosis still occurs in many developing nations and epidemiological data on the impact of this on human health is scanty but, in the light of the increasing incidence of tuberculosis worldwide, it is urgently needed. PMID:11463226

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces pili during human infection

    PubMed Central

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Xicohténcatl-Cortes, Juan; Hess, Sonja; Caballero-Olín, Guillermo; Girón, Jorge A.; Friedman, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is responsible for nearly 3 million human deaths worldwide every year. Understanding the mechanisms and bacterial factors responsible for the ability of M. tuberculosis to cause disease in humans is critical for the development of improved treatment strategies. Many bacterial pathogens use pili as adherence factors to colonize the host. We discovered that M. tuberculosis produces fine (2- to 3-nm-wide), aggregative, flexible pili that are recognized by IgG antibodies contained in sera obtained from patients with active tuberculosis, indicating that the bacilli produce pili or pili-associated antigen during human infection. Purified M. tuberculosis pili (MTP) are composed of low-molecular-weight protein subunits encoded by the predicted M. tuberculosis H37Rv ORF, designated Rv3312A. MTP bind to the extracellular matrix protein laminin in vitro, suggesting that MTP possess adhesive properties. Isogenic mtp mutants lost the ability to produce Mtp in vitro and demonstrated decreased laminin-binding capabilities. MTP shares morphological, biochemical, and functional properties attributed to bacterial pili, especially with curli amyloid fibers. Thus, we propose that MTP are previously unidentified host-colonization factors of M. tuberculosis. PMID:17360408

  1. Advances in molecular diagnostics for Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Desmond M

    2011-07-01

    The two most important molecular diagnostic techniques for bovine tuberculosis are the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) because of its rapid determination of infection, and DNA strain typing because of its ability to answer important epidemiological questions. PCR tests for Mycobacterium bovis have been improved through recent advances in PCR technology, but still lack the sensitivity of good culture methods, and in some situations are susceptible to giving both false negative and false positive results. Therefore, PCR does not usually replace the need for culture, but is used to provide fast preliminary results. DNA typing of M. bovis isolates by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) was developed 25 years ago in New Zealand, and remains an important tool in the New Zealand control scheme, where the typing results are combined with other information to determine large and expensive possum poisoning operations. A range of other DNA typing systems developed for M. bovis in the 1990 s have assisted epidemiological investigations in some countries but are now less commonly used. Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing and spoligotyping, either alone or together, have now become the preferred approaches as they are robust and amenable to electronic analysis and comparison. Spoligotyping gives only moderate discrimination but can be easily applied to large numbers of isolates, and VNTR typing provides better discrimination than all other methods except for REA. While the current typing techniques are sufficient for most epidemiological purposes, more discriminating methods are likely to become available in the near future. PMID:21420257

  2. Biosynthesis of Glycosyldiglycerides in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, John C.; Elbein, Alan D.

    1974-01-01

    A particulate enzyme preparation from Mycobacterium smegmatis catalyzes the transfer of [14C]galactose from uridine 5′-diphosphate (UDP)-[14C]galactose and of [14C]glucose from UDP-[14C]glucose into chloroform-soluble products. The radioactive neutral lipids were purified by passage through diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, followed by thin-layer chromatography. When UDP-glucose was used as substrate, two major radioactive lipids were obtained; one had a hexose-glucose-glycerol ratio of 1:1:1. The second product had a hexose-glycerol ratio of 2:1 and, in addition to glucose, contained lesser amounts of mannose and galactose. With UDP-galactose as substrate, two radioactive products were observed that were chromatographically indistinguishable from the [14C]glucosyl-labeled mono- and diglycosyldiglyceride. Palmitate and oleate were the predominant fatty acid constituents in these lipids and were present in equimolar amounts in all of the products examined. The products have thus been identified as monoglycosyldiglyceride and a diglycosyldiglyceride containing glucose as the major hexose along with mannose and galactose. Properties of the galactosyl and glucosyl transferases are described. Images PMID:4808895

  3. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  4. The 65-kilodalton antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shinnick, T M

    1987-01-01

    The immune response of the host to the antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays the key role in determining immunity from infection with as well as the pathogenicity of this organism. A 65-kilodalton (kDa) protein has been identified as one of the medically important antigens of M. tuberculosis. The gene encoding this antigen was isolated from a lambda gt11-M. tuberculosis recombinant DNA library using monoclonal antibodies directed against the 65-kDa antigen as the specific probes. The nucleotide sequence of this gene was determined, and a 540-amino-acid sequence was deduced. This sequence was shown to correspond to that of the 65-kDa antigen by constructing a plasmid in which this open reading frame was fused to the lacZ gene. The resulting fusion protein reacted specifically with the anti-65-kDa protein antibodies. A second long open reading frame was found downstream of the 65-kDa antigen gene which could encode a protein of 517 amino acids. This putative protein contained 29 tandemly arranged partial or complete matches to a pentapeptide sequence. Images PMID:3029018

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses two chaperonin-60 homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, T H; Coates, A R; Butcher, P D; Hickman, C J; Shinnick, T M

    1993-01-01

    A 65-kDa protein and a 10-kDa protein are two of the more strongly immunoreactive components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. The 65-kDa antigen has homology with members of the GroEL or chaperonin-60 (Cpn60) family of heat shock proteins. The 10-kDa antigen has homology with the GroES or chaperonin-10 family of heat shock proteins. These two proteins are encoded by separate genes in M. tuberculosis. The studies reported here reveal that M. tuberculosis contains a second Cpn60 homolog located 98 bp downstream of the 10-kDa antigen gene. The second Cpn60 homolog (Cpn60-1) displays 61% amino acid sequence identity with the 65-kDa antigen (Cpn60-2) and 53% and 41% identity with the Escherichia coli GroEL protein and the human P60 protein, respectively. Primer-extension analysis revealed that transcription starts 29 bp upstream of the translation start of the Cpn60-1 homolog and protein purification studies indicate that the cpn60-1 gene is expressed as an approximately 60-kDa polypeptide. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7681982

  6. The cell envelope glycoconjugates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Angala, Shiva Kumar; Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Wheat, William H.; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the second most common cause of death due to a single infectious agent. The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of the disease in humans, is a source of unique glycoconjugates and the most distinctive feature of the biology of this organism. It is the basis of much of Mtb pathogenesis and one of the major causes of its intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. At the same time, the unique structures of Mtb cell envelope glycoconjugates, their antigenicity and essentiality for mycobacterial growth provide opportunities for drug, vaccine, diagnostic and biomarker development, as clearly illustrated by recent advances in all of these translational aspects. This review focuses on our current understanding of the structure and biogenesis of Mtb glycoconjugates with particular emphasis on one of most intriguing and least understood aspect of the physiology of mycobacteria: the translocation of these complex macromolecules across the different layers of the cell envelope. It further reviews the rather impressive progress made in the last ten years in the discovery and development of novel inhibitors targeting their biogenesis. PMID:24915502

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  8. Mycobacterium bovis: characteristics of wildlife reservoir hosts.

    PubMed

    Palmer, M V

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in animals and sometimes humans. Many developed nations have long-standing programmes to eradicate tuberculosis in livestock, principally cattle. As disease prevalence in cattle decreases these efforts are sometimes impeded by passage of M. bovis from wildlife to cattle. In epidemiological terms, disease can persist in some wildlife species, creating disease reservoirs, if the basic reproduction rate (R0) and critical community size (CCS) thresholds are achieved. Recognized wildlife reservoir hosts of M. bovis include the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, European badger (Meles meles) in Great Britain and Ireland, African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in South Africa, wild boar (Sus scrofa) in the Iberian Peninsula and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Michigan, USA. The epidemiological concepts of R0 and CCS are related to more tangible disease/pathogen characteristics such as prevalence, pathogen-induced pathology, host behaviour and ecology. An understanding of both epidemiological and disease/pathogen characteristics is necessary to identify wildlife reservoirs of M. bovis. In some cases, there is a single wildlife reservoir host involved in transmission of M. bovis to cattle. Complexity increases, however, in multihost systems where multiple potential reservoir hosts exist. Bovine tuberculosis eradication efforts require elimination of M. bovis transmission between wildlife reservoirs and cattle. For successful eradication identification of true wildlife reservoirs is critical, as disease control efforts are most effective when directed towards true reservoirs. PMID:24171844

  9. Therapeutic keratectomy for Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after LASIK.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Chen; Wang, I-Jong; Chen, Wei-Li; Hu, Fung-Rong

    2003-11-01

    We report successful treatment of a case of Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with therapeutic lamellar keratectomy. A 34-year-old woman developed a 2 x 2 mm feathery infiltration within the interface inferior to the pupil margin with mild inflammation of the conjunctiva in her left eye 40 days after LASIK surgery. Bacterial culture from the infiltrates of the interface of the stromal bed revealed Mycobacterium abscessus. After combination antibiotic therapy including amikacin and ciprofoxacin was given for 6 weeks, infiltration persisted despite the development of necrosis in the flap tissue. Therapeutic lamellar keratectomy combined with flap removal was performed. No recurrence was found 1 year after the surgery. Therapeutic lamellar keratectomy with flap removal can provide an effective treatment modality for the management of post-LASIK Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis that is unresponsive to medical treatment. PMID:14724729

  10. Mycobacterium abscessus skin infection after tattooing--Case report.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Pétra Pereira de; Cruz, Rossilene Conceição da Silva; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; Westphal, Danielle Cristine

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that has been affecting people undergoing invasive procedures, such as videosurgery and mesotherapy. This bacterium has global distribution, being found in numerous niches. The frequency of published reports of infection by rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with tattooing procedures has increased in recent years. However, in Brazil there were no case reports of M. abscessus after tattooing in the literature until now. In this paper, we describe the case of a patient with a nine-month history of lesion on a tattoo site. The diagnosis of infection with Mycobacterium abscessus was established by correlation between dermatological and histopathological aspects, culture and molecular biology techniques. The patient had significant improvement of symptoms with the use of clarithromycin monotherapy. PMID:26560222

  11. Mycobacterium abscessus skin infection after tattooing - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Pétra Pereira; Cruz, Rossilene Conceição da Silva; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; Westphal, Danielle Cristine

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that has been affecting people undergoing invasive procedures, such as videosurgery and mesotherapy. This bacterium has global distribution, being found in numerous niches. The frequency of published reports of infection by rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with tattooing procedures has increased in recent years. However, in Brazil there were no case reports of M. abscessus after tattooing in the literature until now. In this paper, we describe the case of a patient with a nine-month history of lesion on a tattoo site. The diagnosis of infection with Mycobacterium abscessus was established by correlation between dermatological and histopathological aspects, culture and molecular biology techniques. The patient had significant improvement of symptoms with the use of clarithromycin monotherapy. PMID:26560222

  12. Genome Sequencing and Annotation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PR08 strain.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Mohammad Maaruf; Halim, Mohd Zakihalani A; Ismail, Mohamad Izwan; Shien, Lee Lian; Kek, Teh Lay; Fong, Ngeow Yun; Nor, Norazmi Mohd; Zainuddin, Zainul Fadziruddin; Hock, Tang Thean; Najimudin, Mohd Nazalan Mohd; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an acid fast bacterial species in the family Mycobacteriaceae and is the causative agent of most cases of tuberculosis. Here, we report the genomic features of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a patient diagnosed with both pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB). The isolated strain was identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis PR08 (MTB PR08). Genomic DNA of the MTB PR08 strain was extracted and subjected to whole genome sequencing using MiSeq (Illumina, CA,USA). The draft genome size of MTB PR08 strain is 4,292,364 bp with a G + C content of 65.2%. This strain was annotated to have 4723 genes and 48 RNAs. This whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010895. PMID:26981383

  13. Multiple lumps in the breast due to Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Chandanwale, Shirish S; Gulati, Ishita; Baravkar, Dadaso S; Shinde, Sumedha P; Mishra, Neha

    2016-04-01

    Although breast tissue is the most resistant to tuberculosis, its incidence is increasing worldwide. High incidence of breast tuberculosis is presumed in India. The rapidly growing nontubercular mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae, are of increasing clinical importance because infections due to these organisms are often hospital acquired. The true incidence of M. fortuitum is unknown but it has been estimated to be between 4 and 6 cases per one million people. It causes skin or soft tissue infections following trauma or surgery. Breast infection with M. fortuitum is very uncommon. The most common clinical presentation of breast tuberculosis is a painless lump. Multiple lumps are rarely reported. The culture and molecular studies are the keystone for differentiation of various mycobacterium species. We report one such case of a 25-year-old female presenting with multiple painless lumps due to M. fortuitum infection in the left breast. PMID:27451824

  14. Mycobacterium microti infection in two meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Palgrave, C J; Benato, L; Eatwell, K; Laurenson, I F; Smith, N H

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium microti is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. microti is generally considered a pathogen of small rodents, although sporadic infections in a range of other mammals, including domestic animals and man, have been reported. While many human infections have been associated with immunosuppression, an increasing number of cases are being reported in immunocompetent patients. Two cases of M. microti infection in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) are reported. These are the first cases of mycobacterial disease to be described in meerkats outside Africa. PMID:21783200

  15. MTBreg: The Database of Conditionally Regulated Proteins in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kaufman, Markus; Pal, Debnath; Eisenberg, David

    Proteins up- and down- regulated in Mycobacterium tuberculosis grown under conditions mimicking infection are included in this database. It also includes information on proteins that are regulated by selected transcription factors or other regulatory proteins. The literature data provided here is complimentary to the databases provided by Michael Strong that include recent TB computational functional linkages and the Prolinks Database by Peter Bowers. The experimental condition, the experimental dataset and a literature reference will be displayed, including links to the computationally linked proteins in the Prolinks Database and the entry in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Structural Genomics Database.[Copied from information at http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/Services/MTBreg/

  16. Genomic signal analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul Dan; Banica, Dorina; Tuduce, Rodica

    2007-02-01

    As previously shown the conversion of nucleotide sequences into digital signals offers the possibility to apply signal processing methods for the analysis of genomic data. Genomic Signal Analysis (GSA) has been used to analyze large scale features of DNA sequences, at the scale of whole chromosomes, including both coding and non-coding regions. The striking regularities of genomic signals reveal restrictions in the way nucleotides and pairs of nucleotides are distributed along nucleotide sequences. Structurally, a chromosome appears to be less of a "plain text", corresponding to certain semantic and grammar rules, but more of a "poem", satisfying additional symmetry restrictions that evoke the "rhythm" and "rhyme". Recurrent patterns in nucleotide sequences are reflected in simple mathematical regularities observed in genomic signals. GSA has also been used to track pathogen variability, especially concerning their resistance to drugs. Previous work has been dedicated to the study of HIV-1, Clade F and Avian Flu. The present paper applies GSA methodology to study Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) rpoB gene variability, relevant to its resistance to antibiotics. Isolates from 50 Romanian patients have been studied both by rapid LightCycler PCR and by sequencing of a segment of 190-250 nucleotides covering the region of interest. The variability is caused by SNPs occurring at specific sites along the gene strand, as well as by inclusions. Because of the mentioned symmetry restrictions, the GS variations tend to compensate. An important result is that MT can act as a vector for HIV virus, which is able to retrotranscribe its specific genes both into human and MT genomes.

  17. Characterization of Lipoyl Synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Nicholas D; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Horstmann, Abigail K; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Cicchillo, Robert M; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of multiple and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, is on the rise, necessitating the identification of new targets to combat an organism that has infected one-third of the world's population, according to the World Health Organization. The biosynthesis of the lipoyl cofactor is one possible target, given its critical importance in cellular metabolism and the apparent lack of functional salvage pathways in Mtb that are found in humans and many other organisms. The lipoyl cofactor is synthesized de novo in two committed steps, involving the LipB-catalyzed transfer of an octanoyl chain derived from fatty acid biosynthesis to a lipoyl carrier protein and the LipA-catalyzed insertion of sulfur atoms at C6 and C8 of the octanoyl chain. A number of in vitro studies of lipoyl synthases from Escherichia coli, Sulfolobus solfataricus, and Thermosynechococcus elongatus have been conducted, but the enzyme from Mtb has not been characterized. Herein, we show that LipA from Mtb contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters and converts an octanoyl peptide substrate to the corresponding lipoyl peptide product via the same C6-monothiolated intermediate as that observed in the E. coli LipA reaction. In addition, we show that LipA from Mtb forms a complex with the H protein of the glycine cleavage system and that the strength of association is dependent on the presence of S-adenosyl-l-methionine. We also show that LipA from Mtb can complement a lipA mutant of E. coli, demonstrating the commonalities of the two enzymes. Lastly, we show that the substrate for LipA, which normally acts on a post-translationally modified protein, can be reduced to carboxybenzyl-octanoyllysine. PMID:26841001

  18. Immunogenicity and cross-reactivity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis of proteoliposomes derived from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Fátima; Tirado, Yanely; Puig, Alina; Borrero, Reinier; Reyes, Giselle; Fernández, Sonsire; Pérez, José Luis; Kadir, Ramlah; Zayas, Caridad; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Sarmiento, María E; Acosta, Armando

    2013-01-01

    The only currently available vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) is Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), which has inconsistent efficacy to protect against the disease in adults. M. tuberculosis (MTB) cell wall components have been implicated in the pathogenicity of TB and therefore have been a prime target for the identification and characterization of cell wall proteins with potential application in vaccine development. In this regard, proteoliposomes (PLs) derived from mycobacteria containing lipids and cell wall proteins could be potential vaccine candidates against TB. In the present study PLs derived from BCG were prepared. These homogeneous population of spherical microparticles was then immunized into Balb/c mice. Sera of immunized animals showed high IgG response and strong cross-reactivity against different MTB antigens.These results showed that BCG PLs could be potential vaccine candidates against TB. PMID:23458692

  19. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1994-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of HIV infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The AIDS patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. We proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis.

  20. The Significance of Mycobacterium abscessus Subspecies abscessus Isolation During Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Philley, Julie V.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Benwill, Jeana L.; Shepherd, Sara; York, Deanna; Wallace, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Isolation of Mycobacterium abscessus subspecies abscessus (MAA) is common during Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease therapy, but there is limited information about the clinical significance of the MAA isolates. METHODS: We identified 53 of 180 patients (29%) treated for MAC lung disease who had isolation of MAA during MAC lung disease therapy. Patients were divided into those without (group 1) and those with (group 2) MAA lung disease. RESULTS: There were no significant demographic differences between patients with and without MAA isolation or between groups 1 and 2. Group 1 and 2 patients had similar total sputum cultures obtained (P = .7; 95% CI, −13.4 to 8.6) and length of follow-up (P = .8; 95% CI, −21.5 to 16.1). Group 2 patients had significantly more total positive cultures for MAA (mean±SD, 15.0 ± 11.1 vs 1.2 ± 0.4; P < .0001; 95% CI, −17.7 to −9.9), were significantly more likely to develop new or enlarging cavitary lesions while on MAC therapy (P > .0001), and were significantly more likely to meet all three American Thoracic Society diagnostic criteria for nontuberculous mycobacterial disease (21 of 21 [100%] vs 0 of 32 [0%]; P < .0001) compared with group 1 patients. Group 1 patients were significantly more likely to have single, positive MAA cultures than group 2 patients (25 of 31 vs 0 of 21; P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS: Microbiologic and clinical follow-up after completion of MAC lung disease therapy is required to determine the significance of MAA isolated during MAC lung disease therapy. Single MAA isolates are not likely to be clinically significant. PMID:25357074

  1. Analysis of lipids reveals differences between 'Mycobacterium habana' and Mycobacterium simiae.

    PubMed

    Mederos, L M; Valdivia, J A; Sempere, M A; Valero-Guillén, P L

    1998-05-01

    Fatty and mycolic acids and the pattern of glycolipids were studied in a collection of 34 strains of 'Mycobacterium habana' and in two strains of Mycobacterium simiae. Major glycolipids of these micro-organisms were assigned to the glycopeptidolipid (GPL) structural type, but both mycobacteria differed in the patterns obtained by TLC. The strains of 'M. habana' were separated into four groups (A-D), taking into account the presence or absence of several polar GPLs: group A contained GPL-I, GPL-II and GPL-III; group B contained GPL-I, GPL-II', GPL-II and GPL-III; group C contained GPL-II', GPL-II and GPL-III; group D did not contain any of these compounds. Fatty acids of both bacteria were similar, and ranged from 14 to 26 carbon atoms, hexadecanoic, octadecenoic and tuberculostearic acids being predominant. Mycolic acids were also similar by TLC and HPLC, and consisted of alpha-, alpha'- and ketomycolates. Partial structural analysis by MS carried out in strains 'M. habana' TMC 5135 and M. simiae ATCC 25275T revealed that alpha- and ketomycolates ranged, in general, from 79 to 87 carbon atoms, and alpha'-mycolates from 58 to 67 carbon atoms. The alpha- and ketomycolates belonged to several structural series, and minor variations were found between the two strain examined. The data obtained justified the synonymy between 'M. habana' and M. simiae but indicated, in turn, that the former can be distinguished on the basis of GPL analysis. Most strains of 'M. habana' can be defined by the presence of GPL-II and GPL-III, a finding that could be useful in the quality control of potential vaccine strains. PMID:9611792

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium houstonense Strain ATCC 49403T

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur, Anthony; Asmar, Shady; Robert, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium houstonense is a nontuberculous species rarely responsible for human infection. The draft genome of M. houstonense ATCC 49403T comprises 6,451,020 bp, exhibiting a 66.96% G+C content, 5,881 protein-coding genes, and 65 predicted RNA genes. PMID:27231371

  3. Infection with Mycobacterium microti in Animals in France

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, Lorraine; de Cruz, Krystel; Zanella, Gina; Aaziz, Rachid; Bulach, Tabatha; Karoui, Claudine; Hénault, Sylvie; Joncour, Guy

    2014-01-01

    We describe here 35 animal cases of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium microti in France (2002–2014). Recently, molecular tools that overcome the difficulty of confirming infection by this potentially zoonotic agent have revealed an increasing number of cases, suggesting that its prevalence may have been underestimated. PMID:25540404

  4. Mycobacterium marinum Infections in Fish and Humans in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Ucko, M.; Colorni, A.

    2005-01-01

    Israeli Mycobacterium marinum isolates from humans and fish were compared by direct sequencing of the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes, restriction mapping, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. Significant molecular differences separated all clinical isolates from the piscine isolates, ruling out the local aquaculture industry as the source of human infections. PMID:15695698

  5. Osteomyelitis Because of Mycobacterium Xenopi in an Immunocompetent Child.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Martin; Seidl, Maximilian; Henneke, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 6-year-old, immunocompetent boy with chronic osteomyelitis of the calcaneus caused by Mycobacterium xenopi. Of note, typical histopathology was not visible on the first biopsy and developed only later over a period of 6 weeks, highlighting the difficult differential diagnosis of osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:26418244

  6. Sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis to common beef processing interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis and a relevant zoonosis to humans, may be sent to slaughter before diagnosis of infection because of slow multiplication of the pathogen. Purpose. This study evaluates multiple processing interventi...

  7. Whole-Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis BCG-1 (Russia)

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Figueroa, M.; Levi, D.; Markelov, M.; Dedkov, V.; Aleksandrova, N.; Shipulin, G.

    2015-01-01

    BCG vaccine (Mycobacterium bovis BCG-1 [Russia]) is the most important component of tuberculosis prophylaxis in Russia. This study represents the complete genome sequence and genetic characteristics of M. bovis BCG-1 (Russia), which has been used to manufacture BCG vaccine in Russia and in some other countries. PMID:26564042

  8. DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM PARATUBERCULOSIS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, a member of the M. avium complex (MAC), is the causative agent for Johne's disease in cattle. Johne's disease is a slow, progressive infection of the intestine in cattle. M. paratuberculosis infection often results in diarrhea and wasting of cattle...

  9. Mycobacterium caprae Infection in Livestock and Wildlife, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Sabrina; Bezos, Javier; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Álvarez, Julio; Castellanos, Elena; Moya, Nuria; Lozano, Francisco; Javed, M. Tariq; Sáez-Llorente, José L.; Liébana, Ernesto; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas; Tuberculosis, Monitoring of Animal

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium caprae is a pathogen that can infect animals and humans. To better understand the epidemiology of M. caprae, we spoligotyped 791 animal isolates. Results suggest infection is widespread in Spain, affecting 6 domestic and wild animal species. The epidemiology is driven by infections in caprids, although the organism has emerged in cattle. PMID:21392452

  10. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  11. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T

    2015-06-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  12. Mycobacterium chelonae Abscesses Associated with Biomesotherapy, Australia, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Dancer, Craig; Koehler, Ann P.; Hobby, Michaela; Lease, Chris

    2013-01-01

    An outbreak of skin abscesses occurred in Adelaide, Australia, in association with biomesotherapy, an alternative therapy practice. Mycobacterium chelonae was identified in 8 patient and 3 environmental samples. Our findings show M. chelonae infection can be associated with alternative therapies when infection-control breaches occur. Tighter regulations of alternative therapy practices are needed. PMID:23968779

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium cosmeticum DSM 44829

    PubMed Central

    Croce, Olivier; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    We announce the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium cosmeticum strain DSM 44829, a nontuberculous species responsible for opportunistic infection. The genome described here is composed of 6,462,090 bp, with a G+C content of 68.24%. It contains 6,281 protein-coding genes and 75 predicted RNA genes. PMID:24723727

  14. Mycobacterium chelonae abscesses associated with biomesotherapy, Australia, 2008.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Mihaela; Dancer, Craig; Koehler, Ann P; Hobby, Michaela; Lease, Chris

    2013-01-01

    An outbreak of skin abscesses occurred in Adelaide, Australia, in association with biomesotherapy, an alternative therapy practice. Mycobacterium chelonae was identified in 8 patient and 3 environmental samples. Our findings show M. chelonae infection can be associated with alternative therapies when infection-control breaches occur. Tighter regulations of alternative therapy practices are needed. PMID:23968779

  15. Sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis to common beef processing interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, a relevant zoonosis that can spread to humans through inhalation or by ingestion. M. bovis multiplies slowly, so infected animals may be sent to slaughter during the early stages of the disease before diagnosis and when ...

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii

    PubMed Central

    Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii isolate recovered from a sputum culture from an individual with cystic fibrosis. This sequence is the first completed whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and adds value to studies of M. abscessus complex genomics. PMID:27284156

  17. Infection with Mycobacterium microti in animals in France.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Lorraine; de Cruz, Krystel; Zanella, Gina; Aaziz, Rachid; Bulach, Tabatha; Karoui, Claudine; Hénault, Sylvie; Joncour, Guy; Boschiroli, Maria Laura

    2015-03-01

    We describe here 35 animal cases of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium microti in France (2002-2014). Recently, molecular tools that overcome the difficulty of confirming infection by this potentially zoonotic agent have revealed an increasing number of cases, suggesting that its prevalence may have been underestimated. PMID:25540404

  18. [Cutaneous atypical mycobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium massiliense in a cat].

    PubMed

    Albini, S; Mueller, S; Bornand, V; Gutzwiller, M E Ricklin; Burnand, C; Hüssy, D; Abril, C; Reitt, K; Korczak, B M; Miserez, R

    2007-12-01

    Fast growing mycobacteria are saprophytic bacteria that prevail in water and soil. They are opportunistic pathogens and may cause various infections if gaining entry into the body through a trauma. We herein describe the clinical presentation, pathology and diagnosis of the first case of cutaneous atypical mycobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium massiliense in a cat. PMID:18225411

  19. Cellular Interactions in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Noted as one of the more fastidious mycobacteria, infection with MAP is often chara...

  20. Can Molecular Methods Detect 1% Isoniazid Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis?

    PubMed Central

    Folkvardsen, Dorte Bek; Thomsen, Vibeke Ø.; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Bang, Didi; Werngren, Jim; Hoffner, Sven; Hillemann, Doris; Rigouts, Leen

    2013-01-01

    Patients may harbor both drug-susceptible and -resistant bacteria, representing heteroresistance. We studied mixtures of isoniazid-resistant and -susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Conventional drug susceptibility testing was the most sensitive method of detection, whereas the line probe assay and sequencing were not able to detect the clinically relevant 1% proportion of resistant bacteria. PMID:23447641

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium acapulcensis Strain CSURP1424

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, Shady; Rascovan, Nicolás; Robert, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium acapulcensis is a rapidly growing scotochromogenic acid-fast bacillus. The draft genome of M. acapulcensis CSURP1424 comprises 5,290,974 bp, exhibiting a 66.67% G+C content, 4,870 protein-coding genes, and 71 predicted RNA genes. PMID:27516522

  2. Lung Disease Caused by Mycobacterium malmoense in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Min Kyung; Yoon, Jung A; Kim, Junhwan; Yi, Sangyoung; Sung, Heungsup; Shim, Tae Sun

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium malmoense is a very rare cause of lung disease in South Korea. We reported the first case of lung disease caused by M. malmoense in an immunocompetent patient. The patient was successfully treated with a 14-month course of antibiotics. PMID:26175789

  3. Characterization of Mycobacterium orygis as M. tuberculosis complex subspecies.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko; Rahim, Zeaur; Mulder, Arnout; Boeree, Martin J; Simeone, Roxane; Brosch, Roland; van Soolingen, Dick

    2012-04-01

    The oryx bacilli are Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms for which phylogenetic position and host range are unsettled. We characterized 22 isolates by molecular methods and propose elevation to subspecies status as M. orygis. M. orygis is a causative agent of tuberculosis in animals and humans from Africa and South Asia. PMID:22469053

  4. Ultrastructure of superficial mycosidic integuments of Mycobacterium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K S; Salton, M R; Barksdale, L

    1976-01-01

    Cells from pellicle growth of Mycobacterium sp. NQ are enveloped in a mycoside layer which extends outward as long filaments, 5 nm in diameter. Underneath this outer mycosidic casement, ramified ropelike structure, embedded in a dense matrix, overlay the rigid peptidoglycan of the cell wall. Images PMID:1245469

  5. A case of Manila type Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Usami, Osamu; Nakajima, Chie; Endo, Shiro; Inomata, Shinya; Kanamori, Hajime; Hirakata, Yoichi; Uchiyama, Bine; Kaku, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Hattori, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 76-year-old Japanese woman contracted a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB, Manila type) infection in Japan, despite never having traveled. However, her son was treated for TB in the Philippines 3 years before he stayed at her house. Spoligotyping allows us to identify the TB genotype and identify the route of infection. PMID:26273455

  6. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  7. Mycobacterium bovis hip bursitis in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Dan, J M; Crespo, M; Silveira, F P; Kaplan, R; Aslam, S

    2016-02-01

    We present a report of extrapulmonary Mycobacterium bovis infection in a lung transplant recipient. M. bovis is acquired predominantly by zoonotic transmission, particularly from consumption of unpasteurized foods. We discuss epidemiologic exposure, especially as relates to the Mexico-US border, clinical characteristics, resistance profile, and treatment. PMID:26671334

  8. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  11. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  14. Transcriptome analysis of stimulated PBMC from Mycobacterium bovis infected cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunological responses of cattle to Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) infection are of interest in terms of understanding the biology of M. bovis infection and for the development of improved diagnostic techniques. Although considerable time and resources have been invested in understanding immune re...

  15. Unique Structural Features of the Peptidoglycan of Mycobacterium leprae▿

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Crick, Dean C.; McNeil, Michael R.; Brennan, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    The peptidoglycan structure of Mycobacterium spp. has been investigated primarily with the readily cultivable Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis and has been shown to contain unusual features, including the occurrence of N-glycolylated, in addition to N-acetylated, muramic acid residues and direct cross-linkage between meso-diaminopimelic acid residues. Based on results from earlier studies, peptidoglycan from in vivo-derived noncultivable Mycobacterium leprae was assumed to possess the basic structural features of peptidoglycans from other mycobacteria, other than the reported replacement of l-alanine by glycine in the peptide side chains. In the present study, we have analyzed the structure of M. leprae peptidoglycan in detail by combined liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. In contrast to earlier reports, and to the peptidoglycans in M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis, the muramic acid residues of M. leprae peptidoglycan are exclusively N acetylated. The un-cross-linked peptide side chains of M. leprae consist of tetra- and tripeptides, some of which contain additional glycine residues. Based on these findings and genome comparisons, it can be concluded that the massive genome decay in M. leprae does not markedly affect the peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway, with the exception of the nonfunctional namH gene responsible for N-glycolylmuramic acid biosynthesis. PMID:18024514

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain BCG-1 (Russia)

    PubMed Central

    Shitikov, Egor A.; Malakhova, Maja V.; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Ilina, Elena N.; Atrasheuskaya, Alena V.; Ignatyev, Georgy M.; Vinokurova, Nataliya V.; Gorbachyov, Vyacheslav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) is a vaccine strain used for protection against tuberculosis. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of M. bovis strain BCG-1 (Russia). Extensive use of this strain necessitates the study of its genome stability by comparative analysis. PMID:27034492

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium interjectum Strain ATCC 51457T

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur, Anthony; Asmar, Shady; Robert, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium interjectum is a nontuberculosis species rarely responsible for human infection. The draft genome of M. interjectum ATCC 51457T comprises 5,927,979 bp, exhibiting 67.91% G+C content, 5,314 protein-coding genes, and 51 predicted RNA genes. PMID:27231376

  18. MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM AND DRINKING WATER WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Human Mycobacterium avium infections are only known to be acquired from environmental sources such as water and soil. We compared M. avium isolates from clinical and drinking water sources using molecular tools. Methods: M. avium was isolated from water samples colle...

  19. Mycobacterium marinum Infection After Exposure to Coal Mine Water

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Ribes, Julie A.; Lohr, Kristine M.; Evans, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infection has been historically associated with exposure to aquariums, swimming pools, fish, or other marine fauna. We present a case of M marinum left wrist tenosynovitis and elbow bursitis associated with a puncture injury and exposure to coal mine water in Illinois. PMID:26835478

  20. Mycobacterium marinum Infection After Exposure to Coal Mine Water.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Moises A; Ribes, Julie A; Lohr, Kristine M; Evans, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infection has been historically associated with exposure to aquariums, swimming pools, fish, or other marine fauna. We present a case of M marinum left wrist tenosynovitis and elbow bursitis associated with a puncture injury and exposure to coal mine water in Illinois. PMID:26835478

  1. High resolution melting analysis for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Issa, Rahizan; Abdul, Hatijah; Hashim, Siti Hasmah; Seradja, Valentinus H; Shaili, Nurul 'Aishah; Hassan, Nurul Akma Mohd

    2014-10-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) followed by high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species. Rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium species is necessary for the effective diagnosis and management of tuberculosis. In this study, the 16S rRNA gene was tested as the target since this has been identified as a suitable target for the identification of mycobacteria species. During the temperature gradient and primer optimization process, the melting peak (Tm) analysis was determined at a concentration of 50 ng DNA template and 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 µM primer. The qPCR assay for the detection of other mycobacterial species was done at the Tm and primer concentration of 62 °C and 0.4 µM, respectively. The HRM analysis generated cluster patterns that were specific and sensitive to distinguished small sequence differences of the Mycobacterium species. This study suggests that the 16S rRNA-based real-time PCR followed by HRM analysis produced unique cluster patterns for species of Mycobacterium and could differentiate the closely related mycobacteria species. PMID:25038139

  2. REGIONAL ASSESSMENT OF EXPOSURE TO MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX(MAC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is accumulating evidence that potable water is a source of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). The linkage of mycobacteriosis to drinking water has been shown in AIDS populations where up to 8% of deaths in this group is attributed to MAC. Infection with these organisms ha...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain BCG-1 (Russia).

    PubMed

    Sotnikova, Evgeniya A; Shitikov, Egor A; Malakhova, Maja V; Kostryukova, Elena S; Ilina, Elena N; Atrasheuskaya, Alena V; Ignatyev, Georgy M; Vinokurova, Nataliya V; Gorbachyov, Vyacheslav Y

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovisBCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) is a vaccine strain used for protection against tuberculosis. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence ofM. bovisstrain BCG-1 (Russia). Extensive use of this strain necessitates the study of its genome stability by comparative analysis. PMID:27034492

  4. In Vitro Killing of Mycobacterium ulcerans by Acidified Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, R.; Kuijper, S.; Benjamin, N.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.; Wilks, M.; Kolk, A. H. J.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, which causes Buruli ulcer, was exposed to acidified nitrite or to acid alone for 10 or 20 min. Killing was rapid, and viable counts were reduced below detectable limits within 10 min of exposure to 40 mM acidified nitrite. M. ulcerans is highly susceptible to acidified nitrite in vitro. PMID:15273132

  5. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and Presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in Household Water and Biofilm Samples of Patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium Complex Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D.; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S.; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC. PMID:23536397

  6. Mycobacterium angelicum sp. nov., a non-chromogenic, slow-growing species isolated from fish and related to Mycobacterium szulgai.

    PubMed

    Pourahmad, Fazel; Pate, Mateja; Ocepek, Matjaž; Borroni, Emanuele; Cabibbe, Andrea M; Capitolo, Eleonora; Cittaro, Davide; Frizzera, Eliana; Jenčič, Vlasta; Mariottini, Alessandro; Marumo, Kenji; Vaggelli, Guendalina; Cirillo, Daniela M; Tortoli, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    The name 'Mycobacterium angelicum' dates back to 2003 when it was suggested for a slowly growing mycobacterium isolated from freshwater angelfish. This name is revived here and the novel species is proposed on the basis of the polyphasic characterization of four strains including the original one. The four strains presented 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Mycobacterium szulgai but clearly differed from M. szulgai for the milky white aspect of the colonies. The sequence similarity with the type strain of M. szulgai ranged, in eight additionally investigated genetic targets, from 78.9 to 94.3 %, an evident contrast with the close relatedness that emerged at the level of 16S rRNA gene. The average nucleotide identity between the genomes of M. szulgai DSM 44166T and strain 126/5/03T (type strain of the novel species) was 92.92 %, and supported the status of independent species. The confirmation of the name Mycobacterium angelicum sp. nov. is proposed, with strain 126/5/03T ( = CIP 109313T = DSM 45057T) as the type strain. PMID:26420689

  7. How does a Mycobacterium change its spots? Applying molecular tools to track diverse strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defining genetic diversity in the wake of the release of several Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) genome sequences has become a major emphasis in the molecular biology and epidemiology of Johne’s disease research. These data can now be used to define the extent of strain diversity ...

  8. The epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis infections.

    PubMed

    Morris, R S; Pfeiffer, D U; Jackson, R

    1994-05-01

    Mycobacterium bovis has an exceptionally wide host range, but until recent years there was little concern about infection in species other than cattle and man. Diversification of farming enterprises has led to cognizance of the need for control in other domestic animals, notably deer. There has also been recognition that self-maintaining infection is present in wildlife hosts in some countries--notably the European badger in the United Kingdom and Ireland, the Australian brush-tailed possum in New Zealand, and various species of ungulates in limited areas of a number of countries. Although transmission of M. bovis can occur by a number of different routes, control measures imposed on cattle and to a lesser extent on other species have reduced a number of the routes to insignificance. Hence the vast preponderance of transmission within host species is now by the airborne route, and predominantly between species as well. Transmission of infection from badgers to cattle may be an exception, with evidence remaining equivocal about the relative importance of pasture contamination by excretion in badger urine and airborne transmission. In general, contamination of feed and pasture appears to be unimportant in transmission of the disease, because survival times of infective doses of organisms on fomites are relatively short under realistic conditions and because animals are not commonly exposed to a dose high enough to be infective by the alimentary route. Infection through the oro-pharyngeal mucous membrane may be significant, although the infective dose for this route is not known. While many species of animals can become infected with M. bovis, only a few act as maintenance hosts and the rest are spillover hosts in which infection is not self-maintaining. With the exception of cattle and deer, other species have become maintenance hosts only within part of their ecological range. For both badgers and possums, maintenance of infection within a local population is due to

  9. Human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D V; Wallis, R S; Boom, W H; Daniel, T M; Chervenak, K; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the immunodominant or protective antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans. Cell-mediated immunity is necessary for protection, and healthy tuberculin-positive individuals are relatively resistant to exogenous reinfection. We compared the targets of the cell-mediated immune response in healthy tuberculin-positive individuals to those of tuberculosis patients and tuberculin-negative persons. By using T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) of nitrocellulose-bound M. tuberculosis culture filtrate, peaks of T-cell blastogenic activity were identified in the healthy tuberculin reactors at 30, 37, 44, 57, 64, 71 and 88 kDa. Three of these fractions (30, 64, and 71 kDa) coincided with previously characterized proteins: antigen 6/alpha antigen, HSP60, and HSP70, respectively. The blastogenic responses to purified M. tuberculosis antigen 6/alpha antigen and BCG HSP60 were assessed. When cultured with purified antigen 6/alpha antigen, lymphocytes of healthy tuberculin reactors demonstrated greater [3H]thymidine incorporation than either healthy tuberculin-negative controls or tuberculous patients (8,113 +/- 1,939 delta cpm versus 645 +/- 425 delta cpm and 1,019 +/- 710 delta cpm, respectively; P less than 0.01). Healthy reactors also responded to HSP60, although to a lesser degree than antigen 6/alpha antigen (4,276 +/- 1,095 delta cpm; P less than 0.05). Partially purified HSP70 bound to nitrocellulose paper elicited a significant lymphocyte blastogenic response in two of six of the tuberculous patients but in none of the eight healthy tuberculin reactors. Lymphocytes of none of five tuberculin-negative controls responded to recombinant antigens at 14 or 19 kDa or to HSP70. Antibody reactivity generally was inversely correlated with blastogenic response: tuberculous sera had high titer antibody to M. tuberculosis culture filtrate in a range from 35 to 180 kDa. This is the first systematic evaluation of the human response to a panel of native

  10. Isolation of Mycobacterium kumamotonense from a patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Fanourios; Mavromanolakis, Dimitrios Nikitas; Zande, Marina Chari; Gitti, Zoe Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kumamotonense is a novel, slow-growing non-chromogenic nontuberculous mycobacterium, which belongs to Mycobacterium terrae complex. We report, for the first time in Greece, the isolation of M. kumamotonense from an immunocompetent patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis. M. kumamotonense was identified by sequencing analysis of 16S rDNA and 65-kDa heat shock protein genes while by commercial molecular assays it was misidentified as Mycobacterium celatum. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the reference broth microdilution method. The strain was susceptible to amikacin, clarithromycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifabutin, ethambutol and linezolid. PMID:27080783

  11. Clinical Significance and Epidemiologic Analyses of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare among Patients without AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiang Y.; Tarrand, Jeffrey J.; Infante, Rosa; Jacobson, Kalen L.; Truong, Mylene

    2005-01-01

    The clinical significance and prevalence of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare were analyzed in a cohort of 7,472 patients who, from 1999 to 2003, sought care at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, and had cultures performed for mycobacteria. Patients were stratified for age, sex, and underlying diseases, and bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. avium was isolated in 62 (0.83%) of 7,472 patients and M. intracellulare in 65 (0.87%). Clinically, only 10 of the 62 (16.2%) patients with M. avium had probable to definite evidence of infection, whereas the majority (83.8%) had weak evidence of infection. Sex and age did not affect the isolation or infection of M. avium. Hematological tumors predisposed to M. avium colonization but not infection. In contrast, 41 of the 65 (63.1%) patients with M. intracellulare had probable to definite infection, a level much higher than those with M. avium (P < 0.001). M. intracellulare was more prevalent in women (1.33% of 3,311) than in men (0.50% of 4,161) (P < 0.001), and underlying diseases had no effect in women. Men with lung cancer had a higher prevalence (1.37%) than men without (0.34%) (4.0-fold; P < 0.001), but it was similar to that in women. A marked age trend for the isolation of M. intracellulare among women was noted: 0.27% (1-fold) for ages of <50 years, 0.85% (3.1-fold) for ages 50 to 59 years, 1.50% (5.6-fold) for ages 60 to 69 years, and 3.74% (13.9-fold) for ages ≥70 years (trend, P < 0.001). The combined rate for women ≥50 was 1.86% (95% confidence interval [1.30 to 2.42%]) (6.9-fold). Together, these results suggest that, among non-AIDS patients, M. intracellulare is more pathogenic and tends to infect women increasingly beyond menopause (age ≥50 years) regardless of underlying disease. The prevalence rate of 1.86% in postmenopausal women suggests the need to further investigate the public health significance of M. intracellulare. PMID:16145084

  12. Comparative Genetic Analysis of Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium marinum Reveals Evidence of Recent Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Stinear, Timothy P.; Jenkin, Grant A.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Davies, John K.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies of the 16S rRNA genes from Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium marinum have suggested a very close genetic relationship between these species (99.6% identity). However, these organisms are phenotypically distinct and cause diseases with very different pathologies. To investigate this apparent paradox, we compared 3,306 nucleotides from the partial sequences of eight housekeeping and structural genes derived from 18 M. ulcerans strains and 22 M. marinum strains. This analysis confirmed the close genetic relationship inferred from the 16S rRNA data, with nucleotide sequence identity ranging from 98.1 to 99.7%. The multilocus sequence analysis also confirmed previous genotype studies of M. ulcerans that have identified distinct genotypes within a geographical region. Single isolates of both M. ulcerans and M. marinum that were shown by the sequence analysis to be the most closely related were then selected for further study. One- and two-dimensional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the architecture and size of the genome from each species. Genome sizes of approximately 4.4 and 4.6 Mb were obtained for M. ulcerans and M. marinum, respectively. Significant macrorestriction fragment polymorphism was observed between the species. However, hybridization analysis of DNA cleaved with more frequently cutting enzymes identified significant preservation of the flanking sequence at seven of the eight loci sequenced. The exception was the 16S rRNA locus. Two high-copy-number insertion sequences, IS2404 and IS2606, have recently been reported in M. ulcerans, and significantly, these elements are not present in M. marinum. Hybridization of the AseI restriction fragments from M. ulcerans with IS2404 and IS2606 indicated widespread genome distribution for both of these repeated sequences. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that M. ulcerans has recently diverged from M. marinum by the acquisition and concomitant loss of DNA in a

  13. Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium infection demonstrating unusual lobar caseous pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Okuzumi, Shinichi; Minematsu, Naoto; Sasaki, Mamoru; Ohsawa, Kazuma; Murakami, Marohito

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection is a major medical concern in Japan because of its increased prevalence and associated mortality. A common radiological feature in pulmonary MAC infection is a mixture of two basic patterns: fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic; however, lobar consolidation is rare. We report an 83-year-old man with lobar caseous pneumonia caused by pulmonary MAC infection. Radiological findings were predominantly composed of dense lobar consolidation and ground-glass opacity. A diagnosis was made in accordance with the clinical and microbiological criteria set by the American Thoracic Society. A histological examination of lung specimens obtained by using a bronchoscope revealed a caseous granulomatous inflammation with an appearance of Langhans cells. The patient was treated using combined mycobacterium chemotherapy with an initial positive response for 6 months; however, the disease progressed later. We suggest that an awareness of lobar pneumonic consolidation as a rare radiological finding in pulmonary MAC infection is important. PMID:27516892

  14. Disseminated subcutaneous Mycobacterium fortuitum infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Fox, L E; Kunkle, G A; Homer, B L; Manella, C; Thompson, J P

    1995-01-01

    A 15-month-old 27.7-kg sexually intact male Doberman Pinscher was examined because of multiple subcutaneous abscesses on the neck, trunk, and limbs that developed 2 months after a dog bite and were refractory to antibiotic treatment. Incubation of a biopsy specimen at 37 C on a Lowenstein-Jensen agar slant for 8 days yielded growth of a Runyon's Group IV mycobacterium, and disseminated subcutaneous Mycobacterium sp infection was diagnosed. The organism was identified as M fortuitum, and was susceptible to amikacin, doxycycline, cefoxitin, minocycline, trimethoprim/sulfadiazine, and sulfisoxazole. Lesions resolved after 8 months of treatment with doxycycline (5 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 12 h). The cause of dissemination was unknown; however, delay in debridement of the bite wound and corticosteroid use in initial wound management may have potentiated dissemination. PMID:7744663

  15. Aerobic vinyl chloride metabolism in Mycobacterium aurum L1

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmans, S.; Bont, J.A.M. de )

    1992-04-01

    Mycobacterium aurum L1, capable of growth on vinyl chloride as a sole carbon and energy source, was previously isolated from soil contaminated with vinyl chloride. The initial step in vinyl chloride metabolism in strain L1 is catalyzed by alkene monooxygenase, transforming vinyl chloride into the reactive epoxide chlorooxirane. The enzyme responsible for chlorooxirane degradation appeared to be very unstable and thus hampered the characterization of the second step in vinyl chloride metabolism. Dichloroethenes are also oxidized by vinyl chloride-grown cells of strain L1, but they are not utilized as growth substrates. Three additional bacterial strains which utilize vinyl chloride as a sole carbon and energy source were isolated from environments with no known vinyl chloride contamination. The three new isolates were similar to strain L1 and were also identified as Mycobacterium aurum.

  16. [Buruli ulcer: hypothetical modes of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans].

    PubMed

    Rodhain, François

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, has been increasingly rapidly over the past thirty years, particularly in Africa. These extensive necrotic lesions are due to mycolactone, a toxin produced by the bacterium. The mode of Mycobacterium ulcerans transmission is still controversial, and several insect species have been incriminated. Several infected mosquito species have been identified in Australia, while predatory water bugs, particularly belostomatids and naucorids, have been implicated in Africa. Indeed, the bacterium has been detected in these insects' salivary glands, and experimental transmission to mice has been demonstrated, raising the possibility of human transmission by water bug bites. Interestingly, individuals highly exposed to water bug bites tend to be less often infected, indicating that frequent bites by non infected bugs might have a protective effect. Insect-borne transmission would be a minor route of transmission compared to direct transmission via skin trauma. PMID:23472356

  17. Adhesion of Mycobacterium smegmatis to Charged Surfaces and Diagnostics Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorse, Diane; Dhinojwala, Ali; Moore, Francisco

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) causes more than 1 million deaths annually. Smear microscopy is a primary rapid detection tool in areas where 95 % of PTB cases occur. This technique, in which the sputum of a symptomatic patient is stained and examined using a light microscope for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) shows sensitivity between 20 and 60 %. Insufficient bacterial isolation during sample preparation may be a reason for low sensitivity. We are optimizing a system to capture bacteria on the basis of electrostatic interactions to more thoroughly isolate bacteria from suspension and facilitate more accurate detection. Silica supports coated with positively-charged polyelectrolyte, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), captured approximately 4.1 times more Mycobacterium smegmatis, a model organism for MTB, than was captured on negatively-charged silica substrates. Future experimentation will employ branched polymer systems and seek to justify the use of colloidal stability theories to describe initial capture. Supported by University of Akron, Department of Polymer Science, Department of Biology; LORD Corporation.

  18. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare Variant Strain by Molecular Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, M. C.; Palenque, E.; Navarro, M. C.; Nuñez, M. C.; Rebollo, M. J.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members. PMID:11724827

  19. Mycobacterium fortuitum Complex Skin Infection in a Healthy Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Rebecca; Khatami, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum complex skin infection is described in a previously healthy adolescent girl in Sydney, Australia. Mycobacterium fortuitum typically causes superficial skin infections following trauma to the skin and in our patient may have been related to prior leg "waxing". This case highlights common causes for a delay in diagnosis: lack of clinician awareness and inadequate microbiological and histopathological investigations of tissue samples. Due to the size and number of lesions, surgical excision was felt to be a less desirable therapeutic option due to the potential risk of poor cosmetic outcome for our patient. The standard chemotherapeutic approach to M. fortuitum infections involves the use of a combination of at least two antimicrobial agents to which the isolate is susceptible. Despite in vitro susceptibility testing that suggested that the isolate from our patient was resistant to most oral anti-microbial agents, our patient was treated successfully with a 10-week course of oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and moxifloxacin. PMID:25019232

  20. Structural definition of arabinomannans from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Nigou, J; Gilleron, M; Brando, T; Vercellone, A; Puzo, G

    1999-06-01

    The structures of the hydrophilic parietal and cellular arabinomannans isolated from Mycobacterium bovis BCG cell wall [Nigou et al. (1997) J Biol Chem 272: 23094-103] were investigated. Their molecular mass as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was around 16 kDa. Concerning cap structure, capillary electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that dimannoside (Manpalpha1-->2Manp) was the most abundant motif (65-75%). Using two-dimensional 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy, the mannan core was unambiguously demonstrated to be composed of -->6Manpalpha1--> backbone substituted at some O-2 by a single Manp unit. The branching degree was determined as 84%. Finally, arabinomannans were found to be devoid of the phosphatidyl-myo-inositol anchor and, by aminonaphthalene disulfonate tagging, the mannan core was shown to contain a reducing end. This constitutes the main difference between arabinomannans and lipoarabinomannans from Mycobacterium bovis BCG. PMID:10579694

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence: insights and impact on vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Delogu, Giovanni; Provvedi, Roberta; Sali, Michela; Manganelli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The existing TB vaccine, the attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, is effective in protecting infants from severe forms of the disease, while its efficacy in protecting adults from pulmonary TB is poor. In the last two decades, a renewed interest in TB resulted in the development of several candidate vaccines that are now entering clinical trials. However, most of these vaccines are based on a common rationale and aim to induce a strong T-cell response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recent advancements in the understanding of M. tuberculosis virulence determinants and associated pathogenic strategies are opening a new and broader view of the complex interaction between this remarkable pathogen and the human host, providing insights at molecular level that could lead to a new rationale for the design of novel antitubercular vaccines. A vaccination strategy that simultaneously targets different steps in TB pathogenesis may result in improved protection and reduced TB transmission. PMID:26119086

  2. Mycobacterium bovis infection and control in domestic livestock.

    PubMed

    Cousins, D V

    2001-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a well-known zoonotic disease which affects cattle world-wide. The public health risk has been alleviated in many countries by the introduction of pasteurisation, but the disease continues to cause production losses when poorly controlled. The Office International des Epizooties classifies bovine tuberculosis as a List B disease, a disease which is considered to be of socio-economic or public health importance within countries and of significance to the international trade of animals and animal products. Consequently, most developed nations have embarked on campaigns to eradicate M. bovis from the cattle population or at least to control the spread of infection. The success of these eradication and control programmes has been mixed. Mycobacterium bovis infects other animal species, both domesticated and wild, and this range of hosts may complicate attempts to control or eradicate the disease in cattle. PMID:11288521

  3. Current Perspectives on Mycobacterium farcinogenes and Mycobacterium senegalense, the Causal Agents of Bovine Farcy

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Mohamed E.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium farcinogenes and M. senegalense are the causal agents of bovine farcy, a chronic, progressive disease of the skin and lymphatics of zebu cattle. The disease, which is prevalent mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, was in earlier times thought to be caused by Nocardia farcinica and can be described as one of the neglected diseases in cattle. Some aspects of the disease have been investigated during the last five decades but the major development had been in the bacteriological, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic aspects. Molecular analyses confirmed that M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense fall in a subclade together with M. houstonense and M. fortuitum. This subclade is closely related to the one accommodating M. peregrinum, M. porcinum, M. septicum, M. neworleansense, and M. alvei. DNA probes were designed from 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer and could be used for the rapid diagnosis of bovine farcy. An ELISA assay has been evaluated for the serodiagnosis of the disease. The zoonotic potentials of M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense are unknown; few studies reported the isolation of M. senegalense and M. farcinogenes from human clinical sources but not from environmental sources or from other domestic or wild animals. PMID:24876989

  4. Prime–Boost with Mycobacterium smegmatis Recombinant Vaccine Improves Protection in Mice Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; de Oliveira, Fábio Muniz; Trentini, Monalisa Martins; Tiwari, Sangeeta; Chen, Bing; Resende, Danilo Pires; Silva, Bruna D. S.; Chen, Mei; Tesfa, Lydia; Jacobs, William R.; Kipnis, André

    2013-01-01

    The development of a new vaccine as a substitute for Bacillus Calmette–Guerin or to improve its efficacy is one of the many World Health Organization goals to control tuberculosis. Mycobacterial vectors have been used successfully in the development of vaccines against tuberculosis. To enhance the potential utility of Mycobacterium smegmatis as a vaccine, it was transformed with a recombinant plasmid containing the partial sequences of the genes Ag85c, MPT51, and HspX (CMX) from M. tuberculosis. The newly generated recombinant strain mc2-CMX was tested in a murine model of infection. The recombinant vaccine induced specific IgG1 or IgG2a responses to CMX. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the lungs and spleen responded ex vivo to CMX, producing IFN-γ, IL17, TNF-α, and IL2. The vaccine thus induced a significant immune response in mice. Mice vaccinated with mc2-CMX and challenged with M. tuberculosis showed better protection than mice immunized with wild-type M. smegmatis or BCG. To increase the safety and immunogenicity of the CMX antigens, we used a recombinant strain of M. smegmatis, IKE (immune killing evasion), to express CMX. The recombinant vaccine IKE-CMX induced a better protective response than mc2-CMX. The data presented here suggest that the expression of CMX antigens improves the immune response and the protection induced in mice when M. smegmatis is used as vaccine against tuberculosis. PMID:24250805

  5. Disseminated Mycobacterium Simiae with Pelvic Malakoplakia in an AIDS Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chitasombat, Maria Nina; Wattanatranon, Duangkamon

    2015-01-01

    Malakoplakia in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient with disseminated Mycobacterium simiae infection presented with a large pelvic mass that caused organ dysfunction from mimicking a tumor. Malakoplakia is a rare, chronic granulomatous abnormal host response toward infectious agents, presenting as a tumor-like lesion. This is the first report of pelvic malakoplakia after disseminated M. simiae infection in an AIDS patient. PMID:26483613

  6. Mycobacterium abscessus: Causing fatal endocarditis after cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, S; Mishra, V; Sorabjee, J

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an unusual cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. The intrinsic and acquired resistance of this organism to multiple antibiotics is a major issue in planning treatment regimens. We report a case of M. abscessus endocarditis of the native aortic valve in an immunocompetent patient following coronary angiography with a fatal outcome. The case highlights an unfortunate intervention – related nosocomial infection and the difficulties in chemotherapeutic options for this organism, particularly in the presence of renal failure. PMID:25766351

  7. Cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Associated with Mesotherapy Injection.

    PubMed

    Wongkitisophon, Pranee; Rattanakaemakorn, Ploysyne; Tanrattanakorn, Somsak; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2011-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial skin infections have an increasing incidence. In immunocompetent patients, they usually follow local trauma. We present a case of cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus infection following mesotherapy. The lesions were successfully treated with a combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline. Atypical mycobacterial infection should be suspected in patients who develop late-onset skin and soft tissue infection after cutaneous injury, injection, and surgical intervention, particularly if they do not respond to conventional antibiotic treatment. PMID:21487459

  8. Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum in acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ricardo; Fernandes, João; Fernandes, Nuno; Oliveira, Fernanda; Cadete, Manuela

    2007-08-01

    Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum was found in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, in a system composed of two acidic (pH 3.0) springs with temperatures between 56 degrees C at the source and 40 degrees C at the confluence of both springs. Growth and survival assays at 56 degrees C for 60 days were performed, confirming the origin of the strain. PMID:17557859

  9. Human infection due to Mycobacterium marinum after a dolphin bite

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, D. J.

    1970-01-01

    A young man employed at the local aquarium was bitten by a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) during a training session, receiving a slight injury which healed rapidly. Some two months later fluctuant swellings appeared in the region of the bite, which developed into indolent ulcers which have not completely healed seven months after the original bite. Cultures taken on two occasions have yielded a pure growth of Mycobacterium marinum. Images PMID:5529254

  10. Selective targeting of Mycobacterium smegmatis with trehalose-functionalized nanoparticles†

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardana, Kalana W.; Jayawardena, H. Surangi N.; Wijesundera, Samurdhi A.; De Zoysa, Thareendra; Sundhoro, Madanodaya

    2015-01-01

    Silica and iron oxide nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 6 to 40 nm were functionalized with trehalose. The trehalose-conjugated nanoparticles showed strong interactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and minimal interactions with macrophage (RAW 264.7) or A549 cells. In addition, trehalose-conjugated silica nanoparticles selectively interacted with M. smegmatis on M. smegmatis-treated A549 cells, demonstrating high potential of trehalose in developing targeted therapy for treating mycobacterial infection. PMID:26121049