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Sample records for porcine experimental model

  1. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J.; S. de Aluja, Aline; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments. PMID:26252878

  2. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J; de Aluja, Aline S; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments. PMID:26252878

  3. Experimental validation of a new biphasic model of the contact mechanics of the porcine hip

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qianqian; Jin, Zhongmin; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Wilcox, Ruth K

    2014-01-01

    Hip models that incorporate the biphasic behaviour of articular cartilage can improve understanding of the joint function, pathology of joint degeneration and effect of potential interventions. The aim of this study was to develop a specimen-specific biphasic finite element model of a porcine acetabulum incorporating a biphasic representation of the articular cartilage and to validate the model predictions against direct experimental measurements of the contact area in the same specimen. Additionally, the effect of using a different tension–compression behaviour for the solid phase of the articular cartilage was investigated. The model represented different radial clearances and load magnitudes. The comparison of the finite element predictions and the experimental measurement showed good agreement in the location, size and shape of the contact area, and a similar trend in the relationship between contact area and load was observed. There was, however, a deviation of over 30% in the magnitude of the contact area, which might be due to experimental limitations or to simplifications in the material constitutive relationships used. In comparison with the isotropic solid phase model, the tension–compression solid phase model had better agreement with the experimental observations. The findings provide some confidence that the new biphasic methodology for modelling the cartilage is able to predict the contact mechanics of the hip joint. The validation provides a foundation for future subject-specific studies of the human hip using a biphasic cartilage model. PMID:24878736

  4. Experimental factors affecting in vitro absorption of six model compounds across porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Karadzovska, Daniela; Brooks, James D; Riviere, Jim E

    2012-10-01

    This comparative study evaluated the effect of several experimental variables on the absorption of six model [(14)C]-labeled compounds (caffeine, cortisone, diclofenac sodium, mannitol, salicylic acid, and testosterone) through porcine skin. Using static and flow-through diffusion cells, finite or infinite, saturated or unsaturated doses were applied in one of three vehicles: propylene glycol, water, and ethanol following a full factorial experimental design. The flux of each compound into the receptor phase, with or without bovine serum albumin (BSA), was monitored over 24 h. Levels of radioactivity were also determined in the stratum corneum by tape stripping and in the remaining skin. Apparent permeability coefficients (Kp) and dose absorbed were calculated and compared. The overall results emphasize the importance of experimental design and confirm previous findings that identified dose volume, saturation level and vehicle as the main sources of variation in the in vitro assessment of dermal absorption, whilst diffusion cell model and the presence/absence of BSA in the receptor phase had minimal effect. Although the acquired data do not directly reveal new mechanistic information on dermal absorption, the unique and complete study design has provided a suitable data source for the development of dermal absorption prediction models. PMID:22750544

  5. Dye-Free Porcine Model of Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion: A Suitable Approach for Retinal Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen Cehofski, Lasse; Kruse, Anders; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Stensballe, Allan; Honoré, Bent; Vorum, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Branch retinal vein occlusion induces complex biological processes in the retina that are generated by a multitude of interacting proteins. These proteins and their posttranslational modifications can effectively be studied using modern proteomic techniques. However, no method for studying large-scale protein changes following branch retinal vein occlusion has been available until now. Obtainment of retinal tissue exposed to branch retinal vein occlusion is only available through experimental animal models. Traditional models of experimental branch retinal vein occlusion require the use of Rose Bengal dye combined with argon laser photocoagulation. The use of Rose Bengal dye is problematic in proteomic studies as the dye can induce multiple protein modifications when irradiated. This paper presents a novel technique for proteomic analysis of porcine retinal tissue with branch retinal vein occlusion combining a dye-free experimental model with label-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry based proteomics. PMID:26064675

  6. Experimental laparoscopic and thoracoscopic discectomy and instrumented spinal fusion. A feasibility study using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, M; Ferguson, J; Losert, U; Koos, W T

    1998-03-01

    To explore the safety and the effectiveness of laparoscopic and thoracoscopic spinal surgery, an acute/non-survival animal trial was performed in 5 pigs using rigid and flexible endoscopes, flouroscopy, a holmium-YAG laser, and prototype instruments and implants. Our study aimed to approach the intervertebral disc space and spinal canal using laparoscopic and thoracoscopic techniques and to explore the potential and limits for endoscopic anterior spinal decompression and fusion. In a lateral recumbency access was provided to the anterolateral aspect of the lumbar spine from L1/2 to L7/S1, the thoracic spine was accessible from T2/3 to the diaphragmatic insertion. Complete disc space emptying with penetration into the spinal canal could be performed, epidural bleeding could be controlled by a hemostatic sponge, however bleeding restricted visualization for further endoscopic manipulation in the spinal canal. Intervertebral fusion was accomplished at T6/7, L4/5 and L7/S1 using small fragment plates with 3.5 mm screws and iliac bone grafts or prototype carbon fiber cages. On post mortem examination we found no dural tears and no nerve root damage, all animals had stabilized fusion sites and good implant position. We conclude that minimally invasive thoracoscopic and laparoscopic approaches to the spine are feasible and safe to perform disc decompression and implant placement for spinal fusion. In addition to currently performed laparoscopic interbody fusion, also plate fixation to reestablish lordosis of the lumbar spine is feasible at least in the porcine model. Careful disc decompression must be performed prior to implant introduction to prevent iatrogenic disc protrusion and spinal cord or nerve root compression. However, further surgical exploration of the spinal canal using these techniques does not provide adequate visualization of epidural spaces and therefore must be regarded as unsafe. PMID:9565956

  7. The intrapleural volume threshold for ultrasound detection of pneumothoraces: An experimental study on porcine models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Small pneumothoraxes (PTXs) may not impart an immediate threat to trauma patients after chest injuries. However, the amount of pleural air may increase and become a concern for patients who require positive pressure ventilation or air ambulance transport. Lung ultrasonography (US) is a reliable tool in finding intrapleural air, but the performance characteristics regarding the detection of small PTXs need to be defined. The study aimed to define the volume threshold of intrapleural air when PTXs are accurately diagnosed with US and compare this volume with that for chest x-ray (CXR). Methods Air was insufflated into a unilateral pleural catheter in seven incremental steps (10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 350 and 500 mL) in 20 intubated porcine models, followed by a diagnostic evaluation with US and a supine anteroposterior CXR. The sonographers continued the US scanning until the PTXs could be ruled in, based on the pathognomonic US “lung point” sign. The corresponding threshold volume was noted. A senior radiologist interpreted the CXR images. Results The mean threshold volume to confirm the diagnosis of PTX using US was 18 mL (standard deviation of 13 mL). Sixty-five percent of the PTXs were already diagnosed at 10 mL of intrapleural air; 25%, at 25 mL; and the last 10%, at 50 mL. At an air volume of 50 mL, the radiologist only identified four out of 20 PTXs in the CXR pictures; i.e., a sensitivity of 20% (95% CI: 7%, 44%). The sensitivity of CXR increased as a function of volume but leveled off at 67%, leaving one-third (1/3) of the PTXs unidentified after 500 mL of insufflated air. Conclusion Lung US is very accurate in diagnosing even small amounts of intrapleural air and should be performed by clinicians treating chest trauma patients when PTX is among the differential diagnoses. PMID:23453044

  8. Experimental ablation of the pancreas with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Biao; Li, Yu-Yuan; Jia, Lin; Nie, Yu-Qiang; Du, Hong; Jiang, Shu-Man

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and safety of high intensity focused ultrasound's (HIFU) in pancreatic diseases. Twelve pigs were divided into three groups. The pancreases of pigs in Group A were ablated directly with HIFU, but those in Group B and C ablated by extracorporeal HIFU. The pigs in Group C were sacrificed at day 7 after HIFU. Serological parameters were determined pre-operation and post-operation. The entire pancreas was removed for histological examination. Each animal tolerate the HIFU ablation well. The complete necrosis was observed in targeted regions. The margins of the necrotic regions were clearly delineated from the surrounding normal tissues. Infiltration of inflammatory cells and phorocytosis on the boundary were found in group C. Blood and urine amylase levels were relatively steady after HIFU. No acute pancreatitis or severe complications occurred. In conclusion, HIFU ablation on the pancreas was safe and effective in experimental pigs. PMID:21197259

  9. CT and MRI of experimentally induced mesenteric ischemia in a porcine model

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, H.M.; Seggewib, C.; Weghaus, P.; Kamp, M.; Guenther, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of CT and MRI for the detection of bowel wall changes in experimentally induced mesenteric ischemia. In 18 female pigs. a percutaneous embolization of the superior mesenteric artery was performed with buthyl-2-cyanoacrylate and Lipoidal (1:1) (experimental group). In six animals, only diagnostic imaging and histologic evaluation were performed (control group). CT was carried out 3, 6, and 12 h after occlusion. Incremental CT (1 s scan time, 5 mm slice thickness, 7 mm increment, 120 kV/290 mAs) and spiral CT (slice thickness 5 mm, pitch 1.5, 120 kV/165 mA) were performed pre and post contrast injection (Somatom Plus/ Siemens). Serial CT was carried out after intravenous contrast injection (I ml/kg, 2 ml/s). MRI (Magnetom 1.5 T: Siemens) was performed with T1 (pre and post 0.01 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA; Magnevist; Schering. Germany), T2, and proton density images in axial orientation. Slice thickness was 3 mm and slice gap 1 mm. Additionally, a T1-weighted GE sequence was obtained in dynamic technique (before and 30, 60, and 90 s after contrast agent injection) with a slice thickness of 5 mm. Biometrical monitoring included blood pressure, heart frequency, blood cell count, electrolyte status, blood gas analysis, and determination of serum lactate. Image evaluation included morphological analysis and determination of the enhancement pattern. Histological specimens were obtained and analyzed according to the Chiu classification. The histologic workup of the specimen 3, 6, and 12 h after vascular occlusion revealed an average Chiu state 3, 4, and 5. On CT, the bowel wall had a thickness of 4.7 mm on average in the ischemic segments. There was a significant difference from the control group. Free intraperitoneal fluid and intramural gas were seen after 12 h of ischemia in 80%. In ischemic bowel segments, no mural enhancement was seen. Normal segments and the bowel of the control animals showed an enhancement of 34 HU on average.

  10. Blood gas and hematological changes in experimental peracute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; MacWilliams, P S; Schenkman, D I; Bäckström, L R

    1990-01-01

    The effect of experimental, peracute, porcine pleuropneumonia on arterial blood gases, acid base status, the leukogram, and gross and microscopic lung structure was studied in nine growing pigs (mean weight +/- SD 10.6 +/- 2.0 kg). Pigs were inoculated intranasally with a virulent serotype 5 isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and all showed signs typical of the disease within four hours. Death occurred in all pigs from 4.5 to 32 hours postinoculation (mean 14 hours). Gross and microscopic changes were typical of porcine pleuropneumonia in all pigs. Changes in the leukogram included a rapid decline in total white cells, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils. Pigs maintained alveolar ventilation throughout the study as arterial CO2 tension was unchanged; however, arterial O2 tension and pH decreased from (mean +/- SD) 95.2 +/- 5.7 torr and 7.463 +/- 0.018 at baseline to 62.1 +/- 12.3 torr and 7.388 +/- 0.045, respectively, within 90 minutes prior to death. The data showed that in this model of peracute porcine pleuropneumonia, progressive ventilatory failure was not a feature of the disease, and the blood gas values and acid base status were maintained within physiological ranges. The histopathological hematological and physiological findings were consistent with the hypothesis that peracute porcine pleuropneumonia resembles septic shock. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2106382

  11. Semi-spherical Radiofrequency Bipolar Device - A New Technique for Liver Resection: Experimental In Vivo Study on the Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Vavra, P; Penhaker, M; Jurcikova, J; Skrobankova, M; Crha, M; Ostruszka, P; Ihnat, P; Grepl, J; Delongova, P; Dvorackova, J; Prochazka, V; Salounova, D; Skoric, M; Rauser, P; Habib, N; Zonca, P

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of colorectal carcinoma is still growing in the Czech Republic and also all around the world. With success of oncological treatment is also growing a number of potential patients with liver metastases, who can profit from surgical therapy. The aim of this study was to confirm on porcine models that this method by using new surgical device is effective and safe for patients who have to undergo liver resection. The primary hypothesis of the study was to evaluate whether this new device is able to consistently produce homogeneous and predictable areas of coagulation necrosis without the Pringle maneuver of vascular inflow occlusion. The secondary hypothesis of the study was to compare the standard linear radiofrequency device and a new semi-spherical bipolar device for liver ablation and resection in a hepatic porcine model. Twelve pigs were randomly divided into two groups. Each pig underwent liver resection from both liver lobes in the marginal, thinner part of liver parenchyma. The pigs in first group were operated with standard using device and in the second group we used new developed semi-spherical device. We followed blood count in 0(th), 14(th) and 30(th) day from operation. 14(th) day from resection pigs underwent diagnostic laparoscopy to evaluate of their state, and 30(th) day after operation were all pigs euthanized and subjected to histopathological examination. Histopathological evaluation of thermal changes at the resection margin showed strong thermal alteration in both groups. Statistical analysis of collected dates did not prove any significant (p < 0.05) differences between standard using device and our new surgical tool. We proved safety of new designed semi-spherical surgical. This device can offer the possibility of shortening the ablation time and operating time, which is benefit for patients undergoing the liver resection. PMID:24945372

  12. Modeling the effect of experimental variables on the in vitro permeation of six model compounds across porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Karadzovska, Daniela; Brooks, James D; Riviere, Jim E

    2013-02-25

    A majority of quantitative structure-permeability relationships (QSPeRs) predict the permeability coefficient (k(p)) of compounds topically applied as infinite, saturated doses from water vehicles. Alternate delivery vehicles and other experimental variables are rarely incorporated in such models. This research presents the development and statistical validation of QSPeR models that incorporate the effects of penetrant, vehicle, and experimental conditions such as dose volume (finite/infinite), and saturation level (saturated/unsaturated). A composite parameter, a mixture factor (MF), was also included to account for the physicochemical properties of the compound/vehicle mixture components. The resultant models effectively described skin flux and absorption, identifying the summation of hydrogen bond acidity and basicity, excess molar refractivity, dose volume, saturation level, and vehicle as the most prominent factors influencing flux values. The main factors influencing absorption values were the summation of hydrogen bond basicity, dipolarity/polarizability, the McGowan characteristic volume, dose volume, saturation level, and vehicle. The same MF (inverse of the melting point) was considered suitable to describe both flux and absorption. For endpoints involving skin deposition, log propylene glycol solubility was a more suitable MF. Such models show potential for use in drug delivery and toxicology research, specifically in assessing percutaneous absorption data collected under different experimental conditions. PMID:23313919

  13. A porcine model of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Saalfrank, A; Janssen, K-P; Ravon, M; Flisikowski, K; Eser, S; Steiger, K; Flisikowska, T; Müller-Fliedner, P; Schulze, É; Brönner, C; Gnann, A; Kappe, E; Böhm, B; Schade, B; Certa, U; Saur, D; Esposito, I; Kind, A; Schnieke, A

    2016-01-01

    We previously produced pigs with a latent oncogenic TP53 mutation. Humans with TP53 germline mutations are predisposed to a wide spectrum of early-onset cancers, predominantly breast, brain, adrenal gland cancer, soft tissue sarcomas and osteosarcomas. Loss of p53 function has been observed in >50% of human cancers. Here we demonstrate that porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) convert to a transformed phenotype after activation of latent oncogenic TP53R167H and KRASG12D, and overexpression of MYC promotes tumorigenesis. The process mimics key molecular aspects of human sarcomagenesis. Transformed porcine MSCs exhibit genomic instability, with complex karyotypes, and develop into sarcomas on transplantation into immune-deficient mice. In pigs, heterozygous knockout of TP53 was sufficient for spontaneous osteosarcoma development in older animals, whereas homozygous TP53 knockout resulted in multiple large osteosarcomas in 7–8-month-old animals. This is the first report that engineered mutation of an endogenous tumour-suppressor gene leads to invasive cancer in pigs. Unlike in Trp53 mutant mice, osteosarcoma developed in the long bones and skull, closely recapitulating the human disease. These animals thus promise a model for juvenile osteosarcoma, a relatively uncommon but devastating disease. PMID:26974205

  14. Quantitative analysis of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) viremia profiles from experimental infection: a statistical modelling approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the most economically significant viral disease facing the global swine industry. Viremia profiles of PRRS virus challenged pigs reflect the severity and progression of the infection within the host and provide crucial information for subsequen...

  15. Time-dependent image changes after ethanol injection into the pancreas: an experimental study using a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Fushimi, Soichiro; Iwamuro, Masaya; Oda, Shinsuke; Mizukawa, Sho; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethanol, a commonly available agent, has been used to successfully ablate cystic and solid lesions in the pancreas. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an ethanol injection into the porcine pancreas and observe the time-dependent image changes in the pancreatic parenchyma. Methods Pure ethanol was injected into the pancreatic tail using a 25-gauge EUS needle with direct ultrasound guidance under celiotomy: 1 mL and 2 mL were injected, respectively. The abdomen was closed after the injection. MRI was performed before the procedure, immediately after, and on postoperative day (POD) seven. Blood samples were taken before the procedure and on PODs one, three, five, and seven. The pigs were euthanised on POD seven. Results Immediately after the injection, linear high signal areas in the pancreatic tail on T2 and rounded speckled high signal areas on DWI images were detected in both animals, measuring 35 × 32 mm in the 1 mL injected pig and 42 × 38mm in the 2 mL injected pig. After POD seven, rounded high signal areas were noted on T2 images, measuring 22 × 18 mm and 36 × 28 mm respectively. On POD one, the 1 mL injected animal had a 53% elevation in serum amylase while the 2 mL injected animal had a 66% elevation. Histologically, cystic and necrotic changes in the parenchyma were observed, measuring 23 × 22 mm and 40 × 35 mm respectively. Conclusions Our results, which are limited to normal pancreas, suggested that a 1 mL injection caused localised changes within the pancreas while a 2 mL injection induced more widespread changes beyond the pancreas. The effective area of ethanol was widespread immediately after injection, and then the area was reduced with cystic and necrosis changes. PMID:27594908

  16. Porcine cancer models for translational oncology

    PubMed Central

    Sieren, Jessica C.; Quelle, Dawn; Meyerholz, David K.; Rogers, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Large-animal cancer models are needed to advance the development of innovative and clinically applicable tumor diagnostic, therapeutic, and monitoring technologies. We developed a genetically modified porcine model of cancer based on a TP53 mutation, and established its utility for tracking tumorigenesis in vivo through non-invasive clinical imaging approaches. PMID:27308376

  17. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    PubMed

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and reproducibility of results. PMID:26883152

  18. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  19. Porcine Models of Muscular Dystrophy1

    PubMed Central

    Selsby, Joshua T.; Ross, Jason W.; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease. PMID:25991703

  20. Cholinesterase in porcine saliva: Analytical characterization and behavior after experimental stress.

    PubMed

    Tecles, Fernando; Escribano, Damián; Martínez-Miró, Silvia; Hernández, Fuensanta; Contreras, María Dolores; Cerón, José Joaquín

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and characterize the enzyme cholinesterase (ChE) in porcine saliva, as well as to evaluate its behavior in experimental stressful conditions. The results of ChE characterization by using different substrates and the selective inhibitors ethopropazine and physostigmine showed that the main enzyme existing in porcine saliva was butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). An automated assay using butyrylthiocholine iodide as substrate was validated providing adequate reproducibility, linearity results and limit of detection. Salivary ChE was measured using the validated assay in two models of acute stress: twenty pigs stressed for 2min with a nasal snare and other twenty pigs subjected to a short-term road transport. Salivary ChE significantly increased after restraint and transport stress in pigs, as well as the ChE to total protein ratio. In conclusion, BChE is the predominant isoenzyme in porcine saliva, it can be measured by the fast, simple and automated method described in this paper and it increases in the models of stress used in this study. PMID:27234531

  1. Experimental research of mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue under rotational shear stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Kan; Wang, Mingyu; Gao, Changqing; Ma, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue with a series of rotational shear stress control experiments. To this end, several experiments including stress sweep tests, frequency sweep tests and quasi-static creep tests were designed and conducted with a standard rheometer (HAAKE RheoStress6000). The effects of the loading stress rates to mechanical properties of brain tissue were also studied in stress sweep tests. The results of stress sweep tests performed on the same brain showed that brain tissue had an obvious regional inhomogeneity and the mechanical damage occurred at the rotational shear stress of 10-15Pa. The experimental data from three different loading stress rates demonstrated that the mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue was loading stress rate dependent. With the decrease of loading stress rate, a stiffer mechanical characteristic of brain tissue was observed and the occurrence of mechanical damage can be delayed to a higher stress. From the results of frequency sweep tests we found that brain tissue had almost completely elastic properties at high frequency area. The nonlinear creep response under the rotational shear stress of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9Pa was shown in results of creep tests. A new nonlinear viscoelastic solid model was proposed for creep tests and matched well with the test data. Considering the regional differences, loading stress rates and test conditions effects, loss tangent tan δ in porcine brain tissue showed a high uniformity of 0.25-0.45. PMID:26735181

  2. Porcine Parvovirus: Natural and Experimental Infections of the Porcine Fetus and Prevalence In Mature Swine 1

    PubMed Central

    Redman, D. R.; Bohl, E. H.; Ferguson, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Antibodies against porcine parvovirus were detected in 17 of 116 prenursing pig sera. Antibodies against transmissible gastroenteritis or ECPO-6 (an enterovirus) were not detected in prenursing sera of the pigs tested. Seventy-seven percent of 129 serum samples from 23 Ohio farms and 82% of 96 samples from slaughter plants in Ohio were serologically positive for porcine parvovirus. Mummies or other abnormalities were not observed in newly born pigs exposed to porcine parvovirus by the transuterine route 101 days after gestation. Indirect evidence suggested that the virus had not spread to other fet uses following exposure after 101 days at least not in a sufficient amount of time to stimulate detectable antibody. Direct intrafetal exposure to porcine parvovirus (i.m. injection, transutero) after 62 days of gestation resulted in dealth and mummification of the two fetuses, and apparently in the subsequent spread of the virus, as five of nine live pigs born were serologically positive for porcine parvovirus and these five pigs had not been injected with the virus. Immunoglobulin G was detected in all newborn pigs irregardless of known antigenic stimulation or the presence of specific antibody. In general, the presence of immunoglobulin M or immunoglobulin A in fetal serum was correlated with a history of antigenic stimulation or the presence of detectable antibody. PMID:4426705

  3. Salivary Stone Pneumatic Lithotripsy in a Live Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Walvekar, Rohan R; Hoffman, Henry T; Kolenda, Jack; Hernandez, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic fragmentation and removal of artificial calculi in a live porcine model employing intracorporeal pneumatic lithotripsy. In this experimental study, 7 submandibular ducts were accessed and artificial calculi placed. A salivary pneumatic lithotripter probe was inserted through an interventional sialendoscope to fragment the calculi. A salivary duct catheter was then used to flush stone fragments, followed by endoscopy to assess complete fragmentation and ductal trauma. Ultimately, 7 artificial stones (3-10 mm, 4F/5F) were successfully fragmented without causing significant endoluminal trauma. Number of pulses for adequate stone fragmentation averaged 20 (range, 5-31). In all cases, stone fragments were successfully flushed out with the salivary duct catheter. Postprocedure endoscopy confirmed ductal integrity in all 7 ducts. While more studies are needed, this preliminary animal model demonstrates efficacy of endoscopic pneumatic lithotripsy for the management of sialolithiasis. PMID:27048662

  4. Laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy: feasibility study in a chronic porcine model.

    PubMed

    Kaouk, Jihad H; Gill, Inderbir S; Desai, Mihir M; Banks, Kevin L W; Raja, Shanker S; Skacel, Marek; Sung, Gyung Tak

    2003-02-01

    to complex stone surgery such as anatrophic nephrolithotomy with encouraging surgical and functional outcomes. To our knowledge this report represents the initial study of in situ creation of experimental staghorn calculi and laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy performed completely intracorporeally in a chronic porcine model. PMID:12544344

  5. Porcine survival model to simulate acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schurr, Marc O; Schostek, Sebastian; Krautwald, Martina; Gottwald, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The existing animal models used for the simulation of acute gastrointestinal bleedings are usually non-survival models. We developed and evaluated a new porcine model (domestic pig, German Landrace) in which the animal remains alive and survives the artificial bleeding without any cardiovascular impairment. This consists of a bleeding catheter which is implanted into the stomach, then subcutaneously tunnelled from the abdomen to the neck where it is exteriorized and fixed with sutures. Using the injection of porcine blood, controllable and reproducible acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be simulated while maintaining normal gastrointestinal motility and physiology. Depending on the volume of blood applied through the gastric catheter, the bleeding intensity can be varied from traces of blood to a massive haemorrhage. This porcine model could be valuable, e.g. for testing the efficacy of new bleeding diagnostics in large animals before human use. PMID:26306615

  6. Porous Gelatin Particles for Uterine Artery Embolization: An Experimental Study of Intra-Arterial Distribution, Uterine Necrosis, and Inflammation in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki; Osuga, Keigo; Shimazu, Kohki; Higashihara, Hiroki; Nakazawa, Tetsuro; Kato, Kenichi; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Nakamura, Hironobu; Morii, Eiichi; Aozasa, Katsuyuki

    2010-10-15

    PurposeWe evaluated the location of porous gelatin particles (GP; Gelpart; Nippon Kayaku/Astellas, Tokyo, Japan) within the arterial vasculature and their acute effects on uterine necrosis and inflammation after uterine artery embolization (UAE) in swine.Materials and MethodsAdult nonpregnant pigs (n = 6) were allocated to either 1- (n = 3) or 2-mm GP (n = 3). Superselective and bilateral embolization of the uterine arteries was performed. All animals were killed 1 week after UAE. Macroscopic and microscopic findings, including the level of arterial occlusion and their effect on uterine necrosis and inflammation, were analyzed.ResultsAll UAE procedures were completed without severe complications. The macroscopic necrosis was seen in two animals in the 2-mm group with an extent of <50%. The location of the occluded arteries did not differ significantly between groups. The median diameters of the occluded arteries were 449 {mu}m (95% confidence interval [CI] 417-538 {mu}m) in the 1-mm GP group and 484 {mu}m (95% CI 370-560 {mu}m) in the 2-mm GP group. As for microscopic necrosis, no statistically significant difference was observed. The qualitative inflammatory reaction was significantly greater in the 2-mm GP group than in the 1-mm group (p < 0.001).ConclusionsBoth 1- and 2-mm GP occluded the arteries relevant to the target diameter for UAE in porcine uterus, presumably due to the plastic deformity. Both sizes of GP were associated with limited areas of necrosis; however, evaluation of inflammatory reaction was preliminary. Further study with adequate evaluation of inflammatory reactions is suggested.

  7. What Kind of Capsule Endoscope Is Suitable for a Controllable Self-Propelling Capsule Endoscope? Experimental Study Using a Porcine Stomach Model for Clinical Application (with Videos)

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Kazuhiro; Nouda, Sadaharu; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Iguchi, Munetaka; Kojima, Yuichi; Kuramoto, Takanori; Inoue, Takuya; Shindo, Yasunori; Uesugi, Kenshiro; Fujito, Yoshiaki; Nishihara, Hironori; Ohtsuka, Naotake; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Background We have been developing the Self-Propelling Capsule Endoscope (SPCE) that allows for controllability from outside of the body and real-time observation. What kind of capsule endoscope (CE) is suitable for a controllable SPCE is unclear and a very critical point for clinical application. We compared observing ability of three kinds of SPCEs with different viewing angles and frame rates. Methods Eleven buttons were sewed in an excised porcine stomach. Four examiners controlled the SPCE using PillCamSB2, -ESO2, and -COLON2 (Given Imaging Ltd., Israel), for 10 minutes each with the aim of detecting as many buttons and examining them as closely as possible. The ability to find lesions was assessed based on the number of detected buttons. The SPCE-performance score (SPS) was used to evaluate the ability to examine the lesions in detail. Results The SPCE-ESO2, -COLON2, and -SB2 detected 11 [interquartile range (IQR): 0], 10.5 (IQR, 0.5), and 8 (IQR, 1.0) buttons, respectively. The SPCE-ESO2 and -COLON2 had a significantly better ability to detect lesions than the -SB2 (p < 0.05). The SPCE-ESO2, -COLON2, and -SB2 had significantly different SPS values of 22 (IQR, 0), 16.5 (IQR, 1.5), and 14 (IQR, 1.0), respectively (p < 0.05 for all comparisons; SPCE-SB2 vs. -ESO2, -SB2 vs. -COLON2, and -ESO2 vs. -COLON2). Conclusions PillCamESO2 is most suitable in different three CEs for SPCE for examining lesions in detail of the stomach. PMID:26447694

  8. Endoscopic and histological evaluations of a newly designed inguinal hernia mesh implant: Experimental studies on porcine animal model and human cadaver

    PubMed Central

    Panaro, Fabrizio; Matos-Azevedo, Ana Maria; Fatas, José Antonio; Marin, Juan; Navarro, Francis; Zaragoza-Fernandez, Cristobal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Conventional prostheses used for inguinal hernia repair are static and passive. This feasibility-study shows the features of a new 3D tension-free prosthesis in an experimental model. Methods This study was divided into two-phases: 1) aimed to test the physics intrinsic features and the anatomical adaptability of a new 3D designed mesh, and 2) aimed to evaluate the inflammatory reaction associated with different materials used. On phase-1 implantations were performed in pigs. During the first trial phase, the prostheses were also implanted on human cadavers. On phase-2, implantation was carried out on large swine. Follow-up was of 60-days, after which the animals were anaesthetized for laparoscopic assessment, and for sample collection of mesh implantation site for histological analysis. Results All animals showed good 3D mesh tolerance, and the follow-up period was uneventful. The laparoscopy showed no inflammatory lesions on the internal surface of the peritoneum. Macroscopic observation of implantation site revealed some local fibrosis and reorganization of tissue, no signs of infection, and no changes on original implant positioning. Histological analysis on phase-1 showed in most sample segments the deferent duct maintaining its central position and surrounded by vascular and nervous structures. On phase-2 differences in inflammatory lesion score could be found between subjects. Conclusions This new 3D mesh can be placed appropriately and from this preliminary animal study no untoward complications were noted over a 60 day period. PMID:27158482

  9. Brain microabscesses in a porcine model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus often leads to brain microabscesses in humans. Animal models of haematogenous brain abscesses would be useful to study this condition in detail. Recently, we developed a model of S. aureus sepsis in pigs and here we report that brain microabscesses develop in pigs with such induced S. aureus sepsis. Twelve pigs were divided into three groups. Nine pigs received an intravenous inoculation of S. aureus once at time 0 h (group 1) or twice at time 0 h and 12 h (groups 2 and 3). In each group the fourth pig served as control. The pigs were euthanized at time 12 h (Group 1), 24 h (Group 2) and 48 h (Group 3) after the first inoculation. The brains were collected and examined histopathologically. Results All inoculated pigs developed sepsis and seven out of nine pigs developed brain microabscesses. The microabscesses contained S. aureus and were located in the prosencephalon and mesencephalon. Chorioditis and meningitis occurred from 12 h after inoculation. Conclusions Pigs with experimental S. aureus sepsis often develop brain microabscesses. The porcine brain pathology mirrors the findings in human sepsis patients. We therefore suggest the pig as a useful animal model of the development of brain microabscesses caused by S. aureus sepsis. PMID:24176029

  10. Development of a Porcine Model of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michael J.; Rogers, Christopher S.; Stoltz, David A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Prather, Randall S.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a common autosomal recessive disease that affects multiple organs. The lack of an animal model with manifestations like those typically found in humans has slowed understanding of its pathogenesis. Therefore, because of the similarities between human and swine anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics, we chose to develop a porcine model of CF. We used homologous recombination in primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts to disrupt the CFTR gene and then used those cells as nuclear donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer. After crossing heterozygous pigs, we produced CFTR−/− pigs. The newborn CFTR null piglets manifested meconium ileus, pancreatic destruction, early focal biliary cirrhosis, and gall bladder abnormalities that were very similar to those observed in humans with CF. At birth, there were no abnormalities in the airway epithelium or submucosal glands and no evidence of inflammation, consistent with findings in the newborn human. We hope that this porcine model will help elucidate the pathogenesis of CF and thereby lead to the development of new mechanism-based therapies. PMID:19768173

  11. Development of a porcine model of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael J; Rogers, Christopher S; Stoltz, David A; Meyerholz, David K; Prather, Randall S

    2009-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a common autosomal recessive disease that affects multiple organs. The lack of an animal model with manifestations like those typically found in humans has slowed understanding of its pathogenesis. Therefore, because of the similarities between human and swine anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics, we chose to develop a porcine model of CF. We used homologous recombination in primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts to disrupt the CFTR gene and then used those cells as nuclear donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer. After crossing heterozygous pigs, we produced CFTR-/- pigs. The newborn CFTR null piglets manifested meconium ileus, pancreatic destruction, early focal biliary cirrhosis, and gall bladder abnormalities that were very similar to those observed in humans with CF. At birth, there were no abnormalities in the airway epithelium or submucosal glands and no evidence of inflammation, consistent with findings in the newborn human. We hope that this porcine model will help elucidate the pathogenesis of CF and thereby lead to the development of new mechanism-based therapies. PMID:19768173

  12. Experimental Airborne Transmission of Porcine Postweaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, C. S.; Hjulsager, C. K.; Vestergaard, K.; Dupont, K.; Bille-Hansen, V.; Enøe, C.; Jorsal, S. E.; Bækbo, P.; Larsen, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to investigate if porcine postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) could be induced in healthy pigs following contact with air from pigs with clinical signs of PMWS. The pigs were housed in different units. Either 31 (study I) or 25 (study II) pigs with clinical symptoms of PMWS from a PMWS-affected herd and 25 healthy pigs from a PMWS-free, but PCV2-positive, herd were housed in unit A. Fifty pigs from a PMWS-free herd were housed in unit B, which were connected by pipes to unit A. In unit C, 30 pigs from a PMWS-free herd were housed as controls. In study II, the pigs in units A and B from the PMWS-free herd developed clinical signs of PMWS 2-3 weeks after arrival. PMWS was confirmed at necropsy and the diseased pigs had increased PCV2 load and increased antibody titers against PCV2 in serum that coincided with the development of clinical signs typical of PMWS. Sequence analysis revealed that the PCV2 isolate belonged to genotype 2b. In conclusion, the present study showed that PMWS can be induced in pigs from a PMWS-free herd by airborne contact with pigs from a PMWS-affected herd. PMID:23476787

  13. In vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Regelsberger, Jan; Eicker, Sven; Siasios, Ioannis; Hänggi, Daniel; Kirsch, Matthias; Horn, Peter; Winkler, Peter; Signoretti, Stefano; Fountas, Kostas; Dufour, Henry; Barcia, Juan A; Sakowitz, Oliver; Westermaier, Thomas; Sabel, Michael; Heese, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Supplemental education is desirable for neurosurgical training, and the use of human cadaver specimen and virtual reality models is routine. An in vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery was introduced in 2005, and our recent experience with this unique model is outlined here. For the first time, porcine anatomy is illustrated with particular respect to neurosurgical procedures. The pros and cons of this model are described. The aim of the course was to set up a laboratory scenery imitating an almost realistic operating room in which anatomy of the brain and neurosurgical techniques in a mentored environment free from time constraints could be trained. Learning objectives of the course were to learn about the microsurgical techniques in cranial neurosurgery and the management of complications. Participants were asked to evaluate the quality and utility of the programme via standardized questionnaires by a grading scale from A (best) to E (worst). In total, 154 residents have been trained on the porcine model to date. None of the participants regarded his own residency programme as structured. The bleeding and complication management (97%), the realistic laboratory set-up (89%) and the working environment (94%) were favoured by the vast majority of trainees and confirmed our previous findings. After finishing the course, the participants graded that their skills in bone drilling, dissecting the brain and preserving cerebral vessels under microscopic magnification had improved to level A and B. In vivo hands-on courses, fully equipped with microsurgical instruments, offer an outstanding training opportunity in which bleeding management on a pulsating, vital brain represents a unique training approach. Our results have shown that education programmes still lack practical training facilities in which in vivo models may act as a complementary approach in surgical training. PMID:25240530

  14. A Porcine Pneumothorax Model for Teaching Ultrasound Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Oveland, Nils Petter; Sloth, Erik; Andersen, Gratien; Lossius, Hans Morten

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Ultrasound (US) is a sensitive diagnostic tool for detecting pneumothorax (PTX), but methods are needed to optimally teach this technique outside of direct patient care. In training and research settings, porcine PTX models are sometimes used, but the description of the PTX topography in these models is lacking. The study purpose was to define the distribution of air using the reference imaging standard computed tomography (CT), to see if pleural insufflation of air into a live anaesthetized pig truly imitates a PTX in an injured patient. Methods: A unilateral catheter was inserted into one pleural cavity of each of 20 pigs, and 500 mL of air was insufflated. After a complete thoracic CT scan, the anterior, lateral, medial, basal, apical, and posterior components of the PTXs were compared. The amount of air in each location was quantified by measuring the distance from the lung edge to the chest wall (LE-CW). A supine anteroposterior chest radiograph (CXR) was taken from each model and interpreted by a senior radiologist, and the image results were compared to CT. Results: All 20 hemithoraces with PTX were correctly identified by CT, while six remained occult after interpreting the CXRs. The PTXs were anterior (100%), lateral (95%), medial (80%), basal (60%), apical (45%), and posterior (15%). The major proportion of the insufflated 500-mL volume was found in the anterior, medial, and basal recesses. Conclusions: The authors found the distribution of the intrathoracic air to be similar between a porcine model and that to be expected in human trauma patients, all having predominantly anterior PTX topographies. In a training facility, the model is easy to set up and can be scanned by the participants multiple times. To acquire the necessary skills to perform thoracic US examinations for PTX, the porcine models could be useful. PMID:22594363

  15. The porcine lung as a potential model for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Christopher S.; Abraham, William M.; Brogden, Kim A.; Engelhardt, John F.; Fisher, John T.; McCray, Paul B.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Meyerholz, David K.; Namati, Eman; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Prather, Randall S.; Sabater, Juan R.; Stoltz, David Anthony; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Airway disease currently causes most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and developing novel therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the limitations of current models. Although the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been targeted in mice, CF mice fail to develop lung or pancreatic disease like that in humans. In many respects, the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics of pigs resemble those of humans. Thus pigs with a targeted CFTR gene might provide a good model for CF. Here, we review aspects of porcine airways and lung that are relevant to CF. PMID:18487356

  16. The porcine lung as a potential model for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S; Abraham, William M; Brogden, Kim A; Engelhardt, John F; Fisher, John T; McCray, Paul B; McLennan, Geoffrey; Meyerholz, David K; Namati, Eman; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Prather, Randall S; Sabater, Juan R; Stoltz, David Anthony; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2008-08-01

    Airway disease currently causes most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and developing novel therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the limitations of current models. Although the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been targeted in mice, CF mice fail to develop lung or pancreatic disease like that in humans. In many respects, the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics of pigs resemble those of humans. Thus pigs with a targeted CFTR gene might provide a good model for CF. Here, we review aspects of porcine airways and lung that are relevant to CF. PMID:18487356

  17. Development of a Consistent and Reproducible Porcine Scald Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Christine J; Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy; Cuttle, Leila

    2016-01-01

    There are very few porcine burn models that replicate scald injuries similar to those encountered by children. We have developed a robust porcine burn model capable of creating reproducible scald burns for a wide range of burn conditions. The study was conducted with juvenile Large White pigs, creating replicates of burn combinations; 50°C for 1, 2, 5 and 10 minutes and 60°C, 70°C, 80°C and 90°C for 5 seconds. Visual wound examination, biopsies and Laser Doppler Imaging were performed at 1, 24 hours and at 3 and 7 days post-burn. A consistent water temperature was maintained within the scald device for long durations (49.8 ± 0.1°C when set at 50°C). The macroscopic and histologic appearance was consistent between replicates of burn conditions. For 50°C water, 10 minute duration burns showed significantly deeper tissue injury than all shorter durations at 24 hours post-burn (p ≤ 0.0001), with damage seen to increase until day 3 post-burn. For 5 second duration burns, by day 7 post-burn the 80°C and 90°C scalds had damage detected significantly deeper in the tissue than the 70°C scalds (p ≤ 0.001). A reliable and safe model of porcine scald burn injury has been successfully developed. The novel apparatus with continually refreshed water improves consistency of scald creation for long exposure times. This model allows the pathophysiology of scald burn wound creation and progression to be examined. PMID:27612153

  18. Blood gas stability and hematological changes in experimentally-induced acute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; Mirsky, M L; MacWilliams, P S; Bäckström, L R; Collins, M T

    1989-01-01

    Blood gas and hematological responses to acute, mild Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection of growing pigs was studied. Six pigs (average weight 10.1 kg) were experimentally infected intranasally with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5. Four pigs served as controls. Rectal temperatures and arterial blood for gas analysis and hematology were taken at 0, 8, 16, 24, 48 and 72 h postinfection. All infected pigs became febrile showing clinical signs typical of mild to moderate porcine pleuropneumonia; controls remained asymptomatic. Neutrophilia with bands and lymphopenia were observed only in infected pigs. Arterial partial pressures of O2 and CO2, and pH did not change in infected pigs. All pigs were killed after 72 h, and lungs were examined and cultured. Gross and microscopic lesions consistent with porcine pleuropneumonia were seen in 3/6 and 5/6 infected lungs, respectively. Control lungs were grossly normal with no histological evidence of pleuropneumonia. We conclude that in mild, acute porcine pleuropneumonia as established experimentally, a leukogram typical of acute inflammation and stress is seen; however, hypoxemia and alveolar hypoventilation are not features of this form of the disease. PMID:2914231

  19. Acoustic hemostasis of porcine superficial femoral artery: Simulation and in-vivo experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; Mitchell, Stuart; Miller, Matthew; Barnes, Stephen; Hopple, Jerry; Kook, John; Moreau-Gobard, Romain; Hsu, Stephen; Ahiekpor-Dravi, Alexis; Crum, Lawrence A.; Eaton, John; Wong, Keith; Sekins, K. Michael

    2012-10-01

    In-vivo focused ultrasound studies were computationally simulated and conducted experimentally with the aim of occluding porcine superficial femoral arteries (SFA) via thermal coagulation. A multi-array HIFU applicator was used which electronically scanned multiple beam foci around the target point. The spatio-temporally averaged acoustic and temperature fields were simulated in a fluid dynamics and acousto-thermal finite element model with representative tissue fields, including muscle, vessel and blood. Simulations showed that with an acoustic power of 200W and a dose time of 60s, perivascular tissue reached 91°C; and yet blood reached a maximum 59°C, below the coagulation objective for this dose regime (75°C). Per simulations, acoustic-streaming induced velocity in blood reached 6.1cm/s. In in-vivo experiments, several arteries were treated. As simulated, thermal lesions were observed in muscle surrounding SFA in all cases. In dosing limited to 30 to 60 seconds, it required 257W to provide occlusion (one complete and one partial occlusion). Angiography and histology showed evidence of thrombogenesis and collagen shrinkage-based vessel constriction at these doses.

  20. Comparison of modified Kessler tendon suture at different levels in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon and porcine flexors and porcine extensors: an experimental biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Havulinna, J; Leppänen, O V; Järvinen, T L N; Göransson, H

    2011-10-01

    This study compared the biomechanical behaviour of repairs in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zones I, II and III with repairs of different segments of the porcine flexor tendon of the second digit and the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon, in order to assess the validity of porcine tendons as models for human flexor tendon repairs. These porcine tendons were selected after comparing their size with the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon. The tendon repairs were done in three segments of each porcine tendon and repairs in the human tendons were done in zones I,II and III. Ten tendons in each group yielded a total of 90 specimens. A modified Kessler repair was done with 3-0 coated braided polyester suture and subjected to uniaxial tensile testing. In human flexor tendons, the ultimate force was higher in zones I and II than in zone III. The porcine flexor digitorum profundus tendon from the second digit and the proximal segment of the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon behaved similarly to the human flexor tendon in zone III and can be considered as surrogates for the human flexor tendon. PMID:21816887

  1. Use of an Ex Vivo Porcine Mucosal Model to Study Superantigen Penetration.

    PubMed

    Squier, Christopher A; Mantz, Mary J

    2016-01-01

    In vitro perfusion studies are frequently used to determine the penetration of compounds through skin and mucosa. Porcine tissue has been shown to be an excellent model for human tissue in terms of structure, function, and reactivity. We describe the use of porcine tissue ex-vivo in a continuous flow perfusion system to study the behavior of superantigens in this model. PMID:26676044

  2. Porcine incisional hernia model: Evaluation of biologically derived intact extracellular matrix repairs

    PubMed Central

    Delossantos, Aubrey I; Rodriguez, Neil L; Patel, Paarun; Franz, Michael G; Wagner, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    We compared fascial wounds repaired with non-cross-linked intact porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix versus primary closure in a large-animal hernia model. Incisional hernias were created in Yucatan pigs and repaired after 3 weeks via open technique with suture-only primary closure or intraperitoneally placed porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix. Progressive changes in mechanical and biological properties of porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix and repair sites were assessed. Porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix–repaired hernias of additional animals were evaluated 2 and 4 weeks post incision to assess porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix regenerative potential and biomechanical changes. Hernias repaired with primary closure showed substantially more scarring and bone hyperplasia along the incision line. Mechanical remodeling of porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix was noted over time. Porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix elastic modulus and ultimate tensile stress were similar to fascia at 6 weeks. The biology of porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix–reinforced animals was more similar to native abdominal wall versus that with primary closure. In this study, porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix–reinforced repairs provided more complete wound healing response compared with primary closure. PMID:24555008

  3. Evaluation of a Model-Based Hemodynamic Monitoring Method in a Porcine Study of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Revie, James A.; Stevenson, David; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Pretty, Chris J.; Lambermont, Bernard C.; Ghuysen, Alexandre; Kolh, Philippe; Shaw, Geoffrey M.; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The accuracy and clinical applicability of an improved model-based system for tracking hemodynamic changes is assessed in an animal study on septic shock. Methods. This study used cardiovascular measurements recorded during a porcine trial studying the efficacy of large-pore hemofiltration for treating septic shock. Four Pietrain pigs were instrumented and induced with septic shock. A subset of the measured data, representing clinically available measurements, was used to identify subject-specific cardiovascular models. These models were then validated against the remaining measurements. Results. The system accurately matched independent measures of left and right ventricle end diastolic volumes and maximum left and right ventricular pressures to percentage errors less than 20% (except for the 95th percentile error in maximum right ventricular pressure) and all R2 > 0.76. An average decrease of 42% in systemic resistance, a main cardiovascular consequence of septic shock, was observed 120 minutes after the infusion of the endotoxin, consistent with experimentally measured trends. Moreover, modelled temporal trends in right ventricular end systolic elastance and afterload tracked changes in corresponding experimentally derived metrics. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that this model-based method can monitor disease-dependent changes in preload, afterload, and contractility in porcine study of septic shock. PMID:23585774

  4. Material Properties and Constitutive Modeling of Infant Porcine Cerebellum Tissue in Tension at High Strain Rate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kui; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Wenjun; Yin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanical characterization of infant porcine cerebellum tissue in tension at high strain rate is crucial for modeling traumatic cerebellum injury, which is in turn helpful for understanding the biomechanics of such injuries suffered in traffic accidents. Material and Method In this study, the infant porcine cerebellum tissue was given three loading velocities, ie, 2s-1, 20s-1 and 100s-1 with up to 30% strain to investigate the tensile properties. At least six tensile tests for each strain rate were validly performed. Fung, Gent, Ogden and exponential models were applied to fit the constitutive equations, so as to obtain material parameters from the experimental data. Results The Lagrange stress of infant porcine cerebellum tissue in tension appeared to be no more than 3000Pa at each loading velocity. More specifically, the Lagrange stress at 30% strain was (393.7±84.4)Pa, (928.3±56.3)Pa and (2582.4±282.2)Pa at strain rates of 2s-1, 20s-1 and 100s-1, respectively. Fung (0.833≤R2≤0.924), Gent (0.797≤R2≤0.875), Ogden (0.859≤R2≤0.944) and exponential (0.930≤R2≤0.972) models provided excellent fitting to experimental data up to 30% strain. Conclusions The infant cerebellum tissue shows a stiffer response with increase of the loading speed, indicating a strong strain-rate sensitivity. This study will enrich the knowledge on the material properties of infant brain tissue, which may augment the biofidelity of finite element model of human pediatric cerebellum. PMID:25830545

  5. Stent linker effect in a porcine coronary restenosis model.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Kyu; Lim, Kyung Seob; Bae, In-Ho; Nam, Joung-Pyo; Cho, Jae Hwa; Choi, Changyong; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the mechanical effects of different stent linker designs on in-stent restenosis in porcine coronary arteries. We fabricated stents with an open-cell structure composed of nine main cells and three linker structures in model 1 (I-type), model 2 (S-types) and model 3 (U-types)) as well as Model 4, which is similar to a commercial bare metal stent design. The stent cells were 70 mm thick and wide, with a common symmetrical wave pattern. As the radial force increased, the number of main cells increased and the length of linker decreased. Radial force was higher in model 1, with a linear I-linker, than in models with S- or U-linkers. The flexibility measured by three-point bending showed a force of 1.09 N in model 1, 0.35 N in model 2, 0.19 N in model 3, and 0.31 N in model 4. The recoil results were similar in all models except model 4 and were related to the shape of the main cells. The foreshortening results were related to linker shape, with the lowest foreshortening observed in model 3 (U-linker). Restenosis areas in the porcine restenosis model 4 weeks after implantation were 35.4 ± 8.39% (model 1), 30.4 ± 7.56% (model 2), 40.6 ± 9.87% (model 3) and 45.1 ± 12.33% (model 4). In-stent restenosis rates measured by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) showed similar trends as percent area stenosis measured by micro-CT. Model 2, with optimized flexibility and radial force due to its S-linker, showed significantly reduced restenosis in the animal model compared to stents with different linker designs. These results suggest that the optimal stent structure has a minimum radial force for vascular support and maximum flexibility for vascular conformability. The importance of the effects of these differences in stent design and their potential relationship with restenosis remains to be determined. PMID:26318568

  6. Robot-Assisted Pterygium Surgery: Feasibility Study in a Nonliving Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bourcier, Tristan; Nardin, Mathieu; Sauer, Arnaud; Gaucher, David; Speeg, Claude; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to investigate the feasibility of pterygium surgery using the DaVinci Si HD robotic surgical system, and to describe a porcine model for pterygium surgery and evaluate its usefulness. Methods The pterygium models were constructed using enucleated pig eyes and cold cuts. Robotically-assisted pterygium surgeries in nonliving biological pterygium models were performed using the DaVinci Si HD robotic surgical system. Twelve models were prepared, and 12 pterygium excision and conjunctival autografts were performed. Results The DaVinci system provided the necessary dexterity to perform delicate ocular surface surgery and robotic tools were safe for the tissues. The mean duration of the surgical procedures was 36 minutes. There were no intraoperative complications and no unexpected events. Conclusions Robotic-assisted pterygium surgery is technically feasible for porcine eyes using the DaVinci Si HD robotic surgical system. The pterygium model that we describe could be of interest for surgical training. Translational Relevance Little research has been done in robotic microsurgery. Animal experimentation will allow the advantages of robotic-assisted microsurgery to be identified, while underlining the improvements and innovations necessary for clinical use. PMID:25722953

  7. Myocardial Scar Imaging by Standard Single-Energy and Dual-Energy Late Enhancement Computed Tomography: Comparison to Pathology and Electroanatomical Map in an Experimental Chronic Infarct Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Thai, Wai-ee; Wai, Bryan; Cordaro, Kevin; Cheng, Teresa; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Xiong, Guanglei; Cheung, Jim W.; Altman, Robert; Min, James K.; Singh, Jagmeet P.; Barrett, Conor D.; Danik, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Background Myocardial scar is a substrate for ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death. Late enhancement computed tomography (CT) imaging can detect scar, but it remains unclear whether newer late enhancement dual-energy (LE-DECT) acquisition has benefit over standard single-energy late enhancement (LE-CT). Objective We aim to compare late enhancement CT using newer LE-DECT acquisition and single-energy LE-CT acquisitions to pathology and electroanatomical map (EAM) in an experimental chronic myocardial infarction (MI) porcine study. Methods In 8 chronic MI pigs (59±5 kg), we performed dual-source CT, EAM, and pathology. For CT imaging, we performed 3 acquisitions at 10 minutes post-contrast: LE-CT 80 kV, LE-CT 100 kV, and LE-DECT with two post-processing software settings. Results Of the sequences, LE-CT 100 kV provided the best contrast-to-noise ratio (all p≤0.03) and correlation to pathology for scar (ρ=0.88). While LE-DECT overestimated scar (both p=0.02), LE-CT images did not (both p=0.08). On a segment basis (n=136), all CT sequences had high specificity (87–93%) and modest sensitivity (50–67%), with LE-CT 100 kV having the highest specificity of 93% for scar detection compared to pathology and agreement with EAM (κ 0.69). Conclusions Standard single-energy LE-CT, particularly 100kV, matched better to pathology and EAM than dual-energy LE-DECT for scar detection. Larger human trials as well as more technical-based studies that optimize varying different energies with newer hardware and software are warranted. PMID:25977115

  8. Emerging Technologies to Create Inducible and Genetically Defined Porcine Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Schook, Lawrence B.; Rund, Laurie; Begnini, Karine R.; Remião, Mariana H.; Seixas, Fabiana K.; Collares, Tiago

    2016-01-01

    There is an emerging need for new animal models that address unmet translational cancer research requirements. Transgenic porcine models provide an exceptional opportunity due to their genetic, anatomic, and physiological similarities with humans. Due to recent advances in the sequencing of domestic animal genomes and the development of new organism cloning technologies, it is now very feasible to utilize pigs as a malleable species, with similar anatomic and physiological features with humans, in which to develop cancer models. In this review, we discuss genetic modification technologies successfully used to produce porcine biomedical models, in particular the Cre-loxP System as well as major advances and perspectives the CRISPR/Cas9 System. Recent advancements in porcine tumor modeling and genome editing will bring porcine models to the forefront of translational cancer research. PMID:26973698

  9. Biphasic Presence of Fibrocytes in a Porcine Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Taryn E.; Mino, Matthew J.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Mauskar, Neil A.; Prindeze, Nicholas J.; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Jordan, Marion H.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The duroc pig has been described as a promising animal model for use in the study of human wound healing and scar formation. However little is known about the presence and chronology of the fibrocyte cell population in the healing process of these animals. Methods Wounds known to form scar were created on red duroc swine (3“ × 3”) with a dermatome to a total depth of either 0.06“ or 0.09”. These wounds were allowed to heal completely and were biopsied at scheduled time points during the healing process. Biopsies were formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded for immunohistochemical analysis. Porcine-reactive antibodies to CD-45 and procollagen-1 and a human-reactive antibody to LSP-1 were used to detect the presence of fibrocytes in immunohistochemistry an immunocytochemistry. Results Initial immunohistochemical studies showed evidence of a biphasic presence of fibrocytes. Pigs with 0.06“ deep wounds showed positive staining for CD-45 and LSP-1 within highly cellular areas at days 2 and 4 after wounding. Additional animals with 0.09” deep wounds showed positive staining within similar areas at days 56, 70, and 113 after wounding. There was no immunohistochemical evidence of fibrocytes in skin biopsies taken at days 14, 28, or 42. Procollagen-1 staining was diffuse in all samples. Cultured cells stained for CD-45, LSP-1, and procollagen-1 by immunocytochemistry. Conclusions These data confirm that fibrocytes are indeed present in this porcine model. We conclude that these cells are present after initial wounding and later during scar formation and remodeling. We believe that this is evidence of a biphasic presence of fibrocytes, first as an acute response to skin wounding followed by later involvement in the remodeling process, prompted by continued inflammation in a deep partial thickness wound. PMID:25051518

  10. [The isolated perfused porcine kidney model for investigations concerning surgical therapy procedures].

    PubMed

    Peters, Kristina; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Matis, Ulrike; Häcker, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Experiments to develop innovative surgical therapy procedures are conventionally conducted on animals, as crucial aspects like tissue removal and bleeding disposition cannot be investigated in vitro. Extracorporeal organ models however reflect these aspects and could thus reduce the use of animals for this purpose fundamentally in the future. The aim of this work was to validate the isolated perfused porcine kidney model with regard to its use for surgical purposes on the basis of histological and radiological procedures. The results show that neither storage nor artificial perfusion led to any structural or functional damage which would affect the quality of the organ. The kidney model is highly suitable for simulating the main aspects of renal physiology and allows a constant calibration of perfusion pressure and tissue temperature. Thus, with only a moderate amount of work involved, the kidney model provides a cheap and readily available alternative to conventional animal experiments; it allows standardised experimental settings and provides valid results. PMID:17086351

  11. Heterotopic Renal Autotransplantation in a Porcine Model: A Step-by-Step Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kaths, J. Moritz; Echeverri, Juan; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Louis, Kristine S.; Yip, Paul; John, Rohan; Mucsi, Istvan; Ghanekar, Anand; Bagli, Darius; Selzner, Markus; Robinson, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients suffering from end-stage renal disease. It offers better life expectancy and higher quality of life when compared to dialysis. Although the last few decades have seen major improvements in patient outcomes following kidney transplantation, the increasing shortage of available organs represents a severe problem worldwide. To expand the donor pool, marginal kidney grafts recovered from extended criteria donors (ECD) or donated after circulatory death (DCD) are now accepted for transplantation. To further improve the postoperative outcome of these marginal grafts, research must focus on new therapeutic approaches such as alternative preservation techniques, immunomodulation, gene transfer, and stem cell administration. Experimental studies in animal models are the final step before newly developed techniques can be translated into clinical practice. Porcine kidney transplantation is an excellent model of human transplantation and allows investigation of novel approaches. The major advantage of the porcine model is its anatomical and physiological similarity to the human body, which facilitates the rapid translation of new findings to clinical trials. This article offers a surgical step-by-step protocol for an autotransplantation model and highlights key factors to ensure experimental success. Adequate pre- and postoperative housing, attentive anesthesia, and consistent surgical techniques result in favorable postoperative outcomes. Resection of the contralateral native kidney provides the opportunity to assess post-transplant graft function. The placement of venous and urinary catheters and the use of metabolic cages allow further detailed evaluation. For long-term follow-up studies and investigation of alternative graft preservation techniques, autotransplantation models are superior to allotransplantation models, as they avoid the confounding bias posed by rejection and immunosuppressive medication. PMID

  12. Heterotopic Renal Autotransplantation in a Porcine Model: A Step-by-Step Protocol.

    PubMed

    Kaths, J Moritz; Echeverri, Juan; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Louis, Kristine S; Yip, Paul; John, Rohan; Mucsi, Istvan; Ghanekar, Anand; Bagli, Darius; Selzner, Markus; Robinson, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients suffering from end-stage renal disease. It offers better life expectancy and higher quality of life when compared to dialysis. Although the last few decades have seen major improvements in patient outcomes following kidney transplantation, the increasing shortage of available organs represents a severe problem worldwide. To expand the donor pool, marginal kidney grafts recovered from extended criteria donors (ECD) or donated after circulatory death (DCD) are now accepted for transplantation. To further improve the postoperative outcome of these marginal grafts, research must focus on new therapeutic approaches such as alternative preservation techniques, immunomodulation, gene transfer, and stem cell administration. Experimental studies in animal models are the final step before newly developed techniques can be translated into clinical practice. Porcine kidney transplantation is an excellent model of human transplantation and allows investigation of novel approaches. The major advantage of the porcine model is its anatomical and physiological similarity to the human body, which facilitates the rapid translation of new findings to clinical trials. This article offers a surgical step-by-step protocol for an autotransplantation model and highlights key factors to ensure experimental success. Adequate pre- and postoperative housing, attentive anesthesia, and consistent surgical techniques result in favorable postoperative outcomes. Resection of the contralateral native kidney provides the opportunity to assess post-transplant graft function. The placement of venous and urinary catheters and the use of metabolic cages allow further detailed evaluation. For long-term follow-up studies and investigation of alternative graft preservation techniques, autotransplantation models are superior to allotransplantation models, as they avoid the confounding bias posed by rejection and immunosuppressive medication. PMID

  13. A Simple Porcine Model of Inducible Sustained Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anson M; Miller, Jacob R; Voeller, Rochus K; Zierer, Andreas; Lall, Shelly C; Schuessler, Richard B; Damiano, Ralph J; Melby, Spencer J

    2016-01-01

    The surgical management of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an evolving field with a history of testing various lesion sets and ablation technologies. Previous animal models of AF require a chronic intervention to make AF reliably inducible. Our objective was to create an acute, reliable, and reproducible porcine model of sustained AF. To accomplish this, 21 adult domestic pigs underwent median sternotomy. Methods to induce AF were then performed sequentially: manual stimulation, rapid pacing (200 beats per minute), and then rapid pacing of 8 beats with a cycle length of 300 milliseconds, followed by an extra stimulus at decreasing cycle lengths. If AF was not induced, burst pacing was performed at a cycle length of 90 milliseconds for 30 seconds. If AF was still not induced, intravenous neostigmine was administered, and the process was repeated. Atrial fibrillation was considered sustained after 1 minute. Attempts at AF induction were successful in 18 (86%) of 21. Atrial fibrillation was induced during manual stimulation in four (19%), during rapid pacing in five (24%), during burst pacing in five (24%), and after the administration of neostigmine in four (19%). Mean (SD) duration of AF was 3.6 (2.6) minutes. Of the 18, 14 (78%) reverted to sinus rhythm spontaneously and 4 (22%) required an antiarrhythmic. This technique of inducing AF can easily be used to evaluate new technologies and lesion sets without the need for creating a chronic animal model. PMID:26889882

  14. Validation of a vertical progression porcine burn model.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam J; Hirth, Douglas; McClain, Steve A; Crawford, Laurie; Lin, Fubao; Clark, Richard A F

    2011-01-01

    A major potential goal of burn therapy is to limit progression of partial- to full-thickness burns. To better test therapies, the authors developed and validated a vertical progression porcine burn model in which partial-thickness burns treated with an occlusive dressing convert to full-thickness burns that heal with scarring and wound contraction. Forty contact burns were created on the backs and flanks of two young swine using a 150 g aluminum bar preheated to 70°C, 80°C, or 90°C for 20 or 30 seconds. The necrotic epidermis was removed and the burns were covered with a polyurethane occlusive dressing. Burns were photographed at 1, 24, and 48 hours as well as at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days postinjury. Full-thickness biopsies were obtained at 1, 4, 24, and 48 hours as well as at 7 and 28 days. The primary outcomes were presence of deep contracted scars and wound area 28 days after injury. Secondary outcomes were depth of injury, reepithelialization, and depth of scars. Data were compared across burn conditions using analysis of variance and χ(2) tests. Eight replicate burns were created with the aluminum bar using the following temperature/contact-time combinations: 70/20, 70/30, 80/20, 80/30, and 90/20. The percentage of burns healing with contracted scars were 70/20, 0%; 70/30, 25%; 80/20, 50%; 80/30, 75%; and 90/20, 100% (P = .05). Wound areas at 28 days by injury conditions were 70/20, 8.1 cm(2); 70/30, 7.8 cm(2); 80/20, 6.6 cm(2); 80/30, 4.9 cm(2); and 90/20, 4.8 cm(2) (P = .007). Depth of injury judged by depth of endothelial damage for the 80/20 and 80/30 burns at 1 hour was 36% and 60% of the dermal thickness, respectively. The depth of injury to the endothelial cells 1 hour after injury was inversely correlated with the degree of scar area (Pearson's correlation r = -.71, P < .001). Exposure of porcine skin to an aluminum bar preheated to 80°C for 20 or 30 seconds results initially in a partial-thickness burn that when treated with an occlusive dressing

  15. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M.; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This “subject-specific” model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment. PMID:25190415

  16. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M; Mansy, Hansen A; Sandler, Richard H; Royston, Thomas J

    2014-09-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This "subject-specific" model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment. PMID:25190415

  17. Identification of a Divergent Lineage Porcine Pestivirus in Nursing Piglets with Congenital Tremors and Reproduction of Disease following Experimental Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Bailey L.; Arruda, Paulo H.; Magstadt, Drew R.; Schwartz, Kent J.; Dohlman, Tyler; Schleining, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Abby R.; Visek, Callie A.; Victoria, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital tremors is a sporadic disease of neonatal pigs characterized by action-related repetitive myoclonus. A majority of outbreaks of congenital tremors have been attributed to an unidentified virus. The objectives of this project were to 1) detect potential pathogen(s) in samples from piglets with congenital tremors and 2) develop an infection model to reproduce disease. Using next-generation sequencing, a divergent lineage pestivirus was detected in piglets with congenital tremors. The virus was originally most closely related to a bat pestivirus but is now more closely related to a recently published novel porcine pestivirus provisionally named atypical porcine pestivirus. A quantitative real-time PCR detected the virus in samples from neonatal piglets with congenital tremors from two separate farms, but not in samples from unaffected piglets from the same farm. To fulfill the second objective, pregnant sows were inoculated with either serum containing the pestivirus or PBS (control) by intravenous and intranasal routes simultaneously with direct inoculation of fetal amniotic vesicles by ultrasound-guided surgical technique. Inoculations were performed at either 45 or 62 days of gestation. All sows inoculated with the novel pestivirus farrowed piglets affected with congenital tremors while PBS-inoculated control piglets were unaffected. Tremor severity for each piglet was scored from videos taken 0, 1 and 2 days post-farrowing. Tremor severity remained relatively constant from 0 to 2 days post-farrowing for a majority of piglets. The prevalence of congenital tremors in pestivirus-inoculated litters ranged from 57% (4 out of 7 affected piglets) to 100% (10 out of 10 affected piglets). The virus was consistently detected by PCR in tissues from piglets with congenital tremors but was not detected in control piglets. Samples positive by PCR in greater than 90% of piglets sampled included brainstem (37 out of 41), mesenteric lymph node (37 out of 41

  18. Antiviral effect of dietary germanium biotite supplementation in pigs experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A

    2013-01-01

    Germanium biotite (GB) is an aluminosilicate mineral containing 36 ppm germanium. The present study was conducted to better understand the effects of GB on immune responses in a mouse model, and to demonstrate the clearance effects of this mineral against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in experimentally infected pigs as an initial step towards the development of a feed supplement that would promote immune activity and help prevent diseases. In the mouse model, dietary supplementation with GB enhanced concanavalin A (ConA)-induced lymphocyte proliferation and increased the percentage of CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes. In pigs experimentally infected with PRRSV, viral titers in lungs and lymphoid tissues from the GB-fed group were significantly decreased compared to those of the control group 12 days post-infection. Corresponding histopathological analyses demonstrated that GB-fed pigs displayed less severe pathological changes associated with PRRSV infection compared to the control group, indicating that GB promotes PRRSV clearance. These antiviral effects in pigs may be related to the ability of GB to increase CD3+CD8+ T lymphocyte production observed in the mice. Hence, this mineral may be an effective feed supplement for increasing immune activity and preventing disease. PMID:23814470

  19. Pathogenicity of three type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus strains in experimentally inoculated pregnant gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms of reproductive failure resulting from infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) are still poorly understood. The present study, a side-by-side evaluation of the pathogenicity of three type 2 PRRSv strains in a reproductive model, was used as a pilot study...

  20. Computational biomechanics and experimental validation of vessel deformation based on 4D-CT imaging of the porcine aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, Dilana; Finol, Ender A.; Kostrzewa, Michael; Kopaigorenko, Maria; Richter, Götz-M.; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2009-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease results from pathological biomechanical conditions and fatigue of the vessel wall. Image-based computational modeling provides a physical and realistic insight into the patient-specific biomechanics and enables accurate predictive simulations of development, growth and failure of cardiovascular disease. An experimental validation is necessary for the evaluation and the clinical implementation of such computational models. In the present study, we have implemented dynamic Computed-Tomography (4D-CT) imaging and catheter-based in vivo measured pressures to numerically simulate and experimentally evaluate the biomechanics of the porcine aorta. The computations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and simulate the arterial wall response to the transient pressure-based boundary condition. They are evaluated by comparing the numerically predicted wall deformation and that calculated from the acquired 4D-CT data. The dynamic motion of the vessel is quantified by means of the hydraulic diameter, analyzing sequences at 5% increments over the cardiac cycle. Our results show that accurate biomechanical modeling is possible using FEM-based simulations. The RMS error of the computed hydraulic diameter at five cross-sections of the aorta was 0.188, 0.252, 0.280, 0.237 and 0.204 mm, which is equivalent to 1.7%, 2.3%, 2.7%, 2.3% and 2.0%, respectively, when expressed as a function of the time-averaged hydraulic diameter measured from the CT images. The present investigation is a first attempt to simulate and validate vessel deformation based on realistic morphological data and boundary conditions. An experimentally validated system would help in evaluating individual therapies and optimal treatment strategies in the field of minimally invasive endovascular surgery.

  1. Improved Cell Line IPEC-J2, Characterized as a Model for Porcine Jejunal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Silke S.; Richter, Jan F.; Krug, Susanne M.; Jebautzke, Britta; Lee, In-Fah M.; Rieger, Juliane; Sachtleben, Monika; Bondzio, Angelika; Schulzke, Jörg D.; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER) and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ) proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS) or species-specific (porcine serum, PS) conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS), compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS), the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line’s initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function. PMID:24260272

  2. Improved cell line IPEC-J2, characterized as a model for porcine jejunal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Silke S; Richter, Jan F; Krug, Susanne M; Jebautzke, Britta; Lee, In-Fah M; Rieger, Juliane; Sachtleben, Monika; Bondzio, Angelika; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER) and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ) proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS) or species-specific (porcine serum, PS) conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS), compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS), the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line's initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function. PMID:24260272

  3. Vaccination with a genotype 1 modified live vaccine against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus significantly reduces viremia, viral shedding and transmission of the virus in a quasi-natural experimental model.

    PubMed

    Pileri, Emanuela; Gibert, Elisa; Soldevila, Ferran; García-Saenz, Ariadna; Pujols, Joan; Diaz, Ivan; Darwich, Laila; Casal, Jordi; Martín, Marga; Mateu, Enric

    2015-01-30

    The present study assessed the efficacy of vaccination against genotype 1 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in terms of reduction of the transmission. Ninety-eight 3-week-old piglets were divided in two groups: V (n=40) and NV (n=58) that were housed separately. V animals were vaccinated with a commercial genotype 1 PRRSV vaccine while NV were kept as controls. On day 35 post-vaccination, 14 NV pigs were separated and inoculated intranasally with 2 ml of a heterologous genotype 1 PRRSV isolate ("seeder" pigs, SP). The other V and NV animals were distributed in groups of 5 pigs each. Two days later, one SP was introduced into each pen to expose V and NV to PRRSV. Sentinel pigs were allocated in adjacent pens. Follow-up was of 21 days. All NV (30/30) became viremic after contact with SP while only 53% of V pigs were detected so (21/40, p<0.05). Vaccination shortened viremia (12.2±4 versus 3.7±3.4 days in NV and V pigs, respectively, p<0.01). The 50% survival time for becoming infected (Kaplan-Meier) for V was 21 days (CI95%=14.1-27.9) compared to 7 days (CI95%=5.2-8.7) for NV animals (p<0.01). These differences were reflected in the R value as well: 2.78 (CI95%=2.13-3.43) for NV and 0.53 (CI95%=0.19-0.76) for V pigs (p<0.05). All sentinel pigs (10/10) in pens adjacent to NV+SP pens got infected compared to 1/4 sentinel pigs allocated contiguous to a V+SP pen. These data show that vaccination of piglets significantly decrease parameters related to PRRSV transmission. PMID:25439650

  4. Evaluation of hands-on seminar for reduced port surgery using fresh porcine cadaver model

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Saseem; Kurashima, Yo; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kitashiro, Shuji; Kanehira, Eiji; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of various biological and non-biological simulators is playing an important role in training modern surgeons with laparoscopic skills. However, there have been few reports of the use of a fresh porcine cadaver model for training in laparoscopic surgical skills. The purpose of this study was to report on a surgical training seminar on reduced port surgery using a fresh cadaver porcine model and to assess its feasibility and efficacy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The hands-on seminar had 10 fresh porcine cadaver models and two dry boxes. Each table was provided with a unique access port and devices used in reduced port surgery. Each group of 2 surgeons spent 30 min at each station, performing different tasks assisted by the instructor. The questionnaire survey was done immediately after the seminar and 8 months after the seminar. RESULTS: All the tasks were completed as planned. Both instructors and participants were highly satisfied with the seminar. There was a concern about the time allocated for the seminar. In the post-seminar survey, the participants felt that the number of reduced port surgeries performed by them had increased. CONCLUSION: The fresh cadaver porcine model requires no special animal facility and can be used for training in laparoscopic procedures. PMID:27279391

  5. Validation of subject-specific cardiovascular system models from porcine measurements.

    PubMed

    Revie, James A; Stevenson, David J; Chase, J Geoffrey; Hann, Christopher E; Lambermont, Bernard C; Ghuysen, Alexandre; Kolh, Philippe; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Heldmann, Stefan; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    A previously validated mathematical model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) is made subject-specific using an iterative, proportional gain-based identification method. Prior works utilised a complete set of experimentally measured data that is not clinically typical or applicable. In this paper, parameters are identified using proportional gain-based control and a minimal, clinically available set of measurements. The new method makes use of several intermediary steps through identification of smaller compartmental models of CVS to reduce the number of parameters identified simultaneously and increase the convergence stability of the method. This new, clinically relevant, minimal measurement approach is validated using a porcine model of acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Trials were performed on five pigs, each inserted with three autologous blood clots of decreasing size over a period of four to five hours. All experiments were reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty at the University of Liege, Belgium. Continuous aortic and pulmonary artery pressures (P(ao), P(pa)) were measured along with left and right ventricle pressure and volume waveforms. Subject-specific CVS models were identified from global end diastolic volume (GEDV), stroke volume (SV), P(ao), and P(pa) measurements, with the mean volumes and maximum pressures of the left and right ventricles used to verify the accuracy of the fitted models. The inputs (GEDV, SV, P(ao), P(pa)) used in the identification process were matched by the CVS model to errors <0.5%. Prediction of the mean ventricular volumes and maximum ventricular pressures not used to fit the model compared experimental measurements to median absolute errors of 4.3% and 4.4%, which are equivalent to the measurement errors of currently used monitoring devices in the ICU (∼5-10%). These results validate the potential for implementing this approach in the intensive care unit. PMID:22126892

  6. Temporal localization of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in reproductive tissues of experimentally infected boars.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Cinta; García, Carlos; Simarro, Isabel; Castro, José M

    2003-11-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been reported to be shed in the semen of infected boars. To determine whether the reproductive tissues could be a persistent source of virus and the possible origin of PRRSV found in semen of infected boars, 20 PRRSV-seronegative boars were intranasally inoculated with 5 x 10(6) median tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of PRRSV and necropsied at different times post-inoculation (p.i.) from Day 2 to Day 37 p.i. Blood samples were collected before experimental inoculation, at necropsy and at different times p.i. At necropsy, epididymal semen and reproductive tissues were collected and the presence of the virus determined by virus isolation. The infection of the boars was demonstrated by the isolation of the virus from the sera of all inoculated boars and by seroconversion. PRRSV was detected in serum samples from Day 2 to Day 23 p.i., although the viremic period was largely dependent on the individual response to infection. Viral replication was proven within different reproductive tissues from Day 2 to Day 23 p.i., being most consistently found in the epididymus. In addition, PRRSV was isolated in semen from Day 4 to Day 10 p.i. The correlation of a diminished viremia and the inability to isolate PRRSV from semen or reproductive tissues may be due to one of two possibilities. First, viremia is responsible for most of the virus isolated from reproductive tissues due to the movement of PRRSV-infected cells out of the blood and into the tissues. Second, viremia may initially seed the reproductive tissues with PRRSV, and then the virus is produced into the reproductive tract and shed into semen at low levels. PMID:14519471

  7. Modeling the adaptive permeability response of porcine iliac arteries to acute changes in mural shear.

    PubMed

    Hazel, A L; Grzybowski, D M; Friedman, M H

    2003-04-01

    The hypothesis that much of the uptake of macromolecules by the vascular wall takes place while the endothelial lining is adapting to changes in its hemodynamic environment is being tested by a series of in vivo measurements of the uptake of Evans-blue-dye-labeled albumin by porcine iliac arteries subjected to acute changes in blood flow. The uptake data are interpreted through an ad hoc model of the dynamic permeability response that is proposed to accompany alterations in mural shear. The model is able to correlate, with a single set of parameters, the vascular response to a variety of experimental protocols, including sustained step increases and decreases in shear, and alternations in shear of various periods. The best-fit parameters of the model suggest that the adaptive response to an increase in shear proceeds with a latency of approximately 1.5 min and a time constant of approximately 90 min that is substantially shorter than the response to a decrease in shear. PMID:12723682

  8. Porcine models of digestive disease: the future of large animal translational research.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Liara M; Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2015-07-01

    There is increasing interest in nonrodent translational models for the study of human disease. The pig, in particular, serves as a useful animal model for the study of pathophysiological conditions relevant to the human intestine. This review assesses currently used porcine models of gastrointestinal physiology and disease and provides a rationale for the use of these models for future translational studies. The pig has proven its utility for the study of fundamental disease conditions such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, stress-induced intestinal dysfunction, and short bowel syndrome. Pigs have also shown great promise for the study of intestinal barrier function, surgical tissue manipulation and intervention, as well as biomaterial implantation and tissue transplantation. Advantages of pig models highlighted by these studies include the physiological similarity to human intestine and mechanisms of human disease. Emerging future directions for porcine models of human disease include the fields of transgenics and stem cell biology, with exciting implications for regenerative medicine. PMID:25655839

  9. Experimental islet isolation in porcine pancreas with new enzyme Liberase PI.

    PubMed

    Kim, S C; Han, D J; Kang, C H; We, Y M; Back, J H; Kim, Y H; Lim, D G

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the results of 20 consecutive porcine islet isolations using a new enzyme Liberase PI. Twenty pancreata were procured for islet isolation, which was performed using modified Ricordi's method with Liberase PI. Quantitation of islet viability staining, insulin stimulation assay, intracellular insulin content/DNA, and in vivo transplantability into diabetic nude mice were examined for quality control. The results were compared between a high-yield group (>2500 IEQ/g pancreas) and a low-yield group (<2500 IEQ/g pancreas). Sufficient amount of purified islets (3000 IEQ/g pancreas) were obtained using the new brand enzyme Liberase PI. These islets showed good quality in structure and functions, which were demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo standard assays. Isolation index (IEQ/number) of the low-yield group was lower than that of high-yield group (0.75 vs 0.86), which means more fragmentation of islets in the low-yield group. There were no differences in function between the two groups. In conclusion, we obtained sufficient numbers of viable, functional islets from porcine pancreas using a new brand enzyme Liberase PI and low-temperature isolation technique. However, overdigestion of islets during the isolation remains to be overcome. Advance in porcine islet isolation technique will in the future make the porcine islet xenotransplantation a reality for the cure of diabetes mellitus. PMID:15518798

  10. Minimally Invasive Swine Experimental Model for the In Vivo Study of Liver Metabolism of Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, O; Romano, R; Scarpati, G; Esposito, C; Cavaglià, E; Corona, M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop a clinically relevant porcine model for the study of hepatic metabolism of drugs by means of hepatic vein catheterization. Materials and Methods: review of literature and elaboration of a hypothesis, design of an experimental method. Results: recent clinical studies were conducted by withdrawing cirrhotic patients’ blood from right hepatic vein during hepatic vein pressure gradient measurements. Basing on our personal clinical experience and evaluation of research needs, an experimental model is proposed. Conclusions: contemporary measurement of peripheral and hepatic concentration of drugs by peripheral vein and hepatic vein catheterization can be used to create a reliable and reproducible porcine model to study liver metabolism of drugs in vivo. PMID:23905064

  11. Invasive surgery reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    van Hout, Gerardus PJ; Teuben, Michel PJ; Heeres, Marjolein; de Maat, Steven; de Jong, Renate; Maas, Coen; Kouwenberg, Lisanne HJA; Koenderman, Leo; van Solinge, Wouter W; de Jager, Saskia CA; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E

    2015-01-01

    Reperfusion injury following myocardial infarction (MI) increases infarct size (IS) and deteriorates cardiac function. Cardioprotective strategies in large animal MI models often failed in clinical trials, suggesting translational failure. Experimentally, MI is induced artificially and the effect of the experimental procedures may influence outcome and thus clinical applicability. The aim of this study was to investigate if invasive surgery, as in the common open chest MI model affects IS and cardiac function. Twenty female landrace pigs were subjected to MI by transluminal balloon occlusion. In 10 of 20 pigs, balloon occlusion was preceded by invasive surgery (medial sternotomy). After 72 hrs, pigs were subjected to echocardiography and Evans blue/triphenyl tetrazoliumchloride double staining to determine IS and area at risk. Quantification of IS showed a significant IS reduction in the open chest group compared to the closed chest group (IS versus area at risk: 50.9 ± 5.4% versus 69.9 ± 3.4%, P = 0.007). End systolic LV volume and LV ejection fraction measured by echocardiography at follow-up differed significantly between both groups (51 ± 5 ml versus 65 ± 3 ml, P = 0.033; 47.5 ± 2.6% versus 38.8 ± 1.2%, P = 0.005). The inflammatory response in the damaged myocardium did not differ between groups. This study indicates that invasive surgery reduces IS and preserves cardiac function in a porcine MI model. Future studies need to elucidate the effect of infarct induction technique on the efficacy of pharmacological therapies in large animal cardioprotection studies. PMID:26282710

  12. Effect of porcine circovirus type 2a or 2b on infection kinetics and pathogenicity of two genetically divergent strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in the conventional pig model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to characterize the infection dynamics and pathogenicity of two heterologous type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates in a conventional pig model under the influence of concurrent porcine circovirus (PCV) subtype 2a or 2b infection. ...

  13. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Thoracolumbar Fascia Injury and Movement Restriction in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, James H.; Fox, James R.; Maple, Rhonda; Loretan, Caitlin; Badger, Gary J.; Henry, Sharon M.; Vizzard, Margaret A.; Langevin, Helene M.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of back pain following acute back “sprains” is a serious public health problem with poorly understood pathophysiology. The recent finding that human subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP) have increased thickness and decreased mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia measured with ultrasound suggest that the fasciae of the back may be involved in LBP pathophysiology. This study used a porcine model to test the hypothesis that similar ultrasound findings can be produced experimentally in a porcine model by combining a local injury of fascia with movement restriction using a “hobble” device linking one foot to a chest harness for 8 weeks. Ultrasound measurements of thoracolumbar fascia thickness and shear plane mobility (shear strain) during passive hip flexion were made at the 8 week time point on the non-intervention side (injury and/or hobble). Injury alone caused both an increase in fascia thickness (p = .007) and a decrease in fascia shear strain on the non-injured side (p = .027). Movement restriction alone did not change fascia thickness but did decrease shear strain on the non-hobble side (p = .024). The combination of injury plus movement restriction had additive effects on reducing fascia mobility with a 52% reduction in shear strain compared with controls and a 28% reduction compared to movement restriction alone. These results suggest that a back injury involving fascia, even when healed, can affect the relative mobility of fascia layers away from the injured area, especially when movement is also restricted. PMID:26820883

  14. A Zebrafish Larval Model to Assess Virulence of Porcine Streptococcus suis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zaccaria, Edoardo; Cao, Rui; Wells, Jerry M.; van Baarlen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an encapsulated Gram-positive bacterium, and the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in young pigs resulting in considerable economic losses in the porcine industry. It is also considered an emerging zoonotic agent. In the environment, both avirulent and virulent strains occur in pigs, and virulent strains appear to cause disease in both humans and pigs. There is a need for a convenient, reliable and standardized animal model to assess S. suis virulence. A zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae infection model has several advantages, including transparency of larvae, low cost, ease of use and exemption from ethical legislation up to 6 days post fertilization, but has not been previously established as a model for S. suis. Microinjection of different porcine strains of S. suis in zebrafish larvae resulted in highly reproducible dose- and strain-dependent larval death, strongly correlating with presence of the S. suis capsule and to the original virulence of the strain in pigs. Additionally we compared the virulence of the two-component system mutant of ciaRH, which is attenuated for virulence in both mice and pigs in vivo. Infection of larvae with the ΔciaRH strain resulted in significantly higher survival rate compared to infection with the S10 wild-type strain. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a rapid and reliable model to assess the virulence of clinical porcine S. suis isolates. PMID:26999052

  15. A Zebrafish Larval Model to Assess Virulence of Porcine Streptococcus suis Strains.

    PubMed

    Zaccaria, Edoardo; Cao, Rui; Wells, Jerry M; van Baarlen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an encapsulated Gram-positive bacterium, and the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in young pigs resulting in considerable economic losses in the porcine industry. It is also considered an emerging zoonotic agent. In the environment, both avirulent and virulent strains occur in pigs, and virulent strains appear to cause disease in both humans and pigs. There is a need for a convenient, reliable and standardized animal model to assess S. suis virulence. A zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae infection model has several advantages, including transparency of larvae, low cost, ease of use and exemption from ethical legislation up to 6 days post fertilization, but has not been previously established as a model for S. suis. Microinjection of different porcine strains of S. suis in zebrafish larvae resulted in highly reproducible dose- and strain-dependent larval death, strongly correlating with presence of the S. suis capsule and to the original virulence of the strain in pigs. Additionally we compared the virulence of the two-component system mutant of ciaRH, which is attenuated for virulence in both mice and pigs in vivo. Infection of larvae with the ΔciaRH strain resulted in significantly higher survival rate compared to infection with the S10 wild-type strain. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a rapid and reliable model to assess the virulence of clinical porcine S. suis isolates. PMID:26999052

  16. In vivo porcine lipopolysaccharide inflammation models to study immunomodulation of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wyns, H; Plessers, E; De Backer, P; Meyer, E; Croubels, S

    2015-08-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural part of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, is one of the most effective stimulators of the immune system and has been widely applied in pigs as an experimental model for bacterial infection. For this purpose, a variety of Escherichia coli serotypes, LPS doses, routes and duration of administration have been used. LPS administration induces the acute phase response (APR) and is associated with dramatic hemodynamic, clinical and behavioral changes in pigs. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 are involved in the induction of the eicosanoid pathway and the hepatic production of acute phase proteins, including C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp) and pig major acute phase protein (pig-MAP). Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) play a major role in the development of fever and pulmonary hypertension in LPS-challenged pigs, respectively. The LPS-induced APR can be modulated by drugs. Steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ((N)SAIDs) possess anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic properties through (non)-selective central and peripheral cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. Antimicrobial drugs, especially macrolide antibiotics, which are commonly used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of bacterial respiratory diseases, have been recurrently reported to exert clinically important immunomodulatory effects in human and murine research. To investigate the influence of these drugs on the clinical response, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, acute phase proteins (APP) and the course of the febrile response in pigs, in vivo LPS inflammation models can be applied. Yet, to date, in vivo research on the immunomodulatory properties of antimicrobial drugs in these models in pigs is largely lacking. This review provides acritical overview of the use of in vivo porcine E. coli LPS inflammation models for the study of the APR, as

  17. Porcine gonadogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five images submitted for teaching purposes related to porcine gonadogenesis (2), porcine fetal testicular development (2), and porcine fetal ovarian development. Key words include: Egg cell nests, Embryo, GATA4, Genital ridge, Gonad, Leydig cell, Mesonephros, MIS, Ovary, P450c17, Porcine, Sertoli ...

  18. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11 mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240 mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  19. Extrahepatic islet transplantation with microporous polymer scaffolds in syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models

    PubMed Central

    Gibly, Romie F.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Graham, Melanie L.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Lowe, William L.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2011-01-01

    Intraportal transplantation of islets has successfully treated select patients with type 1 diabetes. However, intravascular infusion and the intrahepatic site contribute to significant early and late islet loss, yet a clinical alternative has remained elusive. We investigated non-encapsulating, porous, biodegradable polymer scaffolds as a vehicle for islet transplantation into extrahepatic sites, using syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models. Scaffold architecture was modified to enhance cell infiltration leading to re-vascularization of the islets with minimal inflammatory response. In the diabetic mouse model, 125 islets seeded on scaffolds implanted into the epididymal fat pad restored normoglycemia within an average of 1.95 days and transplantation of only 75 islets required 12.1 days. Increasing the pore size to increase islet-islet interactions did not significantly impact islet function. The porcine model was used to investigate early islet engraftment. Increasing the islet seeding density led to a greater mass of engrafted islets, though the efficiency of islet survival decreased. Transplantation into the porcine omentum provided greater islet engraftment than the gastric submucosa. These results demonstrate scaffolds support murine islet transplantation with high efficiency, and feasibility studies in large animals support continued pre-clinical studies with scaffolds as a platform to control the transplant microenvironment. PMID:21959005

  20. A novel coculture model of porcine central neuroretina explants and retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Lauro, Salvatore; Rodriguez-Crespo, David; Gayoso, Manuel J.; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria T.; Pastor, J. Carlos; Srivastava, Girish K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and standardize a novel organ culture model using porcine central neuroretina explants and RPE cells separated by a cell culture membrane. Methods RPE cells were isolated from porcine eyes, expanded, and seeded on the bottom of cell culture inserts. Neuroretina explants were obtained from the area centralis and cultured alone (controls) on cell culture membranes or supplemented with RPE cells in the same wells but physically separated by the culture membrane. Finally, cellular and tissue specimens were processed for phase contrast, cyto-/histological, and immunochemical evaluation. Neuroretina thickness was also determined. Results Compared to the neuroretinas cultured alone, the neuroretinas cocultured with RPE cells maintained better tissue structure and cellular organization, displayed better preservation of photoreceptors containing rhodopsin, lower levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoexpression, and preservation of cellular retinaldehyde binding protein both markers of reactive gliosis. Neuroretina thickness was significantly greater in the cocultures. Conclusions A coculture model of central porcine neuroretina and RPE cells was successfully developed and standardized. This model mimics a subretinal space and will be useful in studying interactions between the RPE and the neuroretina and to preclinically test potential therapies. PMID:27081295

  1. Shear mechanical properties of the porcine pancreas: experiment and analytical modelling.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, S; Noguer, L; Palierne, J-F

    2013-10-01

    We provide the first account of the shear mechanical properties of porcine pancreas using a rheometer both in linear oscillatory tests and in constant strain-rate tests reaching the non-linear sub-failure regime. Our results show that pancreas has a low and weakly frequency-dependent dynamic modulus and experiences a noticeable strain-hardening beyond 20% strain. In both linear and non-linear regime, the viscoelastic behaviour of porcine pancreas follows a four-parameter bi-power model that has been validated on kidney, liver and spleen. Among the four solid organs of the abdomen, pancreas proves to be the most compliant and the most viscous one. PMID:23820244

  2. Structural investigation of porcine stomach mucin by X-ray fiber diffraction and homology modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Veluraja, K.; Vennila, K.N.; Umamakeshvari, K.; Jasmine, A.; Velmurugan, D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Techniques to get oriented mucin fibre. {yields} X-ray fibre diffraction pattern for mucin. {yields} Molecular modeling of mucin based on X-ray fibre diffraction pattern. -- Abstract: The basic understanding of the three dimensional structure of mucin is essential to understand its physiological function. Technology has been developed to achieve orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules. X-ray fiber diffraction of partially orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules show d-spacing signals at 2.99, 4.06, 4.22, 4.7, 5.37 and 6.5 A. The high intense d-spacing signal at 4.22 A is attributed to the antiparallel {beta}-sheet structure identified in the fraction of the homology modeled mucin molecule (amino acid residues 800-980) using Nidogen-Laminin complex structure as a template. The X-ray fiber diffraction signal at 6.5 A reveals partial organization of oligosaccharides in porcine stomach mucin. This partial structure of mucin will be helpful in establishing a three dimensional structure for the whole mucin molecule.

  3. ENDOSCOPIC HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED US: TECHNICAL ASPECTS AND STUDIES IN AN IN VIVO PORCINE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Wang, Yak-Nam; Maloney, Ezekiel; D'Andrea, Samantha; Starr, Frank; Farr, Navid; Morrison, Kyle; Keilman, George; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Background High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming more widely used for non-invasive and minimally invasive ablation of benign and malignant tumors. Recent studies suggest that HIFU can also enhance targeted drug delivery and stimulate an anti-tumor immune response in many tumors. However, targeting of pancreatic and liver tumors using an extracorporeal source is challenging due to the lack of an adequate acoustic window. The development of an endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided HIFU transducer has many potential benefits including improved targeting, decreased energy requirements and decreased potential for injury to intervening structures. Objective To design, develop and test an EUS-guided HIFU transducer for endoscopic applications. Design A pre-clinical, pilot characterization and feasibility study. Setting Academic research center. Patients Studies were performed in an in vivo porcine model. Intervention Thermal ablation of in vivo porcine pancreas and liver was performed with EUS guided focused ultrasound through the gastric tract. Results The transducer successfully created lesions in gel phantoms and ex vivo bovine livers. In vivo studies demonstrated that targeting and creating lesions in the porcine pancreas and liver are feasible. Limitations This is a pre-clinical, single-center feasibility study with a limited number of subjects. Conclusion An EUS-guided HIFU transducer was successfully designed and developed with dimensions that are appropriate for endoscopic use. Feasibility of performing EUS-guided HIFU ablation in vivo has been demonstrated in an in vivo porcine model. Further development of this technology will allow endoscopists to perform precise therapeutic ablation of peri-lumenal lesions without breaching the wall of the gastric tract. PMID:25759124

  4. Percentile growth charts for biomedical studies using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Corson, A M; Laws, J; Laws, A; Litten, J C; Lean, I J; Clarke, L

    2008-12-01

    Increasing rates of obesity and heart disease are compromising quality of life for a growing number of people. There is much research linking adult disease with the growth and development both in utero and during the first year of life. The pig is an ideal model for studying the origins of developmental programming. The objective of this paper was to construct percentile growth curves for the pig for use in biomedical studies. The body weight (BW) of pigs was recorded from birth to 150 days of age and their crown-to-rump length was measured over the neonatal period to enable the ponderal index (PI; kg/m3) to be calculated. Data were normalised and percentile curves were constructed using Cole's lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) method for BW and PI. The construction of these percentile charts for use in biomedical research will allow a more detailed and precise tracking of growth and development of individual pigs under experimental conditions. PMID:22444086

  5. Long-term survival and integration of porcine expanded neural precursor cell grafts in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Harrower, T P; Tyers, P; Hooks, Y; Barker, R A

    2006-01-01

    Porcine fetal neural tissue has been considered as an alternative source to human allografts for transplantation in neurodegenerative disorders by virtue of the fact that it can overcome the ethical and practical difficulties using human fetal neural tissue. However, primary porcine neural xenografts are rejected while porcine expanded neural precursor neural cells (PNPCs) seem to be less immunogenic and thus survive better [Armstrong, R.J., Harrower, T.P., Hurelbrink, C.B., McLaughin, M., Ratcliffe, E.L., Tyers, P., Richards, A., Dunnett, S.B., Rosser, A.E., Barker, R.A., 2001a. Porcine neural xenografts in the immunocompetent rat: immune response following grafting of expanded neural precursor cells. Neuroscience 106, 201-216]. In this study, we extended these observations to investigate the long-term survival of such transplants in immunosuppressed rats. Unilateral 6 OHDA lesioned rats received grafts into the dopamine denervated striatum of either primary porcine fetal neural tissue dissected from the E26 cortex or cortically derived neural stem cells which had been derived from the same source but expanded in vitro for 21 days. All cortically derived neural stem cell grafts survived up to 5 months in contrast to the poor survival of primary porcine xenografts. Histological analysis demonstrated good graft integration with fibers extending into the surrounding host tissue including white matter with synapse formation, and in addition there was evidence of host vascularization and myelinated fibers within the graft area. This study has therefore shown for the first time the reliable long-term survival of grafts derived from porcine expanded neural precursors in a rat model of PD, with maturation and integration into the host brain. This demonstrates that such xenografted cells may be able to recreate the damaged circuitry in PD although strategies for dopaminergic differentiation of the porcine neural precursor cell remain to be refined. PMID:16246328

  6. Implementation of a 3D porcine lumbar finite element model for the simulation of monolithic spinal rods with variable flexural stiffness.

    PubMed

    Brummund, Martin; Brailovski, Vladimir; Facchinello, Yann; Petit, Yvan; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2015-08-01

    Monolithic superelastic-elastoplastic spinal rods (MSER) are promising candidates to provide (i) dynamic stabilisation in spinal segments prone to mechanical stress concentration and adjacent segment disease and (ii) to provide fusion-ready stabilization in spinal segments at risk of implant failure. However, the stiffness distributions along the rod's longitudinal axis that best meet clinical requirements remain unknown. The present study is part of a mixed numerical experimental research project and aims at the implementation of a 3D finite element model of the porcine lumbar spine to study the role of MSER material properties and stiffness distributions on the intradiscal pressure distribution in the adjacent segment. In this paper, preliminary intradiscal pressure predictions obtained at one functional spinal unit are presented. Due to a lack of porcine material property data, these predictions were obtained on the basis of uncalibrated human vertebral disc data which were taken from the literature. The results indicate that human annulus and nucleus data predict experimental porcine in vivo and in vitro data reasonably well for the compressive forces of varying magnitudes. PMID:26736412

  7. Creating a model of diseased artery damage and failure from healthy porcine aorta.

    PubMed

    Noble, Christopher; Smulders, Nicole; Green, Nicola H; Lewis, Roger; Carré, Matt J; Franklin, Steve E; MacNeil, Sheila; Taylor, Zeike A

    2016-07-01

    Large quantities of diseased tissue are required in the research and development of new generations of medical devices, for example for use in physical testing. However, these are difficult to obtain. In contrast, porcine arteries are readily available as they are regarded as waste. Therefore, reliable means of creating from porcine tissue physical models of diseased human tissue that emulate well the associated mechanical changes would be valuable. To this end, we studied the effect on mechanical response of treating porcine thoracic aorta with collagenase, elastase and glutaraldehyde. The alterations in mechanical and failure properties were assessed via uniaxial tension testing. A constitutive model composed of the Gasser-Ogden-Holzapfel model, for elastic response, and a continuum damage model, for the failure, was also employed to provide a further basis for comparison (Calvo and Peña, 2006; Gasser et al., 2006). For the concentrations used here it was found that: collagenase treated samples showed decreased fracture stress in the axial direction only; elastase treated samples showed increased fracture stress in the circumferential direction only; and glutaraldehyde samples showed no change in either direction. With respect to the proposed constitutive model, both collagenase and elastase had a strong effect on the fibre-related terms. The model more closely captured the tissue response in the circumferential direction, due to the smoother and sharper transition from damage initiation to complete failure in this direction. Finally, comparison of the results with those of tensile tests on diseased tissues suggests that these treatments indeed provide a basis for creation of physical models of diseased arteries. PMID:26945437

  8. A porcine model of relief of unilateral ureteral obstruction: study on self-repairing capability over multiple time points.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Sun, Jing; Miao, Lining; Ji, Lei; Luo, Manyu; Li, Bing; Cui, Wenpeng; Wang, Yangwei; Xie, Yuansheng; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-08-01

    It is still controversial whether renal tubular interstitial fibrosis (TIF) is a reversible process. Although previous studies examining TIF have been carried out in rodents, their kidney size and physiological character differ with humans, and the difference among diverse individuals before and after damage was obvious. Thus an experimental animal model to simulate human kidney disease was urged to be established. In order to clarify whether TIF is reversible, and the exact time points that the kidney has the capacity to be repaired, a porcine relief of unilateral ureteral obstruction (R-UUO) model was developed. Kidney damage and reparation were observed dynamically in vivo over various time points. Pigs were randomized divided into three groups (n = 6): UUO 5 days group, UUO 7 days, and UUO 10 days group. Each porcine in that groups underwent UUO and subsequent R-UUO for three time points. Renal function, histological structure, and protein expressions of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), vimentin and E-cadherin were evaluated at different time points. Following R-UUO after 5 and 7 days of UUO, compared to UUO, serum creatinine levels were significantly decreased. Renal pathological tissue damage was repaired. The expressions of α-SMA and vimentin were decreased and E-cadherin expression was increased (P < 0.05). However, during R-UUO 14, 28, and 56 days after 10 days of UUO, serum creatinine was not decreased significantly. The expressions of α-SMA and vimentin consistently remained at high levels. Renal damage was unable to be restored and resulted in chronic lesions. Kidney damage induced by UUO can be reversed in early stages. However, longer time of UUO with significant levels of TIF showed limited reversibility. The porcine R-UUO model provides an ideal animal model for the investigation of kidney injury and repair as well as for the evaluation of the effect of drug treatment. PMID:27381184

  9. Porcine models of digestive disease: the future of large animal translational research

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Liara M.; Moeser, Adam J.; Blikslager, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in non-rodent translational models for the study of human disease. The pig, in particular, serves as a useful animal model for the study of pathophysiological conditions relevant to the human intestine. This review assesses currently used porcine models of gastrointestinal physiology and disease and provides a rationale for the use of these models for future translational studies. The pig has proven its utility for the study of fundamental disease conditions such as ischemia/ reperfusion injury, stress-induced intestinal dysfunction, and short bowel syndrome. Pigs have also shown great promise for the study of intestinal barrier function, surgical tissue manipulation and intervention, as well as biomaterial implantation and tissue transplantation. Advantages of pig models highlighted by these studies include the physiological similarity to human intestine as well as to mechanisms of human disease. Emerging future directions for porcine models of human disease include the fields of transgenics and stem cell biology, with exciting implications for regenerative medicine. PMID:25655839

  10. A Porcine Anterior Segment Perfusion and Transduction Model With Direct Visualization of the Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, Ralitsa T.; Roy, Pritha; Park, Daniel B.; Jensen, Adrianna; Scott, Gordon; Cohen-Karni, Devora; Fautsch, Michael P.; Schuman, Joel S.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish a consistent and affordable, high quality porcine anterior segment perfusion and transduction model that allows direct visualization of the trabecular meshwork. Methods Porcine anterior segments were cultured within 2 hours of death by removing lens and uvea and securing in a specially designed petri dish with a thin bottom to allow direct visualization of the trabecular meshwork with minimal distortion. Twenty-two control eyes (CO) with a constant flow rate were compared to eight gravity perfused eyes (COgr, 15 mm Hg). We established gene delivery to the TM using eGFP expressing feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vector GINSIN at 108 transducing units (TU) per eye (GINSIN_8, n = 8) and 107 TU (GINSIN_7, n = 8). Expression was assessed for 14 days before histology was obtained. Results Pig eyes were a reliable source for consistent and high quality anterior segment cultures with a low failure rate of 12%. Control eyes had an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 15.8 ± 1.9 mm Hg at fixed pump perfusion with 3 μL/min compared to gravity perfused COgr with imputed 3.7 ± 1.6 μL/min. Vector GINSIN_8 eyes experienced a transient posttransduction IOP increase of 44% that resolved at 48 hours; this was not observed in GINSIN_7 eyes. Expression was higher in GINSIN_8 than in GINSIN_7 eyes. Trabecular meshwork architecture was well preserved. Conclusions Compared with previously used human donor eyes, this inexpensive porcine anterior segment perfusion model is of sufficient, repeatable high quality to develop strategies of TM bioengineering. Trabecular meshwork could be observed directly. Despite significant anatomic differences, effects of transduction replicate the main aspects of previously explored human, feline and rodent models. PMID:27002293

  11. Constitutive Modeling of Porcine Liver in Indentation Using 3D Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, P.; Socrate, S.; Zickler, T.E.; Howe, R.D.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present an inverse finite-element modeling framework for constitutive modeling and parameter estimation of soft tissues using full-field volumetric deformation data obtained from 3D ultrasound. The finite-element model is coupled to full-field visual measurements by regularization springs attached at nodal locations. The free ends of the springs are displaced according to the locally estimated tissue motion and the normalized potential energy stored in all springs serves as a measure of model-experiment agreement for material parameter optimization. We demonstrate good accuracy of estimated parameters and consistent convergence properties on synthetically generated data. We present constitutive model selection and parameter estimation for perfused porcine liver in indentation and demonstrate that a quasilinear viscoelastic model with shear modulus relaxation offers good model-experiment agreement in terms of indenter displacement (0.19 mm RMS error) and tissue displacement field (0.97 mm RMS error). PMID:19627823

  12. Porcine cadaver iris model for iris heating during corneal surgery with a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Wang, Jiang; Yan, Ying; Juhasz, Tibor; Kurtz, Ron

    2015-03-01

    Multiple femtosecond lasers have now been cleared for use for ophthalmic surgery, including for creation of corneal flaps in LASIK surgery. Preliminary study indicated that during typical surgical use, laser energy may pass beyond the cornea with potential effects on the iris. As a model for laser exposure of the iris during femtosecond corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature rise in porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by the femtosecond laser. Additionally, ex-vivo iris heating due to femtosecond laser irradiation was measured with an infrared thermal camera (Fluke corp. Everett, WA) as a validation of the simulation.

  13. In vivo porcine left atrial wall stress: Computational model.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Elena S; Bellini, Chiara; Schwartzman, David S

    2011-10-13

    Most computational models of the heart have so far concentrated on the study of the left ventricle, mainly using simplified geometries. The same approach cannot be adopted to model the left atrium, whose irregular shape does not allow morphological simplifications. In addition, the deformation of the left atrium during the cardiac cycle strongly depends on the interaction with its surrounding structures. We present a procedure to generate a comprehensive computational model of the left atrium, including physiological loads (blood pressure), boundary conditions (pericardium, pulmonary veins and mitral valve annulus movement) and mechanical properties based on planar biaxial experiments. The model was able to accurately reproduce the in vivo dynamics of the left atrium during the passive portion of the cardiac cycle. A shift in time between the peak pressure and the maximum displacement of the mitral valve annulus allows the appendage to inflate and bend towards the ventricle before the pulling effect associated with the ventricle contraction takes place. The ventricular systole creates room for further expansion of the appendage, which gets in close contact with the pericardium. The temporal evolution of the volume in the atrial cavity as predicted by the finite element simulation matches the volume changes obtained from CT scans. The stress field computed at each time point shows remarkable spatial heterogeneity. In particular, high stress concentration occurs along the appendage rim and in the region surrounding the pulmonary veins. PMID:21907340

  14. ULTRASOUND-ENHANCED rt-PA THROMBOLYSIS IN AN EX VIVO PORCINE CAROTID ARTERY MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E.; Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Caudell Stamper, Danielle N.; Vela, Deborah C.; Sutton, Jonathan T.; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is known to enhance recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) thrombolysis. In this study, occlusive porcine whole blood clots were placed in flowing plasma within living porcine carotid arteries. Ultrasonically induced stable cavitation was investigated as an adjuvant to rt-PA thrombolysis. Aged, retracted clots were exposed to plasma alone, plasma containing rt-PA (7.1 ± 3.8 μg/mL) or plasma with rt-PA and Definity® ultrasound contrast agent (0.79 ± 0.47 μL/mL) with and without 120-kHz continuous wave ultrasound at a peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.44 MPa. An insonation scheme was formulated to promote and maximize stable cavitation activity by incorporating ultrasound quiescent periods that allowed for the inflow of Definity®-rich plasma. Cavitation was measured with a passive acoustic detector throughout thrombolytic treatment. Thrombolytic efficacy was measured by comparing clot mass before and after treatment. Average mass loss for clots exposed to rt-PA and Definity® without ultrasound (n = 7) was 34%, and with ultrasound (n = 6) was 83%, which constituted a significant difference (p < 0.0001). Without Definity® there was no thrombolytic enhancement by ultrasound exposure alone at this pressure amplitude (n = 5, p < 0.0001). In the low-oxygen environment of the ischemic artery, significant loss of endothelium occurred but no correlation was observed between arterial tissue damage and treatment type. Acoustic stable cavitation nucleated by an infusion of Definity® enhances rt-PA thrombolysis without apparent treatment-related damage in this ex vivo porcine carotid artery model. PMID:21723448

  15. Effect of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccination on PCV2-viremic piglets after experimental PCV2 challenge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccines on PCV2-viremic and -seropositive piglets born from naturally PCV2-infected sows against postnatal PCV2 challenge. The experimental design was aimed at mimicking commercial swine rearing conditions to evaluate the response of the PCV2 vaccine on PCV2-viremic and -seropositive piglets after experimental PCV2 challenge. PCV2a (or 2b)-viremic piglets received a PCV2 vaccine at 21 days of age followed by a PCV2b (or 2a) challenge at 49 days of age (28 days post vaccination). The PCV2 vaccines elicited a high level of humoral (as measured by immunoperoxidase monolayer assay and neutralizing antibody titers) and cellular (as measured by the frequency of PCV2-specific interferon-γ-secreting cells) immune response in the PCV2-viremic piglets after vaccination even in the presence of maternally derived antibodies (MDA). The initial infection of PCV2 in the pigs was not affected by PCV2 vaccination, however the challenging PCV2 was reduced by PCV2 vaccination on PCV2-viremic pigs. The results from this study demonstrate that the PCV2 vaccine used in this study is effective at reducing PCV2 viremia and lymphoid PCV2 DNA, even for PCV2-viremic pigs with passively acquired MDA at the time of vaccination. PMID:24484292

  16. Restenosis and the proportional neointimal response to coronary artery injury: results in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R S; Huber, K C; Murphy, J G; Edwards, W D; Camrud, A R; Vlietstra, R E; Holmes, D R

    1992-02-01

    Restenosis is a reparative response to arterial injury occurring with percutaneous coronary revascularization. However, the quantitative characteristics of the relation between vessel injury and the magnitude of restenotic response remain unknown. This study was thus performed to determine the relation between severity of vessel wall injury and the thickness of resulting neointimal proliferation in a porcine model of coronary restenosis. Twenty-six porcine coronary artery segments in 24 pigs were subjected to deep arterial injury with use of overexpanded, percutaneously delivered tantalum wire coils. The vessels were studied microscopically 4 weeks after coil implantation to measure the relation between the extent of injury and the resulting neointimal thickness. For each wire site, a histopathologic score proportional to injury depth and the neointimal thicknesses at that site were determined. Mean injury scores were compared with both mean neointimal thickness and planimetry-derived area percent lumen stenosis. The severity of vessel injury strongly correlated with neointimal thickness and percent diameter stenosis (p less than 0.001). Neointimal proliferation resulting from a given wire was related to injury severity in adjacent wires, suggesting an interaction among effects at injured sites. If the results in this model apply to human coronary arteries, restenosis may depend on the degree of vessel injury sustained during angioplasty. PMID:1732351

  17. Porcine retinal cell line VIDO R1 and Chlamydia suis to modelize ocular chlamydiosis.

    PubMed

    Käser, Tobias; Cnudde, Thomas; Hamonic, Glenn; Rieder, Meghanne; Pasternak, J Alex; Lai, Ken; Tikoo, Suresh K; Wilson, Heather L; Meurens, François

    2015-08-15

    Human ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infections can lead to trachoma, the major cause of infectious blindness worldwide. Trachoma control strategies are very helpful but logistically challenging, and a trachoma vaccine is needed but not available. Pigs are a valuable large animal model for various immunological questions and could facilitate the study of human ocular chlamydial infections. In addition, a recent study identified the zoonotic potential of Chlamydia suis, the natural pathogen of pigs. In terms of the One Health Initiative, understanding the host-pathogen-interactions and finding a vaccine for porcine chlamydia infections would also benefit human health. Thus, we infected the porcine retinal cell line VIDO R1 with C. suis and analyzed the chlamydial life cycle and the innate immune response of the infected cells. Our results indicate that C. suis completes its life cycle in VIDO R1 cells within 48 h, comparable to C. trachomatis in humans. C. suis infection of VIDO R1 cells led to increased levels of various innate immune mediators like pathogen recognition receptors, cytokines and chemokines including IL6, TNFα, and MMP9, also most relevant in human C. trachomatis infections. These results illustrate the first steps in the host-pathogen-interactions of ocular C. suis infections in pigs and show their similarity to C. trachomatis infections in humans, justifying further testing of pigs as an animal model for human trachoma. PMID:26103808

  18. A novel device to create consistent deep dermal burns in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Seema; Chan, Queenie; Bertinetti, Monique; Harvey, John G; Hei, Erik R La; Holland, Andrew JA

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this study to evaluate a novel device to create a consistent and reproducible deep partial thickness burn in a porcine model. A thermostatically controlled, heated aluminium disc device was fashioned by the Biomedical Department of our institution. Contact burns were made on the flank of two Great White pigs by applying the device heated to 92°C at intervals of 5, 10, 15 and 20 seconds to four separate test areas area of skin. Biopsies for histological analysis of burn depth were taken on day 0 at 10 minutes post burn and on day 8. Biopsies taken at day 0 revealed superficial to mid-dermal burns, with minimal dermal edema and necrosis. Those from day 8 showed mid to deep dermal edema and necrosis in all four test areas following a 20 second contact duration burn. The new contact burn device was able to create a consistent deep dermal burn after 20 seconds of contact. We anticipate that this new device could be used to investigate the development of hypertrophic scarring in a porcine model. PMID:27335694

  19. Laparoscopic colonic anastomosis using a degradable stent in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Cai, Xiu-Jun; Wang, Hai-Hong; Yu, Yan-Lan; Huang, Di-Yu; Ge, Guang-Ju; Hu, Hai-Yi; Yu, Shi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic colonic anastomosis using a degradable stent in a porcine model. METHODS: Twenty Bama mini-pigs were randomly assigned to a stent group (n = 10) and control group (hand-sewn anastomosis, n = 10). The anastomotic completion and operation times were recorded, along with histological examination, postoperative general condition, complications, mortality, bursting pressure, and the average anastomotic circumference (AC). RESULTS: All pigs survived postoperatively except for one in the stent group that died from ileus at 11 wk postoperatively. The operation and anastomotic completion times of the stent group were significantly shorter than those of the control group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.001, respectively). There were no significant differences in bursting pressure between the groups (P = 0.751). No obvious difference was found between the AC and normal circumference in the stent group, but AC was significantly less than normal circumference in the control group (P = 0.047, P < 0.05). No intestinal leakage and luminal stenosis occurred in the stent group. Histological examination revealed that the stent group presented with lower general inflammation and better healing. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic colonic anastomosis with a degradable stent is a simple, rapid, and safe procedure in this porcine model. PMID:27217702

  20. Induced Hypothermia Does Not Harm Hemodynamics after Polytrauma: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Weuster, Matthias; Mommsen, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Mohr, Juliane; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Flohé, Sascha; Fröhlich, Matthias; Keibl, Claudia; Seekamp, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Witte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Background. The deterioration of hemodynamics instantly endangers the patients' life after polytrauma. As accidental hypothermia frequently occurs in polytrauma, therapeutic hypothermia still displays an ambivalent role as the impact on the cardiopulmonary function is not yet fully understood. Methods. We have previously established a porcine polytrauma model including blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, and hemorrhagic shock. Therapeutic hypothermia (34°C) was induced for 3 hours. We documented cardiovascular parameters and basic respiratory parameters. Pigs were euthanized after 15.5 hours. Results. Our polytrauma porcine model displayed sufficient trauma impact. Resuscitation showed adequate restoration of hemodynamics. Induced hypothermia had neither harmful nor major positive effects on the animals' hemodynamics. Though heart rate significantly decreased and mixed venous oxygen saturation significantly increased during therapeutic hypothermia. Mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and wedge pressure showed no significant differences comparing normothermic trauma and hypothermic trauma pigs during hypothermia. Conclusions. Induced hypothermia after polytrauma is feasible. No major harmful effects on hemodynamics were observed. Therapeutic hypothermia revealed hints for tissue protective impact. But the chosen length for therapeutic hypothermia was too short. Nevertheless, therapeutic hypothermia might be a useful tool for intensive care after polytrauma. Future studies should extend therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:26170533

  1. Porcine aortic organ culture: a model to study the cellular response to vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Gotlieb, A I; Boden, P

    1984-07-01

    Organ cultures of porcine thoracic aorta were studied to define the characteristics of this system as a model to study the reaction of endothelial cells (ECs) and the underlying smooth muscle cells (SMCs) to injury. Both nonwounded and wounded cultures, the latter having had part of the endothelial surface gently denuded with a scalpel blade, were studied over a 7 d period by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the nonwounded ECs underwent a shape change from elongated to polygonal within 24 h in culture. In both nonwounded and wounded explants there was cell proliferation beneath the nondenuded endothelium so that by 7 d several layers of cells were present showing features of the secretory type of SMCs. This proliferation, however, did not occur if the endothelium was totally removed from the aorta. There was also evidence of gaps between the surface ECs, and by 7 d lamellipodia of cells beneath the surface were present in these gaps. Occasionally, elongated cells were seen to be present on the surface of the endothelium. In the wounded organ culture, cell migration and proliferation occurred extending from the wound edge and producing a covering of cells on the denuded area. There were also multilayered cells beneath the surface similar to the nonwounded area. Occasional foam cells were seen in the depth of the multilayered proliferating cells. The results indicate that organ culture of porcine thoracic aorta is a good model to study the reaction of ECs and underlying SMCs to injury. PMID:6469272

  2. Evaluation of aortic cannula jet lesions in a porcine cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) model.

    PubMed

    Schnürer, C; Hager, M; Györi, G; Velik-Salchner, C; Moser, P L; Laufer, G; Lorenz, I H; Kolbitsch, C

    2011-02-01

    In cardiosurgery patients atherosclerotic debris displaced from the cannulation site but also from the opposite aortic wall by the "sandblast-like" effect of the high-pressure jet emanating from the cannula is a potential source of intraoperative arterial embolization and consequently postoperative neurologic dysfunction. The present study examined the extent to which shear stress exerted on the intact aortic intima by an aortic cannula jet stream can cause endothelial lesions that promote thrombogenesis and consequently thrombembolism. A single-stream, straight-tip aortic cannula was used in a porcine cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) model. Following a 120-minute CPB pump run, a 60-minute stabilization period was allowed before sacrificing the pigs (N.=40) for histological evaluation of the ascending aorta and the brain. Opposite the cannulation site endothelial lesions (diameter: 3.81±1.3 mm; depth: 0.017±0.003 mm) were present in 22.5% (9/40) of aortic specimens. Cerebral thrombembolic lesions were not found. The present study showed that single-stream, straight-tip aortic cannulas caused jet lesions of the formerly intact aortic endothelium opposite the cannulation site in 22.5% of cases in a porcine CPB model. PMID:21224818

  3. Ventricular Arrhythmias and Mortality Associated with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in a Porcine Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Regueiro-Purriños, Marta; Fernández-Vázquez, Felipe; de Prado, Armando Perez; Altónaga, Jose R; Cuellas-Ramón, Carlos; Ajenjo-Silverio, Jose M; Orden, Asuncion; Gonzalo-Orden, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia of the myocardium can lead to reversible or irreversible injury depending on the severity and duration of the preceding ischemia. Here we compared sevoflurane and isoflurane with particular reference to their hemodynamic effects and ability to modify the effects of acute severe myocardial ischemia and reperfusion on ventricular arrhythmias and mortality in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Female Large White pigs were premedicated with ketamine, midazolam, and atropine. Propofol was given intravenously for the anesthetic induction, and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane. Endovascular, fluoroscopy-guided, coronary procedures were performed to occlude the midleft anterior descending artery by using a coronary angioplasty balloon. After 75 min, the balloon catheter system was withdrawn and the presence of adequate reperfusion flow was verified. The pigs were followed for 2 mo, and overall mortality rate was calculated. The isoflurane group showed lower arterial pressure throughout the procedure, with the difference reaching statistical significance after induction of myocardial ischemia. The ventricular fibrillation rate was higher in isoflurane group (81.3%) than the sevoflurane group (51.7%; relative risk, 1.57 [1.03 to 2.4]). Overall survival was lower in the isoflurane group (75%) than the sevoflurane group (96.4%). In conclusion, in this porcine model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, sevoflurane was associated with higher hemodynamic stability and fewer ventricular arrhythmias and mortality than was isoflurane. PMID:21333167

  4. A porcine model of full-thickness burn, excision and skin autografting

    PubMed Central

    Branski, Ludwik K.; Mittermayr, Rainer; Herndon, David N.; Norbury, William B.; Masters, Oscar E.; Hofmann, Martina; Traber, Daniel L.; Redl, Heinz; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2008-01-01

    Acute burn wounds often require early excision and adequate coverage to prevent further hypothermia, protein and fluid losses, and the risk of infection. Meshed autologous skin grafts are generally regarded as the standard treatment for extensive full-thickness burns. Graft take and rate of wound healing, however, depend on several endogenous factors. This paper describes a standardized reproducible porcine model of burn and skin grafting which can be used to study the effects of topical treatments on graft take and re-epithelialization. Procedures provide a protocol for successful porcine burn wound experiments with special focus on pre-operative care, anesthesia, burn allocation, excision and grafting, postoperative treatment, dressing application, and specimen collection. Selected outcome measurements include percent area of wound closure by planimetry, wound assessment using a clinical assessment scale, and histological scoring. The use of this standardized model provides burn researchers with a valuable tool for the comparison of different topical drug treatments and dressing materials in a setting that closely mimics clinical reality. PMID:18617332

  5. Sinus Hypoplasia Precedes Sinus Infection in a Porcine Model of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eugene H; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Meyerholz, David K; Potash, Andrea E; Wallen, Tanner J; Reznikov, Leah R; Sieren, Jessica C; Karp, Philip H; Ernst, Sarah; Moninger, Thomas O; Gansemer, Nicholas D; McCray, Paul B; Stoltz, David A; Welsh, Michael J; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Chronic sinusitis is nearly universal in humans with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is accompanied by sinus hypoplasia (small sinuses). However, whether impaired sinus development is a primary feature of loss of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or a secondary consequence of chronic infection remains unknown. Our objective was to study the early pathogenesis of sinus disease in CF. Study Design Animal/basic science research. Methods Sinus development was studied in a porcine CF model. Results Porcine sinus epithelia expressed CFTR and exhibited transepithelial anion transport. Disruption of the CFTR gene eliminated both. Sinuses of newborn CF pigs were not infected and showed no evidence of inflammation, yet were hypoplastic at birth. Older CF pigs spontaneously developed sinus disease similar to that seen in humans with CF. Conclusions These results define a role for CFTR in sinus development and suggest the potential of the CF pig as a genetic model of CF-sinus disease in which to test therapeutic strategies to minimize sinus-related CF morbidity. PMID:22711071

  6. Experimental infection of conventional nursing pigs and their dams with Porcine deltacoronavirus.

    PubMed

    Vitosh-Sillman, Sarah; Loy, John Dustin; Brodersen, Bruce; Kelling, Clayton; Doster, Alan; Topliff, Christina; Nelson, Eric; Bai, Jianfa; Schirtzinger, Erin; Poulsen, Elizabeth; Meadors, Barbara; Anderson, Joseph; Hause, Benjamin; Anderson, Gary; Hesse, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a newly identified virus that has been detected in swine herds of North America associated with enteric disease. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the pathogenicity, course of infection, virus kinetics, and aerosol transmission of PDCoV using 87 conventional piglets and their 9 dams, including aerosol and contact controls to emulate field conditions. Piglets 2-4 days of age and their dams were administered an oronasal PDCoV inoculum with a quantitative real-time reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR quantification cycle (Cq) value of 22 that was generated from a field sample having 100% nucleotide identity to USA/Illinois121/2014 determined by metagenomic sequencing and testing negative for other enteric disease agents using standard assays. Serial samples of blood, serum, oral fluids, nasal and fecal swabs, and tissues from sequential autopsy, conducted daily on days 1-8 and regular intervals thereafter, were collected throughout the 42-day study for qRT-PCR, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Diarrhea developed in all inoculated and contact control pigs, including dams, by 2 days post-inoculation (dpi) and in aerosol control pigs and dams by 3-4 dpi, with resolution occurring by 12 dpi. Mild to severe atrophic enteritis with PDCoV antigen staining was observed in the small intestine of affected piglets from 2 to 8 dpi. Mesenteric lymph node and small intestine were the primary sites of antigen detection by immunohistochemistry, and virus RNA was detected in these tissues to the end of the study. Virus RNA was detectable in piglet fecal swabs to 21 dpi, and dams to 14-35 dpi. PMID:27578872

  7. Enzymolysis kinetics, thermodynamics and model of porcine cerebral protein with single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound-assisted processing.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ye; Ding, Yangyang; Feng, Weiwei; Wang, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Yao; Wu, Huiyu; Wang, Xintong; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    The present work investigated the enzymolysis kinetics, thermodynamics and model of porcine cerebral protein (PCP) which was pretreated by single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound. The kinetic constants for ultrasonic pretreated and traditional enzymolysis have been determined. Results showed that the value of KM in ultrasonic PCP (UPCP) enzymolysis decreased by 9% over that in the traditional enzymolysis. The values of reaction rate constant (k) for UPCP enzymolysis increased by 207%, 121%, 62%, and 45% at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K, respectively. For the thermodynamic parameters, ultrasound decreased activation energy (Ea), change in enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) by 76%, 82% and 31% in PCP, respectively. However, ultrasound had little change in Gibbs free energy (ΔG) value in the temperature range of 293-323 K. Therefore, a general kinetic equation for the enzymolysis model of UPCP by a simple empirical equation was suggested. The experimental values fits with the enzymolysis kinetic model with a low average relative error (4%) confirmed that the kinetic model was accurate to reflect the enzymolysis process. The positive effect of single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound in this study and application of the kinetic model may be useful for the release of bioactive peptides from meat processing by-products. PMID:26384911

  8. Immunohistochemistry of porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Berger, U; Mahrle, G

    1991-01-01

    The present paper reports immunohistological findings in porcine skin, which were obtained by use of mono- and polyclonal antihuman antibodies and either alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) or peroxidase (POX) technique. Epidermal staining was observed with antibodies to keratins (K 8.12, RSKE 60), filaggrin, and calmodulin (ACAM). Staining of connective tissue and vessels was achieved using antibodies to vimentin (V9(1)), collagen type IV, and fibronectin. In general, these antibodies gave a staining pattern similar to that of normal human skin. The similarities of immunoreactivity to poly- and monoclonal antihuman antibodies in porcine and human skin render porcine skin a reliable model in biomedical research. PMID:1710864

  9. Scabies Mites Alter the Skin Microbiome and Promote Growth of Opportunistic Pathogens in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Swe, Pearl M.; Zakrzewski, Martha; Kelly, Andrew; Krause, Lutz; Fischer, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Background The resident skin microbiota plays an important role in restricting pathogenic bacteria, thereby protecting the host. Scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei) are thought to promote bacterial infections by breaching the skin barrier and excreting molecules that inhibit host innate immune responses. Epidemiological studies in humans confirm increased incidence of impetigo, generally caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, secondary to the epidermal infestation with the parasitic mite. It is therefore possible that mite infestation could alter the healthy skin microbiota making way for the opportunistic pathogens. A longitudinal study to test this hypothesis in humans is near impossible due to ethical reasons. In a porcine model we generated scabies infestations closely resembling the disease manifestation in humans and investigated the scabies associated changes in the skin microbiota over the course of a mite infestation. Methodology/Principal Findings In a 21 week trial, skin scrapings were collected from pigs infected with S. scabies var. suis and scabies-free control animals. A total of 96 skin scrapings were collected before, during infection and after acaricide treatment, and analyzed by bacterial 16S rDNA tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. We found significant changes in the epidermal microbiota, in particular a dramatic increase in Staphylococcus correlating with the onset of mite infestation in animals challenged with scabies mites. This increase persisted beyond treatment from mite infection and healing of skin. Furthermore, the staphylococci population shifted from the commensal S. hominis on the healthy skin prior to scabies mite challenge to S. chromogenes, which is increasingly recognized as being pathogenic, coinciding with scabies infection in pigs. In contrast, all animals in the scabies-free cohort remained relatively free of Staphylococcus throughout the trial. Conclusions/Significance This is the first

  10. Novel A20-gene-eluting stent inhibits carotid artery restenosis in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen-hua; Peng, Jing; Meng, Zhao-you; Chen, Lin; Huang, Jia-Lu; Huang, He-qing; Li, Li; Zeng, Wen; Wei, Yong; Zhu, Chu-Hong; Chen, Kang-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Carotid artery stenosis is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although carotid angioplasty and stenting using an embolic protection device has been introduced as a less invasive carotid revascularization approach, in-stent restenosis limits its long-term efficacy and safety. The objective of this study was to test the anti-restenosis effects of local stent-mediated delivery of the A20 gene in a porcine carotid artery model. Materials and methods The pCDNA3.1EHA20 was firmly attached onto stents that had been collagen coated and treated with N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol)propionate solution and anti-DNA immunoglobulin fixation. Anti-restenosis effects of modified vs control (the bare-metal stent and pCDNA3.1 void vector) stents were assessed by Western blot and scanning electron microscopy, as well as by morphological and inflammatory reaction analyses. Results Stent-delivered A20 gene was locally expressed in porcine carotids in association with significantly greater extent of re-endothelialization at day 14 and of neointimal hyperplasia inhibition at 3 months than stenting without A20 gene expression. Conclusion The A20-gene-eluting stent inhibits neointimal hyperplasia while promoting re-endothelialization and therefore constitutes a novel potential alternative to prevent restenosis while minimizing complications. PMID:27540277

  11. Efficacy of a new bivalent vaccine of porcine circovirus type 2 and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Fostera™ PCV MH) under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Changhoon; Jeong, Jiwoon; Choi, Kyuhyung; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new bivalent vaccine (Fostera™ PCV MH, Zoetis) of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in growing pigs under experimental conditions. A total of 80 pigs were randomly divided into 8 groups (10 pigs per group). The pigs were administered the bivalent vaccine intramuscularly as a 2.0 mL dose at 21 days of age based on the manufacturer's instructions. Three weeks after vaccination, the pigs were inoculated with either PCV2 (intranasal route) or M. hyopneumoniae (intratracheal route) or both. Regardless of the type of inoculation, vaccinated pigs after challenge exhibited effective reduction of clinical signs, PCV2 viremia levels and mycoplasma nasal shedding, and lung and lymphoid lesion when compared to unvaccinated challenged pigs. Vaccinated challenged pigs had significantly higher (P<0.05) levels of PCV2-specific neutralizing antibodies, and numbers of PCV2-and M. hyopneumoniae-specific interferon-γ secreting cells compared to unvaccinated challenged pigs. This study demonstrates that the bivalent vaccine is able to protect pigs against either PCV2 or M. hyopneumoniae infection or both based on clinical, microbiological, immunological, and pathological evaluation. PMID:26626212

  12. Effects of epidermal growth factor on atrophic enteritis in piglets induced by experimental porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jeom-Yong; Shin, Kyoung-Sun; Lee, Chul-Seung; Song, Dae-Sub

    2008-08-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) promotes gastrointestinal mucosal recovery by stimulating the mitogenic activity of intestinal crypt epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of EGF on atrophic enteritis induced in piglets by experimental infection with porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) strain Dr13. Two groups of 12 conventional, colostrum-deprived, 1-day-old, large White-Duroc cross breed piglets were inoculated orally with PEDV (3 x 10(5) 50% tissue culture infective doses), with or without EGF (10 microg/kg/day, intraperitoneally once daily for 4 days after infection) and compared to 12 uninfected, untreated control piglets. PEDV+EGF piglets had less severe clinical signs than PEDV only piglets at 48 and 60 h post-infection (hpi). Histologically, the ratio of villous height:crypt depth of PEDV+EGF piglets was significantly higher than PEDV only piglets at 36 and 48 hpi. Immunohistochemistry for Ki67 demonstrated increased proliferation in intestinal crypt epithelial cells of PEDV+EGF piglets compared to PEDV only piglets at 36, 48 and 60 hpi. EGF stimulates proliferation of intestinal crypt epithelial cells and promotes recovery from atrophic enteritis in PEDV-infected piglets. PMID:17574457

  13. The History and Evolution of Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Models.

    PubMed

    Povlishock, John

    2016-01-01

    This narrative provides a brief history of experimental animal model development for the study of traumatic brain injury. It draws upon a relatively rich history of early animal modeling that employed higher order animals to assess concussive brain injury while exploring the importance of head movement versus stabilization in evaluating the animal's response to injury. These themes are extended to the development of angular/rotational acceleration/deceleration models that also exploited brain movement to generate both the morbidity and pathology typically associated with human traumatic brain injury. Despite the significance of these early model systems, their limitations and overall practicality are discussed. Consideration is given to more contemporary rodent animal models that replicate individual/specific features of human injury, while via various transgenic technologies permitting the evaluation of injury-mediated pathways. The narrative closes on a reconsideration of higher order, porcine animal models of injury and their implication for preclinical/translational research. PMID:27604709

  14. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin.

    PubMed

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2015-03-21

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure-PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery. PMID:25716689

  15. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure—PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery.

  16. In vivo tissue response following implantation of shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Clubb, Fred J.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Miller, Matthew W.; Fossum, Theresa W.; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM) imaging after zero, thirty and ninety days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time zero (less than one hour exposure to blood prior to euthanization), partial healing was observed at thirty days, and almost complete healing had occurred at ninety days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response. PMID:23650278

  17. Porcine skin visible lesion thresholds for near-infrared lasers including modeling at two pulse durations and spot sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; Polhamus, Garrett D.; Roach, William P.; Stolarski, David J.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Stockton, Kevin; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Chen, Bo; Welch, Ashley J.

    2006-07-01

    With the advent of such systems as the airborne laser and advanced tactical laser, high-energy lasers that use 1315-nm wavelengths in the near-infrared band will soon present a new laser safety challenge to armed forces and civilian populations. Experiments in nonhuman primates using this wavelength have demonstrated a range of ocular injuries, including corneal, lenticular, and retinal lesions as a function of pulse duration. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) laser safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental data, and there is scant data for this wavelength. We are reporting minimum visible lesion (MVL) threshold measurements using a porcine skin model for two different pulse durations and spot sizes for this wavelength. We also compare our measurements to results from our model based on the heat transfer equation and rate process equation, together with actual temperature measurements on the skin surface using a high-speed infrared camera. Our MVL-ED50 thresholds for long pulses (350 µs) at 24-h postexposure are measured to be 99 and 83 Jcm-2 for spot sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 mm diam, respectively. Q-switched laser pulses of 50 ns have a lower threshold of 11 Jcm-2 for a 5-mm-diam top-hat laser pulse.

  18. A retrospective review of burn dressings on a porcine burn model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Kravchuk, Olena; Kimble, Roy M

    2010-08-01

    This is a study to compare wound healing among three types of dressings on a porcine model with deep-dermal-partial-thickness burns. The burns in this study were from eight animal trials conducted in the past for other purposes and only burns with a uniform pale appearance that had served as controls in original experiments were selected. In total, there were 57 burns in 33 pigs, using one of following three dressings: Acticoat (Silver) (3 trials), Jelonet (Gauze) (3 trials), and Solosite Gel/Jelonet (Gel/Gauze) (2 trials). The wound healing assessments included wound re-epithelialisation during a 6-week period, clinical and histological scar assessments at week 6 after burn. Of all wound healing/scar assessments, only re-epithelialisation showed statistical difference between dressings. Earlier re-epithelialisation was observed in Gel/Gauze dressings compared to Silver and/or Gauze dressings. However, this study revealed huge variation in wound healing outcome between 3 trials within both Silver and/or Gauze dressings, supported by significant differences on re-epithelialisation, clinical and histological scar measurements. In addition, it was found that larger animals healed better than smaller ones, based on weights from 21 pigs. Of all dressings, Silver delivers the best protection for wound colonization/infection. Wound colonization/infection was found to confine wound healing and lead to thinner RND in scars. From this study, we cannot find enough evidence to suggest the beneficial effect of one dressing(s) over others on burn wound healing outcome on a porcine model with small deep-dermal-partial-thickness burns with a relative small sample size. PMID:19864074

  19. Vascular histopathologic reaction to pulmonary artery banding in an in vivo growing porcine model.

    PubMed

    Nedorost, Lukáš; Uemura, Hideki; Furck, Anke; Saeed, Imran; Slavik, Zdenek; Kobr, Jiří; Tonar, Zbyněk

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary artery banding (PAB) is used as a surgical palliation to reduce excessive pulmonary blood flow caused by congenital heart defects. Due to the lack of microscopic studies dealing with the tissue remodeling caused by contemporary PAB materials, this study aimed to assess histologic changes associated with PAB surgery by analyzing local tissue reaction to the presence of Gore-Tex strips fixed around the pulmonary artery. Gore-Tex strips were used for PAB in a growing porcine model. After 5 weeks, histologic samples with PAB (n = 5) were compared with healthy pulmonary arterial segments distal to the PAB or from a sham-treated animal (n = 1). Stereology was used to quantify the density of the vasa vasorum and the area fraction of elastin, smooth muscle actin, macrophages, and nervi vasorum within the pulmonary arterial wall. The null hypothesis stated that samples did not differ histopathologically from adjacent vascular segments or sham-treated samples. The PAB samples had a greater area fraction of macrophages, a lower amount of nervi vasorum, and a tendency toward decreased smooth muscle content compared with samples that had no PAB strips. There was no destruction of elastic membranes, no medionecrosis, no pronounced inflammatory infiltration or foreign body reaction, and no vasa vasorum deficiency after the PAB. All the histopathologic changes were limited to the banded vascular segment and did not affect distal parts of the pulmonary artery. The study results show the tissue reaction of palliative PAB and suggest that Gore-Tex strips used contemporarily for PAB do not cause severe local histologic damage to the banded segment of the pulmonary arterial wall after 5 weeks in a porcine PAB model. PMID:23591800

  20. Bovine Serum Albumin Glutaraldehyde for Completely Sutureless Laparoscopic Heminephrectomy in a Survival Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa, Aldrin Joseph R.; Kaplan, Adam G.; Khosravi, Amanda; Truong, Hung; Andrade, Lorena; Lin, Rachelle; Alipanah, Reza; Ortiz, Cervando; McCormick, David; Box, Geoffrey N.; Lee, Hak J.; Deane, Leslie A.; Edwards, Robert A.; McDougall, Elspeth M.; Clayman, Ralph V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) has not received widespread clinical application because of its technical challenge. Bovine serum albumin glutaraldehyde (BSAG) is a hemostatic agent that is independent of the clotting cascade. We evaluated the use of BSAG as the sole agent for parenchymal and collecting system closure during LPN in a survival porcine model. Methods Eighteen pigs underwent hilar clamping and LPN by longitudinal excision of the lateral one-third of the right kidney. The opened collecting system was covered with oxidized cellulose to prevent BSAG seepage into the urinary tract. BSAG was allowed to set for 10 or 5 minutes. Twelve animals underwent survival LPN BSAG only closure; six control pigs were acutely studied using saline. Urinary extravasation was evaluated by injection of furosemide and indigo carmine, and then evaluating the renal surface and bladder catheter drainage for dye. A subjective bleeding score was assigned after hilum unclamping. At 6 weeks, BSAG kidneys were harvested for burst pressure testing and histopathological analysis. Results All 12 pigs survived for 6 weeks. No pigs had urinary extravasation. Mean percentage of kidney removed by weight was 19%. Mean warm ischemia time was 29 minutes. Five pigs required a second BSAG application to achieve a bleeding score of 0. Mean arterial and collecting system burst pressures were 301.8 and 322.4 mm Hg, respectively. Mean postoperative creatinine increase was 0.07 mg/dL. Conclusion BSAG for completely sutureless LPN in a survival porcine model was feasible. PMID:20059350

  1. Histologic Characterization of Acellular Dermal Matrices in a Porcine Model of Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Christopher A.; Dearth, Christopher L.; Reing, Janet E.; Kramer, Caroline R.; Gagne, Darcy H.; Crapo, Peter M.; Garcia, Onelio; Badhwar, Amit; Scott, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) have been commonly used in expander-based breast reconstruction to provide inferolateral prosthesis coverage. Although the clinical performance of these biologic scaffold materials varies depending on a number of factors, an in-depth systematic characterization of the host response is yet to be performed. The present study evaluates the biochemical composition and structure of two ADMs, AlloDerm® Regenerative Tissue Matrix and AlloMax™ Surgical Graft, and provides a comprehensive spatiotemporal characterization in a porcine model of tissue expander breast reconstruction. Methods: Each ADM was characterized with regard to thickness, permeability, donor nucleic acid content, (residual double-stranded DNA [dsDNA]), and growth factors (basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF], vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], and transforming growth factor-beta 1 [TGF-β1]). Cytocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro cell culture on the ADMs. The host response was evaluated at 4 and 12 weeks at various locations within the ADMs using established metrics of the inflammatory and tissue remodeling response: cell infiltration, multinucleate giant cell formation, extent of ADM remodeling, and neovascularization. Results: AlloMax incorporated more readily with surrounding host tissue as measured by earlier and greater cell infiltration, fewer foreign body giant cells, and faster remodeling of ADM. These findings correlated with the in vitro composition and cytocompatibility analysis, which showed AlloMax to more readily support in vitro cell growth. Conclusions: AlloMax and AlloDerm demonstrated distinct remodeling characteristics in a porcine model of tissue expander breast reconstruction. PMID:24941900

  2. Endoscopic spray cryotherapy for genitourinary malignancies: safety and efficacy in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Power, Nicholas E.; Silberstein, Jonathan L.; Tarin, Tatum; Au, Joyce; Thorner, Daniel; Ezell, Paula; Monette, Sébastien; Fong, Yuman; Rusch, Valerie; Finley, David

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects and safety of using endoscopic spray cryotherapy (ESC) on bladder, ureteral, and renal pelvis urothelium in a live porcine model. Subjects and methods: ESC treatments were systematically applied to urothelial sites in the bladder, ureter, and renal pelvis of eight female Yorkshire swine in a prospective trial. Freeze–thaw cycles ranged from 5 to 60 s/cycle for one to six cycles using a 7 French cryotherapy catheter. Tissue was evaluated histologically for treatment-related effects. Acute physiologic effects were evaluated with pulse oximetry, Doppler sonography, and postmortem findings. Results: In bladder, treatment depth was inconsistent regardless of dose, demonstrating urothelial necrosis in one, muscularis propria depth necrosis in two, and full thickness necrosis in all remaining samples. In ureter, full thickness necrosis was seen in all samples, even with the shortest spray duration (5 s/cycle for six cycles or 30 s/cycle for one cycle). Treatment to the renal pelvis was complicated by adiabatic gas expansion of liquid nitrogen to its gaseous state, resulting in high intraluminal pressures requiring venting to avoid organ perforation, even at the lowest treatment settings. At a planned dose of 5 s/cycle for six cycles of the first renal pelvis animal, treatment was interrupted by sudden and unrecoverable cardiopulmonary failure after three cycles. Repeated studies replicated this event. Ultrasound and immediate necropsy confirmed the creation of a large gaseous embolism and reproducible cardiopulmonary effects. Conclusion: ESC in a porcine urothelial treatment model results in full-thickness tissue necrosis in bladder, ureter, and renal pelvis at a minimal treatment settings of 5 s/cycle for six cycles. Adiabatic gas expansion may result in fatal pyelovenous gas embolism and collateral organ injury, as seen in both animals receiving treatment to the renal pelvis in this study. These results raise safety concerns for use

  3. Dynamic and Volumetric Variables Reliably Predict Fluid Responsiveness in a Porcine Model with Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Broch, Ole; Gruenewald, Matthias; Renner, Jochen; Meybohm, Patrick; Schöttler, Jan; Heß, Katharina; Steinfath, Markus; Bein, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability of stroke volume variation (SVV), pulse pressure variation (PPV) and global end-diastolic volume (GEDV) for prediction of fluid responsiveness in presence of pleural effusion is unknown. The aim of the present study was to challenge the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness in a porcine model with pleural effusions. Methods Pigs were studied at baseline and after fluid loading with 8 ml kg−1 6% hydroxyethyl starch. After withdrawal of 8 ml kg−1 blood and induction of pleural effusion up to 50 ml kg−1 on either side, measurements at baseline and after fluid loading were repeated. Cardiac output, stroke volume, central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary occlusion pressure (PAOP) were obtained by pulmonary thermodilution, whereas GEDV was determined by transpulmonary thermodilution. SVV and PPV were monitored continuously by pulse contour analysis. Results Pleural effusion was associated with significant changes in lung compliance, peak airway pressure and stroke volume in both responders and non-responders. At baseline, SVV, PPV and GEDV reliably predicted fluid responsiveness (area under the curve 0.85 (p<0.001), 0.88 (p<0.001), 0.77 (p = 0.007). After induction of pleural effusion the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness was well preserved and also PAOP was predictive. Threshold values for SVV and PPV increased in presence of pleural effusion. Conclusions In this porcine model, bilateral pleural effusion did not affect the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness. PMID:23418546

  4. Resolving the viscoelasticity and anisotropy dependence of the mechanical properties of skin from a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Wong, W L E; Joyce, T J; Goh, K L

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical response of skin to external loads is influenced by anisotropy and viscoelasticity of the tissue, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report a study of the main effects of tissue orientation (TO, which is linked to anisotropy) and strain rate (SR, a measure of viscoelasticity), as well as the interaction effects between the two factors, on the tensile properties of skin from a porcine model. Tensile testing to rupture of porcine skin tissue was conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of the tissue modulus of elasticity (E) and fracture-related properties, namely maximum stress [Formula: see text] and strain [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text], to varying SR and TO. Specimens were excised from the abdominal skin in two orientations, namely parallel (P) and right angle (R) to the torso midline. Each TO was investigated at three SR levels, namely 0.007-0.015 [Formula: see text] (low), 0.040 [Formula: see text] (mid) and 0.065 [Formula: see text] (high). Two-factor analysis of variance revealed that the respective parameters responded differently to varying SR and TO. Significant changes in the [Formula: see text] were observed with different TOs but not with SR. The [Formula: see text] decreased significantly with increasing SR, but no significant variation was observed for different TOs. Significant changes in E were observed with different TOs; E increased significantly with increasing SR. More importantly, the respective mechanical parameters were not significantly influenced by interactions between SR and TO. These findings suggest that the trends associated with the changes in the skin mechanical properties may be attributed partly to differences in the anisotropy and viscoelasticity but not through any interaction between viscoelasticity and anisotropy. PMID:26156308

  5. Three dimensional electromechanical model of porcine heart with penetrating wound injury.

    PubMed

    Usyk, Taras; Kerckhoffs, Roy

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is development a prototype computational model of the pig heart that can be used to predict physiological responses to a penetrating wound injury. The pig has been chosen for this model studies because it shares many anatomical similarities with humans. Three-dimensional cubic Hermite finite element meshes based on detailed measurements of porcine anatomy combined into an integrated anatomic model. The pig ventricular model includes detailed left and right ventricular geometry and myofiber and laminar sheet orientations throughout the mesh. The cardiac mesh was refined and monodomain equations for action potential propagation solved using well-established collocation-Galerkin finite element methods. The membrane kinetic equations for the action potential model was based on detailed cellular models of transmembrane ionic fluxes and intracellular calcium fluxes in canine ventricular myocytes and human atrial myocytes. We modified the anisotropic myocardial conductivity tensor on the endocardial surface of the ventricles by making use of a surface model fitted to measured of Purkinje fiber network anatomy. The mechanical model compute regional three-dimensional stress and strain distributions using anisotropic constitutive laws referred to local material coordinate axes defined by local myofiber and laminar sheet orientations. Passive myocardial mechanics modeled using exponential orthotropic strain energy functions. Active systolic myocardial stresses computed from a multi-scale model that uses crossbridge theory to predict calcium-activated sarcomere length- and velocity-dependent tension filament tension. Since the electrical and mechanical models use a common finite element mesh as the parent parametric framework and both models are solved within our custom finite element package, it is straightforward to couple these models, as we have recently done for a model of coupled ventricular electromechanics. We apply the coupled electromechanical

  6. Assessment of Novel Anti-thrombotic Fusion Proteins for Inhibition of Stenosis in a Porcine Model of Arteriovenous Graft

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Christi M.; Zhuplatov, Ilya; He, Yuxia; Wun, Tze-Chein; Kim, Seong-Eun; Cheung, Alfred K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis arteriovenous synthetic grafts (AVG) provide high volumetric blood flow rates shortly after surgical placement. However, stenosis often develops at the vein-graft anastomosis contributing to thrombosis and early graft failure. Two novel fusion proteins, ANV-6L15 and TAP-ANV, inhibit the tissue factor/factor VIIa coagulation complex and the factor Xa/factor Va complex, respectively. Each inhibitor domain is fused to an annexin V domain that targets the inhibitor activity to sites of vascular injury to locally inhibit thrombosis. This study’s objective was to determine if these antithrombotic proteins are safe and effective in inhibiting AVG stenosis. Methods A bolus of either TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 fusion protein was administered intravenously immediately prior to surgical placement of a synthetic graft between the external jugular vein and common carotid artery in a porcine model. At surgery, the vein and artery were irrigated with the anti-thrombotic fusion protein. Control animals received intravenous heparin. At 4 weeks, MRI was performed to evaluate graft patency, the pigs were then euthanized and grafts and attached vessels were explanted for histomorphometric assessment of neointimal hyperplasia at the vein-graft anastomosis. Blood was collected at surgery, immediately after surgery and at euthanasia for serum metabolic panels and coagulation chemistries. Results No acute thrombosis occurred in the control group or in either experimental group. No abnormal serum chemistries, activated clotting times or PT, PTT values were observed after treatment in experimental or control animals. However, at the vein-graft anastomosis, there was no difference between the control and experimental groups in cross-sectional lumen areas, as measured on MRI, and no difference in hyperplasia areas as determined by histomorphometry. These results suggest that local irrigation of TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 intra-operatively was as effective in inhibiting acute graft

  7. Development and translational imaging of a TP53 porcine tumorigenesis model

    PubMed Central

    Sieren, Jessica C.; Meyerholz, David K.; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T.; Newell, John D.; Hammond, Emily; Rohret, Judy A.; Rohret, Frank A.; Struzynski, Jason T.; Goeken, J. Adam; Naumann, Paul W.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Taghiyev, Agshin; Van Rheeden, Richard; Hagen, Jussara; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.; Rogers, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the second deadliest disease in the United States, necessitating improvements in tumor diagnosis and treatment. Current model systems of cancer are informative, but translating promising imaging approaches and therapies to clinical practice has been challenging. In particular, the lack of a large-animal model that accurately mimics human cancer has been a major barrier to the development of effective diagnostic tools along with surgical and therapeutic interventions. Here, we developed a genetically modified porcine model of cancer in which animals express a mutation in TP53 (which encodes p53) that is orthologous to one commonly found in humans (R175H in people, R167H in pigs). TP53R167H/R167H mutant pigs primarily developed lymphomas and osteogenic tumors, recapitulating the tumor types observed in mice and humans expressing orthologous TP53 mutant alleles. CT and MRI imaging data effectively detected developing tumors, which were validated by histopathological evaluation after necropsy. Molecular genetic analyses confirmed that these animals expressed the R167H mutant p53, and evaluation of tumors revealed characteristic chromosomal instability. Together, these results demonstrated that TP53R167H/R167H pigs represent a large-animal tumor model that replicates the human condition. Our data further suggest that this model will be uniquely suited for developing clinically relevant, noninvasive imaging approaches to facilitate earlier detection, diagnosis, and treatment of human cancers. PMID:25105366

  8. Selenium toxicity and porcine focal symmetrical poliomyelomalacia: description of a field outbreak and experimental reproduction.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, T M; Scholz, R W; Drake, T R

    1983-01-01

    An acute afebrile paretic condition was diagnosed in 18 of 225 feeder pigs between eight to ten weeks of age. Nine pigs died acutely, seven pigs were euthanatized and two appeared to recover. Macroscopic lesions in the ventral horns of the cervical and lumbar/sacral spinal cord enlargements consisted of focal, bilateral, depressed areas. Histopathologically, the lesion consisted of endothelial proliferation, glial cell reaction and microcavitation. Similar lesions were observed in some brain stem motor nuclei. High selenium levels were detected in the pig feed and in pig tissues and blood. Two of five experimental pigs fed a commercial grower ration and supplemented with 52 ppm selenium as sodium selenite developed paresis and paralysis after a 29 day feeding trial. Histopathological lesions of focal symmetrical poliomyelomalacia confined to the cervical and lumbar/sacral spinal cord enlargements, and identical to those in the field cases, were produced. Select brain stem motor nuclei were also affected. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. PMID:6667430

  9. The Effect of Experimental Fusarium Mycotoxicosis on Microbiota Diversity in Porcine Ascending Colon Contents

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Śliżewska, Katarzyna; Nowak, Adriana; Zielonka, Łukasz; Żakowska, Zofia; Gajęcka, Magdalena; Gajęcki, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of exposure of pigs to the Fusarium mycotoxins zearalenone (ZEN) and deoxynivalenol (DON), administered together and separately, on the colon microbiota. An experiment was conducted for 42 days on gilts, randomly assigned to four groups and administered either ZEN, DON, ZEN+DON, or a placebo. The number of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeasts, molds, anaerobic Clostridium perfringens, fecal streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were determined in the contents of the ascending colon. The influence of mycotoxins on the functional diversity of the colonic microbiota was assessed using EcoPlate tests (Biolog). Analysis revealed the predominance of LAB in all groups of pigs. Zearalenone, administered separately and together with DON, was found to have an adverse effect on mesophilic aerobic bacteria, but only after long exposure to this mycotoxin. During the six weeks of the experiment, the concentration of C. perfringens, E. coli, and other bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae was most considerably reduced in the experimental groups exposed to zearalenone, both separately and together with DON. Mycotoxins also affected the functional biodiversity of microorganisms. Both Shannon’s diversity index and the number of catabolized substrates in Biolog plate (the R index) were much higher in the group subjected to mixed mycotoxicosis. PMID:25025709

  10. Endovascular Broad-Neck Aneurysm Creation in a Porcine Model Using a Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlenbruch, Georg Nikoubashman, Omid; Steffen, Bjoern; Dadak, Mete; Palmowski, Moritz; Wiesmann, Martin

    2013-02-15

    Ruptured cerebral arterial aneurysms require prompt treatment by either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling. Training for these sophisticated endovascular procedures is essential and ideally performed in animals before their use in humans. Simulators and established animal models have shown drawbacks with respect to degree of reality, size of the animal model and aneurysm, or time and effort needed for aneurysm creation. We therefore aimed to establish a realistic and readily available aneurysm model. Five anticoagulated domestic pigs underwent endovascular intervention through right femoral access. A total of 12 broad-neck aneurysms were created in the carotid, subclavian, and renal arteries using the Amplatzer vascular plug. With dedicated vessel selection, cubic, tubular, and side-branch aneurysms could be created. Three of the 12 implanted occluders, two of them implanted over a side branch of the main vessel, did not induce complete vessel occlusion. However, all aneurysms remained free of intraluminal thrombus formation and were available for embolization training during a surveillance period of 6 h. Two aneurysms underwent successful exemplary treatment: one was stent-assisted, and one was performed with conventional endovascular coil embolization. The new porcine aneurysm model proved to be a straightforward approach that offers a wide range of training and scientific applications that might help further improve endovascular coil embolization therapy in patients with cerebral aneurysms.

  11. Study of Cardiac Arrest Caused by Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism and Thrombolytic Resuscitation in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lian-Xing; Li, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Jun; Tong, Nan; Xiao, Hong-Li; An, Le

    2016-01-01

    Background: The success rate of resuscitation in cardiac arrest (CA) caused by pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is low. Furthermore, there are no large animal models that simulate clinical CA. The aim of this study was to establish a porcine CA model caused by PTE and to investigate the pathophysiology of CA and postresuscitation. Methods: This model was induced in castrated male pigs (30 ± 2 kg; n = 21) by injecting thrombi (10–15 ml) via the left external jugular vein. Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) was performed at baseline, CA, and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). After CTPA during CA, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with thrombolysis (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator 50 mg) was initiated. Hemodynamic, respiratory, and blood gas data were monitored. Cardiac troponins T, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase-MB, myoglobin, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were compared between baseline and CA with paired-sample t-test and compared among different time points for survival animals with repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: Seventeen animals achieved CA after emboli injection, while four achieved CA after 5–8 ml more thrombi. Nine animals survived 6 h after CPR. CTPA showed obstruction of the pulmonary arteries. Mean aortic pressure data showed occurrence of CA caused by PTE (Z = −2.803, P = 0.002). The maximal rate of mean increase of left ventricular pressure (dp/dtmax) was statistically decreased (t = 6.315, P = 0.000, variation coefficient = 0.25), and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2) decreased to the lowest value (t = 27.240, P = 0.000). After ROSC (n = 9), heart rate (HR) and mean right ventricular pressure (MRVP) remained different versus baseline until 2 h after ROSC (HR, P = 0.036; MRVP, P = 0.027). Myoglobin was statistically increased from CA to 1 h after ROSC (P = 0.036, 0.026, 0.009, respectively), and BNP was increased

  12. Protective effects of N-acetylcysteine on acetic acid-induced colitis in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease and involves multiple etiological factors. Acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis is a reproducible and simple model, sharing many characteristics with human colitis. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been widely used as an antioxidant in vivo and in vitro. NAC can affect several signaling pathways involving in apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell growth and arrest, redox-regulated gene expression, and inflammatory response. Therefore, NAC may not only protect against the direct injurious effects of oxidants, but also beneficially alter inflammatory events in colitis. This study was conducted to investigate whether NAC could alleviate the AA-induced colitis in a porcine model. Methods Weaned piglets were used to investigate the effects of NAC on AA-induced colitis. Severity of colitis was evaluated by colon histomorphology measurements, histopathology scores, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, as well as concentrations of malondialdehyde and pro-inflammatory mediators in the plasma and colon. The protective role of NAC was assessed by measurements of antioxidant status, growth modulator, cell apoptosis, and tight junction proteins. Abundances of caspase-3 and claudin-1 proteins in colonic mucosae were determined by the Western blot method. Epidermal growth factor receptor, amphiregulin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mRNA levels in colonic mucosae were quantified using the real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR. Results Compared with the control group, AA treatment increased (P < 0.05) the histopathology scores, intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) numbers and density in the colon, myeloperoxidase activity, the concentrations of malondialdehyde and pro-inflammatory mediators in the plasma and colon, while reducing (P < 0.05) goblet cell numbers and the protein/DNA ratio in the colonic mucosa. These adverse effects of AA were partially ameliorated (P < 0.05) by dietary

  13. A Porcine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury via Head Rotational Acceleration.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D Kacy; Harris, James P; Browne, Kevin D; Wolf, John A; Duda, John E; Meaney, David F; Margulies, Susan S; Smith, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Unique from other brain disorders, traumatic brain injury (TBI) generally results from a discrete biomechanical event that induces rapid head movement. The large size and high organization of the human brain makes it particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury from rotational accelerations that can cause dynamic deformation of the brain tissue. Therefore, replicating the injury biomechanics of human TBI in animal models presents a substantial challenge, particularly with regard to addressing brain size and injury parameters. Here we present the historical development and use of a porcine model of head rotational acceleration. By scaling up the rotational forces to account for difference in brain mass between swine and humans, this model has been shown to produce the same tissue deformations and identical neuropathologies found in human TBI. The parameters of scaled rapid angular accelerations applied for the model reproduce inertial forces generated when the human head suddenly accelerates or decelerates in falls, collisions, or blunt impacts. The model uses custom-built linkage assemblies and a powerful linear actuator designed to produce purely impulsive non-impact head rotation in different angular planes at controlled rotational acceleration levels. Through a range of head rotational kinematics, this model can produce functional and neuropathological changes across the spectrum from concussion to severe TBI. Notably, however, the model is very difficult to employ, requiring a highly skilled team for medical management, biomechanics, neurological recovery, and specialized outcome measures including neuromonitoring, neurophysiology, neuroimaging, and neuropathology. Nonetheless, while challenging, this clinically relevant model has proven valuable for identifying mechanisms of acute and progressive neuropathologies as well as for the evaluation of noninvasive diagnostic techniques and potential neuroprotective treatments following TBI. PMID:27604725

  14. Intracoronary photodynamic therapy reduces neointimal growth without suppressing re‐endothelialisation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Waksman, R; Leitch, I M; Roessler, J; Yazdi, H; Seabron, R; Tio, F; Scott, R W; Grove, R I; Rychnovsky, S; Robinson, B; Pakala, R; Cheneau, E

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of intracoronary PhotoPoint photodynamic therapy (PDT) with a new photosensitiser, MV0611, in the overstretch balloon and stent porcine models of restenosis. Methods 28 pigs were injected with 3 mg/kg of MV0611 systemically 4 h before the procedure. Animals were divided into either the balloon overstretch injury (BI) group (n  =  19) or the stented group (n  =  9). After BI, a centred delivery catheter was positioned in the artery to cover the injured area, and light (532 nm, 125 J/cm2) was applied to activate the drug (n  =  10). Control arteries (n  =  9) were not activated by light. In the stented group, the drug was light activated before stent deployment. Serial sections of vessels were processed 14 days after treatment in the BI group and 30 days after treatment in the stented group for histomorphometric or immunohistochemical analysis. Results Intracoronary PDT significantly reduced intimal thickness in both BI and stented arteries (about 65%: 0.22 (SEM 0.05) mm v 0.62 (0.05) mm, p < 0.01; and about 26%: 0.40 (0.04) mm v 0.54 (0.04) mm, p < 0.01, respectively). PDT increased luminal area by ⩽ 60% and 50% within BI and stented arteries (3.43 (0.27) mm2v 5.51 (0.52) mm2, p < 0.05; 4.0 (0.02) mm2v 6.0 (0.16) mm2, p < 0.01), respectively. Complete re‐endothelialisation was observed by immunohistochemical and gross histological analyses in all PDT and control arteries. There were no cases of aneurysm formation or thrombosis. Conclusion Intracoronary PhotoPoint PDT with MV0611 reduces intimal proliferation without suppressing re‐endothelialisation in a porcine model of restenosis. PMID:16399853

  15. Feasibility and safety of endoscopic cryoablation at the duodenal papilla: Porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; Reinhard, Mary K; Wagh, Mihir S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and safety of liquid nitrogen spray cryoablation at the duodenal papilla in a porcine model. METHODS: This prospective study protocol was approved by the University of Florida Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Six pigs underwent liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy at the duodenal papilla. Freeze time of 20-s was applied per cycle (4 cycles/session). Survival animals (n = 4) were monitored for adverse events. Hemoglobin, white blood count, liver tests, and lipase were obtained at baseline and post-treatment. EGD was performed on day#7 to evaluate the papilla and for histology. All animals were euthanized and necropsy was performed at the end of the one-week survival period. Feasibility was defined as successful placement of the decompression tube in the duodenum, followed by delivery of spray cryotherapy to the duodenal papilla. Safety was determined by monitoring post-treatment blood tests and clinical course. Treatment effect was defined as endoscopic and histologic changes after cryotherapy. This was established by comparing endoscopic and histologic findings from mucosal biopsies prior to cryotherapy and on post-operative day (POD)#7. Full-thickness specimen was obtained post-mortem to assess depth of injury. RESULTS: Spray cryotherapy was feasible and successfully performed in all 6/6 (100%) animals. Cryospray with liquid nitrogen (four 20-s freeze-thaw cycles) at the duodenal papilla resulted in white frost formation at and around the target region. The mean procedural time was 54.5 min (range 50-58 min). All six animals studied had stable blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse oximetry measurements during the procedure. There were no significant intra-procedural adverse events. There were no significant differences in hemoglobin, white cell count, liver tests or lipase from baseline to post-cryotherapy. Survival animals were monitored daily post-operatively without any clinical ill effects from the cryotherapy. There was

  16. Evaluation of a Novel Laser-assisted Coronary Anastomotic Connector - the Trinity Clip - in a Porcine Off-pump Bypass Model

    PubMed Central

    Stecher, David; Bronkers, Glenn; Noest, Jappe O.T.; Tulleken, Cornelis A.F.; Hoefer, Imo E.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Buijsrogge, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    To simplify and facilitate beating heart (i.e., off-pump), minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery, a new coronary anastomotic connector, the Trinity Clip, is developed based on the excimer laser-assisted nonocclusive anastomosis technique. The Trinity Clip connector enables simplified, sutureless, and nonocclusive connection of the graft to the coronary artery, and an excimer laser catheter laser-punches the opening of the anastomosis. Consequently, owing to the complete nonocclusive anastomosis construction, coronary conditioning (i.e., occluding or shunting) is not necessary, in contrast to the conventional anastomotic technique, hence simplifying the off-pump bypass procedure. Prior to clinical application in coronary artery bypass grafting, the safety and quality of this novel connector will be evaluated in a long-term experimental porcine off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) study. In this paper, we describe how to evaluate the coronary anastomosis in the porcine OPCAB model using various techniques to assess its quality. Representative results are summarized and visually demonstrated. PMID:25490000

  17. Acellular hydrogel for regenerative burn wound healing: translation from a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Arianne; Burke, Jacqueline; Volk, Susan W; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Currently available skin grafts and skin substitute for healing following third-degree burn injuries is fraught with complications, often resulting in long-term physical and psychological sequelae. Synthetic treatment that can promote wound healing in a regenerative fashion would provide an off-the-shelf, non-immunogenic strategy to improve clinical care of severe burn wounds. Here, we demonstrate vulnerary efficacy and accelerated healing mechanism of dextran-based hydrogel in third-degree porcine burn model. The model was optimized to allow examination of the hydrogel treatment for clinical translation and its regenerative response mechanisms. Hydrogel treatment accelerated third-degree burn wound healing by rapid wound closure, improved reepithelialization, enhanced extracellular matrix remodeling, and greater nerve reinnervation, compared to the dressing treated group. These effects appear to be mediated through the ability of the hydrogel to facilitate a rapid but brief initial inflammatory response that coherently stimulates neovascularization within the granulation tissue during the first week of treatment, followed by an efficient vascular regression to promote a regenerative healing process. Our results suggest that the dextran-based hydrogels may substantially improve healing quality and reduce skin grafting incidents and thus pave the way for clinical studies to improve the care of severe burn injury patients. PMID:26358387

  18. Systemic Inflammatory Response After Natural Orifice Translumenal Surgery: Transvaginal Cholecystectomy in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Joe K. M.; Tong, Daniel K. H.; HO, David W. Y.; Luk, John; Law, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We analyzed circulating TNF-α and IL-6 to determine systemic inflammatory responses associated with transvaginal cholecystectomy in a porcine model. Methods: Six female pigs were used for a survival study after transvaginal cholecystectomy (NOTES group) using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) instruments and a single-channel endoscope. Blood was drawn preoperatively and 24 hours and 48 hours postoperatively. Four pigs were used as controls. In addition, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in 2 pigs for laparoscopic control. Results: In all 6 pigs in the NOTES group, no major intraoperative complications occurred. No significant differences were found between control, laparoscopic, and NOTES groups in terms of preoperative IL-6 level (P=0.897) and at 24 hours (P=0.790), and 48 hours postoperatively (P=0.945). Similarly, there was no significant difference in mean preoperative (P=0.349) and mean day 2 postoperative TNF-α levels (P=0.11). But a significant increase in day 1 postoperative TNF-α levels in the laparoscopic group compared with that in the control and NOTES groups was observed (P=0.049). One limitation of our study is that the sample size was relatively small. Conclusion: NOTES is safe in animal models in terms of anatomical and cellular level changes with minimal systemic inflammatory host responses elicited. Further study needs to be carried out in humans before NOTES can be recommended for routine use. PMID:19366533

  19. Attenuation of virulence of Lawsonia intracellularis after in vitro passages and its effects on the experimental reproduction of porcine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio A; Beckler, Dana; Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha M; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-02-22

    Non-pathogenic Lawsonia intracellularis variants have been obtained through multiple passages in cell culture but there is no information regarding the number of passages necessary to attenuate a pathogenic isolate. The present study evaluated the susceptibility of pigs to L. intracellularis after 10, 20 and 40 passages in vitro. Three groups (six animals/group) were inoculated with pure culture of L. intracellularis on passage 10, 20 or 40 and one group with placebo. The animals were monitored for clinical signs, fecal shedding and serological IgG response during 28 days post-inoculation. Gross and histologic lesions and the level of infection based on the amount of L. intracellularis-specific antigen in the intestinal mucosa identified by immunohistochemistry were evaluated in two animals from each group on days 14, 21 and 28. Animals inoculated with passages 10 and 20 demonstrated proliferative lesions typical of porcine proliferative enteropathy associated with the presence of Lawsonia-specific antigen in the intestinal mucosa. Passage 40-inoculated pigs did not show proliferative lesions or presence of Lawsonia antigen at any time point throughout the study. Similar patterns of the fecal shedding were observed in passage 10 and 20-infected pigs but those infected with passage 40 shed for a short period. Serological IgG responses in passage 10 and 20-inoculated pigs were detected from day 14 post-infection but not at all in passage 40-inoculated animals. These results demonstrate attenuation of the virulence properties of L. intracellularis between 20 and 40 cell passages in vitro. This information will be valuable for design of future experimental models and for studying the mechanisms involved in the attenuation of L. intracellularis virulence. PMID:22939985

  20. Experimental Models for Neurotrauma Research.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Johan; Risling, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    Physical trauma in the central nervous system (CNS) is usually the result of a number of forces in different directions and dimensions. A large number of experimental models have been developed to improve the possibilities to understand the outcome of CNS trauma. In this chapter, we will describe the need for a variety of experimental models for research on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI). Models can serve different needs, such as: to test new treatments for injuries, to reveal thresholds for injuries, to provide a better understanding of injury mechanisms, or to test tools and methods for translation between experiments and clinical data. In this chapter, we will discuss on the validation of models and translation between experimental and clinical studies. PMID:27604724

  1. Finite element model of the temperature increase in excised porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Kurtz, Ronald M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2012-07-01

    In order to model the thermal effect of laser exposure of the iris during laser corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature increase in porcine cadaver iris. The simulation data for the 60 kHz FS60 Laser showed that the temperature increased up to 1.23°C and 2.45°C (at laser pulse energy 1 and 2 µJ, respectively) by the 24 second procedure time. Calculated temperature profiles show good agreement with data obtained from ex vivo experiments using porcine cadaver iris. Simulation results of different types of femtosecond lasers indicate that the Laser in situ keratomileusis procedure does not present a safety hazard to the iris.

  2. A Triple Culture Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier Using Porcine Brain Endothelial cells, Astrocytes and Pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Burkhart, Annette; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models based on primary brain endothelial cells (BECs) cultured as monoculture or in co-culture with primary astrocytes and pericytes are useful for studying many properties of the BBB. The BECs retain their expression of tight junction proteins and efflux transporters leading to high trans-endothelial electric resistance (TEER) and low passive paracellular permeability. The BECs, astrocytes and pericytes are often isolated from small rodents. Larger species as cows and pigs however, reveal a higher yield, are readily available and have a closer resemblance to humans, which make them favorable high-throughput sources for cellular isolation. The aim of the present study has been to determine if the preferable combination of purely porcine cells isolated from the 6 months old domestic pigs, i.e. porcine brain endothelial cells (PBECs) in co-culture with porcine astrocytes and pericytes, would compare with PBECs co-cultured with astrocytes and pericytes isolated from newborn rats with respect to TEER value and low passive permeability. The astrocytes and pericytes were grown both as contact and non-contact co-cultures as well as in triple culture to examine their effects on the PBECs for barrier formation as revealed by TEER, passive permeability, and expression patterns of tight junction proteins, efflux transporters and the transferrin receptor. This syngenic porcine in vitro BBB model is comparable to triple cultures using PBECs, rat astrocytes and rat pericytes with respect to TEER formation, low passive permeability, and expression of hallmark proteins signifying the brain endothelium (tight junction proteins claudin 5 and occludin, the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (PgP) and breast cancer related protein (BCRP), and the transferrin receptor). PMID:26241648

  3. In vivo perfusion assessment of an anastomosis surgery on porcine intestinal model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Opferman, Justin; Decker, Ryan; Cheon, Gyeong W.; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Anastomosis, the connection of two structures, is a critical procedure for reconstructive surgery with over 1 million cases/year for visceral indication alone. However, complication rates such as strictures and leakage affect up to 19% of cases for colorectal anastomoses and up to 30% for visceral transplantation anastomoses. Local ischemia plays a critical role in anastomotic complications, making blood perfusion an important indicator for tissue health and predictor for healing following anastomosis. In this work, we apply a real time multispectral imaging technique to monitor impact on tissue perfusion due to varying interrupted suture spacing and suture tensions. Multispectral tissue images at 470, 540, 560, 580, 670 and 760 nm are analyzed in conjunction with an empirical model based on diffuse reflectance process to quantify the hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the suture site. The investigated tissues for anastomoses include porcine small (jejunum and ileum) and large (transverse colon) intestines. Two experiments using interrupted suturing with suture spacing of 1, 2, and 3 mm and tension levels from 0 N to 2.5 N are conducted. Tissue perfusion at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min after suturing are recorded and compared with the initial normal state. The result indicates the contrast between healthy and ischemic tissue areas and assists the determination of suturing spacing and tension. Therefore, the assessment of tissue perfusion will permit the development and intra-surgical monitoring of an optimal suture protocol during anastomosis with less complications and improved functional outcome.

  4. A pilot study on ultrasound-assisted liposuction of the greater omentum in porcine models.

    PubMed

    Sumiyama, Kazuki; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Ohya, Tomohiko; Aihara, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Keiichi; Imazu, Hiroo; Tamai, Naoto; Nagano, Hiroshi; Ishinoda, Yasuhiro; Tajiri, Hisao

    2012-03-01

    The greater omentum is the largest depot of visceral fat, and recent studies implicate removal of omental fat as a therapeutic option for metabolic syndrome (MS). This study evaluated the technical feasibility of reducing omental fat by using ultrasound-assisted liposuction (UAL) in porcine models. We removed as much omental adipose tissues as possible with a novel ultrasonic aspirator specifically designed for visceral liposuction that was inserted into the peritoneal cavity via the bilateral hypochondrial trocars. The greater part of the omental surface was emulsified and suctioned within 12.4 ± 9.2 (mean ± SD) min. In the survival study, all animals survived for two weeks without clinically evident complications following UAL. Histological examinations confirmed a substantial reduction in omental fat in pigs subjected to UAL. In conclusion, the pilot animal study conducted here demonstrated the technical feasibility of omental liposuction. UAL thus has potential as a relatively non-invasive liposuction approach to treat MS by selectively reducing the visceral fat content of the greater omentum. PMID:21395461

  5. Development of Off-pump Mitral Valve Replacement in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Matthew J.; Aoki, Chikashi; Satoshi, Takebayashi; Shimaoka, Toru; McGarvey, Jeremy R.; Gorman, Robert C.; Gorman, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We describe our initial experience with on-bypass and off-bypass (off-pump) mitral valve replacement with the modified version of our novel catheter-based sutureless mitral valve (SMV2) technology, which was developed to atraumatically anchor and seal in the mitral position. Description The SMV is a self-expanding device consisting of a custom designed nitinol framework and a pericardial leaflet valve mechanism. For the current studies our original device was modified (SMV2) to reduce the delivery profile and to allow for controlled deployment whilst still maintaining the key principles necessary for atraumatic anchoring and sealing in the MV position. Evaluation Ten Yorkshire pigs underwent successful SMV2 device implantation via a left atriotomy (on-pump N=6; off-pump N=4). Echocardiography and angiography revealed excellent LV systolic function, no significant perivalvular leak, no MV stenosis, no left ventricular (LV) outflow tract obstruction and no aortic valve insufficiency. Necropsy demonstrated that the SMV2 devices were anchored securely. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility and short-term success of off-pump mitral valve replacement using a novel, catheter-based device in a porcine model. PMID:25841820

  6. Noncontact imaging of burn depth and extent in a porcine model using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Amaan; Saggese, Steve; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Nanney, Lillian; Cuccia, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The standard of care for clinical assessment of burn severity and extent lacks a quantitative measurement. In this work, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) was used to measure 48 thermal burns of graded severity (superficial partial, deep partial, and full thickness) in a porcine model. Functional (total hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation) and structural parameters (tissue scattering) derived from the SFDI measurements were monitored over 72 h for each burn type and compared to gold standard histological measurements of burn depth. Tissue oxygen saturation (stO2) and total hemoglobin (ctHbT) differentiated superficial partial thickness burns from more severe burn types after 2 and 72 h, respectively (p<0.01), but were unable to differentiate deep partial from full thickness wounds in the first 72 h. Tissue scattering parameters separated superficial burns from all burn types immediately after injury (p<0.01), and separated all three burn types from each other after 24 h (p<0.01). Tissue scattering parameters also showed a strong negative correlation to histological burn depth as measured by vimentin immunostain (r2>0.89). These results show promise for the use of SFDI-derived tissue scattering as a correlation to burn depth and the potential to assess burn depth via a combination of SFDI functional and structural parameters. PMID:25147961

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of mannanase-hydrolyzed copra meal in a porcine model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Ibuki, Masahisa; Fukui, Kensuke; Kanatani, Hiroyuki; Mine, Yoshinori

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of mannanase-hydrolyzed copra meal (MNB), including β-1,4-mannobiose (67.8%), in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced porcine model of intestinal inflammation. In the DSS-positive control (POS) and MNB treatment (MCM) groups, DSS was first administered to piglets via intragastric catheter for 5 days, followed by 5 days administration of saline or MCM. A negative control group (NEG) received a saline alternative to DSS and MNB. Inflammation was assessed by clinical signs, morphological and histological measurements, gut permeability and neutrophil infiltration. Local production of TNF-α and IL-6 were analyzed by ELISA, colonic and ileal inflammatory gene expressions were assessed by real time RT-PCR, and CD4+CD25+ cell populations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Crypt elongation and muscle thickness, D-mannitol gut permeation, colonic expression of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α and IL-6 and myeloperoxidase activity were significantly lower in the MCM group than in that of POS group. The mRNA levels of ileal IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α were significantly lower following MCM treatment than with POS treatment.MNB exerts anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, suggesting that MNB is a novel therapeutic that may provide relief to human and animals suffering from intestinal inflammation. PMID:24430661

  8. Antibody Responses to Sarcoptes scabiei Apolipoprotein in a Porcine Model: Relevance to Immunodiagnosis of Recent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rampton, Melanie; Walton, Shelley F.; Holt, Deborah C.; Pasay, Cielo; Kelly, Andrew; Currie, Bart J.; McCarthy, James S.; Mounsey, Kate E.

    2013-01-01

    No commercial immunodiagnostic tests for human scabies are currently available, and existing animal tests are not sufficiently sensitive. The recombinant Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein antigen Sar s 14.3 is a promising immunodiagnostic, eliciting high levels of IgE and IgG in infected people. Limited data are available regarding the temporal development of antibodies to Sar s 14.3, an issue of relevance in terms of immunodiagnosis. We utilised a porcine model to prospectively compare specific antibody responses to a primary infestation by ELISA, to Sar s 14.3 and to S. scabiei whole mite antigen extract (WMA). Differences in the antibody profile between antigens were apparent, with Sar s 14.3 responses detected earlier, and declining significantly after peak infestation compared to WMA. Both antigens resulted in >90% diagnostic sensitivity from weeks 8–16 post infestation. These data provide important information on the temporal development of humoral immune responses in scabies and further supports the development of recombinant antigen based immunodiagnostic tests for recent scabies infestations. PMID:23762351

  9. Adipose tissue remodeling in a novel domestic porcine model of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Aditya S.; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Eirin, Alfonso; Tang, Hui; Jordan, Kyra L.; Woollard, John R.; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish and characterize a novel domestic porcine model of obesity. Design and Methods Fourteen domestic pigs were fed normal (lean, n=7) or high-fat/high-fructose diet (obese, n=7) for 16 weeks. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue biopsies were obtained after 8, 12 and 16 weeks of diet, and pericardial adipose tissue after 16 weeks, for assessments of adipocyte size, fibrosis, and inflammation. Adipose tissue volume and cardiac function were studied with multi-detector computed-tomography, and oxygenation with magnetic resonance imaging. Plasma lipids profiles, insulin resistance, and markers of inflammation were evaluated. Results Compared with lean, obese pigs had elevated cholesterol and triglycerides levels, blood pressure, and insulin resistance. Both abdominal and pericardial fat volume increased after 16 weeks of obese. In abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, adipocyte size and both tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression progressively increased. Macrophage infiltration showed in both abdominal and pericardial adipose tissues. Circulating TNF-α increased in obese only at 16 weeks. Compared with Lean, obese pigs had similar global cardiac function, but myocardial perfusion and oxygenation were significantly impaired. Conclusion A high-fat/high-fructose diet induces in domestic pigs many characteristics of metabolic syndrome, which is useful to investigate the effects of the obesity. PMID:25627626

  10. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging: detection of ischemia in a porcine model with FFR verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is a high resolution, non-invasive technique for assessing myocardial blood ow (MBF), which in concert with coronary CT angiography enable CT to provide a unique, comprehensive, fast analysis of both coronary anatomy and functional ow. We assessed perfusion in a porcine model with and without coronary occlusion. To induce occlusion, each animal underwent left anterior descending (LAD) stent implantation and angioplasty balloon insertion. Normal ow condition was obtained with balloon completely de ated. Partial occlusion was induced by balloon in ation against the stent with FFR used to assess the extent of occlusion. Prospective ECG-triggered partial scan images were acquired at end systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Images were reconstructed using FBP and a hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4, Philips Healthcare). Processing included: beam hardening (BH) correction, registration of image volumes using 3D cubic B-spline normalized mutual-information, and spatio-temporal bilateral ltering to reduce partial scan artifacts and noise variation. Absolute blood ow was calculated with a deconvolutionbased approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). Arterial input function was estimated from the left ventricle (LV) cavity. Regions of interest (ROIs) were identi ed in healthy and ischemic myocardium and compared in normal and occluded conditions. Under-perfusion was detected in the correct LAD territory and ow reduction agreed well with FFR measurements. Flow was reduced, on average, in LAD territories by 54%.

  11. Adenoviral gene transfer corrects the ion transport defect in the sinus epithelia of a porcine CF model.

    PubMed

    Potash, Andrea E; Wallen, Tanner J; Karp, Philip H; Ernst, Sarah; Moninger, Thomas O; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Stoltz, David A; Zabner, Joseph; Chang, Eugene H

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs spontaneously develop sinus and lung disease resembling human CF. The CF pig presents a unique opportunity to use gene transfer to test hypotheses to further understand the pathogenesis of CF sinus disease. In this study, we investigated the ion transport defect in the CF sinus and found that CF porcine sinus epithelia lack cyclic AMP (cAMP)-stimulated anion transport. We asked whether we could restore CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) current in the porcine CF sinus epithelia by gene transfer. We quantified CFTR transduction using an adenovirus expressing CFTR and green fluorescent protein (GFP). We found that as little as 7% of transduced cells restored 6% of CFTR current with 17-28% of transduced cells increasing CFTR current to 50% of non-CF levels. We also found that we could overcorrect cAMP-mediated current in non-CF epithelia. Our findings indicate that CF porcine sinus epithelia lack anion transport, and a relatively small number of cells expressing CFTR are required to rescue the ion transport phenotype. These studies support the use of the CF pig as a preclinical model for future gene therapy trials in CF sinusitis. PMID:23511247

  12. Bioartificial Heart: A Human-Sized Porcine Model – The Way Ahead

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Alexander; Patil, Nikhil Prakash; Sabashnikov, Anton; Jungebluth, Philipp; Korkmaz, Sevil; Li, Shiliang; Veres, Gabor; Soos, Pal; Ishtok, Roland; Chaimow, Nicole; Pätzold, Ines; Czerny, Natalie; Schies, Carsten; Schmack, Bastian; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Simon, André Rüdiger; Karck, Matthias; Szabo, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Background A bioartificial heart is a theoretical alternative to transplantation or mechanical left ventricular support. Native hearts decellularized with preserved architecture and vasculature may provide an acellular tissue platform for organ regeneration. We sought to develop a tissue-engineered whole-heart neoscaffold in human-sized porcine hearts. Methods We decellularized porcine hearts (n = 10) by coronary perfusion with ionic detergents in a modified Langendorff circuit. We confirmed decellularization by histology, transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, quantified residual DNA by spectrophotometry, and evaluated biomechanical stability with ex-vivo left-ventricular pressure/volume studies, all compared to controls. We then mounted the decellularized porcine hearts in a bioreactor and reseeded them with murine neonatal cardiac cells and human umbilical cord derived endothelial cells (HUVEC) under simulated physiological conditions. Results Decellularized hearts lacked intracellular components but retained specific collagen fibers, proteoglycan, elastin and mechanical integrity; quantitative DNA analysis demonstrated a significant reduction of DNA compared to controls (82.6±3.2 ng DNA/mg tissue vs. 473.2±13.4 ng DNA/mg tissue, p<0.05). Recellularized porcine whole-heart neoscaffolds demonstrated re-endothelialization of coronary vasculature and measurable intrinsic myocardial electrical activity at 10 days, with perfused organ culture maintained for up to 3 weeks. Conclusions Human-sized decellularized porcine hearts provide a promising tissue-engineering platform that may lead to future clinical strategies in the treatment of heart failure. PMID:25365554

  13. Virtual Electrophysiologic Study in a Three-dimensional Cardiac MRI Model of Porcine Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jason; Jacobson, Jason T; Ng, Justin K; Gordon, David; Lee, Daniel C; Carr, James C.; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study sought to test the hypothesis that “virtual” electrophysiologic studies (EPS) on an anatomic platform generated by 3D MRI reconstruction of the left ventricle (LV) can reproduce the reentrant circuits of induced ventricular tachycardia (VT) in a porcine model of myocardial infarction (MI). Background Delayed-enhancement MRI has been used to characterize MI and “gray zones”, which are thought to reflect heterogeneous regions of viable and non-viable myocytes. Methods MI by coronary artery occlusion was induced in eight pigs. After a recovery period, 3D cardiac MRIs were obtained from each pig in-vivo. Normal areas, gray zones, and infarct cores were classified based on voxel intensity. In the computer model, gray zones were assigned slower conduction and longer action potential durations than those for normal myocardium. Virtual EPS was performed and was compared to results of actual in vivo programmed stimulation and non-contact mapping. Results The LV volumes ranged from 97.8 to 166.2 cm3 with 4.9 to 17.5% of voxels classified as infarct zones. Six of the seven pigs that developed VT during actual EPS were also inducible with virtual EPS. Four of the six pigs that had simulated VT had reentrant circuits that approximated the circuits seen with non-contact mapping, while the remaining two had similar circuits but propagating in opposite directions. Conclusions This initial study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a mathematical model to MRI reconstructions of the LV to predict VT circuits. Virtual EPS may be helpful to plan catheter ablation strategies or to identify patients who are at risk for future episodes of VT. PMID:22633654

  14. Cell Sheet Transplantation for Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Pidial, Laetitia; Camilleri, Sophie; Bellucci, Alexandre; Casanova, Amaury; Viel, Thomas; Tavitian, Bertrand; Cellier, Christophe; Clement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Extended esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is highly responsible for esophageal stricture. We conducted a comparative study in a porcine model to evaluate the effectiveness of adipose tissue-derived stromal cell (ADSC) double cell sheet transplantation. Methods Twelve female pigs were treated with 5 cm long hemi-circumferential ESD and randomized in two groups. ADSC group (n = 6) received 4 double cell sheets of allogenic ADSC on a paper support membrane and control group (n = 6) received 4 paper support membranes. ADSC were labelled with PKH-67 fluorophore to allow probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopie (pCLE) monitoring. After 28 days follow-up, animals were sacrificed. At days 3, 14 and 28, endoscopic evaluation with pCLE and esophagography were performed. Results One animal from the control group was excluded (anesthetic complication). Animals from ADSC group showed less frequent alimentary trouble (17% vs 80%; P = 0.08) and higher gain weight on day 28. pCLE demonstrated a compatible cell signal in 4 animals of the ADSC group at day 3. In ADSC group, endoscopy showed that 1 out of 6(17%) animals developed a severe esophageal stricture comparatively to 100% (5/5) in the control group; P = 0.015. Esophagography demonstrated a decreased degree of stricture in the ADSC group on day 14 (44% vs 81%; P = 0.017) and day 28 (46% vs 90%; P = 0.035). Histological analysis showed a decreased fibrosis development in the ADSC group, in terms of surface (9.7 vs 26.1 mm²; P = 0.017) and maximal depth (1.6 vs 3.2 mm; P = 0.052). Conclusion In this model, transplantation of allogenic ADSC organized in double cell sheets after extended esophegeal ESD is strongly associated with a lower esophageal stricture’s rate. PMID:26930409

  15. Development of a Bronchial Wall Model: Triple Culture on a Decellularized Porcine Trachea.

    PubMed

    Melo, Esther; Kasper, Jennifer Y; Unger, Ronald E; Farré, Ramon; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2015-09-01

    In vitro coculture models mimicking the bronchial barrier are a significant step forward in investigating the behavior and function of the upper respiratory tract mucosa. To date, mostly synthetic materials have been used as substrates to culture the cells. However, decellularized tissues provide a more in vivo-like environment based on the native extracellular matrix. In this study, an in vitro, bronchial wall coculture model has been established using a decellularized, porcine luminal trachea membrane and employing three relevant human cell types. The tissue was decellularized and placed in plastic transwell supports. The human bronchial epithelial cell line, 16HBE14o-, was seeded on the apical side of the membrane with the human lung fibroblast cell line, Wi-38, and/or the microvascular endothelial cell line, ISO-HAS-1, seeded on the basolateral side. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was measured over 10 days and tight/adherens junctions (ZO-1, occludin/β-catenin) were studied through immunofluorescence. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed to evaluate microvilli and cilia formation. All cultures grew successfully on the membrane. TER values of 555 Ω·cm(2) (±21, SEM) were achieved in the monoculture. Cocultures with fibroblasts reached 565 Ω·cm(2) (±41, SEM), with endothelial cells at 638 Ω·cm(2) (±37, SEM), and the triple culture achieved 552 Ω·cm(2) (±38, SEM). ZO-1, occludin, and β-catenin were expressed in 16HBE14o- under all culture conditions. Using SEM, a dense microvilli population was found. Prominent cell-cell contacts and clusters of emerging cilia could be identified. Fibroblasts and endothelial cells strengthened the formation of a tight barrier by the 16HBE14o-. Thus, the coculture of three relevant cell types in combination with native decellularized scaffolds as a substrate approaches more closely the in vivo situation and could be used to study mechanisms of upper respiratory damage and regeneration. PMID

  16. Cholesteryl esters accumulate in the heart in a porcine model of ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Drevinge, Christina; Karlsson, Lars O; Ståhlman, Marcus; Larsson, Thomas; Perman Sundelin, Jeanna; Grip, Lars; Andersson, Linda; Borén, Jan; Levin, Malin C

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia is associated with intracellular accumulation of lipids and increased depots of myocardial lipids are linked to decreased heart function. Despite investigations in cell culture and animal models, there is little data available on where in the heart the lipids accumulate after myocardial ischemia and which lipid species that accumulate. The aim of this study was to investigate derangements of lipid metabolism that are associated with myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of ischemia and reperfusion. The large pig heart enables the separation of the infarct area with irreversible injury from the area at risk with reversible injury and the unaffected control area. The surviving myocardium bordering the infarct is exposed to mild ischemia and is stressed, but remains viable. We found that cholesteryl esters accumulated in the infarct area as well as in the bordering myocardium. In addition, we found that expression of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) was up-regulated, suggesting that choleteryl ester uptake is mediated via these receptors. Furthermore, we found increased ceramide accumulation, inflammation and endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress in the infarcted area of the pig heart. In addition, we found increased levels of inflammation and ER stress in the myocardium bordering the infarct area. Our results indicate that lipid accumulation in the heart is one of the metabolic derangements remaining after ischemia, even in the myocardium bordering the infarct area. Normalizing lipid levels in the myocardium after ischemia would likely improve myocardial function and should therefore be considered as a target for treatment. PMID:23637933

  17. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Reduces Cerebral Oxidative Stress Following Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Arvola, Oiva; Haapanen, Henri; Herajärvi, Johanna; Anttila, Tuomas; Puistola, Ulla; Karihtala, Peeter; Tuominen, Hannu; Anttila, Vesa; Juvonen, Tatu

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic precondition has become prominent as one of the most promising methods to mitigate neurological damage following ischemic insult. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning can be seen in the markers of oxidative stress or in redox-regulating enzymes in a porcine model. A total of 12 female piglets were randomly assigned to 2 groups. The study group underwent an intervention of 4 cycles of 5-minute ischemic preconditioning on the right hind leg. All piglets underwent 60-minute hypothermic circulatory arrest. Oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was measured from blood samples with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After 7 days of follow-up, samples from the brain, heart, kidney, and ovary were harvested for histopathologic examination. The immunohistochemical stainings of hypoxia marker hypoxia-inducible factor-1-α, oxidative stress marker 8-OHdG, DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, and antioxidant response regulators nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and protein deglycase were analyzed. The level of 8-OHdG referred to baseline was decreased in the sagittal sinus׳ blood samples in the study group after a prolonged deep hypothermic circulatory arrest at 360 minutes after reperfusion. Total histopathologic score was 3.8 (1.8-6.0) in the study group and was 4.4 (2.5-6.5) in the control group (P = 0.72), demonstrating no statistically significant difference in cerebral injury. Our findings demonstrate that the positive effects of remote ischemic preconditioning can be seen in cellular oxidative balance regulators in an animal model after 7 days of preconditioned ischemic insult. PMID:27568144

  18. Sclera-Choroid-RPE Transport of Eight β-Blockers in Human, Bovine, Porcine, Rabbit, and Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Rajendra S.; Cheruvu, Narayan P. S.; Edelhauser, Henry F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the influence of drug lipophilicity, ocular pigmentation, and species differences on transscleral solute transport. Methods. The transport of eight β-blockers across excised sclera/sclera-choroid-RPE (SCRPE) of albino rabbit, pigmented rabbit, human, porcine, and bovine eyes was determined over 6 hours. The ex vivo transscleral β-blocker transport to the vitreous at the end of 6 hours was determined in euthanatized, pigmented Brown Norway rats. The thicknesses of the sclera and SCRPE and the melanin content in choroid-RPE (CRPE) were measured to determine whether species differences in drug transport can be explained on this basis. Results. Solute lipophilicity inversely correlated with the SCRPE cumulative percentage of transport in all species (R2 ≥ 0.80). The CRPE impeded the SCRPE transport of all β-blockers (51%–64% resistance in the rabbits; 84%–99.8% in the bovine and porcine eyes) more than the sclera, with the impedance increasing with lipophilicity. SCRPE transport followed the trend albino rabbit > pigmented rabbit > human > porcine > bovine, and a cross-species comparison showed good Spearman's rho correlation (R2 ≥ 0.85). Bovine (R2 = 0.84), porcine (R2 = 0.84), and human (R2 = 0.71) SCRPE transport was more predictive than that in the rabbit models (R2 = 0.60–0.61) of transscleral solute transport to the vitreous in rats. The CRPE concentrations were higher in pigmented rabbits than in albino rabbits. The melanin content of the CRPE exhibited the trend albino rabbit ≪ pigmented rabbit < porcine ∼ bovine < rat. Normalization to scleral thickness abolished the species differences in scleral transport. Normalization to SCRPE thickness and melanin content significantly reduced species differences in SCRPE transport. Conclusions. Owing to the presence of pigment and drug binding, choroid-RPE is the principal barrier to transscleral β-blocker transport, with the barrier being more significant for lipophilic

  19. The rolling-circle melting-pot model for porcine circovirus DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication (Ori) among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. Porcine circo...

  20. Low-shear modelled microgravity environment maintains morphology and differentiated functionality of primary porcine hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Leonard J; Walker, Simon W; Hayes, Peter C; Plevris, John N

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocytes cultured in conventional static culture rapidly lose polarity and differentiated function. This could be explained by gravity-induced sedimentation, which prevents formation of complete three-dimensional (3D) cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions and disrupts integrin-mediated signals (including the most abundant hepatic integrin alpha(5)beta(1)), important for cellular polarity and differentiation. Cell culture in a low fluid shear modelled microgravity (about 10(-2) g) environment promotes spatial colocation/self-aggregation of dissociated cells and induction of 3D differentiated liver morphology. Previously, we demonstrated the utility of a NASA rotary bioreactor in maintaining key metabolic functions and 3D aggregate formation of high-density primary porcine hepatocyte cultures over 21 days. Using serum-free chemically defined medium, without confounding interactions of exogenous bioscaffolding or bioenhancing surface materials, we investigated features of hepatic cellular polarity and differentiated functionality, including expression of hepatic integrin alpha(5), as markers of functional morphology. We report here that in the absence of exogenous biomatrix scaffolding, hepatocytes cultured in serum-free chemically defined medium in a microgravity environment rapidly (<24 h) form macroscopic (2-5 mm), compacted 3D hepatospheroid structures consisting of a shell of glycogen-positive viable cells circumscribing a core of eosinophilic cells. The spheroid shell layers exhibited ultrastructural, morphological and functional features of differentiated, polarized hepatic tissue including strong expression of the integrin alpha(5) subunit, functional bile canaliculi, albumin synthesis, and fine ultrastructure reminiscent of in vivo hepatic tissue. The low fluid shear microgravity environment may promote tissue-like self-organization of dissociated cells, and offer advantages over spheroids cultured in conventional formats to delineate optimal conditions for

  1. Assessment of Chronological Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on Hilar Bile Ducts in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae Woong Lu, David S. K. Osuagwu, Ferdnand Raman, Steven; Lassman, Charles

    2013-11-07

    PurposeTo evaluate the chronological effects of irreversible electroporation (IRE) on large hilar bile ducts in an in vivo porcine model correlated with computed tomography (CT) cholangiography and histopathology.Materials and MethodsTwelve IRE zones were made along hilar bile ducts intraoperatively under ultrasound (US)-guidance in 11 pigs. Paired electrodes were placed either on opposing sides of the bile duct (straddle [STR]) or both on one side of the bile duct (one-sided [OSD]). The shortest electrode-to-duct distance was classified as periductal (≤2 mm) or nonperiductal (>2 mm). CT cholangiography and laboratory tests were performed before IRE and again at 2 days, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks after IRE. Degree of bile duct injury were graded as follows: grade 0 = no narrowing; grade 1 = ≤50 % duct narrowing; grade 2 = >50 % narrowing without proximal duct dilatation; grade 3 = grade 2 with proximal duct dilatation; and grade 4 = grade 3 with enzyme elevation. Pigs were selected for killing and histopathology at 2 days, 4, and 8 weeks.ResultsNonperiductal electrode placement produced no long-term strictures in 5 of 5 ducts. Periductal electrode placement produced mild narrowing in 6 of 7 ducts: 5 grade 1 and 1 grade 2. None showed increased enzymes. There was no significant difference between STR versus OSD electrode placement. Histopathology showed minor but relatively greater ductal mural changes in narrowed ducts.ConclusionIn the larger hilar ducts, long-term patency and mural integrity appear resistant to IRE damage with the energy deposition used, especially if the electrode is not immediately periductal in position.

  2. Carbon dioxide laser ablation with immediate autografting in a full-thickness porcine burn model.

    PubMed Central

    Glatter, R D; Goldberg, J S; Schomacker, K T; Compton, C C; Flotte, T J; Bua, D P; Greaves, K W; Nishioka, N S; Sheridan, R L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the long-term clinical and histologic outcome of immediate autografting of full-thickness burn wounds ablated with a high-power continuous-wave CO2 laser to sharply débrided wounds in a porcine model. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Continuous-wave CO2 lasers have performed poorly as tools for burn excision because the large amount of thermal damage to viable subeschar tissues precluded successful autografting. However, a new technique, in which a high-power laser is rapidly scanned over the eschar, results in eschar vaporization without significant damage to underlying viable tissues, allowing successful immediate autografting. METHODS: Full-thickness paravertebral burn wounds measuring 36 cm2 were created on 11 farm swine. Wounds were ablated to adipose tissue 48 hours later using either a surgical blade or a 150-Watt continuous-wave CO2 laser deflected by an x-y galvanometric scanner that translated the beam over the tissue surface, removing 200 microm of tissue per scan. Both sites were immediately autografted and serially evaluated clinically and histologically for 180 days. RESULTS: The laser-treated sites were nearly bloodless. The mean residual thermal damage was 0.18+/-0.05 mm. The mean graft take was 96+/-11% in manual sites and 93+/-8% in laser sites. On postoperative day 7, the thickness of granulation tissue at the graft-wound bed interface was greater in laser-debrided sites. By postoperative day 180, the manual and laser sites were histologically identical. Vancouver scar assessment revealed no differences in scarring at postoperative day 180. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term scarring, based on Vancouver scar assessments and histologic evaluation, was equivalent at 6 months in laser-ablated and sharply excised sites. Should this technology become practical, the potential clinical implications include a reduction in surgical blood loss without sacrifice of immediate engraftment rates or long-term outcome. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  3. Laparoendoscopic single-site simple nephrectomy using a magnetic anchoring system in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Hyo; Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Seo Yeon; Han, Deok Hyun; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic anchoring devices may reduce the number of port sites needed in laparoscopic surgery. In this study, we prospectively assessed the feasibility of using a magnetic anchoring and guidance system (MAGS) in laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery performed by novices. Materials and Methods A total of 10 LESS simple nephrectomies were performed with or without MAGS in a nonsurvival porcine model by 6 operators with no previous LESS surgery experience. After installation of the homemade single port, an intra-abdominal magnet was fixed to the renal parenchyma with suturing and stabilized by an external magnet placed on the flank so that the position of the kidney could be easily changed by moving the external handheld magnet. The length of the procedure and any intraoperative complications were evaluated. Results Operative time (mean±standard deviation) was shorter in the group using the magnetic anchoring device (M-LESS-N) than in the group with conventional LESS nephrectomy (C-LESS-N) (63±20.8 minutes vs. 82±40.7 minutes, respectively). Although all nephrectomies were completed uneventfully in the M-LESS-N group, renal vein injury occurred during dissection of the renal hilum in two cases of C-LESS-N and was resolved by simultaneous transection of the renal artery and vein with an Endo-GIA stapler. Conclusions LESS-N using MAGS is a feasible technique for surgeons with no LESS surgery experience. Taking into account the 2 cases of renal vein injury in the C-LESS-N group, the application of MAGS may be beneficial for overcoming the learning curve of LESS surgery. PMID:27195320

  4. Efficacy of Trypsin in Treating Coral Snake Envenomation in the Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Parker-Cote, Jennifer L; O'Rourke, Dorcas P; Brewer, Kori L; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Punja, Mohan; Bush, Sean P; Miller, Susan N; Meggs, William J

    2015-12-01

    Antivenom is the definitive treatment for venomous snakebites. Alternative treatments warrant investigation because antivenom is sometimes unavailable, expensive, and can have deleterious side effects. This study assesses the efficacy of trypsin to treat coral snake envenomation in an in vivo porcine model. A randomized, blinded study was conducted. Subjects were 13 pigs injected subcutaneously with 1 mL of eastern coral snake venom (10 mg/mL) in the right distal hind limb. After 1 min, subjects were randomized to have the envenomation site injected with either 1 mL of saline or 1 mL of trypsin (100 mg/mL) by a blinded investigator. Clinical endpoint was survival for 72 h or respiratory depression defined as respiratory rate <15 breaths per minute, falling pulse oximetry, or agonal respirations. Fisher's exact t test was used for between group comparisons. Average time to toxicity for the saline control was 263 min (191-305 min). The development of respiratory depression occurred more frequently in control pigs than treated pigs (p = 0.009). Four of the six pigs that received trypsin survived to the end of the 3-day study. No control pigs survived. Two of the trypsin treatment pigs died with times to toxicity of 718 and 971 min. Survival to 12 and 24 h was significantly greater in the trypsin treatment group (p = 0.002, p = 0.009, respectively). Local injection of trypsin, a proteolytic enzyme, at the site of envenomation decreased the toxicity of eastern coral snake venom and increased survival significantly. Further investigation is required before these results can be extended to human snakebites. PMID:25952763

  5. Small-Incision Laparoscopy-Assisted Surgery Under Abdominal Cavity Irrigation in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Takuro; Aoe, Tomohiko; Yu, Wen-Wei; Ebihara, Yuma; Kawahira, Hiroshi; Isono, Shiro; Naya, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgeries are performed under carbon dioxide insufflation. Switching from gas to an isotonic irrigant introduces several benefits and avoids some adverse effects of gas insufflation. We developed an irrigating device and apparatus designed for single-incision laparoscopic surgery and tested its advantages and drawbacks during surgery in a porcine model. Materials and Methods: Six pigs underwent surgical procedures under general anesthesia. A 30-cm extracorporeal cistern was placed over a 5–6-cm abdominal incision. The abdomen was irrigated with warm saline that was drained via a suction tube placed near the surgical field and continuously recirculated through a closed circuit equipped with a hemodialyzer as a filter. Irrigant samples from two pigs were cultured to check for bacterial and fungal contamination. Body weight was measured before and after surgery in four pigs that had not received treatments affecting hemodynamics or causing diuresis. Results: One-way flow of irrigant ensured laparoscopic vision by rinsing blood from the surgical field. Through a retroperitoneal approach, cystoprostatectomy was successfully performed in three pigs, nephrectomy in two, renal excision in two, and partial nephrectomy in one, under simultaneous ultrasonographic monitoring. Through a transperitoneal approach, liver excision and hemostasis with a bipolar sealing device were performed in three pigs, and bladder pedicle excision was performed in one pig. Bacterial and fungal contamination of the irrigant was observed on the draining side of the circuit, but the filter captured the contaminants. Body weight increased by a median of 2.1% (range, 1.2–4.4%) of initial weight after 3–5 hours of irrigation. Conclusions: Surgery under irrigation is feasible and practical when performed via a cistern through a small abdominal incision. This method is advantageous, especially in the enabling of continuous and free

  6. Donor site healing dynamics: molecular, histological, and noninvasive imaging assessment in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Mauskar, Neil A; Sood, Subeena; Travis, Taryn E; Matt, Sarah E; Mino, Matthew J; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Moffatt, Lauren T; Fidler, Philip; Epstein, Stephen E; Jordan, Marion H; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the physiology of donor site healing will lead to advances in how these wounds are treated and may ultimately allow faster healing, more frequent autografting, and more effective care of the burn-injured patient. Unfortunately, a paucity of data exists regarding perfusion metrics over the course of donor site healing. Furthermore, there are no studies that interrelate indices of perfusion with the molecular and cellular processes of donor site healing. Male Duroc pigs were anesthetized and donor site wounds were created using a Zimmer dermatome at a depth of 0.060 inch (1.52 mm). Digital photographs, laser Doppler images, and punch biopsies were obtained before and after excision and on days 2, 4, 7, 9, 11, 14, and 16 until wounds were healed. RNA isolation was performed and quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to examine differential gene expression over the time course. Formalin-fixed biopsies were embedded in paraffin, sectioned, stained, and examined. Wound surfaces were 83% re-epithelialized by day 16. Perfusion peaked on day 2 then declined, but it remained significantly elevated compared to before excision (P < .05). From day 9 onward, mean perfusion units were not significantly different from baseline (P < .05). Twenty-two representative genes were selected for examination. RNA expression of collagen, tenascin-cytoactin, inflammatory cytokines, remodeling enzymes, growth factors, and Wnt was increased. Inflammatory cells and cytokines were demonstrated histologically. Nuclei per high powered field peaked at day 7 and neodermal thickness increased daily to day 14. A novel porcine model for donor site wound healing that interrelates re-epithelilaizationand perfusion with molecular and cellular indices has been demonstrated. PMID:23511287

  7. The updated experimental proteinoid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Nakashima, T.; Przybylski, A.; Syren, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental proteinoid model includes new results indicating that polymers sufficiently rich in basic amino acid catalyze the synthesis of peptides from ATP and amino acids and of oligonucleotides from ATP. The need for simulation syntheses of amino acids yielding significant proportions of basic amino acids is now in focus. The modeled simultaneous protocellular synthesis of peptides and polynucleotides is part of a more comprehensive proposal for the origin of the coded genetic mechanism. The finding of membrane and action potentials in proteinoid microspheres, with or without added lecithin, is reported. The crucial nature of a nonrandom matrix for protocells is developed.

  8. Experimental Trauma Models: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Frink, Michael; Andruszkow, Hagen; Zeckey, Christian; Krettek, Christian; Hildebrand, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of polytrauma patients remains a medical as well as socioeconomic challenge. Although diagnostics and therapy improved during the last decades, multiple injuries are still the major cause of fatalities in patients below 45 years of age. Organ dysfunction and organ failure are major complications in patients with major injuries and contribute to mortality during the clinical course. Profound understanding of the systemic pathophysiological response is crucial for innovative therapeutic approaches. Therefore, experimental studies in various animal models are necessary. This review is aimed at providing detailed information of common trauma models in small as well as in large animals. PMID:21331361

  9. Experimental analysis of the mechanical behavior of the viscoelastic porcine pancreas and preliminary case study on the human pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wex, C; Fröhlich, M; Brandstädter, K; Bruns, C; Stoll, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the mechanical properties of the pancreas. Up to now, the mechanical properties of the pancreas are not sufficiently characterized. The possibility of intraoperative mechanical testing of pathological pancreata will allow the classification of pancreatic diseases in the future. The application of mechanical parameters instead of the intraoperative frozen section analysis shortens waiting times in the operating room. This study proves the general applicability of shear rheology for the determination of the mechanical properties of pancreas and the assessment of graft quality for transplantation. Porcine and human pancreas samples were examined ex vivo and a nonlinear viscoelastic behavior was observed. Pancreas was found to be more viscous than liver but both abdominal organs showed a similar flow behavior. The shear deformation dependence of healthy human pancreas was similar to porcine pancreas. An increase in the post-mortem time led to an increase in the complex modulus for a post-mortem time up to 8.5 days. Histological investigations showed that an increased amount of collagen coincides with the stiffening of the pancreatic tissue. PMID:25460416

  10. EXPERIMENTAL MODELLING OF AORTIC ANEURYSMS

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Barry J; Corbett, Timothy J; Cloonan, Aidan J; O’Donnell, Michael R; Walsh, Michael T; Vorp, David A; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    A range of silicone rubbers were created based on existing commercially available materials. These silicones were designed to be visually different from one another and have distinct material properties, in particular, ultimate tensile strengths and tear strengths. In total, eleven silicone rubbers were manufactured, with the materials designed to have a range of increasing tensile strengths from approximately 2-4MPa, and increasing tear strengths from approximately 0.45-0.7N/mm. The variations in silicones were detected using a standard colour analysis technique. Calibration curves were then created relating colour intensity to individual material properties. All eleven materials were characterised and a 1st order Ogden strain energy function applied. Material coefficients were determined and examined for effectiveness. Six idealised abdominal aortic aneurysm models were also created using the two base materials of the study, with a further model created using a new mixing technique to create a rubber model with randomly assigned material properties. These models were then examined using videoextensometry and compared to numerical results. Colour analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship (p<0.0009) with both tensile strength and tear strength, allowing material strength to be determined using a non-destructive experimental technique. The effectiveness of this technique was assessed by comparing predicted material properties to experimentally measured methods, with good agreement in the results. Videoextensometry and numerical modelling revealed minor percentage differences, with all results achieving significance (p<0.0009). This study has successfully designed and developed a range of silicone rubbers that have unique colour intensities and material strengths. Strengths can be readily determined using a non-destructive analysis technique with proven effectiveness. These silicones may further aid towards an improved understanding of the

  11. Scaffold-Based Delivery of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis: Preliminary Studies in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zongyang; Tee, Boon Ching; Kennedy, Kelly S.; Kennedy, Patrick M.; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Mallery, Susan R.; Fields, Henry W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bone regeneration through distraction osteogenesis (DO) is promising but remarkably slow. To accelerate it, autologous mesenchymal stem cells have been directly injected to the distraction site in a few recent studies. Compared to direct injection, a scaffold-based method can provide earlier cell delivery with potentially better controlled cell distribution and retention. This pilot project investigated a scaffold-based cell-delivery approach in a porcine mandibular DO model. Materials and Methods Eleven adolescent domestic pigs were used for two major sets of studies. The in-vitro set established methodologies to: aspirate bone marrow from the tibia; isolate, characterize and expand bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs); enhance BM-MSC osteogenic differentiation using FGF-2; and confirm cell integration with a gelatin-based Gelfoam scaffold. The in-vivo set transplanted autologous stem cells into the mandibular distraction sites using Gelfoam scaffolds; completed a standard DO-course and assessed bone regeneration by macroscopic, radiographic and histological methods. Repeated-measure ANOVAs and t-tests were used for statistical analyses. Results From aspirated bone marrow, multi-potent, heterogeneous BM-MSCs purified from hematopoietic stem cell contamination were obtained. FGF-2 significantly enhanced pig BM-MSC osteogenic differentiation and proliferation, with 5 ng/ml determined as the optimal dosage. Pig BM-MSCs integrated readily with Gelfoam and maintained viability and proliferative ability. After integration with Gelfoam scaffolds, 2.4–5.8×107 autologous BM-MSCs (undifferentiated or differentiated) were transplanted to each experimental DO site. Among 8 evaluable DO sites included in the final analyses, the experimental DO sites demonstrated less interfragmentary mobility, more advanced gap obliteration, higher mineral content and faster mineral apposition than the control sites, and all transplanted scaffolds were completely

  12. Experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Philippa; Villanueva, Augusto; Friedman, Scott L.; Koike, Kazuhiko; Llovet, Josep M.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and deadly cancer whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Comparative genomic studies from human HCC samples have classified HCCs into different molecular subgroups; yet, the unifying feature of this tumor is its propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. This review seeks to analyze the available experimental models in HCC research and to correlate data from human populations with them in order to consolidate our efforts to date, as it is increasingly clear that different models will be required to mimic different subclasses of the neoplasm. These models will be instrumental in the evaluation of compounds targeting specific molecular pathways in future preclinical studies. PMID:18314222

  13. Experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Newell, Philippa; Villanueva, Augusto; Friedman, Scott L; Koike, Kazuhiko; Llovet, Josep M

    2008-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and deadly cancer whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Comparative genomic studies from human HCC samples have classified HCCs into different molecular subgroups; yet, the unifying feature of this tumor is its propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. This review seeks to analyze the available experimental models in HCC research and to correlate data from human populations with them in order to consolidate our efforts to date, as it is increasingly clear that different models will be required to mimic different subclasses of the neoplasm. These models will be instrumental in the evaluation of compounds targeting specific molecular pathways in future preclinical studies. PMID:18314222

  14. Clot retraction affects the extent of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis in an ex vivo porcine thrombosis model

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jonathan T.; Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Perrin, Stephen R.; Vela, Deborah C.; Holland, Christy K.

    2013-01-01

    Using an FDA-approved contrast agent (Definity®) and thrombolytic drug (rt-PA), we investigated ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis in two whole-blood clot models. Porcine venous blood was collected from donor hogs and coagulated in two different materials. This method produced clots with differing compositional properties, as determined by routine scanning electron microscopy and histology. Clots were deployed in an ex vivo porcine thrombolysis model, while an intermittent ultrasound scheme previously developed to maximize stable cavitation was applied and acoustic emissions were detected. Exposure of clots to 3.15 μg/mL rt-PA promoted lysis in both clot models, compared to exposure to plasma alone. However, in the presence of rt-PA, Definity®, and ultrasound, only unretracted clots experienced significant enhancement of thrombolysis compared to treatment with rt-PA. In these clots, microscopy studies revealed loose erythrocyte aggregates, a significantly less extensive fibrin network, and a higher porosity, which may facilitate increase penetration of thrombolytics by cavitation. PMID:23453629

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells preserve neonatal right ventricular function in a porcine model of pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Wehman, Brody; Sharma, Sudhish; Pietris, Nicholas; Mishra, Rachana; Siddiqui, Osama T; Bigham, Grace; Li, Tieluo; Aiello, Emily; Murthi, Sarah; Pittenger, Mark; Griffith, Bartley; Kaushal, Sunjay

    2016-06-01

    Limited therapies exist for patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) who develop right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have not been evaluated in a preclinical model of pressure overload, which simulates the pathophysiology relevant to many forms of CHD. A neonatal swine model of RV pressure overload was utilized to test the hypothesis that MSCs preserve RV function and attenuate ventricular remodeling. Immunosuppressed Yorkshire swine underwent pulmonary artery banding to induce RV dysfunction. After 30 min, human MSCs (1 million cells, n = 5) or placebo (n = 5) were injected intramyocardially into the RV free wall. Serial transthoracic echocardiography monitored RV functional indices including 2D myocardial strain analysis. Four weeks postinjection, the MSC-treated myocardium had a smaller increase in RV end-diastolic area, end-systolic area, and tricuspid vena contracta width (P < 0.01), increased RV fractional area of change, and improved myocardial strain mechanics relative to placebo (P < 0.01). The MSC-treated myocardium demonstrated enhanced neovessel formation (P < 0.0001), superior recruitment of endogenous c-kit+ cardiac stem cells to the RV (P < 0.0001) and increased proliferation of cardiomyocytes (P = 0.0009) and endothelial cells (P < 0.0001). Hypertrophic changes in the RV were more pronounced in the placebo group, as evidenced by greater wall thickness by echocardiography (P = 0.008), increased cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area (P = 0.001), and increased expression of hypertrophy-related genes, including brain natriuretic peptide, β-myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain. Additionally, MSC-treated myocardium demonstrated increased expression of the antihypertrophy secreted factor, growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), and its downstream effector, SMAD 2/3, in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and in the porcine RV myocardium. This is the first report of the use of MSCs as a therapeutic

  16. Renoprotective Mechanism of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Based on Transcriptomic Analysis in a Porcine Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sook Young; Cho, Young In; Lee, Kwang Suk; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Yang, Seung Choul; Han, Woong Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a well-known phenomenon in which tissues are exposed to a brief period of ischemia prior to a longer ischemic event. This technique produces tissue tolerance to ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Currently, IPC’s mechanism of action is poorly understood. Using a porcine single kidney model, we performed remote IPC with renal IRI and evaluated the IPC mechanism of action. Following left nephrectomy, 15 female Yorkshire pigs were divided into three groups: no IPC and 90 minutes of warm ischemia (control), remote IPC immediately followed by 90 minutes of warm ischemia (rIPCe), and remote IPC with 90 minutes of warm ischemia performed 24 hours later (rIPCl). Differential gene expression analysis was performed using a porcine-specific microarray. The microarray analysis of porcine renal tissues identified 1,053 differentially expressed probes in preconditioned pigs. Among these, 179 genes had altered expression in both the rIPCe and rIPCl groups. The genes were largely related to oxidation reduction, apoptosis, and inflammatory response. In the rIPCl group, an additional 848 genes had altered expression levels. These genes were primarily related to immune response and inflammation, including those coding for cytokines and cytokine receptors and those that play roles in the complement system and coagulation cascade. In the complement system, the membrane attack complex was determined to be sublytic, because it colocalized with phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Furthermore, alpha 2 macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, uterine plasmin trypsin inhibitor, and arginase-1 mRNA levels were elevated in the rIPCl group. These findings indicate that remote IPC produces renoprotective effects through multiple mechanisms, and these effects develop over a long timeframe rather than immediately following IPC. PMID:26489007

  17. Porcine Head Response to Blast

    PubMed Central

    Shridharani, Jay K.; Wood, Garrett W.; Panzer, Matthew B.; Capehart, Bruce P.; Nyein, Michelle K.; Radovitzky, Raul A.; Bass, Cameron R. ‘Dale’

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30 s and the remaining two recovered within 8 min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300–2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2 = 0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are

  18. Porcine acute liver failure model established by two-phase surgery and treated with hollow fiber bioartificial liver support system

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Mu, Ning; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Yan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish a highly reproducible animal model of acute liver failure (ALF), for assessing the effect of bioartificial liver support system (BALSS). METHODS: A two-phase complete liver devascularization procedure was performed in eight loco-hybrid pigs. Blood biochemical index and liver biopsy were studied every 2 h after surgery, and survival time was recorded. The BALSS constructed with high volume recirculating technique was a hollow fiber circulating system consisting of a hepatocyte reactor-hollow fiber module inoculated with microcarrier-adhering hepatocytes, and a double pump, heparinized, thermostabilized, micro-capsulized activated carbon-adsorbing plasmapheresis system. Twelve pigs undergoing two-phase surgery were randomized into: control group (perfused without hepatocytes, n = 6) and treatment group (perfused with hepatocytes, n = 6). Intergroup liver biochemical indexes, survival time, and liver pathological changes were analyzed at regular intervals. RESULTS: Two-phase surgery was performed in all the experimental pigs, and there was no obvious difference between their biochemical indexes. After 3 h of phase II surgery, ammonia (Amm) increased to (269±37) μmol/L. After 5 h of the surgery, fibrinogen (Fib) decreased to (1.5±0.2) g/L. After 7 h of the surgery, ALT, AST, Tbil and PT were (7.6±1.8) nka/L, (40±5) nka/L, (55±8) μmol/L and (17.5±1.7) nka/L respectively. After 9 h of surgery, ALB and Cr were (27±4) g/L and (87±9) μmol/L. After 13 h of surgery, BUN was (3.5±0.9) μmol/L. All the above values were different from those determined before surgery. Survival time of pigs averaged 13.5±1.4 h. ALF pigs in the other group were treated with BALSS. The comparison analysis between the treated and control animals showed the changes of Tbil, PT, Alb, BUN, Cr, Fib, and Amm (P<0.01), but there was no change of ALT and AST. The survival time was statistically different (P<0.01), and there was no significant difference in histological

  19. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (SecPBMC), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-SecPBMC), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-SecPBMC had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-SecPBMC had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-SecPBMC significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  20. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  1. Evaluation of a minimally invasive renal cooling device using heat transfer analysis and an in vivo porcine model.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Thomas M; Summers, Edward K; Batzer, Rachel; Simpson, Christie; Lewis, Raymond; Dhanani, Nadeem N; Slocum, Alexander H

    2013-06-01

    Partial nephrectomy is the gold standard treatment for renal cell carcinoma. This procedure requires temporary occlusion of the renal artery, which can cause irreversible damage due to warm ischemia after 30 min. Open surgical procedures use crushed ice to induce a mild hypothermia of 20°C in the kidney, which can increase allowable ischemia time up to 2.5 h. The Kidney Cooler device was developed previously by the authors to achieve renal cooling using a minimally invasive approach. In the present study an analytical model of kidney cooling in situ was developed using heat transfer equations to determine the effect of kidney thickness on cooling time. In vivo porcine testing was conducted to evaluate the cooling performance of this device and to identify opportunities for improved surgical handling. Renal temperature was measured continuously at 6 points using probes placed orthogonally to each other within the kidney. Results showed that the device can cool the core of the kidney to 20°C in 10-20 min. Design enhancements were made based on surgeon feedback; it was determined that the addition of an insulating air layer below the device increased difficulty of positioning the device around the kidney and did not significantly enhance cooling performance. The Kidney Cooler has been shown to effectively induce mild renal hypothermia of 20°C in an in vivo porcine model. PMID:22951039

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A gene electrotransfer promotes angiogenesis in a porcine model of cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bulysheva, A A; Hargrave, B; Burcus, N; Lundberg, C G; Murray, L; Heller, R

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to assess safety and therapeutic potential of gene electrotransfer (GET) as a method for delivery of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) to ischemic myocardium in a porcine model. Myocardial ischemia was induced by surgically occluding the left anterior descending coronary artery in swine. GET following plasmid encoding VEGF-A injection was performed at four sites in the ischemic region. Control groups either received injections of the plasmid without electrotransfer or injections of the saline vehicle. Animals were monitored for 7 weeks and the hearts were evaluated for angiogenesis, myocardial infarct size and left ventricular contractility. Arteriograms suggest growth of new arteries as early as 2 weeks after treatment in electrotransfer animals. There is a significant reduction of infarct area and left ventricular contractility is improved in GET-treated group compared with controls. There was no significant difference in mortality of animals treated with GET of plasmid encoding VEGF-A from the control groups. Gene delivery of plasmid encoding VEGF-A to ischemic myocardium in a porcine model can be accomplished safely with potential for myocardial repair and regeneration. PMID:27078083

  3. Simultaneous irrigation and negative pressure wound therapy enhances wound healing and reduces wound bioburden in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathryn; Bills, Jessica; Barker, Jenny; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Infected foot wounds are one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and amputation among persons with diabetes. The objective of the study was to investigate a new wound therapy system that employs negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) with simultaneous irrigation therapy. For this study, we used a porcine model with full-thickness excisional wounds, inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Wounds were treated for 21 days of therapy with either NPWT, NPWT with simultaneous irrigation therapy using normal saline or polyhexanide biguanide (PHMB) at low or high flow rates, or control. Data show that NPWT with either irrigation condition improved wound healing rates over control-treated wounds, yet did not differ from NPWT alone. NPWT improved bioburden over control-treated wounds. NPWT with simultaneous irrigation further reduced bioburden over control and NPWT-treated wounds; however, flow rate did not affect these outcomes. Together, these data show that NPWT with simultaneous irrigation therapy with either normal saline or PHMB has a positive effect on bioburden in a porcine model, which may translate clinically to improved wound healing outcomes. PMID:24134060

  4. Establishment of a simplified in vitro porcine blood–brain barrier model with high transendothelial electrical resistance

    PubMed Central

    Patabendige, Adjanie; Skinner, Robert A.; Abbott, N. Joan

    2013-01-01

    Good in vitro blood–brain barrier (BBB) models that mimic the in vivo BBB phenotype are essential for studies on BBB functionality and for initial screening in drug discovery programmes, as many potential therapeutic drug candidates have poor BBB permeation. Difficulties associated with the availability of human brain tissue, coupled with the time and cost associated with using animals for this kind of research have led to the development of non-human cell culture models. However, most BBB models display a low transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), which is a measure of the tightness of the BBB. To address these issues we have established and optimised a robust, simple to use in vitro BBB model using porcine brain endothelial cells (PBECs). The PBEC model gives high TEER without the need for co-culture with astrocytes (up to 1300 Ω cm2 with a mean TEER of ∼800 Ω cm2) with well organised tight junctions as shown by immunostaining for occludin and claudin-5. Functional assays confirmed the presence of high levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and presence of the efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1). Presence of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) was confirmed by TaqMan real-time RT-PCR assay. Real-time RT-PCR assays for BCRP, occludin and claudin-5 demonstrated no significant differences between batches of PBECs, and also between primary and passage 1 PBECs. A permeability screen of 10 compounds demonstrated the usefulness of the model as a tool for drug permeability studies. Qualitative and quantitative results from this study confirm that this in vitro porcine BBB model is reliable and robust; it is also simpler to generate than most other BBB models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Electrical Synapses. PMID:22789905

  5. Experimental Modelling of Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paleo Cageao, P.; Turnbull, B.; Bartelt, P.

    2012-04-01

    Debris flows are gravity-driven mass movements typically containing water, sediments, soil and rocks. These elements combine to give a flow complex phenomenology that exhibits characteristics common to diverse geophysical flows from dry granular media (e.g. levee formation) to viscous gravity currents (viscous fingering and surge instabilities). The exceptional speeds and range debris flows can achieve motivate the need for a co-ordinated modelling approach that can provide insight into the key physical processes that dictate the hazard associated with the flows. There has been recent progress in theoretical modelling approaches that capture the details of the multi-component nature of debris flows. The promise of such models is underlined by their qualitatively successful comparison with field-scale experimental data. The aim of the present work is to address the technical difficulties in achieving a controlled and repeatable laboratory-scale experiment for robust testing of these multi-component models. A laboratory experiment has been designed and tested that can provide detailed information of the internal structure of debris flows. This constitutes a narrow Perspex chute that can be tilted to any angle between 0° and ≈ 60°. A mixture of glycerine and glass balls was initially held behind a lock-gate, before being released down the chute. The evolving flow was captured through high speed video, analysed with a Particle Image Velocimetry algorithm to provide the changing velocity field. A wide parameter space has been tested, allowing variations in particle size, dispersity, surface roughness, fluid viscosity, slope angle and solid volume fraction. While matching key similarity criteria, such as Froude number, with a typical field event, these experiments allow close examination of a wide range of physical scenarios for the robust testing of new multi-component flow models. Further diagnostics include force plate and pore pressure measurements, with a view

  6. Vesicoureteral reflux in young children: a study of radiometric thermometry as detection modality using an ex vivo porcine model.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-09-01

    Microwave radiometry is evaluated for renal thermometry tailored to detect the pediatric condition of vesicoureteral urine reflux (VUR) from the bladder through the ureter into the kidney. Prior to a potential reflux event, the urine is heated within the bladder by an external body contacting a hyperthermia applicator to generate a fluidic contrast temperature relative to normal body temperature. A single band, miniaturized radiometer (operating at 3.5 GHz) is connected to an electromagnetic-interference-shielded and suction-coupled elliptical antenna to receive thermal radiation from an ex vivo porcine phantom model. Brightness (radiometric) and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying urine phantom reflux volumes (20-40 mL) and contrast temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 °C within the kidney phantom. The kidney phantom itself is located at 40 mm depth (skin-to-kidney center distance) and surrounded by the porcine phantom. Radiometric step responses to injection of urine simulant by a syringe are shown to be highly correlated with in situ kidney temperatures measured by fiberoptic probes. Statistically, the performance of the VUR detecting scheme is evaluated by error probabilities of making a wrong decision. Laboratory testing of the radiometric system supports the feasibility of passive non-invasive kidney thermometry for the detection of VUR classified within the two highest grades. PMID:22892477

  7. Vesicoureteral reflux in young children: a study of radiometric thermometry as detection modality using an ex vivo porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-09-01

    Microwave radiometry is evaluated for renal thermometry tailored to detect the pediatric condition of vesicoureteral urine reflux (VUR) from the bladder through the ureter into the kidney. Prior to a potential reflux event, the urine is heated within the bladder by an external body contacting a hyperthermia applicator to generate a fluidic contrast temperature relative to normal body temperature. A single band, miniaturized radiometer (operating at 3.5 GHz) is connected to an electromagnetic-interference-shielded and suction-coupled elliptical antenna to receive thermal radiation from an ex vivo porcine phantom model. Brightness (radiometric) and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying urine phantom reflux volumes (20-40 mL) and contrast temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 °C within the kidney phantom. The kidney phantom itself is located at 40 mm depth (skin-to-kidney center distance) and surrounded by the porcine phantom. Radiometric step responses to injection of urine simulant by a syringe are shown to be highly correlated with in situ kidney temperatures measured by fiberoptic probes. Statistically, the performance of the VUR detecting scheme is evaluated by error probabilities of making a wrong decision. Laboratory testing of the radiometric system supports the feasibility of passive non-invasive kidney thermometry for the detection of VUR classified within the two highest grades

  8. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornblower, V. D. M.; Yu, E.; Fenster, A.; Battista, J. J.; Malthaner, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo.

  9. Experimental modeling of pulmonary barotrauma.

    PubMed

    Siermontowski, Piotr; Kozłowski, Wojciech; Pedrycz, Agnieszka; Krefft, Karolina; Kaczerska, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    The main causes of pulmonary barotrauma include loss of consciousness or panic attack of a diver and emergence from underwater with a constricted glottis. However, numerous publications and our observations indicate that the majority of fully symptomatic cases of pulmonary barotrauma develop without any evident errors in the ascending technique. Therefore, an attempt was made to examine such cases using the experimental model of pulmonary barotrauma designed by the authors. The experiment was conducted on 32 rabbits divided into three groups: Group C--not subjected to any treatment; Group E--with induced pulmonary barotrauma; and Group CT--subjected only to compression followed by quick decompression. In Groups E and CT, the same morphological markers of pulmonary barotrauma were detected in the lungs, although their severity varied. Morphological markers of pulmonary barotrauma were observed both in the group where the tube was not ob-structed (E) and in animals exposed only to rapid decompression (CT) PMID:26094289

  10. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research. PMID:26047667

  11. Experimental models of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research. PMID:26047667

  12. Evaluation of a novel laparoscopic camera for characterization of renal ischemia in a porcine model using digital light processing (DLP) hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olweny, Ephrem O.; Tan, Yung K.; Faddegon, Stephen; Jackson, Neil; Wehner, Eleanor F.; Best, Sara L.; Park, Samuel K.; Thapa, Abhas; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2012-03-01

    Digital light processing hyperspectral imaging (DLP® HSI) was adapted for use during laparoscopic surgery by coupling a conventional laparoscopic light guide with a DLP-based Agile Light source (OL 490, Optronic Laboratories, Orlando, FL), incorporating a 0° laparoscope, and a customized digital CCD camera (DVC, Austin, TX). The system was used to characterize renal ischemia in a porcine model.

  13. Immunity Elicited by an Experimental Vaccine Based on Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein in Piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shanshan; Zhang, Chunyan; Wang, Jing; Wei, Li; Quan, Rong; Yang, Jiayu; Yan, Xu; Li, Zixuan; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study, we reported that a recombinant protein from fusion expression of flagellin to porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Cap induced robust humoral and cell-mediated immunity that afforded full protection for PCV2 infection using BALB/c mice. Here, we further evaluated the immunogenicity and protection of the recombinant protein using specific pathogen free (SPF) pigs. Twenty-five 3-week-old piglets without passively acquired immunity were divided into 5 groups. All piglets except negative controls were challenged with a virulent PCV2 at 21 days after booster vaccination and necropsied at 21 days post-challenge. Vaccination of piglets with the recombinant protein without adjuvant induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses as observed by high levels of PCV2-specific IgG antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, as well as frequencies of PCV2-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells that conferred good protection against PCV2 challenge, with significant reduced PCV2 viremia, mild lesions, low PCV2 antigen-positive cells, as well as improved body weight gain, comparable to piglets vaccinated with a commercial PCV2 subunit vaccine. These results further demonstrated that the recombinant flagellin-Cap fusion protein is capable of inducing solid protective humoral and cellular immunity when administered to pigs, thereby becoming an effective PCV2 vaccine candidate for control of PCV2 infection. PMID:26848967

  14. Immunity Elicited by an Experimental Vaccine Based on Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Wei, Li; Quan, Rong; Yang, Jiayu; Yan, Xu; Li, Zixuan; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study, we reported that a recombinant protein from fusion expression of flagellin to porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Cap induced robust humoral and cell-mediated immunity that afforded full protection for PCV2 infection using BALB/c mice. Here, we further evaluated the immunogenicity and protection of the recombinant protein using specific pathogen free (SPF) pigs. Twenty-five 3-week-old piglets without passively acquired immunity were divided into 5 groups. All piglets except negative controls were challenged with a virulent PCV2 at 21 days after booster vaccination and necropsied at 21 days post-challenge. Vaccination of piglets with the recombinant protein without adjuvant induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses as observed by high levels of PCV2-specific IgG antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, as well as frequencies of PCV2-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells that conferred good protection against PCV2 challenge, with significant reduced PCV2 viremia, mild lesions, low PCV2 antigen-positive cells, as well as improved body weight gain, comparable to piglets vaccinated with a commercial PCV2 subunit vaccine. These results further demonstrated that the recombinant flagellin-Cap fusion protein is capable of inducing solid protective humoral and cellular immunity when administered to pigs, thereby becoming an effective PCV2 vaccine candidate for control of PCV2 infection. PMID:26848967

  15. A New Porcine Sponge Material for Temporary Embolization: An Experimental Short-Term Pilot Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Louail, B.; Sapoval, M. Bonneau, M.; Wasseff, M.; Senechal, Q.; Gaux, J-C.

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a porcine-derived gelfoam, Curaspon, for the temporary occlusion of the visceral arteries. Methods. Curaspon was used for the selective embolization of segmentary hepatic, unilateral polar renal, and single lumbar arteries of 10 pigs under general anesthesia. Sequential angiographic checks were carried out and the pigs killed between 3 days and 2 weeks later. Macroscopic and microscopic studies using standard techniques were used to evaluate the immediate efficacy of embolization, duration of and completeness of recanalization on angiography, macroscopic appearance of target-organ ischemia, and microscopic analysis of inflammatory reaction. Results. Immediate arterial occlusion was obtained in all cases. Renal arteries showed a total recanalization in 63% of cases on day 7 and 100% on day 14. Total hepatic recanalization was obtained in 100% of animals on day 7. All lumbar arteries were recanalized on day 14. Microscopic analysis in the kidney revealed a mild inflammatory reaction and a progressive lysis of the Curaspon (87% of samples at day 3 showed a persistence of Curaspon and 5% at day 14). In some cases, localized and partial destruction of the arterial wall was visualized. In the liver the same patterns were observed but resolved more completely and more rapidly. Conclusions. Curaspon is an efficient material for the temporary occlusion of visceral and parietal arteries in pigs. However, arterial aneurysms were observed and a relationship of these with the material cannot be excluded.

  16. Experimental reproduction of porcine epidemic abortion and respiratory syndrome (mystery swine disease) by infection with Lelystad virus: Koch's postulates fulfilled.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, C; Wensvoort, G; Pol, J M

    1991-07-01

    Aerosol exposure of eight pregnant sows to cell-culture- propagated Lelystad virus resulted in clinical signs characteristic of so-called mystery swine disease. After an incubation of 4-7 days, all sows were inappetant and listless for 6-9 days. Two sows developed a transient red-blue discolouration of the ears ('abortus blauw' or blue ear disease) accompanied by abdominal respiration, and two had a fever for one day only. One sow aborted at 109 days of gestation. The other seven sows, farrowing between 113 and 117 days of gestation, gave birth to numerous mummified, dead, and weak piglets. Of these seven, the mean number of piglets born dead to each sow was 4.6 and the mean number born alive was 7.7; 3.1 piglets per sow (40%) died within the first week. Lelystad virus was isolated from 31 piglets, which were born dead or died shortly after birth. Antibody was detected in precolostral blood samples or ascitic fluids of 23 piglets, a finding which demonstrated transplacental passage of the virus in six out of eight litters. We conclude that Lelystad virus is the causal agent of mystery swine disease. Since its aetiology is no longer a mystery, we propose the more appropriate name 'porcine epidemic abortion and respiratory syndrome (PEARS)'. PMID:1949539

  17. Experimental infection of United States swine with a Chinese highly pathogenic strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baoqing; Lager, Kelly M; Henningson, Jamie N; Miller, Laura C; Schlink, Sarah N; Kappes, Matthew A; Kehrli, Marcus E; Brockmeier, Susan L; Nicholson, Tracy L; Yang, Han-Chun; Faaberg, Kay S

    2013-01-20

    The pathogenesis of Type 2 highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) in 10-week old swine in the United States was investigated. rJXwn06, rescued from an infectious clone of Chinese HP-PRRSV, replicated in swine with at least 100-fold increased kinetics over U.S. strain VR-2332. rJXwn06 caused significant weight loss, exacerbated disease due to bacterial sepsis and more severe histopathological lung lesions in pigs exposed to HP-PRRSV than to those infected with VR-2332. Novel findings include identification of bacterial species present, the degree of thymic atrophy seen, and the inclusion of contact animals that highlighted the ability of HP-PRRSV to rapidly transmit between animals. Furthermore, comprehensive detailed cytokine analysis of serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and tracheobronchial lymph node tissue homogenate revealed a striking elevation in levels of cytokines associated with both innate and adaptive immunity in HP-PRRSV infected swine, and showed that contact swine differed in the degree of cytokine response. PMID:23079105

  18. Cell Lineage Identification and Stem Cell Culture in a Porcine Model for the Study of Intestinal Epithelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Liara M.; Williamson, Ian; Piedrahita, Jorge A.; Blikslager, Anthony T.; Magness, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Significant advances in intestinal stem cell biology have been made in murine models; however, anatomical and physiological differences between mice and humans limit mice as a translational model for stem cell based research. The pig has been an effective translational model, and represents a candidate species to study intestinal epithelial stem cell (IESC) driven regeneration. The lack of validated reagents and epithelial culture methods is an obstacle to investigating IESC driven regeneration in a pig model. In this study, antibodies against Epithelial Adhesion Molecule 1 (EpCAM) and Villin marked cells of epithelial origin. Antibodies against Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), Minichromosome Maintenance Complex 2 (MCM2), Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and phosphorylated Histone H3 (pH3) distinguished proliferating cells at various stages of the cell cycle. SOX9, localized to the stem/progenitor cells zone, while HOPX was restricted to the +4/‘reserve’ stem cell zone. Immunostaining also identified major differentiated lineages. Goblet cells were identified by Mucin 2 (MUC2); enteroendocrine cells by Chromogranin A (CGA), Gastrin and Somatostatin; and absorptive enterocytes by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and sucrase isomaltase (SIM). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated morphologic and sub-cellular characteristics of stem cell and differentiated intestinal epithelial cell types. Quantitative PCR gene expression analysis enabled identification of stem/progenitor cells, post mitotic cell lineages, and important growth and differentiation pathways. Additionally, a method for long-term culture of porcine crypts was developed. Biomarker characterization and development of IESC culture in the porcine model represents a foundation for translational studies of IESC-driven regeneration of the intestinal epithelium in physiology and disease. PMID:23840480

  19. Intracapsular hip pressures in a porcine model: does position and volume matter?

    PubMed

    Hosalkar, Harish S; Varley, Eric S; Glaser, Diana A; Farnsworth, Christine L; Wenger, Dennis R

    2011-09-01

    This study outlines a relationship between joint volume, positioning, and intracapsular pressure in a healthy hip. After measuring the native intracapsular pressure in 12 porcine specimens, each joint was injected with radio-opaque-colored saline as pressures were measured. At 20 mmHg, the hip was placed in its position of ease and then in differing positions while pressures were recorded. Position significantly altered pressures, with the lowest values in neutral and the highest in hyperextension (P<0.001). Extreme hip positions may be detrimental because of high pressures created within the joint, possibly explaining complications associated with some hip diagnostic and treatment methods. PMID:21606854

  20. Experimental Model of Proximal Junctional Fracture after Multilevel Posterior Spinal Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur, Annie; Parent, Stefan; Petit, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk of proximal junctional fractures (PJF) with multilevel spinal instrumentation, especially in the osteoporotic spine. This problem is associated with significant morbidity and possibly the need for reoperation. Various techniques have been proposed in an attempt to decrease the risk of PJF but there is no experimental model described for in vitro production of PJF after multilevel instrumentation. The objective of this study is to develop an experimental model of PJF after multilevel posterior instrumentation. Initially, four porcine specimens including 4 vertebrae and instrumented at the 3 caudal vertebrae using a pedicle screw construct were subjected to different loading conditions. Loading conditions on porcine specimens involving cyclic loading along the axis of the center vertebral body line, with constrained flexion between 0° and 15° proximally, and fully constraining the specimen distally resulted in a fracture pattern most representative of a PJF seen clinically in humans, so to undergo human cadaveric testing with similar loading conditions was decided. Clinically relevant PJF were produced in all 3 human specimens. The experimental model described in this study will allow the evaluation of different parameters influencing the incidence and prevention of PJF after multilevel posterior spinal instrumentation. PMID:27610381

  1. Experimental Model of Proximal Junctional Fracture after Multilevel Posterior Spinal Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Levasseur, Annie; Parent, Stefan; Petit, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk of proximal junctional fractures (PJF) with multilevel spinal instrumentation, especially in the osteoporotic spine. This problem is associated with significant morbidity and possibly the need for reoperation. Various techniques have been proposed in an attempt to decrease the risk of PJF but there is no experimental model described for in vitro production of PJF after multilevel instrumentation. The objective of this study is to develop an experimental model of PJF after multilevel posterior instrumentation. Initially, four porcine specimens including 4 vertebrae and instrumented at the 3 caudal vertebrae using a pedicle screw construct were subjected to different loading conditions. Loading conditions on porcine specimens involving cyclic loading along the axis of the center vertebral body line, with constrained flexion between 0° and 15° proximally, and fully constraining the specimen distally resulted in a fracture pattern most representative of a PJF seen clinically in humans, so to undergo human cadaveric testing with similar loading conditions was decided. Clinically relevant PJF were produced in all 3 human specimens. The experimental model described in this study will allow the evaluation of different parameters influencing the incidence and prevention of PJF after multilevel posterior spinal instrumentation. PMID:27610381

  2. Effects of an Inactivated Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) Vaccine on PCV2 Virus Shedding in Semen from Experimentally Infected Boars ▿

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hwi Won; Han, Kiwon; Kim, Duyeol; Oh, Yeonsu; Kang, Ikjae; Park, Changhoon; Jang, Hyun; Chae, Chanhee

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of an inactivated porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccine on PCV2b virus shedding in the semen of experimentally infected boars by measuring the immunological response and the PCV2b DNA load in blood and semen. Twelve boars were randomly divided into three groups. The boars in group 1 (n = 4) were immunized with an inactivated PCV2 vaccine and were challenged with PCV2b. The boars in group 2 (n = 4) were only challenged with PCV2b. The boars in group 3 (n = 4) served as negative controls. The number of PCV2 genome copies of PCV2 in the serum and semen were significantly lower in vaccinated challenged boars than in nonvaccinated challenged boars at 7, 10, 14, 21, 32, 35, 42, 49, and 60 days postinoculation. The number of PCV2b genomes in the semen correlated with the number of PCV2b genomes in the blood in both vaccinated challenged (R = 0.714) and nonvaccinated challenged (R = 0.861) boars. The results of the present study demonstrate that the inactivated PCV2 vaccine significantly decreases the amount of PCV2b DNA shedding in semen from vaccinated boars after experimental infection with PCV2b. PMID:21613465

  3. Safety of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Modified Live Virus (MLV) vaccine strains in a young pig infection model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the safety of all modified live virus vaccines commercially available in Europe against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) under the same experimental conditions. For this purpose, one hundred and twenty three-week-old piglets, divided into five groups, were used. On day 0 of the experiment, nine pigs per group were removed and the remaining fifteen were vaccinated with the commercial vaccines Ingelvac PRRS MLV, Amervac PRRS, Pyrsvac-183 and Porcilis PRRS by the IM route or were mock vaccinated and used as controls. On day 3, the nine unvaccinated pigs were re-introduced into their respective groups and served as sentinel pigs. Clinical signs were recorded daily and lung lesions were determined on days 7, 14 and 21, when 5 vaccinated pigs per group were euthanized. Blood samples and swabs were taken every three days and different organs were collected at necropsy to determine the presence of PRRSV. None of the vaccines studied caused detectable clinical signs in vaccinated pigs although lung lesions were found. Altogether, these results indicate that all vaccines can be considered clinically safe. However, some differences were found in virological parameters. Thus, neither Pyrsvac-183 nor Porcilis PRRS could be detected in porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) cultures or in lung sections used to determine PRRSV by immunohistochemistry, indicating that these viruses might have lost their ability to replicate in PAM. This inability to replicate in PAM might be related to the lower transmission rate and the delay in the onset of viremia observed in these groups PMID:24308693

  4. Contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis in a porcine model of acute peripheral arterial thrombosis and prevention of anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Nederhoed, Johanna H; Slikkerveer, Jeroen; Meyer, Klaas W; Wisselink, Willem; Musters, René J P; Yeung, Kak K

    2014-03-01

    Acute peripheral arterial thrombosis can be threatening to life and limb. Dissolution of the thrombus local catheter-directed intra-arterial infusion of fibrinolytic agents such as urokinase is the standard therapy for thrombosis; however, this method is time-intensive, and amputation of the affected limb is still needed in 10-30% of cases. Furthermore, thrombolytic therapy carries the risk of bleeding complications. The use of small gas-filled bubbles, or ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), in combination with ultrasound has been investigated as an improved thrombolytic therapy in acute coronary and cerebral arterial thrombosis. The authors describe a porcine model of acute peripheral arterial occlusion to test contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis approaches that combine ultrasound, UCAs and fibrinolytic agents and recommend a strategy for preventing severe allergic reactions to UCAs in the pigs. PMID:24552914

  5. Silver absorption on burns after the application of Acticoat: data from pediatric patients and a porcine burn model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Kempf, Margit; Mott, Jonathon; Chang, Hong-En; Francis, Rod; Liu, Pei-Yun; Cuttle, Leila; Olszowy, Henry; Kravchuk, Olena; Mill, Julie; Kimble, Roy M

    2009-01-01

    Silver dressings have been widely used to successfully prevent burn wound infection and sepsis. However, a few case studies have reported the functional abnormality and failure of vital organs, possibly caused by silver deposits. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum silver level in the pediatric burn population and also in several internal organs in a porcine burn model after the application of Acticoat. A total of 125 blood samples were collected from 46 pediatric burn patients. Thirty-six patients with a mean of 13.4% TBSA burns had a mean peak serum silver level of 114 microg/L, whereas 10 patients with a mean of 1.85% TBSA burns had an undetectable level of silver (<5.4 microg/L). Overall, serum silver levels were closely related to burn sizes. However, the highest serum silver was 735 microg/L in a 15-month-old toddler with 10% TBSA burns and the second highest was 367 microg/L in a 3-year old with 28% TBSA burns. In a porcine model with 2% TBSA burns, the mean peak silver level was 38 microg/L at 2 to 3 weeks after application of Acticoat and was then significantly reduced to an almost undetectable level at 6 weeks. Of a total of four pigs, silver was detected in all four livers (1.413 microg/g) and all four hearts (0.342 microg/g), three of four kidneys (1.113 microg/g), and two of four brains (0.402 microg/g). This result demonstrated that although variable, the level of serum silver was positively associated with the size of burns, and significant amounts of silver were deposited in internal organs in pigs with only 2% TBSA burns, after application of Acticoat. PMID:19165102

  6. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma as a shielding technique after endoscopic mucosal resection in rat and porcine models

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Boix, Jaume; Moreno de Vega, Vicente; Bon, Ignacio; Marín, Ingrid; Bartolí, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The aims were to assess the efficacy of endoscopic application of Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to prevent delayed perforation and to induce mucosal healing after endoscopic resections. Patients and methods: Colonic induced lesions were performed in rats (n = 16) and pigs (n = 4). Animals were randomized to receive onto the lesions saline (control) or PRP. Animals underwent endoscopic follow-up. Thermal injury was assessed with a 1 – 4 scale: (1) mucosal necrosis; (2) submucosal necrosis; (3) muscularis propria necrosis; and (4) serosal necrosis Results: Saline treatment showed 50 % of mortality in rats (P = 0.02). Mean ulcerated area after 48 hours and 7 days was significantly smaller with PRP than with saline (0.27 ± 0.02 cm2 and 0.08 ± 0.01 cm2 vs. 0.56 ± 0.1 cm2 and 0.40 ± 0.06 cm2; P < 0.001). The incidence of thermal injury was significantly lower with PRP (1.25 ± 0.46) than in controls (2.25 ± 0.50); P = 0.006. The porcine model showed a trend toward higher mucosal restoration in animals treated with PRP than with saline at weeks 1 and 2 (Median area in cm2: 0.55 and 0.40 vs. 1.32 and 0.79) Conclusions: Application of PRP to colonic mucosal lesions showed strong healing properties in rat and porcine models. PMID:27540573

  7. Pericytes support neutrophil transmigration via interleukin-8 across a porcine co-culture model of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Christian; Pieloch, Paulina; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2013-08-01

    Transmigration of neutrophils across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to an inflamed brain tissue is an important process during neuronal inflammation. The process of neutrophil activation as well as their way of rolling along the endothelium and their transmigration is quite well understood. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the fate of neutrophils after they have transmigrated through the endothelium. The role of the other cells of the neurovascular unit in this process is also poorly understood. Here we studied the potential of pericytes to chemo-attract neutrophils under inflammatory conditions. Quantitative real time PCR, western blot analysis, and a chemotaxis assay showed that pericytes are able to chemo-attract neutrophils by interleukin-8 (IL-8) after stimulation with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), or interleukin-1beta (IL-1β). Then, a co-culture model consisting of primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCECs) and primary porcine brain capillary pericytes (PBCPs) was used to analyze neutrophil transmigration across the BBB. As a model for inflammation, LPS was used and the effects of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were analyzed. In general, all stimulants apart from IFN-γ were able to increase transendothelial neutrophil migration. This effect was significantly reduced by a specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9. MMP-2/-9 secretion is expected to decrease adhesion to pericytes and thus support the transmigration of neutrophils. Additionally, in an adhesion experiment, we showed that MMP-2/-9 inhibition significantly enhances the adhesion of neutrophils to pericytes. PMID:23769734

  8. Decolonisation of MRSA, S. aureus and E. coli by Cold-Atmospheric Plasma Using a Porcine Skin Model In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Maisch, Tim; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Heinlin, Julia; Karrer, Sigrid; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years new antibacterial agents approved by the U.S. FDA decreased whereas in parallel the resistance situation of multi-resistant bacteria increased. Thus, community and nosocomial acquired infections of resistant bacteria led to a decrease in the efficacy of standard therapy, prolonging treatment time and increasing healthcare costs. Therefore, the aim of this work was to demonstrate the applicability of cold atmospheric plasma for decolonisation of Gram-positive (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) using an ex vivo pig skin model. Freshly excised skin samples were taken from six month old female pigs (breed: Pietrain). After application of pure bacteria on the surface of the explants these were treated with cold atmospheric plasma for up to 15 min. Two different plasma devices were evaluated. A decolonisation efficacy of 3 log10 steps was achieved already after 6 min of plasma treatment. Longer plasma treatment times achieved a killing rate of 5 log10 steps independently from the applied bacteria strains. Histological evaluations of untreated and treated skin areas upon cold atmospheric plasma treatment within 24 h showed no morphological changes as well as no significant degree of necrosis or apoptosis determined by the TUNEL-assay indicating that the porcine skin is still vital. This study demonstrates for the first time that cold atmospheric plasma is able to very efficiently kill bacteria applied to an intact skin surface using an ex vivo porcine skin model. The results emphasize the potential of cold atmospheric plasma as a new possible treatment option for decolonisation of human skin from bacteria in patients in the future without harming the surrounding tissue. PMID:22558091

  9. Effects of Intracoronary Administration of Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Park, Jong Ha; Kim, Bo Won; Ahn, Jinhee; Kim, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Sup; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Choi, Jung Hyun; Cha, Kwang Soo; Hong, Taek Jong; Park, Tae Sik; Kim, Sang-Pil; Song, Seunghwan; Kim, Ji Yeon; Park, Mi Hwa; Jung, Jin Sup

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are known to be potentially effective in regeneration of damaged tissue. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of intracoronary administration of ADSCs in reducing the infarction area and improving function after acute transmural myocardial infarction (MI) in a porcine model. Materials and Methods ADSCs were obtained from each pig's abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue by simple liposuction. After 3 passages of 14-days culture, 2 million ADSCs were injected into the coronary artery 30 min after acute transmural MI. At baseline and 4 weeks after the ADSC injection, 99mTc methoxyisobutylisonitrile-single photon emission computed tomography (MIBI-SPECT) was performed to evaluate the left ventricular volume, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF; %), and perfusion defects as well as the myocardial salvage (%) and salvage index. At 4 weeks, each pig was sacrificed, and the heart was extracted and dissected. Gross and microscopic analyses with specific immunohistochemistry staining were then performed. Results Analysis showed improvement in the perfusion defect, but not in the LVEF in the ADSC group (n=14), compared with the control group (n=14) (perfusion defect, -13.0±10.0 vs. -2.6±12.0, p=0.019; LVEF, -8.0±15.4 vs. -15.9±14.8, p=0.181). There was a tendency of reducing left ventricular volume in ADSC group. The ADSCs identified by stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) staining were well co-localized by von Willebrand factor and Troponin T staining. Conclusion Intracoronary injection of cultured ADSCs improved myocardial perfusion in this porcine acute transmural MI model. PMID:26446632

  10. Preliminary evidence of age-dependent clinical signs associated with porcine circovirus 2b in experimentally infected CH3/Rockefeller mice.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Alessandra M M G; Cruz, Taís F; Yamada, Katarina B; Gerber, Priscilla F; Gabardo, Michelle P; Araújo, João P; Guedes, Roberto M C; Mori, Cinthia K; Oliveira, Camila P; Santos, Sueli S; Richtzenhain, Leonardo J

    2015-12-01

    Mice and rats are susceptible to porcine circovirus 2b (PCV2) infection under field and experimental conditions. However, whether PCV2 induces disease in rodents remains a matter of debate. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether PCV2-induced disease in mice is age-dependent and whether intranasally inoculated animals are able to infect animals they come into contact with. Twenty-five CH3/Rockefeller mice were divided into six groups and intranasally inoculated with 25μL of either PCV2b or PBS on days 0, 3 and 6. One group remained untreated. Two age groups were tested: 3-week-old mice and 6-week-old mice. The administration of three PCV2 intranasal inoculations at intervals of three days was able to induce infection and support virus transmission in susceptible mice, regardless of the age at inoculation. The clinical signs associated with PCV2 infection were more severe in younger mice, and PCV2-DNA load was higher in their faeces. In conclusion, PCV2 induced disease in mice. PMID:26679798

  11. Cytokine profiles in pregnant gilts experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and relationships with viral load and fetal outcome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of extensive research, immunologic control mechanisms against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) remain poorly understood. Cytokine responses have been exhaustively studied in nursery pigs and show contradictory results. Since no detailed reports on cytokine respons...

  12. Electrosurgical vessel sealing tissue temperature: experimental measurement and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Roland K; Chastagner, Matthew W; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J

    2013-02-01

    The temporal and spatial tissue temperature profile in electrosurgical vessel sealing was experimentally measured and modeled using finite element modeling (FEM). Vessel sealing procedures are often performed near the neurovascular bundle and may cause collateral neural thermal damage. Therefore, the heat generated during electrosurgical vessel sealing is of concern among surgeons. Tissue temperature in an in vivo porcine femoral artery sealed using a bipolar electrosurgical device was studied. Three FEM techniques were incorporated to model the tissue evaporation, water loss, and fusion by manipulating the specific heat, electrical conductivity, and electrical contact resistance, respectively. These three techniques enable the FEM to accurately predict the vessel sealing tissue temperature profile. The averaged discrepancy between the experimentally measured temperature and the FEM predicted temperature at three thermistor locations is less than 7%. The maximum error is 23.9%. Effects of the three FEM techniques are also quantified. PMID:23192471

  13. Mannan oligosaccharide improves immune responses and growth efficiency of nursery pigs experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Che, T M; Johnson, R W; Kelley, K W; Van Alstine, W G; Dawson, K A; Moran, C A; Pettigrew, J E

    2011-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether the ingestion of mannan oligosaccharide (MOS, Bio-Mos) alters the immune response of nursery pigs challenged with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). A total of 64 pigs (3 wk old), free of PRRSV, were used in 2 separate but similar experiments conducted sequentially. Pigs were blocked by initial BW. Sex and ancestry were equalized across treatments. Pigs were randomly assigned from within blocks to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement [2 types of diet: control (0%) and MOS addition (0.2%); 2 levels of PRRSV: with and without]. There were 8 replicate chambers of 2 pigs each. After 2 wk of a 4-wk period of feeding the treatments, pigs were intranasally inoculated with PRRSV or a sterile medium at 5 wk of age. The PRRSV challenge decreased ADG, ADFI, and G:F throughout the experiment (P < 0.001). Feeding MOS improved G:F of the pigs during d 7 to 14 (P=0.041) postinfection (PI). Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein, and haptoglobin were increased by PRRSV (P < 0.001). The MOS × PRRSV interaction was significant for TNF-α at d 14 PI (P=0.028), suggesting that infected pigs fed MOS had less TNF-α than those fed the control. Dietary MOS increased serum IL-10 at d 14 PI (P=0.036). Further, MOS-fed pigs had greater numbers of white blood cells (WBC) at d 3 (P=0.048) and 7 PI (P=0.042) and lymphocytes at d 7 PI (P=0.023) than control-fed pigs. In contrast, PRRSV decreased (P < 0.01) WBC numbers until d 14 PI. Dietary MOS appeared (P=0.060) to increase the neutrophils in PRRSV-infected pigs at d 3 PI, but no (P=0.202) MOS × PRRSV interaction was found. Infection with PRRSV increased rectal temperature (RT) of pigs at d 3 PI (P < 0.001) and continued to affect the infected pigs fed the control diet until d 14 PI. The MOS × PRRSV interaction for RT was found at d 7 (P < 0.01) and 10 (P=0.098) PI, indicating that the infected pigs fed MOS had a

  14. Progenitor Cell Therapy in a Porcine Acute Myocardial Infarction Model Induces Cardiac Hypertrophy, Mediated by Paracrine Secretion of Cardiotrophic Factors Including TGFβ1

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Brendan; Sorajja, Paul; Hynes, Brian; Kumar, Arun H.S.; Araoz, Phillip A.; Stalboerger, Paul G.; Miller, Dylan; Reed, Cynthia; Schmeckpeper, Jeffrey; Wang, Shaohua; Liu, Chunsheng; Terzic, Andre; Kruger, David; Riederer, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Administration of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) is a promising therapy for post-infarction cardiac repair. However, the mechanisms that underlie apparent beneficial effects on myocardial remodeling are unclear. In a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction, we investigated the therapeutic effects of a mixed population of culture modified peripheral blood mononuclear cells (termed hereafter porcine EPC). Porcine EPC were isolated using methods identical to those previously adopted for harvest of EPC in human cell therapy studies. In addition the therapeutic effects of paracrine factors secreted by these cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Intracoronary injection of autologous porcine EPC was associated with increased infarct territory mass and improved regional ventricular systolic function at 2 months compared to control. Treatment with conditioned media derived from autologous EPC was associated with similar improved effects on infarct territory mass and function. Histologic analysis of the infarct territory revealed significantly increased cardiomyocyte size in EPC and conditioned media treated groups, when compared to controls. A paracrine EPC effect was also verified in a pure myocardial preparation in which cardiomyocytes devoid of fibroblast, neuronal and vascular elements directly responded by increasing cell mass when exposed to the same conditioned media. Analysis of conditioned media revealed elevated levels of TGFβ1 (human 267.3±11.8 pg/ml, porcine 57.1±6.1 pg/ml), a recognized mediator of hypertrophic signaling in the heart. Neutralizing antibodies to TGFβ1 attenuated the pro-hypertrophic effect of conditioned media, and use of recombinant TGFβ1 added to fresh media replicated the pro-hypertrophic effects of conditioned media in vitro. These data demonstrate the potential of paracrine factors secreted from endothelial progenitor cells to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy contributing to increased infarct territory LV mass, with

  15. Experimental reproduction of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-associated enteritis in pigs infected with PCV2 alone or concurrently with Lawsonia intracellularis or Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, T; Madson, D M; Roof, M; Layton, S M; Ramamoorthy, S; Meng, X J; Halbur, P G

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus (PCV)-associated disease (PCVAD) has emerged to become one of the most economically important pig diseases globally. One of the less commonly recognized clinical manifestations of PCVAD is PCV2 type 2 (PCV2)-associated enteritis in growing pigs; however, experimental confirmation of the ability of PCV2 alone or PCV2 coinfection with other agent(s) to induce enteritis is lacking. In this study, 120 specific-pathogen-free (SPF) pigs were divided randomly into six groups: controls (negative control pigs), PCV2 (inoculated with PCV2), LAW (inoculated with Lawsonia intracellularis), SALM (inoculated with Salmonella typhimurium), PCV2-LAW (concurrently inoculated with PCV2 and Lawsonia intracellularis) and PCV2-SALM (concurrently inoculated with PCV2 and Salmonella typhimurium). One half of the pigs in each group were subject to necropsy examination 14 days postinoculation (dpi) and the remaining pigs were examined at 28 dpi. The average daily weight gain was not different (P>0.05) between groups. Individual pigs inoculated orally with PCV2 regardless of coinfection status (2/10 PCV2, 1/10 PCV2-LAW, 3/10 PCV2-SALM) developed PCVAD with diarrhoea and reduced weight gain or weight loss between 14 and 28 dpi. Those pigs had characteristic microscopic lesions in lymphoid and enteric tissues associated with abundant PCV2 antigen. Enteric lesions were characterized by necrosuppurative and proliferative enteritis with crypt elongation and epithelial hyperplasia in LAW and PCV2-LAW pigs by 14 dpi, ulcerative and necrosuppurative colitis in SALM and PCV2-SALM pigs by 14 dpi, and lymphohistiocytic enteritis with depletion of Peyer's patches in PCV2, PCV2-SALM and PCV2-LAW pigs by 28 dpi. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report documenting that under experimental conditions, PCV2 can induce enteritis independently from other enteric pathogens and that oral challenge is a potentially important route and perhaps the natural route of PCV2 transmission in

  16. Formation of reactive aldehydes (MDA, HHE, HNE) during the digestion of cod liver oil: comparison of human and porcine in vitro digestion models.

    PubMed

    Tullberg, Cecilia; Larsson, Karin; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Comi, Irene; Scheers, Nathalie; Vegarud, Gerd; Undeland, Ingrid

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we investigated lipid oxidation of cod liver oil during gastrointestinal (GI) digestion using two types of in vitro digestion models. In the first type of model, we used human GI juices, while we used digestive enzymes and bile from porcine origin in the second type of model. Human and porcine models were matched with respect to factors important for lipolysis, using a standardized digestion protocol. The digests were analysed for reactive oxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE), and 4-hydroxy-trans-2-hexenal (HHE) by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS), and for free fatty acids (FFA) obtained during the digestion by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The formation of the oxidation products MDA, HHE, and HNE was low during the gastric digestion, however, it increased during the duodenal digestion. The formation of the oxidation products reached higher levels when digestive juices of human origin were used (60 μM of MDA, 0.96 μM of HHE, and 1.6 μM of HNE) compared to when using enzymes and bile of porcine origin (9.8, and 0.36 μM of MDA; 0.16, and 0.026 μM of HHE; 0.23, and 0.005 μM of HNE, respectively, in porcine models I and II). In all models, FFA release was only detected during the intestinal step, and reached up to 31% of total fatty acids (FA). The findings in this work may be of importance when designing oxidation oriented lipid digestion studies. PMID:26838473

  17. In-vivo tissue repair using light-activated surgical adhesive in a porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Riley, Jill N.; Dickson, Tonya J.; Hou, Dong Ming; Rogers, Pamela; March, Keith L.

    2001-05-01

    An in vivo study was conducted to investigate the feasibility, mechanical function, and chronic biocompatibility of a new light-activated surgical adhesive for achieving rapid hemostasis of the puncture site following diagnostic catheterization and interventional cardiac procedures. Porcine carotid arteries (nequals6) and femoral arteries (nequals6) were exposed, and an incision was made in the arterial walls using a 16G needle. The surgical adhesive, composed of a poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold doped with the traditional protein solder mix of serum albumin and indocyanine green dye, was used to close the incisions in conjunction with an 805-nm diode laser. Blood flow was restored to the vessels immediately after the procedure and the incision sites were checked for patency. The strength and hemostatic abilities of the new surgical adhesive were evaluated in the context of arterial pressure, persistence of hemostatis and presence of any inflammatory reaction after 3 days. After this evaluation period, the surgical procedure was repeated on the carotid arteries (nequals6) and femoral arteries (nequals6) of three additional animals that had been heparinized prior to surgery to closer approximate the conditions seen in a typical vascular surgical setting.

  18. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation Lung Ablation: Preliminary Results in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Deodhar, Ajita; Monette, Sebastien; Single, Gordon W.; Hamilton, William C.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-12-15

    Objective: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses direct electrical pulses to create permanent 'pores' in cell membranes to cause cell death. In contrast to conventional modalities, IRE has a nonthermal mechanism of action. Our objective was to study the histopathological and imaging features of IRE in normal swine lung. Materials and Methods: Eleven female swine were studied for hyperacute (8 h), acute (24 h), subacute (96 h), and chronic (3 week) effects of IRE ablation in lung. Paired unipolar IRE applicators were placed under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Some applicators were deliberately positioned near bronchovascular structures. IRE pulse delivery was synchronized with the cardiac rhythm only when ablation was performed within 2 cm of the heart. Contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed immediately before and after IRE and at 1 and 3 weeks after IRE ablation. Representative tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Results: Twenty-five ablations were created: ten hyperacute, four acute, and three subacute ablations showed alveolar edema and necrosis with necrosis of bronchial, bronchiolar, and vascular epithelium. Bronchovascular architecture was maintained. Chronic ablations showed bronchiolitis obliterans and alveolar interstitial fibrosis. Immediate post-procedure CT images showed linear or patchy density along the applicator tract. At 1 week, there was consolidation that resolved partially or completely by 3 weeks. Pneumothorax requiring chest tube developed in two animals; no significant cardiac arrhythmias were noted. Conclusion: Our preliminary porcine study demonstrates the nonthermal and extracellular matrix sparing mechanism of action of IRE. IRE is a potential alternative to thermal ablative modalities.

  19. Investigating detrusor muscle concentrations of oxybutynin after intravesical delivery in an ex vivo porcine model.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nicholas A; Lee, Kay M; Allender, Chris J; Bowen, Jenna L; Gumbleton, Mark; Harrah, Tim; Raja, Aditya; Joshi, Hrishi B

    2015-07-01

    Intravesical oxybutynin is highly effective in the treatment of overactive bladder. Traditionally the mechanism of action was explained by antagonism of muscarinic receptors located in the detrusor, however evidence now suggests antimuscarinics may elicit their effect by modifying afferent pathways in the mucosal region. This study aimed to investigate the bladder wall distribution of oxybutynin in an ex vivo setting providing tissue - layer specific concentrations of drug achieved after intravesical delivery. Whole ex vivo porcine bladders were intravesically instilled with 0.167 mg mL(-1) oxybutynin solution. After 60 min, tissue samples were excised, serially sectioned parallel to the urothelial surface and extracted drug quantified. Drug distribution into the urothelium, lamina propria and detrusor was determined. Oxybutynin permeated into the bladder wall at a higher rate than other drugs previously investigated (apparent transurothelial Kp = 1.36 × 10(-5) cm s(-1) ). After 60 min intravesical instillation, concentrations achieved in the urothelium (298.69 μg g(-1) ) and lamina propria (43.65 μg g(-1) ) but not the detrusor (0.93 μg g(-1) ) were greater than reported IC50 values for oxybutynin. This work adds to the increasing body of evidence suggesting antimuscarinics elicit their effects via mechanisms other than direct inhibition of detrusor contraction. PMID:25989054

  20. Using heterogeneity in the population structure of U.S. swine farms to compare transmission models for porcine epidemic diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    O’Dea, Eamon B.; Snelson, Harry; Bansal, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, U.S. swine producers were confronted with the disruptive emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED). Movement of animals among farms is hypothesised to have played a role in the spread of PED among farms. Via this or other mechanisms, the rate of spread may also depend on the geographic density of farms and climate. To evaluate such effects on a large scale, we analyse state-level counts of outbreaks with variables describing the distribution of farm sizes and types, aggregate flows of animals among farms, and an index of climate. Our first main finding is that it is possible for a correlation analysis to be sensitive to transmission model parameters. This finding is based on a global sensitivity analysis of correlations on simulated data that included a biased and noisy observation model based on the available PED data. Our second main finding is that flows are significantly associated with the reports of PED outbreaks. This finding is based on correlations of pairwise relationships and regression modeling of total and weekly outbreak counts. These findings illustrate how variation in population structure may be employed along with observational data to improve understanding of disease spread. PMID:26947420

  1. Development of a novel ex vivo porcine skin explant model for the assessment of mature bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingping; Phillips, Priscilla L; Sampson, Edith M; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Jin, Shouguang; Antonelli, Patrick; Schultz, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been proposed to be a major factor contributing to the failure of chronic wounds to heal because of their increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents and the prolonged inflammation they cause. Phenotypic characteristics of bacterial biofilms vary depending on the substratum to which they attach, the nutritional environment, and the microorganisms within the biofilm community. To develop an ex vivo biofilm model that more closely mimics biofilms in chronic skin wounds, we developed an optimal procedure to grow mature biofilms on a central partial-thickness wound in 12-mm porcine skin explants. Chlorine gas produced optimal sterilization of explants while preserving histological properties of the epidermis and dermis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus developed mature biofilms after 3 days that had dramatically increased tolerance to gentamicin and oxacillin (∼100× and 8,000× minimal inhibitory concentration, respectively) and to sodium hypochlorite (0.6% active chlorine). Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy verified extensive exopolymeric biofilm structures on the explants. Despite a significant delay, a ΔlasI quorum-sensing mutant of P. aeruginosa developed biofilm as antibiotic-tolerant as wild-type after 3 days. This ex vivo model simulates growth of biofilms on skin wounds and provides an accurate model to assess effects of antimicrobial agents on mature biofilms. PMID:23927831

  2. Edmund Prince Fowler Award Thesis. Evaluation of random skin flap survival in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Pratt, M F

    1996-06-01

    The pathophysiology of random skin flap necrosis in the pig model was studied the effects of several drugs on skin flap survival were examined. The investigated drugs included acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), pentoxifylline (PTX), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and an experimental 21-aminosteroid, U-74389G. Each drug altered different parameters known to be associated with tissue necrosis. Demonstrated mechanisms of skin flap failure included the alteration of erythrocyte flexibility and platelet function and the activation of neutrophils with resultant accumulation of damaging oxygen-free radicals. Random skin flap survival did not improve with ASA but did improve significantly with PTX, PGE2, and U-74389G. The results of this study underscore the importance of neutrophil-mediated necrosis in the pathophysiology of skin flap failure. The data further demonstrate the need to develop drugs aimed at reversing or preventing the tissue damage from oxygen-free radicals in order to enhance the survival of random skin flaps. PMID:8656954

  3. In Silico Experimental Modeling of Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Trisilowati; Mallet, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    In silico experimental modeling of cancer involves combining findings from biological literature with computer-based models of biological systems in order to conduct investigations of hypotheses entirely in the computer laboratory. In this paper, we discuss the use of in silico modeling as a precursor to traditional clinical and laboratory research, allowing researchers to refine their experimental programs with an aim to reducing costs and increasing research efficiency. We explain the methodology of in silico experimental trials before providing an example of in silico modeling from the biomathematical literature with a view to promoting more widespread use and understanding of this research strategy. PMID:22523709

  4. Prospective randomized comparison of endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection and conventional submucosal dissection in the resection of superficial esophageal/gastric lesions in a living porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Gomercic, Cécile; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gonzalez, Jean-Michel; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Garcès-Duran, Rodrigo; Garnier, Emmanuelle; Hébuterne, Xavier; Berdah, Stéphane; Barthet, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: To assess experimentally endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection (ESTD) as an alternative technique of endoscopic submucosal resection. Patients and methods: This was a prospective, randomized, comparative experimental animal study carried out over a period of 9 months at the surgical research and teaching center of Aix-Marseille University, France. Virtual esophageal and gastric lesions measuring 3 cm in diameter were resected in pigs weighing 25 to 30 kg. The primary aim was to evaluate ESTD’s efficacy compared with endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The secondary aims were to determine complication rates as well as to assess procedure time and procedure speed, histologic quality of the resected specimen, and procedure cost. Results: Eighteen procedures (9 ESD and 9 ESTD) were performed in nine pigs. The technical success rate was 88.9 % for both techniques, with one single failure in each. The en bloc resection rate was 100 % for ESTD and 88.9 % for ESD (one failure). The complication rate (22 %) and median procedure time were similar but dissection speed was quicker with ESTD in the esophagus (P = 0.03). Median procedure cost (728 Euros for ESD and ESTD) did not differ. On histologic examination, the lateral margins were healthy in 100 % of ESTD and in 88.9 % of ESD (P = 0.49). Deep resection margins were of better quality in ESTD (median submucosal thickness: 1307.1 µm vs. 884.7 µm; P = 0.039). Conclusions: ESTD is feasible and safe but not superior in the treatment of superficial esophageal/gastric lesions in porcine models compared with ESD. Nevertheless it provides a better quality histologic specimen. PMID:26716116

  5. Effect of stents coated with a combination of sirolimus and alpha-lipoic acid in a porcine coronary restenosis model.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung Seob; Park, Jun-Kyu; Jeong, Myung Ho; Bae, In-Ho; Nah, Jae-Woon; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Jung Ha; Lee, So Youn; Jang, Eun Jae; Jang, Suyoung; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Sim, Doo Sun; Park, Keun-Ho; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kang, Jung Chaee

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate antiproliferative sirolimus- and antioxidative alpha-lipoic acid (ALA)-eluting stents using biodegradable polymer [poly-L-lactic acid (PLA)] in a porcine coronary overstretch restenosis model. Forty coronary arteries of 20 pigs were randomized into four groups in which the coronary arteries had a bare metal stent (BMS, n = 10), ALA-eluting stent with PLA (AES, n = 10), sirolimus-eluting stent with PLA (SES, n = 10), or sirolimus- and ALA-eluting stent with PLA (SAS, n = 10). A histopathological analysis was performed 28 days after the stenting. The ALA and sirolimus released slowly over 30 days. There were no significant differences between groups in the injury or inflammation score; however, there were significant differences in the percent area of stenosis (56.2 ± 11.78% in BMS vs. 51.5 ± 12.20% in AES vs. 34.7 ± 7.23% in SES vs. 28.7 ± 7.30% in SAS, P < 0.0001) and fibrin score [1.0 (range 1.0-1.0) in BMS vs. 1.0 (range 1.0-1.0) in AES vs. 2.0 (range 2.0-2.0) in SES vs. 2.0 (range 2.0-2.0) in SAS, P < 0.0001] between the four groups. The percent area of stenosis based on micro-computed tomography corresponded with the restenosis rates based on histopathological stenosis in different proportions in the four groups (54.8 ± 7.88% in BMS vs. 50.4 ± 14.87% in AES vs. 34.5 ± 7.22% in SES vs. 28.9 ± 7.22% in SAS, P < 0.05). SAS showed a better neointimal inhibitory effect than BMS, AES, and SES at 1 month after stenting in a porcine coronary restenosis model. Therefore, SAS with PLA can be a useful drug combination for coronary stent coating to suppress neointimal hyperplasia. PMID:26886814

  6. In-vivo regional myocardial perfusion measurements in a porcine model by ECG-gated multislice computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Meyer, Cristopher A.; Teague, Shawn; Stecker, Michael; Hutchins, Gary; McLennan, Gordon; Persohn, Scott

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether functional multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) can identify regional areas of normally perfused and ischemic myocardium in a porcine model. Material and Methods: Three out bred pigs, two of which had ameroids surgically implanted to constrict flow within the LAD and LCx coronary arteries, were injected with 25 mL of iopromide (Isovue) at a rate of 5 mL/second via the femoral or jugular vein. Sixty axial scans along the short axis of the heart was acquired on a 16-slice CT scanner (Philips MX8000-IDT) triggered at end-diastole of the cardiac cycle and acquiring an image within 270 msec. A second series of scans were taken after an intravenous injection of a vasodilator, 150 μg/kg/min of adenosine. ROIs were drawn around the myocardial tissue and the resulting time-density curves were used to extract perfusion values. Results: Determination of the myocardial perfusion and fractional blood volume implementing three different perfusion models. A 5-point averaging or 'smoothing' algorithm was employed to effectively filter the data due to its noisy nature. The (preliminary) average perfusion and fractional blood volume values over selected axial slices for the pig without an artificially induced stenosis were measured to be 84 +/- 22 mL/min/100g-tissue and 0.17 +/- 0.04 mL/g-tissue, the former is consistent with PET scan and EBCT results. The pig with a stenosis in the left LAD coronary artery showed a reduced global perfusion value -- 45 mL/min/100g-tissue. Correlations in regional perfusion values relative to the stenosis were weak. During the infusion of adenosine, averaged perfusion values for the three subjects increased by 46 (+/-45) percent, comparable to increases measured with PET. Conclusion: Quantifying global perfusion values using MDCT appear encouraging. Future work will focus resolving the systematic effects from noise due to signal fluctuation from the porcine tachyardia (80-93 BPM) and provide a more robust measurement

  7. Xenotransplantation of Human Cardiomyocyte Progenitor Cells Does Not Improve Cardiac Function in a Porcine Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure. Results from a Randomized, Blinded, Placebo Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jansen of Lorkeers, Sanne J.; Gho, Johannes M. I. H.; Koudstaal, Stefan; van Hout, Gerardus P. J.; Zwetsloot, Peter Paul M.; van Oorschot, Joep W. M.; van Eeuwijk, Esther C. M.; Leiner, Tim; Hoefer, Imo E.; Goumans, Marie-José; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs) were successfully isolated from fetal and adult human hearts. Direct intramyocardial injection of human CMPCs (hCMPCs) in experimental mouse models of acute myocardial infarction significantly improved cardiac function compared to controls. Aim Here, our aim was to investigate whether xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of fetal hCMPCs in a pig model of chronic myocardial infarction is safe and efficacious, in view of translation purposes. Methods & Results We performed a randomized, blinded, placebo controlled trial. Four weeks after ischemia/reperfusion injury by 90 minutes of percutaneous left anterior descending artery occlusion, pigs (n = 16, 68.5 ± 5.4 kg) received intracoronary infusion of 10 million fetal hCMPCs or placebo. All animals were immunosuppressed by cyclosporin (CsA). Four weeks after infusion, endpoint analysis by MRI displayed no difference in left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular end diastolic and left ventricular end systolic volumes between both groups. Serial pressure volume (PV-)loop and echocardiography showed no differences in functional parameters between groups at any timepoint. Infarct size at follow-up, measured by late gadolinium enhancement MRI showed no difference between groups. Intracoronary pressure and flow measurements showed no signs of coronary obstruction 30 minutes after cell infusion. No premature death occurred in cell treated animals. Conclusion Xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of hCMPCs is feasible and safe, but not associated with improved left ventricular performance and infarct size compared to placebo in a porcine model of chronic myocardial infarction. PMID:26678993

  8. Inhibition of early AAA formation by aortic intraluminal pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) infusion in a novel porcine AAA model

    PubMed Central

    Kloster, Brian O.; Lund, Lars; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of abdominal aortic aneurysms found in screening programs are small, and as no effective treatment exits, many will expand until surgery is indicated. Therefore, it remains intriguing to develop a safe and low cost treatment of these small aneurysms, that is able to prevent or delay their expansion. In this study, we investigated whether intraluminal delivered pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) can impair the early AAA development in a porcine model. Methods The infrarenal aorta was exposed in thirty pigs. Twenty underwent an elastase based AAA inducing procedure and ten of these received an additional intraluminal PGG infusion. The final 10 were sham operated and served as controls. Results All pigs who only had an elastase infusion developed macroscopically expanding AAAs. In pigs treated with an additional PGG infusion the growth rate of the AP-diameter rapidly returned to physiological values as seen in the control group. In the elastase group, histology revealed more or less complete resolution of the elastic lamellae in the media while they were more abundant, coherent and structurally organized in the PGG group. The control group displayed normal physiological growth and histology. Conclusion In our model, intraluminal delivered PGG is able to penetrate the aortic wall from the inside and impair the early AAA development by stabilizing the elastic lamellae and preserving their integrity. The principle holds a high clinical potential if it can be translated to human conditions, since it, if so, potentially could represent a new drug for stabilizing small abdominal aneurysms. PMID:27144001

  9. Increased survival time after delayed histamine and prostaglandin blockade in a porcine model of severe sepsis-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Byrne, K; Sielaff, T D; Michna, B; Carey, P D; Blocher, C R; Vasquez, A; Sugerman, H J

    1990-03-01

    A combination of cimetidine, diphenhydramine, and ibuprofen has been shown to be an effective treatment in a porcine model of septic acute lung injury. The present study was designed to evaluate this therapy in a delayed treatment survival model. Three groups of animals were studied: a control group (C, n = 6) received a sham infusion of 0.9% saline; a septic group (Ps, n = 5) received a continuous infusion of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa organisms; and a treatment group (CID, n = 6) received P. aeruginosa plus cimetidine 150 mg, ibuprofen 12.5 mg/kg, and diphenhydramine 10 mg/kg given at 90 min after P. aeruginosa infusion, and hourly thereafter. Group Ps developed fulminant acute lung injury and hypodynamic septic shock. CID therapy ameliorated temporarily the progressive course of hypoxemia and increased extravascular lung water (EVLW), delayed the onset of cardiovascular deterioration, and improved significantly survival time. It was concluded that CID therapy given at 90 min after the onset of lethal continuous P. aeruginosa infusion improved significantly animal survival time by improving temporarily hypoxemia and increase in EVLW and delaying cardiovascular collapse. PMID:2302957

  10. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions. PMID:26218890

  11. Validation of an Experimentally Derived Uncertainty Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K. B.; Cox, D. E.; Balas, G. J.; Juang, J.-N.

    1996-01-01

    The results show that uncertainty models can be obtained directly from system identification data by using a minimum norm model validation approach. The error between the test data and an analytical nominal model is modeled as a combination of unstructured additive and structured input multiplicative uncertainty. Robust controllers which use the experimentally derived uncertainty model show significant stability and performance improvements over controllers designed with assumed ad hoc uncertainty levels. Use of the identified uncertainty model also allowed a strong correlation between design predictions and experimental results.

  12. Penile enhancement using a porcine small intestinal submucosa graft in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Leungwattanakij, S; Pummangura, N; Ratana-Olarn, K

    2006-01-01

    Several biodegradable materials have been experimented for penile enhancement, but none show the potential for clinical use. This study was designed to use porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) augmenting the normal tunica albuginea to increase the functional girth of the rat penis. In all, 20 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats constituted the study population. The animals were divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of the control (n=10) and group 2 (n=10) consisted of rats that underwent penile enhancement by a longitudinal I-shaped incision of the tunica albuginea on both sides, and the dissection of the plane between tunica albuginea and cavernosal tissue was carried out (n=10). The incision was then patched with a 3 x 10 mm2 piece of SIS, using a 6/0 nylon suture material. The penile length and mid-circumference were then measured using a Vernier Caliper before and 2 months after surgery. All rat penises underwent histological examination using Masson's trichome and Verhoff's van Giesen's stain for collagen and elastic fibers. The penile length, mid-circumference and degree of fibrosis score were expressed as mean+/-s.e. (standard error) and analyzed using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test. A statistical significance was accepted at P-value < or =0.05. Our results showed similar preoperative penile length and circumference in both groups. However, 2 months after the surgery, the mean penile circumference of the SIS group has grown significantly larger than the control group, while the mean penile length remained unchanged. The histological study of the rat penises revealed minimal amounts of fibrosis under the graft, and the elastic fibers of the graft showed orientation in a circular manner. In conclusion, SIS appears promising for material use in a penile enhancement. PMID:16049525

  13. Is intervertebral disc pressure linked to herniation?: An in-vitro study using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Mamiko; Gooyers, Chad E; Karakolis, Thomas; Noguchi, Kimihiro; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-06-14

    Approximately 40% of low back pain cases have been attributed to internal disc disruption. This disruption mechanism may be linked to intradiscal pressure changes, since mechanical loading directly affects the pressure and the stresses that the inner annulus fibrosus experiences. The objective of this study was to characterize cycle-varying changes in four dependent measures (intradiscal pressure, flexion-extension moments, specimen height loss, and specimen rotation angle) using a cyclic flexion-extension (CFE) loading protocol known to induce internal disc disruption. A novel bore-screw pressure sensor system was used to instrument 14 porcine functional spinal units. The CFE loading protocol consisted of 3600 cycles of flexion-extension range of motion (average 18.30 (SD 3.76) degrees) at 1Hz with 1500N of compressive load. On average, intradiscal pressure and specimen height decreased by 47% and 62%, respectively, and peak moments increased by 102%. From 900 to 2100 cycles, all variables exhibited significant changes between successive time points, except for the specimen posture at maximum pressure, which demonstrated a significant shift towards flexion limit after 2700 cycles. There were no further changes in pressure range after 2100 cycles, whereas peak moments and height loss were significantly different from prior time points throughout the CFE protocol. Twelve of the 14 specimens showed partial herniation; however, injury type was not significantly correlated to any of the dependent measures. Although change in pressure was not predictive of damage type, the increase in pressure range seen during this protocol supports the premise that repetitive combined loading (i.e., radial compression, tension and shear) imposes damage to the inner annulus fibrosus, and its failure mechanism may be linked to fatigue. PMID:27157242

  14. Induction of continuous expanding infrarenal aortic aneurysms in a large porcine animal model

    PubMed Central

    Kloster, Brian O.; Lund, Lars; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2015-01-01

    Background A large animal model with a continuous expanding infrarenal aortic aneurysm gives access to a more realistic AAA model with anatomy and physiology similar to humans, and thus allows for new experimental research in the natural history and treatment options of the disease. Methods 10 pigs (group A) underwent infrarenal aortic dissection, balloon dilatation, infusion of elastase into the lumen and placement of a stenosing cuff around the aorta. 10 control pigs (group B) underwent a sham procedure. The subsequent 28 days the AP-diameters of the aneurysms were measured using ultrasound, hereafter the pigs were euthanized for inspection and AAA wall sampling for histological analysis. Results In group A, all pigs developed continuous expanding AAA's with a mean increase in AP-diameter to 16.26 ± 0.93 mm equivalent to a 57% increase. In group B the AP-diameters increased to 11.33 ± 0.13 mm equivalent to 9.3% which was significantly less than in group A (p < 0.001). In group A, a significant negative association between the preoperative weight and the resulting AP-diameters was found. Histology shoved more or less complete resolution of the elastic tissue in the tunica media in group A. The most frequent complication was a neurological deficit in the lower limbs. Conclusion In pigs it's possible to induce continuous expanding AAA's based upon proteolytic degradation and pathological flow, resembling the real life dynamics of human aneurysms. Because the lumbars are preserved, it's also a potential model for further studies of novel endovascular devices and their complications. PMID:25685342

  15. Successful treatment of adult respiratory distress syndrome by histamine and prostaglandin blockade in a porcine Pseudomonas model.

    PubMed

    Sielaff, T D; Sugerman, H J; Tatum, J L; Blocher, C R

    1987-08-01

    , ibuprofen, is effective and essential in the treatment of hypoxemia, early pulmonary hypertension, and pulmonary microvascular injury in this fulminant model of porcine Pseudomonas ARDS. PMID:3112984

  16. Structural and functional annotation of the porcine immunome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The domestic pig is known as an excellent model for human immunology and the two species share many pathogens. Susceptibility to infectious disease is one of the major constraints on swine performance, yet the structure and function of genes comprising the pig immunome are not well-characterized. The completion of the pig genome provides the opportunity to annotate the pig immunome, and compare and contrast pig and human immune systems. Results The Immune Response Annotation Group (IRAG) used computational curation and manual annotation of the swine genome assembly 10.2 (Sscrofa10.2) to refine the currently available automated annotation of 1,369 immunity-related genes through sequence-based comparison to genes in other species. Within these genes, we annotated 3,472 transcripts. Annotation provided evidence for gene expansions in several immune response families, and identified artiodactyl-specific expansions in the cathelicidin and type 1 Interferon families. We found gene duplications for 18 genes, including 13 immune response genes and five non-immune response genes discovered in the annotation process. Manual annotation provided evidence for many new alternative splice variants and 8 gene duplications. Over 1,100 transcripts without porcine sequence evidence were detected using cross-species annotation. We used a functional approach to discover and accurately annotate porcine immune response genes. A co-expression clustering analysis of transcriptomic data from selected experimental infections or immune stimulations of blood, macrophages or lymph nodes identified a large cluster of genes that exhibited a correlated positive response upon infection across multiple pathogens or immune stimuli. Interestingly, this gene cluster (cluster 4) is enriched for known general human immune response genes, yet contains many un-annotated porcine genes. A phylogenetic analysis of the encoded proteins of cluster 4 genes showed that 15% exhibited an accelerated

  17. The impact of force on the timing of bruises evaluated in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Barington, Kristiane; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2016-05-01

    In animal models developed in order to estimate the age of bruises, focus has been on the changes over time and not considering the force used to inflict the trauma. In the present study, gross and histological changes in 2, 4, 6 and 8 h old bruises which were inflicted with a low, moderate and high force were compared. Twelve experimental pigs were randomly assigned to three groups of force (low, moderate and high force). All pigs were anesthetized, and on each animal four blunt traumas were inflicted on the back with the low, moderate or high force according to the groups. The pigs were kept in anesthesia for 2, 4, 6 or 8 h, after which they were euthanized, and skin and muscle tissues were sampled for histology. As control, two pigs were included. The gross appearance of bruises developed similarly until 0.5 h after infliction at which time the visibility of the bruises depended on the force. The infiltration of subcutaneous neutrophils depended on the time and force used which was confirmed by both manual evaluation and image analysis of immunostained skin sections. In the muscle tissue, the number of macrophages was found useful for age determination in bruises inflicted with the highest force. Therefore, when evaluating forensic cases of bruises in both human and veterinary pathology the impact of force and not only the timing should be taken into consideration. PMID:27085141

  18. A porcine model of early atrial fibrillation using a custom-built, radio transmission-controlled pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Schwarzl, Michael; Alogna, Alessio; Zweiker, David; Verderber, Jochen; Huber, Stefan; Manninger, Martin; Scherr, Daniel; Antoons, Gudrun; Pieske, Burkert M; Post, Heiner; Lueger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying atrial remodeling toward atrial fibrillation (AF) are incompletely understood. We induced AF in 16 pigs by 6weeks of rapid atrial pacing (RAP, 600bpm) using a custom-built, telemetrically controlled pacemaker. AF evolution was monitored three times per week telemetrically in unstressed, conscious animals. We established a dose-response relationship between RAP duration and occurrence of sustained AF >60minutes. Left atrial (LA) dilatation was present already at 2weeks of RAP. There was no evidence of left ventricular heart failure after 6weeks of RAP. As a proof-of-principle, arterial hypertension was induced in 5/16 animals by implanting desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA, an aldosterone-analog) subcutaneously to accelerate atrial remodeling. RAP+DOCA resulted in increased AF stability with earlier onset of sustained AF and accelerated anatomical atrial remodeling with more pronounced LA dilatation. This novel porcine model can serve to characterize effects of maladaptive stimuli or protective interventions specifically during early AF. PMID:26803554

  19. Effect of age and maternal antibodies on the systemic and mucosal immune response after neonatal immunization in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Bautista, Edgar R; Garcia-Ruiz, Carlos E; Gama-Espinosa, Alicia L; Ramirez-Estudillo, Carmen; Rojas-Gomez, Oscar I; Vega-Lopez, Marco A

    2014-01-01

    Newborn mammals are highly susceptible to respiratory infections. Although maternal antibodies (MatAb) offer them some protection, they may also interfere with their systemic immune response to vaccination. However, the impact of MatAb on the neonatal mucosal immune response remains incompletely described. This study was performed to determine the effect of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific MatAb on the anti-OVA antibody response in sera, nasal secretions and saliva from specific pathogen-free Vietnamese miniature piglets immunized at 7 or 14 days of age. Our results demonstrated that MatAb increased antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses in sera, and transiently enhanced an early secretory IgA response in nasal secretions of piglets immunized at 7 days of age. In contrast, we detected a lower mucosal (nasal secretion and saliva) anti-OVA IgG response in piglets with MatAb immunized at 14 days of age, compared with piglets with no MatAb, suggesting a modulatory effect of antigen-specific maternal factors on the isotype transfer to the mucosal immune exclusion system. In our porcine model, we demonstrated that passive maternal immunity positively modulated the systemic and nasal immune responses of animals immunized early in life. Our results, therefore, open the possibility of inducing systemic and respiratory mucosal immunity in the presence of MatAb through early vaccination. PMID:24754050

  20. Synthesis and anti-staphylococcal activity of TiO2 nanoparticles and nanowires in ex vivo porcine skin model.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Namrata; Anjusree, G S; Madhavan, Asha Anish; Priyanka, P; Sankar, Deepthi; Nisha, N; Lakshmi, S V; Jayakumar, R; Balakrishnan, Avinash; Biswas, Raja

    2014-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major causes of skin and soft tissue infections. In this study we compared the antimicrobial activity of two different TiO2 nanoformulations against Staphylococcus aureus. We synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles of approximately 80 nm diameter and TiO2 nanowires of approximately 100 nm diameter. Both nanoformulations possess anti-microbial activity; were non-hemolytic and cytocompatible. However, the anti-staphylococcal activity of TiO2 nanowires was better than the nanoparticles. In broth culture, growth of S. aureus was only partially inhibited by 2% and 4 wt% TiO2 nanoparticles and completely inhibited by TiO2 nanowires till 24 h. TiO2 nanowires treated S. aureus cells exhibits diminished membrane potential than nanoparticle treated cells. The anti-microbial properties of both TiO2 nanoformulations were validated using ex vivo porcine skin model which supplements the in vitro assays. Anti-bacterial activity of the TiO2 nanowires were also validated against multi drug resistant pathogenic strains of S. aureus, showing the clinical potency of the TiO2 nanowires compared to its nanoparticles. PMID:24734539

  1. Hepatic and Splenic Stiffness Augmentation Assessed with MR Elastography in an in vivo Porcine Portal Hypertension Model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Meng; Kolipaka, Arunark; Woodrum, David A.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Romano, Anthony J; Manduca, Armando; Talwalkar, Jayant A.; Araoz, Philip A.; McGee, Kiaran P.; Anavekar, Nandan S.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of portal pressure on the shear stiffness of the liver and spleen in a well-controlled in vivo porcine model with MR Elastography (MRE). A significant correlation between portal pressure and tissue stiffness could be used to noninvasively assess increased portal venous pressure (portal hypertension), which is a frequent clinical condition caused by cirrhosis of the liver and is responsible for the development of many lethal complications. Materials and Methods During multiple intra-arterial infusions of Dextran-40 in three adult domestic pigs in vivo, 3-D abdominal MRE was performed with left ventricle and portal catheters measuring blood pressure simultaneously. Least-squares linear regressions were used to analyze the relationship between tissue stiffness and portal pressure. Results Liver and spleen stiffness have a dynamic component that increases significantly following an increase in portal or left ventricular pressure. Correlation coefficients with the linear regressions between stiffness and pressure exceeded 0.8 in most cases. Conclusion The observed stiffness-pressure relationship of the liver and spleen could provide a promising noninvasive method for assessing portal pressure. Using MRE to study the tissue mechanics associated with portal pressure may provide new insights into the natural history and pathophysiology of hepatic diseases and may have significant diagnostic value in the future. PMID:23418135

  2. Enamel pathology resulting from loss of function in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in a porcine animal model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene H; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Bromage, Timothy G; Bringas, Pablo; Welsh, Michael J; Zabner, Joseph; Paine, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a phosphorylation- and ATP-regulated anion channel. CFTR expression and activity is frequently associated with an anion exchanger (AE) such as AE2 coded by the Slc4a2 gene. Mice null for Cftr and mice null for Slc4a2 have enamel defects, and there are some case reports of enamel anomalies in patients with CF. In this study we demonstrate that both Cftr and AE2 expression increased significantly during the rat enamel maturation stage versus the earlier secretory stage (5.6- and 2.9-fold, respectively). These qPCR data im- ply that there is a greater demand for Cl(-) and bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) transport during the maturation stage of enamel formation, and that this is, at least in part, provided by changes in Cftr and AE2 expression. In addition, the enamel phenotypes of 2 porcine models of CF, CFTR-null, and CFTR-ΔF508 have been examined using backscattered electron microscopy in a scanning electron microscope. The enamel of newborn CFTR-null and CFTR-ΔF508 animals is hypomineralized. Together, these data provide a molecular basis for interpreting enamel disease associated with disruptions to CFTR and AE2 expression. PMID:21525720

  3. Enamel Pathology Resulting from Loss of Function in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in a Porcine Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eugene H.; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Bromage, Timothy G.; Bringas, Pablo; Welsh, Michael J.; Zabner, Joseph; Paine, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a phosphorylation- and ATP-regulated anion channel. CFTR expression and activity is frequently associated with an anion exchanger (AE) such as AE2 coded by the Slc4a2 gene. Mice null for Cftr and mice null for Slc4a2 have enamel defects, and there are some case reports of enamel anomalies in patients with CF. In this study we demonstrate that both Cftr and AE2 expression increased significantly during the rat enamel maturation stage versus the earlier secretory stage (5.6- and 2.9-fold, respectively). These qPCR data im- ply that there is a greater demand for Cl– and bicarbonate (HCO3–) transport during the maturation stage of enamel formation, and that this is, at least in part, provided by changes in Cftr and AE2 expression. In addition, the enamel phenotypes of 2 porcine models of CF, CFTR-null, and CFTR-ΔF508 have been examined using backscattered electron microscopy in a scanning electron microscope. The enamel of newborn CFTR-null and CFTR-ΔF508 animals is hypomineralized. Together, these data provide a molecular basis for interpreting enamel disease associated with disruptions to CFTR and AE2 expression. PMID:21525720

  4. ICG angiography predicts burn scarring within 48 h of injury in a porcine vertical progression burn model.

    PubMed

    Fourman, Mitchell S; McKenna, Peter; Phillips, Brett T; Crawford, Laurie; Romanelli, Filippo; Lin, Fubao; McClain, Steve A; Khan, Sami U; Dagum, Alexander B; Singer, Adam J; Clark, Richard A F

    2015-08-01

    The current standard of care in determining the need to excise and graft a burn remains with the burn surgeon, whose clinical judgment is often variable. Prior work suggests that minimally invasive perfusion technologies are useful in burn prognostication. Here we test the predictive capabilities of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) and indocyanine green dye (ICG) angiography in the prediction of burn scarring 28 days after injury using a previously validated porcine burn model that shows vertical progression injury. Twelve female Yorkshire swine were burned using a 2.5 × 2.5 cm metal bar at variable temperature and application times to create distinct burn depths. Six animals (48 injuries total) each were analyzed with LDI or ICG angiography at 1, 24, 48, and 72 h following injury. A linear regression was then performed correlating perfusion measurements against wound contraction at 28 days after injury. ICG angiography showed a peak linear correlate (r(2)) of .63 (95% CI .34 to .92) at 48 h after burn. This was significantly different from the LDI linear regression (p < .05), which was measured at r(2) of .20 (95% CI .02 to .39). ICG angiography linear regression was superior to LDI at all timepoints. Findings suggest that ICG angiography may have significant potential in the prediction of long-term burn outcomes. PMID:25499407

  5. Changes in leukocyte subsets of pregnant gilts experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and relationships with viral load and fetal outcome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of more than two decades of extensive research, the understanding of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) immunity is still incomplete. A PRRSv infection of the late term pregnant female can result in abortions, early farrowings, fetal death, and the birth of weak, co...

  6. Validation of a major quantitative trait locus associated with host response to experimental infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious diseases are costly to the swine industry and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the most devastating. In earlier work, a quantitative trait locus associated with resistance/susceptibility to PRRSV was identified on Sus scrofa chromosome 4 (SSC4) using ~560 exp...

  7. Novel technique for full-thickness resection of gastric malignancy: feasibility of nonexposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (news) in porcine models.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takashi; Goto, Osamu; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Hatao, Fumihiko; Wada, Ikuo; Niimi, Keiko; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Fujishiro, Mitsuihiro; Koike, Kazuhiko; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2013-12-01

    Full-thickness resection for gastric malignancy carries a risk of peritoneal dissemination due to opening of the gastric lumen. We evaluated the feasibility and safety a novel method of full-thickness resection without transmural communication, called nonexposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery in ex vivo and in vivo porcine models. Six explanted porcine stomachs and 6 live pigs were used for this study. After marking and submucosal injection around 3 cm simulated lesions, the seromuscular layer was laparoscopically cut and sutured with the lesion inverted to the inside. Consecutively, a mucosubmucosal incision was made endoscopically. Three pigs used for the survival study were monitored for 7 days. All 12 lesions were successfully resected en bloc without perforation. The 3 pigs survived for 1 week without adverse events, and necropsy revealed neither leakage nor abscess formation related to the operation. We demonstrated nonexposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery to be technically feasible and safe in both ex vivo and in vivo porcine studies. PMID:24300935

  8. Experimental Modeling of Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy. An Experimental Morphological Study.

    PubMed

    Khoroshilova-Maslova, I P; Leparskaya, N L; Nabieva, M M; Andreeva, L D

    2015-05-01

    A model of proliferative vitreoretinopathy induced by simultaneous intravitreal injection of recombinant IL-1β and platelet concentrate is created and its main morphological manifestations are studied on Chinchilla rabbits. The model reflects pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinopathy: epiretinal membrane with the formation of retinal plication, traction detachment of the retina; moderate inflammatory reaction in the uveal tract, in the optic nerve infundibulum, in the vitreous body; intact structural elements of the retina, dissociation of the retinal pigmented epithelium cells with their subsequent migration. The model is adequate to the clinical picture of proliferative vitreoretinopathy in humans, which recommends it for experimental studies of the efficiency of drug therapy and prevention of this disease. PMID:26033599

  9. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27051507

  10. Comparative analysis of in situ versus ex situ perfusion on flow and microcirculation in kidney procurement: research on a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The first crucial step in transplantation appears to be the effective rinsing of the graft during organ procurement. Even though there is strong suspicion that ex situ perfusion results in better rinsing of the graft, there is no proof for this hypothesis. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences of in situ and ex situ kidney perfusion in a porcine model. Methods Standardised multiorgan procurement was performed in 15 German landrace pigs. Perfusion was carried out using histidine–tryptophan–ketoglutarate solution (HTK) under the application of pressure. In one kidney, in situ perfusion via the aorta was carried out while the second kidney received ex situ perfusion via the renal artery (RA). Perfusate flow inside the aorta and the RA was recorded at different pressure steps. In order to visualise the effect on the microcirculation, different coloured microparticles (MPs; 10 μm) were administered via the aorta or RA. Subsequently, frozen sections of the explanted kidneys were analysed histologically and MPs were evaluated quantitatively. Results Ex situ kidney perfusion resulted in significantly improved flow rates (P<0.0001) compared with in situ perfusion. By applying ex situ perfusion it was even possible to attain physiological flow levels on the RA under the application of external pressure of 150 to 200 mmHg. The amount of MPs was able to highlight the positive impact of ex situ perfusion on microcirculation of the kidney graft (P<0.0001). Conclusions The use of MPs represents a valuable tool for quantitative investigation and illustration of kidney perfusion in experimental setups. Additional ex situ perfusion is able to improve the quality of kidney perfusion. PMID:23837545