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Sample records for pore loop interacts

  1. Extracellular zinc ion regulates transient receptor potential melastatin 5 (TRPM5) channel activation through its interaction with a pore loop domain.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kunitoshi; Tominaga, Makoto

    2013-09-01

    The transient receptor potential melastatin 5 (TRPM5) channel is a monovalent cation channel activated by intracellular Ca(2+). Expression of this channel is restricted to taste cells, the pancreas and brainstem, and is thought to be involved in controlling membrane potentials. Its endogenous ligands are not well characterized. Here, we show that extracellular application of Zn(2+) inhibits TRPM5 activity. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, extracellular application of ZnCl2 inhibited step-pulse-induced TRPM5 currents with 500 nM free intracellular Ca(2+) in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 4.3 μM at -80 mV). ZnSO4 also inhibited TRPM5 activity. Extracellular application of ZnCl2 inhibited TRPM5 activation at several temperatures. Furthermore, inhibition by 30 μM ZnCl2 was impaired in TRPM5 mutants in which His at 896, and Glu at 926 and/or Glu at 939 in the outer pore loop were replaced with Gln. From these results, we conclude that extracellular Zn(2+) inhibits TRPM5 channels, and the residues in the outer pore loop of TRPM5 are critically involved in the inhibition. PMID:23884414

  2. Extracellular Zinc Ion Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 5 (TRPM5) Channel Activation through Its Interaction with a Pore Loop Domain

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Kunitoshi; Tominaga, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential melastatin 5 (TRPM5) channel is a monovalent cation channel activated by intracellular Ca2+. Expression of this channel is restricted to taste cells, the pancreas and brainstem, and is thought to be involved in controlling membrane potentials. Its endogenous ligands are not well characterized. Here, we show that extracellular application of Zn2+ inhibits TRPM5 activity. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, extracellular application of ZnCl2 inhibited step-pulse-induced TRPM5 currents with 500 nm free intracellular Ca2+ in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 4.3 μm at −80 mV). ZnSO4 also inhibited TRPM5 activity. Extracellular application of ZnCl2 inhibited TRPM5 activation at several temperatures. Furthermore, inhibition by 30 μm ZnCl2 was impaired in TRPM5 mutants in which His at 896, and Glu at 926 and/or Glu at 939 in the outer pore loop were replaced with Gln. From these results, we conclude that extracellular Zn2+ inhibits TRPM5 channels, and the residues in the outer pore loop of TRPM5 are critically involved in the inhibition. PMID:23884414

  3. Observational Evidence for Loop-Loop Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiping, W.; Guangli, H.; Yuhua, T.; Aoao, X.

    2004-01-01

    Through analysis of the data including the hard x-ray(BASTE) microwave(NoRP) and magnetogram(MDI from SOHO) as well as the images of soft x-ray(YHKOH) and EIT(SOHO) on Apr. 151998 solar flare in the active region 8203(N30W12) we found: (1) there are similar quasi period oscillation in the profile of hard x-ray flux (25-5050-100keV) and microwave flux(1GHz) with duration of 85+/-25s every peak includes two sub-peak structures; (2) in the preheat phase of the flare active magnetic field changes apparently and a s-pole spot emerges ; (3) several EIT and soft x-ray loops exist and turn into bright . All of these may suggest that loop-loop interaction indeed exist. Through reconnection the electrons may be accelerated and the hard x-ray and microwave emission take place.

  4. Two interacting particles in a spherical pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio; Castelletti, Gabriela

    2011-02-01

    In this work we analytically evaluate, for the first time, the exact canonical partition function for two interacting spherical particles into a spherical pore. The interaction with the spherical substrate and between particles is described by an attractive square-well and a square-shoulder potential. In addition, we obtain exact expressions for both the one particle and an averaged two particle density distribution. We develop a thermodynamic approach to few-body systems by introducing a method based on thermodynamic measures [I. Urrutia, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 104503 (2010)] for nonhard interaction potentials. This analysis enables us to obtain expressions for the pressure, the surface tension, and the equivalent magnitudes for the total and Gaussian curvatures. As a by-product, we solve systems composed of two particles outside a fixed spherical obstacle. We study the low density limit for a many-body system confined to a spherical cavity and a many-body system surrounding a spherical obstacle. From this analysis we derive the exact first order dependence of the surface tension and Tolman length. Our findings show that the Tolman length goes to zero in the case of a purely hard wall spherical substrate, but contains a zero order term in density for square-well and square-shoulder wall-fluid potentials. This suggests that any nonhard wall-fluid potential should produce a non-null zero order term in the Tolman length.

  5. Modeling the interaction of ultrasound with pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1991-01-01

    Factors that affect ultrasonic velocity sensing of density during consolidation of metal powders are examined. A comparison is made between experimental results obtained during the final stage of densification and the predictions of models that assume either a spherical or a spheroidal pore shape. It is found that for measurements made at low frequencies during the final stage of densification, relative density (pore fraction) and pore shape are the two most important factors determining the ultrasonic velocity, the effect of pore size is negligible.

  6. Putative pore-loops of TMEM16/anoctamin channels affect channel density in cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Adomaviciene, Aiste; Smith, Keith J; Garnett, Hannah; Tammaro, Paolo

    2013-07-15

    The recently identified TMEM16/anoctamin protein family includes Ca(2+)-activated anion channels (TMEM16A, TMEM16B), a cation channel (TMEM16F) and proteins with unclear function. TMEM16 channels consist of eight putative transmembrane domains (TMs) with TM5-TM6 flanking a re-entrant loop thought to form the pore. In TMEM16A this region has also been suggested to contain residues involved in Ca(2+) binding. The role of the putative pore-loop of TMEM16 channels was investigated using a chimeric approach. Heterologous expression of either TMEM16A or TMEM16B resulted in whole-cell anion currents with very similar conduction properties but distinct kinetics and degrees of sensitivity to Ca(2+). Furthermore, whole-cell currents mediated by TMEM16A channels were ∼six times larger than TMEM16B-mediated currents. Replacement of the putative pore-loop of TMEM16A with that of TMEM16B (TMEM16A-B channels) reduced the currents by ∼six-fold, while the opposite modification (TMEM16B-A channels) produced a ∼six-fold increase in the currents. Unexpectedly, these changes were not secondary to variations in channel gating by Ca(2+) or voltage, nor were they due to changes in single-channel conductance. Instead, they depended on the number of functional channels present on the plasma membrane. Generation of additional, smaller chimeras within the putative pore-loop of TMEM16A and TMEM16B led to the identification of a region containing a non-canonical trafficking motif. Chimeras composed of the putative pore-loop of TMEM16F transplanted into the TMEM16A protein scaffold did not conduct anions or cations. These data suggest that the putative pore-loop does not form a complete, transferable pore domain. Furthermore, our data reveal an unexpected role for the putative pore-loop of TMEM16A and TMEM16B channels in the control of the whole-cell Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance. PMID:23613533

  7. Interactions between bedforms, turbulence and pore flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blois, G.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Hardy, R. J.; Lead, J.

    2010-12-01

    A widespread occurrence of flow-form interaction in rivers is represented by subaqueous bedforms such as dunes. Many models have been proposed to explain how bedform generation and evolution are driven by turbulent flow structures that control the incipient motion of cohesionless sediments and later bedform development. However, most of these models have assumed such bedforms to be migrating over an impermeable bed, and that any surface-subsurface flow interaction is negligible. However, for some gravel-bed rivers the porosity can be high, up to 43%, which may result in significant flow both through the permeable bed (hyporheic flow) and across the surface-subsurface interface. The mass and momentum exchange occurring at the interface may have a strong impact on the structure of turbulent flow in the near-bed region. In the case of a dune, its topography induces a local pressure gradient that enhances flow across the interface. This results in a flow structure that may be radically different from that commonly proposed by past work. This paper presents results from a simplified laboratory model akin to a fine-grained bedform generated on top of a coarser sediment bed. Particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted in order to characterise flow both over and underneath an idealised 2-dimensional dune (0.41 m long, 0.056 m high and having a leeside angle of 27°) overlaying a packed bed of uniform size spheres (D = 0.04 m diameter). Experiments were conducted in free surface flow conditions (Froude number = 0.1; Reynolds number = 25,000) for one bedform height: flow depth ratio (0.31). The flow above the dune was measured using a standard PIV technique while a novel endoscopic PIV (EPIV) system allowed collection of flow data within the pore spaces beneath the dune. The results show that topographically-induced subsurface flow significantly modifies the structure of flow in the leeside of the dune, resulting in a flow field that is radically different

  8. Crack interaction with 3-D dislocation loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huajian

    CRACKS in a solid often interact with other crystal defects such as dislocation loops. The interaction effects are of 3-D character yet their analytical treatment has been mostly limited to the 2-D regime due to mathematical complications. This paper shows that distribution of the stress intensity factors along a crack front due to arbitrary dislocation loops may be expressed as simple line integrals along the loop contours. The method of analysis is based on the 3-D Bueckner-Rice weight function theory for elastic crack analysis. Our results have significantly simplified the calculations for 3-D dislocation loops produced in the plastic processes at the crack front due to highly concentrated crack tip stress fields. Examples for crack-tip 3-D loops and 2-D straight dislocations emerging from the crack tip are given to demonstrate applications of the derived formulae. The results are consistent with some previous analytical solutions existing in the literature. As further applications we also analyse straight dislocations that are parallel or perpendicular to the crack plane but are not parallel to the crack front.

  9. Evidence that extracellular anions interact with a site outside the CFTR chloride channel pore to modify channel properties.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-Jun; Linsdell, Paul

    2009-05-01

    Extracellular anions enter into the pore of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel, interacting with binding sites on the pore walls and with other anions inside the pore. There is increasing evidence that extracellular anions may also interact with sites away from the channel pore to influence channel properties. We have used site-directed mutagenesis and patch-clamp recording to identify residues that influence interactions with external anions. Anion interactions were assessed by the ability of extracellular Pt(NO2)42- ions to weaken the pore-blocking effect of intracellular Pt(NO2)42- ions, a long-range ion-ion interaction that does not appear to reflect ion interactions inside the pore. We found that mutations that remove positive charges in the 4th extracellular loop of CFTR (K892Q and R899Q) significantly alter the interaction between extracellular and intracellular Pt(NO2)42- ions. These mutations do not affect unitary Cl- conductance or block of single-channel currents by extracellular Pt(NO2)42- ions, however, suggesting that the mutated residues are not in the channel pore region. These results suggest that extracellular anions can regulate CFTR pore properties by binding to a site outside the pore region, probably by a long-range conformational change. Our findings also point to a novel function of the long 4th extracellular loop of the CFTR protein in sensing and (or) responding to anions in the extracellular solution. PMID:19448737

  10. Three charged amino acids in extracellular loop 1 are involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guiying; Rahman, Kazi S.; Infield, Daniel T.; Kuang, Christopher; Prince, Chengyu Z.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bears six extracellular loops (ECL1–6); ECL1 is the site of several mutations associated with CF. Mutation R117H has been reported to reduce current amplitude, whereas D110H, E116K, and R117C/L/P may impair channel stability. We hypothesized that these amino acids might not be directly involved in ion conduction and permeation but may contribute to stabilizing the outer vestibule architecture in CFTR. We used cRNA injected oocytes combined with electrophysiological techniques to test this hypothesis. Mutants bearing cysteine at these sites were not functionally modified by extracellular MTS reagents and were blocked by GlyH-101 similarly to WT-CFTR. These results suggest that these three residues do not contribute directly to permeation in CFTR. In contrast, mutants D110R-, E116R-, and R117A-CFTR exhibited instability of the open state and significantly shortened burst duration compared with WT-CFTR and failed to be locked into the open state by AMP-PNP (adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imido) triphosphate); charge-retaining mutants showed mainly the full open state with comparably longer open burst duration. These interactions suggest that these ECL1 residues might be involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR. A CFTR homology model suggested that E116 interacts with R104 in both the closed and open states, D110 interacts with K892 in the fully closed state, and R117 interacts with E1126 in the open state. These interactions were confirmed experimentally. The results suggest that D110, E116, and R117 may contribute to stabilizing the architecture of the outer pore of CFTR by interactions with other charged residues. PMID:25024266

  11. Three charged amino acids in extracellular loop 1 are involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; Rahman, Kazi S; Infield, Daniel T; Kuang, Christopher; Prince, Chengyu Z; McCarty, Nael A

    2014-08-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bears six extracellular loops (ECL1-6); ECL1 is the site of several mutations associated with CF. Mutation R117H has been reported to reduce current amplitude, whereas D110H, E116K, and R117C/L/P may impair channel stability. We hypothesized that these amino acids might not be directly involved in ion conduction and permeation but may contribute to stabilizing the outer vestibule architecture in CFTR. We used cRNA injected oocytes combined with electrophysiological techniques to test this hypothesis. Mutants bearing cysteine at these sites were not functionally modified by extracellular MTS reagents and were blocked by GlyH-101 similarly to WT-CFTR. These results suggest that these three residues do not contribute directly to permeation in CFTR. In contrast, mutants D110R-, E116R-, and R117A-CFTR exhibited instability of the open state and significantly shortened burst duration compared with WT-CFTR and failed to be locked into the open state by AMP-PNP (adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido) triphosphate); charge-retaining mutants showed mainly the full open state with comparably longer open burst duration. These interactions suggest that these ECL1 residues might be involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR. A CFTR homology model suggested that E116 interacts with R104 in both the closed and open states, D110 interacts with K892 in the fully closed state, and R117 interacts with E1126 in the open state. These interactions were confirmed experimentally. The results suggest that D110, E116, and R117 may contribute to stabilizing the architecture of the outer pore of CFTR by interactions with other charged residues. PMID:25024266

  12. The bacteriophage ϕ29 tail possesses a pore-forming loop for cell membrane penetration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingwei; Gui, Miao; Wang, Dianhong; Xiang, Ye

    2016-06-23

    Most bacteriophages are tailed bacteriophages with an isometric or a prolate head attached to a long contractile, long non-contractile, or short non-contractile tail. The tail is a complex machine that plays a central role in host cell recognition and attachment, cell wall and membrane penetration, and viral genome ejection. The mechanisms involved in the penetration of the inner host cell membrane by bacteriophage tails are not well understood. Here we describe structural and functional studies of the bacteriophage ϕ29 tail knob protein gene product 9 (gp9). The 2.0 Å crystal structure of gp9 shows that six gp9 molecules form a hexameric tube structure with six flexible hydrophobic loops blocking one end of the tube before DNA ejection. Sequence and structural analyses suggest that the loops in the tube could be membrane active. Further biochemical assays and electron microscopy structural analyses show that the six hydrophobic loops in the tube exit upon DNA ejection and form a channel that spans the lipid bilayer of the membrane and allows the release of the bacteriophage genomic DNA, suggesting that cell membrane penetration involves a pore-forming mechanism similar to that of certain non-enveloped eukaryotic viruses. A search of other phage tail proteins identified similar hydrophobic loops, which indicates that a common mechanism might be used for membrane penetration by prokaryotic viruses. These findings suggest that although prokaryotic and eukaryotic viruses use apparently very different mechanisms for infection, they have evolved similar mechanisms for breaching the cell membrane. PMID:27309813

  13. Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment

    PubMed Central

    Höök, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves—the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for ‘open’ surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a ‘unity’ of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and

  14. Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment.

    PubMed

    Höök, Kristina

    2009-12-12

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves-the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for 'open' surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a 'unity' of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and experienced

  15. Positioning of extracellular loop 1 affects pore gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Infield, Daniel T; Cui, Guiying; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A

    2016-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, the dysfunction of which directly leads to the life-shortening disease CF. Extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) of CFTR contains several residues involved in stabilizing the open state of the channel; some, including D110, are sites of disease-associated gating mutations. Structures from related proteins suggest that the position of CFTR's extracellular loops may change considerably during gating. To better understand the roles of ECL1 in CFTR function, we utilized functional cysteine cross-linking to determine the effects of modulation of D110C-CFTR and of a double mutant of D110C with K892C in extracellular loop 4 (ECL4). The reducing agent DTT elicited a large potentiation of the macroscopic conductance of D110C/K892C-CFTR, likely due to breakage of a spontaneous disulfide bond between C110 and C892. DTT-reduced D110C/K892C-CFTR was rapidly inhibited by binding cadmium ions with high affinity, suggesting that these residues frequently come in close proximity in actively gating channels. Effects of DTT and cadmium on modulation of pore gating were demonstrated at the single-channel level. Finally, disulfided D110C/K892C-CFTR channels were found to be less sensitive than wild-type or DTT-treated D110C/K892C-CFTR channels to stimulation by IBMX, suggesting an impact of this conformational restriction on channel activation by phosphorylation. The results are best explained in the context of a model of CFTR gating wherein stable channel opening requires correct positioning of functional elements structurally influenced by ECL1. PMID:26684250

  16. Quantitation of interactions between two DNA loops demonstrates loop domain insulation in E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Priest, David G; Kumar, Sandip; Yan, Yan; Dunlap, David D; Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E

    2014-10-21

    Eukaryotic gene regulation involves complex patterns of long-range DNA-looping interactions between enhancers and promoters, but how these specific interactions are achieved is poorly understood. Models that posit other DNA loops--that aid or inhibit enhancer-promoter contact--are difficult to test or quantitate rigorously in eukaryotic cells. Here, we use the well-characterized DNA-looping proteins Lac repressor and phage λ CI to measure interactions between pairs of long DNA loops in E. coli cells in the three possible topological arrangements. We find that side-by-side loops do not affect each other. Nested loops assist each other's formation consistent with their distance-shortening effect. In contrast, alternating loops, where one looping element is placed within the other DNA loop, inhibit each other's formation, thus providing clear support for the loop domain model for insulation. Modeling shows that combining loop assistance and loop interference can provide strong specificity in long-range interactions. PMID:25288735

  17. Quantitation of interactions between two DNA loops demonstrates loop domain insulation in E. coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Priest, David G.; Kumar, Sandip; Yan, Yan; Dunlap, David D.; Dodd, Ian B.; Shearwin, Keith E.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene regulation involves complex patterns of long-range DNA-looping interactions between enhancers and promoters, but how these specific interactions are achieved is poorly understood. Models that posit other DNA loops—that aid or inhibit enhancer–promoter contact—are difficult to test or quantitate rigorously in eukaryotic cells. Here, we use the well-characterized DNA-looping proteins Lac repressor and phage λ CI to measure interactions between pairs of long DNA loops in E. coli cells in the three possible topological arrangements. We find that side-by-side loops do not affect each other. Nested loops assist each other’s formation consistent with their distance-shortening effect. In contrast, alternating loops, where one looping element is placed within the other DNA loop, inhibit each other’s formation, thus providing clear support for the loop domain model for insulation. Modeling shows that combining loop assistance and loop interference can provide strong specificity in long-range interactions. PMID:25288735

  18. Reovirus FAST Proteins Drive Pore Formation and Syncytiogenesis Using a Novel Helix-Loop-Helix Fusion-Inducing Lipid Packing Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Muzaddid; de Antueno, Roberto; Langelaan, David N.; Parmar, Hiren B.; Shin, Kyungsoo; Rainey, Jan K.; Duncan, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Pore formation is the most energy-demanding step during virus-induced membrane fusion, where high curvature of the fusion pore rim increases the spacing between lipid headgroups, exposing the hydrophobic interior of the membrane to water. How protein fusogens breach this thermodynamic barrier to pore formation is unclear. We identified a novel fusion-inducing lipid packing sensor (FLiPS) in the cytosolic endodomain of the baboon reovirus p15 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein that is essential for pore formation during cell-cell fusion and syncytiogenesis. NMR spectroscopy and mutational studies indicate the dependence of this FLiPS on a hydrophobic helix-loop-helix structure. Biochemical and biophysical assays reveal the p15 FLiPS preferentially partitions into membranes with high positive curvature, and this partitioning is impeded by bis-ANS, a small molecule that inserts into hydrophobic defects in membranes. Most notably, the p15 FLiPS can be functionally replaced by heterologous amphipathic lipid packing sensors (ALPS) but not by other membrane-interactive amphipathic helices. Furthermore, a previously unrecognized amphipathic helix in the cytosolic domain of the reptilian reovirus p14 FAST protein can functionally replace the p15 FLiPS, and is itself replaceable by a heterologous ALPS motif. Anchored near the cytoplasmic leaflet by the FAST protein transmembrane domain, the FLiPS is perfectly positioned to insert into hydrophobic defects that begin to appear in the highly curved rim of nascent fusion pores, thereby lowering the energy barrier to stable pore formation. PMID:26061049

  19. Functional Analysis of the Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 Terminal Fusion Loops and Interactions with Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Sicong

    2012-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) glycoprotein GP64 is the major envelope protein of the budded virus (BV). GP64 is a class III fusion protein that mediates BV attachment to the cell surface and low-pH-triggered membrane fusion between the BV envelope and the endosome membrane during entry. Class III fusion proteins contain terminal looped structures that are believed to interact with membranes. To examine the functions of 3 loops found at the apex of the GP64 postfusion structure, we generated 2-alanine substitutions that scanned the two so-called fusion loops (loop 1 and loop 2) plus an adjacent loop structure (loop 3) that is closely attached to loop 2 and is also found at the apex of the GP64 postfusion structure. We identified essential residues from Y75 to T86 (loop 1) and N149 to H156 (loop 2) that are required for fusion activity, but no essential residues in loop 3. Further analysis revealed that critical fusion loop residues fall within two groups that are associated with either membrane merger (hemifusion) or fusion pore expansion. We next examined the interactions of soluble GP64 proteins and BV with membranes composed of various phospholipids. BV interacted directly with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) comprised of phospholipids phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidic acid (PC/PA) or phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (PC/PS) under neutral and acidic pH. We also examined the interactions of soluble GP64 constructs containing substitutions of the most hydrophobic residues within each of the two fusion loops. We found that a 2-residue substitution in either single loop (loop 1 [positions 81 and 82] or loop 2 [positions 153 and 154]) was not sufficient to substantially reduce the GP64-liposome interaction, but the same substitutions in both fusion loops severely reduced the GP64-liposome association at neutral pH. These results suggest that critical hydrophobic residues in both fusion loops may be involved in the

  20. The Effects of Hairpin loops on Ligand-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Binh; Wilson, W. David

    2009-01-01

    Hairpin nucleic acids are frequently used in physical studies due to their greater thermal stability compared to their equivalent duplex structures. They are also good models for more complex loop-containing structures such as quadruplexes, i-motifs, cruciforms, and molecular beacons. Although a connecting loop can increase stability, there is little information on how the loop influences the interactions of small molecules with attached base-paired nucleic acid regions. In this study, the effects of different hairpin loops on the interactions of A/T specific DNA minor groove binding agents with a common stem sequence have been investigated by spectroscopic and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor methods. The results indicate that the hairpin loop has little influence on the specific site interactions on the stem but significantly affects nonspecific binding. The use of a non-nucleotide loop (with a reduced negative charge) not only enhances the thermal stability of the hairpin but also reduces the non-specific binding at the loop without compromising the primary binding affinity on the stem. PMID:19778070

  1. An interacting loop model of solar flare bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of the strong heating produced at chromospheric levels during a solar flare burst, the local gas pressure can transiently attain very large values in certain regions. The effectiveness of the surrounding magnetic field at confining this high pressure plasma is therefore reduced and the flaring loop becomes free to expand laterally. In so doing it may drive magnetic field lines into neighboring, nonflaring, loops in the same active region, causing magnetic reconnection to take place and triggering another flare burst. The features of this interacting loop model are found to be in good agreement with the energetics and time structure of flare associated solar hard X-ray bursts.

  2. Interaction of local anesthetics with the K+ channel pore domain

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Noel W.; Zhorov, Boris S.; Moczydlowski, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    Local anesthetics and related drugs block ionic currents of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ conducted across the cell membrane by voltage-dependent ion channels. Many of these drugs bind in the permeation pathway, occlude the pore and stop ion movement. However channel-blocking drugs have also been associated with decreased membrane stability of certain tetrameric K+ channels, similar to the destabilization of channel function observed at low extracellular K+ concentration. Such drug-dependent stability may result from electrostatic repulsion of K+ from the selectivity filter by a cationic drug molecule bound in the central cavity of the channel. In this study we used the pore domain of the KcsA K+ channel protein to test this hypothesis experimentally with a biochemical assay of tetramer stability and theoretically by computational simulation of local anesthetic docking to the central cavity. We find that two common local anesthetics, lidocaine and tetracaine, promote thermal dissociation of the KcsA tetramer in a K+-dependent fashion. Docking simulations of these drugs with open, open-inactivated and closed crystal structures of KcsA yield many energetically favorable drug-channel complexes characterized by nonbonded attraction to pore-lining residues and electrostatic repulsion of K+. The results suggest that binding of cationic drugs to the inner cavity can reduce tetramer stability of K+ channels. PMID:23545989

  3. Computers in the Human Interaction Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waibel, Alex; Steusloff, Hartwig; Stiefelhagen, Rainer; Watson, Kym

    It is a common experience in our modern world for humans to be overwhelmed by the complexities of technological artifacts around us and by the attention they demand. While technology provides wonderful support and helpful assistance, it also gives rise to an increased preoccupation with technology itself and with a related fragmentation of attention. But, as humans, we would rather attend to a meaningful dialog and interaction with other humans than to control the operations of machines that serve us. The cause for such complexity and distraction, however, is a natural consequence of the flexibility and choices of functions and features that the technology has to offer.

  4. Computers in the Human Interaction Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waibel, A.; Stiefelhagen, R.; Carlson, R.; Casas, J.; Kleindienst, J.; Lamel, L.; Lanz, O.; Mostefa, D.; Omologo, M.; Pianesi, F.; Polymenakos, L.; Potamianos, G.; Soldatos, J.; Sutschet, G.; Terken, J.

    It is a common experience in our modern world, for us humans to be overwhelmed by the complexities of technological artifacts around us, and by the attention they demand. While technology provides wonderful support and helpful assistance, it also causes an increased preoccupation with technology itself and a related fragmentation of attention. But as humans, we would rather attend to a meaningful dialog and interaction with other humans, than to control the operations of machines that serve us. The cause for such complexity and distraction, however, is a natural consequence of the flexibility and choice of functions and features that technology has to offer. Thus flexibility of choice and the availability of desirable functions are in conflict with ease of use and our very ability to enjoy their benefits.

  5. The interactions of astrocytes and fibroblasts with defined pore structures in static and perfusion cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; Donoghue, Peter S.; Higginson, Jennifer R.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Barnett, Susan C.; Riehle, Mathis O.

    2011-01-01

    Open pores to maintain nutrient diffusion and waste removal after cell colonization are crucial for the successful application of constructs based on assembled membranes, in our case tubular scaffolds made of ɛ-polycaprolactone (PCL), for use in tissue engineering. Due to the complex three-dimensional structure and large size of such scaffolds needed for transplantable tissues, it is difficult to investigate the cell–pore interactions in situ. Therefore miniaturized bioreactors inside Petri dishes (30 mm in diameter), containing porous PCL or poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes, were developed to allow the interactions of different cells with defined pores to be investigated in situ during both static and perfusion cultures. Investigation of two different cell types (fibroblasts and cortical astrocytes) and how they interact with a range of pores (100–350 μm in diameter) for up to 50 days indicated that the cells either ‘covered’ or ‘bridged’ the pores. Three distinct behaviors were observed in the way cortical astrocytes interacted with pores, while fibroblasts were able to quickly bridge the pores based on consistent “joint efforts”. Our studies demonstrate that the distinct pore sealing behaviors of both cell types were influenced by pore size, initial cell density and culture period, but not by medium perfusion within the range of shear forces investigated. These findings form important basic data about the usability of pores within scaffolds that could inform the design and fabrication of suitable scaffolds for various applications in tissue engineering. PMID:21163522

  6. The insecticidal spider toxin SFI1 is a knottin peptide that blocks the pore of insect voltage-gated sodium channels via a large β-hairpin loop.

    PubMed

    Bende, Niraj S; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Herzig, Volker; Ramanujam, Venkatraman; Brown, Geoffrey W; Bosmans, Frank; Nicholson, Graham M; King, Glenn F; Mobli, Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    Spider venoms contain a plethora of insecticidal peptides that act on neuronal ion channels and receptors. Because of their high specificity, potency and stability, these peptides have attracted much attention as potential environmentally friendly insecticides. Although many insecticidal spider venom peptides have been isolated, the molecular target, mode of action and structure of only a small minority have been explored. Sf1a, a 46-residue peptide isolated from the venom of the tube-web spider Segesteria florentina, is insecticidal to a wide range of insects, but nontoxic to vertebrates. In order to investigate its structure and mode of action, we developed an efficient bacterial expression system for the production of Sf1a. We determined a high-resolution solution structure of Sf1a using multidimensional 3D/4D NMR spectroscopy. This revealed that Sf1a is a knottin peptide with an unusually large β-hairpin loop that accounts for a third of the peptide length. This loop is delimited by a fourth disulfide bond that is not commonly found in knottin peptides. We showed, through mutagenesis, that this large loop is functionally critical for insecticidal activity. Sf1a was further shown to be a selective inhibitor of insect voltage-gated sodium channels, consistent with its 'depressant' paralytic phenotype in insects. However, in contrast to the majority of spider-derived sodium channel toxins that function as gating modifiers via interaction with one or more of the voltage-sensor domains, Sf1a appears to act as a pore blocker. PMID:25559770

  7. Low Reynolds Number Interactions between Colloidal Particles near the Entrance to a Cylindrical Pore.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran; Venkatesan; Tryggvason; Scott Fogler H

    2000-09-15

    The interaction between stable colloidal particles arriving at a pore entrance was studied using a numerical method for the case where the particle size is smaller than but of the same order as the pore size. The numerical method was adapted from a front-tracking technique developed for studying incompressible, multifluid flow by S. O. Unverdi and G. Tryggvason (J. Comp. Phys. 100, 25, 1992). The method is based on the finite difference solution of Navier-Stokes equation on a stationary, structured, Cartesian grid and the explicit representation of the particle-liquid interface using an unstructured grid that moves through the stationary grid. The simulations are in two dimensions, considering both deformable and nondeformable particles, and include interparticle colloidal interactions. The interparticle and particle-pore hydrodynamic interactions, which are very difficult to determine using existing analytical and semi-numerical, semi-analytical techniques in microhydrodynamics, are naturally accounted for in our numerical method and need not be explicity determined. Two- and three-particle motion toward a pore has been considered in our simulations. The simulations demonstrate how the competition between hydrodynamic forces and colloidal forces acting on particles dictate their flow behavior near the pore entrance. The predicted dependence of the particle flow behavior on the flow velocity and the ratio of pore size to particle size are qualitatively consistent with the experimental observations of V. Ramachandran and H. S. Fogler (J. Fluid Mech. 385, 129, 1999). Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10985810

  8. Coupling root architecture and pore network modeling - an attempt towards better understanding root-soil interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniel; Bodner, Gernot; Raoof, Amir

    2013-04-01

    Understanding root-soil interactions is of high importance for environmental and agricultural management. Root uptake is an essential component in water and solute transport modeling. The amount of groundwater recharge and solute leaching significantly depends on the demand based plant extraction via its root system. Plant uptake however not only responds to the potential demand, but in most situations is limited by supply form the soil. The ability of the plant to access water and solutes in the soil is governed mainly by root distribution. Particularly under conditions of heterogeneous distribution of water and solutes in the soil, it is essential to capture the interaction between soil and roots. Root architecture models allow studying plant uptake from soil by describing growth and branching of root axes in the soil. Currently root architecture models are able to respond dynamically to water and nutrient distribution in the soil by directed growth (tropism), modified branching and enhanced exudation. The porous soil medium as rooting environment in these models is generally described by classical macroscopic water retention and sorption models, average over the pore scale. In our opinion this simplified description of the root growth medium implies several shortcomings for better understanding root-soil interactions: (i) It is well known that roots grow preferentially in preexisting pores, particularly in more rigid/dry soil. Thus the pore network contributes to the architectural form of the root system; (ii) roots themselves can influence the pore network by creating preferential flow paths (biopores) which are an essential element of structural porosity with strong impact on transport processes; (iii) plant uptake depend on both the spatial location of water/solutes in the pore network as well as the spatial distribution of roots. We therefore consider that for advancing our understanding in root-soil interactions, we need not only to extend our root models

  9. Thermal Fluctuation and Elasticity of Lipid Vesicles Interacting with Pore-Forming Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Hwan; Choi, Sung-Min; Doe, Changwoo; Faraone, Antonio; Pincus, Philip A.; Kline, Steven R.

    2010-07-01

    The thermal fluctuation and elasticity of dioleoyl-phosphocholine large unilamellar vesicle interacting with pore-forming peptide, melittin, were investigated by neutron spin-echo measurements. The relaxation behavior of the membrane fluctuation with different peptide to lipid molar ratio P/L can be divided into three regions, resulting from characteristic changes of the effective bending modulus κ˜ of the membrane which includes the effects of internal dissipation within the membrane. At low P/L, melittin is adsorbed parallel to the surface of membrane and κ˜ decreases significantly due to perturbation of hydrocarbon chain packing. At a critical P/L, melittin forms pores in the membrane and κ˜ starts to increase slightly due to high pore rigidity. At higher P/L where the repulsive interpore interaction becomes significant, κ˜ increases rapidly.

  10. Mechanisms of water interaction with pore systems of hydrochar and pyrochar from poplar forestry waste.

    PubMed

    Conte, Pellegrino; Hanke, Ulrich M; Marsala, Valentina; Cimò, Giulia; Alonzo, Giuseppe; Glaser, Bruno

    2014-05-28

    The aim of this study was to understand the water-surface interactions of two chars obtained by gasification (pyrochar) and hydrothermal carbonization (hydrochar) of a poplar biomass. The two samples revealed different chemical compositions as evidenced by solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. In fact, hydrochar resulted in a lignin-like material still containing oxygenated functionalities. Pyrochar was a polyaromatic system in which no heteronuclei were detected. After saturation with water, hydrochar and pyrochar were analyzed by fast field cycling (FFC) NMR relaxometry. Results showed that water movement in hydrochar was mainly confined in very small pores. Conversely, water movement in pyrochar led to the conclusion that a larger number of transitional and very large pores were present. These results were confirmed by porosity evaluation derived from gas adsorption. Variable-temperature FFC NMR experiments confirmed a slow-motion regime due to a preferential diffusion of water on the solid surface. Conversely, the higher number of large pores in pyrochar allowed slow movement only up to 50 °C. As the temperature was raised to 80 °C, water interactions with the pore surface became weaker, thereby allowing a three-dimensional water exchange with the bulk liquid. This paper has shown that pore size distribution was more important than chemical composition in affecting water movement in two chemically different charred systems. PMID:24814907

  11. MRI and PGSE NMR Studies of Long-range, Pore-pore Interaction Effects in Gas Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, Iain; Rigby, Sean; Chudek, John; Holt, Liz; Lowe, John

    2011-03-01

    In this work MRI and PGSE NMR have been used to directly study the advanced condensation effect during water adsorption in a macroscopically heterogeneous sol-gel silica pellet. It has been found that capillary condensation will occur at unexpectedly lower pressures in regions of much larger pores that lie in close proximity to smaller pores.

  12. Inter-Subunit Interactions across the Upper Voltage Sensing-Pore Domain Interface Contribute to the Concerted Pore Opening Transition of Kv Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Irit, Orr; Yifrach, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    The tight electro-mechanical coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of Kv channels lies at the heart of their fundamental roles in electrical signaling. Structural data have identified two voltage sensor pore inter-domain interaction surfaces, thus providing a framework to explain the molecular basis for the tight coupling of these domains. While the contribution of the intra-subunit lower domain interface to the electro-mechanical coupling that underlies channel opening is relatively well understood, the contribution of the inter-subunit upper interface to channel gating is not yet clear. Relying on energy perturbation and thermodynamic coupling analyses of tandem-dimeric Shaker Kv channels, we show that mutation of upper interface residues from both sides of the voltage sensor-pore domain interface stabilizes the closed channel state. These mutations, however, do not affect slow inactivation gating. We, moreover, find that upper interface residues form a network of state-dependent interactions that stabilize the open channel state. Finally, we note that the observed residue interaction network does not change during slow inactivation gating. The upper voltage sensing-pore interaction surface thus only undergoes conformational rearrangements during channel activation gating. We suggest that inter-subunit interactions across the upper domain interface mediate allosteric communication between channel subunits that contributes to the concerted nature of the late pore opening transition of Kv channels. PMID:24340010

  13. Interactions between permeant and blocking anions inside the CFTR chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Binding of cytoplasmic anionic open channel blockers within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is antagonized by extracellular Cl(-). In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the interaction between extracellular Cl(-) (and other anions) and cytoplasmic Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions inside the CFTR channel pore. In constitutively open (E1371Q-CFTR) channels, these different anions bind to two separate sites, located in the outer and inner vestibules of the pore respectively, in a mutually antagonistic fashion. A mutation in the inner vestibule (I344K) that greatly increased Pt(NO2)4(2-) binding affinity also greatly strengthened antagonistic Cl(-):blocker interactions as well as the voltage-dependence of block. Quantitative analysis of ion binding affinity suggested that the I344K mutation strengthened interactions not only with intracellular Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions but also with extracellular Cl(-), and that altered blocker Cl(-)- and voltage-dependence were due to the introduction of a novel type of antagonistic ion:ion interaction inside the pore that was independent of Cl(-) binding in the outer vestibule. It is proposed that this mutation alters the arrangement of anion binding sites inside the pore, allowing both Cl(-) and Pt(NO2)4(2-) to bind concurrently within the inner vestibule in a strongly mutually antagonistic fashion. However, the I344K mutation does not increase single channel conductance following disruption of Cl(-) binding in the outer vestibule in R334Q channels. Implications for the arrangement of ion binding sites in the pore, and their functional consequences for blocker binding and for rapid Cl(-) permeation, are discussed. PMID:25892339

  14. A new subclass of nucleoporins that functionally interact with nuclear pore protein NSP1.

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, C; Doye, V; Grandi, P; Nehrbass, U; Hurt, E C

    1992-01-01

    NSP1 is a nuclear pore protein (nucleoporin) essential for cell growth. To identify the components that functionally interact with NSP1 in the living cell, we developed a genetic screen for mutants that are lethal in a genetic background of mutated, but not wild type NSP1. Fourteen synthetic lethal mutants were obtained, belonging to at least four different complementation groups. The genes of two complementation groups, NSP116 and NSP49, were cloned. Like the previously described nucleoporins, these genes encode proteins with many repeat sequences. NSP116 and NSP49, however, contain a new repetitive sequence motif 'GLFG', which classifies them as a subclass of nucleoporins. NSP116 and NSP49, tagged with the IgG binding domain of protein A and expressed in yeast, are located at the nuclear envelope. These data provide in vivo evidence that distinct subclasses of nucleoporins physically interact or share overlapping function in nuclear pore complexes. Images PMID:1464327

  15. State-dependent blocker interactions with the CFTR chloride channel: implications for gating the pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is subject to voltage-dependent open-channel block by a diverse range of cytoplasmic anions. However, in most cases the ability of these blocking substances to influence the pore opening and closing process has not been reported. In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the state-dependent block of CFTR by cytoplasmic Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions. Two major effects of Pt(NO2)4(2-) were identified. First, this anion caused fast, voltage-dependent block of open channels, leading to an apparent decrease in single-channel current amplitude. Secondly, Pt(NO2)4(2-) also decreased channel open probability due to an increase in interburst closed times. Interestingly, mutations in the pore that weakened (K95Q) or strengthened (I344K, V345K) interactions with Pt(NO2)4(2-) altered blocker effects both on Cl(-) permeation and on channel gating, suggesting that both these effects are a consequence of Pt(NO2)4(2-) interaction with a single site within the pore. Experiments at reduced extracellular Cl(-) concentration hinted that Pt(NO2)4(2-) may have a third effect, possibly increasing channel activity by interfering with channel closure. These results suggest that Pt(NO2)4(2-) can enter from the cytoplasm into the pore inner vestibule of both open and closed CFTR channels, and that Pt(NO2)4(2-) bound in the inner vestibule blocks Cl(-) permeation as well as interfering with channel opening and, perhaps, channel closure. Implications for the location of the channel gate in the pore, and the operation of this gate, are discussed. PMID:24671572

  16. Steady-state interactions of glibenclamide with CFTR: evidence for multiple sites in the pore.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z R; Zeltwanger, S; McCarty, N A

    2004-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which the sulfonylurea drug, glibenclamide, inhibits single CFTR channels in excised patches from Xenopus oocytes. Glibenclamide blocks the open pore of the channel via binding at multiple sites with varying kinetics. In the absence of glibenclamide, open-channel bursts exhibited a flickery intraburst closed state (C1); this is due to block of the pore by the pH buffer, TES. Application of 25 microM glibenclamide to the cytoplasmic solution resulted in the appearance of two drug-induced intraburst closed states (C2, C3) of widely different duration, which differed in pH-dependence. The kinetics of interaction with the C3 state, but not the C2 state, were strongly voltage-dependent. The durations of both the C2 and C3 states were concentration-dependent, indicating a non-linear reaction scheme. Application of drug also increased the burst duration, which is consistent with an open-channel blocking mechanism. A kinetic model is proposed. These results indicate that glibenclamide interacts with open CFTR channels in a complex manner, involving interactions with multiple binding sites in the channel pore. PMID:15366420

  17. Effect of long-range electrostatic interaction on pore clogging in viscous particle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng; Yang, Mengmeng; Li, Shuiqing

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we implement the long-range electrostatic interactions (both Coulomb and dipole interactions) into the discrete-element method simulation of small adhesive particles to investigate their influence on the formation of clogging patterns at single-pore level. The relationship between microscopic interparticle forces and the macroscopic clogging quantities, i.e. the flow permeability and clogging structures, is established. Simulated results indicate that the early-stage capture of charged particles is enhanced by the attraction between these particles and their induced charge on the wall surface. However, further aggregation is suppressed by the repulsive Coulomb interaction between the deposited particles and the suspended ones. Meanwhile, the attraction among polarized particles causes the formation of long particle chains on the surface. These particles chains, bended by flow stress, enhance the bridging phenomenon that leads to a rapid pore clogging. Comparatively, the final clogging structures have lower volume fraction and higher flow permeability in contrast to the neutral case. The results suggest that the controlled charging or polarizing of particles provide a feasible way to tune the formation process and the final state of pore clogging. This work has been funded by the National Key Basic Research and Development Program (2013CB228506).

  18. The looped adhesive strip: An example of coplanar delamination interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottega, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon of peeling and debonding of thin layers is a subject of interest to those concerned with adhesives, thin films, and layered materials. In recent years much attention has been focused on such problems as a result of increased interest and application of advanced composites and thin film coatings. A related problem which is of interest for its own sake but also represents a simple example of a tangled adhesive strip and of coplanar delamination interaction, is the problem of a looped adhesive strip. This is the subject of the present study. Researchers consider here the problem of an elastic strip which possesses an adherend on (at least) one of its surfaces. If the strip is deformed so that two portions of such a surface are brought into contact, a position of the strip becomes bonded and a loop is formed. Researchers are interested in determining the equilibrium configuration of such a strip and investigating the behavior of the strip when its edges are pulled apart. The problem is approached as a moving interior boundary problem in the calculus of variations with the strip modeled as an inextensible elastica and the bond strength characterized by its surface energy. A Griffith type energy criterion is employed for debonding, and solutions corresponding to the problem of interest obtained. The solution obtained will be seen to predict the interesting phenomenon of bond point propagation, as well as the more standard peeling type behavior. Numerical results demonstrating the phenomena of interest are presented as well and will be seen to reveal both stable and unstable propagation of the boundaries of the bonded portion of the strip, depending upon the loading conditions.

  19. Electrostatic interaction effects on tension-induced pore formation in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Levadnyy, Victor; Tsuboi, Taka-aki; Belaya, Marina; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of electrostatic interactions on the rate constant (kp) for tension-induced pore formation in lipid membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles under constant applied tension. A decrease in salt concentration in solution as well as an increase in surface charge density of the membranes increased kp. These data indicate that kp increases as the extent of electrostatic interaction increases. We developed a theory on the effect of the electrostatic interactions on the free energy profile of the membrane containing a prepore and also on the values of kp; this theory explains the experimental results and fits the experimental data reasonably well in the presence of weak electrostatic interactions. Based on these results, we conclude that a decrease in the free energy barrier of the prepore state due to electrostatic interactions is the main factor causing an increase in kp.

  20. Maximization of the rate of chloride conduction in the CFTR channel pore by ion-ion interactions.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiandi; Linsdell, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Multi-ion pore behaviour has been identified in many Cl(-) channel types but its biophysical significance is uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel that disrupt anion-anion interactions within the pore are associated with drastically reduced single channel conductance. These results are consistent with models suggesting that rapid Cl(-) permeation in CFTR results from repulsive ion-ion interactions between Cl(-) ions bound concurrently inside the pore. Naturally occurring mutations that disrupt these interactions can result in cystic fibrosis. PMID:15130785

  1. Super-resolution 3D tomography of interactions and competition in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiong; Goryaynov, Alexander; Yang, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    A selective barrier formed by intrinsically disordered Phe-Gly (FG) nucleoporins (Nups) allows transport receptor (TR)-facilitated translocation of signal-dependent cargos through the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) of eukaryotic cells. However, the configuration of the FG-Nup barrier and its interactions with multiple TRs in native NPCs remain obscure. Here, we mapped the interaction sites of various TRs or FG segments within the FG-Nup barrier by using high-speed super-resolution microscopy and used these sites to reconstruct the three-dimensional tomography of the native barrier in the NPC. We found that each TR possesses a unique interaction zone within the FG-Nup barrier and that two major TRs, importin β1 and Crm1, outcompete other TRs in binding FG Nups. Moreover, TRs may alter the tomography of the FG-Nup barrier and affect one another's pathways under circumstances of heavy competition. PMID:26878241

  2. Neutron reflection study of the interaction of the eukaryotic pore-forming actinoporin equinatoxin II with lipid membranes reveals intermediate states in pore formation.

    PubMed

    Wacklin, Hanna P; Bremec, Biserka Bakrač; Moulin, Martina; Rojko, Nejc; Haertlein, Michael; Forsyth, Trevor; Anderluh, Gregor; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    Equinatoxin II (EqtII), a eukaryotic pore-forming toxin, lyses cell membranes through a mechanism involving the insertion of its N-terminal α-helix into the membrane. EqtII pore formation is dependent on sphingomyelin (SM), although cholesterol (Chol) and membrane microdomains have also been suggested to enhance its activity. We have investigated the mechanism of EqtII binding and insertion by using neutron reflection to determine the structures of EqtII-membrane assemblies in situ. EqtII has several different modes of binding to membranes depending on the lipid composition. In pure dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes, EqtII interacts weakly and reversibly with the lipid head groups in an orientation approximately parallel to the membrane surface. The presence of sphingomyelin (SM) gives rise to a more upright orientation of EqtII, but Chol is required for insertion into the core of the membrane. Cooling the EqtII-lipid assembly below the lipid phase transition temperature leads to deep water penetration and a significant reduction in the extension of the protein outside the membrane, indicating that phase-separation plays a role in EqtII pore-formation. An inactive double-cysteine mutant of EqtII in which the α-helix is covalently tethered to the rest of the protein, interacts only reversibly with all the membranes. Releasing the α-helix in situ by reduction of the disulphide bridge, however, causes the mutant protein to penetrate in DMPC-SM-Chol membranes in a manner identical to that of the wild-type protein. Our results help clarify the early steps in pore formation by EqtII and highlight the valuable information on protein-membrane interactions available from neutron reflection measurements. PMID:26706098

  3. Interaction of KCNE subunits with the KCNQ1 K+ channel pore

    PubMed Central

    Panaghie, Gianina; Tai, Kwok-Keung; Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2006-01-01

    KCNQ1 α subunits form functionally distinct potassium channels by coassembling with KCNE ancillary subunits MinK and MiRP2. MinK-KCNQ1 channels generate the slowly activating, voltage-dependent cardiac IKs current. MiRP2-KCNQ1 channels form a constitutively active current in the colon. The structural basis for these contrasting channel properties, and the mechanisms of α subunit modulation by KCNE subunits, are not fully understood. Here, scanning mutagenesis located a tryptophan-tolerant region at positions 338–340 within the KCNQ1 pore-lining S6 domain, suggesting an exposed region possibly amenable to interaction with transmembrane ancillary subunits. This hypothesis was tested using concomitant mutagenesis in KCNQ1 and in the membrane-localized ‘activation triplet’ regions of MinK and MiRP2 to identify pairs of residues that interact to control KCNQ1 activation. Three pairs of mutations exerted dramatic effects, ablating channel function or either removing or restoring control of KCNQ1 activation. The results place KCNE subunits close to the KCNQ1 pore, indicating interaction of MiRP2-72 with KCNQ1-338; and MinK-59,58 with KCNQ1-339, 340. These data are consistent either with perturbation of the S6 domain by MinK or MiRP2, dissimilar positioning of MinK and MiRP2 within the channel complex, or both. Further, the results suggest specifically that two of the interactions, MiRP2-72/KCNQ1-338 and MinK-58/KCNQ1-340, are required for the contrasting gating effects of MinK and MiRP2. PMID:16308347

  4. NMR Characterization and Membrane Interactions of the Loop Region of Kindlin-3 F1 Subdomain.

    PubMed

    Chua, Geok-Lin; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Kindlins-1,2 and 3 are FERM domain-containing cytosolic proteins involved in the activation and regulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Apart from binding to integrin β cytosolic tails, kindlins and the well characterized integrin-activator talin bind membrane phospholipids. The ubiquitin-like F1 sub-domain of the FERM domain of talin contains a short loop that binds to the lipid membrane. By contrast, the F1 sub-domain of kindlins contains a long loop demonstrated binding to the membrane. Here, we report structural characterization and lipid interactions of the 83-residue F1 loop of kindlin-3 using NMR and optical spectroscopy methods. NMR studies demonstrated that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 is globally unfolded but stretches of residues assuming transient helical conformations could be detected in aqueous solution. We mapped membrane binding interactions of the F1 loop with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) containing either zwitterionic lipids or negatively charged lipids using 15N-1H HSQC titrations. These experiments revealed that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 preferentially interacted with the negatively charged SUVs employing almost all of the residues. By contrast, only fewer residues appeared to be interacted with SUVs containing neutral lipids. Further, CD and NMR data suggested stabilization of helical conformations and predominant resonance perturbations of the F1 loop in detergent containing solutions. Conformations of an isolated N-terminal peptide fragment, or EK21, of the F1 loop, containing a poly-Lys sequence motif, important for membrane interactions, were also investigated in detergent solutions. EK21 adopted a rather extended or β-type conformations in complex with negatively charged SDS micelles. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the conformations and residue-specific interactions of kindlin F1 loop with lipids. These data therefore provide important insights into the interactions of kindlin FERM domain with membrane

  5. NMR Characterization and Membrane Interactions of the Loop Region of Kindlin-3 F1 Subdomain

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Geok-Lin; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Kindlins-1,2 and 3 are FERM domain-containing cytosolic proteins involved in the activation and regulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Apart from binding to integrin β cytosolic tails, kindlins and the well characterized integrin-activator talin bind membrane phospholipids. The ubiquitin-like F1 sub-domain of the FERM domain of talin contains a short loop that binds to the lipid membrane. By contrast, the F1 sub-domain of kindlins contains a long loop demonstrated binding to the membrane. Here, we report structural characterization and lipid interactions of the 83-residue F1 loop of kindlin-3 using NMR and optical spectroscopy methods. NMR studies demonstrated that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 is globally unfolded but stretches of residues assuming transient helical conformations could be detected in aqueous solution. We mapped membrane binding interactions of the F1 loop with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) containing either zwitterionic lipids or negatively charged lipids using 15N-1H HSQC titrations. These experiments revealed that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 preferentially interacted with the negatively charged SUVs employing almost all of the residues. By contrast, only fewer residues appeared to be interacted with SUVs containing neutral lipids. Further, CD and NMR data suggested stabilization of helical conformations and predominant resonance perturbations of the F1 loop in detergent containing solutions. Conformations of an isolated N-terminal peptide fragment, or EK21, of the F1 loop, containing a poly-Lys sequence motif, important for membrane interactions, were also investigated in detergent solutions. EK21 adopted a rather extended or β-type conformations in complex with negatively charged SDS micelles. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the conformations and residue-specific interactions of kindlin F1 loop with lipids. These data therefore provide important insights into the interactions of kindlin FERM domain with membrane

  6. Effect of Interaction between Chromatin Loops on Cell-to-Cell Variability in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tianshou

    2016-01-01

    According to recent experimental evidence, the interaction between chromatin loops, which can be characterized by three factors—connection pattern, distance between regulatory elements, and communication form, play an important role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effect that addresses the question of how changes in these factors affect variability at the expression level in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. Here we make such an effort, based on a mechanic model that maps three fundamental patterns for two interacting DNA loops into a 4–state model of stochastic transcription. We first show that in contrast to side-by-side loops, nested loops enhance mRNA expression and reduce expression noise whereas alternating loops have just opposite effects. Then, we compare effects of facilitated tracking and direct looping on gene expression. We find that the former performs better than the latter in controlling mean expression and in tuning expression noise, but this control or tuning is distance–dependent, remarkable for moderate loop lengths, and there is a limit loop length such that the difference in effect between two communication forms almost disappears. Our analysis and results justify the facilitated chromatin–looping hypothesis. PMID:27153118

  7. Loop interactions during catalysis by dihydrofolate reductase from Moritella profunda.

    PubMed

    Behiry, Enas M; Evans, Rhiannon M; Guo, Jiannan; Loveridge, E Joel; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2014-07-29

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is often used as a model system to study the relation between protein dynamics and catalysis. We have studied a number of variants of the cold-adapted DHFR from Moritella profunda (MpDHFR), in which the catalytically important M20 and FG loops have been altered, and present a comparison with the corresponding variants of the well-studied DHFR from Escherichia coli (EcDHFR). Mutations in the M20 loop do not affect the actual chemical step of transfer of hydride from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate to the substrate 7,8-dihydrofolate in the catalytic cycle in either enzyme; they affect the steady state turnover rate in EcDHFR but not in MpDHFR. Mutations in the FG loop also have different effects on catalysis by the two DHFRs. Despite the two enzymes most likely sharing a common catalytic cycle at pH 7, motions of these loops, known to be important for progression through the catalytic cycle in EcDHFR, appear not to play a significant role in MpDHFR. PMID:25014120

  8. An intermolecular electrostatic interaction controls the prepore-to-pore transition in a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin.

    PubMed

    Wade, Kristin R; Hotze, Eileen M; Kuiper, Michael J; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W; Tweten, Rodney K

    2015-02-17

    β-Barrel pore-forming toxins (βPFTs) form an obligatory oligomeric prepore intermediate before the formation of the β-barrel pore. The molecular components that control the critical prepore-to-pore transition remain unknown for βPFTs. Using the archetype βPFT perfringolysin O, we show that E183 of each monomer within the prepore complex forms an intermolecular electrostatic interaction with K336 of the adjacent monomer on completion of the prepore complex. The signal generated throughout the prepore complex by this interaction irrevocably commits it to the formation of the membrane-inserted giant β-barrel pore. This interaction supplies the free energy to overcome the energy barrier (determined here to be ∼ 19 kcal/mol) to the prepore-to-pore transition by the coordinated disruption of a critical interface within each monomer. These studies provide the first insight to our knowledge into the molecular mechanism that controls the prepore-to-pore transition for a βPFT. PMID:25646411

  9. In the loop: long range chromatin interactions and gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Enhancers, silencer and insulators are DNA elements that play central roles in regulation of the genome that are crucial for development and differentiation. In metazoans, these elements are often separated from target genes by distances that can reach 100 Kb. How regulation can be accomplished over long distances has long been intriguing. Current data indicate that although the mechanisms by which these diverse regulatory elements affect gene transcription may vary, an underlying feature is the establishment of close contacts or chromatin loops. With the generalization of this principle, new questions emerge, such as how the close contacts are formed and stabilized and, importantly, how they contribute to the regulation of transcriptional output at target genes. This review will concentrate on examples where a functional role and a mechanistic understanding has been explored for loops formed between genes and their regulatory elements or among the elements themselves. PMID:21258045

  10. A remarkably stable kissing-loop interaction defines substrate recognition by the Neurospora Varkud Satellite ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Patricia; Legault, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Kissing loops are tertiary structure elements that often play key roles in functional RNAs. In the Neurospora VS ribozyme, a kissing-loop interaction between the stem–loop I (SLI) substrate and stem–loop V (SLV) of the catalytic domain is known to play an important role in substrate recognition. In addition, this I/V kissing-loop interaction is associated with a helix shift in SLI that activates the substrate for catalysis. To better understand the role of this kissing-loop interaction in substrate recognition and activation by the VS ribozyme, we performed a thermodynamic characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry using isolated SLI and SLV stem–loops. We demonstrate that preshifted SLI variants have higher affinity for SLV than shiftable SLI variants, with an energetic cost of 1.8–3 kcal/mol for the helix shift in SLI. The affinity of the preshifted SLI for SLV is remarkably high, the interaction being more stable by 7–8 kcal/mol than predicted for a comparable duplex containing three Watson–Crick base pairs. The structural basis of this remarkable stability is discussed in light of previous NMR studies. Comparative thermodynamic studies reveal that kissing-loop complexes containing 6–7 Watson–Crick base pairs are as stable as predicted from comparable RNA duplexes; however, those with 2–3 Watson–Crick base pairs are more stable than predicted. Interestingly, the stability of SLI/ribozyme complexes is similar to that of SLI/SLV complexes. Thus, the I/V kissing loop interaction represents the predominant energetic contribution to substrate recognition by the trans-cleaving VS ribozyme. PMID:25051972

  11. Sediment-pore water interactions controlling cementation in the NanTroSEIZE drilling transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, W.; Spinelli, G. A.; Torres, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    One goal of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) is to understand how changes in subducting sediment control the transition from aseismic to seismogenic behavior in subduction zones. In the sediment entering the Nankai subduction zone, dramatic changes in physical and chemical properties occur across a diagenetic boundary; they are thought to affect sediment strength and deformation. The dissolution of disseminated volcanic ash and precipitation of silica cement may be responsible for these changes in physical properties, but the mechanism controlling cementation was unclear (Spinelli et al., 2007). In this study, we used CrunchFlow (Steefel, 2009) to simulate chemical reactions and fluid flow through 1-D sediment columns at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sites on the incoming plate in Nankai Trough. The simulations include the thermodynamics and kinetics of sediment-water interactions, advection of pore water and sediment due to compaction, and multi-component diffusion in an accumulating sediment column. Key reactions in the simulations are: ash dissolution, amorphous silica precipitation and dissolution, and zeolite precipitation. The rate of ash decomposition was constrained using Sr isotope data of Joseph et al. (2012). Our model reproduces the distinct diagenetic boundary observed in sediment and pore water chemistry, which defines two zones. Above this boundary (zone 1), dissolved and amorphous silicate contents are high and the potassium concentration remains near seawater values or gradually decreases toward the boundary. Below the boundary, both dissolved and amorphous silicate content drop rapidly, concomitant with a decrease in dissolved potassium. Our model shows that these changes in the system are driven by formation of clinoptilolite in response to changes in pore fluid pH. The low pH values (<7.6) above the diagenetic boundary accelerate ash decomposition and maintain clinoptilolite slightly undersaturated. The

  12. Polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibit Kv1.4 by interacting with positively charged extracellular pore residues.

    PubMed

    Farag, N E; Jeong, D; Claydon, T; Warwicker, J; Boyett, M R

    2016-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) modulate voltage-gated K(+) channel inactivation by an unknown site and mechanism. The effects of ω-6 and ω-3 PUFAs were investigated on the heterologously expressed Kv1.4 channel. PUFAs inhibited wild-type Kv1.4 during repetitive pulsing as a result of slowing of recovery from inactivation. In a mutant Kv1.4 channel lacking N-type inactivation, PUFAs reversibly enhanced C-type inactivation (Kd, 15-43 μM). C-type inactivation was affected by extracellular H(+) and K(+) as well as PUFAs and there was an interaction among the three: the effect of PUFAs was reversed during acidosis and abolished on raising K(+) Replacement of two positively charged residues in the extracellular pore (H508 and K532) abolished the effects of the PUFAs (and extracellular H(+) and K(+)) on C-type inactivation but had no effect on the lipoelectric modulation of voltage sensor activation, suggesting two separable interaction sites/mechanisms of action of PUFAs. Charge calculations suggest that the acidic head group of the PUFAs raises the pKa of H508 and this reduces the K(+) occupancy of the selectivity filter, stabilizing the C-type inactivated state. PMID:27281482

  13. A Theoretical Analysis of the Interaction Between Pores and Inclusions During the Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nick, Arash Safavi; Vynnycky, Michael; Fredriksson, Hasse

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is derived to predict the trajectories of pores and inclusions that are nucleated in the interdendritic region during the continuous casting of steel. Using basic fluid mechanics and heat transfer, scaling analysis, and asymptotic methods, the model accounts for the possible lateral drift of the pores as a result of the dependence of the surface tension on temperature and sulfur concentration. Moreover, the soluto-thermocapillary drift of such pores prior to final solidification, coupled to the fact that any inclusions present can only have a vertical trajectory, can help interpret recent experimental observations of pore-inclusion clusters in solidified steel castings.

  14. Non-BPS interactions from the type II one loop four graviton amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban

    2016-06-01

    We obtain T-duality invariant second order differential equations satisfied by the {D}8{{ R }}4 and {D}10{{ R }}4 interactions from the low energy expansion of the one loop four graviton amplitude in toroidally compactified type II string theory. The eigenvalues of these equations are completely determined by the structure of the one loop integrands. Unlike the BPS interactions, these non-BPS interactions satisfy Poisson equations having source terms that receive contributions from both the bulk and boundary of the worldsheet moduli space. We explicitly solve these equations in nine-dimensions.

  15. Interactions between human defensins and lipid bilayers: evidence for formation of multimeric pores.

    PubMed Central

    Wimley, W. C.; Selsted, M. E.; White, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    Defensins comprise a family of broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides that are stored in the cytoplasmic granules of mammalian neutrophils and Paneth cells of the small intestine. Neutrophil defensins are known to permeabilize cell membranes of susceptible microorganisms, but the mechanism of permeabilization is uncertain. We report here the results of an investigation of the mechanism by which HNP-2, one of 4 human neutrophil defensins, permeabilizes large unilamellar vesicles formed from the anionic lipid palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG). As observed by others, we find that HNP-2 (net charge = +3) cannot bind to vesicles formed from neutral lipids. The binding of HNP-2 to vesicles containing varying amounts of POPG and neutral (zwitterionic) palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) demonstrates that binding is initiated through electrostatic interactions. Because vesicle aggregation and fusion can confound studies of the interaction of HNP-2 with vesicles, those processes were explored systematically by varying the concentrations of vesicles and HNP-2, and the POPG:POPC ratio. Vesicles (300 microM POPG) readily aggregated at HNP-2 concentrations above 1 microM, but no mixing of vesicle contents could be detected for concentrations as high as 2 microM despite the fact that intervesicular lipid mixing could be demonstrated. This indicates that if fusion of vesicles occurs, it is hemi-fusion, in which only the outer monolayers mix at bilayer contact sites. Under conditions of limited aggregation and intervesicular lipid mixing, the fractional leakage of small solutes is a sigmoidal function of peptide concentration. For 300 microM POPG vesicles, 50% of entrapped solute is released by 0.7 microM HNP-2. We introduce a simple method for determining whether leakage from vesicles is graded or all-or-none. We show by means of this fluorescence "requenching" method that native HNP-2 induces vesicle leakage in an all-or-none manner, whereas reduced HNP-2 induces

  16. Loop A is critical for the functional interaction of two Beta vulgaris PIP aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Jozefkowicz, Cintia; Rosi, Pablo; Sigaut, Lorena; Soto, Gabriela; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Amodeo, Gabriela; Alleva, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Research done in the last years strongly support the hypothesis that PIP aquaporin can form heterooligomeric assemblies, specially combining PIP2 monomers with PIP1 monomers. Nevertheless, the structural elements involved in the ruling of homo versus heterooligomeric organization are not completely elucidated. In this work we unveil some features of monomer-monomer interaction in Beta vulgaris PIP aquaporins. Our results show that while BvPIP2;2 is able to interact with BvPIP1;1, BvPIP2;1 shows no functional interaction. The lack of functional interaction between BvPIP2;1 and BvPIP1;1 was further corroborated by dose-response curves of water permeability due to aquaporin activity exposed to different acidic conditions. We also found that BvPIP2;1 is unable to translocate BvPIP1;1-ECFP from an intracellular position to the plasma membrane when co-expressed, as BvPIP2;2 does. Moreover we postulate that the first extracellular loop (loop A) of BvPIP2;1, could be relevant for the functional interaction with BvPIP1;1. Thus, we investigate BvPIP2;1 loop A at an atomic level by Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS) and by direct mutagenesis. We found that, within the tetramer, each loop A presents a dissimilar behavior. Besides, BvPIP2;1 loop A mutants restore functional interaction with BvPIP1;1. This work is a contribution to unravel how PIP2 and PIP1 interact to form functional heterooligomeric assemblies. We postulate that BvPIP2;1 loop A is relevant for the lack of functional interaction with BvPIP1;1 and that the monomer composition of PIP assemblies determines their functional properties. PMID:23483963

  17. Loop A Is Critical for the Functional Interaction of Two Beta vulgaris PIP Aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Jozefkowicz, Cintia; Rosi, Pablo; Sigaut, Lorena; Soto, Gabriela; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Amodeo, Gabriela; Alleva, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Research done in the last years strongly support the hypothesis that PIP aquaporin can form heterooligomeric assemblies, specially combining PIP2 monomers with PIP1 monomers. Nevertheless, the structural elements involved in the ruling of homo versus heterooligomeric organization are not completely elucidated. In this work we unveil some features of monomer-monomer interaction in Beta vulgaris PIP aquaporins. Our results show that while BvPIP2;2 is able to interact with BvPIP1;1, BvPIP2;1 shows no functional interaction. The lack of functional interaction between BvPIP2;1 and BvPIP1;1 was further corroborated by dose-response curves of water permeability due to aquaporin activity exposed to different acidic conditions. We also found that BvPIP2;1 is unable to translocate BvPIP1;1-ECFP from an intracellular position to the plasma membrane when co-expressed, as BvPIP2;2 does. Moreover we postulate that the first extracellular loop (loop A) of BvPIP2;1, could be relevant for the functional interaction with BvPIP1;1. Thus, we investigate BvPIP2;1 loop A at an atomic level by Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS) and by direct mutagenesis. We found that, within the tetramer, each loop A presents a dissimilar behavior. Besides, BvPIP2;1 loop A mutants restore functional interaction with BvPIP1;1. This work is a contribution to unravel how PIP2 and PIP1 interact to form functional heterooligomeric assemblies. We postulate that BvPIP2;1 loop A is relevant for the lack of functional interaction with BvPIP1;1 and that the monomer composition of PIP assemblies determines their functional properties. PMID:23483963

  18. Structural Variation and Uniformity among Tetraloop-Receptor Interactions and Other Loop-Helix Interactions in RNA Crystal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; Chai, Dinggeng; Fraser, Marie E.; Zimmerly, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Tetraloop-receptor interactions are prevalent structural units in RNAs, and include the GAAA/11-nt and GNRA-minor groove interactions. In this study, we have compiled a set of 78 nonredundant loop-helix interactions from X-ray crystal structures, and examined them for the extent of their sequence and structural variation. Of the 78 interactions in the set, only four were classical GAAA/11-nt motifs, while over half (48) were GNRA-minor groove interactions. The GNRA-minor groove interactions were not a homogeneous set, but were divided into five subclasses. The most predominant subclass is characterized by two triple base pair interactions in the minor groove, flanked by two ribose zipper contacts. This geometry may be considered the “standard” GNRA-minor groove interaction, while the other four subclasses are alternative ways to form interfaces between a minor groove and tetraloop. The remaining 26 structures in the set of 78 have loops interacting with mostly idiosyncratic receptors. Among the entire set, a number of sequence-structure correlations can be identified, which may be used as initial hypotheses in predicting three-dimensional structures from primary sequences. Conversely, other sequence patterns are not predictive; for example, GAAA loop sequences and GG/CC receptors bind to each other with three distinct geometries. Finally, we observe an example of structural evolution in group II introns, in which loop-receptor motifs are substituted for each other while maintaining the larger three-dimensional geometry. Overall, the study gives a more complete view of RNA loop-helix interactions that exist in nature. PMID:23152878

  19. The functional interaction between abaecin and pore-forming peptides indicates a general mechanism of antibacterial potentiation.

    PubMed

    Rahnamaeian, Mohammad; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Long-chain proline-rich antimicrobial peptides such as bumblebee abaecin show minimal activity against Gram-negative bacteria despite binding efficiently to specific intracellular targets. We recently reported that bumblebee abaecin interacts with Escherichia coli DnaK but shows negligible antibacterial activity unless it is combined with sublethal doses of the pore-forming peptide hymenoptaecin. These two bumblebee peptides are co-expressed in vivo in response to a bacterial challenge. Here we investigated whether abaecin interacts similarly with pore-forming peptides from other organisms by replacing hymenoptaecin with sublethal concentrations of cecropin A (0.3μM) or stomoxyn (0.05μM). We found that abaecin increased the membrane permeabilization effects of both peptides, confirming that it can reduce the minimal inhibitory concentrations of pore-forming peptides from other species. We also used atomic force microscopy to show that 20μM abaecin combined with sublethal concentrations of cecropin A or stomoxyn causes profound structural changes to the bacterial cell surface. Our data indicate that the potentiating functional interaction between abaecin and pore-forming peptides is not restricted to specific co-expressed peptides from the same species but is likely to be a general mechanism. Combination therapies based on diverse insect-derived peptides could therefore be used to tackle bacteria that are recalcitrant to current antibiotics. PMID:26845197

  20. Dislocation dynamics simulations of interactions between gliding dislocations and radiation induced prismatic loops in zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet, Julie; Dupuy, Laurent; Onimus, Fabien; Mompiou, Frédéric; Perusin, Simon; Ambard, Antoine

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of Pressurized Water Reactor fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys is strongly affected by neutron irradiation due to the high density of radiation induced dislocation loops. In order to investigate the interaction mechanisms between gliding dislocations and loops in zirconium, a new nodal dislocation dynamics code, adapted to Hexagonal Close Packed metals, has been used. Various configurations have been systematically computed considering different glide planes, basal or prismatic, and different characters, edge or screw, for gliding dislocations with -type Burgers vectors. Simulations show various interaction mechanisms such as (i) absorption of a loop on an edge dislocation leading to the formation of a double super-jog, (ii) creation of a helical turn, on a screw dislocation, that acts as a strong pinning point or (iii) sweeping of a loop by a gliding dislocation. It is shown that the clearing of loops is more favorable when the dislocation glides in the basal plane than in the prismatic plane explaining the easy dislocation channeling in the basal plane observed after neutron irradiation by transmission electron microscopy.

  1. Investigation of Interactions at the Extracellular Loops of the Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 (RXFP1)*

    PubMed Central

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A.; Petrie, Emma J.; Chen, Catherine Z.; Wang, Amy; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin, an emerging pharmaceutical treatment for acute heart failure, activates the relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP1), which is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. In addition to the classic transmembrane (TM) domain, RXFP1 possesses a large extracellular domain consisting of 10 leucine-rich repeats and an N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module. Relaxin-mediated activation of RXFP1 requires multiple coordinated interactions between the ligand and various receptor domains including a high affinity interaction involving the leucine-rich repeats and a predicted lower affinity interaction involving the extracellular loops (ELs). The LDLa is essential for signal activation; therefore the ELs/TM may additionally present an interaction site to facilitate this LDLa-mediated signaling. To overcome the many challenges of investigating relaxin and the LDLa module interactions with the ELs, we engineered the EL1 and EL2 loops onto a soluble protein scaffold, mapping specific ligand and loop interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Key EL residues were subsequently mutated in RXFP1, and changes in function and relaxin binding were assessed alongside the RXFP1 agonist ML290 to monitor the functional integrity of the TM domain of these mutant receptors. The outcomes of this work make an important contribution to understanding the mechanism of RXFP1 activation and will aid future development of small molecule RXFP1 agonists/antagonists. PMID:25352603

  2. Investigation of interactions at the extracellular loops of the relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1).

    PubMed

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Petrie, Emma J; Chen, Catherine Z; Wang, Amy; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Bathgate, Ross A D; Gooley, Paul R

    2014-12-12

    Relaxin, an emerging pharmaceutical treatment for acute heart failure, activates the relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP1), which is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. In addition to the classic transmembrane (TM) domain, RXFP1 possesses a large extracellular domain consisting of 10 leucine-rich repeats and an N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module. Relaxin-mediated activation of RXFP1 requires multiple coordinated interactions between the ligand and various receptor domains including a high affinity interaction involving the leucine-rich repeats and a predicted lower affinity interaction involving the extracellular loops (ELs). The LDLa is essential for signal activation; therefore the ELs/TM may additionally present an interaction site to facilitate this LDLa-mediated signaling. To overcome the many challenges of investigating relaxin and the LDLa module interactions with the ELs, we engineered the EL1 and EL2 loops onto a soluble protein scaffold, mapping specific ligand and loop interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Key EL residues were subsequently mutated in RXFP1, and changes in function and relaxin binding were assessed alongside the RXFP1 agonist ML290 to monitor the functional integrity of the TM domain of these mutant receptors. The outcomes of this work make an important contribution to understanding the mechanism of RXFP1 activation and will aid future development of small molecule RXFP1 agonists/antagonists. PMID:25352603

  3. Revised Morning Loops of the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock Based on Analyses of Direct Regulatory Interactions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sally; Manfield, Ian; Stockley, Peter; Carré, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    The network structure of the plant circadian clock is complex and direct regulatory interactions between individual components have proven particularly difficult to predict from genetic analyses. Here, we systematically investigate in vivo binding interactions between the morning-specific transcription factor, LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and the promoters of other components of the network. We then demonstrate the functionality of these interactions by testing the responsiveness of the target gene to an ethanol-induced change in expression level of the LHY protein. We uncover novel, negative autoregulatory feedback loops from LHY and the closely related CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED-1 (CCA1) onto their own and each other's expression. Furthermore we show that LHY acts as a repressor of all other clock components, including PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATORs (PRRs) 9 and 7, which were previously thought to be positive regulatory targets. These experimental results lead to a substantial revision of the morning loops of the clock. PMID:26625126

  4. Revised Morning Loops of the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock Based on Analyses of Direct Regulatory Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sally; Manfield, Ian; Stockley, Peter; Carré, Isabelle A.

    2015-01-01

    The network structure of the plant circadian clock is complex and direct regulatory interactions between individual components have proven particularly difficult to predict from genetic analyses. Here, we systematically investigate in vivo binding interactions between the morning-specific transcription factor, LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and the promoters of other components of the network. We then demonstrate the functionality of these interactions by testing the responsiveness of the target gene to an ethanol-induced change in expression level of the LHY protein. We uncover novel, negative autoregulatory feedback loops from LHY and the closely related CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED-1 (CCA1) onto their own and each other’s expression. Furthermore we show that LHY acts as a repressor of all other clock components, including PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATORs (PRRs) 9 and 7, which were previously thought to be positive regulatory targets. These experimental results lead to a substantial revision of the morning loops of the clock. PMID:26625126

  5. From the pore scale to the core scale: How to model the spatial interactions in soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Patricia; Pot, Valerie; Monga, Oivier; Chenu, Claire; Vieuble-Gonod, Laurent; Vogel, Laure; Nunan, Naoise; Otten, Wilfried; Baveye, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Recently, innovative modeling tools have been developed to describe the physico-chemical processes occurring in soil pores at scales directly relevant to microorganisms. Modelling efforts have attempted to understand how microbial processes such as decomposition or competition among species are affected by diffusion in 2-D or 3-D environments. Most of these models use a virtual representative pore network that can have the same features as soil pores with regular lattice grid. The most recent and innovative of these models use real images of soil structure from binarized 3D images. These models are able to simulate microbial degradation although microorganisms and organic matter are placed at different locations in the pore space. Then, the encounter of nutrients and microorganisms is achieved through the implementation of the diffusion process of the soluble substrates in the connected water-filled space. The high computational demand of this type of approach restricts its applicability to small-scale systems, typically in the order of micrometers or millimeters. The numerical techniques used to solve the equations include the lattice Boltzmann method, algorithmic methods and finite element methods. Most of these models have not yet been tested with experimental data because of the difficulties of investigating such small scales. On the other hand, many experimental results developed at the core scale have showed the importance of soil microbial habitat and especially how physical characteristics (pore sizes, connectivity) control the decomposition of organic substrates via their accessibility by microorganisms. The general question we have now to answer is whether information on the spatial heterogeneity of soils at the microscale can be used to predict the processes observed at the macroscale in soils

  6. A FDR-Preserving Field Theory for Interacting Brownian Particles: One-Loop Theory and MCT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bongsoo; Kawasaki, Kyozi

    2008-02-21

    We develop a field theoretical treatment of a model of interacting Brownian particles. We pay particlular attention to the requirement of the time reversal (TR) invariance and the flucutation-dissipation relationship (FDR). Previous field theoretical formulations were found to be inconsistent with this requirement. The method used in the present formulation is a modified version of the auxilliary field method due originally to Andreanov, Biroli and Lefevre (ABL). We recover the correct diffusion law when the interaction is dropped as well as the standard mode coupling equation in the one-loop order calculation for interacting Brownian particle systems.

  7. Optimizing the inner loop of the gravitational force interaction on modern processors

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Michael S

    2010-12-08

    We have achieved superior performance on multiple generations of the fastest supercomputers in the world with our hashed oct-tree N-body code (HOT), spanning almost two decades and garnering multiple Gordon Bell Prizes for significant achievement in parallel processing. Execution time for our N-body code is largely influenced by the force calculation in the inner loop. Improvements to the inner loop using SSE3 instructions has enabled the calculation of over 200 million gravitational interactions per second per processor on a 2.6 GHz Opteron, for a computational rate of over 7 Gflops in single precision (700/0 of peak). We obtain optimal performance some processors (including the Cell) by decomposing the reciprocal square root function required for a gravitational interaction into a table lookup, Chebychev polynomial interpolation, and Newton-Raphson iteration, using the algorithm of Karp. By unrolling the loop by a factor of six, and using SPU intrinsics to compute on vectors, we obtain performance of over 16 Gflops on a single Cell SPE. Aggregated over the 8 SPEs on a Cell processor, the overall performance is roughly 130 Gflops. In comparison, the ordinary C version of our inner loop only obtains 1.6 Gflops per SPE with the spuxlc compiler.

  8. Alginate based hybrid copolymer hydrogels--influence of pore morphology on cell-material interaction.

    PubMed

    Gnanaprakasam Thankam, Finosh; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2014-11-01

    Alginate based hybrid copolymer hydrogels with unidirectional pore morphology were prepared to achieve synergistic biological performance for cardiac tissue engineering applications. Alginate based hybrid copolymer (ALGP) were prepared using alginate and poly(propylene fumarate) (HT-PPF) units. Different hybrid bimodal hydrogels were prepared by covalent crosslinking using poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate) and vinyl monomer viz acrylic acid, methyl methacrylate, butyl methacrylate and N-N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide and ionic crosslinking with calcium. The morphologically modified hydrogels (MM-hydrogels) with unidirectional elongated pores and high aspect ratio were prepared. MM-hydrogels favour better mechanical properties; it also enhances cell viability and infiltration due to unidirectional pores. However, the crosslinkers influence the fibroblast infiltration of these hydrogels. Synthesis of collagen and fibroblast infiltration was greater for alginate copolymer crosslinked with poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate-acrylic acid (ALGP-PA) even after one month (288%). This hybrid MM-hydrogel promoted cardiomyoblast growth on to their interstices signifying its potent applications in cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:25129740

  9. Enhancer-promoter interactions are encoded by complex genomic signatures on looping chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, Sean; Truty, Rebecca M.; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Discriminating the gene target of a distal regulatory element from other nearby transcribed genes is a challenging problem with the potential to illuminate the causal underpinnings of complex diseases. We present TargetFinder, a computational method that reconstructs regulatory landscapes from genomic features along the genome. The resulting models accurately predict individual enhancer-promoter interactions across diverse cell lines with a false discovery rate up to fifteen times smaller than using the closest gene. By evaluating the genomic features driving this accuracy, we uncover interactions between structural proteins, transcription factors, epigenetic modifications, and transcription that together distinguish interacting from non-interacting enhancer-promoter pairs. Most of this signature is not proximal to the enhancers and promoters, but instead decorates the looping DNA. We conclude that complex but consistent combinations of marks on the one-dimensional genome encode the three-dimensional structure of fine-scale regulatory interactions. PMID:27064255

  10. Enhancer-promoter interactions are encoded by complex genomic signatures on looping chromatin.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Sean; Truty, Rebecca M; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-05-01

    Discriminating the gene target of a distal regulatory element from other nearby transcribed genes is a challenging problem with the potential to illuminate the causal underpinnings of complex diseases. We present TargetFinder, a computational method that reconstructs regulatory landscapes from diverse features along the genome. The resulting models accurately predict individual enhancer-promoter interactions across multiple cell lines with a false discovery rate up to 15 times smaller than that obtained using the closest gene. By evaluating the genomic features driving this accuracy, we uncover interactions between structural proteins, transcription factors, epigenetic modifications, and transcription that together distinguish interacting from non-interacting enhancer-promoter pairs. Most of this signature is not proximal to the enhancers and promoters but instead decorates the looping DNA. We conclude that complex but consistent combinations of marks on the one-dimensional genome encode the three-dimensional structure of fine-scale regulatory interactions. PMID:27064255

  11. Interaction of Ammonia Gas with Sediments and Pore Water and Induced Uranium Immobilization under Vadose Zone Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Szecsody, J. E.; Truex, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Preliminary studies have demonstrated the potential of ammonia gas (NH3) treatment on contaminated sediment as a vadose zone uranium remediation approach. In this work, we conducted batch, column, and flow wedge experiments to study the ammonia gas transport and interaction with sediments and pore water. The uranium immobilization effectiveness of the ammonia gas treatment technology was also evaluated. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and significantly increases the pH (up to ~13.2) and the electrical conductivity (EC). The rate and range of the increase in both pH and EC are dependent on the ammonia concentration in the gas and the pore water content and chemistry. The pH and EC changes follow a similar pattern. During an ammonia gas injection into a heterogeneous system, it was observed that the NH3 front proceeded faster in layers of lower water content compared to the same sediment layers of higher water content. Elevated pH values (11 to 13.2) initially resulted from the NH3 gas partitioning into the pore water was buffered down to ~ 9 after 7 months of sediment exposure to the air. The rate of NH3 diffusion in sediment is a function of the water content in the sediment. Higher cation/anion concentrations during the ammonia gas treatment indicated mineral dissolution due to pH increase, while lower ionic concentrations after the pH buffering revealed significant mineral precipitation. This precipitation incorporates uranium into mineral structures or provides a coating to uranium minerals, therefore achieving uranium immobilization. Treatment with 5% v/v NH3 gas for one week followed by three weeks buffering resulted in a 75% reduction in the mobile uranium mass. After 2 to 12 months of treatment, the immobile phase of uranium mass increased by up to 2.3 times.

  12. Probing the influence of hypermodified residues within the tRNA3(Lys) anticodon stem loop interacting with the A-loop primer sequence from HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Davis, Darrell R; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2016-03-01

    Replication of the HIV-1 virus requires reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome, a process that is specifically initiated by human tRNA3(Lys) packaged within the infectious virion. The primary binding site for the tRNA involves the 3' 18 nucleotides with an additional interaction between an adenine rich loop (A-loop) in the template and the anticodon stem-loop region of the tRNA3(Lys). The loop of the tRNA primer contains two hypermodified base residues and a pseudouridine that are required for a proper binding and activity. Here, we investigate the influence on the structure, dynamics and binding stability of the three modified residues (mnm(5)s(2)U34, t(6)A37 and Ψ39) using extensive molecular dynamics and Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) analysis. Consistent with experiment, the results suggest that the three modified residues are required for faithful binding. Residues mnm(5)s(2)U34 and Ψ39 have a major influence in stabilizing the anticodon loop whereas mnm(5)s(2)U34 and t(6)A37 appear to stabilize the formation of the complex of tRNA3(Lys) with the HIV-1 A-loop. PMID:26655694

  13. Molecular simulation studies of monovalent counterion-mediated interactions in a model RNA kissing loop

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alan A.; Draper, David E.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2011-01-01

    Summary A kissing loop is a highly stable complex formed by loop-loop base pairing between two RNA hairpins. This common structural motif is utilized in a wide variety of RNA mediated processes, including antisense recognition, substrate recognition in riboswitches, and viral replication. Recent work has shown that the Tar-Tar* complex, an archetypal kissing loop, can form without Mg2+, so long as high concentrations of alkali chloride salts are present. Interestingly, the stability of the complex is found to decrease with increasing cation size. In this work, we use molecular simulations to develop a molecular-level understanding of the origins of the observed counterion specificity. The ionic atmosphere of the Tar-Tar* complex was examined in the presence of 800mm NaCl, KCl, or CsCl. We used spatial free energy density profiles to analyze the differences in counterion accumulation at different spatial extents from the RNA molecule. We find that the lowest free energy levels, which are situated in the vicinity of the loop-loop interface can accommodate roughly two counterions, irrespective of counterion type. However, as we move into higher free energy levels, which are farther from the loop-loop interface, we observe increased differences in the numbers of accumulated counterions, with this number being largest for Na+ and smallest for Cs+. We analyzed the source of these differences and were able to attribute these to two distinct features: The extent of partial dehydration varies based on cation type and the smaller the cation, the greater the degree of dehydration. While smaller ions bind their first hydration shell water molecules more tightly than larger ions, they are also able to shed these water molecules for stronger electrostatic interactions with the RNA molecule. Secondly, we observed a distinct asymmetry in the numbers of accumulated cations around each hairpin in the Tar-Tar* complex. We were able to ascribe this asymmetry to the presence of a

  14. 3D Loops Evolutions (Twists And Expansions) And Magnetic Fields Interactions Studied With SOHO/EIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portier-Fozzani, Fabrice

    1999-10-01

    I will present some results from my PHD/Thesis. With SOHO/EIT, 3D Technics such as stereovision and "vision by shape" were developped to study coronal structures evolution. To discribe loops morphology, we adapted with M. Aschwanden a torus fit which include twist evolution. On a quick magnetic flux emergence (August 5th 1997), the twist were decreasing while the loop expand. During a long time evolution (July - August 1996), flaring activities were well correlated with sudden decrease in the twist. These 2 results correspond to the evolution expected with the Parker's formula (1977). Magnetic field lines interactions were also analyzed. From multi-wavelengths observations, we had studied some morphological and topological changes which can be interpreted as interactions between open and closed field lines (ie between Coronal Holes and Active Region Loops). Then, relationship between CME/Flares formation and our different instabilities studied were analyzed in the aim to find, in the futur, good criteria concerning space weather.

  15. Forces of Interaction between Surfaces Bearing Looped Polymer Brushes in Good Solvent.

    SciTech Connect

    Alonzo, Jose; Mays, Jimmy; Kilbey, II, S Michael

    2009-01-01

    In a previous publication we suggested [Huang et al., Macromolecules, 2008, 41, 1745-1752] that looped polymer brushes formed by tethering chains by both ends to a surface may exhibit a polydispersity-like effect due to a distribution of distances between tethering points, leading to segment density profiles dominated by a long and diffuse exponentially-decaying tail. To study this issue in more detail, the force profiles (forces of interaction as a function of separation distance) of a series of looped polymer brushes made by preferential adsorption of poly(2-vinylpyridine)-polystyrene-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PVP-b-PS-b-PVP) triblock copolymers of varying molecular weight and asymmetry ratio are measured using the surface forces apparatus. The force profiles are analyzed using an equivalent diblock model, which considers the triblock copolymer brushes as being comprised of two diblock copolymers of half the PS molecular weight. While scaling the dependencies of the interaction energy and distance on molecular weight, the tethering density and segment size coalesce the measured force profiles to the universal profile, it is necessary to include polydispersity in the description of the equilibrium structure. This is done using the self-consistent field model of Milner et al. [Macromolecules, 1988, 21, 2610-2619]. For looped brushes formed from the symmetric and moderately symmetric triblock copolymers we find that the polydispersity due to molecular weight distribution effectively accounts for the observed force profiles. On the other hand, agreement between the measured and predicted force profiles of looped brushes formed from highly asymmetric copolymers at low degrees-of-compression is achieved only if a much smaller value of the polydispersity index is used in the fitting. The implication of these results is that the shape of the segment density profiles is not due to the previously proposed anchor-induced polydispersity arising due to loop formation; however in

  16. Nonlinear interaction of kinetic Alfvén waves and ion acoustic waves in coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, Nitin; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    Over the years, coronal heating has been the most fascinating question among the scientific community. In the present article, a heating mechanism has been proposed based on the wave-wave interaction. Under this wave-wave interaction, the high frequency kinetic Alfvén wave interacts with the low frequency ion acoustic wave. These waves are three dimensionally propagating and nonlinearly coupled through ponderomotive nonlinearity. A numerical code based on pseudo-spectral technique has been developed for solving these normalized dynamical equations. Localization of kinetic Alfvén wave field has been examined, and magnetic power spectrum has also been analyzed which shows the cascading of energy to higher wavenumbers, and this cascading has been found to have Kolmogorov scaling, i.e., k-5 /3 . A breakpoint appears after Kolmogorov scaling and next to this spectral break; a steeper scaling has been obtained. The presented nonlinear interaction for coronal loops plasmas is suggested to generate turbulent spectrum having Kolmogorov scaling in the inertial range and steepened scaling in the dissipation range. Since Kolmogorov turbulence is considered as the main source for coronal heating; therefore, the suggested mechanism will be a useful tool to understand the mystery of coronal loop heating through Kolmogorov turbulence and dissipation.

  17. Two-dimensional combinatorial screening and the RNA Privileged Space Predictor program efficiently identify aminoglycoside–RNA hairpin loop interactions

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Dustin J.; Seedhouse, Steven J.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    Herein, we report the identification of RNA hairpin loops that bind derivatives of kanamycin A, tobramycin, neamine, and neomycin B via two-dimensional combinatorial screening, a method that screens chemical and RNA spaces simultaneously. An arrayed aminoglycoside library was probed for binding to a 6-nucleotide RNA hairpin loop library (4096 members). Members of the loop library that bound each aminoglycoside were excised from the array, amplified and sequenced. Sequences were analyzed with our newly developed RNA Privileged Space Predictor (RNA-PSP) program, which analyzes selected sequences to identify statistically significant trends. RNA-PSP identified the following unique trends: 5′UNNNC3′ loops for the kanamycin A derivative (where N is any nucleotide); 5′UNNC3′ loops for the tobramycin derivative; 5′UNC3′ loops for the neamine derivative; and 5′UNNG3′ loops for the neomycin B derivative. The affinities and selectivities of a subset of the ligand–hairpin loop interactions were determined. The selected interactions have Kd values ranging from 10 nM to 605 nM. Selectivities ranged from 0.4 to >200-fold. Interestingly, the results from RNA-PSP are able to qualitatively predict specificity based on overlap between the RNA sequences selected for the ligands. These studies expand the information available on small molecule–RNA motif interactions, which could be useful to design ligands targeting RNA. PMID:19726586

  18. ATP-dependent interaction of yeast U5 snRNA loop 1 with the 5' splice site.

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, R K; Lund, M; Okeefe, R T

    2001-01-01

    Pre-messenger RNA splicing is a two-step process by which introns are removed and exons joined together. In yeast, the U5 snRNA loop 1 interacts with the 5' exon before the first step of splicing and with the 5' and 3' exons before the second step. In vitro studies revealed that yeast U5 loop 1 is not required for the first step of splicing but is essential for holding the 5' and 3' exons for ligation during the second step. It is critical, therefore, that loop 1 contacts the 5' exon before the first step of splicing to hold this exon following cleavage from the pre-mRNA. At present it is not known how U5 loop 1 is positioned on the 5' exon prior to the first step of splicing. To address this question, we have used site-specific photoactivated crosslinking in yeast spliceosomes to investigate the interaction of U5 loop 1 with the pre-mRNA prior to the first step of splicing. We have found that the highly conserved uridines in loop 1 make ATP-dependent contacts with an approximately 8-nt region at the 5' splice site that includes the invariant GU. These interactions are dependent on functional U2 and U6 snRNAs. Our results support a model where U5 snRNA loop 1 interacts with the 5' exon in two steps during its targeting to the 5' splice site. PMID:11453062

  19. Micellar lipid composition affects micelle interaction with class B scavenger receptor extracellular loops.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Gontero, Brigitte; Nowicki, Marion; Margier, Marielle; Masset, Gabriel; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) like cluster determinant 36 (CD36) and SR class B type I (SR-BI) play a debated role in lipid transport across the intestinal brush border membrane. We used surface plasmon resonance to analyze real-time interactions between the extracellular protein loops and various ligands ranging from single lipid molecules to mixed micelles. Micelles mimicking physiological structures were necessary for optimal binding to both the extracellular loop of CD36 (lCD36) and the extracellular loop of SR-BI (lSR-BI). Cholesterol, phospholipid, and fatty acid micellar content significantly modulated micelle binding to and dissociation from the transporters. In particular, high phospholipid micellar concentrations inhibited micelle binding to both receptors (-53.8 and -74.4% binding at 0.32 mM compared with 0.04 mM for lCD36 and lSR-BI, respectively, P < 0.05). The presence of fatty acids was crucial for micelle interactions with both proteins (94.4 and 81.3% binding with oleic acid for lCD36 and lSR-BI, respectively, P < 0.05) and fatty acid type substitution within the micelles was the component that most impacted micelle binding to the transporters. These effects were partly due to subsequent modifications in micellar size and surface electric charge, and could be correlated to micellar vitamin D uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our findings show for the first time that micellar lipid composition and micellar properties are key factors governing micelle interactions with SRs. PMID:25833688

  20. Interactions between amiodarone and the hERG potassium channel pore determined with mutagenesis and in silico docking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihong; Colenso, Charlotte K; El Harchi, Aziza; Cheng, Hongwei; Witchel, Harry J; Dempsey, Chris E; Hancox, Jules C

    2016-08-01

    The antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone delays cardiac repolarisation through inhibition of hERG-encoded potassium channels responsible for the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr). This study aimed to elucidate molecular determinants of amiodarone binding to the hERG channel. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made at 37°C of ionic current (IhERG) carried by wild-type (WT) or mutant hERG channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Alanine mutagenesis and ligand docking were used to investigate the roles of pore cavity amino-acid residues in amiodarone binding. Amiodarone inhibited WT outward IhERG tails with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of ∼45nM, whilst inward IhERG tails in a high K(+) external solution ([K(+)]e) of 94mM were blocked with an IC50 of 117.8nM. Amiodarone's inhibitory action was contingent upon channel gating. Alanine-mutagenesis identified multiple residues directly or indirectly involved in amiodarone binding. The IC50 for the S6 aromatic Y652A mutation was increased to ∼20-fold that of WT IhERG, similar to the pore helical mutant S624A (∼22-fold WT control). The IC50 for F656A mutant IhERG was ∼17-fold its corresponding WT control. Computational docking using a MthK-based hERG model differentiated residues likely to interact directly with drug and those whose Ala mutation may affect drug block allosterically. The requirements for amiodarone block of aromatic residues F656 and Y652 within the hERG pore cavity are smaller than for other high affinity IhERG inhibitors, with relative importance to amiodarone binding of the residues investigated being S624A∼Y652A>F656A>V659A>G648A>T623A. PMID:27256139

  1. Impacts of pore to regional scale variations in authigenic composition and texture on anthropogenically influenced fluid-rock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    Diagenetic history plays a dominant role in determining the suitability of subsurface rock units as hosts for fluids that have societal importance. The performance of subsurface aquifers and storage facilities for CO2, natural gas, and liquid waste, is largely tied to the evolution of pore space and distribution and composition of authigenic minerals. While geoscientists may be well aware of the importance and nuances of diagenesis, project managers and decision-makers are unlikely to have a geologic understanding of determining factors such as burial history, fluid flow, and mineral thermodynamics. Thus, if falls to the geoscientists to effectively communicate meaningful conceptual models that adequately capture diagenetic heterogeneity and the potential for temporal changes with anthropogenically-induced changes in subsurface chemistry. This can be particularly difficult in subsurface systems that are sparsely sampled. Here, we look at the example of the basal Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone and overlying Eau Claire Formation in the Illinois Basin, the respective reservoir and seal for the largest ongoing demonstration of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration in the United States. Relatively few cores are available to study the pore-scale composition and structure of these units, and those that are available show a complex and spatially variable diagenetic history. Compilation of past studies and new analyses from the Illinois Basin are combined to illustrate the burial history and fluid flow record that will influence how these units respond to the massive volumes of supercritical CO2 injected into the subsurface. Pore to regional scale differences in authigenic mineral composition and texture result in significantly different predicted fluid-rock interactions and various potential consequences of injection. This project provides examples of both successes and challenges associated with communicating the diagentic complexity to stakeholders and the potential

  2. Multiple Protein Interactions Involving Proposed Extracellular Loop Domains of the Tight Junction Protein Occludin

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, Asma; Brown, G. Thomas; Tom, Jeffrey; Drake, Alex; Bui, Tam T.T.; Quan, Cliff; Mrsny, Randall J.

    2005-01-01

    Occludin is a tetraspan integral membrane protein in epithelial and endothelial tight junction (TJ) structures that is projected to have two extracellular loops. We have used peptides emulating central regions of human occludin's first and second loops, termed O-A:101–121 and O-B:210–228, respectively, to examine potential molecular interactions between these two regions of occludin and other TJ proteins. A superficial biophysical assessment of A:101–121 and O-B:210–228 showed them to have dissimilar solution conformation characteristics. Although O-A:101–121 failed to strongly interact with protein components of the human epithelial intestinal cell line T84, O-B:210–228 selectively associated with occludin, claudin-one and the junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A. Further, the presence of O-B:210–228, but not O-A:101–121, impeded the recovery of functional TJ structures. A scrambled peptide sequences of O-B:210–228 failed to influence TJ assembly. These studies demonstrate distinct properties for these two extracellular segments of the occludin protein and provide an improved understanding of how specific domains of occludin may interact with proteins present at TJ structures. PMID:15659655

  3. Interactions between impermeant blocking ions in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore: evidence for anion-induced conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ning; Linsdell, Paul

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that extracellular Cl(-) ions can weaken the inhibitory effects of intracellular open channel blockers in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel pore. This effect is frequently attributed to repulsive ion-ion interactions inside the pore. However, since Cl(-) ions are permeant in CFTR, it is also possible that extracellular Cl(-) ions are directly competing with intracellular blocking ions for a common binding site; thus, this does not provide direct evidence for multiple, independent anion binding sites in the pore. To test for the possible through-space nature of ion-ion interactions inside the CFTR pore, we investigated the interaction between impermeant anions applied to either end of the pore. We found that inclusion of low concentrations of impermeant Pt(NO(2))(4) (2-) ions in the extracellular solution weaken the blocking effects of three different intracellular blockers [Pt(NO(2))(4) (2-), glibenclamide and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid] without affecting their apparent voltage dependence. However, the effects of extracellular Pt(NO(2))(4) (2-) ions are too strong to be accounted for by simple competitive models of ion binding inside the pore. In addition, extracellular Fe(CN)(6) (3-) ions, which do not appear to enter the pore, also weaken the blocking effects of intracellular Pt(NO(2))(4) (2-) ions. In contrast to previous models that invoked interactions between anions bound concurrently inside the pore, we propose that Pt(NO(2))(4) (2-) and Fe(CN)(6) (3-) binding to an extracellularly accessible site outside of the channel permeation pathway alters the structure of an intracellular anion binding site, leading to weakened binding of intracellular blocking ions. PMID:16794779

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE INTERACTION OF THE EG5 LOOP5 WITH THE NUCLEOTIDE SITE

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam G.; Cooke, Roger; Rice, Sarah; Pate, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Loop 5 (L5) is a conserved loop that projects from the α2-helix adjacent to the nucleotide site of all kinesin-family motors. L5 is critical to the function of the mitotic kinesin-5 family motors and is the binding site for several kinesin-5 inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials. Its conformational dynamics and its role in motor function are not fully understood. Our previous work using EPR spectroscopy suggested that L5 alters the nucleotide pocket conformation of the kinesin-5 motor Eg5 [1]. EPR spectra of a spin-labeled nucleotide analog bound at the nucleotide site of Eg5 display a highly immobilized component that is absent if L5 is shortened or if the inhibitor STLC is added [1], which X-ray structures suggest stabilizes a L5 conformation pointing away from the nucleotide site. These data, coupled with the proximity of L5 to the nucleotide site suggest L5 could interact with a bound nucleotide, modulating function. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Eg5 to explore the interaction of L5 with the nucleotide site in greater detail. We performed MD simulations in which the L5-domain of the Eg5•ADP X-ray structure was manually deformed via backbone bond rotations. The L5-domain of Eg5 was sufficiently lengthy that portions of L5 could be located in proximity to bound ADP. The MD simulations evolved to thermodynamically stable structures at 300K showing that L5 can interact directly with bound nucleotide with significant impingement on the ribose hydroxyls, consistent with the EPR spectroscopy results. Taken together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that L5 modulates Eg5 function via interaction with the nucleotide-binding site. PMID:21872609

  5. Analysis of the interaction of the Eg5 Loop5 with the nucleotide site.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Timothy D; Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam G; Cooke, Roger; Rice, Sarah E; Pate, Edward

    2011-11-21

    Loop 5 (L5) is a conserved loop that projects from the α2-helix adjacent to the nucleotide site of all kinesin-family motors. L5 is critical to the function of the mitotic kinesin-5 family motors and is the binding site for several kinesin-5 inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials. Its conformational dynamics and its role in motor function are not fully understood. Our previous work using EPR spectroscopy suggested that L5 alters the nucleotide pocket conformation of the kinesin-5 motor Eg5 (Larson et al., 2010). EPR spectra of a spin-labeled nucleotide analog bound at the nucleotide site of Eg5 display a highly immobilized component that is absent if L5 is shortened or if the inhibitor STLC is added (Larson et al., 2010), which X-ray structures suggest stabilizes an L5 conformation pointing away from the nucleotide site. These data, coupled with the proximity of L5 to the nucleotide site suggest L5 could interact with a bound nucleotide, modulating function. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Eg5 to explore the interaction of L5 with the nucleotide site in greater detail. We performed MD simulations in which the L5-domain of the Eg5·ADP X-ray structure was manually deformed via backbone bond rotations. The L5-domain of Eg5 was sufficiently lengthy that portions of L5 could be located in proximity to bound ADP. The MD simulations evolved to thermodynamically stable structures at 300 K showing that L5 can interact directly with bound nucleotide with significant impingement on the ribose hydroxyls, consistent with the EPR spectroscopy results. Taken together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that L5 modulates Eg5 function via interaction with the nucleotide-binding site. PMID:21872609

  6. Analysis of the Interaction of the Eg5 Loop5 with the Nucleotide Site

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam G.; Cooke, Roger; Rice, Sarah E.; Pate, Edward F.

    2011-11-21

    Loop 5 (L5) is a conserved loop that projects from the α2-helix adjacent to the nucleotide site of all kinesin-family motors. L5 is critical to the function of the mito tickinesin-5 family motors and is the binding site for several kinesin-5 inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials. Its conformational dynamics and its role in motor function are not fully understood. Our previous work using EPR spectroscopy suggested that L5 alters the nucleotide pocket conformation of the kinesin-5 motor Eg5 (Larsonetal.,2010). EPR spectra of a spin-labeled nucleotide analog bound at the nucleotide site of Eg5 display a highly immobilized component that is absent if L5 is shortened or if the inhibitor STLC is added (Larson etal.,2010), which X-ray structures suggest stabilizes an L5 conformation pointing away from the nucleotide site. These data, coupled with the proximity of L5 to the nucleotide site suggest L5 could interact with a bound nucleotide, modulating function. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Eg5 to explore the interaction of L5 with the nucleotide site in greater detail. We performed MD simulations in which the L5-domain of the Eg5•ADP X-ray structure was manually deformed via backbone bond rotations. The L5-domain of Eg5 was sufficiently lengthy that portions of L5 could belocated in proximity to bound ADP. The MD simulations evolved to thermodynamically stable structures at 300K showing that L5 can interact directly with bound nucleotide with significant impingement on the ribosehydroxyls, consistent with the EPR spectroscopy results. Taken together, these data provide support for the hypothes is that L5 modulates Eg5 function via interaction with the nucleotide-binding site.

  7. Simulation of the interaction between an edge dislocation and a 1 0 0 interstitial dislocation loop in -iron

    SciTech Connect

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Grammatikopoulos, P.; Bacon, D; Osetsky, Yu N

    2008-01-01

    Atomic-level simulations are used to investigate the interaction of an edge dislocation with h100i interstitial dislocation loops in airon at 300 K. Dislocation reactions are studied systematically for different loop positions and Burgers vector orientations, and results are compared for two different interatomic potentials. Reactions are wide-ranging and complex, but can be described in terms of conventional dislocation reactions in which Burgers vector is conserved. The fraction of interstitials left behind after dislocation breakaway varies from 25 to 100%. The nature of the reactions requiring high applied stress for breakaway is identified. The obstacle strengths of h100i loops, 1/2h111i loops and voids containing the same number (169) of point defects are compared. h100i loops with Burgers vector parallel to the dislocation glide plane are slightly stronger than h100i and 1/2h111i loops with inclined Burgers vector: voids are about 30% weaker than the stronger loops. However, small voids are stronger than small 1/2h111i loops. The complexity of some reactions and the variety of obstacle strengths poses a challenge for the development of continuum models of dislocation behaviour in irradiated iron. 2008 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Designed to penetrate: Time-resolved interaction of single antibiotic molecules with bacterial pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Danelon, Christophe; Winterhalter, Mathias; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2002-07-01

    Membrane permeability barriers are among the factors contributing to the intrinsic resistance of bacteria to antibiotics. We have been able to resolve single ampicillin molecules moving through a channel of the general bacterial porin, OmpF (outer membrane protein F), believed to be the principal pathway for the -lactam antibiotics. With ion channel reconstitution and high-resolution conductance recording, we find that ampicillin and several other efficient penicillins and cephalosporins strongly interact with the residues of the constriction zone of the OmpF channel. Therefore, we hypothesize that, in analogy to substrate-specific channels that evolved to bind certain metabolite molecules, antibiotics have "evolved" to be channel-specific. Molecular modeling suggests that the charge distribution of the ampicillin molecule complements the charge distribution at the narrowest part of the bacterial porin. Interaction of these charges creates a region of attraction inside the channel that facilitates drug translocation through the constriction zone and results in higher permeability rates.

  9. Molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction of an edge dislocation with Frank loops in Fe-Ni10-Cr20 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudouin, Jean-Baptiste; Nomoto, Akiyoshi; Perez, Michel; Monnet, Ghiath; Domain, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    The inhibition of dislocations motion by irradiation-induced defects, such as dislocation loops, is one of the main mechanisms of irradiation hardening of austenitic stainless steels. In this work, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of interaction between an edge dislocation and Frank loops in Fe-Ni10-Cr20 ternary alloy mimicking austenitic stainless steels are carried out to investigate and model dislocation behavior. An empirical interatomic potential developed recently for a ternary FeNiCr system is used for the MD calculations. The interactions are calculated at different temperatures, loop orientations, loop size and solute atom configurations. The results show that the loop strength and the interaction processes depend on the solute atom configuration, the geometrical configurations between the dislocation and the loop and temperature. It is also demonstrated that a small Frank loop is not so weak an obstacle in the alloy. The interaction leads microstructural change such as loop shearing, loop unfaulting and loop absorption in the dislocation. In the former two cases, the loop remains after the interaction, however in some cases an absorption of the remaining loop by subsequent interactions with successive dislocations is observed.

  10. Pore Characterization of Shale Rock and Shale Interaction with Fluids at Reservoir Pressure-Temperature Conditions Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Watkins, E.; Xu, H.; Pawar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Oil/gas produced from unconventional reservoirs has become strategically important for the US domestic energy independence. In unconventional realm, hydrocarbons are generated and stored in nanopores media ranging from a few to hundreds of nanometers. Fundamental knowledge of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes that control fluid flow and propagation within nano-pore confinement is critical for maximizing unconventional oil/gas production. The size and confinement of the nanometer pores creates many complex rock-fluid interface interactions. It is imperative to promote innovative experimental studies to decipher physical and chemical processes at the nanopore scale that govern hydrocarbon generation and mass transport of hydrocarbon mixtures in tight shale and other low permeability formations at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions. We have carried out laboratory investigations exploring quantitative relationship between pore characteristics of the Wolfcamp shale from Western Texas and the shale interaction with fluids at reservoir P-T conditions using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We have performed SANS measurements of the shale rock in single fluid (e.g., H2O and D2O) and multifluid (CH4/(30% H2O+70% D2O)) systems at various pressures up to 20000 psi and temperature up to 150 oF. Figure 1 shows our SANS data at different pressures with H2O as the pressure medium. Our data analysis using IRENA software suggests that the principal changes of pore volume in the shale occurred on smaller than 50 nm pores and pressure at 5000 psi (Figure 2). Our results also suggest that with increasing P, more water flows into pores; with decreasing P, water is retained in the pores.

  11. Central loop of non-conventional toxin WTX from Naja kaouthia is important for interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Kasheverov, Igor E; Chugunov, Anton O; Kulbatskii, Dmitrii S; Myshkin, Mikhail Yu; Utkin, Yuri N; Efremov, Roman G; Tsetlin, Victor I; Arseniev, Alexander S; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Dolgikh, Dmitry A

    2016-09-01

    'Three-finger' toxin WTX from Naja kaouthia interacts with nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and mAChRs). Mutagenesis and competition experiments with (125)I-α-bungarotoxin revealed that Arg31 and Arg32 residues from the WTX loop II are important for binding to Torpedo californica and human α7 nAChRs. Computer modeling suggested that loop II occupies the orthosteric binding site at α7 nAChR. The similar toxin interface was previously described as a major determinant of allosteric interactions with mAChRs. PMID:27343701

  12. Ranolazine inhibition of hERG potassium channels: Drug–pore interactions and reduced potency against inactivation mutants

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunyun; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Hancox, Jules C.

    2014-01-01

    The antianginal drug ranolazine, which combines inhibitory actions on rapid and sustained sodium currents with inhibition of the hERG/IKr potassium channel, shows promise as an antiarrhythmic agent. This study investigated the structural basis of hERG block by ranolazine, with lidocaine used as a low potency, structurally similar comparator. Recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from cell lines expressing wild-type (WT) or mutant hERG channels. Docking simulations were performed using homology models built on MthK and KvAP templates. In conventional voltage clamp, ranolazine inhibited IhERG with an IC50 of 8.03 μM; peak IhERG during ventricular action potential clamp was inhibited ~ 62% at 10 μM. The IC50 values for ranolazine inhibition of the S620T inactivation deficient and N588K attenuated inactivation mutants were respectively ~ 73-fold and ~ 15-fold that for WT IhERG. Mutations near the bottom of the selectivity filter (V625A, S624A, T623A) exhibited IC50s between ~ 8 and 19-fold that for WT IhERG, whilst the Y652A and F656A S6 mutations had IC50s ~ 22-fold and 53-fold WT controls. Low potency lidocaine was comparatively insensitive to both pore helix and S6 mutations, but was sensitive to direction of K+ flux and particularly to loss of inactivation, with an IC50 for S620T-hERG ~ 49-fold that for WT IhERG. Docking simulations indicated that the larger size of ranolazine gives it potential for a greater range of interactions with hERG pore side chains compared to lidocaine, in particular enabling interaction of its two aromatic groups with side chains of both Y652 and F656. The N588K mutation is responsible for the SQT1 variant of short QT syndrome and our data suggest that ranolazine is unlikely to be effective against IKr/hERG in SQT1 patients. PMID:24877995

  13. Invariant TAD Boundaries Constrain Cell-Type-Specific Looping Interactions between Promoters and Distal Elements around the CFTR Locus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily M.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Jain, Gaurav; Dekker, Job

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional genome structure plays an important role in gene regulation. Globally, chromosomes are organized into active and inactive compartments while, at the gene level, looping interactions connect promoters to regulatory elements. Topologically associating domains (TADs), typically several hundred kilobases in size, form an intermediate level of organization. Major questions include how TADs are formed and how they are related to looping interactions between genes and regulatory elements. Here we performed a focused 5C analysis of a 2.8 Mb chromosome 7 region surrounding CFTR in a panel of cell types. We find that the same TAD boundaries are present in all cell types, indicating that TADs represent a universal chromosome architecture. Furthermore, we find that these TAD boundaries are present irrespective of the expression and looping of genes located between them. In contrast, looping interactions between promoters and regulatory elements are cell-type specific and occur mostly within TADs. This is exemplified by the CFTR promoter that in different cell types interacts with distinct sets of distal cell-type-specific regulatory elements that are all located within the same TAD. Finally, we find that long-range associations between loci located in different TADs are also detected, but these display much lower interaction frequencies than looping interactions within TADs. Interestingly, interactions between TADs are also highly cell-type-specific and often involve loci clustered around TAD boundaries. These data point to key roles of invariant TAD boundaries in constraining as well as mediating cell-type-specific long-range interactions and gene regulation. PMID:26748519

  14. Insight into a molecular interaction force supporting peptide backbones and its implication to protein loops and folding.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Shi; Chen, Dong; Xie, Neng-Zhong; Huang, Ri-Bo; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Although not being classified as the most fundamental protein structural elements like α-helices and β-strands, the loop segment may play considerable roles for protein stability, flexibility, and dynamic activity. Meanwhile, the protein loop is also quite elusive; i.e. its interactions with the other parts of protein as well as its own shape-maintaining forces have still remained as a puzzle or at least not quite clear yet. Here, we report a molecular force, the so-called polar hydrogen-π interaction (Hp-π), which may play an important role in supporting the backbones of protein loops. By conducting the potential energy surface scanning calculations on the quasi π-plane of peptide bond unit, we have observed the following intriguing phenomena: (1) when the polar hydrogen atom of a peptide unit is perpendicularly pointing to the π-plane of other peptide bond units, a remarkable Hp-π interaction occurs; (2) the interaction is distance and orientation dependent, acting in a broad space, and belonging to the 'point-to-plane' one. The molecular force reported here may provide useful interaction concepts and insights into better understanding the loop's unique stability and flexibility feature, as well as the driving force of the protein global folding. PMID:25375237

  15. Protein-lipid interactions and non-lamellar lipidic structures in membrane pore formation and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C

    2016-03-01

    Pore-forming proteins and peptides act on their targeted lipid bilayer membranes to increase permeability. This approach to the modulation of biological function is relevant to a great number of living processes, including; infection, parasitism, immunity, apoptosis, development and neurodegeneration. While some pore-forming proteins/peptides assemble into rings of subunits to generate discrete, well-defined pore-forming structures, an increasing number is recognised to form pores via mechanisms which co-opt membrane lipids themselves. Among these, membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) family proteins, Bax/colicin family proteins and actinoporins are especially prominent and among the mechanisms believed to apply are the formation of non-lamellar (semi-toroidal or toroidal) lipidic structures. In this review I focus on the ways in which lipids contribute to pore formation and contrast this with the ways in which lipids are co-opted also in membrane fusion and fission events. A variety of mechanisms for pore formation that involve lipids exists, but they consistently result in stable hybrid proteolipidic structures. These structures are stabilised by mechanisms in which pore-forming proteins modify the innate capacity of lipid membranes to respond to their environment, changing shape and/or phase and binding individual lipid molecules directly. In contrast, and despite the diversity in fusion protein types, mechanisms for membrane fusion are rather similar to each other, mapping out a pathway from pairs of separated compartments to fully confluent fused membranes. Fusion proteins generate metastable structures along the way which, like long-lived proteolipidic pore-forming complexes, rely on the basic physical properties of lipid bilayers. Membrane fission involves similar intermediates, in the reverse order. I conclude by considering the possibility that at least some pore-forming and fusion proteins are evolutionarily related

  16. Analog Study of Interacting and Noninteracting Multiple-loop Control Systems for Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, George J; Phillips, W E , Jr

    1955-01-01

    The results of an analog investigation of several turbojet-engine control configurations is presented in this report. Both proportional and proportional-plus-integral controllers were studied, and compensating terms for engine interaction were added to the control system. Data were obtained on the stability limits and the transient responses of these various configurations. Analytical expressions in terms of the component transfer functions were developed for the configurations studied, and the optimum form for the compensation terms was determined. It was found that the addition of the integral term, while making the system slower and more oscillatory, was desirable in that it made the final values of the system parameters independent of source of disturbance and also eliminated droop in these parameters. Definite improvement in system characteristics resulted from the use of proper compensation terms. At comparable gain points the compensated system was faster and more stable. Complete compensation eliminated engine interaction, permitting each loop to be developed to an optimum point independently.

  17. A Mutation in S6 of Shaker Potassium Channels Decreases the K+ Affinity of an Ion Binding Site Revealing Ion–Ion Interactions in the Pore

    PubMed Central

    Ogielska, Eva M.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, potassium channels are extraordinarily selective for potassium over other ions. However, in the absence of potassium, certain potassium channels can conduct sodium. Sodium flux is blocked by the addition of low concentrations of potassium. Potassium affinity, and therefore the ability to block sodium current, varies among potassium channel subtypes (Korn, S.J., and S.R. Ikeda. 1995. Science. 269:410–412; Starkus, J.G., L. Kuschel, M.D. Rayner, and S.H. Heinemann. 1997. J. Gen. Physiol. 110:539–550). The Shaker potassium channel conducts sodium poorly in the presence of very low (micromolar) potassium due to its high potassium affinity (Starkus, J.G., L. Kuschel, M.D. Rayner, and S.H. Heinemann. 1997. J. Gen. Physiol. 110:539–550; Ogielska, E.M., and R.W. Aldrich. 1997. Biophys. J. 72:A233 [Abstr.]). We show that changing a single residue in S6, A463C, decreases the apparent internal potassium affinity of the Shaker channel pore from the micromolar to the millimolar range, as determined from the ability of potassium to block the sodium currents. Independent evidence that A463C decreases the apparent affinity of a binding site in the pore comes from a study of barium block of potassium currents. The A463C mutation decreases the internal barium affinity of the channel, as expected if barium blocks current by binding to a potassium site in the pore. The decrease in the apparent potassium affinity in A463C channels allows further study of possible ion interactions in the pore. Our results indicate that sodium and potassium can occupy the pore simultaneously and that multiple occupancy results in interactions between ions in the channel pore. PMID:9689030

  18. Nonlinear interactions in the thalamocortical loop in essential tremor: A model-based frequency domain analysis.

    PubMed

    He, F; Sarrigiannis, P G; Billings, S A; Wei, H; Rowe, J; Romanowski, C; Hoggard, N; Hadjivassilliou, M; Rao, D G; Grünewald, R; Khan, A; Yianni, J

    2016-06-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that essential tremor has a central origin. Different structures appear to be part of the central tremorogenic network, including the motor cortex, the thalamus and the cerebellum. Some studies using electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) show linear association in the tremor frequency between the motor cortex and the contralateral tremor electromyography (EMG). Additionally, high thalamomuscular coherence is found with the use of thalamic local field potential (LFP) recordings and tremulous EMG in patients undergoing surgery for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Despite a well-established reciprocal anatomical connection between the thalamus and cortex, the functional association between the two structures during "tremor-on" periods remains elusive. Thalamic (Vim) LFPs, ipsilateral scalp EEG from the sensorimotor cortex and contralateral tremor arm EMG recordings were obtained from two patients with essential tremor who had undergone successful surgery for DBS. Coherence analysis shows a strong linear association between thalamic LFPs and contralateral tremor EMG, but the relationship between the EEG and the thalamus is much less clear. These measurements were then analyzed by constructing a novel parametric nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous input (NARX) model. This new approach uncovered two distinct and not overlapping frequency "channels" of communication between Vim thalamus and the ipsilateral motor cortex, defining robustly "tremor-on" versus "tremor-off" states. The associated estimated nonlinear time lags also showed non-overlapping values between the two states, with longer corticothalamic lags (exceeding 50ms) in the tremor active state, suggesting involvement of an indirect multisynaptic loop. The results reveal the importance of the nonlinear interactions between cortical and subcortical areas in the central motor network of essential tremor. This work is important because it demonstrates

  19. Aromatic–aromatic interactions between residues in KCa3.1 pore helix and S5 transmembrane segment control the channel gating process

    PubMed Central

    Garneau, Line; Klein, Hélène; Lavoie, Marie-France; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Parent, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    The Ca2+-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 is emerging as a therapeutic target for a large variety of health disorders. One distinguishing feature of KCa3.1 is that the channel open probability at saturating Ca2+ concentrations (Pomax) is low, typically 0.1–0.2 for KCa3.1 wild type. This observation argues for the binding of Ca2+ to the calmodulin (CaM)–KCa3.1 complex, promoting the formation of a preopen closed-state configuration leading to channel opening. We have previously shown that the KCa3.1 active gate is most likely located at the level of the selectivity filter. As Ca2+-dependent gating of KCa3.1 originates from the binding of Ca2+ to CaM in the C terminus, the hypothesis of a gate located at the level of the selectivity filter requires that the conformational change initiated in the C terminus be transmitted to the S5 and S6 transmembrane helices, with a resulting effect on the channel pore helix directly connected to the selectivity filter. A study was thus undertaken to determine to what extent the interactions between the channel pore helix with the S5 and S6 transmembrane segments contribute to KCa3.1 gating. Molecular dynamics simulations first revealed that the largest contact area between the pore helix and the S5 plus S6 transmembrane helices involves residue F248 at the C-terminal end of the pore helix. Unitary current recordings next confirmed that modulating aromatic–aromatic interactions between F248 and W216 of the S5 transmembrane helical segment and/or perturbing the interactions between F248 and residues in S6 surrounding the glycine hinge G274 cause important changes in Pomax. This work thus provides the first evidence for a key contribution of the pore helix in setting Pomax by stabilizing the channel closed configuration through aromatic–aromatic interactions involving F248 of the pore helix. We propose that the interface pore helix/S5 constitutes a promising site for designing KCa3.1 potentiators. PMID:24470490

  20. Complex interactions among residues within pore region determine the K+ dependence of a KAT1-type potassium channel AmKAT1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangzhe; Sentenac, Hervé; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Su, Yanhua

    2015-08-01

    KAT1-type channels mediate K(+) influx into guard cells that enables stomatal opening. In this study, a KAT1-type channel AmKAT1 was cloned from the xerophyte Ammopiptanthus mongolicus. In contrast to most KAT1-type channels, its activation is strongly dependent on external K(+) concentration, so it can be used as a model to explore the mechanism for the K(+) -dependent gating of KAT1-type channels. Domain swapping between AmKAT1 and KAT1 reveals that the S5-pore-S6 region controls the K(+) dependence of AmKAT1, and residue substitutions show that multiple residues within the S5-Pore linker and Pore are involved in its K(+) -dependent gating. Importantly, complex interactions occur among these residues, and it is these interactions that determine its K(+) dependence. Finally, we analyzed the potential mechanism for the K(+) dependence of AmKAT1, which could originate from the requirement of K(+) occupancy in the selectivity filter to maintain its conductive conformation. These results provide new insights into the molecular basis of the K(+) -dependent gating of KAT1-type channels. PMID:26032087

  1. Biodegradation of subsurface oil in a tidally influenced sand beach: Impact of hydraulics and interaction with pore water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Lee, Kenneth; Abrams, Stewart; Suidan, Makram

    2015-05-01

    The aerobic biodegradation of oil in tidally influenced beaches was investigated numerically in this work using realistic beach and tide conditions. A numerical model BIOMARUN, coupling a multiple-Monod kinetic model BIOB to a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model 2-D MARUN, was used to simulate the biodegradation of low-solubility hydrocarbon and transport processes of associated solute species (i.e., oxygen and nitrogen) in a tidally influenced beach environment. It was found that different limiting factors affect different portions of the beach. In the upper intertidal zone, where the inland incoming nutrient concentration was large (1.2 mg N/L), oil biodegradation occurred deeper in the beach (i.e., 0.3 m below the surface). In the midintertidal zone, a reversal was noted where the biodegradation was fast at shallow locations (i.e., 0.1 m below the surface), and it was due to the decrease of oxygen with depth due to consumption, which made oxygen the limiting factor for biodegradation. Oxygen concentration in the midintertidal zone exhibited two peaks as a function of time. One peak was associated with the high tide, when dissolved oxygen laden seawater filled the beach and a second oxygen peak was observed during low tides, and it was due to pore oxygen replenishment from the atmosphere. The effect of the capillary fringe (CF) height was investigated, and it was found that there is an optimal CF for the maximum biodegradation of oil in the beach. Too large a CF (i.e., very fine material) would attenuate oxygen replenishment (either from seawater or the atmosphere), while too small a CF (i.e., very coarse material) would reduce the interaction between microorganisms and oil in the upper intertidal zone due to rapid reduction in the soil moisture at low tide. This article was corrected on 22 JUN 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  2. Interaction between permeation and gating in a putative pore domain mutant in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z R; McDonough, S I; McCarty, N A

    2000-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel with distinctive kinetics. At the whole-cell level, CFTR currents in response to voltage steps are time independent for wild type and for the many mutants reported so far. Single channels open for periods lasting up to tens of seconds; the openings are interrupted by brief closures at hyperpolarized, but not depolarized, potentials. Here we report a serine-to-phenylalanine mutation (S1118F) in the 11th transmembrane domain that confers voltage-dependent, single-exponential current relaxations and moderate inward rectification of the macroscopic currents upon expression in Xenopus oocytes. At steady state, the S1118F-CFTR single-channel conductance rectifies, corresponding to the whole-cell rectification. In addition, the open-channel burst duration is decreased 10-fold compared with wild-type channels. S1118F-CFTR currents are blocked in a voltage-dependent manner by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC); the affinity of S1118F-CFTR for DPC is similar to that of the wild-type channel, but blockade exhibits moderately reduced voltage dependence. Selectivity of the channel to a range of anions is also affected by this mutation. Furthermore, the permeation properties change during the relaxations, which suggests that there is an interaction between gating and permeation in this mutant. The existence of a mutation that confers voltage dependence upon CFTR currents and that changes kinetics and permeation properties of the channel suggests a functional role for the 11th transmembrane domain in the pore in the wild-type channel. PMID:10866956

  3. Interaction between permeation and gating in a putative pore domain mutant in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z R; McDonough, S I; McCarty, N A

    2000-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel with distinctive kinetics. At the whole-cell level, CFTR currents in response to voltage steps are time independent for wild type and for the many mutants reported so far. Single channels open for periods lasting up to tens of seconds; the openings are interrupted by brief closures at hyperpolarized, but not depolarized, potentials. Here we report a serine-to-phenylalanine mutation (S1118F) in the 11th transmembrane domain that confers voltage-dependent, single-exponential current relaxations and moderate inward rectification of the macroscopic currents upon expression in Xenopus oocytes. At steady state, the S1118F-CFTR single-channel conductance rectifies, corresponding to the whole-cell rectification. In addition, the open-channel burst duration is decreased 10-fold compared with wild-type channels. S1118F-CFTR currents are blocked in a voltage-dependent manner by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC); the affinity of S1118F-CFTR for DPC is similar to that of the wild-type channel, but blockade exhibits moderately reduced voltage dependence. Selectivity of the channel to a range of anions is also affected by this mutation. Furthermore, the permeation properties change during the relaxations, which suggests that there is an interaction between gating and permeation in this mutant. The existence of a mutation that confers voltage dependence upon CFTR currents and that changes kinetics and permeation properties of the channel suggests a functional role for the 11th transmembrane domain in the pore in the wild-type channel. PMID:10866956

  4. Insight into a molecular interaction force supporting peptide backbones and its implication to protein loops and folding

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qi-Shi; Chen, Dong; Xie, Neng-Zhong; Huang, Ri-Bo; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Although not being classified as the most fundamental protein structural elements like α-helices and β-strands, the loop segment may play considerable roles for protein stability, flexibility, and dynamic activity. Meanwhile, the protein loop is also quite elusive; i.e. its interactions with the other parts of protein as well as its own shape-maintaining forces have still remained as a puzzle or at least not quite clear yet. Here, we report a molecular force, the so-called polar hydrogen–π interaction (Hp–π), which may play an important role in supporting the backbones of protein loops. By conducting the potential energy surface scanning calculations on the quasi π-plane of peptide bond unit, we have observed the following intriguing phenomena: (1) when the polar hydrogen atom of a peptide unit is perpendicularly pointing to the π-plane of other peptide bond units, a remarkable Hp–π interaction occurs; (2) the interaction is distance and orientation dependent, acting in a broad space, and belonging to the ‘point-to-plane’ one. The molecular force reported here may provide useful interaction concepts and insights into better understanding the loop’s unique stability and flexibility feature, as well as the driving force of the protein global folding. PMID:25375237

  5. Interaction between beam control and rf feedback loops for high Q cavities an heavy beam loading. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, L.K.; Kwan, C.M.; Yeung, K.S.

    1994-04-01

    An open-loop state space model of all the major low-level rf feedback control loops is derived. The model has control and state variables for fast-cycling machines to apply modern multivariable feedback techniques. A condition is derived to know when exactly we can cross the boundaries between time-varying and time-invariant approaches for a fast-cycling machine like the Low Energy Booster (LEB). The conditions are dependent on the Q of the cavity and the rate at which the frequency changes with time. Apart from capturing the time-variant characteristics, the errors in the magnetic field are accounted in the model to study the effects on synchronization with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB). The control model is useful to study the effects on beam control due to heavy beam loading at high intensities, voltage transients just after injection especially due to time-varying voltages, instability thresholds created by the cavity tuning feedback system, cross coupling between feedback loops with and without direct rf feedback etc. As a special case we have shown that the model agrees with the well known Pedersen model derived for the CERN PS booster. As an application of the model we undertook a detailed study of the cross coupling between the loops by considering all of them at once for varying time, Q and beam intensities. A discussion of the method to identify the coupling is shown. At the end a summary of the identified loop interactions is presented.

  6. Evaluation of reaction mechanism of coal-metal oxide interactions in chemical-looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Poston, James; Tian, Hanjing; Miller, Duane; Simonyi, Thomas

    2010-11-15

    The knowledge of reaction mechanism is very important in designing reactors for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of coal. Recent CLC studies have considered the more technically difficult problem of reactions between abundant solid fuels (i.e. coal and waste streams) and solid metal oxides. A definitive reaction mechanism has not been reported for CLC reaction of solid fuels. It has often been assumed that the solid/solid reaction is slow and therefore requires that reactions be conducted at temperatures high enough to gasify the solid fuel, or decompose the metal oxide. In contrast, data presented in this paper demonstrates that solid/solid reactions can be completed at much lower temperatures, with rates that are technically useful as long as adequate fuel/metal oxide contact is achieved. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations as well as experimental techniques such as thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), flow reactor studies, in situ X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to evaluate how the proximal interaction between solid phases proceeds. The data indicate that carbon induces the Cu-O bond breaking process to initiate the combustion of carbon at temperatures significantly lower than the spontaneous decomposition temperature of CuO, and the type of reducing medium in the vicinity of the metal oxide influences the temperature at which the oxygen release from the metal oxide takes place. Surface melting of Cu and wetting of carbon may contribute to the solid-solid contacts necessary for the reaction. (author)

  7. Closed-loop bird-computer interactions: a new method to study the role of bird calls.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Alexandre; Roy, Pierre; Pachet, François; Nagle, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    In the field of songbird research, many studies have shown the role of male songs in territorial defense and courtship. Calling, another important acoustic communication signal, has received much less attention, however, because calls are assumed to contain less information about the emitter than songs do. Birdcall repertoire is diverse, and the role of calls has been found to be significant in the area of social interaction, for example, in pair, family, and group cohesion. However, standard methods for studying calls do not allow precise and systematic study of their role in communication. We propose herein a new method to study bird vocal interaction. A closed-loop computer system interacts with canaries, Serinus canaria, by (1) automatically classifying two basic types of canary vocalization, single versus repeated calls, as they are produced by the subject, and (2) responding with a preprogrammed call type recorded from another bird. This computerized animal-machine interaction requires no human interference. We show first that the birds do engage in sustained interactions with the system, by studying the rate of single and repeated calls for various programmed protocols. We then show that female canaries differentially use single and repeated calls. First, they produce significantly more single than repeated calls, and second, the rate of single calls is associated with the context in which they interact, whereas repeated calls are context independent. This experiment is the first illustration of how closed-loop bird-computer interaction can be used productively to study social relationships. PMID:21052754

  8. Hsc70-interacting HPD loop of the J domain of polyomavirus T antigens fluctuates in ps to ns and micros to ms.

    PubMed

    Berjanskii, Mark; Riley, Michael; Van Doren, Steven R

    2002-08-16

    The backbone dynamics of the J domain from polyomavirus T antigens have been investigated using 15N NMR relaxation and molecular dynamics simulation. Model-free relaxation analysis revealed picosecond to nanosecond motions in the N terminus, the I-II loop, the C-terminal end of helix II through the HPD loop to the beginning of helix III, and the C-terminal end of helix III to the C terminus. The backbone dynamics of the HPD loop and termini are dominated by motions with moderately large amplitudes and correlation times of the order of a nanosecond or longer. Conformational exchange on the microsecond to millisecond timescale was identified in the HPD loop, the N and C termini, and the I-II loop. A 9.7ns MD trajectory manifested concerted swings of the HPD loop. Transitions between major and minor conformations of the HPD loop featured distinct patterns of change in backbone dihedral angles and hydrogen bonds. Fraying of the C-terminal end of helix II and the N-terminal end of helix III correlated with displacements of the HPD loop. Correlation of crankshaft motions of Gly46 and Gly47 with the collective motions of the HPD loop suggested an important role of the two glycine residues in the mobility of the loop. Fluctuations of the HPD loop correlated with relative reorientation of side-chains of Lys35 and Asp44 that interact with Hsc70. PMID:12162962

  9. On the origin of asymmetric interactions between permeant anions and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; St Aubin, Chantal N; Linsdell, Paul

    2007-02-15

    Single channel and macroscopic current recording was used to investigate block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel pore by the permeant anion Au(CN)2(-). Block was 1-2 orders of magnitude stronger when Au(CN)2(-) was added to the intracellular versus the extracellular solution, depending on membrane potential. A point mutation within the pore, T-338A, strongly decreased the asymmetry of block, by weakening block by intracellular Au(CN)2(-) and at the same time strengthening block by external Au(CN)2(-). Block of T-338A, but not wild-type, was strongest at the current reversal potential and weakened by either depolarization or hyperpolarization. In contrast to these effects, the T-338A mutation had no impact on block by the impermeant Pt(NO2)4(2-) ion. We suggest that the CFTR pore has at least two anion binding sites at which Au(CN)2(-) and Pt(NO2)4(2-) block Cl- permeation. The T-338A mutation decreases a barrier for Au(CN)2(-) movement between different sites, leading to significant changes in its blocking action. Our finding that apparent blocker binding affinity can be altered by mutagenesis of a residue which does not contribute to a blocker binding site has important implications for interpreting the effects of mutagenesis on channel blocker effects. PMID:17142267

  10. Carbenoxolone inhibits Pannexin1 channels through interactions in the first extracellular loop

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) is an ATP release channel important for controlling immune responses and synaptic strength. Various stimuli including C-terminal cleavage, a high concentration of extracellular potassium, and voltage have been demonstrated to activate Panx1. However, it remains unclear how Panx1 senses and integrates such diverse stimuli to form an open channel. To provide a clue on the mechanism underlying Panx1 channel gating, we investigated the action mechanism of carbenoxolone (CBX), the most commonly used small molecule for attenuating Panx1 function triggered by a wide range of stimuli. Using a chimeric approach, we discovered that CBX reverses its action polarity and potentiates the voltage-gated channel activity of Panx1 when W74 in the first extracellular loop is mutated to a nonaromatic residue. A systematic mutagenesis study revealed that conserved residues in this loop also play important roles in CBX function, potentially by mediating CBX binding. We extended our experiments to other Panx1 inhibitors such as probenecid and ATP, which also potentiate the voltage-gated channel activity of a Panx1 mutant at position 74. Notably, probenecid alone can activate this mutant at a resting membrane potential. These data suggest that CBX and other inhibitors, including probenecid, attenuate Panx1 channel activity through modulation of the first extracellular loop. Our experiments are the first step toward identifying a previously unknown mode of CBX action, which provide insight into the role of the first extracellular loop in Panx1 channel gating. PMID:26755773

  11. Interaction between 2 extracellular loops influences the activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Steven D; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is thought to be controlled by cytoplasmic factors. However, recent evidence has shown that overall channel activity is also influenced by extracellular anions that interact directly with the extracellular loops (ECLs) of the CFTR protein. Very little is known about the structure of the ECLs or how substances interacting with these ECLs might affect CFTR function. We used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced throughout ECL1 and 2 key sites in ECL4. Furthermore, interactions between ECL1 and ECL4 were investigated by the formation of disulfide crosslinks between cysteines introduced into these 2 regions. Crosslinks could be formed between R899C (in ECL4) and a number of sites in ECL1 in a manner that was dependent on channel activity, suggesting that the relative orientation of these 2 loops changes on activation. Formation of these crosslinks inhibited channel function, suggesting that relative movement of these ECLs is important to normal channel function. Implications of these findings for the effects of mutations in the ECLs that are associated with cystic fibrosis and interactions with extracellular substances that influence channel activity are discussed. PMID:25253636

  12. SARM modulates MyD88-mediated TLR activation through BB-loop dependent TIR-TIR interactions.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Emil; Ding, Jeak Ling; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognise invading pathogens and initiate an innate immune response by recruiting intracellular adaptor proteins via heterotypic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain interactions. Of the five TIR domain-containing adaptor proteins identified, Sterile α- and armadillo-motif-containing protein (SARM) is functionally unique; suppressing immune signalling instead of promoting it. Here we demonstrate that the recombinantly expressed and purified SARM TIR domain interacts with both the major human TLR adaptors, MyD88 and TRIF. A single glycine residue located in the BB-loop of the SARM TIR domain, G601, was identified as essential for interaction. A short peptide derived from this motif was also found to interact with MyD88 in vitro. SARM expression in HEK293 cells was found to significantly suppress lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated upregulation of inflammatory cytokines, IL-8 and TNF-α, an effect lost in the G601A mutant. The same result was observed with cytokine activation initiated by MyD88 expression and stimulation of TLR2 with lipoteichoic acid (LTA), suggesting that SARM is capable of suppressing both TRIF- and MyD88- dependent TLR signalling. Our findings indicate that SARM acts on a broader set of target proteins than previously thought, and that the BB-loop motif is functionally important, giving further insight into the endogenous mechanisms used to suppress inflammation in immune cells. PMID:26592460

  13. CRACM3 regulates the stability of non-excitable exocytotic vesicle fusion pores in a Ca2+-independent manner via molecular interaction with syntaxin4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Sahid, Muhammad Novrizal Abdi; Takemasa, Erika; Kiyoi, Takeshi; Kuno, Miyuki; Oshima, Yusuke; Maeyama, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ release-activated calcium channel 3 (CRACM3) is a unique member of the CRAC family of Ca2+-selective channels. In a non-excitable exocytosis model, we found that the extracellular L3 domain and the cytoplasmic C-terminus of CRACM3 interacted in an activity-dependent manner with the N-peptide of syntaxin4, a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor protein. Our biochemical, electrophysiological and single-vesicle studies showed that knockdown of CRACM3 suppressed functional exocytosis by decreasing the open time of the vesicle fusion pore without affecting Ca2+ influx, the activity-dependent membrane capacitance (Cm) change, and the total number of fusion events. Conversely, overexpressing CRACM3 significantly impaired cell exocytosis independent of Ca2+, led to an impaired Cm change, decreased the number of fusion events, and prolonged the dwell time of the fusion pore. CRACM3 changes the stability of the vesicle fusion pore in a manner consistent with the altered molecular expression. Our findings imply that CRACM3 plays a greater role in exocytosis than simply acting as a compensatory subunit of a Ca2+ channel. PMID:27301714

  14. SCAMP2 Interacts with Arf6 and Phospholipase D1 and Links Their Function to Exocytotic Fusion Pore Formation in PC12 CellsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lixia; Liao, Haini; Castle, Anna; Zhang, Jie; Casanova, James; Szabo, Gabor; Castle, David

    2005-01-01

    SNAP receptor (SNARE)-mediated fusion is regarded as a core event in exocytosis. Exocytosis is supported by other proteins that set up SNARE interactions between secretory vesicle and plasma membranes or facilitate fusion pore formation. Secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) are candidate proteins for functioning in these events. In neuroendocrine PC12 cells, SCAMP2 colocalizes on the cell surface with three other proteins required for dense-core vesicle exocytosis: phospholipase D1 (PLD1), the small GTPase Arf6, and Arf6 guanine nucleotide exchange protein ARNO. Arf6 and PLD1 coimmunoprecipitate (coIP) with SCAMP2. These associations have been implicated in exocytosis by observing enhanced coIP of Arf6 with SCAMP2 after cell depolarization and in the presence of guanosine 5′-O-(3-thio)triphosphate and by inhibition of coIP by a SCAMP-derived peptide that inhibits exocytosis. The peptide also suppresses PLD activity associated with exocytosis. Using amperometry to analyze exocytosis, we show that expression of a point mutant of SCAMP2 that exhibits decreased association with Arf6 and of mutant Arf6 deficient in activating PLD1 have the same inhibitory effects on early events in membrane fusion. However, mutant SCAMP2 also uniquely inhibits fusion pore dilation. Thus, SCAMP2 couples Arf6-stimulated PLD activity to exocytosis and links this process to formation of fusion pores. PMID:16030257

  15. Interactions between voltage sensor and pore domains in a hERG K+ channel model from molecular simulations and the effects of a voltage sensor mutation.

    PubMed

    Colenso, Charlotte K; Sessions, Richard B; Zhang, Yi H; Hancox, Jules C; Dempsey, Christopher E

    2013-06-24

    The hERG K(+) channel is important for establishing normal electrical activity in the human heart. The channel's unique gating response to membrane potential changes indicates specific interactions between voltage sensor and pore domains that are poorly understood. In the absence of a crystal structure we constructed a homology model of the full hERG membrane domain and performed 0.5 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in a hydrated membrane. The simulations identify potential interactions involving residues at the extracellular surface of S1 in the voltage sensor and at the N-terminal end of the pore helix in the hERG model. In addition, a diffuse interface involving hydrophobic residues on S4 (voltage sensor) and pore domain S5 of an adjacent subunit was stable during 0.5 μs of simulation. To assess the ability of the model to give insight into the effects of channel mutation we simulated a hERG mutant that contains a Leu to Pro substitution in the voltage sensor S4 helical segment (hERG L532P). Consistent with the retention of gated K(+) conductance, the L532P mutation was accommodated in the S4 helix with little disruption of helical structure. The mutation reduced the extent of interaction across the S4-S5 interface, suggesting a structural basis for the greatly enhanced deactivation rate in hERG L532P. The study indicates that pairwise comparison of wild-type and mutated channel models is a useful approach to interpreting functional data where uncertainty in model structures exist. PMID:23672495

  16. Track formation and dislocation loop interaction in spinel irradiated with swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Skuratov, V. A.

    1998-05-01

    The microstructure of polycrystalline stoichiometric magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl 2O 4) has been examined by cross-section electron microscopy following 430 MeV Kr + or 614 MeV Xe + ion irradiation near room temperature up to a fluence of 1.1 × 10 16 ions/m 2. In addition, the microstructure was examined for two spinel specimens which had been preirradiated with either 2 MeV Al + ions or 3.6 MeV Fe + ions and subsequently irradiated with 430 MeV Kr + ions. The Al + and Fe + preirradiated specimens contained a high density (10 21-10 23 m -3) of interstitial dislocation loops with diameters between 5 and 30 nm prior to the swift heavy ion irradiation. Near-continuous latent ion tracks were observed in all of the specimens irradiated with swift heavy ions. The swift heavy ions also appeared to efficiently destroy pre-existing dislocation loops with diameters <5 nm, whereas larger loops remained intact following the swift heavy ion irradiation. The swift heavy ions caused structural disordering of the octahedral cautions, but did not appear to produce amorphous cores in the ion tracks. The disordered ion track diameters were ˜2.0 and ˜2.6 nm for the 430 MeV Kr and 614 MeV Xe ion irradiations, respectively.

  17. Phase transition of strongly interacting matter with a chemical potential dependent Polyakov loop potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Guo-yun; Tang, Zhan-duo; Di Toro, Massimo; Colonna, Maria; Gao, Xue-yan; Gao, Ning

    2016-07-01

    We construct a hadron-quark two-phase model based on the Walecka-quantum hadrodynamics and the improved Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model with an explicit chemical potential dependence of Polyakov loop potential (μ PNJL model). With respect to the original PNJL model, the confined-deconfined phase transition is largely affected at low temperature and large chemical potential. Using the two-phase model, we investigate the equilibrium transition between hadronic and quark matter at finite chemical potentials and temperatures. The numerical results show that the transition boundaries from nuclear to quark matter move towards smaller chemical potential (lower density) when the μ -dependent Polyakov loop potential is taken. In particular, for charge asymmetric matter, we compute the local asymmetry of u , d quarks in the hadron-quark coexisting phase, and analyze the isospin-relevant observables possibly measurable in heavy-ion collision (HIC) experiments. In general new HIC data on the location and properties of the mixed phase would bring relevant information on the expected chemical potential dependence of the Polyakov loop contribution.

  18. The ZEB1/miR-200c feedback loop regulates invasion via actin interacting proteins MYLK and TKS5

    PubMed Central

    Stemmler, Marc P.; Kleemann, Julia A.; Brabletz, Thomas; Brabletz, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process which is aberrantly activated during cancer invasion and metastasis. Elevated expression of EMT-inducers like ZEB1 enables tumor cells to detach from the primary tumor and invade into the surrounding tissue. The main antagonist of ZEB1 in controlling EMT is the microRNA-200 family that is reciprocally linked to ZEB1 in a double negative feedback loop. Here, we further elucidate how the ZEB1/miR-200 feedback loop controls invasion of tumor cells. The process of EMT is attended by major changes in the actin cytoskeleton. Via in silico screening of genes encoding for actin interacting proteins, we identified two novel targets of miR-200c - TKS5 and MYLK (MLCK). Co-expression of both genes with ZEB1 was observed in several cancer cell lines as well as in breast cancer patients and correlated with low miR-200c levels. Depletion of TKS5 or MYLK in breast cancer cells reduced their invasive potential and their ability to form invadopodia. Whereas TKS5 is known to be a major component, we could identify MYLK as a novel player in invadopodia formation. In summary, TKS5 and MYLK represent two mediators of invasive behavior of cancer cells that are regulated by the ZEB1/miR-200 feedback loop. PMID:26334100

  19. Modeling Interactions between Speech Production and Perception: Speech Error Detection at Semantic and Phonological Levels and the Inner Speech Loop

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Bernd J.; Crawford, Eric; Bekolay, Trevor; Eliasmith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Production and comprehension of speech are closely interwoven. For example, the ability to detect an error in one's own speech, halt speech production, and finally correct the error can be explained by assuming an inner speech loop which continuously compares the word representations induced by production to those induced by perception at various cognitive levels (e.g., conceptual, word, or phonological levels). Because spontaneous speech errors are relatively rare, a picture naming and halt paradigm can be used to evoke them. In this paradigm, picture presentation (target word initiation) is followed by an auditory stop signal (distractor word) for halting speech production. The current study seeks to understand the neural mechanisms governing self-detection of speech errors by developing a biologically inspired neural model of the inner speech loop. The neural model is based on the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF) and consists of a network of about 500,000 spiking neurons. In the first experiment we induce simulated speech errors semantically and phonologically. In the second experiment, we simulate a picture naming and halt task. Target-distractor word pairs were balanced with respect to variation of phonological and semantic similarity. The results of the first experiment show that speech errors are successfully detected by a monitoring component in the inner speech loop. The results of the second experiment show that the model correctly reproduces human behavioral data on the picture naming and halt task. In particular, the halting rate in the production of target words was lower for phonologically similar words than for semantically similar or fully dissimilar distractor words. We thus conclude that the neural architecture proposed here to model the inner speech loop reflects important interactions in production and perception at phonological and semantic levels. PMID:27303287

  20. Modeling Interactions between Speech Production and Perception: Speech Error Detection at Semantic and Phonological Levels and the Inner Speech Loop.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Bernd J; Crawford, Eric; Bekolay, Trevor; Eliasmith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Production and comprehension of speech are closely interwoven. For example, the ability to detect an error in one's own speech, halt speech production, and finally correct the error can be explained by assuming an inner speech loop which continuously compares the word representations induced by production to those induced by perception at various cognitive levels (e.g., conceptual, word, or phonological levels). Because spontaneous speech errors are relatively rare, a picture naming and halt paradigm can be used to evoke them. In this paradigm, picture presentation (target word initiation) is followed by an auditory stop signal (distractor word) for halting speech production. The current study seeks to understand the neural mechanisms governing self-detection of speech errors by developing a biologically inspired neural model of the inner speech loop. The neural model is based on the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF) and consists of a network of about 500,000 spiking neurons. In the first experiment we induce simulated speech errors semantically and phonologically. In the second experiment, we simulate a picture naming and halt task. Target-distractor word pairs were balanced with respect to variation of phonological and semantic similarity. The results of the first experiment show that speech errors are successfully detected by a monitoring component in the inner speech loop. The results of the second experiment show that the model correctly reproduces human behavioral data on the picture naming and halt task. In particular, the halting rate in the production of target words was lower for phonologically similar words than for semantically similar or fully dissimilar distractor words. We thus conclude that the neural architecture proposed here to model the inner speech loop reflects important interactions in production and perception at phonological and semantic levels. PMID:27303287

  1. Loop-Loop Interactions Regulate KaiA-Stimulated KaiC Phosphorylation in the Cyanobacterial KaiABC Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin; Pattanayek, Rekha; Sheehan, Jonathan H.; Xu, Yao; Mori, Tetsuya; Smith, Jarrod A.; Johnson, Carl H.

    2013-01-01

    The Synechococcus elongatus KaiA, KaiB and KaiC proteins in the presence of ATP generate a post-translational oscillator (PTO) that runs in a temperature-compensated manner with a period of 24 hours. KaiA dimer stimulates phosphorylation of KaiC hexamer at two sites per subunit, T432 and S431, and KaiB dimers antagonize KaiA action and induce KaiC subunit exchange. Neither the mechanism of KaiA-stimulated KaiC phosphorylation nor that of KaiB-mediated KaiC dephosphorylation is understood in detail at the present time. We demonstrate here that the A422V KaiC mutant sheds light on the former mechanism. It was previously reported that A422V is less sensitive to dark pulse-induced phase resetting and has a reduced amplitude of the KaiC phosphorylation rhythm in vivo. A422 maps to a loop (422-loop) that continues toward the phosphorylation sites. By pulling on the C-terminal peptide of KaiC (A-loop), KaiA removes restraints from the adjacent 422-loop whose increased flexibility indirectly promotes kinase activity. We found in the crystal structure that A422V KaiC lacks phosphorylation at S431 and exhibits a subtle, local conformational change relative to wild-type KaiC. MD simulations indicate higher mobility of the 422-loop in the absence of the A-loop and mobility differences in other areas associated with phosphorylation activity between wild-type and mutant KaiCs. The A-loop···422-loop relay that informs KaiC phosphorylation sites of KaiA dimer binding propagates to loops from neighboring KaiC subunits, thus providing support for a concerted allosteric mechanism of phosphorylation. PMID:23351065

  2. Loop-Loop Interactions Regulate KaiA-Stimulated KaiC Phosphorylation in the Cyanobacterial KaiABC Circadian Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Pattanayek, Rekha; Sheehan, Jonathan H.; Xu, Yao; Mori, Tetsuya; Smith, Jarrod A.; Johnson, Carl H.

    2013-01-25

    We found that the Synechococcus elongatus KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC proteins in the presence of ATP generate a post-translational oscillator that runs in a temperature-compensated manner with a period of 24 h. KaiA dimer stimulates phosphorylation of KaiC hexamer at two sites per subunit, T432 and S431, and KaiB dimers antagonize KaiA action and induce KaiC subunit exchange. Neither the mechanism of KaiA-stimulated KaiC phosphorylation nor that of KaiB-mediated KaiC dephosphorylation is understood in detail at present. We demonstrate here that the A422V KaiC mutant sheds light on the former mechanism. It was previously reported that A422V is less sensitive to dark pulse-induced phase resetting and has a reduced amplitude of the KaiC phosphorylation rhythm in vivo. A422 maps to a loop (422-loop) that continues toward the phosphorylation sites. By pulling on the C-terminal peptide of KaiC (A-loop), KaiA removes restraints from the adjacent 422-loop whose increased flexibility indirectly promotes kinase activity. We found in the crystal structure that A422V KaiC lacks phosphorylation at S431 and exhibits a subtle, local conformational change relative to wild-type KaiC. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate higher mobility of the 422-loop in the absence of the A-loop and mobility differences in other areas associated with phosphorylation activity between wild-type and mutant KaiCs. Finally, the A-loop–422-loop relay that informs KaiC phosphorylation sites of KaiA dimer binding propagates to loops from neighboring KaiC subunits, thus providing support for a concerted allosteric mechanism of phosphorylation.

  3. Mapping the Interaction Site for a β-Scorpion Toxin in the Pore Module of Domain III of Voltage-gated Na+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Joel Z.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Scheuer, Todd; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Catterall, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels initiates and propagates action potentials in electrically excitable cells. β-Scorpion toxins, including toxin IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssIV), enhance activation of NaV channels. CssIV stabilizes the voltage sensor in domain II in its activated state via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. Amino acid residues required for the action of CssIV have been identified in the S1-S2 and S3-S4 extracellular loops of domain II. The extracellular loops of domain III are also involved in toxin action, but individual amino acid residues have not been identified. We used site-directed mutagenesis and voltage clamp recording to investigate amino acid residues of domain III that are involved in CssIV action. In the IIISS2-S6 loop, five substitutions at four positions altered voltage-sensor trapping by CssIVE15A. Three substitutions (E1438A, D1445A, and D1445Y) markedly decreased voltage-sensor trapping, whereas the other two substitutions (N1436G and L1439A) increased voltage-sensor trapping. These bidirectional effects suggest that residues in IIISS2-S6 make both positive and negative interactions with CssIV. N1436G enhanced voltage-sensor trapping via increased binding affinity to the resting state, whereas L1439A increased voltage-sensor trapping efficacy. Based on these results, a three-dimensional model of the toxin-channel interaction was developed using the Rosetta modeling method. These data provide additional molecular insight into the voltage-sensor trapping mechanism of toxin action and define a three-point interaction site for β-scorpion toxins on NaV channels. Binding of α- and β-scorpion toxins to two distinct, pseudo-symmetrically organized receptor sites on NaV channels acts synergistically to modify channel gating and paralyze prey. PMID:22761417

  4. Exploring TAR–RNA aptamer loop–loop interaction by X-ray crystallography, UV spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Lebars, Isabelle; Legrand, Pierre; Aimé, Ahissan; Pinaud, Noël; Fribourg, Sébastien; Di Primo, Carmelo

    2008-01-01

    In HIV-1, trans-activation of transcription of the viral genome is regulated by an imperfect hairpin, the trans-activating responsive (TAR) RNA element, located at the 5′ untranslated end of all viral transcripts. TAR acts as a binding site for viral and cellular proteins. In an attempt to identify RNA ligands that would interfere with the virus life-cycle by interacting with TAR, an in vitro selection was previously carried out. RNA hairpins that formed kissing-loop dimers with TAR were selected [Ducongé F. and Toulmé JJ (1999) RNA, 5:1605–1614]. We describe here the crystal structure of TAR bound to a high-affinity RNA aptamer. The two hairpins form a kissing complex and interact through six Watson–Crick base pairs. The complex adopts an overall conformation with an inter-helix angle of 28.1°, thus contrasting with previously reported solution and modelling studies. Structural analysis reveals that inter-backbone hydrogen bonds between ribose 2′ hydroxyl and phosphate oxygens at the stem-loop junctions can be formed. Thermal denaturation and surface plasmon resonance experiments with chemically modified 2′-O-methyl incorporated into both hairpins at key positions, clearly demonstrate the involvement of this intermolecular network of hydrogen bonds in complex stability. PMID:18996893

  5. The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome

    SciTech Connect

    Greco-Stewart, Valerie S.; Miron, Paul; Abrahem, Abrahem; Pelchat, Martin . E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca

    2007-01-05

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that depends on DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) for its transcription and replication. While it is generally accepted that RNAP II is involved in HDV replication, its interaction with HDV RNA requires confirmation. A monoclonal antibody specific to the carboxy terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNAP II was used to establish the association of RNAP II with both polarities of HDV RNA in HeLa cells. Co-immunoprecipitations using HeLa nuclear extract revealed that RNAP II interacts with HDV-derived RNAs at sites located within the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Analysis of these regions revealed a strong selection to maintain a rod-like conformation and demonstrated several conserved features. These results provide the first direct evidence of an association between human RNAP II and HDV RNA and suggest two transcription start sites on both polarities of HDV RNA.

  6. Closed Loop Interactions between Spiking Neural Network and Robotic Simulators Based on MUSIC and ROS

    PubMed Central

    Weidel, Philipp; Djurfeldt, Mikael; Duarte, Renato C.; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    In order to properly assess the function and computational properties of simulated neural systems, it is necessary to account for the nature of the stimuli that drive the system. However, providing stimuli that are rich and yet both reproducible and amenable to experimental manipulations is technically challenging, and even more so if a closed-loop scenario is required. In this work, we present a novel approach to solve this problem, connecting robotics and neural network simulators. We implement a middleware solution that bridges the Robotic Operating System (ROS) to the Multi-Simulator Coordinator (MUSIC). This enables any robotic and neural simulators that implement the corresponding interfaces to be efficiently coupled, allowing real-time performance for a wide range of configurations. This work extends the toolset available for researchers in both neurorobotics and computational neuroscience, and creates the opportunity to perform closed-loop experiments of arbitrary complexity to address questions in multiple areas, including embodiment, agency, and reinforcement learning. PMID:27536234

  7. Closed Loop Interactions between Spiking Neural Network and Robotic Simulators Based on MUSIC and ROS.

    PubMed

    Weidel, Philipp; Djurfeldt, Mikael; Duarte, Renato C; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    In order to properly assess the function and computational properties of simulated neural systems, it is necessary to account for the nature of the stimuli that drive the system. However, providing stimuli that are rich and yet both reproducible and amenable to experimental manipulations is technically challenging, and even more so if a closed-loop scenario is required. In this work, we present a novel approach to solve this problem, connecting robotics and neural network simulators. We implement a middleware solution that bridges the Robotic Operating System (ROS) to the Multi-Simulator Coordinator (MUSIC). This enables any robotic and neural simulators that implement the corresponding interfaces to be efficiently coupled, allowing real-time performance for a wide range of configurations. This work extends the toolset available for researchers in both neurorobotics and computational neuroscience, and creates the opportunity to perform closed-loop experiments of arbitrary complexity to address questions in multiple areas, including embodiment, agency, and reinforcement learning. PMID:27536234

  8. On the Origin of Asymmetric Interactions between Permeant Anions and the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Mohammad; St. Aubin, Chantal N.; Linsdell, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Single channel and macroscopic current recording was used to investigate block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel pore by the permeant anion \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Au}}({\\mathrm{CN}})_{2}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}. Block was 1–2 orders of magnitude stronger when \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Au}}({\\mathrm{CN}})_{2}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} was added to the intracellular versus the extracellular solution, depending on membrane potential. A point mutation within the pore, T-338A, strongly decreased the asymmetry of block, by weakening block by intracellular \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Au}}({\\mathrm{CN}})_{2}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and at the same time strengthening block by external \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Au}}({\\mathrm{CN}})_{2}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}. Block of T-338A, but not wild-type, was strongest at the current reversal potential and weakened by either depolarization or hyperpolarization. In contrast to these

  9. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the α1 pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Alan; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Openings of high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, HVA calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1) associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ, and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of HVA calcium channels. PMID:24917826

  10. Hydrophobic interactions between the S5 segment and the pore helix stabilizes the closed state of Slo2.1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Hansen, Angela; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2016-04-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, Slo2.1K(+) channels are in a closed state unless activated by an elevation in [Na(+)]i. Fenamates such as niflumic acid also activate Slo2.1. Previous studies suggest that activation of Slo2.1 channels is mediated by a conformational change in the selectivity filter, and not a widening of the aperture formed by the S6 segment bundle crossing as occurs in voltage-gated K(+) channels. It is unclear how binding of Na(+) or fenamates is allosterically linked to opening of the presumed selectivity filter activation gate in Slo2.1. Here we examined the role of the S5 transmembrane segment in the activation of Slo2.1. Channels were heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and whole cell currents measured with the voltage-clamp technique. Ala substitution of five residues located on a single face of the S5 α-helical segment induced constitutive channel activity. Leu-209, predicted to face towards Phe-240 in the pore helix was investigated by further mutagenesis. Mutation of Leu-209 to Glu or Gln induced maximal channel activation as did the combined mutation to Ala of all three hydrophobic S5 residues predicted to be adjacent to Phe-240. Together these results suggest that hydrophobic interactions between residues in S5 and the C-terminal end of the pore helix stabilize Slo2.1 channels in a closed state. PMID:26724206

  11. The Stomatogastric Nervous System as a Model for Studying Sensorimotor Interactions in Real-Time Closed-Loop Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Daur, Nelly; Diehl, Florian; Mader, Wolfgang; Stein, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The perception of proprioceptive signals that report the internal state of the body is one of the essential tasks of the nervous system and helps to continuously adapt body movements to changing circumstances. Despite the impact of proprioceptive feedback on motor activity it has rarely been studied in conditions in which motor output and sensory activity interact as they do in behaving animals, i.e., in closed-loop conditions. The interaction of motor and sensory activities, however, can create emergent properties that may govern the functional characteristics of the system. We here demonstrate a method to use a well-characterized model system for central pattern generation, the stomatogastric nervous system, for studying these properties in vitro. We created a real-time computer model of a single-cell muscle tendon organ in the gastric mill of the crab foregut that uses intracellular current injections to control the activity of the biological proprioceptor. The resulting motor output of a gastric mill motor neuron is then recorded intracellularly and fed into a simple muscle model consisting of a series of low-pass filters. The muscle output is used to activate a one-dimensional Hodgkin–Huxley type model of the muscle tendon organ in real-time, allowing closed-loop conditions. Model properties were either hand tuned to achieve the best match with data from semi-intact muscle preparations, or an exhaustive search was performed to determine the best set of parameters. We report the real-time capabilities of our models, its performance and its interaction with the biological motor system. PMID:22435059

  12. Rational engineering of the Neurospora VS ribozyme to allow substrate recognition via different kissing-loop interactions.

    PubMed

    Lacroix-Labonté, Julie; Girard, Nicolas; Dagenais, Pierre; Legault, Pascale

    2016-08-19

    The Neurospora VS ribozyme is a catalytic RNA that has the unique ability to specifically recognize and cleave a stem-loop substrate through formation of a highly stable kissing-loop interaction (KLI). In order to explore the engineering potential of the VS ribozyme to cleave alternate substrates, we substituted the wild-type KLI by other known KLIs using an innovative engineering method that combines rational and combinatorial approaches. A bioinformatic search of the protein data bank was initially performed to identify KLIs that are structurally similar to the one found in the VS ribozyme. Next, substrate/ribozyme (S/R) pairs that incorporate these alternative KLIs were kinetically and structurally characterized. Interestingly, several of the resulting S/R pairs allowed substrate cleavage with substantial catalytic efficiency, although with reduced activity compared to the reference S/R pair. Overall, this study describes an innovative approach for RNA engineering and establishes that the KLI of the trans VS ribozyme can be adapted to cleave other folded RNA substrates. PMID:27166370

  13. U6atac snRNA stem-loop interacts with U12 p65 RNA binding protein and is functionally interchangeable with the U12 apical stem-loop III.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagjit; Sikand, Kavleen; Conrad, Heike; Will, Cindy L; Komar, Anton A; Shukla, Girish C

    2016-01-01

    Formation of catalytic core of the U12-dependent spliceosome involves U6atac and U12 interaction with the 5' splice site and branch site regions of a U12-dependent intron, respectively. Beyond the formation of intermolecular helix I region between U6atac and U12 snRNAs, several other regions within these RNA molecules are predicted to form stem-loop structures. Our previous work demonstrated that the 3' stem-loop region of U6atac snRNA contains a U12-dependent spliceosome-specific targeting activity. Here, we show a detailed structure-function analysis and requirement of a substructure of U6atac 3' stem-loop in U12-dependent in vivo splicing. We show that the C-terminal RNA recognition motif of p65, a U12 snRNA binding protein, also binds to the distal 3' stem-loop of U6atac. By using a binary splice site mutation suppressor assay we demonstrate that p65 protein-binding apical stem-loop of U12 snRNA can be replaced by this U6atac distal 3' stem-loop. Furthermore, we tested the compatibility of the U6atac 3' end from phylogenetically distant species in a human U6atac background, to establish the evolutionary relatedness of these structures and in vivo function. In summary, we demonstrate that RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions in the minor spliceosome are highly plastic as compared to the major spliceosome. PMID:27510544

  14. U6atac snRNA stem-loop interacts with U12 p65 RNA binding protein and is functionally interchangeable with the U12 apical stem-loop III

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagjit; Sikand, Kavleen; Conrad, Heike; Will, Cindy L.; Komar, Anton A.; Shukla, Girish C.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of catalytic core of the U12-dependent spliceosome involves U6atac and U12 interaction with the 5′ splice site and branch site regions of a U12-dependent intron, respectively. Beyond the formation of intermolecular helix I region between U6atac and U12 snRNAs, several other regions within these RNA molecules are predicted to form stem-loop structures. Our previous work demonstrated that the 3′ stem-loop region of U6atac snRNA contains a U12-dependent spliceosome-specific targeting activity. Here, we show a detailed structure-function analysis and requirement of a substructure of U6atac 3′ stem-loop in U12-dependent in vivo splicing. We show that the C-terminal RNA recognition motif of p65, a U12 snRNA binding protein, also binds to the distal 3′ stem-loop of U6atac. By using a binary splice site mutation suppressor assay we demonstrate that p65 protein-binding apical stem-loop of U12 snRNA can be replaced by this U6atac distal 3′ stem-loop. Furthermore, we tested the compatibility of the U6atac 3′ end from phylogenetically distant species in a human U6atac background, to establish the evolutionary relatedness of these structures and in vivo function. In summary, we demonstrate that RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions in the minor spliceosome are highly plastic as compared to the major spliceosome. PMID:27510544

  15. Structure-function relationships of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and of a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein in their interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, T.L. )

    1991-11-12

    Peptides corresponding to portions of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and to a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein were synthetically modified in order to gain information on structure-function relationships of neurotoxin loop 2 interactions with the acetylcholine receptor. Binding of synthetic peptides to the acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo electric organ membranes was assessed by measuring their ability to inhibit the binding of {sup 125}I-{alpha}-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The peptides showing the highest affinity for the receptor were a peptide corresponding to the sequence of loop 2 (residues 25-44) of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) toxin b and the structurally similar segment of CVS rabies virus glycoprotein. These affinities were comparable to those of d-tubocurarine and suberyldicholine. These results demonstrate the importance of loop 2 in the neurotoxin interaction with the receptor. N- and C-terminal deletions of the loop 2 peptides and substitution of residues invariant or highly conserved among neurotoxins were performed in order to determine the role of individual residues in binding. Residues 25-40 are the most crucial in the interaction with the acetylcholine receptor. Since this region of the glycoprotein contains residues corresponding to all of the functionally invariant neurotoxin residues, it may interact with the acetylcholine receptor through a mechanism similar to that of the neurotoxins.

  16. CHiCAGO: robust detection of DNA looping interactions in Capture Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Jonathan; Freire-Pritchett, Paula; Wingett, Steven W; Várnai, Csilla; Dimond, Andrew; Plagnol, Vincent; Zerbino, Daniel; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Javierre, Biola-Maria; Osborne, Cameron; Fraser, Peter; Spivakov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Capture Hi-C (CHi-C) is a method for profiling chromosomal interactions involving targeted regions of interest, such as gene promoters, globally and at high resolution. Signal detection in CHi-C data involves a number of statistical challenges that are not observed when using other Hi-C-like techniques. We present a background model and algorithms for normalisation and multiple testing that are specifically adapted to CHi-C experiments. We implement these procedures in CHiCAGO ( http://regulatorygenomicsgroup.org/chicago ), an open-source package for robust interaction detection in CHi-C. We validate CHiCAGO by showing that promoter-interacting regions detected with this method are enriched for regulatory features and disease-associated SNPs. PMID:27306882

  17. Crystal structure of the octameric pore of staphylococcal γ-hemolysin reveals the β-barrel pore formation mechanism by two components

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Keitaro; Kawai, Yuka; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Hirano, Nagisa; Kaneko, Jun; Tomita, Noriko; Ohta, Makoto; Kamio, Yoshiyuki; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcal γ-hemolysin is a bicomponent pore-forming toxin composed of LukF and Hlg2. These proteins are expressed as water-soluble monomers and then assemble into the oligomeric pore form on the target cell. Here, we report the crystal structure of the octameric pore form of γ-hemolysin at 2.5 Å resolution, which is the first high-resolution structure of a β-barrel transmembrane protein composed of two proteins reported to date. The octameric assembly consists of four molecules of LukF and Hlg2 located alternately in a circular pattern, which explains the biochemical data accumulated over the past two decades. The structure, in combination with the monomeric forms, demonstrates the elaborate molecular machinery involved in pore formation by two different molecules, in which interprotomer electrostatic interactions using loops connecting β2 and β3 (loop A: Asp43-Lys48 of LukF and Lys37-Lys43 of Hlg2) play pivotal roles as the structural determinants for assembly through unwinding of the N-terminal β-strands (amino-latch) of the adjacent protomer, releasing the transmembrane stem domain folded into a β-sheet in the monomer (prestem), and interaction with the adjacent protomer. PMID:21969538

  18. A CC′ Loop Decoy Peptide Blocks the Interaction Between Act1 and IL-17RA to Attenuate IL-17- and IL-25-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Caini; Swaidani, Shadi; Qian, Wen; Kang, Zizhen; Sun, Paige; Han, Yue; Wang, Chenhui; Gulen, Muhammet Fatih; Yin, Weiguo; Zhang, Chunjiang; Fox, Paul L; Aronica, Mark; Hamilton, Thomas A; Misra, Saurav; Deng, Junpeng; Li, Xiaoxia

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) and IL-25 signaling induce the expression of genes that encode inflammatory factors and they are implicated in the pathology of various inflammatory diseases. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activator 1 (Act1) is an adaptor protein and E3 ubiquitin ligase that is critical for IL-17 and IL-25 signaling, and it is recruited to their receptors through heterotypic interactions between their SEFIR [SEF (similar expression to fibroblast growth factor genes)/IL-17R] domains. Modeling of SEFIR domains has shown their structural similarity with the Toll-IL-1 receptor (TIR) domains of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and the IL-1R. Whereas the BB′ loop of TIR is required for TIR-TIR interactions, we found that deletion of the BB′ loop from Act1 or IL-17RA (a common subunit of IL-17R and IL-25R) did not affect Act1–IL-17RA interactions. Instead, deletion of the CC′ loop from Act1 or IL-17RA abolished the interaction between Act1 and IL-17RA, suggesting that SEFIR and TIR domains interact in different manners. Surface plasmon resonance measurements showed that a peptide corresponding to the CC′ loop bound directly to IL-17RA. A cell-permeable decoy peptide based on the CC′ loop sequence inhibited IL-17- and IL-25-mediated signaling, and it inhibited IL-17- and IL-25-induced responses in vitro and pulmonary inflammation in vivo. Together, these findings provide the molecular basis for the specificity of SEFIR versus TIR domain interactions and consequent signaling. Moreover, we suggest that the CC′ loop motif of SEFIR domains is a promising target for therapeutic strategies against IL-17- and IL-25-asssociated inflammatory diseases. PMID:22045852

  19. Phylogeny, Functional Annotation, and Protein Interaction Network Analyses of the Xenopus tropicalis Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deyu

    2013-01-01

    The previous survey identified 70 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins, but it was proved to be incomplete, and the functional information and regulatory networks of frog bHLH transcription factors were not fully known. Therefore, we conducted an updated genome-wide survey in the Xenopus tropicalis genome project databases and identified 105 bHLH sequences. Among the retrieved 105 sequences, phylogenetic analyses revealed that 103 bHLH proteins belonged to 43 families or subfamilies with 46, 26, 11, 3, 15, and 4 members in the corresponding supergroups. Next, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analyses showed 65 significant GO annotations of biological processes and molecular functions and KEGG pathways counted in frequency. To explore the functional pathways, regulatory gene networks, and/or related gene groups coding for Xenopus tropicalis bHLH proteins, the identified bHLH genes were put into the databases KOBAS and STRING to get the signaling information of pathways and protein interaction networks according to available public databases and known protein interactions. From the genome annotation and pathway analysis using KOBAS, we identified 16 pathways in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. From the STRING interaction analysis, 68 hub proteins were identified, and many hub proteins created a tight network or a functional module within the protein families. PMID:24312906

  20. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  1. A CC' loop decoy peptide blocks the interaction between Act1 and IL-17RA to attenuate IL-17- and IL-25-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Caini; Swaidani, Shadi; Qian, Wen; Kang, Zizhen; Sun, Paige; Han, Yue; Wang, Chenhui; Gulen, Muhammet Fatih; Yin, Weiguo; Zhang, Chunjiang; Fox, Paul L; Aronica, Mark; Hamilton, Thomas A; Misra, Saurav; Deng, Junpeng; Li, Xiaoxia

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) and IL-25 signaling induce the expression of genes encoding inflammatory factors and are implicated in the pathology of various inflammatory diseases. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activator 1 (Act1) is an adaptor protein and E3 ubiquitin ligase that is critical for signaling by either IL-17 or IL-25, and it is recruited to their receptors (IL-17R and IL-25R) through heterotypic interactions between the SEFIR [SEF (similar expression to fibroblast growth factor genes) and IL-17R] domain of Act1 and that of the receptor. SEFIR domains have structural similarity with the Toll-IL-1 receptor (TIR) domains of Toll-like receptors and IL-1R. Whereas the BB' loop of TIR is required for TIR-TIR interactions, we found that deletion of the BB' loop from Act1 or IL-17RA (a common subunit of both IL-17R and IL-25R) did not affect Act1-IL-17RA interactions; rather, deletion of the CC' loop from Act1 or IL-17RA abolished the interaction between both proteins. Surface plasmon resonance measurements showed that a peptide corresponding to the CC' loop of Act1 bound directly to IL-17RA. A cell-permeable decoy peptide based on the CC' loop sequence inhibited IL-17- or IL-25-mediated signaling in vitro, as well as IL-17- and IL-25-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice. Together, these findings provide the molecular basis for the specificity of SEFIR-SEFIR versus TIR-TIR domain interactions and consequent signaling. Moreover, we suggest that the CC' loop motif of SEFIR domains is a promising target for therapeutic strategies against inflammatory diseases associated with IL-17 or IL-25 signaling. PMID:22045852

  2. On the interaction between a vacancy and interstitial loops in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Puigvi, Mary Angels; de Diego, Nieves; Serra, Anna; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2007-01-01

    Atomic-scale computer simulation is used to study interaction between a vacancy and clusters of self-interstitial atoms in metals with hcp, fcc and bcc crystal structure: -zirconium, copper and -iron. Effects of cluster size, atomic structure, dislocation nature of the cluster side and temperature are investigated. A vacancy can recombine with any interstitial in small clusters and this does not affect cluster mobility. In large clusters interaction depends on whether the cluster sides dissociate into partial dislocations. A vacancy recombines only on undissociated sides and corners created with undissociated segments. Vacancies inside the cluster perimeter do not recombine but restrict cluster mobility. Temperature enhances recombination by either increasing the number of recombination sites or assisting vacancy diffusion towards such sites. The results are relevant to differences in bcc, fcc and hcp metals microstructure evolution under irradiation observed experimentally and studied by theoretical or higher level modelling techniques.

  3. Effects of fluid-rock interactions in arkosic sandstones: Long-term direct monitoring of changes in permeability, electrical conductivity, and pore fluid chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, A.; Milsch, H.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of low enthalpy geothermal energy production from deep sedimentary reservoirs laboratory experiments and simulations in the system quartz-feldspar-water were conducted. To constrain the effect of fluid-rock interactions on permeability under hydrothermal in situ conditions an interdisciplinary approach covering petrophysical, petrological and hydrogeochemical methods was applied. Long-term flow-through experiments were conducted under hydrostatic pressure conditions in a HPT-permeameter. Two arkosic sandstones, one pure quartz arenite (Fontainebleau) as well as one sandwich sample containing a quartz-feldspar powder of defined grain size and composition were investigated. The pore fluid was distilled water. At a maximum temperature of 160°C both permeability and electrical rock conductivity were simultaneously monitored. The maximum run duration was three months. Complementary batch experiments were performed with quartz-feldspar powders to constrain the mechanisms and kinetics of potentially occurring hydrothermal reactions. The resulting fluids were analysed with ICP-OES and the reacted powders were characterised with XRD and SEM. Additionally, the hydrothermal reactions were modelled with PHREEQC. It will be demonstrated that permeability decreases in the course of the experiments. However, compared to similar experiments conducted under deviatoric stress conditions (Tenthorey et al., 1998) the decrease in permeability is low. For both arkosic sandstones and at stagnant flow conditions the electrical rock conductivity showed an asymptotical increase indicating that the respective pore fluid approaches a saturation state. Furthermore, fluid samples taken at the end of the Fontainebleau experiment exhibit supersaturation with respect to quartz. In addition, PHREEQC simulations of the feldspar-quartz-water equilibrium indicate that different clay minerals and gibbsite are supersaturated in the resulting fluid. Consequently and despite the sluggish

  4. Poring over two-pore channel pore mutants

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Christopher J.; Patel, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore channels are members of the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily. They localise to the endolysosomal system and are likely targets for the Ca2+ mobilising messenger NAADP. In this brief review, we relate mutagenesis of the TPC pore to a recently published homology model and discuss how pore mutants are informing us of TPC function. Molecular physiology of these ubiquitous proteins is thus emerging. PMID:27226934

  5. Influence of polymer architecture and polymer-wall interaction on the adsorption of polymers into a slit-pore.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Escobedo, Fernando A

    2004-02-01

    The effects of molecular topology and polymer-surface interaction on the properties of isolated polymer chains trapped in a slit were investigated using off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations. Various methods were implemented to allow efficient simulation of molecular structure, confinement force, and free energy for a chain interacting with such "sticky" surfaces. The simulations were performed in the canonical ensemble, and the free energy was sampled via virtual slit-separation moves. Six different chain architectures were studied: linear, star-branched, dendritic, cyclic, two-node (i.e., containing two tetrafunctional intramolecular crosslinks), and six-node molecules. The first three topologies entail increasing degrees of branching, and the last three topologies entail increasing degrees of intramolecular bonding. The confinement force, monomer density profile, and conformational properties for all these systems were compared (for identical molecular weight N) and analyzed as a function of adsorption strength. The compensation point where the wall attraction counterbalances the polymer-slit exclusion effects was the focus of our study. It was found that the attractive energy at the compensation point, epsilon(c), is a weak increasing function of the chain length for excluded-volume chains. The value of epsilon(c) differs significantly for different topologies, and smaller values are associated with better-adsorbing molecules. Due to their globular shape and numerous chain ends, branched molecules (e.g., stars and dendrimers) experience a relatively small entropic penalty for adsorption at low adsorption force and moderate confinement. However, as the adsorption force increases, the more flexible linear chains reach the compensation point at a weaker attractive energy because of the ease with which monomers can be packed near the walls. In moderate to weak confinement, molecules with intramolecular cross-links, such as cyclic, two-node, and six-node molecules

  6. Influence of polymer architecture and polymer-wall interaction on the adsorption of polymers into a slit-pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2004-02-01

    The effects of molecular topology and polymer-surface interaction on the properties of isolated polymer chains trapped in a slit were investigated using off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations. Various methods were implemented to allow efficient simulation of molecular structure, confinement force, and free energy for a chain interacting with such “sticky” surfaces. The simulations were performed in the canonical ensemble, and the free energy was sampled via virtual slit-separation moves. Six different chain architectures were studied: linear, star-branched, dendritic, cyclic, two-node (i.e., containing two tetrafunctional intramolecular crosslinks), and six-node molecules. The first three topologies entail increasing degrees of branching, and the last three topologies entail increasing degrees of intramolecular bonding. The confinement force, monomer density profile, and conformational properties for all these systems were compared (for identical molecular weight N) and analyzed as a function of adsorption strength. The compensation point where the wall attraction counterbalances the polymer-slit exclusion effects was the focus of our study. It was found that the attractive energy at the compensation point, ɛc, is a weak increasing function of the chain length for excluded-volume chains. The value of ɛc differs significantly for different topologies, and smaller values are associated with better-adsorbing molecules. Due to their globular shape and numerous chain ends, branched molecules (e.g., stars and dendrimers) experience a relatively small entropic penalty for adsorption at low adsorption force and moderate confinement. However, as the adsorption force increases, the more flexible linear chains reach the compensation point at a weaker attractive energy because of the ease with which monomers can be packed near the walls. In moderate to weak confinement, molecules with intramolecular cross-links, such as cyclic, two-node, and six-node molecules, always

  7. Tailoring Staircase-like Hysteresis Loops in Electrodeposited Trisegmented Magnetic Nanowires: a Strategy toward Minimization of Interwire Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Agramunt-Puig, Sebastià; Del-Valle, Núria; Navau, Carles; Baró, Maria D; Estradé, Sònia; Peiró, Francesca; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J; Sanchez, Alvaro; Nogués, Josep; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2016-02-17

    A new strategy to minimize magnetic interactions between nanowires (NWs) dispersed in a fluid is proposed. Such a strategy consists of preparing trisegmented NWs containing two antiparallel ferromagnetic segments with dissimilar coercivity separated by a nonmagnetic spacer. The trisegmented NWs exhibit a staircase-like hysteresis loop with tunable shape that depends on the relative length of the soft- and hard-magnetic segments and the respective values of saturation magnetization. Such NWs are prepared by electrodepositing CoPt/Cu/Ni in a polycarbonate (PC) membrane. The antiparallel alignment is set by applying suitable magnetic fields while the NWs are still embedded in the PC membrane. Analytic calculations are used to demonstrate that the interaction magnetic energy from fully compensated trisegmented NWs with antiparallel alignment is reduced compared to a single-component NW with the same length or the trisegmented NWs with the two ferromagnetic counterparts parallel to each other. The proposed approach is appealing for the use of magnetic NWs in certain biological or catalytic applications where the aggregation of NWs is detrimental for optimized performance. PMID:26804742

  8. Functional mechanisms of neurotransmitter transporters regulated by lipid-protein interactions of their terminal loops.

    PubMed

    Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-09-01

    The physiological functions of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) in reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synapse into the presynaptic nerve have been shown to be complemented by their involvement, together with non-plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters, in the reverse transport of substrate (efflux) in response to psychostimulants. Recent experimental evidence implicates highly anionic phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP(2)) lipids in such functions of the serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT) transporters. Thus, for both SERT and DAT, neurotransmitter efflux has been shown to be strongly regulated by the presence of PIP(2) lipids in the plasma membrane, and the electrostatic interaction of the N-terminal region of DAT with the negatively charged PIP(2) lipids. We examine the experimentally established phenotypes in a structural context obtained from computational modeling based on recent crystallographic data. The results are shown to set the stage for a mechanistic understanding of physiological actions of neurotransmitter transporters in the NSS family of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25847498

  9. Solution structure of urotensin-II receptor extracellular loop III and characterization of its interaction with urotensin-II.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Stéphane; Ségalas-Milazzo, Isabelle; Guilhaudis, Laure; Oulyadi, Hassan; Fournier, Alain; Davoust, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    Urotensin-II (U-II) is a vasoactive hormone that acts through a G-protein-coupled receptor named UT. Recently, we have shown, using the surface plasmon resonance technology that human U-II (hU-II) interacts with the hUT(281-300) fragment, a segment containing the extracellular loop III (EC-III) and short extensions of the transmembrane domains VI and VII (TM-VI and TM-VII). To further investigate the interaction of UT receptor with U-II, we have determined the solution structure of hUT(281-300) by high-resolution NMR and molecular modeling and we have examined, also using NMR, the binding with hU-II at residue level. In the presence of dodecylphosphocholine micelles, hUT(281-300) exhibited a type III beta-turn (Q285-L288), followed by an -helical structure (A289-L299), the latter including a stretch of transmembrane helix VII. Upon addition of hU-II, significant chemical shift perturbations were observed for residues located just on the N-terminal side of the beta-turn (end of TM-VI/beginning of EC-III) and on one face of the -helix (end of EC-III/beginning of TM-VII). These data, in conjunction with intermolecular NOEs, suggest that the initiation site of EC-III, as well as the upstream portion of helix VII, would be involved in agonist binding and allow to propose points of interaction in the ligand-receptor complex. PMID:18423797

  10. Nonlocal interactions stabilize long range loops in the initial folding intermediates of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ittah, V; Haas, E

    1995-04-01

    A search for the topology of the chain folding of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), in unfolded and partially folded states, was done by means of time resolved dynamic nonradiative excitation energy transfer (ET) measurements. Four double labeled BPTI derivatives were used in which the donor was attached to the N-terminal arginine residue and the acceptor was specifically attached to one of the lysine residues. The four derivatives form a series of labeled backbone segments of increasing length spanning the full lengths of the BPTI chain: 15, 26, 41, and 46 residues. The intramolecular segmental end-to-end distance (EED) distributions were determined for all the derivatives by global analysis of the decay curves of both the donor and the acceptor in the reduced state, in low (0.5 M) guanidinium chloride (GuHCl) concentrations at pH 3.6 and 2.1 (R and A states, respectively). The results show that, in the partial folding conditions of low GuHCl concentration, reduced BPTI is in a compact state, but in this state the polypeptide chain is not in a condensed statistical coil conformation. Two distinct subpopulations were found for the four intramolecular EED distributions. One subpopulation was compact, with native-like EED distribution, while the second was unfolded. The pairs of sites, residues 1 and 26 and residues 1 and 46, showed close proximity in the dominant subpopulation. These contacts form two loops (probably collapsed): one consists of the first 26 residues, and the second comprises the full length of the chain from the N- to the C-terminal segments, which is in fact made up to two shorter loops (1-26 and 27-46). The N-terminal 15 residue segment was relaxed into statistical coil-like non-native conformation, in contrast to its extended conformation in the native state. The effect of temperature in the range of 2-60 degrees C was small; the folded subpopulations were stable over this range. These results show that in BPTI the compact

  11. Functional mechanisms of neurotransmitter transporters regulated by lipid-protein interactions of their terminal loops

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-01-01

    The physiological functions of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) in reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synapse into the presynaptic nerve have been shown to be complemented by their involvement, together with non-plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters, in the reverse transport of substrate (efflux) in response to psychostimulants. Recent experimental evidence implicates highly anionic phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) lipids in such functions of the serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT) transporters. Thus, for both SERT and DAT, neurotransmitter efflux has been shown to be strongly regulated by the presence of PIP2 lipids in the plasma membrane, and the electrostatic interaction of the N-terminal region of DAT with the negatively charged PIP2 lipids. We examine the experimentally established phenotypes in a structural context obtained from computational modeling based on recent crystallographic data. The results are shown to set the stage for a mechanistic understanding of physiological actions of neurotransmitter transporters in the NSS family of membrane proteins. PMID:25847498

  12. Inhibitory effects of nontoxic protein volvatoxin A1 on pore-forming cardiotoxic protein volvatoxin A2 by interaction with amphipathic alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Tzu; Lin, Su-Chang; Hsu, Chyong-Ing; Liaw, Yen-Chywan; Lin, Jung-Yaw

    2006-07-01

    Volvatoxin A2, a pore-forming cardiotoxic protein, was isolated from the edible mushroom Volvariella volvacea. Previous studies have demonstrated that volvatoxin A consists of volvatoxin A2 and volvatoxin A1, and the hemolytic activity of volvatoxin A2 is completely abolished by volvatoxin A1 at a volvatoxin A2/volvatoxin A1 molar ratio of 2. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which volvatoxin A1 inhibits the cytotoxicity of volvatoxin A2. Volvatoxin A1 by itself was found to be nontoxic, and furthermore, it inhibited the hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of volvatoxin A2 at molar ratios of 2 or lower. Interestingly, volvatoxin A1 contains 393 amino acid residues that closely resemble a tandem repeat of volvatoxin A2. Volvatoxin A1 contains two pairs of amphipathic alpha-helices but it lacks a heparin-binding site. This suggests that volvatoxin A1 may interact with volvatoxin A2 but not with the cell membrane. By using confocal microscopy, it was demonstrated that volvatoxin A1 could not bind to the cell membrane; however, volvatoxin A1 could inhibit binding of volvatoxin A2 to the cell membrane at a molar ratio of 2. Via peptide competition assay and in conjunction with pull-down and co-pull-down experiments, we demonstrated that volvatoxin A1 and volvatoxin A2 may form a complex. Our results suggest that this occurs via the interaction of one molecule of volvatoxin A1, which contains two amphipathic alpha-helices, with two molecules of volvatoxin A2, each of which contains one amphipathic alpha-helix. Taken together, the results of this study reveal a novel mechanism by which volvatoxin A1 regulates the cytotoxicity of volvatoxin A2 via direct interaction, and potentially provide an exciting new strategy for chemotherapy. PMID:16792702

  13. Pore Velocity Estimation Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devary, J. L.; Doctor, P. G.

    1982-08-01

    Geostatistical data analysis techniques were used to stochastically model the spatial variability of groundwater pore velocity in a potential waste repository site. Kriging algorithms were applied to Hanford Reservation data to estimate hydraulic conductivities, hydraulic head gradients, and pore velocities. A first-order Taylor series expansion for pore velocity was used to statistically combine hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic head gradient, and effective porosity surfaces and uncertainties to characterize the pore velocity uncertainty. Use of these techniques permits the estimation of pore velocity uncertainties when pore velocity measurements do not exist. Large pore velocity estimation uncertainties were found to be located in the region where the hydraulic head gradient relative uncertainty was maximal.

  14. Radial Symmetry in a Chimaeric Glutamate Receptor Pore

    PubMed Central

    Wilding, Timothy J; Lopez, Melany N.; Huettner, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors comprise two conformationally different A/C and B/D subunit pairs. Closed channels exhibit 4-fold radial symmetry in the transmembrane domain (TMD) but transition to 2-fold dimer-of-dimers symmetry for extracellular ligand binding and N-terminal domains. Here, to evaluate symmetry in open pores we analyzed interaction between the Q/R editing site near the pore loop apex and the transmembrane M3 helix of kainate receptor subunit GluK2. Chimaeric subunits that combined the GluK2 TMD with extracellular segments from NMDA receptors, which are obligate heteromers, yielded channels made up of A/C and B/D subunit pairs with distinct substitutions along M3 and/or Q/R site editing status, in an otherwise identical homotetrameric TMD. Our results indicate that Q/R site interaction with M3 occurs within individual subunits and is essentially the same for both A/C and B/D subunit conformations, suggesting that 4-fold pore symmetry persists in the open state. PMID:24561802

  15. Interaction of Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf4 with the Nuclear Pore Subunit Nup205 Is Required for Proper Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, YiQing; Kucharski, Thomas J.; Gamache, Isabelle; Blanchette, Paola; Branton, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenovirus type 5 E4orf4 is a multifunctional protein that regulates viral gene expression. The activities of E4orf4 are mainly mediated through binding to protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). E4orf4 recruits target phosphoproteins into complexes with PP2A, resulting in dephosphorylation of host factors, such as SR splicing factors. In the current study, we utilized immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry to identify novel E4orf4-interacting proteins. In this manner we identified Nup205, a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) as an E4orf4 interacting partner. The arginine-rich motif (ARM) of E4orf4 was required for interaction with Nup205 and for nuclear localization of E4orf4. ARMs are commonly found on viral nuclear proteins, and we observed that Nup205 interacts with three different nuclear viral proteins containing ARMs. E4orf4 formed a trimolecular complex containing both Nup205 and PP2A. Furthermore, Nup205 complexed with E4orf4 was hypophosphorylated, suggesting that the protein is specifically targeted for dephosphorylation. An adenovirus mutant that does not express E4orf4 (Orf4−) displayed elevated early and reduced late gene expression relative to that of the wild type. We observed that knockdown of Nup205 resulted in the same phenotype as that of the Orf4− virus, suggesting that the proteins function as a complex to regulate viral gene expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nup205 resulted in a more than a 4-fold reduction in the replication of wild-type adenovirus. Our data show for first time that Ad5 E4orf4 interacts with and modifies the NPC and that Nup205-E4orf4 binding is required for normal regulation of viral gene expression and viral replication. IMPORTANCE Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are highly regulated conduits in the nuclear membrane that control transport of macromolecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Viruses that replicate in the nucleus must negotiate the NPC during nuclear entry, and viral DNA, mRNA, and

  16. Ecological consequences of body size decline in harvested fish species: positive feedback loops in trophic interactions amplify human impact.

    PubMed

    Audzijonyte, Asta; Kuparinen, Anna; Gorton, Rebecca; Fulton, Elizabeth A

    2013-04-23

    Humans are changing marine ecosystems worldwide, both directly through fishing and indirectly through climate change. One of the little explored outcomes of human-induced change involves the decreasing body sizes of fishes. We use a marine ecosystem model to explore how a slow (less than 0.1% per year) decrease in the length of five harvested species could affect species interactions, biomasses and yields. We find that even small decreases in fish sizes are amplified by positive feedback loops in the ecosystem and can lead to major changes in natural mortality. For some species, a total of 4 per cent decrease in length-at-age over 50 years resulted in 50 per cent increase in predation mortality. However, the magnitude and direction in predation mortality changes differed among species and one shrinking species even experienced reduced predation pressure. Nevertheless, 50 years of gradual decrease in body size resulted in 1-35% decrease in biomasses and catches of all shrinking species. Therefore, fisheries management practices that ignore contemporary life-history changes are likely to overestimate long-term yields and can lead to overfishing. PMID:23365151

  17. Interactions between Shh, Sostdc1 and Wnt signaling and a new feedback loop for spatial patterning of the teeth.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Won; Kwak, Sungwook; Woolley, Thomas E; Lee, Min-Jung; Kim, Eun-Jung; Baker, Ruth E; Kim, Hee-Jin; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Tickle, Cheryll; Maini, Philip K; Jung, Han-Sung

    2011-05-01

    Each vertebrate species displays specific tooth patterns in each quadrant of the jaw: the mouse has one incisor and three molars, which develop at precise locations and at different times. The reason why multiple teeth form in the jaw of vertebrates and the way in which they develop separately from each other have been extensively studied, but the genetic mechanism governing the spatial patterning of teeth still remains to be elucidated. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is one of the key signaling molecules involved in the spatial patterning of teeth and other ectodermal organs such as hair, vibrissae and feathers. Sostdc1, a secreted inhibitor of the Wnt and Bmp pathways, also regulates the spatial patterning of teeth and hair. Here, by utilizing maternal transfer of 5E1 (an anti-Shh antibody) to mouse embryos through the placenta, we show that Sostdc1 is downstream of Shh signaling and suggest a Wnt-Shh-Sostdc1 negative feedback loop as a pivotal mechanism controlling the spatial patterning of teeth. Furthermore, we propose a new reaction-diffusion model in which Wnt, Shh and Sostdc1 act as the activator, mediator and inhibitor, respectively, and confirm that such interactions can generate the tooth pattern of a wild-type mouse and can explain the various tooth patterns produced experimentally. PMID:21447550

  18. Bach2-Batf interactions control Th2-type immune response by regulating the IL-4 amplification loop.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Makoto; Ise, Wataru; Ochi, Mizuki; Suzuki, Junpei; Kometani, Kohei; Maruyama, Saho; Izumoto, Maya; Matsumoto, Akira; Takemori, Nobuaki; Takemori, Ayako; Shinoda, Kenta; Nakayama, Toshinori; Ohara, Osamu; Yasukawa, Masaki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Masakatsu

    2016-01-01

    Although Bach2 has an important role in regulating the Th2-type immune response, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We herein demonstrate that Bach2 associates with Batf and binds to the regulatory regions of the Th2 cytokine gene loci. The Bach2-Batf complex antagonizes the recruitment of the Batf-Irf4 complex to AP-1 motifs and suppresses Th2 cytokine production. Furthermore, we find that Bach2 regulates the Batf and Batf3 expressions via two distinct pathways. First, Bach2 suppresses the maintenance of the Batf and Batf3 expression through the inhibition of IL-4 production. Second, the Bach2-Batf complex directly binds to the Batf and Batf3 gene loci and reduces transcription by interfering with the Batf-Irf4 complex. These findings suggest that IL-4 and Batf form a positive feedback amplification loop to induce Th2 cell differentiation and the subsequent Th2-type immune response, and Bach2-Batf interactions are required to prevent an excessive Th2 response. PMID:27581382

  19. Addressing the Glycine-Rich Loop of Protein Kinases by a Multi-Facetted Interaction Network: Inhibition of PKA and a PKB Mimic.

    PubMed

    Lauber, Birgit S; Hardegger, Leo A; Asraful, Alam K; Lund, Bjarte A; Dumele, Oliver; Harder, Michael; Kuhn, Bernd; Engh, Richard A; Diederich, François

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases continue to be hot targets in drug discovery research, as they are involved in many essential cellular processes and their deregulation can lead to a variety of diseases. A series of 32 enantiomerically pure inhibitors was synthesized and tested towards protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase B mimic PKAB3 (PKA triple mutant). The ligands bind to the hinge region, ribose pocket, and glycine-rich loop at the ATP site. Biological assays showed high potency against PKA, with Ki values in the low nanomolar range. The investigation demonstrates the significance of targeting the often neglected glycine-rich loop for gaining high binding potency. X-ray co-crystal structures revealed a multi-facetted network of ligand-loop interactions for the tightest binders, involving orthogonal dipolar contacts, sulfur and other dispersive contacts, amide-π stacking, and H-bonding to organofluorine, besides efficient water replacement. The network was analyzed in a computational approach. PMID:26578105

  20. Interaction of <1 0 0> dislocation loops with dislocations studied by dislocation dynamics in α-iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X. J.; Dupuy, L.; Devincre, B.; Terentyev, D.; Vincent, L.

    2015-05-01

    Interstitial dislocation loops with Burgers vector of <1 0 0> type are formed in α-iron under neutron or heavy ion irradiation. As the density and size of these loops increase with radiation dose and temperature, these defects are thought to play a key role in hardening and subsequent embrittlement of iron-based steels. The aim of the present work is to study the pinning strength of the loops on mobile dislocations. Prior to run massive Dislocation Dynamics (DD) simulations involving experimentally representative array of radiation defects and dislocations, the DD code and its parameterization are validated by comparing the individual loop-dislocation reactions with those obtained from direct atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Several loop-dislocation reaction mechanisms are successfully reproduced as well as the values of the unpinning stress to detach mobile dislocations from the defects.

  1. Interaction between hydrocarbon seepage, chemosynthetic communities and bottom water redox at cold seeps of the Makran accretionary prism: insights from habitat-specific pore water sampling and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, D.; Sahling, H.; Nöthen, K.; Bohrmann, G.; Zabel, M.; Kasten, S.

    2011-09-01

    The interaction between fluid seepage, bottom water redox, and chemosynthetic communities was studied at cold seeps across one of the world's largest oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) located at the Makran convergent continental margin. Push cores were obtained from seeps within and at the lower boundary of the core-OMZ with a remotely operated vehicle. Extracted pore water was analyzed for sulfide and sulfate contents. Depending on oxygen availability, seeps were either colonized by microbial mats or by mats and macrofauna. The latter, including ampharetid polychaetes and vesicomyid clams, occurred in distinct benthic habitats which were arranged in a concentric fashion around gas orifices. At most sites colonized by microbial mats, hydrogen sulfide was exported into the bottom water. Where macrofauna was widely abundant, hydrogen sulfide was consumed within the sediment. Numerical modeling of pore water profiles was performed in order to assess rates of fluid advection and bioirrigation. While the magnitude of upward fluid flow decreased from 11 cm yr-1 to <1 cm yr-1 and the sulfate/methane transition zone (SMTZ) deepened with increasing distance from the central gas orifice, the fluxes of sulfate into the SMTZ did not significantly differ (6.6-9.3 mol m-2 yr-1). Depth-integrated rates of bioirrigation increased from 162 cm yr-1 in central habitats characterized by microbial mats and sparse macrofauna to 348 cm yr-1 in habitats of large and small vesicomyid clams. These results reveal that chemosynthetic macrofauna inhabiting the outer seep habitats at the lower boundary of the OMZ efficiently bioirrigate and thus transport sulfate into the upper 10 to 15 cm of the sediment. In this way bioirrigation compensates for the lower upward flux of methane in outer habitats and stimulates rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate high enough to provide sulfide for chemosynthesis. Through bioirrigation macrofauna engineer their geochemical environment and fuel

  2. Interaction between hydrocarbon seepage, chemosynthetic communities, and bottom water redox at cold seeps of the Makran accretionary prism: insights from habitat-specific pore water sampling and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, D.; Sahling, H.; Nöthen, K.; Bohrmann, G.; Zabel, M.; Kasten, S.

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between fluid seepage, bottom water redox, and chemosynthetic communities was studied at cold seeps across one of the world's largest oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) located at the Makran convergent continental margin. Push cores were obtained from seeps within and below the core-OMZ with a remotely operated vehicle. Extracted sediment pore water was analyzed for sulfide and sulfate concentrations. Depending on oxygen availability in the bottom water, seeps were either colonized by microbial mats or by mats and macrofauna. The latter, including ampharetid polychaetes and vesicomyid clams, occurred in distinct benthic habitats, which were arranged in a concentric fashion around gas orifices. At most sites colonized by microbial mats, hydrogen sulfide was exported into the bottom water. Where macrofauna was widely abundant, hydrogen sulfide was retained within the sediment. Numerical modeling of pore water profiles was performed in order to assess rates of fluid advection and bioirrigation. While the magnitude of upward fluid flow decreased from 11 cm yr-1 to <1 cm yr-1 and the sulfate/methane transition (SMT) deepened with increasing distance from the central gas orifice, the fluxes of sulfate into the SMT did not significantly differ (6.6-9.3 mol m-2 yr-1). Depth-integrated rates of bioirrigation increased from 120 cm yr-1 in the central habitat, characterized by microbial mats and sparse macrofauna, to 297 cm yr-1 in the habitat of large and few small vesicomyid clams. These results reveal that chemosynthetic macrofauna inhabiting the outer seep habitats below the core-OMZ efficiently bioirrigate and thus transport sulfate down into the upper 10 to 15 cm of the sediment. In this way the animals deal with the lower upward flux of methane in outer habitats by stimulating rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate high enough to provide hydrogen sulfide for chemosynthesis. Through bioirrigation, macrofauna engineer their geochemical

  3. Identification of positive charges situated at the outer mouth of the CFTR chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-Jun; Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2008-11-01

    We have used site-directed mutagenesis and functional analysis to identify positively charged amino acid residues in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel that interact with extracellular anions. Mutation of two positively charged arginine residues in the first extracellular loop (ECL) of CFTR, R104, and R117, as well as lysine residue K335 in the sixth transmembrane region, leads to inward rectification of the current-voltage relationship and decreased single channel conductance. These effects are dependent on the charge of the substituted side chain and on the Cl(-) concentration, suggesting that these positive charges normally act to concentrate extracellular Cl(-) ions near the outer mouth of the pore. Side chain charge-dependent effects are mimicked by manipulating charge in situ by mutating these amino acids to cysteine followed by covalent modification with charged cysteine-reactive reagents, confirming the location of these side chains within the pore outer vestibule. State-independent modification of R104C and R117C suggests that these residues are located at the outermost part of the pore. We suggest that ECL1 contributes to the CFTR pore external vestibule and that positively charged amino acid side chains in this region act to attract Cl(-) ions into the pore. In contrast, we find no evidence that fixed positive charges in other ECLs contribute to the permeation properties of the pore. PMID:18449561

  4. Long-distance kissing loop interactions between a 3' proximal Y-shaped structure and apical loops of 5' hairpins enhance translation of Saguaro cactus virus.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Maitreyi; Shi, Kerong; Yuan, Xuefeng; Simon, Anne E

    2011-08-15

    Circularization of cellular mRNAs is a key event prior to translation initiation. We report that efficient translation of Saguaro cactus virus (SCV) requires a 3' translational enhancer (PTE) located partially in coding sequences. Unlike a similar PTE reported in the 3' UTR of Pea enation mosaic virus that does not engage in an RNA:RNA interaction (Wang Z. et al., J. Biol. Chem. 284, 14189-14202, 2009), the SCV PTE participates in long distance RNA:RNA interactions with hairpins located in the p26 ORF and in the 5' UTR of one subgenomic RNA. At least two additional RNA:RNA interactions are also present, one of which involves the p26 initiation codon. Similar PTE can be found in six additional carmoviruses that can putatively form long-distance interactions with 5' hairpins located in comparable positions. PMID:21664637

  5. The desensitization gate of inhibitory Cys-loop receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Marc; Thomas, Philip; Smart, Trevor G.

    2015-04-01

    Cys-loop neurotransmitter-gated ion channels are vital for communication throughout the nervous system. Following activation, these receptors enter into a desensitized state in which the ion channel shuts even though the neurotransmitter molecules remain bound. To date, the molecular determinants underlying this most fundamental property of Cys-loop receptors have remained elusive. Here we present a generic mechanism for the desensitization of Cys-loop GABAA (GABAARs) and glycine receptors (GlyRs), which both mediate fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. Desensitization is regulated by interactions between the second and third transmembrane segments, which affect the ion channel lumen near its intracellular end. The GABAAR and GlyR pore blocker picrotoxin prevented desensitization, consistent with its deep channel-binding site overlapping a physical desensitization gate.

  6. Constraint on R-parity violating MSSM at the one-loop level from CP-odd N-N interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Nodoka; Sato, Toru; Kubota, Takahiro

    2011-10-21

    Minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation (RPVMSSM) contributes to the P-, CP-odd four-quark interaction. The P-, CP-odd four-quark interaction is constrained by the new {sup 199}Hg EDM experimental data. It is then possible to constrain R-parity violating (RPV) couplings from the {sup 199}Hg EDM data. In this talk, we analyze the RPV contribution to the P-, CP-odd four-quark interaction at the one-loop level to give constraints on RPV parameters.

  7. TRAP-5' stem loop interaction increases the efficiency of transcription termination in the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon leader region.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Adam P; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Babitzke, Paul

    2007-11-01

    TRAP regulates expression of the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon by a transcription attenuation mechanism in which tryptophan-activated TRAP binds to 11 (G/U)AG repeats in the nascent trp leader transcript. Bound TRAP blocks formation of an antiterminator structure and allows formation of an overlapping intrinsic terminator upstream of the trp operon structural genes. A 5' stem-loop (5'SL) structure located upstream of the triplet repeat region also interacts with TRAP. TRAP-5'SL RNA interaction participates in the transcription attenuation mechanism by preferentially increasing the affinity of TRAP for the nascent trp leader transcript during the early stages of transcription, when only a few triplet repeats have been synthesized. Footprinting assays indicated that the 5'SL contacts TRAP through two discrete groups of single-stranded nucleotides that lie in the hairpin loop and in an internal loop. Filter binding and in vivo expression assays of 5'SL mutants established that G7, A8, and A9 from the internal loop, and A19 and G20 from the hairpin loop are critical for proper 5'SL function. These nucleotides are conserved among certain other 5'SL-containing organisms. Single-round transcription results indicated that the 5'SL increases the termination efficiency when transcription is fast; however, the influence of the 5'SL was lost when transcription was slowed by reducing the ribonucleoside triphosphate concentration. Since there is a limited amount of time for TRAP to bind to the nascent transcript and promote termination, our data suggest that the contribution of TRAP-5'SL interaction increases the rate of TRAP binding, which, in turn, increases the efficiency of transcription termination. PMID:17881743

  8. Bulged residues promote the progression of a loop–loop interaction to a stable and inhibitory antisense–target RNA complex

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Fabrice A.; Westhof, Eric; Ehresmann, Chantal; Ehresmann, Bernard; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.; Romby, Pascale

    2001-01-01

    In several groups of bacterial plasmids, antisense RNAs regulate copy number through inhibition of replication initiator protein synthesis. These RNAs are characterized by a long hairpin structure interrupted by several unpaired residues or bulged loops. In plasmid R1, the inhibitory complex between the antisense RNA (CopA) and its target mRNA (CopT) is characterized by a four-way junction structure and a side-by-side helical alignment. This topology facilitates the formation of a stabilizer intermolecular helix between distal regions of both RNAs, essential for in vivo control. The bulged residues in CopA/CopT were shown to be required for high in vitro binding rate and in vivo activity. This study addresses the question of why removal of bulged nucleotides blocks stable complex formation. Structure mapping, modification interference, and molecular modeling of bulged-less mutant CopA–CopT complexes suggests that, subsequent to loop–loop contact, helix propagation is prevented. Instead, a fully base paired loop–loop interaction is formed, inducing a continuous stacking of three helices. Consequently, the stabilizer helix cannot be formed, and stable complex formation is blocked. In contrast to the four-way junction topology, the loop–loop interaction alone failed to prevent ribosome binding at its loading site and, thus, inhibition of RepA translation was alleviated. PMID:11470871

  9. Early closure of a long loop in the refolding of adenylate kinase: a possible key role of non-local interactions in the initial folding steps.

    PubMed

    Orevi, Tomer; Ben Ishay, Eldad; Pirchi, Menachem; Jacob, Maik H; Amir, Dan; Haas, Elisha

    2009-01-30

    Most globular protein chains, when transferred from high to low denaturant concentrations, collapse instantly before they refold to their native state. The initial compaction of the protein molecule is assumed to have a key effect on the folding pathway, but it is not known whether the earliest structures formed during or instantly after collapse are defined by local or by non-local interactions--that is, by secondary structural elements or by loop closure of long segments of the protein chain. Stable closure of one or several long loops can reduce the chain entropy at a very early stage and can prevent the protein from following non-productive pathways whose number grows exponentially with the length of the protein chain. In Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (AK), about seven long loops define the topology of the native structure. We selected four loop-forming sections of the chain and probed the time course of loop formation during refolding of AK. We labeled the termini of the loop segments with tryptophan and cysteine-5-amidosalicylic acid. This donor-acceptor pair of probes used with fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer spectroscopy (FRET) is suitable for detecting very short distances and thus is able to distinguish between random and specific compactions. Refolding of AK was initiated by stopped-flow mixing, followed simultaneously by donor and acceptor fluorescence, and analyzed in terms of energy transfer efficiency and distance. In the collapsed state of AK, observed after the 5-ms dead time of the instrument, one of the selected segments shows a native-like separation of its termini; it forms a loop already in the collapsed state. A second segment that includes the first but is longer by 15 residues shows an almost native-like separation of its termini. In contrast, a segment that is shorter but part of the second segment shows a distance separation of its termini as high as a segment that spans almost the whole protein chain. We conclude

  10. The Natively Disordered Loop of Bcl-2 Undergoes Phosphorylation-Dependent Conformational Change and Interacts with Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, CongBao; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Chia, Joel; Mu, Yuguang; Baek, Kwanghee; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2012-01-01

    Bcl-2 plays a central role in the regulation of apoptosis. Structural studies of Bcl-2 revealed the presence of a flexible and natively disordered loop that bridges the Bcl-2 homology motifs, BH3 and BH4. This loop is phosphorylated on multiple sites in response to a variety of external stimuli, including the microtubule-targeting drugs, paclitaxel and colchicine. Currently, the underlying molecular mechanism of Bcl-2 phosphorylation and its biological significance remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the molecular characteristics of this anti-apoptotic protein. To this end, we generated synthetic peptides derived from the Bcl-2 loop, and multiple Bcl-2 loop truncation mutants that include the phosphorylation sites. Our results demonstrate that S87 in the flexible loop of Bcl-2 is the primary phosphorylation site for JNK and ERK2, suggesting some sequence or structural specificity for the phosphorylation by these kinases. Our NMR studies and molecular dynamics simulation studies support indicate that phosphorylation of S87 induces a conformational change in the peptide. Finally, we show that the phosphorylated peptides of the Bcl-2 loop can bind Pin1, further substantiating the phosphorylation-mediated conformation change of Bcl-2. PMID:23272207

  11. Pore formation and translocation of melittin.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, K; Yoneyama, S; Miyajima, K

    1997-01-01

    Melittin, a bee venom, is a basic amphiphilic peptide, which mainly acts on the lipid matrix of membranes, lysing various cells. To elucidate the molecular mechanism, we investigated its interactions with phospholipid vesicles. The peptide formed a pore with a short lifetime in the membrane, as revealed by the release of an anionic fluorescent dye, calcein, from the liposomes. Our new double-labeling method clarified that the pore size increased with the peptide-to-lipid ratio. Upon the disintegration of the pore, a fraction of the peptides translocated across the bilayer. The pore formation was coupled with the translocation, which was proved by three fluorescence experiments recently developed by our laboratory. A novel model for the melittin pore formation was discussed in comparison with other pore-forming peptides. PMID:9251799

  12. Determinants of pore folding in potassium channel biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Erin; Khanna, Pooja; Tu, LiWei; Robinson, John M.; Deutsch, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Many ion channels, both selective and nonselective, have reentrant pore loops that contribute to the architecture of the permeation pathway. It is a fundamental feature of these diverse channels, regardless of whether they are gated by changes of membrane potential or by neurotransmitters, and is critical to function of the channel. Misfolding of the pore loop leads to loss of trafficking and expression of these channels on the cell surface. Mature tetrameric potassium channels contain an α-helix within the pore loop. We systematically mutated the “pore helix” residues of the channel Kv1.3 and assessed the ability of the monomer to fold into a tertiary reentrant loop. Our results show that pore loop residues form a canonical α-helix in the monomer early in biogenesis and that disruption of tertiary folding is caused by hydrophilic substitutions only along one face of this α-helix. These results provide insight into the determinants of the reentrant pore conformation, which is essential for ion channel function. PMID:24616516

  13. Spin-orbit interaction driven collective electron-hole excitations in a noncentrosymmetric nodal loop Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyo-Hoon; Lee, Kwan-Woo; Pickett, Warren E.

    2015-09-01

    NbP is one member of a new class of nodal loop semimetals characterized by the cooperative effects of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and a lack of inversion center. Here transport and spectroscopic properties of NbP are evaluated using density functional theory methods. SOC together with the lack of inversion symmetry splits degeneracies, giving rise to "Russian doll nested" Fermi surfaces containing 4 ×10-4 electron (hole) carriers/f.u. Due to the modest SOC strength in Nb, the Fermi surfaces map out the Weyl nodal loops. Calculated structure around T*≈100 K in transport properties reproduces well the observed transport behavior only when SOC is included, attesting to the precision of the (delicate) calculations and the stoichiometry of the samples. Low-energy collective electron-hole excitations (plasmons) in the 20-60 meV range result from the nodal loop splitting.

  14. Insight into virus encapsulation mechanism through in silico interaction study between coat protein and RNA operator loops of Sesbania mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Meena, Chetan Kumar; Borkotoky, Subhomoi; Murali, Ayaluru

    2016-05-24

    Viruses are parasite by nature and they are responsible for many diseases. Inhibitor development is very difficult for viruses due to their rapid mutative nature. A common approach for treating virus infection is targeting them at the genomic level and an encapsulation mechanism can be one of the targets. Sesbania mosaic virus (SeMV) is a spherical virus and its capsid is formed by a coat protein, which contains the Arginine Rich Motif (ARM). This ARM interacts with RNA operator loops present in their genome and starts encapsulation. Though the structure of SeMV was already solved by crystallography, it lacks the critical ARM domain. We predicted the full-length three-dimensional structure of this protein by using crystal structure (lacking ARM) as a template along with tertiary structure of RNA operator loops. Docking studies were performed to discover the interacting residues of protein and RNA which are driving protein and RNA to interact with each other. We observed that these interactions lead to conformation changes in the coat protein structure, which starts genome encapsulation process. The ARM region is found to be crucial for these interactions. Molecular dynamics simulation studies were performed to check the conformational changes and free energy landscapes were generated to check the viability of these changes in terms of energy. In this work we proposed one RNA operator loop that is responsible for noticeable conformational changes in the SeMV structure and might be involved in the activation of the viral protein. The results of this in silico study can be tested further through in vitro studies and can be used to stop encapsulation. PMID:27063578

  15. A frequent human coagulation Factor VII mutation (A294V, c152) in loop 140s affects the interaction with activators, tissue factor and substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Toso, Raffaella; Pinotti, Mirko; High, Katherine A; Pollak, Eleanor S; Bernardi, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Activated Factor VII (FVIIa) is a vitamin-K-dependent serine protease that initiates blood clotting after interacting with its cofactor tissue factor (TF). The complex FVIIa-TF is responsible for the activation of Factor IX (FIX) and Factor X (FX), leading ultimately to the formation of a stable fibrin clot. Activated FX (FXa), a product of FVIIa enzymic activity, is also the most efficient activator of zymogen FVII. Interactions of FVII/FVIIa with its activators, cofactor and substrates have been investigated extensively to define contact regions and residues involved in the formation of the complexes. Site-directed mutagenesis and inhibition assays led to the identification of sites removed from the FVIIa active site that influence binding specificity and affinity of the enzyme. In this study we report the characterization of a frequent naturally occurring human FVII mutant, A294V (residue 152 in the chymotrypsin numbering system), located in loop 140s. This region undergoes major rearrangements after FVII activation and is relevant to the development of substrate specificity. FVII A294V shows delayed activation by FXa as well as reduced activity towards peptidyl and macromolecular substrates without impairing the catalytic efficiency of the triad. Also, the interaction of this FVII variant with TF was altered, suggesting that this residue, and more likely loop 140s, plays a pivotal role not only in the recognition of FX by the FVIIa-TF complex, but also in the interaction of FVII with both its activators and cofactor TF. PMID:11931672

  16. Interactions of H562 in the S5 Helix with T618 and S621 in the Pore Helix Are Important Determinants of hERG1 Potassium Channel Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lees-Miller, James P.; Subbotina, Julia O.; Guo, Jiqing; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Noskov, Sergei Y.; Duff, Henry J.

    2009-01-01

    hERG1 is a member of the cyclic nucleotide binding domain family of K+ channels. Alignment of cyclic nucleotide binding domain channels revealed an evolutionary conserved sequence HwX(A/G)C in the S5 domain. We reasoned that histidine 562 in hERG1 could play an important structure-function role. To explore this role, we created in silica models of the hERG1 pore domain based on the KvAP crystal structure with Rosetta-membrane modeling and molecular-dynamics simulations. Simulations indicate that the H562 residue in the S5 helix spans the gap between the S5 helix and the pore helix, stabilizing the pore domain, and that mutation at the H562 residue leads to a disruption of the hydrogen bonding to T618 and S621, resulting in distortion of the selectivity filter. Analysis of the simulated point mutations at positions 562/618/621 showed that the reciprocal double mutations H562W/T618I would partially restore the orientation of the 562 residue. Matching hydrophobic interactions between mutated W562 residue and I618 partially compensate for the disrupted hydrogen bonding. Complementary in vitro electrophysiological studies confirmed the results of the molecular-dynamics simulations on single mutations at positions 562, 618, and 621. Experimentally, mutations of the H562 to tryptophan produced a functional channel, but with slowed deactivation and shifted V1/2 of activation. Furthermore, the double mutation T618I/H562W rescued the defects seen in activation, deactivation, and potassium selectivity seen with the H562W mutation. In conclusion, interactions between H562 in the S5 helix and amino acids in the pore helix are important determinants of hERG1 potassium channel function, as confirmed by theory and experiment. PMID:19413965

  17. Looping Mediated Interaction between the Promoter and 3′ UTR Regulates Type II Collagen Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jash, Arijita; Yun, Kangsun; Sahoo, Anupama; So, Jae-Seon; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2012-01-01

    Type II collagen is the major component of articular cartilage and is mainly synthesized by chondrocytes. Repeated sub-culturing of primary chondrocytes leads to reduction of type II collagen gene (Col2a1) expression, which mimics the process of chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Although the functional importance of Col2a1 expression has been extensively investigated, mechanism of transcriptional regulation during chondrocyte dedifferentiation is still unclear. In this study, we have investigated the crosstalk between cis-acting DNA element and transcription factor on Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the potential regulatory regions in the Col2a1 genomic locus. Among them, promoter and 3′ untranslated region (UTR) showed highly accessible chromatin architecture with enriched recruitment of active chromatin markers in primary chondrocytes. 3′ UTR has a potent enhancer function which recruits Lef1 (Lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1) transcription factor, leading to juxtaposition of the 3′ UTR with the promoter through gene looping resulting in up-regulation of Col2a1 gene transcription. Knock-down of endogenous Lef1 level significantly reduced the gene looping and subsequently down-regulated Col2a1 expression. However, these regulatory loci become inaccessible due to condensed chromatin architecture as chondrocytes dedifferentiate which was accompanied by a reduction of gene looping and down-regulation of Col2a1 expression. Our results indicate that Lef1 mediated looping between promoter and 3′ UTR under the permissive chromatin architecture upregulates Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. PMID:22815835

  18. Cataract-causing mutation S228P promotes βB1-crystallin aggregation and degradation by separating two interacting loops in C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Qi, Liang-Bo; Hu, Li-Dan; Liu, Huihui; Li, Hai-Yun; Leng, Xiao-Yao; Yan, Yong-Bin

    2016-07-01

    β/γ-Crystallins are predominant structural proteins in the cytoplasm of lens fiber cells and share a similar fold composing of four Greek-key motifs divided into two domains. Numerous cataract-causing mutations have been identified in various β/γ-crystallins, but the mechanisms underlying cataract caused by most mutations remains uncharacterized. The S228P mutation in βB1-crystallin has been linked to autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract. Here we found that the S228P mutant was prone to aggregate and degrade in both of the human and E. coli cells. The intracellular S228P aggregates could be redissolved by lanosterol. The S228P mutation modified the refolding pathway of βB1-crystallin by affecting the formation of the dimeric intermediate but not the monomeric intermediate. Compared with native βB1-crystallin, the refolded S228P protein had less packed structures, unquenched Trp fluorophores and increased hydrophobic exposure. The refolded S228P protein was prone to aggregate at the physiological temperature and decreased the protective effect of βB1-crystallin on βA3-crystallin. Molecular dynamic simulation studies indicated that the mutation decreased the subunit binding energy and modified the distribution of surface electrostatic potentials. More importantly, the mutation separated two interacting loops in the C-terminal domain, which shielded the hydrophobic core from solvent in native βB1-crystallin. These two interacting loops are highly conserved in both of the N- and C-terminal domains of all β/γ-crystallins. We propose that these two interacting loops play an important role in the folding and structural stability of β/γ-crystallin domains by protecting the hydrophobic core from solvent access. PMID:27318838

  19. Position of the kissing-loop interaction associated with PTE-type 3’CITEs can affect enhancement of cap-independent translation

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Maitreyi; Kuhlmann, Micki M.; Kumar, Kalyani; Simon, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    The Panicum mosaic virus-like translation enhancer (PTE) functions as a cap-independent translation enhancer (3’CITE) in members of several Tombusviridae genera including 7/19 carmoviruses. For nearly all PTE, a kissing-loop connects the element with a hairpin found in several conserved locations in the genomic RNA (5’ terminal hairpin or ~100 nt from the 5’end) and small subgenomic RNA (~63 nt from the 5’end). Moving the interaction closer to the 5’end in reporter mRNAs using Saguaro cactus virus (SCV) sequences had either a minimal or substantial negative effect on translation. Movement of the kissing loop from position 104 to the SCV 5’ terminal hairpin also reduced translation by 4-fold. These results suggest that relocating the PTE kissing loop closer to the 5’end reduces PTE efficiency, in contrast to results for the Barley yellow dwarf BTE and Tomato bushy stunt virus Y-shaped 3’CITEs , suggesting that different 3’CITEs have different bridging requirements. PMID:24928038

  20. Position of the kissing-loop interaction associated with PTE-type 3'CITEs can affect enhancement of cap-independent translation.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Maitreyi; Kuhlmann, Micki M; Kumar, Kalyani; Simon, Anne E

    2014-06-01

    The Panicum mosaic virus-like translation enhancer (PTE) functions as a cap-independent translation enhancer (3'CITE) in members of several Tombusviridae genera including 7/19 carmoviruses. For nearly all PTE, a kissing-loop connects the element with a hairpin found in several conserved locations in the genomic RNA (5' terminal hairpin or ~100 nt from the 5' end) and small subgenomic RNA (~63 nt from the 5' end). Moving the interaction closer to the 5' end in reporter mRNAs using Saguaro cactus virus (SCV) sequences had either a minimal or substantial negative effect on translation. Movement of the kissing loop from position 104 to the SCV 5' terminal hairpin also reduced translation by 4-fold. These results suggest that relocating the PTE kissing loop closer to the 5' end reduces PTE efficiency, in contrast to results for the Barley yellow dwarf BTE and Tomato bushy stunt virus Y-shaped 3'CITEs, suggesting that different 3'CITEs have different bridging requirements. PMID:24928038

  1. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Lee, Elizabeth; Kallam, Alekhya; Majumdar, Partha; Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J.; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James; Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  2. SufE D74R Substitution Alters Active Site Loop Dynamics To Further Enhance SufE Interaction with the SufS Cysteine Desulfurase

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yuyuan; Kim, Dokyong; Dong, Guangchao; Busenlehner, Laura S.; Frantom, Patrick A.; Outten, F. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Many essential metalloproteins require iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster cofactors for their function. In vivo persulfide formation from L-cysteine is a key step in the biogenesis of Fe–S clusters in most organisms. In Escherichia coli, the SufS cysteine desulfurase mobilizes persulfide from L-cysteine via a PLP-dependent ping-pong reaction. SufS requires the SufE partner protein to transfer the persulfide to the SufB Fe–S cluster scaffold. Without SufE, the SufS enzyme fails to efficiently turn over and remains locked in the persulfide-bound state. Coordinated protein–protein interactions mediate sulfur transfer from SufS to SufE. Multiple studies have suggested that SufE must undergo a conformational change to extend its active site Cys loop during sulfur transfer from SufS. To test this putative model, we mutated SufE Asp74 to Arg (D74R) to increase the dynamics of the SufE Cys51 loop. Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) analysis of SufE D74R revealed an increase in solvent accessibility and dynamics in the loop containing the active site Cys51 used to accept persulfide from SufS. Our results indicate that the mutant protein has a stronger binding affinity for SufS than that of wild-type SufE. In addition, SufE D74R can still enhance SufS desulfurase activity and did not show saturation at higher SufE D74R concentrations, unlike wild-type SufE. These results show that dynamic changes may shift SufE to a sulfur-acceptor state that interacts more strongly with SufS. PMID:26171726

  3. The Intracellular Loop of the Glycine Receptor: It's not all about the Size.

    PubMed

    Langlhofer, Georg; Villmann, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The family of Cys-loop receptors (CLRs) shares a high degree of homology and sequence identity. The overall structural elements are highly conserved with a large extracellular domain (ECD) harboring an α-helix and 10 β-sheets. Following the ECD, four transmembrane domains (TMD) are connected by intracellular and extracellular loop structures. Except the TM3-4 loop, their length comprises 7-14 residues. The TM3-4 loop forms the largest part of the intracellular domain (ICD) and exhibits the most variable region between all CLRs. The ICD is defined by the TM3-4 loop together with the TM1-2 loop preceding the ion channel pore. During the last decade, crystallization approaches were successful for some members of the CLR family. To allow crystallization, the intracellular loop was in most structures replaced by a short linker present in prokaryotic CLRs. Therefore, no structural information about the large TM3-4 loop of CLRs including the glycine receptors (GlyRs) is available except for some basic stretches close to TM3 and TM4. The intracellular loop has been intensively studied with regard to functional aspects including desensitization, modulation of channel physiology by pharmacological substances, posttranslational modifications, and motifs important for trafficking. Furthermore, the ICD interacts with scaffold proteins enabling inhibitory synapse formation. This review focuses on attempts to define structural and functional elements within the ICD of GlyRs discussed with the background of protein-protein interactions and functional channel formation in the absence of the TM3-4 loop. PMID:27330534

  4. The Intracellular Loop of the Glycine Receptor: It’s not all about the Size

    PubMed Central

    Langlhofer, Georg; Villmann, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The family of Cys-loop receptors (CLRs) shares a high degree of homology and sequence identity. The overall structural elements are highly conserved with a large extracellular domain (ECD) harboring an α-helix and 10 β-sheets. Following the ECD, four transmembrane domains (TMD) are connected by intracellular and extracellular loop structures. Except the TM3–4 loop, their length comprises 7–14 residues. The TM3–4 loop forms the largest part of the intracellular domain (ICD) and exhibits the most variable region between all CLRs. The ICD is defined by the TM3–4 loop together with the TM1–2 loop preceding the ion channel pore. During the last decade, crystallization approaches were successful for some members of the CLR family. To allow crystallization, the intracellular loop was in most structures replaced by a short linker present in prokaryotic CLRs. Therefore, no structural information about the large TM3–4 loop of CLRs including the glycine receptors (GlyRs) is available except for some basic stretches close to TM3 and TM4. The intracellular loop has been intensively studied with regard to functional aspects including desensitization, modulation of channel physiology by pharmacological substances, posttranslational modifications, and motifs important for trafficking. Furthermore, the ICD interacts with scaffold proteins enabling inhibitory synapse formation. This review focuses on attempts to define structural and functional elements within the ICD of GlyRs discussed with the background of protein-protein interactions and functional channel formation in the absence of the TM3–4 loop. PMID:27330534

  5. Proteomic identification of M. tuberculosis protein kinase substrates: PknB recruits GarA, a FHA domain-containing protein, through activation loop-mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Villarino, A; Duran, R; Wehenkel, A; Fernandez, P; England, P; Brodin, P; Cole, S T; Zimny-Arndt, U; Jungblut, P R; Cerveñansky, C; Alzari, P M

    2005-07-29

    Genes for functional Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) are ubiquitous in prokaryotic genomes, but little is known about their physiological substrates and their actual involvement in bacterial signal transduction pathways. We report here the identification of GarA (Rv1827), a Forkhead-associated (FHA) domain-containing protein, as a putative physiological substrate of PknB, an essential Ser/Thr protein kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using a global proteomic approach, GarA was found to be the best detectable substrate of the PknB catalytic domain in non-denatured whole-cell protein extracts from M. tuberculosis and the saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis. Enzymological and binding studies of the recombinant proteins demonstrate that docking interactions between the activation loop of PknB and the C-terminal FHA domain of GarA are required to enable efficient phosphorylation at a single N-terminal threonine residue, Thr22, of the substrate. The predicted amino acid sequence of the garA gene, including both the N-terminal phosphorylation motif and the FHA domain, is strongly conserved in mycobacteria and other related actinomycetes, suggesting a functional role of GarA in putative STPK-mediated signal transduction pathways. The ensuing model of PknB-GarA interactions suggests a substrate recruitment mechanism that might apply to other mycobacterial kinases bearing multiple phosphorylation sites in their activation loops. PMID:15978616

  6. Crystal structures of SIRT3 reveal that the α2-α3 loop and α3-helix affect the interaction with long-chain acyl lysine.

    PubMed

    Gai, Wei; Li, He; Jiang, Hualiang; Long, Yaqiu; Liu, Dongxiang

    2016-09-01

    SIRT1-7 play important roles in many biological processes and age-related diseases. In addition to a NAD(+) -dependent deacetylase activity, they can catalyze several other reactions, including the hydrolysis of long-chain fatty acyl lysine. To study the binding modes of sirtuins to long-chain acyl lysines, we solved the crystal structures of SIRT3 bound to either a H3K9-myristoylated- or a H3K9-palmitoylated peptide. Interaction of SIRT3 with the palmitoyl group led to unfolding of the α3-helix. The myristoyl and palmitoyl groups bind to the C-pocket and an allosteric site near the α3-helix, respectively. We found that the residues preceding the α3-helix determine the size of the C-pocket. The flexibility of the α2-α3 loop and the plasticity of the α3-helix affect the interaction with long-chain acyl lysine. PMID:27501476

  7. NMDA receptor structures reveal subunit arrangement and pore architecture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Lü, Wei; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Goehring, April; Du, Juan; Song, Xianqiang; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are Hebbian-like coincidence detectors, requiring binding of glycine and glutamate in combination with the relief of voltage-dependent magnesium block to open an ion conductive pore across the membrane bilayer. Despite the importance of the NMDA receptor in the development and function of the brain, a molecular structure of an intact receptor has remained elusive. Here we present x-ray crystal structures of the GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptor with the allosteric inhibitor, Ro25-6981, partial agonists and the ion channel blocker, MK-801. Receptor subunits are arranged in a 1-2-1-2 fashion, demonstrating extensive interactions between the amino terminal and ligand binding domains. The transmembrane domains harbor a closed-blocked ion channel, a pyramidal central vestibule lined by residues implicated in binding ion channel blockers and magnesium, and a ~2-fold symmetric arrangement of ion channel pore loops. These structures provide new insights into the architecture, allosteric coupling and ion channel function of NMDA receptors. PMID:25008524

  8. Drugs Modulate Interactions between the First Nucleotide-Binding Domain and the Fourth Cytoplasmic Loop of Human P-Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2016-05-24

    Drug substrates stimulate ATPase activity of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) ATP-binding cassette drug pump by an unknown mechanism. Cross-linking analysis was performed to test if drug substrates stimulate P-gp ATPase activity by altering cross-talk at the first transmission interface linking the drug-binding [intracellular loop 4 (S909C)] and first nucleotide-binding domains [NBD1 (V472C or L443C)]. In the absence of lipid (inactive P-gp), only V472C/S909C showed cross-linking. Drugs blocked V472C/S909C cross-linking. In the presence of lipids (active P-gp), drug substrates promoted only L443C/S909C cross-linking. This suggests that drug substrates stimulate ATPase activity through a conformational change that shifts Ser909 away from Val472 and toward Leu443. PMID:27159830

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Cx26 Hemichannel: Insights into Voltage-Dependent Loop-Gating

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Taekyung; Roux, Benoît; Jo, Sunhwan; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Harris, Andrew L.; Bargiello, Thaddeus A.

    2012-01-01

    Loop-gating is one of two voltage-dependent mechanisms that regulate the open probability of connexin channels. The loop-gate permeability barrier is formed by a segment of the first extracellular loop (E1) (the parahelix) and appears to be accompanied by straightening of the bend angle between E1 and the first transmembrane domain (TM1). Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify and characterize interacting van der Waals and electrostatic networks that stabilize the parahelices and TM1/E1 bend angles of the open Cx26 hemichannel. Dynamic fluctuations in an electrostatic network in each subunit are directly linked to the stability of parahelix structure and TM1/E1 bend angle in adjacent subunits. The electrostatic network includes charged residues that are pore-lining and thus positioned to be voltage sensors. We propose that the transition to the closed state is initiated by voltage-driven disruption of the networks that stabilize the open-state parahelix configuration, allowing the parahelix to protrude into the channel pore to form the loop-gate barrier. Straightening of the TM1/E1 bend appears to be a consequence of the reorganization of the interacting networks that accompany the conformational change of the parahelix. The electrostatic network extends across subunit boundaries, suggesting a concerted gating mechanism. PMID:22455917

  10. Molecular mechanism of pore formation by actinoporins.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katarina Crnigoj; Viero, Gabriella; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Macek, Peter; Anderluh, Gregor

    2009-12-15

    Actinoporins are effective pore-forming toxins produced by sea anemones. These extremely potent, basic 20 kDa proteins readily form pores in membranes that contain sphingomyelin. Much has been learned about the molecular basis of their pore-forming mechanism in recent years. Pore formation is a multi-step process that involves recognition of membrane sphingomyelin, firm binding to the membrane accompanied by the transfer of the N-terminal region to the lipid-water interface and finally pore formation after oligomerisation of three to four monomers. The final conductive pathway is formed by amphipathic alpha-helices, hence actinoporins are an important example of so-called alpha-helical pore-forming toxins. Actinoporins have become useful model proteins to study protein-membrane interactions, specific recognition of lipids in the membrane, and protein oligomerisation in the lipid milieu. Recent sequence and structural data of proteins similar to actinoporins indicate that they are not a unique family restricted to sea anemones as was long believed. An AF domain superfamily (abbreviated from actinoporin-like proteins and fungal fruit-body lectins) was defined and shown to contain members from three animal and two plant phyla. On the basis of functional properties of some members we hypothesise that AF domain proteins are peripheral membrane proteins. Finally, ability of actinoporins to form transmembrane pores has been exploited in some novel biomedical applications. PMID:19268680

  11. Computational design of protein antigens that interact with the CDR H3 loop of HIV broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5

    PubMed Central

    Azoitei, M.L.; Ban, Y.A.; Kalyuzhny, O.; Guenaga, J.; Schroeter, A.; Porter, J.; Wyatt, R.; Schief, W.R.

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of proteins with novel binding specificities and increased affinity is one of the major goals of computational protein design. Epitope-scaffolds are a new class of antigens engineered by transplanting viral epitopes of pre-defined structure to protein scaffolds, or by building protein scaffolds around such epitopes. Epitope-scaffolds are of interest as vaccine components to attempt to elicit neutralizing antibodies targeting the specified epitope. In this study we developed a new computational protocol, MultiGraft Interface, that transplants epitopes but also designs additional scaffold features outside the epitope to enhance antibody-binding specificity and potentially influence the specificity of elicited antibodies. We employed MultiGraft Interface to engineer novel epitope-scaffolds that display the known epitope of HIV-1 neutralizing antibody 2F5 and that also interact with the functionally important CDR H3 antibody loop. MultiGraft Interface generated an epitope-scaffold that bound 2F5 with sub-nanomolar affinity (KD = 400 pM) and that interacted with the antibody CDR H3 loop through computationally designed contacts. Substantial structural modifications were necessary to engineer this antigen, with the 2F5 epitope replacing a helix in the native scaffold and with 15% of the native scaffold sequence being modified in the design stage. This epitope-scaffold represents a successful example of rational protein backbone engineering and protein-protein interface design and could prove useful in the field of HIV vaccine design. MultiGraft Interface can be generally applied to engineer novel binding partners with altered specificity and optimized affinity. PMID:25043744

  12. The second-sphere residue T263 is important for the function and catalytic activity of PTP1B via interaction with the WPD-loop.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peng; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Hong-Mei; Fu, Xiao-Lei; Cui, Fu-ai; Yu, Xiao; Wen, Shi-shuai; Bi, Wen-Xiang; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2014-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases have diverse substrate specificities and intrinsic activities that lay the foundations for the fine-tuning of a phosphorylation network to precisely regulate cellular signal transduction. All classical PTPs share common catalytic mechanisms, and the important catalytic residues in the first sphere of their active sites have been well characterized. However, little attention has been paid to the second-sphere residues that are potentially important in defining the intrinsic activity and substrate specificity of PTPs. Here, we find that a conserved second-sphere residue, Thr263, located in the surface Q-loop is important for both the function and activity of PTPs. Using PTP1B as a study model, we found that mutations of Thr263 impaired the negative regulation role of PTP1B in insulin signaling. A detailed mechanistic study utilizing steady-state kinetics, Brønsted analysis and pH dependence in the presence of pNPP or phosphopeptide substrates revealed that Thr263 is required for the stabilization of the leaving group during catalysis. Further crystallographic studies and structural comparison revealed that Thr263 regulates the general acid function through modulation of the WPD-loop by the T263:F182/Y/H interaction pair, which is conserved in 26 out of 32 classical PTPs. In addition, the hydrophobic interaction between Thr263 and Arg1159 of the insulin receptor contributes to the substrate specificity of PTP1B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the general role of the second-sphere residue Thr263 in PTP catalysis. Our findings suggest that the second sphere residues of PTP active site may play important roles in PTP-mediated function in both normal and diseased states. PMID:25450460

  13. Unliganded HIV-1 gp120 core structures assume the CD4-bound conformation with regulation by quaternary interactions and variable loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Young Do; Finzi, Andrés; Wu, Xueling; Dogo-Isonagie, Cajetan; Lee, Lawrence K.; Moore, Lucas R.; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Stuckey, Jonathan; Yang, Yongping; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Vicic, David A.; Debnath, Asim K.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Bewley, Carole A.; Mascola, John R.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2013-03-04

    The HIV-1 envelope (Env) spike (gp120{sub 3}/gp41{sub 3}) undergoes considerable structural rearrangements to mediate virus entry into cells and to evade the host immune response. Engagement of CD4, the primary human receptor, fixes a particular conformation and primes Env for entry. The CD4-bound state, however, is prone to spontaneous inactivation and susceptible to antibody neutralization. How does unliganded HIV-1 maintain CD4-binding capacity and regulate transitions to the CD4-bound state? To define this mechanistically, we determined crystal structures of unliganded core gp120 from HIV-1 clades B, C, and E. Notably, all of these unliganded HIV-1 structures resembled the CD4-bound state. Conformational fixation with ligand selection and thermodynamic analysis of full-length and core gp120 interactions revealed that the tendency of HIV-1 gp120 to adopt the CD4-bound conformation was restrained by the V1/V2- and V3-variable loops. In parallel, we determined the structure of core gp120 in complex with the small molecule, NBD-556, which specifically recognizes the CD4-bound conformation of gp120. Neutralization by NBD-556 indicated that Env spikes on primary isolates rarely assume the CD4-bound conformation spontaneously, although they could do so when quaternary restraints were loosened. Together, the results suggest that the CD4-bound conformation represents a 'ground state' for the gp120 core, with variable loop and quaternary interactions restraining unliganded gp120 from 'snapping' into this conformation. A mechanism of control involving deformations in unliganded structure from a functionally critical state (e.g., the CD4-bound state) provides advantages in terms of HIV-1 Env structural diversity and resistance to antibodies and inhibitors, while maintaining elements essential for entry.

  14. A Cyclized Helix-Loop-Helix Peptide as a Molecular Scaffold for the Design of Inhibitors of Intracellular Protein-Protein Interactions by Epitope and Arginine Grafting.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Daisuke; Kitada, Hidekazu; Oguri, Masahiro; Nishihara, Toshio; Michigami, Masataka; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Yuba, Eiji; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Im, Haeri; Cho, Sunhee; Joung, Jong Young; Kodama, Seiji; Kono, Kenji; Ham, Sihyun; Fujii, Ikuo

    2016-08-26

    The design of inhibitors of intracellular protein-protein interactions (PPIs) remains a challenge in chemical biology and drug discovery. We propose a cyclized helix-loop-helix (cHLH) peptide as a scaffold for generating cell-permeable PPI inhibitors through bifunctional grafting: epitope grafting to provide binding activity, and arginine grafting to endow cell-permeability. To inhibit p53-HDM2 interactions, the p53 epitope was grafted onto the C-terminal helix and six Arg residues were grafted onto another helix. The designed peptide cHLHp53-R showed high inhibitory activity for this interaction, and computational analysis suggested a binding mode for HDM2. Confocal microscopy of cells treated with fluorescently labeled cHLHp53-R revealed cell membrane penetration and cytosolic localization. The peptide inhibited the growth of HCT116 and LnCap cancer cells. This strategy of bifunctional grafting onto a well-structured peptide scaffold could facilitate the generation of inhibitors for intracellular PPIs. PMID:27467415

  15. Soil pore structure and substrate C mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleutel, Steven; Maenhout, Peter; Vanhoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle; De Neve, Stefaan

    2014-05-01

    Our aim was to investigate the complex interactions between soil pore structure, soil biota and decomposition of added OM substrates. We report on a lab incubation experiment in which CO2 respiration from soil cores was monitored (headspace GC analysis) and an X-ray CT approach yielded soil pore size distributions. Such combined use of X-ray CT with soil incubation studies was obstructed, until now, by many practical constraints such as CT-volume quality, limited resolution, scanning time and complex soil pore network quantification, which have largely been overcome in this study. We incubated a sandy loam soil (with application of ground grass or sawdust) in 18 small aluminium rings (Ø 1 cm, h 1 cm). Bulk density was adjusted to 1.1 or 1.3 Mg m-3 (compaction) and 6 rings were filled at a coarser Coarse Sand:Fine Sand:Silt+Clay ratio. While compaction induced a strong reduction in the cumulative C mineralization for both grass and sawdust substrates, artificial change to a coarser soil texture only reduced net C mineralization from the added sawdust. There thus appears to be a strong interaction effect between soil pore structure and substrate type on substrate decomposition. Correlation coefficients between the C mineralization rates and volumes of 7 pore size classes (from the X-ray CT data) also showed an increasing positive correlation with increasing pore size. Since any particulate organic matter initially present in the soil was removed prior to the experiment (sieving, ashing the >53µm fraction and recombining with the <53µm fraction), the added OM can be localized by means of X-ray CT. Through on-going image analysis the surrounding porosity of the added grass or sawdust particles is being quantified to further study the interaction between the soil pore structure and substrate decomposition.

  16. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  17. SCAM analysis of Panx1 suggests a peculiar pore structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Dahl, Gerhard

    2010-11-01

    Vertebrates express two families of gap junction proteins: the well-characterized connexins and the pannexins. In contrast to connexins, pannexins do not appear to form gap junction channels but instead function as unpaired membrane channels. Pannexins have no sequence homology to connexins but are distantly related to the invertebrate gap junction proteins, innexins. Despite the sequence diversity, pannexins and connexins form channels with similar permeability properties and exhibit similar membrane topology, with two extracellular loops, four transmembrane (TM) segments, and cytoplasmic localization of amino and carboxy termini. To test whether the similarities extend to the pore structure of the channels, pannexin 1 (Panx1) was subjected to analysis with the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM). The thiol reagents maleimidobutyryl-biocytin and 2-trimethylammonioethyl-methanethiosulfonate reacted with several cysteines positioned in the external portion of the first TM segment (TM1) and the first extracellular loop. These data suggest that portions of TM1 and the first extracellular loop line the outer part of the pore of Panx1 channels. In this aspect, the pore structures of Panx1 and connexin channels are similar. However, although the inner part of the pore is lined by amino-terminal amino acids in connexin channels, thiol modification was detected in carboxyterminal amino acids in Panx1 channels by SCAM analysis. Thus, it appears that the inner portion of the pores of Panx1 and connexin channels may be distinct. PMID:20937692

  18. Molecular Architecture and Functional Analysis of NetB, a Pore-forming Toxin from Clostridium perfringens*

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Christos G.; Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P.; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Naylor, Claire E.; Cole, Ambrose R.; Moss, David S.; Titball, Richard W.; Basak, Ajit K.

    2013-01-01

    NetB is a pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and has been reported to play a major role in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis, a disease that has emerged due to the removal of antibiotics in animal feedstuffs. Here we present the crystal structure of the pore form of NetB solved to 3.9 Å. The heptameric assembly shares structural homology to the staphylococcal α-hemolysin. However, the rim domain, a region that is thought to interact with the target cell membrane, shows sequence and structural divergence leading to the alteration of a phosphocholine binding pocket found in the staphylococcal toxins. Consistent with the structure we show that NetB does not bind phosphocholine efficiently but instead interacts directly with cholesterol leading to enhanced oligomerization and pore formation. Finally we have identified conserved and non-conserved amino acid positions within the rim loops that significantly affect binding and toxicity of NetB. These findings present new insights into the mode of action of these pore-forming toxins, enabling the design of more effective control measures against necrotic enteritis and providing potential new tools to the field of bionanotechnology. PMID:23239883

  19. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  20. The Effect of Pore Connectivity on Water Adsorption Isotherms in Non-activated Graphitic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    StrioloDr., A; Gubbins, Dr. K. E.; Chialvo, Ariel A; Cummings, Peter T

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption of water in graphitic carbons is usually simulated via a weighted average of the adsorption isotherms simulated in carbon-slit pore of different widths. By following this procedure, details about pore morphology and pore connectivity may be overlooked. Towards a better match between virtual and real experiments, we present simulated adsorption isotherms for SPC/E model water in porous carbons composed by interconnected carbon-slit pores. The pores are separated from each other by one graphene layer. Imperfections (lack of carbon atoms) in the graphene layers result in interconnections between pores. The grand canonical Monte Carlo algorithm is used here to simulate water adsorption. Our results show that while the qualitative features obtained in the simulation of independent slit-shaped pores are reproduced when interconnected pores are considered, the adsorption isotherms rise more gradually and the adsorption/desorption hysteresis loops are narrower in the latter case.

  1. Effect of Spin-Crossover-Induced Pore Contraction on CO2–Host Interactions in the Porous Coordination Polymers [Fe(pyrazine)M(CN)4] (M = Ni, Pt)

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Jeffrey T; Chen, De-Li; Liu, Jinchen; Chirdon, Danielle; Kauffman, Kristi; Goodman, Angela; Johnson, J Karl

    2013-02-01

    Variable-temperature in situ ATR-FTIR spectra are presented for the porous spin-crossover compounds [Fe(pyrazine)Ni(CN)4] and [Fe(pyrazine)Pt(CN)4] under CO2 pressures of up to 8 bar. Significant shifts in the ν3 and ν2 IR absorption bands of adsorbed CO2 are observed as the host materials undergo transition between low- and high-spin states. Computational models used to determine the packing arrangement of CO2 within the pore structures show a preferred orientation of one of the adsorbed CO2 molecules with close O=C=O···H contacts with the pyrazine pillar ligands. The interaction is a consequence of the commensurate distance of the inter-pyrazine separations and the length of the CO2 molecule, which allows the adsorbed CO2 to effectively bridge the pyrazine pillars in the structure. The models were used to assign the distinct shifts in the IR absorption bands of the adsorbed CO2 that arise from changes in the O=C=O···H contacts that strengthen and weaken in correlation with changes in the Fe–N bond lengths as the spin state of Fe changes. The results indicate that spin-crossover compounds can function as a unique type of flexible sorbent in which the pore contractions associated with spin transition can affect the strength of CO2–host interactions.

  2. Purification of the Vertebrate Nuclear Pore Complex by Biochemical Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian R.; Forbes, Douglass J.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore is a large and complex biological machine, mediating all signal-directed transport between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The vertebrate pore has a mass of ~120 million daltons or 30 times the size of a ribosome. The large size of the pore, coupled to its tight integration in the nuclear lamina, has hampered the isolation of pore complexes from vertebrate sources. We have now developed a strategy for the purification of nuclear pores from in vitro assembled annulate lamellae (AL), a cytoplasmic mimic of the nuclear envelope that lacks a lamina, nuclear matrix, and chromatin-associated proteins. We find that purified pore complexes from annulate lamellae contain every nuclear pore protein tested. In addition, immunoblotting reveals the presence of soluble transport receptors and factors known to play important roles in the transport of macromolecules through the pore. While transport factors such as Ran and NTF2 show only transient interaction with the pores, a number of soluble transport receptors, including importin β, show a tight association with the purified pores. In summary, we report that we have purified the vertebrate pore by biochemical criteria; silver staining reveals ~40–50 distinct protein bands. PMID:11208084

  3. The Rice Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor TDR INTERACTING PROTEIN2 Is a Central Switch in Early Anther Development[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhenzhen; Yu, Jing; Cheng, Xiaowei; Zong, Xu; Xu, Jie; Chen, Mingjiao; Li, Zongyun; Zhang, Dabing; Liang, Wanqi

    2014-01-01

    In male reproductive development in plants, meristemoid precursor cells possessing transient, stem cell–like features undergo cell divisions and differentiation to produce the anther, the male reproductive organ. The anther contains centrally positioned microsporocytes surrounded by four distinct layers of wall: the epidermis, endothecium, middle layer, and tapetum. Here, we report that the rice (Oryza sativa) basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein TDR INTERACTING PROTEIN2 (TIP2) functions as a crucial switch in the meristemoid transition and differentiation during early anther development. The tip2 mutants display undifferentiated inner three anther wall layers and abort tapetal programmed cell death, causing complete male sterility. TIP2 has two paralogs in rice, TDR and EAT1, which are key regulators of tapetal programmed cell death. We revealed that TIP2 acts upstream of TDR and EAT1 and directly regulates the expression of TDR and EAT1. In addition, TIP2 can interact with TDR, indicating a role of TIP2 in later anther development. Our findings suggest that the bHLH proteins TIP2, TDR, and EAT1 play a central role in regulating differentiation, morphogenesis, and degradation of anther somatic cell layers, highlighting the role of paralogous bHLH proteins in regulating distinct steps of plant cell–type determination. PMID:24755456

  4. PIL5, a Phytochrome-Interacting Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Protein, Is a Key Negative Regulator of Seed Germination in Arabidopsis thalianaW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eunkyoo; Kim, Jonghyun; Park, Eunae; Kim, Jeong-Il; Kang, Changwon; Choi, Giltsu

    2004-01-01

    The first decision made by an angiosperm seed, whether to germinate or not, is based on integration of various environmental signals such as water and light. The phytochromes (Phys) act as red and far-red light (Pfr) photoreceptors to mediate light signaling through yet uncharacterized pathways. We report here that the PIF3-like 5 (PIL5) protein, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is a key negative regulator of phytochrome-mediated seed germination. PIL5 preferentially interacts with the Pfr forms of Phytochrome A (PhyA) and Phytochrome B (PhyB). Analyses of a pil5 mutant in conjunction with phyA and phyB mutants, a pif3 pil5 double mutant, and PIL5 overexpression lines indicate that PIL5 is a negative factor in Phy-mediated promotion of seed germination, inhibition of hypocotyl negative gravitropism, and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Our data identify PIL5 as the first Phy-interacting protein that regulates seed germination. PMID:15486102

  5. A mutation in the pore of the sodium channel alters gating.

    PubMed Central

    Tomaselli, G F; Chiamvimonvat, N; Nuss, H B; Balser, J R; Pérez-García, M T; Xu, R H; Orias, D W; Backx, P H; Marban, E

    1995-01-01

    Ion permeation and channel gating are classically considered independent processes, but site-specific mutagenesis studies in K channels suggest that residues in or near the ion-selective pore of the channel can influence activation and inactivation. We describe a mutation in the pore of the skeletal muscle Na channel that alters gating. This mutation, I-W53C (residue 402 in the mu 1 sequence), decreases the sensitivity to block by tetrodotoxin and increases the sensitivity to block by externally applied Cd2+ relative to the wild-type channel, placing this residue within the pore near the external mouth. Based on contemporary models of the structure of the channel, this residue is remote from the regions of the channel known to be involved in gating, yet this mutation abbreviates the time to peak and accelerates the decay of the macroscopic Na current. At the single-channel level we observe a shortening of the latency to first opening and a reduction in the mean open time compared with the wild-type channel. The acceleration of macroscopic current kinetics in the mutant channels can be simulated by changing only the activation and deactivation rate constants while constraining the microscopic inactivation rate constants to the values used to fit the wild-type currents. We conclude that the tryptophan at position 53 in the domain IP-loop may act as a linchpin in the pore that limits the opening transition rate. This effect could reflect an interaction of I-W53 with the activation voltage sensors or a more global gating-induced change in pore structure. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7612823

  6. Molecular assembly of lethal factor enzyme and pre-pore heptameric protective antigen in early stage of translocation.

    PubMed

    Alisaraie, Laleh; Rouiller, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    During intoxication, the anthrax toxin lethal (LF) and edema (EF) factors initially assemble with the protective antigen (PA) on the plasma membrane of cells expressing the membrane-bound surface-exposed anthrax toxin receptor (ATR). This takes place at the physiological pH prior to entering the acidic environment of the endosome. We elucidated the molecular dynamics (MD) behaviors of the three-dimensional structure of the (PA63)7LF3 complex in various conformations and analyzed the dynamical properties of the fully loaded pre-pore complex on the plasma membrane at the physiological pH. The analysis points to the interaction networks of amino acids conserved between PA63 octamer and heptamer, which are not affected during the initial stage of the LFs binding. The simulations show an asymmetrical movement of the complex domains that directly affect LFs conformations. The conformational and structural alterations of the 2β2-2β3 loops of PA subunits are associated with pore formation. The early conformational changes of the loops appear as they peel off from the domain 2 toward domain 4 of each PA subunit. The LFs unfold in 1α1 segments of their N-terminal initiating the early stage of the pre-pore formation. The results indicate instable regions within the complex and provide important clues concerning the detail of fluctuating residues of the LF-PA interface regions at the early steps of toxins translocation. PMID:26659402

  7. P2X7R large pore is partially blocked by pore forming proteins antagonists in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Faria, Robson X; Reis, Ricardo A M; Ferreira, Leonardo G B; Cezar-de-Mello, Paula F T; Moraes, Milton O

    2016-06-01

    The ATP-gated P2X7R (P2X7R) is a channel, which is involved in events, such as inflammation, cell death, and pain. The most intriguing event concerning P2X7R functions is the phenomenon of pore dilation. Once P2X7R is activated, the permeability of the plasma membrane becomes higher, leading to the permeation of 1000 Da-weight solutes. The mechanisms involved in this process remain unclear. Nevertheless, this event is not exclusively through P2X7R, as other proteins may form large pores in the plasma membrane. Recent evidence concerning pore formation reveals putative P2X7R and other pores-associated protein complexes, revealing cross-interactive pharmacological and biophysical issues. In this work, we showed results that corroborated with cross-interactive aspects with P2X7R and pores in astrocytes. These cells expressed most of the pores, including P2X7R. We discovered that different pore types open with peculiar characteristics, as both anionic and cationic charged solutes permeate the plasma membrane, following P2X7R activation. Moreover, we showed that both synergic and additive relationships are found within P2X7, cationic, and anionic large pores. Therefore, our data suggest that other protein-related pores are assembled following the formation of P2X7R pore. PMID:26830892

  8. Nuclear pores. Architecture of the nuclear pore complex coat.

    PubMed

    Stuwe, Tobias; Correia, Ana R; Lin, Daniel H; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent T; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Hoelz, André

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) constitutes the sole gateway for bidirectional nucleocytoplasmic transport. Despite half a century of structural characterization, the architecture of the NPC remains unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of a reconstituted ~400-kilodalton coat nucleoporin complex (CNC) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at a 7.4 angstrom resolution. The crystal structure revealed a curved Y-shaped architecture and the molecular details of the coat nucleoporin interactions forming the central "triskelion" of the Y. A structural comparison of the yeast CNC with an electron microscopy reconstruction of its human counterpart suggested the evolutionary conservation of the elucidated architecture. Moreover, 32 copies of the CNC crystal structure docked readily into a cryoelectron tomographic reconstruction of the fully assembled human NPC, thereby accounting for ~16 megadalton of its mass. PMID:25745173

  9. Solution structure of the ActD–5′-CCGTT3GTGG-3′ complex: drug interaction with tandem G·T mismatches and hairpin loop backbone

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chen, Fu-Ming; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Binding of actinomycin D (ActD) to the seemingly single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligomer 5′-CCGTT3 GTGG-3′ has been studied in solution using high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. A strong binding constant (8 × 106 M–1) and high quality NMR spectra have allowed us to determine the initial DNA structure using distance geometry as well as the final ActD–5′-CCGTT3 GTGG-3′ complex structure using constrained molecular dynamics calculations. The DNA oligomer 5′-CCGTT3GTGG-3′ in the complex forms a hairpin structure with tandem G·T mismatches at the stem region next to a loop of three stacked thymine bases pointing toward the major groove. Bipartite T2O–GH1 and T2O–G2NH2 hydrogen bonds were detected for the G·T mismatches that further stabilize this unusual DNA hairpin. The phenoxazone chromophore of ActD intercalates nicely between the tandem G·T mismatches in essentially one major orientation. Additional hydrophobic interactions between the ActD quinoid amino acid residues with the loop T5–T6–T7 backbone protons were also observed. The hydrophobic G–phenoxazone–G interaction in the ActD–5′-CCGTT3GTGG-3′ complex is more robust than that of the classical ActD– 5′-CCGCT3GCGG-3′ complex, consistent with the roughly 2-fold stronger binding of ActD to the 5′-CCGTT3GTGG-3′ sequence than to its 5′-CCG CT3GCGG-3′ counterpart. Stabilization by ActD of a hairpin containing non-canonical stem base pairs further strengthens the notion that ActD or other related compounds may serve as a sequence- specific ssDNA-binding agent that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other retroviruses replicating through ssDNA intermediates. PMID:12736312

  10. Natively Unstructured Loops Differ from Other Loops

    PubMed Central

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%–70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein–protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  11. Interface engineering of synthetic pores: towards hypersensitive biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mora, Federico; Tran, Duy-Hien; Oudry, Natalie; Hopfgartner, Gerard; Jeannerat, Damien; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Hydrophilic anchoring is introduced as a promising strategy to constructively control the various interactions of synthetic pore sensors with the surrounding biphasic environment. Artificial rigid-rod beta barrels are selected as classical synthetic multifunctional pores and random-coil tetralysines are attached as hydrophilic anchors. The synthesis of this advanced pore is accomplished in 32 steps from commercially available starting materials. With regard to pore activity as such, the key impact of hydrophilic anchoring is a change from a Hill coefficient n<1 to n=4. This change confirms successful suppression of the competing self-assembly with precipitation from the aqueous phase as the origin of the accomplished increase in pore activity. The hydrophilic anchors do not interfere with the blockage of the synthetic pore sensors by anionic analytes. In the case of stoichiometric binding of blockers (K(D)=EC(50) of the pore; EC(50)=concentration needed to observe 50 % pore activity), however, the increase in pore activity achieved by hydrophilic anchoring results in improved pore blockage under high dilution conditions. Controls confirm that this increase does not occur with analytes that do not exhibit stoichiometric binding (K(D)>EC(50)). These results not only reveal stoichiometric binding as the expected origin of the sensitivity limit of synthetic pore sensors, they also provide promising solutions for this problem. The combination of hydrophilic anchoring with targeted pore formation emerges as a particularly promising strategy to further reduce effective pore concentrations. The scope and limitations of this approach are exemplified with pertinent analyte pairs that are essential for the sensing of sucrose, lactose, acetate, and glutamate with synthetic pores in samples from the supermarket. PMID:18067110

  12. Role of the Juxtamembrane Region of Cytoplasmic Loop 3 in the Gating and Conductance of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel are controlled by interactions of ATP with its cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). The NBDs are connected to the transmembrane pore via four cytoplasmic loops. These loops have been suggested to play roles both in channel gating and in forming a cytoplasmic extension of the channel pore. To investigate the structure and function of one of these cytoplasmic loops, we have used patch clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced into loop 3. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents modify cysteines introduced at 14 of 16 sites studied in the juxtamembrane region of loop 3, in all cases leading to inhibition of channel function. In most cases, both the functional effects of modification and the rate of modification were similar for negatively and positively charged MTS reagents. Single-channel recordings indicated that, at all sites, inhibition was the result of an MTS reagent-induced decrease in channel open probability; in no case was the Cl– conductance of open channels altered by modification. These results indicate that loop 3 is readily accessible to the cytoplasm and support the involvement of this region in the control of channel gating. However, our results do not support the hypothesis that this region is close enough to the Cl– permeation pathway to exert any influence on permeating Cl– ions. We propose that either the cytoplasmic pore is very wide or cytoplasmic Cl– ions use other routes to access the transmembrane pore. PMID:22545782

  13. Role of the juxtamembrane region of cytoplasmic loop 3 in the gating and conductance of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-05-15

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel are controlled by interactions of ATP with its cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). The NBDs are connected to the transmembrane pore via four cytoplasmic loops. These loops have been suggested to play roles both in channel gating and in forming a cytoplasmic extension of the channel pore. To investigate the structure and function of one of these cytoplasmic loops, we have used patch clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced into loop 3. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents modify cysteines introduced at 14 of 16 sites studied in the juxtamembrane region of loop 3, in all cases leading to inhibition of channel function. In most cases, both the functional effects of modification and the rate of modification were similar for negatively and positively charged MTS reagents. Single-channel recordings indicated that, at all sites, inhibition was the result of an MTS reagent-induced decrease in channel open probability; in no case was the Cl(-) conductance of open channels altered by modification. These results indicate that loop 3 is readily accessible to the cytoplasm and support the involvement of this region in the control of channel gating. However, our results do not support the hypothesis that this region is close enough to the Cl(-) permeation pathway to exert any influence on permeating Cl(-) ions. We propose that either the cytoplasmic pore is very wide or cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions use other routes to access the transmembrane pore. PMID:22545782

  14. Effect of hairpin loop structure on reactivity, sequence preference and adduct orientation of a DNA-interactive pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) antitumour agent.

    PubMed

    Thurston, David E; Vassoler, Higia; Jackson, Paul J M; James, Colin H; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2015-04-01

    The pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) are a family of covalent-binding DNA-interactive minor-groove binding agents with a thermodynamic preference for binding to 5'-Pu-G-Pu-3' sequences (Pu = Purine) but a kinetic preference for 5'-Py-G-Py-3' (Py = Pyrimidine). Using HPLC/MS methodology and a range of designed hairpin-forming oligonucleotides, the kinetics of reaction of a C8-bis-pyrrole pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) conjugate (GWL-78, 2) with sixteen isomeric oligonucleotides has been evaluated, each containing a single PBD binding site in one of two locations. The PBD-binding base-pair triplets were designed to include every possible combination of A and T bases adjacent to the covalently-reacting guanine, with the set of hairpins consisting of isomeric pairs containing the same sequence in the hairpin stem but with either hexaethylene glycol (HEG) or TTT loops. The PBD 2 reacted most rapidly with TGT and TGA sequences, with the possibility that adducts might form in both the 3'- and 5'-directions with some sequences according to modelling studies. A faster reaction rate was observed for all hairpins containing the HEG loop except one (Seq 10) when the PBD binding triplets were located either near the loop or adjacent to the 5'-end. Modelling studies have suggested that this difference in reactivity could be due to the structural flexibility of the HEG loop allowing both A-ring-3' and A-ring-5' adducts to form, while a TTT loop should favour only A-ring-5' adducts due to steric considerations. These findings contrast with the results reported by Nguyen and Wilson for the interaction of non-covalent DNA-binding molecules with DNA hairpins, where the loop structure was found to have little effect on interaction in the main stem of the hairpin. PMID:25733051

  15. The pore space scramble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormally, Alexandra; Bentham, Michelle; Vermeylen, Saskia; Markusson, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and energy security continue to be the context of the transition to a secure, affordable and low carbon energy future, both in the UK and beyond. This is reflected in for example, binding climate policy targets at the EU level, the introduction of renewable energy targets, and has also led to an increasing interest in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology with its potential to help mitigate against the effects of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning. The UK has proposed a three phase strategy to integrate CCS into its energy system in the long term focussing on off-shore subsurface storage (DECC, 2014). The potential of CCS therefore, raises a number of challenging questions and issues surrounding the long-term storage of CO2 captured and injected into underground spaces and, alongside other novel uses of the subsurface, contributes to opening a new field for discussion on the governance of the subsurface. Such 'novel' uses of the subsurface have lead to it becoming an increasingly contested space in terms of its governance, with issues emerging around the role of ownership, liability and property rights of subsurface pore space. For instance, questions over the legal ownership of pore space have arisen with ambiguity over the legal standpoint of the surface owner and those wanting to utilise the pore space for gas storage, and suggestions of whether there are depths at which legal 'ownership' becomes obsolete (Barton, 2014). Here we propose to discuss this 'pore space scramble' and provide examples of the competing trajectories of different stakeholders, particularly in the off-shore context given its priority in the UK. We also propose to highlight the current ambiguity around property law of pore space in the UK with reference to approaches currently taken in different national contexts. Ultimately we delineate contrasting models of governance to illustrate the choices we face and consider the ethics of these models for the common good

  16. The Arabidopsis Nuclear Pore and Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Iris; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a double membrane structure that separates the eukaryotic cytoplasm from the nucleoplasm. The nuclear pores embedded in the nuclear envelope are the sole gateways for macromolecular trafficking in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear pore complexes assembled at the nuclear pores are large protein conglomerates composed of multiple units of about 30 different nucleoporins. Proteins and RNAs traffic through the nuclear pore complexes, enabled by the interacting activities of nuclear transport receptors, nucleoporins, and elements of the Ran GTPase cycle. In addition to directional and possibly selective protein and RNA nuclear import and export, the nuclear pore gains increasing prominence as a spatial organizer of cellular processes, such as sumoylation and desumoylation. Individual nucleoporins and whole nuclear pore subcomplexes traffic to specific mitotic locations and have mitotic functions, for example at the kinetochores, in spindle assembly, and in conjunction with the checkpoints. Mutants of nucleoporin genes and genes of nuclear transport components lead to a wide array of defects from human diseases to compromised plant defense responses. The nuclear envelope acts as a repository of calcium, and its inner membrane is populated by functionally unique proteins connected to both chromatin and—through the nuclear envelope lumen—the cytoplasmic cytoskeleton. Plant nuclear pore and nuclear envelope research—predominantly focusing on Arabidopsis as a model—is discovering both similarities and surprisingly unique aspects compared to the more mature model systems. This chapter gives an overview of our current knowledge in the field and of exciting areas awaiting further exploration. PMID:22303264

  17. Magnetic-resonance pore imaging of nonsymmetric microscopic pore shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Stefan Andreas; Wang, Xindi; Hosking, Peter; Simpson, M. Cather; Hunter, Mark; Galvosas, Petrik

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the microstructure of porous media such as biological tissue or porous solids is of high interest in health science and technology, engineering and material science. Magnetic resonance pore imaging (MRPI) is a recent technique based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which allows us to acquire images of the average pore shape in a given sample. Here we provide details on the experimental design, challenges, and requirements of MRPI, including its calibration procedures. Utilizing a laser-machined phantom sample, we present images of microscopic pores with a hemiequilateral triangular shape even in the presence of NMR relaxation effects at the pore walls. We therefore show that MRPI is applicable to porous samples without a priori knowledge about their pore shape and symmetry. Furthermore, we introduce "MRPI mapping," which combines MRPI with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This enables one to resolve microscopic pore sizes and shapes spatially, thus expanding the application of MRPI to samples with heterogeneous distributions of pores.

  18. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakage assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.

  19. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore » assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  20. Atomistic Simulations of Pore Formation and Closure in Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, W. F. Drew; Sapay, Nicolas; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membranes separate distinct aqueous compartments, but can be breached by transient hydrophilic pores. A large energetic cost prevents pore formation, which is largely dependent on the composition and structure of the lipid bilayer. The softness of bilayers and the disordered structure of pores make their characterization difficult. We use molecular-dynamics simulations with atomistic detail to study the thermodynamics, kinetics, and mechanism of pore formation and closure in DLPC, DMPC, and DPPC bilayers, with pore formation free energies of 17, 45, and 78 kJ/mol, respectively. By using atomistic computer simulations, we are able to determine not only the free energy for pore formation, but also the enthalpy and entropy, which yields what is believed to be significant new insights in the molecular driving forces behind membrane defects. The free energy cost for pore formation is due to a large unfavorable entropic contribution and a favorable change in enthalpy. Changes in hydrogen bonding patterns occur, with increased lipid-water interactions, and fewer water-water hydrogen bonds, but the total number of overall hydrogen bonds is constant. Equilibrium pore formation is directly observed in the thin DLPC lipid bilayer. Multiple long timescale simulations of pore closure are used to predict pore lifetimes. Our results are important for biological applications, including the activity of antimicrobial peptides and a better understanding of membrane protein folding, and improve our understanding of the fundamental physicochemical nature of membranes. PMID:24411253

  1. Interaction of three-finger proteins from snake venoms and from mammalian brain with the cys-loop receptors and their models.

    PubMed

    Faure, G; Shelukhina, I V; Porowinska, D; Shulepko, M A; Lyukmanova, E N; Dolgikh, D A; Spirova, E N; Kasheverov, I E; Utkin, Yu N; Corringer, J-P; Tsetlin, V I

    2016-05-01

    With the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) it was shown that ws-Lynx1, a water-soluble analog of the three-finger membrane-bound protein Lynx1, that modulates the activity of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), interacts with the acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) with high affinity, K D = 62 nM. This result agrees with the earlier demonstrated competition of ws-Lynx1 with radioiodinated α-bungarotoxin for binding to AChBP. For the first time it was shown that ws-Lynx1 binds to GLIC, prokaryotic Cys-loop receptor (K D = 1.3 μM). On the contrary, SPR revealed that α-cobratoxin, a three-finger protein from cobra venom, does not bind to GLIC. Obtained results indicate that SPR is a promising method for analysis of topography of ws-Lynx1 binding sites using its mutants and those of AChBP and GLIC. PMID:27417718

  2. Ionic interactions near the loop L4 are important for maintaining the active-site environment and the dimer stability of (pro)caspase 3

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    We have examined the role of a salt bridge between Lys242 and Glu246 in loop L4 of procaspase 3 and of mature caspase 3, and we show that the interactions are required for stabilizing the active site. Replacing either of the residues with an alanine residue results in a complete loss of procaspase 3 activity. Although both mutants are active in the context of the mature caspase 3, the mutations result in an increase in Km and a decrease in kcat when compared with the wild-type caspase 3. In addition, the mutations result in an increase in the pKa value associated with a change in kcat with pH, but does not affect the transition observed for Km versus pH. The mutations also affect the accessibility of the active-site solvent as measured by tryptophan fluorescence emission in the presence of quenching agents and as a function of pH. We show that, as the pH is lowered, the (pro)caspase dissociates, and the mutations increase the pH-dependent instability of the dimer. Overall, the results suggest that the contacts lost in the procaspase as a result of replacing Lys242 and Glu246 are compensated partially in the mature caspase as a result of new contacts that are known to form on zymogen processing. PMID:15312047

  3. Investigation by two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of the interaction of the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1 with hairpin loop DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mely, Yves; Azoulay, Joel; Beltz, Herve; Clamme, Jean-Pierre; Bernacchi, Serena; Ficheux, Damien; Roques, Bernard P.; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2004-09-01

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of HIV-1 possesses nucleic acid chaperone properties that are critical for the two strand transfer reactions required during reverse transcription. The first DNA strand transfer relies on the destabilization by NCp7 of double-stranded segments of the transactivation response element, TAR sequence, at the 3' end of the genomic RNA and the complementary sequence cTAR at the 3" terminus of the early product of reverse transcription. To characterize NCp7-mediated nucleic acid destabilization, we investigated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and two photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, the interaction of a doubly-labelled cTAR sequence with NCp7. The conformational fluctuations observed in the absence of NCp7 were associated with the rapid opening and closing (fraying) of the double stranded terminal segment of cTAR. NCp7 destabilizes cTAR mainly through a large increase of the opening rate constant. Additionally, the various destabilizing structures (bulges, internal loop, mismatches) spread all over cTAR secondary structure were found to be critical for NCp7 chaperone activity. Taken together, our data enabled us to propose a molecular mechanism for the destabilizing activity of NCp7 on cTAR which is crucial for the formation of the cTAR-TAR complex during the first strand transfer reaction.

  4. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  5. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  6. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  7. The Lone Loop Radiative Corrections to W Pair Production in Electron Positron Annihilation in the Supersymmetric Extension of the Salam-Weinberg Model of the Electroweak Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, S.

    1992-01-01

    The one loop radiative corrections to W pair production in e^+e^- annihilation in the supersymmetric extension of the Salam-Weinberg (SW) model of the electroweak interactions are calculated. Since our model contains the SW theory, and several calculations have been reported on the latter we compare these results with ours. In general agreement is found, a detailed comparison is not possible since the explicit details have not been published. However we have cross checked many of SW model results with Sundaresan and Kalyniak who have performed the calculation using the same renormalization scheme as ours. The virtual corrections are determined in the on-mass-shell renormalization scheme (OMRS) of Sakakibara. The OMRS scheme has several advantages, one being that it is a transparent (i.e. in terms of the physics) renormalization procedure. Moreover the fundamental set of input parameters of OMRS is well determined. By this we mean the accurate determination of the Z-boson mass at LEP I and the expected precise measurement of the W mass at LEP II, and the already well determined alpha value constitute a good set of the fundamental input parameters. Of course the Higgs boson mass and the fermion mass have also to be put in. So far the top quark and the Higgs boson have eluded detection and consequently their masses have to be put in as free parameters. One very important feature in determining how good the standard model (SM) is involves the measurement of the tri-boson coupling. Such a coupling occurs in e^+e^- to W^+W ^- in the SM, at the tree level. For a precision check, one must calculate one loop radiative corrections in SM, using the tri-boson coupling. We have also evaluated W pair production with non standard coupling to get an intuitive feel for deviations away from the SM. Supersymmetry has the effect of reducing the virtual corrections. The effect of supersymmetry is examined on the differential cross section of e^+e^- to W^+W^-, the 'A' term, the magnetic

  8. Adsorption hysteresis for a slit-like pore model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutarov, V. V.; Tarasevich, Yu. I.; Aksenenko, E. V.; Ivanova, Z. G.

    2011-07-01

    The Frenkel-Halsey-Hill equation is used to describe the adsorption branch of a hysteresis loop upon polylayer adsorption with an H3 loop according to IUPAC nomenclature. The equation for the desorption branch of a hysteresis loop is derived from a combined solution to the equation for the Gibbs potential change, given the adsorbent swelling and pore connectivity function, and the Laplace equation taken for the conditions of infinitely elongated meniscus. This equation is shown to connect the adsorbate relative pressure in a bulk phase for the desorption branch of a hysteresis loop with the key parameters of the adsorption system. The equation obtained was verified by a water adsorption isotherm on natural mineral schungite.

  9. Direct Demonstration That Loop1 of Scap Binds to Loop7: A CRUCIAL EVENT IN CHOLESTEROL HOMEOSTASIS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinxin; Lee, Kwang Min; Kinch, Lisa N; Clark, Lindsay; Grishin, Nick V; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Brown, Michael S; Goldstein, Joseph L; Radhakrishnan, Arun

    2016-06-10

    Cholesterol homeostasis is mediated by Scap, a polytopic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein that transports sterol regulatory element-binding proteins from the ER to Golgi, where they are processed to forms that activate cholesterol synthesis. Scap has eight transmembrane helices and two large luminal loops, designated Loop1 and Loop7. We earlier provided indirect evidence that Loop1 binds to Loop7, allowing Scap to bind COPII proteins for transport in coated vesicles. When ER cholesterol rises, it binds to Loop1. We hypothesized that this causes dissociation from Loop7, abrogating COPII binding. Here we demonstrate direct binding of the two loops when expressed as isolated fragments or as a fusion protein. Expressed alone, Loop1 remained intracellular and membrane-bound. When Loop7 was co-expressed, it bound to Loop1, and the soluble complex was secreted. A Loop1-Loop7 fusion protein was also secreted, and the two loops remained bound when the linker between them was cleaved by a protease. Point mutations that disrupt the Loop1-Loop7 interaction prevented secretion of the Loop1-Loop7 fusion protein. These data provide direct documentation of intramolecular Loop1-Loop7 binding, a central event in cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:27068746

  10. Pore dynamics in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozen, I.; Dommersnes, P.

    2014-09-01

    Transient circular pores can open in plasma membrane of cells due to mechanical stress, and failure to repair such pores lead to cell death. Similar pores in the form of defects also exist among smectic membranes, such as in myelin sheaths or mitochondrial membranes. The formation and growth of membrane defects are associated with diseases, for example multiple sclerosis. A deeper understanding of membrane pore dynamics can provide a more refined picture of membrane integrity-related disease development, and possibly also treatment options and strategies. Pore dynamics is also of great importance regarding healthcare applications such as drug delivery, gene or as recently been implied, cancer therapy. The dynamics of pores significantly differ in stacks which are confined in 2D compared to those in cells or vesicles. In this short review, we will summarize the dynamics of different types of pores that can be observed in biological membranes, which include circular transient, fusion and hemi-fusion pores. We will dedicate a section to floral and fractal pores which were discovered a few years ago and have highly peculiar characteristics. Finally, we will discuss the repair mechanisms of large area pores in conjunction with the current cell membrane repair hypotheses.

  11. Closed-Loop Neuroscience and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation: A Tale of Two Loops.

    PubMed

    Zrenner, Christoph; Belardinelli, Paolo; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Ziemann, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop neuroscience is receiving increasing attention with recent technological advances that enable complex feedback loops to be implemented with millisecond resolution on commodity hardware. We summarize emerging conceptual and methodological frameworks that are available to experimenters investigating a "brain in the loop" using non-invasive brain stimulation and briefly review the experimental and therapeutic implications. We take the view that closed-loop neuroscience in fact deals with two conceptually quite different loops: a "brain-state dynamics" loop, used to couple with and modulate the trajectory of neuronal activity patterns, and a "task dynamics" loop, that is the bidirectional motor-sensory interaction between brain and (simulated) environment, and which enables goal-directed behavioral tasks to be incorporated. Both loops need to be considered and combined to realize the full experimental and therapeutic potential of closed-loop neuroscience. PMID:27092055

  12. Regulation of Activation and Processing of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) by a Complex Electrostatic Interaction between the Regulatory Domain and Cytoplasmic Loop 3*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2012-01-01

    NEG2, a short C-terminal segment (817–838) of the unique regulatory (R) domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, has been reported to regulate CFTR gating in response to cAMP-dependent R domain phosphorylation. The underlying mechanism, however, is unclear. Here, Lys-946 of cytoplasmic loop 3 (CL3) is proposed as counter-ion of Asp-835, Asp-836, or Glu-838 of NEG2 to prevent the channel activation by PKA. Arg-764 or Arg-766 of the Ser-768 phosphorylation site of the R domain is proposed to promote the channel activation possibly by weakening the putative CL3-NEG2 electrostatic attraction. First, not only D835A, D836A, and E838A but also K946A reduced the PKA-dependent CFTR activation. Second, both K946D and D835R/D836R/E838R mutants were activated by ATP and curcumin to a different extent. Third, R764A and R766A mutants enhanced the PKA-dependent activation. However, it is very exciting that D835R/D836R/E838R and K946D/H950D and H950R exhibited normal channel processing and activity whereas D835R/D836R/E838R/K946D/H950D was fractionally misprocessed and silent in response to forskolin. Further, D836R and E838R played a critical role in the asymmetric electrostatic regulation of CFTR processing, and Ser-768 phosphorylation may not be involved. Thus, a complex interfacial interaction among CL3, NEG2, and the Ser-768 phosphorylation site may be responsible for the asymmetric electrostatic regulation of CFTR activation and processing. PMID:23060444

  13. Closing the loop of the soil water retention curve

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Alsherif, N; Wayllace, Alexandra; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    The authors, to their knowledge for the first time, produced two complete principal soil water retention curves (SWRCs) under both positive and negative matric suction regimes. An innovative testing technique combining the transient water release and imbibition method (TRIM) and constant flow method (CFM) was used to identify the principal paths of SWRC in the positive pore-water pressure regime under unsaturated conditions. A negative matric suction of 9.8 kPa is needed to reach full saturation or close the loop of the SWRC for a silty soil. This work pushes the understanding of the interaction of soil and water into new territory by quantifying the boundaries of the SWRC over the entire suction domain, including both wetting and drying conditions that are relevant to field conditions such as slope wetting under heavy rainfall or rapid groundwater table rise in earthen dams or levees.

  14. Rollercoaster Loop Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  15. Rollercoaster loop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-11-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  16. A Systematic Investigation of Structure/Function Requirements for the Apolipoprotein A-I/Lecithin Cholesterol Acyltransferase Interaction Loop of High-density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaodong; Wu, Zhiping; Huang, Ying; Wagner, Matthew A; Baleanu-Gogonea, Camelia; Mehl, Ryan A; Buffa, Jennifer A; DiDonato, Anthony J; Hazen, Leah B; Fox, Paul L; Gogonea, Valentin; Parks, John S; DiDonato, Joseph A; Hazen, Stanley L

    2016-03-18

    The interaction of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) with apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) plays a critical role in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) maturation. We previously identified a highly solvent-exposed apoA-I loop domain (Leu(159)-Leu(170)) in nascent HDL, the so-called "solar flare" (SF) region, and proposed that it serves as an LCAT docking site (Wu, Z., Wagner, M. A., Zheng, L., Parks, J. S., Shy, J. M., 3rd, Smith, J. D., Gogonea, V., and Hazen, S. L. (2007) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 14, 861-868). The stability and role of the SF domain of apoA-I in supporting HDL binding and activation of LCAT are debated. Here we show by site-directed mutagenesis that multiple residues within the SF region (Pro(165), Tyr(166), Ser(167), and Asp(168)) of apoA-I are critical for both LCAT binding to HDL and LCAT catalytic efficiency. The critical role for possible hydrogen bond interaction at apoA-I Tyr(166) was further supported using reconstituted HDL generated from apoA-I mutants (Tyr(166) → Glu or Asn), which showed preservation in both LCAT binding affinity and catalytic efficiency. Moreover, the in vivo functional significance of NO2-Tyr(166)-apoA-I, a specific post-translational modification on apoA-I that is abundant within human atherosclerotic plaque, was further investigated by using the recombinant protein generated from E. coli containing a mutated orthogonal tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair enabling site-specific insertion of the unnatural amino acid into apoA-I. NO2-Tyr(166)-apoA-I, after subcutaneous injection into hLCAT(Tg/Tg), apoA-I(-/-) mice, showed impaired LCAT activation in vivo, with significant reduction in HDL cholesteryl ester formation. The present results thus identify multiple structural features within the solvent-exposed SF region of apoA-I of nascent HDL essential for optimal LCAT binding and catalytic efficiency. PMID:26797122

  17. Cilia and Nuclear Pore Proteins: Pore No More?

    PubMed

    Obado, Samson O; Rout, Michael P

    2016-09-12

    Nuclear pore proteins at the base of cilia were thought to regulate transport into cilia. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Del Viso et al. (2016) challenge this view, showing instead that pore proteins localize to ciliary basal bodies and that their perturbation leads to congenital heart disease. PMID:27623377

  18. Pore size analysis of activated carbons from argon and nitrogen porosimetry using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, R.J.; Hyduke, D.R.; Lastoskie, C.M.

    2000-05-30

    The authors present isotherms calculated from density functional theory for the adsorption of argon in model slit-shaped carbon pores at 77 K. The model isotherms are used to interpret experimental argon uptake measurements and to obtain the pore size distributions of several porous carbons. A similar set of density measurements and to obtain the pore size distributions of several porous carbons. A similar set of density functional theory isotherms, previously reported for nitrogen adsorption on carbon slit pores at 77 K, are used to determine pore size distributions for the same set of carbons. The pore size distribution maxima, mean pore widths, and specific pore volumes measured using the two different probe gases are all found to agree to within approximately 8% on average. Some of the differences in the pore size distributions obtained from argon and nitrogen porosimetry may be attributable to quadrupolar interactions of the nitrogen molecules with functional groups on the carbon surface.

  19. Water Stream "Loop-the-Loop"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefimenko, Oleg

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design of a modified loop-the-loop apparatus in which a water stream is used to illustrate centripetal forces and phenomena of high-velocity hydrodynamics. Included are some procedures of carrying out lecture demonstrations. (CC)

  20. Functional asymmetry of the conserved cystine loops in alphabetagamma GABA A receptors revealed by the response to GABA activation and drug potentiation.

    PubMed

    Tierney, M Louise; Luu, Tien; Gage, Peter W

    2008-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels respond to specific neurotransmitters by transiently opening an integral membrane ion-selective pore, allowing ions to move down their electrochemical gradient. A distinguishing feature of all members of the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily is the presence of a 13-amino acid disulfide loop (Cys-loop) in the extracellular ligand-binding domain. Structural data derived from the acetylcholine receptor place this loop at the interface between the ligand-binding domain and the transmembrane pore-forming domain where it is ideally located to participate in coupling ligand binding to channel opening. We have introduced specific mutations into a conserved motif at the mid-point of the Cys-loop of the GABA A receptor subunits alpha1, beta2 and gamma2S where the sequence reads aromatic, proline, aliphatic (ArProAl motif). Receptors carrying a mutation in the Cys-loop of one of their subunits were expressed in L929 cells and responses to both GABA and drugs were assessed using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Drug potentiation and direct activation were significantly enhanced by mutations in this Cys-loop but these effects were subunit-dependent. Currents in response to agonists were larger when mutations were carried in the alpha and beta subunits but not in the gamma subunit. In contrast, potentiation of current responses by diazepam, etomidate and pentobarbital were all enhanced when mutations were carried in the alpha and gamma subunits, but not the beta subunit. Since the disruption of interactions mediated through the ArProAl motif enhances the mutant receptor's response to both agonist and drugs we suggest that this motif in the Cys-loop of the wild-type receptor participates in interactions that create activation barriers to conformational changes during channel gating. PMID:18083058

  1. Relationship between the Averaged Deposition Rate Coefficients for Colloids in a Single Pore and Various Pore-scale Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, S.; Mohan Kumar, M.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Raoof, A.

    2014-12-01

    The colloid deposition behavior observed at the Darcy scale represents an average of the processes occurring at the pore scale. Hence, a better understanding of the processes occurring at the Darcy scale can be obtained by studying colloid transport at the pore-scale and then upscaling the results. In this study, we have developed a mathematical model to simulate the transport of colloids in a cylindrical pore by considering various processes such as advection, diffusion, colloid-soil surface interactions and hydrodynamic wall effects. The pore space is divided into three different regions, namely, the bulk, diffusion and potential regions, based on the dominant processes acting in each of these regions. In the bulk region, colloid transport is governed by advection and diffusion; whereas in the diffusion region, colloid mobility due to diffusion is retarded by hydrodynamic wall effects. Colloid-solid interaction forces dominate the transport in the potential region where colloid deposition occurs and are calculated using DLVO theory. The expressions for mass transfer rate coefficients between the diffusion and potential regions have been derived for different DLVO energy profiles. These are incorporated in the pore-scale equations in the form of a boundary condition at the diffusion-potential region interface. The model results are used to obtain the colloid breakthrough curve at the end of a long pore, and then it is fitted with 1D advection-dispersion-adsorption model so as to determine the averaged attachment and detachment rate coefficients at the scale of a single pore. A sensitivity analysis of the model to six pore-scale parameters (colloid and wall surface potentials, solution ionic strength, average pore-water velocity, colloid radius, and pore radius) is carried out so as to find the relation between the averaged deposition rate coefficients at pore scale vs the pore-scale parameters. We found an hyper exponential relation between the colloid attachment

  2. Silicon Pore Optics Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijersbergen, Marco; Collon, M. J.; Günther, R.; Partapsing, R.; Ackermann, M.; Olde Riekerink, M.; Cooper-Jensen, C.; Christensen, F.; Freyberg, M.; Krumrey, M.; Erhard, M.; van Baren, C.; Wallace, K.; Bavdaz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon pore optics have been developed over the last years to enable future astrophysical X-ray telescopes and have now become a candidate mirror technology for the IXO mission. Scientific requirements demand an angular resolution better than 5” and a large effective area of several square meters at photon energies of 1 keV. This paper discusses the performance of the latest generation of these novel light, stiff and modular X-ray optics, based on ribbed plates made from commercial high grade 12” silicon wafers. Stacks with several tens of silicon plates have been assembled in the course of an ESA technology development program, by bending the plates into an accurate shape and directly bonding them on top of each other. Several mirror modules, using two stacks each, have been aligned and integrated to form the conical approximation of a Wolter-I design. This paper presents the status of the technology, addresses and discusses a number of activities in the ongoing ESA technology development and shows the latest results of full area measurements at the long-beamline MPE X-ray test facility (PANTER) and the PTB beam line at the BESSY electron storage ring in Berlin.

  3. Biophysics, pathophysiology, and pharmacology of ion channel gating pores

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) are a feature of voltage gated ion channels (VGICs) and voltage sensitive proteins. They are composed of four transmembrane (TM) segments (S1–S4). Currents leaking through VSDs are called omega or gating pore currents. Gating pores are caused by mutations of the highly conserved positively charged amino acids in the S4 segment that disrupt interactions between the S4 segment and the gating charge transfer center (GCTC). The GCTC separates the intracellular and extracellular water crevices. The disruption of S4–GCTC interactions allows these crevices to communicate and create a fast activating and non-inactivating alternative cation-selective permeation pathway of low conductance, or a gating pore. Gating pore currents have recently been shown to cause periodic paralysis phenotypes. There is also increasing evidence that gating pores are linked to several other familial diseases. For example, gating pores in Nav1.5 and Kv7.2 channels may underlie mixed arrhythmias associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) phenotypes and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH), respectively. There is little evidence for the existence of gating pore blockers. Moreover, it is known that a number of toxins bind to the VSD of a specific domain of Na+ channels. These toxins may thus modulate gating pore currents. This focus on the VSD motif opens up a new area of research centered on developing molecules to treat a number of cell excitability disorders such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and pain. The purpose of the present review is to summarize existing knowledge of the pathophysiology, biophysics, and pharmacology of gating pore currents and to serve as a guide for future studies aimed at improving our understanding of gating pores and their pathophysiological roles. PMID:24772081

  4. Closed-Loop Neuroscience and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation: A Tale of Two Loops

    PubMed Central

    Zrenner, Christoph; Belardinelli, Paolo; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Ziemann, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop neuroscience is receiving increasing attention with recent technological advances that enable complex feedback loops to be implemented with millisecond resolution on commodity hardware. We summarize emerging conceptual and methodological frameworks that are available to experimenters investigating a “brain in the loop” using non-invasive brain stimulation and briefly review the experimental and therapeutic implications. We take the view that closed-loop neuroscience in fact deals with two conceptually quite different loops: a “brain-state dynamics” loop, used to couple with and modulate the trajectory of neuronal activity patterns, and a “task dynamics” loop, that is the bidirectional motor-sensory interaction between brain and (simulated) environment, and which enables goal-directed behavioral tasks to be incorporated. Both loops need to be considered and combined to realize the full experimental and therapeutic potential of closed-loop neuroscience. PMID:27092055

  5. Pore facies analysis: incorporation of rock properties into pore geometry based classes in a Permo-Triassic carbonate reservoir in the Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimpour-Bonab, H.; Aliakbardoust, E.

    2014-06-01

    Pore facies analysis is a useful method for the classification of reservoir rocks according to pore geometry characteristics. The importance of this method is related to the dependence of the dynamic behaviour of the reservoir rock on the pore geometry. In this study, pore facies analysis was performed by the quantification and classification of the mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves applying the multi-resolution graph-based clustering (MRGC) method. Each pore facies includes a limited variety of rock samples with different depositional fabrics and diagenetic histories, which are representative of one type of pore geometry. The present pore geometry is the result of the interaction between the primary rock fabric and its diagenetic overprint. Thus the variations in petrographic properties can be correlated with the pore geometry characteristics. Accordingly, the controlling parameters in the pore geometry characteristics were revealed by detailed petrographic analysis in each pore facies. The reservoir rock samples were then classified using the determined petrographic properties which control the pore system quality. This method is proposed for the classification of reservoir rocks in complicated carbonate reservoirs, in order to reduce the incompatibility of traditional facies analysis with pore system characteristics. The method is applicable where enough capillary pressure data is not available.

  6. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    SciTech Connect

    Chesi, Stefano; Jaffe, Arthur; Loss, Daniel; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  7. OPE for super loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro; Wang, Tianheng

    2011-11-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion for Null Polygon Wilson loops to the Mason-Skinner-Caron-Huot super loop dual to non MHV gluon amplitudes. We explain how the known tree level amplitudes can be promoted into an infinite amount of data at any loop order in the OPE picture. As an application, we re-derive all one loop NMHV six gluon amplitudes by promoting their tree level expressions. We also present some new all loops predictions for these amplitudes.

  8. The preprocessed doacross loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.; Mirchandaney, Ravi

    1990-01-01

    Dependencies between loop iterations cannot always be characterized during program compilation. Doacross loops typically make use of a-priori knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies to carry out required synchronizations. A type of doacross loop is proposed that allows the scheduling of iterations of a loop among processors without advance knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies. The method proposed for loop iterations requires that parallelizable preprocessing and postprocessing steps be carried out during program execution.

  9. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  10. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, Hagan; Walker, Barbara J.; Chang, Chung-yu; Niblack, Brett; Panchal, Rekha

    1998-01-01

    An inactive pore-forming agent which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell.

  11. Te homogeneous precipitation in Ge dislocation loop vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin Toinin, J.; Portavoce, A.; Texier, M.; Bertoglio, M.; Hoummada, K.

    2016-06-01

    High resolution microscopies were used to study the interactions of Te atoms with Ge dislocation loops, after a standard n-type doping process in Ge. Te atoms neither segregate nor precipitate on dislocation loops, but form Te-Ge clusters at the same depth as dislocation loops, in contradiction with usual dopant behavior and thermodynamic expectations. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations show that Te atoms are repulsed from dislocation loops due to elastic interactions, promoting homogeneous Te-Ge nucleation between dislocation loops. This phenomenon is enhanced by coulombic interactions between activated Te2+ or Te1+ ions.

  12. The Type III Secretion Translocation Pore Senses Host Cell Contact

    PubMed Central

    Armentrout, Erin I.; Rietsch, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are nano-syringes used by a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens to promote infection by directly injecting effector proteins into targeted host cells. Translocation of effectors is triggered by host-cell contact and requires assembly of a pore in the host-cell plasma membrane, which consists of two translocator proteins. Our understanding of the translocation pore, how it is assembled in the host cell membrane and its precise role in effector translocation, is extremely limited. Here we use a genetic technique to identify protein-protein contacts between pore-forming translocator proteins, as well as the T3SS needle-tip, that are critical for translocon function. The data help establish the orientation of the translocator proteins in the host cell membrane. Analysis of translocon function in mutants that break these contacts demonstrates that an interaction between the pore-forming translocator PopD and the needle-tip is required for sensing host cell contact. Moreover, tethering PopD at a dimer interface also specifically prevents host-cell sensing, arguing that the translocation pore is actively involved in detecting host cell contact. The work presented here therefore establishes a signal transduction pathway for sensing host cell contact that is initiated by a conformational change in the translocation pore, and is subsequently transmitted to the base of the apparatus via a specific contact between the pore and the T3SS needle-tip. PMID:27022930

  13. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-06-19

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl(-) and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl(-) ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl(-) flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl(-). The location of these Cl(-)-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl(-) ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:25944907

  14. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore*

    PubMed Central

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl− and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl− ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl− ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl− permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl− flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl−. The location of these Cl−-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl− ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl− ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:25944907

  15. Conserved cysteine residues in the pore region are obligatory for human TRPM2 channel function

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Zhu-Zhong; Mao, Hong-Ju; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    2006-01-01

    TRPM2 proteins belong to the melastatin-related transient receptor potential or TRPM subfamily and form Ca2+-permeable cationic channels activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphoribose (ADPR). The TRPM2 channel subunit, like all its close relatives, is structurally homologous to the well-characterized voltage-gated potassium channel subunits, each containing six transmembrane segments and a putative pore loop between the fifth and sixth segments. Nevertheless, the structural elements determining the TRPM2 channel functions are still not well understood. In this study, we investigated the functional role of two conserved cysteine residues (at positions 996 and 1008) in the putative pore region of the human TRPM2 by site-directed mutagenesis combined with electrophysiological and biochemical approaches. Expression of wild type hTRPM2 channels in HEK293 cells resulted in robust ADPR-evoked currents. Substitution of cysteine with alanine or serine generated mutant channels that failed to be activated by ADPR. Furthermore, experiments by Western blotting, immunocytochemistry, biotin labelling, and co-immunoprecipitation techniques showed no obvious changes in protein expression, trafficking or membrane localisation, and the ability of interacting with neighbouring subunits that is required for channel assembly. Co-expression of wild type and mutant subunits significantly reduced the ADPR-evoked currents; for combination of wild type and C996S mutant subunits, the reduction was approximately 95%, indicating that incorporation of one or more non-functional C996S subunits leads to the loss of channel function. These results taken together suggest that the cysteine residues in the pore region are obligatory for TRPM2 channel function. PMID:16822940

  16. Membrane pore formation at protein-lipid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Froelich, Christopher J; Wallace, Mark I; Anderluh, Gregor

    2014-11-01

    Pore-forming proteins (PFPs) interact with lipid bilayers to compromise membrane integrity. Many PFPs function by inserting a ring of oligomerized subunits into the bilayer to form a protein-lined hydrophilic channel. However, mounting evidence suggests that PFPs can also generate 'proteolipidic' pores by contributing to the fusion of inner and outer bilayer leaflets to form a toroidal structure. We discuss here toroidal pore formation by peptides including melittin, protegrin, and Alzheimer's Aβ1-41, as well as by PFPs from several evolutionarily unrelated families: the colicin/Bcl-2 grouping including the pro-apoptotic protein Bax, actinoporins derived from sea anemones, and the membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) set of proteins. We also explore how the structure and biological role of toroidal pores might be investigated further. PMID:25440714

  17. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  18. Can ash clog soil pores?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoof, Cathelijne; Stoof, Cathelijne; Gevaert, Anouk; Gevaert, Anouk; Baver, Christine; Baver, Christine; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Morales, Veronica; Morales, Veronica; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Martin, Deborah; Martin, Deborah; Steenhuis, Tammo; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2015-04-01

    Wildfire can greatly increase a landscape's vulnerability to flooding and erosion events, and ash is thought to play a large role in controlling runoff and erosion processes after wildfire. Although ash can store rainfall and thereby reduce runoff and erosion for a limited period after wildfires, it has also been hypothesized to clog soil pores and reduce infiltration. Several researchers have attributed the commonly observed increase in runoff and erosion after fire to the potential pore-clogging effect of ash. Evidence is however incomplete, as to date, research has solely focused on identifying the presence of ash in the soil, with the actual flow processes associated with the infiltration and pore-clogging of ash remaining a major unknown. In several laboratory experiments, we tested the hypothesis that ash causes pore clogging to the point that infiltration is hampered and ponding occurs. We first visualized and quantified pore-scale infiltration of water and ash in sand of a range of textures and at various infiltration rates, using a digital bright field microscope capturing both photo and video. While these visualization experiments confirm field and lab observation of ash washing into soil pores, we did not observe any clogging of pores, and have not been able to create conditions for which this does occur. Additional electrochemical analysis and measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity indicate that pore clogging by ash is not plausible. Electrochemical analysis showed that ash and sand are both negatively charged, showing that attachment of ash to sand and any resulting clogging is unlikely. Ash also had quite high saturated conductivity, and systems where ash was mixed in or lying on top of sand had similarly high hydraulic conductivity. Based on these various experiments, we cannot confirm the hypothesis that pore clogging by ash contributes to the frequently observed increase in post-fire runoff, at least for the medium to coarse sands

  19. Effects of guanine bases at the central loop on stabilization of the quadruplex DNAs and their interactions with Meso-tetrakis(N-methylpyridium-4-yl)porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sun Hee; Moon, Jihye; Lee, Myung Won; Kim, Seog K

    2015-10-01

    The thermal stability of the G-quadruplex formed from the thrombin-binding aptamer, 5'G2T2G2TGTG2T2G2, in which the guanine (G) base at the central loop was replaced with an adenine (A) or inosine (I) base, was examined to determine the role of the central G base in stabilizing the quadruplex. Replacement of the central G base by the I base resulted in a slight decrease in thermal stability. On the other hand, the stability of the G-quadruplex decreased to a significant extent when it was replaced with the A base. The optimized structure of the G-quadruplex, which was obtained by a molecular dynamic simulation, showed that the carbonyl group of the C5 position of the central G base could form hydrogen bonds with the G1 amine group at the C7 position on the upper G-quartet. This formation of a hydrogen bond contributes to the stability of the G-quadruplex. The spectral property of meso-tetrakis(N-methylpyridium-4yl)porphyrin (TMPyP) associated with the G-quadruplex was characterized by a moderate red shift and hypochromism in the absorption spectrum, a positive CD signal, and two emission maxima in the fluorescence emission spectrum, suggesting that TMPyP binds at the exterior of the G-quadruplex. Spectral properties were slightly altered when the G base at the central loop was replaced with A or I, while the fluorescence decay times of TMPyP associated with the G-quadruplex were identical. Observed spectral properties removes the possibility of intercalation binding mode for TMPyP. TMPyP binds at the exterior of the quadruplex. Whether it stacks on the central loop or binds at the side of the quadruplex is unclear at this stage. PMID:26057195

  20. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Annulate Lamellae Pore Complexes in Nuclear Transport in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raghunayakula, Sarita; Subramonian, Divya; Dasso, Mary; Kumar, Rita; Zhang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Annulate lamellae are cytoplasmic organelles containing stacked sheets of membranes embedded with pore complexes. These cytoplasmic pore complexes at annulate lamellae are morphologically similar to nuclear pore complexes at the nuclear envelope. Although annulate lamellae has been observed in nearly all types of cells, their biological functions are still largely unknown. Here we show that SUMO1-modification of the Ran GTPase-activating protein RanGAP1 not only target RanGAP1 to its known sites at nuclear pore complexes but also to annulate lamellae pore complexes through interactions with the Ran-binding protein RanBP2 and the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 in mammalian cells. Furthermore, upregulation of annulate lamellae, which decreases the number of nuclear pore complexes and concurrently increases that of annulate lamellae pore complexes, causes a redistribution of nuclear transport receptors including importin α/β and the exportin CRM1 from nuclear pore complexes to annulate lamellae pore complexes and also reduces the rates of nuclear import and export. Moreover, our results reveal that importin α/β-mediated import complexes initially accumulate at annulate lamellae pore complexes upon the activation of nuclear import and subsequently disassociate for nuclear import through nuclear pore complexes in cells with upregulation of annulate lamellae. Lastly, CRM1-mediated export complexes are concentrated at both nuclear pore complexes and annulate lamellae pore complexes when the disassembly of these export complexes is inhibited by transient expression of a Ran GTPase mutant arrested in its GTP-bound form, suggesting that RanGAP1/RanBP2-activated RanGTP hydrolysis at these pore complexes is required for the dissociation of the export complexes. Hence, our findings provide a foundation for further investigation of how upregulation of annulate lamellae decreases the rates of nuclear transport and also for elucidation of the biological significance of the

  1. Blind loop syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Blind loop syndrome occurs when digested food slows or stops moving through part of the intestines. This ... The name of this condition refers to the "blind loop" formed by part of the intestine that ...

  2. Investigation of pore size related parameters during long-term CO2-brine-rock interaction from batch experiments and from in situ rock cores after 4 years of geological CO2 storage at the Ketzin pilot site (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemke, Kornelia; Liebscher, Axel; Fischer, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate long-term effects of injected CO2 on pore size related parameters. Changes in porosity, pore geometry and distribution, effective permeability, and capillary entry conditions influence the development of static and dynamic storage capacity and injectivity. For the batch experiments core samples from the target reservoir horizon and its directly overlying cap-rock of the Triassic Stuttgart Formation at the Ketzin pilot storage site in Germany drilled in 2007 (observation well Ktzi 202) were exposed to pure CO2 and synthetic reservoir brine in corrosion-resistant, high-pressure autoclaves under in situ P-T conditions over various time periods. For the first run with reservoir sandstone, seven inner core section (Ø 50 mm x 100 mm) and additional rock fragments were stored in separate autoclaves for 40 months. After 15, 21, 24, and 40 months, respectively, all autoclaves were opened and samples were taken for mineralogical, geochemical, microbiological and petrophysical investigations. In a second run, three parallel siltstone samples were placed in autoclaves and exposed to CO2 and synthetic reservoir brine with run durations of 2, 4 and 6 months; a fourth cap-rock sample was exposed to N2 for 6 months and served as blind-run. The samples were investigated by NMR relaxation and mercury injection porosimetry (MIP). The NMR amplitude is related to fluid filled porosity. In addition, the distribution of NMR-T2 values reflects the pore sizes. The porosity of the connected pore system and the distribution of pore throats can be derived from the MIP. Based on the data, empirical models were used to estimate corresponding permeabilities as well as displacement, threshold, and critical pore pressure from the mercury data. The porosity data of the batch experiments determined by NMR and MIP are comparable and consistent with the logging data. The data of the reservoir experiments indicate only small changes of the pore size

  3. Nanodisc-cell fusion: control of fusion pore nucleation and lifetimes by SNARE protein transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenyong; Auclair, Sarah M; Bello, Oscar; Vennekate, Wensi; Dudzinski, Natasha R; Krishnakumar, Shyam S; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    The initial, nanometer-sized connection between the plasma membrane and a hormone- or neurotransmitter-filled vesicle -the fusion pore- can flicker open and closed repeatedly before dilating or resealing irreversibly. Pore dynamics determine release and vesicle recycling kinetics, but pore properties are poorly known because biochemically defined single-pore assays are lacking. We isolated single flickering pores connecting v-SNARE-reconstituted nanodiscs to cells ectopically expressing cognate, "flipped" t-SNAREs. Conductance through single, voltage-clamped fusion pores directly reported sub-millisecond pore dynamics. Pore currents fluctuated, transiently returned to baseline multiple times, and disappeared ~6 s after initial opening, as if the fusion pore fluctuated in size, flickered, and resealed. We found that interactions between v- and t-SNARE transmembrane domains (TMDs) promote, but are not essential for pore nucleation. Surprisingly, TMD modifications designed to disrupt v- and t-SNARE TMD zippering prolonged pore lifetimes dramatically. We propose that the post-fusion geometry of the proteins contribute to pore stability. PMID:27264104

  4. Radiation Enhanced Absorption of Frank Loops by Nanovoids in Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Zhang, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron and heavy ion irradiations generally induce voids in metallic materials, and continuous radiations typically result in void swelling and mechanical failure of the irradiated materials. Recent experiments showed that nanovoids in nanotwinned copper could act as sinks for radiation-induced Frank loops, significantly mitigating radiation damage. In this paper, we report on structural evolution of Frank loops under cascades and address the role of nanovoids in absorbing Frank loops in detail by using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that a stand-alone Frank loop is stable under cascades. When Frank loops are adjacent to nanovoids, the diffusion of a group of atoms from the loop into nanovoids is accomplished via the formation and propagation of dislocation loops. The loop-nanovoid interactions result in the shrinkage of the nanovoids and the Frank loops.

  5. Geostatistical Modeling of Pore Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Devary, J.L.; Doctor, P.G.

    1981-06-01

    A significant part of evaluating a geologic formation as a nuclear waste repository involves the modeling of contaminant transport in the surrounding media in the event the repository is breached. The commonly used contaminant transport models are deterministic. However, the spatial variability of hydrologic field parameters introduces uncertainties into contaminant transport predictions. This paper discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to the modeling of spatially varying hydrologic field parameters required as input to contaminant transport analyses. Kriging estimation techniques were applied to Hanford Reservation field data to calculate hydraulic conductivity and the ground-water potential gradients. These quantities were statistically combined to estimate the groundwater pore velocity and to characterize the pore velocity estimation error. Combining geostatistical modeling techniques with product error propagation techniques results in an effective stochastic characterization of groundwater pore velocity, a hydrologic parameter required for contaminant transport analyses.

  6. A defined epitope on the human choriogonadotropin alpha-subunit interacts with the second extracellular loop of the transmembrane domain of the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Couture, L; Remy, J J; Rabesona, H; Troalen, F; Pajot-Augy, E; Bozon, V; Haertle, T; Bidart, J M; Salesse, R

    1996-10-15

    The monoclonal antibody, HT13 recognizes human choriogonadotropin (CG) bound to the extracellular domain of its receptor, but not to the full-length receptor. The HT13 epitope is located in the regions of residues 15-17 and 73-75 of the human CG alpha-subunit. Only one synthetic peptide, lutropin (LH)/CG-receptor-(481-497)-peptide (EL2 peptide), which spans the second putative extracellular loop of the LH/CG-receptor endodomain, prevents recognition of human CG by HT13 mAb. EL2 peptide decreases hormone-induced cAMP production, but not high-affinity binding. An anti-EL2 serum also displays the capacity to inhibit human CG-stimulated cAMP production. These results suggest that the second extracellular loop of the receptor is in contact with the HT13 epitope of human CG alpha-subunit and is involved in signal transduction. A relative orientation of the hormone versus the endodomain is proposed. PMID:8917465

  7. Restricted Transport in Small Pores

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John L.; Quinn, John A.

    1974-01-01

    The basic hydrodynamic equations governing transport in submicron pores are reexamined. Conditions necessary for a simplified, one-dimensional treatment of the diffusion/convection process are established. Steric restrictions and Brownian motion are incorporated directly into the resulting model. Currently available fluid mechanical results are used to evaluate an upper limit on hindered diffusion; this limit is valid for small particle-to-pore ratios. Extensions of the analysis are shown to depend on numerical solutions of the related hydrodynamic problem, that of asymmetrical particle motion in a bounded fluid. PMID:4813157

  8. Electrostatic and potential cation-pi forces may guide the interaction of extracellular loop III with Na+ and bile acids for human apical Na+-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Antara; Hussainzada, Naissan; Khandelwal, Akash; Swaan, Peter W

    2008-03-01

    The hASBT (human apical Na(+)-dependent bile acid transporter) constitutes a key target of anti-hypercholesterolaemic therapies and pro-drug approaches; physiologically, hASBT actively reclaims bile acids along the terminal ileum via Na(+) co-transport. Previously, TM (transmembrane segment) 7 was identified as part of the putative substrate permeation pathway using SCAM (substitute cysteine accessibility mutagenesis). In the present study, SCAM was extended through EL3 (extracellular loop 3; residues Arg(254)-Val(286)) that leads into TM7 from the exofacial matrix. Activity of most EL3 mutants was significantly hampered upon cysteine substitution, whereas ten (out of 31) were functionally inactive (<10% activity). Since only E282C lacked plasma membrane expression, EL3 amino acids predominantly fulfill critical functional roles during transport. Oppositely charged membrane-impermeant MTS (methanethiosulfonate) reagents {MTSET [(2-trimethylammonium) ethyl MTS] and MTSES [(2-sulfonatoethyl) MTS]} produced mostly similar inhibition profiles wherein only middle and descending loop segments (residues Thr(267)-Val(286)) displayed significant MTS sensitivity. The presence of bile acid substrate significantly reduced the rates of MTS modification for all MTS-sensitive mutants, suggesting a functional association between EL3 residues and bile acids. Activity assessments at equilibrative [Na(+)] revealed numerous Na(+)-sensitive residues, possibly performing auxiliary functions during transport such as transduction of protein conformational changes during translocation. Integration of these data suggests ligand interaction points along EL3 via electrostatic interactions with Arg(256), Glu(261) and probably Glu(282) and a potential cation-pi interaction with Phe(278). We conclude that EL3 amino acids are essential for hASBT activity, probably as primary substrate interaction points using long-range electrostatic attractive forces. PMID:18028035

  9. Current loop coalescence studied by 3-D electromagnetic particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Sakai, Jun-Ichi; Koide, Shinji; Buneman, O.; Neubert, T.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare plasma data from the Yohkoh satellite is analyzed. The interactions of current loops were observed in the active regions on the Sun. This observation pointed out the importance of the idea that the solar flare is generated by the coalescence of current loops. The three dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations are to help in understanding the global interaction between two current loops including the evolution of the twist of loops due to instabilities. Associated rapid dynamics of current loop coalescence such as reconnection, shock waves and associated kinetic processes such as energy transfer, acceleration of particles, and electromagnetic emissions are to be studied by the code to complement analytical theories and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the current loop coalescence. The simulation results show the strong interactions between two current loops, beam and whistler instabilities, and associated parallel and perpendicular particle heating.

  10. Membrane pores induced by magainin.

    PubMed

    Ludtke, S J; He, K; Heller, W T; Harroun, T A; Yang, L; Huang, H W

    1996-10-29

    Magainin, found in the skin of Xenopus laevis, belongs to a broad class of antimicrobial peptides which kill bacteria by permeabilizing the cytoplasmic membrane but do not lyse eukaryotic cells. The 23-residue peptide has been shown to form an amphiphilic helix when associated with membranes. However, its molecular mechanism of action has been controversial. Oriented circular dichroism has detected helical magainin oriented perpendicular to the plane of the membrane at high peptide concentrations, but Raman, fluorescence, differential scanning calorimetry, and NMR all indicate that the peptide is associated with the head groups of the lipid bilayer. Here we show that neutron in-plane scattering detects pores formed by magainin 2 in membranes only when a substantial fraction of the peptide is oriented perpendicular to the membrane. The pores are almost twice as large as the alamethicin pores. On the basis of the in-plane scattering data, we propose a toroidal (or wormhole) model, which differs from the barrel-stave model of alamethicin in that the lipid bends back on itself like the inside of a torus. The bending requires a lateral expansion in the head group region of the bilayer. Magainin monomers play the role of fillers in the expansion region thereby stabilizing the pore. This molecular configuration is consistent with all published magainin data. PMID:8901513

  11. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, H.; Walker, B.J.; Chang, C.Y.; Niblack, B.; Panchal, R.

    1998-07-07

    An inactive pore-forming agent is revealed which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell. 30 figs.

  12. Smooth DNA transport through a narrowed pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Carson, Spencer; Wilson, James; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Wanunu, Meni

    2014-11-18

    Voltage-driven transport of double-stranded DNA through nanoscale pores holds much potential for applications in quantitative molecular biology and biotechnology, yet the microscopic details of translocation have proven to be challenging to decipher. Earlier experiments showed strong dependence of transport kinetics on pore size: fast regular transport in large pores (> 5 nm diameter), and slower yet heterogeneous transport time distributions in sub-5 nm pores, which imply a large positional uncertainty of the DNA in the pore as a function of the translocation time. In this work, we show that this anomalous transport is a result of DNA self-interaction, a phenomenon that is strictly pore-diameter dependent. We identify a regime in which DNA transport is regular, producing narrow and well-behaved dwell-time distributions that fit a simple drift-diffusion theory. Furthermore, a systematic study of the dependence of dwell time on DNA length reveals a single power-law scaling of 1.37 in the range of 35-20,000 bp. We highlight the resolution of our nanopore device by discriminating via single pulses 100 and 500 bp fragments in a mixture with >98% accuracy. When coupled to an appropriate sequence labeling method, our observation of smooth DNA translocation can pave the way for high-resolution DNA mapping and sizing applications in genomics. PMID:25418307

  13. Membrane pore formation in atomistic and coarse-grained simulations.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Sonja A; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-10-01

    Biological cells and their organelles are protected by ultra thin membranes. These membranes accomplish a broad variety of important tasks like separating the cell content from the outer environment, they are the site for cell-cell interactions and many enzymatic reactions, and control the in- and efflux of metabolites. For certain physiological functions e.g. in the fusion of membranes and also in a number of biotechnological applications like gene transfection the membrane integrity needs to be compromised to allow for instance for the exchange of polar molecules across the membrane barrier. Mechanisms enabling the transport of molecules across the membrane involve membrane proteins that form specific pores or act as transporters, but also so-called lipid pores induced by external fields, stress, or peptides. Recent progress in the simulation field enabled to closely mimic pore formation as supposed to occur in vivo or in vitro. Here, we review different simulation-based approaches in the study of membrane pores with a focus on lipid pore properties such as their size and energetics, poration mechanisms based on the application of external fields, charge imbalances, or surface tension, and on pores that are induced by small molecules, peptides, and lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26748016

  14. Smooth DNA Transport through a Narrowed Pore Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Spencer; Wilson, James; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Wanunu, Meni

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-driven transport of double-stranded DNA through nanoscale pores holds much potential for applications in quantitative molecular biology and biotechnology, yet the microscopic details of translocation have proven to be challenging to decipher. Earlier experiments showed strong dependence of transport kinetics on pore size: fast regular transport in large pores (> 5 nm diameter), and slower yet heterogeneous transport time distributions in sub-5 nm pores, which imply a large positional uncertainty of the DNA in the pore as a function of the translocation time. In this work, we show that this anomalous transport is a result of DNA self-interaction, a phenomenon that is strictly pore-diameter dependent. We identify a regime in which DNA transport is regular, producing narrow and well-behaved dwell-time distributions that fit a simple drift-diffusion theory. Furthermore, a systematic study of the dependence of dwell time on DNA length reveals a single power-law scaling of 1.37 in the range of 35–20,000 bp. We highlight the resolution of our nanopore device by discriminating via single pulses 100 and 500 bp fragments in a mixture with >98% accuracy. When coupled to an appropriate sequence labeling method, our observation of smooth DNA translocation can pave the way for high-resolution DNA mapping and sizing applications in genomics. PMID:25418307

  15. Pore growth in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Jeong, G. Y.; Sohn, D.-S.; Jamison, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is currently under development in the DOE's Material Management and Minimization program to convert HEU-fueled research reactors to LEU-fueled reactors. In some demanding conditions in high-power and high-performance reactors, large pores form in the interaction layers between the U-Mo fuel particles and the Al matrix, which pose a potential to cause fuel failure. In this study, comprehension of the formation and growth of these pores was explored. As a product, a model to predict pore growth and porosity increase was developed. The model includes three major topics: fission gas release from the U-Mo and the IL to the pores, stress evolution in the fuel meat, and the effect of amorphous IL growth. Well-characterized in-pile data from reduced-size plates were used to fit the model parameters. A data set from full-sized plates, independent and distinctively different from those used to fit the model parameters, was used to examine the accuracy of the model. The model showed fair agreement with the measured data. The model suggested that the growth of the IL has a critical effect on pore growth, as both its material properties and energetics are favorable to pore formation. Therefore, one area of the current effort, focused on suppressing IL growth, appears to be on the right track to improve the performance of this fuel.

  16. Effect of Confinement on the Bubble Points of Hydrocarbons in Controlled-Pore Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Sheng; Lutkenhaus, Jodie; Nasrabadi, Hadi; Hadi Nasrabadi Team

    2015-03-01

    Phase behavior in shale remains a challenging problem in the petroleum industry due to many complexities. One complexity is the strong surface-fluid interactions in shale nano-scale pores. These interactions can lead to a heterogeneous distribution of molecules, which conventional bulk-phase thermodynamics fails to describe. Herein, we report a study on the bubble points of various hydrocarbons confined in nanoporous controlled-pore glasses of 4.3 to 38.1 nm pore diameter. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to measure the temperature at which the gas phase begins to form (i.e. bubble point). Besides pore diameter, the relative hydrocarbon loading in the controlled-pore glass is evaluated. The findings suggest that the bubble point is dramatically affected by pore diameter.

  17. Solubilization and characterization of the anthrax toxin pore in detergent micelles

    PubMed Central

    Vernier, Gregory; Wang, Jie; Jennings, Laura D; Sun, Jianjun; Fischer, Audrey; Song, Likai; Collier, R John

    2009-01-01

    Proteolytically activated Protective Antigen (PA) moiety of anthrax toxin self-associates to form a heptameric ring-shaped oligomer (the prepore). Acidic pH within the endosome converts the prepore to a pore that serves as a passageway for the toxin's enzymatic moieties to cross the endosomal membrane. Prepore is stable in solution under mildly basic conditions, and lowering the pH promotes a conformational transition to an insoluble pore-like state. N-tetradecylphosphocholine (FOS14) was the only detergent among 110 tested that prevented aggregation without dissociating the multimer into its constituent subunits. FOS14 maintained the heptamers as monodisperse, insertion-competent 440-kDa particles, which formed channels in planar phospholipid bilayers with the same unitary conductance and ability to translocate a model substrate protein as channels formed in the absence of detergent. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis detected pore-like conformational changes within PA on solubilization with FOS14, and electron micrograph images of FOS14-solubilized pore showed an extended, mushroom-shaped structure. Circular dichroïsm measurements revealed an increase in α helix and a decrease in β structure in pore formation. Spectral changes caused by a deletion mutation support the hypothesis that the 2β2-2β3 loop transforms into the transmembrane segment of the β-barrel stem of the pore. Changes caused by selected point mutations indicate that the transition to α structure is dependent on residues of the luminal 2β11-2β12 loop that are known to affect pore formation. Stabilizing the PA pore in solution with FOS14 may facilitate further structural analysis and a more detailed understanding of the folding pathway by which the pore is formed. PMID:19609933

  18. Nanodisc-cell fusion: control of fusion pore nucleation and lifetimes by SNARE protein transmembrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhenyong; Auclair, Sarah M.; Bello, Oscar; Vennekate, Wensi; Dudzinski, Natasha R.; Krishnakumar, Shyam S.; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    The initial, nanometer-sized connection between the plasma membrane and a hormone- or neurotransmitter-filled vesicle –the fusion pore– can flicker open and closed repeatedly before dilating or resealing irreversibly. Pore dynamics determine release and vesicle recycling kinetics, but pore properties are poorly known because biochemically defined single-pore assays are lacking. We isolated single flickering pores connecting v-SNARE-reconstituted nanodiscs to cells ectopically expressing cognate, “flipped” t-SNAREs. Conductance through single, voltage-clamped fusion pores directly reported sub-millisecond pore dynamics. Pore currents fluctuated, transiently returned to baseline multiple times, and disappeared ~6 s after initial opening, as if the fusion pore fluctuated in size, flickered, and resealed. We found that interactions between v- and t-SNARE transmembrane domains (TMDs) promote, but are not essential for pore nucleation. Surprisingly, TMD modifications designed to disrupt v- and t-SNARE TMD zippering prolonged pore lifetimes dramatically. We propose that the post-fusion geometry of the proteins contribute to pore stability. PMID:27264104

  19. Spatially directed vesicle capture in the ordered pores of breath-figure polymer films.

    PubMed

    Arora, J S; Ponnusamy, T; Zheng, R; Venkataraman, P; Raghavan, S R; Blake, D; John, V T

    2015-07-14

    This work describes a new method to selectively capture liposomes and other vesicle entities in the patterned pores of breath-figure polymer films. The process involves the deposition of a hydrophobe containing biopolymer in the pores of the breath figure, and the tethering of vesicles to the biopolymer through hydrophobic interactions. The process is versatile, can be scaled up and extended to the deposition of other functional materials in the pores of breath figures. PMID:26021456

  20. Magnetic loop emergence within a granule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gömöry, P.; Beck, C.; Balthasar, H.; Rybák, J.; Kučera, A.; Koza, J.; Wöhl, H.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: We investigate the temporal evolution of magnetic flux emerging within a granule in the quiet-Sun internetwork at disk center. Methods: We combined IR spectropolarimetry of high angular resolution performed in two Fe i lines at 1565 nm with speckle-reconstructed G-band imaging. We determined the magnetic field parameters by a LTE inversion of the full Stokes vector using the SIR code, and followed their evolution in time. To interpret the observations, we created a geometrical model of a rising loop in 3D. The relevant parameters of the loop were matched to the observations where possible. We then synthesized spectra from the 3D model for a comparison to the observations. Results: We found signatures of magnetic flux emergence within a growing granule. In the early phases, a horizontal magnetic field with a distinct linear polarization signal dominated the emerging flux. Later on, two patches of opposite circular polarization signal appeared symmetrically on either side of the linear polarization patch, indicating a small loop-like structure. The mean magnetic flux density of this loop was roughly 450 G, with a total magnetic flux of around 3 × 1017 Mx. During the ~12 min episode of loop occurrence, the spatial extent of the loop increased from about 1 to 2 arcsec. The middle part of the appearing feature was blueshifted during its occurrence, supporting the scenario of an emerging loop. There is also clear evidence for the interaction of one loop footpoint with a preexisting magnetic structure of opposite polarity. The temporal evolution of the observed spectra is reproduced to first order by the spectra derived from the geometrical model. During the phase of clearest visibility of the loop in the observations, the observed and synthetic spectra match quantitatively. Conclusions: The observed event can be explained as a case of flux emergence in the shape of a small-scale loop. The fast disappearance of the loop at the end could possibly be due to magnetic

  1. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Terrence C.; DeWolf, Travis; Kleinhans, Ashley; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is even more difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the output from the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects the hardware's future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses of neuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loop benchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of “minimal” simulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, while still maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the same benchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchers to explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardware excels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motor control for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we show that an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across a randomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interacting joints to be controlled. PMID:26696820

  2. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Terrence C; DeWolf, Travis; Kleinhans, Ashley; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is even more difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the output from the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects the hardware's future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses of neuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loop benchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of "minimal" simulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, while still maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the same benchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchers to explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardware excels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motor control for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we show that an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across a randomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interacting joints to be controlled. PMID:26696820

  3. Loops and trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron-Huot, S.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate relations between loop and tree amplitudes in quantum field theory that involve putting on-shell some loop propagators. This generalizes the so-called Feynman tree theorem which is satisfied at 1-loop. Exploiting retarded boundary conditions, we give a generalization to ℓ-loop expressing the loops as integrals over the on-shell phase space of exactly ℓ particles. We argue that the corresponding integrand for ℓ > 2 does not involve the forward limit of any physical tree amplitude, except in planar gauge theories. In that case we explicitly construct the relevant physical amplitude. Beyond the planar limit, abandoning direct integral representations, we propose that loops continue to be determined implicitly by the forward limit of physical connected trees, and we formulate a precise conjecture along this line. Finally, we set up technology to compute forward amplitudes in supersymmetric theories, in which specific simplifications occur.

  4. Telomere targeting with a novel G-quadruplex-interactive ligand BRACO-19 induces T-loop disassembly and telomerase displacement in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangtong; Liu, Xinrui; Li, Yunqian; Xu, Songbai; Ma, Chengyuan; Wu, Xinmin; Cheng, Ye; Yu, Zhiyun; Zhao, Gang; Chen, Yong

    2016-03-22

    Interference with telomerase and telomere maintenance is emerging as an attractive target for anticancer therapies. Ligand-induced stabilization of G-quadruplex formation by the telomeric DNA 3'-overhang inhibits telomerase from catalyzing telomeric DNA synthesis and from capping telomeric ends, making these ligands good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. BRACO-19 is one of the most effective and specific ligand for telomeric G4. It is shown here that BRACO-19 suppresses proliferation and reduces telomerase activity in human glioblastoma cells, paralleled by the displacement of telomerase from nuclear to cytoplasm. Meanwhile, BRACO-19 triggers extensive DNA damage response at telomere, which may result from uncapping and disassembly of telomeric T-loop structure, characterized by the formation of anaphase bridge and telomere fusion, as well as the release of telomere-binding protein from telomere. The resulting dysfunctional telomere ultimately provokes p53 and p21-mediated cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence. Notably, normal primary astrocytes do not respond to the treatment of BRACO-19, suggesting the agent's good selectivity for cancer cells. These results reinforce the notion that G-quadruplex binding compounds can act as broad inhibitors of telomere-related processes and have potential as selective antineoplastic drugs for various tumors including malignant gliomas. PMID:26908447

  5. Telomere targeting with a novel G-quadruplex-interactive ligand BRACO-19 induces T-loop disassembly and telomerase displacement in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangtong; Liu, Xinrui; Li, Yunqian; Xu, Songbai; Ma, Chengyuan; Wu, Xinmin; Cheng, Ye; Yu, Zhiyun; Zhao, Gang; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Interference with telomerase and telomere maintenance is emerging as an attractive target for anticancer therapies. Ligand-induced stabilization of G-quadruplex formation by the telomeric DNA 3′-overhang inhibits telomerase from catalyzing telomeric DNA synthesis and from capping telomeric ends, making these ligands good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. BRACO-19 is one of the most effective and specific ligand for telomeric G4. It is shown here that BRACO-19 suppresses proliferation and reduces telomerase activity in human glioblastoma cells, paralleled by the displacement of telomerase from nuclear to cytoplasm. Meanwhile, BRACO-19 triggers extensive DNA damage response at telomere, which may result from uncapping and disassembly of telomeric T-loop structure, characterized by the formation of anaphase bridge and telomere fusion, as well as the release of telomere-binding protein from telomere. The resulting dysfunctional telomere ultimately provokes p53 and p21-mediated cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence. Notably, normal primary astrocytes do not respond to the treatment of BRACO-19, suggesting the agent's good selectivity for cancer cells. These results reinforce the notion that G-quadruplex binding compounds can act as broad inhibitors of telomere-related processes and have potential as selective antineoplastic drugs for various tumors including malignant gliomas. PMID:26908447

  6. Tight dual models of pore spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glantz, Roland; Hilpert, Markus

    2008-05-01

    The pore throats in a porous medium control permeability, drainage, and straining through their pore scale geometry and through the way they are connected via pore bodies on the macroscale. Likewise, imbibition is controlled through the geometry of the pore bodies (pore scale) and through the way the pore bodies are connected via pore throats on the macroscale. In an effort to account for both scales at the same time we recently introduced an image-based model for pore spaces that consists of two parts related by duality: (1) a decomposition of a polyhedral pore space into polyhedral pore bodies separated by polygonal pore throats and (2) a polygonal pore network that is homotopy equivalent to the pore space. In this paper we stick to the dual concept while amending the definition of the pore throats and, as a consequence, the other elements of the dual model. Formerly, the pore throats consisted of single two-dimensional Delaunay cells, while they now usually consist of more than one two-dimensional Delaunay cell and extend all the way into the narrowing ends of the pore channel cross sections. This is the first reason for naming the amended dual model "tight". The second reason is that the formation of the pore throats is now guided by an objective function that always attains its global optimum (tight optimization). At the end of the paper we report on simulations of drainage performed on tight dual models derived from simulated sphere packings and 3D gray-level images. The C-code for the generation of the tight dual model and the simulation of drainage is publicly available at https://jshare.johnshopkins.edu/mhilper1/public_html/tdm.html.

  7. Defeating the pores of Kohn.

    PubMed

    Ng, Calvin S H; Lau, Rainbow W H; Lau, Kelvin K W; Underwood, Malcolm J; Yim, Anthony P C

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of emphysema with an endobronchial valve, entire lobar treatment is important in achieving adequate atelectasis. This case illustrates that without treatment of the entire lobe, it can fail to collapse even after several years, leading to treatment failure. Intralobar collateral ventilation through the pores of Kohn is demonstrated in this case, as endobronchial valve blockage of the remaining patent anterior segment resulted in the desired atelectasis and significant improvements in pulmonary function. PMID:24585656

  8. Laminated BEAM loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danisch, Lee A.

    1996-10-01

    BEAM sensors include treated loops of optical fiber that modulate optical throughput with great sensitivity and linearity, in response to curvature of the loop out of its plane. This paper describes BEAM sensors that have two loops treated in opposed fashion, hermetically sealed in flexible laminations. The sensors include an integrated optoelectronics package that extracts curvature information from the treated portion of the loops while rejecting common mode errors. The laminated structure is used to sense various parameters including displacement, force, pressure, flow, and acceleration.

  9. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  10. Pore morphologies of root induced biopores from single pore to network scale investigated by XRCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peth, Stephan; Wittig, Marlen C.; Uteau Puschmann, Daniel; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Haas, Christoph; Holthusen, Dörthe; Horn, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Biopores are assumed to be an important factor for nutrient acquisition by providing biologically highly active soil-root interfaces to re-colonizing roots and controlling oxygen and water flows at the pedon scale and within the rhizosphere through the formation of branching channel networks which potentially enhance microbial turnover processes. Characteristic differences in pore morphologies are to be expected depending on the genesis of biopores which, for example, can be earthworm-induced or root-induced or subsequently modified by one of the two. Our understanding of biophysical interactions between plants and soil can be significantly improved by quantifying 3D biopore architectures across scales ranging from single biopores to pedon scale pore networks and linking pore morphologies to microscale measurements of transport processes (e.g. oxygen diffusion). While a few studies in the past have investigated biopore networks on a larger scale yet little is known on the micro-morphology of root-induces biopores and their associated rhizosphere. Also little data is available on lateral transport of oxygen through the rhizosphere which will strongly influence microbial turnover processes and consequently control the release and uptake of nutrients. This paper highlights results gathered within a research unit on nutrient acquisition from the subsoil. Here we focus on X-ray microtomography (XRCT) studies ranging from large soil columns (70 cm length and 20 cm diameter) to individual biopores and its surrounding rhizosphere. Samples were collected from sites with different preceding crops (fescue, chicory, alfalfa) and various cropping durations (1-3 years). We will present an approach for quantitative image analysis combined with micro-sensor measurements of oxygen diffusion and spatial gradients of O2 partial pressures to relate pore structure with transport functions. Implications of various biopore architectures for the accessibility of nutrient resources in

  11. Neutrons measure phase behavior in pores at Angstrom size

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have measured the phase behavior of green house gases in pores at the Angstrom-level, using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor. Yuri Melnichenko, an instrument scientist on the General Purpose Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GP SANS) Diffractometer at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor, his postdoctoral associate Lilin He and collaborators Nidia Gallego and Cristian Contescu from the Material Sciences Division (ORNL) were engaged in the work. They were studying nanoporous carbons to assess their attractiveness as storage media for hydrogen, with a view to potential use for on-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications. Nanoporous carbons can also serve as electrode material for supercapacitors and batteries. The researchers successfully determined that the most efficiently condensing pore size in a carbon nanoporous material for hydrogen storage is less than one nanometer. In a paper recently published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the collaborators used small angle neutron scattering to study how hydrogen condenses in small pores at ambient temperature. They discovered that the surface-molecule interactions create internal pressures in pores that may exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to 50. 'This is an exciting result,' Melnichenko said, 'as you achieve extreme densification in pores 'for free', i.e. without spending any energy. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored to maximize hydrogen storage capacities.' Another important factor that defines the adsorption capacity of sub-nanometer pores is their shape. In order to get accurate structural information and maximize sorption capacity, it is important that pores are small and of approximately uniform size. In collaboration with Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi who supplied the samples, Melnichenko and his collaborators used the GP SANS

  12. Evolution kinetics of interstitial loops in irradiated materials: a phase-field model

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Li, Yulan; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial loops are one of the principal evolving defects in irradiated materials. The evolution of interstitial loops, including spatial and size distributions, affects both vacancy and interstitial accumulations in the matrix, hence, void formation and volumetric swelling. In this work, a phase-field model to simulate the growth kinetics of interstitial loops in irradiated materials during aging is developed. The diffusion of vacancies and interstitials and the elastic interaction between interstitial loops and point defects are accounted in the model. The effects of interstitial concentration, chemical potential, and elastic interaction on the growth kinetics and stability of interstitial loops are investigated in two and three dimensions. It is found that the elastic interaction enhances the growth kinetics of interstitial loops. The elastic interaction also affects the stability of a small interstitial loop adjacent to a larger loop. The model predicts linear growth rates for interstitial loops that is in agreement with the previous theoretical predictions and experimental observations.

  13. Statistical geometry of pores and statistics of porous nanofibrous assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Stephen J; Sampson, William W

    2005-01-01

    The application of theoretical models to describe the structure of the types of fibrous network produced by the electrospinning of polymers for use in tissue engineering and a number of other applications is presented. Emphasis is placed on formal analyses of the pore size distribution and porosities that one would encounter with such structures and the nature of their relationships with other structural characteristics likely to be important for the performance of nanofibrous materials. The theoretical structures considered result from interactions between randomly placed straight rods that represent fibres with nanoscale dimensions. The dominant role of fibre diameter in controlling the pore diameter of the networks is shown and we discuss the perhaps counter-intuitive finding that at a given network mass per unit area and porosity, increasing fibre diameter results in an increase in mean pore radius. Larger pores may be required for ingrowth of cells to nanofibrous networks, hence this study clarifies that simply making the diameters of the fibres smaller might not be the way to improve cell proliferation on such substrates. An extensive review of structural features of the network such as the distribution of mass, inter-fibre contacts and available surface for cell attachment, fibre contact distributions for integrity of the networks and the porosity and pore size distributions is given, with emphasis placed on nanofibre dimensions for the first time. PMID:16849188

  14. The role of pore geometry in single nanoparticle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Pevarnik, Matthew; Teslich, Nick; Cabrini, Stefano; Morrison, Alan P.; Siwy, Zuzanna S.; Letant, Sonia E.

    2012-08-22

    In this study, we observe single nanoparticle translocation events via resistive pulse sensing using silicon nitride pores described by a range of lengths and diameters. Pores are prepared by focused ion beam milling in 50 nm-, 100 nm-, and 500 nm-thick silicon nitride membranes with diameters fabricated to accommodate spherical silica nanoparticles with sizes chosen to mimic that of virus particles. In this manner, we are able to characterize the role of pore geometry in three key components of the detection scheme, namely, event magnitude, event duration, and event frequency. We find that the electric field created by the applied voltage and the pore’s geometry is a critical factor. We develop approximations to describe this field, which are verified with computer simulations, and interactions between particles and this field. In so doing, we formulate what we believe to be the first approximation for the magnitude of ionic current blockage that explicitly addresses the invariance of access resistance of solid-state pores during particle translocation. These approximations also provide a suitable foundation for estimating the zeta potential of the particles and/or pore surface when studied in conjunction with event durations. We also verify that translocation achieved by electro-osmostic transport is an effective means of slowing translocation velocities of highly charged particles without compromising particle capture rate as compared to more traditional approaches based on electrophoretic transport.

  15. The role of pore geometry in single nanoparticle detection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Pevarnik, Matthew; Teslich, Nick; Cabrini, Stefano; Morrison, Alan P.; Siwy, Zuzanna S.; Letant, Sonia E.

    2012-08-22

    In this study, we observe single nanoparticle translocation events via resistive pulse sensing using silicon nitride pores described by a range of lengths and diameters. Pores are prepared by focused ion beam milling in 50 nm-, 100 nm-, and 500 nm-thick silicon nitride membranes with diameters fabricated to accommodate spherical silica nanoparticles with sizes chosen to mimic that of virus particles. In this manner, we are able to characterize the role of pore geometry in three key components of the detection scheme, namely, event magnitude, event duration, and event frequency. We find that the electric field created by the appliedmore » voltage and the pore’s geometry is a critical factor. We develop approximations to describe this field, which are verified with computer simulations, and interactions between particles and this field. In so doing, we formulate what we believe to be the first approximation for the magnitude of ionic current blockage that explicitly addresses the invariance of access resistance of solid-state pores during particle translocation. These approximations also provide a suitable foundation for estimating the zeta potential of the particles and/or pore surface when studied in conjunction with event durations. We also verify that translocation achieved by electro-osmostic transport is an effective means of slowing translocation velocities of highly charged particles without compromising particle capture rate as compared to more traditional approaches based on electrophoretic transport.« less

  16. The Bicomponent Pore-Forming Leucocidins of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Francis

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to produce water-soluble proteins with the capacity to oligomerize and form pores within cellular lipid bilayers is a trait conserved among nearly all forms of life, including humans, single-celled eukaryotes, and numerous bacterial species. In bacteria, some of the most notable pore-forming molecules are protein toxins that interact with mammalian cell membranes to promote lysis, deliver effectors, and modulate cellular homeostasis. Of the bacterial species capable of producing pore-forming toxic molecules, the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most notorious. S. aureus can produce seven different pore-forming protein toxins, all of which are believed to play a unique role in promoting the ability of the organism to cause disease in humans and other mammals. The most diverse of these pore-forming toxins, in terms of both functional activity and global representation within S. aureus clinical isolates, are the bicomponent leucocidins. From the first description of their activity on host immune cells over 100 years ago to the detailed investigations of their biochemical function today, the leucocidins remain at the forefront of S. aureus pathogenesis research initiatives. Study of their mode of action is of immediate interest in the realm of therapeutic agent design as well as for studies of bacterial pathogenesis. This review provides an updated perspective on our understanding of the S. aureus leucocidins and their function, specificity, and potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:24847020

  17. Ion exclusion by sub-2-nm carbon nanotube pores

    PubMed Central

    Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K.; Stadermann, Michael; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica

    2008-01-01

    Biological pores regulate the cellular traffic of a large variety of solutes, often with high selectivity and fast flow rates. These pores share several common structural features: the inner surface of the pore is frequently lined with hydrophobic residues, and the selectivity filter regions often contain charged functional groups. Hydrophobic, narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes can provide a simplified model of membrane channels by reproducing these critical features in a simpler and more robust platform. Previous studies demonstrated that carbon nanotube pores can support a water flux comparable to natural aquaporin channels. Here, we investigate ion transport through these pores using a sub-2-nm, aligned carbon nanotube membrane nanofluidic platform. To mimic the charged groups at the selectivity region, we introduce negatively charged groups at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by plasma treatment. Pressure-driven filtration experiments, coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of the permeate and feed, are used to quantify ion exclusion in these membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion that can be as high as 98% under certain conditions. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, whereas steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. PMID:18539773

  18. RNase A Does Not Translocate the Alpha-Hemolysin Pore

    PubMed Central

    Krasniqi, Besnik; Lee, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    The application of nanopore sensing utilizing the α-hemolysin pore to probe proteins at single-molecule resolution has expanded rapidly. In some studies protein translocation through the α-hemolysin has been reported. However, there is no direct evidence, as yet, that proteins can translocate the α-hemolysin pore. The biggest challenge to obtaining direct evidence is the lack of a highly sensitive assay to detect very low numbers of protein molecules. Furthermore, if an activity based assay is applied then the proteins translocating by unfolding should refold back to an active confirmation for the assay technique to work. To overcome these challenges we selected a model enzyme, ribonuclease A, that readily refolds to an active conformation even after unfolding it with denaturants. In addition we have developed a highly sensitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction based activity assay for ribonuclease A. Initially, ribonuclease A, a protein with a positive net charge and dimensions larger than the smallest diameter of the pore, was subjected to nanopore analysis under different experimental conditions. Surprisingly, although the protein was added to the cis chamber (grounded) and a positive potential was applied, the interaction of ribonuclease A with α-hemolysin pore induced small and large blockade events in the presence and the absence of a reducing and/or denaturing agent. Upon measuring the zeta potential, it was found that the protein undergoes a charge reversal under the experimental conditions used for nanopore sensing. From the investigation of the effect of voltage on the interaction of ribonuclease A with the α-hemolysin pore, it was impossible to conclude if the events observed were translocations. However, upon testing for ribonuclease A activity on the trans chamber it was found that ribonuclease A does not translocate the α-hemolysin pore. PMID:24505349

  19. Molecular Basis for the Anchoring of Proto-Oncoprotein Nup98 to the Cytoplasmic Face of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Stuwe, Tobias T.; von Borzyskowski, Lennart Schada; Davenport, Andrew M.; Hoelz, André

    2014-01-01

    The cytoplasmic filament nucleoporins of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) are critically involved in nuclear export and remodeling of mRNA ribonucleoprotein particles and are associated with various human malignancies. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Nup98 C-terminal autoproteolytic domain, frequently missing from leukemogenic forms of the protein, in complex with the N-terminal domain of Nup82 and the C-terminal tail fragment of Nup159. The Nup82 β propeller serves as a non-cooperative binding platform for both binding partners. Interaction of Nup98 with Nup82 occurs through a reciprocal exchange of loop structures. Strikingly, the same Nup98 groove promiscuously interacts with Nup82 and Nup96 in a mutually excusive fashion. Simultaneous disruption of both Nup82 interactions in yeast causes severe defects in mRNA export, while the severing of a single interaction is tolerated. Thus, the cytoplasmic filament network of the NPC is robust, consistent with its essential function in nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:22480613

  20. Measuring kinetic drivers of pneumolysin pore structure.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C; Sonnen, Andreas F-P

    2016-05-01

    Most membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) proteins are thought to form pores in target membranes by assembling into pre-pore oligomers before undergoing a pre-pore to pore transition. Assembly during pore formation is into both full rings of subunits and incomplete rings (arcs). The balance between arcs and full rings is determined by a mechanism dependent on protein concentration in which arc pores arise due to kinetic trapping of the pre-pore forms by the depletion of free protein subunits during oligomerization. Here we describe the use of a kinetic assay to study pore formation in red blood cells by the MACPF/CDC pneumolysin from Streptococcus pneumoniae. We show that cell lysis displays two kinds of dependence on protein concentration. At lower concentrations, it is dependent on the pre-pore to pore transition of arc oligomers, which we show to be a cooperative process. At higher concentrations, it is dependent on the amount of pneumolysin bound to the membrane and reflects the affinity of the protein for its receptor, cholesterol. A lag occurs before cell lysis begins; this is dependent on oligomerization of pneumolysin. Kinetic dissection of cell lysis by pneumolysin demonstrates the capacity of MACPF/CDCs to generate pore-forming oligomeric structures of variable size with, most likely, different functional roles in biology. PMID:26906727

  1. USING A NEW FINITE SLIT PORE MODEL FOR NLDFT ANALYSIS OF CARBON PORE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Jagiello, Jacek; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Oliver, James P; Lupini, Andrew R; Contescu, Cristian I

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present a model for analyzing activated carbon micropore structures based on graphene sheet walls of finite thickness and extent. This is a two-dimensional modification of the widely used infinite slit pore model that assumes graphite-like infinitely extended pore walls. The proposed model has two versions: (1) a strip pore constructed with graphene strip walls that have finite length L in the x direction and are infinite in the y direction. Strip pores are open on both sides in the x direction. (2) A channel pore is a strip pore partially closed along one edge by a perpendicularly oriented graphene wall. This more realistic model allows pore termination via both physical pore entrances and pore blockage. The model consequently introduces heterogeneity of the adsorption potential that is reduced near pore entrances and enhanced near corners of pore walls. These energetically heterogeneous structures fill with adsorbate more gradually than homogeneous pores of the same width. As a result, the calculated adsorption isotherms are smoother and less steep for the finite versus the infinite pore model. In the application of this model for carbon characterization it is necessary to make an assumption about the pore length. In this work we made this assumption based on the high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results. We find the agreement between the experiment and the model significantly better for the finite than for the infinite pore model.

  2. Network representation of pore scale imagery for percolation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klise, K. A.; McKenna, S. A.; Read, E.; Karpyn, Z. T.; Celauro, J.

    2012-12-01

    Multiphase flow under capillary dominated flow regimes is driven by an intricate relationship between pore geometry, material and fluid properties. In this research, high-resolution micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging experiments are used to investigate structural and surface properties of bead packs, and how they influence percolation pathways. Coreflood experiments use a mix of hydrophilic and hydrophobic beads to track the influence of variable contact angle on capillary flow. While high-resolution CT images can render micron scale representation of the pore space, data must be upscaled to capture pore and pore throat geometry for use in percolation models. In this analysis, the pore space is upscaled into a network representation based on properties of the medial axis. Finding the medial axis using micron scale images is computationally expensive. Here, we compare the efficiency and accuracy of medial axes using erosion-based and watershed algorithms. The resulting network representation is defined as a ball-and-stick model which represents pores and pore throats. The ball-and-stick model can be further reduced by eliminating sections of the network that fall below a capillary pressure threshold. In a system of mixed hydrophilic and hydrophobic beads, capillary pressure can change significantly throughout the network based on the interaction between surface and fluid properties. The upscaled network representations are used in percolation models to estimate transport pathway. Current results use a basic percolation model that sequentially fills neighboring pores with the highest potential. Future work will expand the percolation model to include additional mechanics, such as trapping, vacating pores, and viscous fingering. Results from the coreflood experiments will be used to validate upscaling techniques and percolation models. Preliminary results show that the relative strength of water-wet and oil-wet surfaces has a significant impact on percolation

  3. Manipulating Adenovirus Hexon Hypervariable Loops Dictates Immune Neutralisation and Coagulation Factor X-dependent Cell Interaction In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiangtao; Duffy, Margaret R.; Deng, Lin; Dakin, Rachel S.; Uil, Taco; Custers, Jerome; Kelly, Sharon M.; McVey, John H.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are common pathogens, mostly targeting ocular, gastrointestinal and respiratory cells, but in some cases infection disseminates, presenting in severe clinical outcomes. Upon dissemination and contact with blood, coagulation factor X (FX) interacts directly with the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) hexon. FX can act as a bridge to bind heparan sulphate proteoglycans, leading to substantial Ad5 hepatocyte uptake. FX “coating” also protects the virus from host IgM and complement-mediated neutralisation. However, the contribution of FX in determining Ad liver transduction whilst simultaneously shielding the virus from immune attack remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the FX protection mechanism is not conserved amongst Ad types, and identify the hexon hypervariable regions (HVR) of Ad5 as the capsid proteins targeted by this host defense pathway. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we manipulate Ad5 HVR interactions to interrogate the interplay between viral cell transduction and immune neutralisation. We show that FX and inhibitory serum components can co-compete and virus neutralisation is influenced by both the location and extent of modifications to the Ad5 HVRs. We engineered Ad5-derived HVRs into the rare, native non FX-binding Ad26 to create Ad26.HVR5C. This enabled the virus to interact with FX at high affinity, as quantified by surface plasmon resonance, FX-mediated cell binding and transduction assays. Concomitantly, Ad26.HVR5C was also sensitised to immune attack in the absence of FX, a direct consequence of the engineered HVRs from Ad5. In both immune competent and deficient animals, Ad26.HVR5C hepatic gene transfer was mediated by FX following intravenous delivery. This study gives mechanistic insight into the pivotal role of the Ad5 HVRs in conferring sensitivity to virus neutralisation by IgM and classical complement-mediated attack. Furthermore, through this gain-of-function approach we demonstrate the dual

  4. Thermal power loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottschlich, Joseph M.; Richter, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The concept of a thermal power loop (TPL) to transport thermal power over relatively large distances is presented as an alternative to heat pipes and their derivatives. The TPL is compared to heat pipes, and capillary pumped loops with respect to size, weight, conservation of thermal potential, start-up, and 1-g testing capability. Test results from a proof of feasibility demonstrator at the NASA JPL are discussed. This analysis demonstrates that the development of specific thermal power loops will result in substantial weight and cost savings for many spacecraft.

  5. The Structure of Herpesvirus Fusion Glycoprotein B-Bilayer Complex Reveals the Protein-Membrane and Lateral Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Ulrike E.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Pandurangan, Arun Prasad; Cairns, Tina M.; Hannah, Brian P.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Topf, Maya; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Grünewald, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycoprotein B (gB) is a key component of the complex herpesvirus fusion machinery. We studied membrane interaction of two gB ectodomain forms and present an electron cryotomography structure of the gB-bilayer complex. The two forms differed in presence or absence of the membrane proximal region (MPR) but showed an overall similar trimeric shape. The presence of the MPR impeded interaction with liposomes. In contrast, the MPR-lacking form interacted efficiently with liposomes. Lateral interaction resulted in coat formation on the membranes. The structure revealed that interaction of gB with membranes was mediated by the fusion loops and limited to the outer membrane leaflet. The observed intrinsic propensity of gB to cluster on membranes indicates an additional role of gB in driving the fusion process forward beyond the transient fusion pore opening and subsequently leading to fusion pore expansion. PMID:23850455

  6. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  7. Incomplete pneumolysin oligomers form membrane pores.

    PubMed

    Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Gilbert, Robert J C

    2014-01-01

    Pneumolysin is a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family of pore-forming proteins that are produced as water-soluble monomers or dimers, bind to target membranes and oligomerize into large ring-shaped assemblies comprising approximately 40 subunits and approximately 30 nm across. This pre-pore assembly then refolds to punch a large hole in the lipid bilayer. However, in addition to forming large pores, pneumolysin and other CDCs form smaller lesions characterized by low electrical conductance. Owing to the observation of arc-like (rather than full-ring) oligomers by electron microscopy, it has been hypothesized that smaller oligomers explain smaller functional pores. To investigate whether this is the case, we performed cryo-electron tomography of pneumolysin oligomers on model lipid membranes. We then used sub-tomogram classification and averaging to determine representative membrane-bound low-resolution structures and identified pre-pores versus pores by the presence of membrane within the oligomeric curve. We found pre-pore and pore forms of both complete (ring) and incomplete (arc) oligomers and conclude that arc-shaped oligomeric assemblies of pneumolysin can form pores. As the CDCs are evolutionarily related to the membrane attack complex/perforin family of proteins, which also form variably sized pores, our findings are of relevance to that class of proteins as well. PMID:24759615

  8. pH controlled gating of toxic protein pores by dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Taraknath; Kanchi, Subbarao; Ayappa, K. G.; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2016-06-01

    Designing effective nanoscale blockers for membrane inserted pores formed by pore forming toxins, which are expressed by several virulent bacterial strains, on a target cell membrane is a challenging and active area of research. Here we demonstrate that PAMAM dendrimers can act as effective pH controlled gating devices once the pore has been formed. We have used fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize the cytolysin A (ClyA) protein pores modified with fifth generation (G5) PAMAM dendrimers. Our results show that the PAMAM dendrimer, in either its protonated (P) or non-protonated (NP) states can spontaneously enter the protein lumen. Protonated dendrimers interact strongly with the negatively charged protein pore lumen. As a consequence, P dendrimers assume a more expanded configuration efficiently blocking the pore when compared with the more compact configuration adopted by the neutral NP dendrimers creating a greater void space for the passage of water and ions. To quantify the effective blockage of the protein pore, we have calculated the pore conductance as well as the residence times by applying a weak force on the ions/water. Ionic currents are reduced by 91% for the P dendrimers and 31% for the NP dendrimers. The preferential binding of Cl- counter ions to the P dendrimer creates a zone of high Cl- concentration in the vicinity of the internalized dendrimer and a high concentration of K+ ions in the transmembrane region of the pore lumen. In addition to steric effects, this induced charge segregation for the P dendrimer effectively blocks ionic transport through the pore. Our investigation shows that the bio-compatible PAMAM dendrimers can potentially be used to develop therapeutic protocols based on the pH sensitive gating of pores formed by pore forming toxins to mitigate bacterial infections.Designing effective nanoscale blockers for membrane inserted pores formed by pore forming toxins, which are expressed by several virulent

  9. Transmembrane Pores Formed by Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Human LL-37 is a multifunctional cathelicidin peptide that has shown a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity by permeabilizing microbial membranes similar to other antimicrobial peptides; however, its molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Two independent experiments revealed LL-37 bound to membranes in the {alpha}-helical form with the axis lying in the plane of membrane. This led to the conclusion that membrane permeabilization by LL-37 is a nonpore carpet-like mechanism of action. Here we report the detection of transmembrane pores induced by LL-37. The pore formation coincided with LL-37 helices aligning approximately normal to the plane of the membrane. We observed an unusual phenomenon of LL-37 embedded in stacked membranes, which are commonly used in peptide orientation studies. The membrane-bound LL-37 was found in the normal orientation only when the membrane spacing in the multilayers exceeded its fully hydrated value. This was achieved by swelling the stacked membranes with excessive water to a swollen state. The transmembrane pores were detected and investigated in swollen states by means of oriented circular dichroism, neutron in-plane scattering, and x-ray lamellar diffraction. The results are consistent with the effect of LL-37 on giant unilamellar vesicles. The detected pores had a water channel of radius 2333 {angstrom}. The molecular mechanism of pore formation by LL-37 is consistent with the two-state model exhibited by magainin and other small pore-forming peptides. The discovery that peptide-membrane interactions in swollen states are different from those in less hydrated states may have implications for other large membrane-active peptides and proteins studied in stacked membranes.

  10. Atomistic Insight on the Charging Energetics in Sub-nanometer Pore Supercacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Rui; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Feng, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Electrodes featuring sub-nanometer pores can significantly enhance the capacitance and energy density of supercapacitors. However, ions must pay an energy penalty to enter sub-nanometer pores as they have to shed part of their solvation shell. The magnitude of such energy penalty plays a key role in determining the accessibility and charging/discharging of these sub-nanometer pores. Here we report on the atomistic simulation of Na+ and Cl ions entering a polarizable slit pore with a width of 0.82 nm. We show that the free energy penalty for these ions to enter the pore is less than 14 kJ/mol for both Na+ and Cl ions. The surprisingly small energy penalty is caused by the van der Waals attractions between ion and pore walls, the image charge effects, the moderate (19-26%) de-hydration of the ions inside the pore, and the strengthened interactions between ions and their hydration water molecules in the sub-nanometer pore. The results provide strong impetus for further developing nanoporous electrodes featuring sub- nanometer pores.

  11. Kinetics of Diffusion and Convection in 3.2-Å Pores

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G.

    1973-01-01

    The kinetics of transport in pores the size postulated for cell membranes has been investigated by direct computer simulation (molecular dynamics). The simulated pore is 11 Å long and 3.2 Å in radius, and the water molecules are modeled by hard, smooth spheres, 1 Å in radius. The balls are given an initial set of positions and velocities (with an average temperature of 313° K) and the computer then calculates their exact paths through the pore. Two different conditions were used at the ends of the pore. In one, the ends are closed and the balls are completely isolated. In the other, the ball density in each end region is fixed so that a pressure difference can be established and a net convective flow produced. The following values were directly measured in the simulated experiments: net and diffusive (oneway) flux; pressure, temperature, and diffusion coefficients in the pore; area available for diffusion; probability distribution of ball positions in the pore; and the interaction between diffusion and convection. The density, viscosity, and diffusion coefficients in the bulk fluid were determined from the theory of hard sphere dense gases. From these values, the “equivalent” pore radius (determined by the same procedure that is used for cell membranes) was computed and compared with the physical pore radius of the simulated pore. PMID:4702015

  12. Saccade learning with concurrent cortical and subcortical basal ganglia loops

    PubMed Central

    N'Guyen, Steve; Thurat, Charles; Girard, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    The Basal Ganglia (BG) is a central structure involved in multiple cortical and subcortical loops. Some of these loops are believed to be responsible for saccade target selection. We study here how the very specific structural relationships of these saccadic loops can affect the ability of learning spatial and feature-based tasks. We propose a model of saccade generation with reinforcement learning capabilities based on our previous BG and superior colliculus models. It is structured around the interactions of two parallel cortico-basal loops and one tecto-basal loop. The two cortical loops separately deal with spatial and non-spatial information to select targets in a concurrent way. The subcortical loop is used to make the final target selection leading to the production of the saccade. These different loops may work in concert or disturb each other regarding reward maximization. Interactions between these loops and their learning capabilities are tested on different saccade tasks. The results show the ability of this model to correctly learn basic target selection based on different criteria (spatial or not). Moreover the model reproduces and explains training dependent express saccades toward targets based on a spatial criterion. Finally, the model predicts that in absence of prefrontal control, the spatial loop should dominate. PMID:24795615

  13. Open-pore polyurethane product

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, R.T.; Salyer, I.O.

    1974-02-17

    The method is described of producing an open-pore polyurethane foam having a porosity of at least 50% and a density of 0.1 to 0.5 g per cu cm, and which consists of coherent spherical particles of less than 10 mu diam separated by interconnected interstices. It is useful as a filter and oil absorbent. The product is admirably adapted to scavenging of crude oil from the surface of seawater by preferential wicking. The oil-soaked product may then be compressed to recover the oil or burned for disposal. The crosslinked polyurethane structures are remarkably solvent and heat-resistance as compared with known thermoplastic structures. Because of their relative inertness, they are useful filters for gasoline and other hydrocarbon compounds. (7 claims)

  14. Fluids in micropores. II. Self-diffusion in a simple classical fluid in a slit pore

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, M.; Cushman, J.H.; Diestler, D.J.; Rhykerd C.L. Jr.

    1988-01-15

    Self-diffusion coefficients D are computed for a model slit pore consisting of a rare-gas fluid confined between two parallel face-centered cubic (100) planes (walls) of rigidly fixed rare-gas atoms. By means of an optimally vectorized molecular-dynamics program for the CYBER 205, the dependence of D on the thermodynamic state (specified by the chemical potential ..mu.., temperature T, and the pore width h) of the pore fluid has been explored. Diffusion is governed by Fick's law, even in pores as narrow as 2 or 3 atomic diameters. The diffusion coefficient oscillates as a function of h with fixed ..mu.. and T, vanishing at critical values of h, where fluid--solid phase transitions occur. A shift of the pore walls relative to one another in directions parallel with the walls can radically alter the structure of the pore fluid and consequently the magnitude of D. Since the pore fluid forms distinct layers parallel to the walls, a local diffusion coefficient D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ associated with a given layer i can be defined. D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ is least for the contact layer, even for pores as wide as 30 atomic diameters (approx.100 A). Moreover, D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ increases with increasing distance of the fluid layer from the wall and, for pore widths between 16 and 30 atomic diameters, D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ is larger in the center of the pore than in the bulk fluid that is in equilibrium with the pore fluid. The opposite behavior is observed in corresponding smooth-wall pores, in which the discrete fluid--wall interactions have been averaged by smearing the wall atoms over the plane of the wall.

  15. pH controlled gating of toxic protein pores by dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Taraknath; Kanchi, Subbarao; Ayappa, K G; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-07-14

    Designing effective nanoscale blockers for membrane inserted pores formed by pore forming toxins, which are expressed by several virulent bacterial strains, on a target cell membrane is a challenging and active area of research. Here we demonstrate that PAMAM dendrimers can act as effective pH controlled gating devices once the pore has been formed. We have used fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize the cytolysin A (ClyA) protein pores modified with fifth generation (G5) PAMAM dendrimers. Our results show that the PAMAM dendrimer, in either its protonated (P) or non-protonated (NP) states can spontaneously enter the protein lumen. Protonated dendrimers interact strongly with the negatively charged protein pore lumen. As a consequence, P dendrimers assume a more expanded configuration efficiently blocking the pore when compared with the more compact configuration adopted by the neutral NP dendrimers creating a greater void space for the passage of water and ions. To quantify the effective blockage of the protein pore, we have calculated the pore conductance as well as the residence times by applying a weak force on the ions/water. Ionic currents are reduced by 91% for the P dendrimers and 31% for the NP dendrimers. The preferential binding of Cl(-) counter ions to the P dendrimer creates a zone of high Cl(-) concentration in the vicinity of the internalized dendrimer and a high concentration of K(+) ions in the transmembrane region of the pore lumen. In addition to steric effects, this induced charge segregation for the P dendrimer effectively blocks ionic transport through the pore. Our investigation shows that the bio-compatible PAMAM dendrimers can potentially be used to develop therapeutic protocols based on the pH sensitive gating of pores formed by pore forming toxins to mitigate bacterial infections. PMID:27328315

  16. Atomic Structure of Graphene Subnanometer Pores.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Alex W; Lee, Gun-Do; He, Kuang; Gong, Chuncheng; Chen, Qu; Yoon, Euijoon; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-12-22

    The atomic structure of subnanometer pores in graphene, of interest due to graphene's potential as a desalination and gas filtration membrane, is demonstrated by atomic resolution aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. High temperatures of 500 °C and over are used to prevent self-healing of the pores, permitting the successful imaging of open pore geometries consisting of between -4 to -13 atoms, all exhibiting subnanometer diameters. Picometer resolution bond length measurements are used to confirm reconstruction of five-membered ring projections that often decorate the pore perimeter, knowledge which is used to explore the viability of completely self-passivated subnanometer pore structures; bonding configurations where the pore would not require external passivation by, for example, hydrogen to be chemically inert. PMID:26524121

  17. Carboxy terminus and pore-forming domain properties specific to Cx37 are necessary for Cx37-mediated suppression of insulinoma cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Tasha K.; Sorgen, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Connexin 37 (Cx37) suppresses cell proliferation when expressed in rat insulinoma (Rin) cells, an effect also manifest in vivo during vascular development and in response to tissue injury. Mutant forms of Cx37 with nonfunctional channels but normally localized, wild-type carboxy termini are not growth suppressive. Here we determined whether the carboxy-terminal (CT) domain is required for Cx37-mediated growth suppression and whether the Cx37 pore-forming domain can be replaced with the Cx43 pore-forming domain and still retain growth-suppressive properties. We show that despite forming functional gap junction channels and hemichannels, Cx37 with residues subsequent to 273 replaced with a V5-epitope tag (Cx37–273tr*V5) had no effect on the proliferation of Rin cells, did not facilitate G1-cell cycle arrest with serum deprivation, and did not prolong cell cycle time comparably to the wild-type protein. The chimera Cx43*CT37, comprising the pore-forming domain of Cx43 and CT of Cx37, also did not suppress proliferation, despite forming functional gap junctions with a permselective profile similar to wild-type Cx37. Differences in channel behavior of both Cx37–273tr*V5 and Cx43*CT37 relative to their wild-type counterparts and failure of the Cx37-CT to interact as the Cx43-CT does with the Cx43 cytoplasmic loop suggest that the Cx37-CT and pore-forming domains are both essential to growth suppression by Cx37. PMID:24133065

  18. Quasi-periodic processes in the flare loop generated by sudden temperature enhancements at loop footpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Jelínek, P.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: During the impulsive flare phase, the plasma at the flare loop footpoints is rapidly heated by particle beams. In the present paper, we study processes that occur after this sudden heating in a two-dimensional magnetic loop. Methods: We adopt a 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, in which we solve a full set of the ideal time-dependent MHD equations by means of the FLASH code, using the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Periods in the processes are estimated by the wavelet analysis technique. Results: We consider a model of the solar atmosphere with a symmetric magnetic loop. The length of this loop in the corona is approximately 21.5 Mm. At both loop footpoints, at the transition region, we initiate the Gaussian temperature (pressure) perturbation with the maximum temperature 14, 7, or 3.5 times higher than the unperturbed temperature. In the corona, the perturbations produce supersonic blast shocks with the Mach number of about 1.1, but well below Alfvén velocities. We consider cases with the same perturbations at both footpoints (symmetric case) and one with different perturbations (asymmetric case). In the symmetric case, the shocks move along both loop legs upwards to the top of the loop, where they interact and form a transient compressed region. Then they continue in their motion to the transition region at the opposite side of the loop, where they are reflected upwards, and so on. At the top of the loop, the shock appears periodically with the period of about 170 s. In the loop legs during this period, a double peak of the plasma parameters, which is connected with two arrivals of shocks, is detected: firstly, when the shock moves up and then when the shock, propagating from the opposite loop leg, moves down. Increasing the distance of the detection point in the loop leg from the top of the loop, the time interval between these shock arrivals increases. Thus, at these detection points, the processes with shorter periods can be detected. After

  19. Time loops in a gravitational theory

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, A.L.

    1993-06-01

    We demonstrate here that time loops can be constructed by pasting different wormhole solutions with higher order perturbative terms in a model originated by Gidding and Strominger and subsequently improved by Coule and Maeda. In this model a scalar field interacts with a gravitational axion in Euclidean space. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Perfluoroalkyl-Functionalized Hyperbranched Polyglycerol as Pore Forming Agents and Supramolecular Hosts in Polymer Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Olaf; Zieringer, Maximilian; Duncanson, Wynter J.; Weitz, David A.; Haag, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl-functionalized, hyperbranched polyglycerols that produce stable microbubbles are integrated into a microfluidic emulsion to create porous microspheres. In a previously-presented work a dendrimer with a perfluorinated shell was used. By replacing this dendrimer core with a hyperbranched core and evaluating different core sizes and degrees of fluorinated shell functionalization, we optimized the process to a more convenient synthesis and higher porosities. The new hyperbranched polyglycerol porogens produced more pores and can be used to prepare microspheres with porosity up to 12% (v/v). The presented preparation forms pores with a perfluoroalkyl-functionalized surface that enables the resulting microspheres to act as supramolecular host systems. The microspheres can incorporate gases into the pores and actives in the polymer matrix, while the perfluoroalkylated pore surface can be used to immobilize perfluoro-tagged molecules onto the pores by fluorous-fluorous interaction. PMID:26343631

  1. Perfluoroalkyl-Functionalized Hyperbranched Polyglycerol as Pore Forming Agents and Supramolecular Hosts in Polymer Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Olaf; Zieringer, Maximilian; Duncanson, Wynter J; Weitz, David A; Haag, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl-functionalized, hyperbranched polyglycerols that produce stable microbubbles are integrated into a microfluidic emulsion to create porous microspheres. In a previously-presented work a dendrimer with a perfluorinated shell was used. By replacing this dendrimer core with a hyperbranched core and evaluating different core sizes and degrees of fluorinated shell functionalization, we optimized the process to a more convenient synthesis and higher porosities. The new hyperbranched polyglycerol porogens produced more pores and can be used to prepare microspheres with porosity up to 12% (v/v). The presented preparation forms pores with a perfluoroalkyl-functionalized surface that enables the resulting microspheres to act as supramolecular host systems. The microspheres can incorporate gases into the pores and actives in the polymer matrix, while the perfluoroalkylated pore surface can be used to immobilize perfluoro-tagged molecules onto the pores by fluorous-fluorous interaction. PMID:26343631

  2. Stress fields around two pores in an elastic body: exact quadrature domain solutions

    PubMed Central

    Crowdy, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Analytical solutions are given for the stress fields, in both compression and far-field shear, in a two-dimensional elastic body containing two interacting non-circular pores. The two complex potentials governing the solutions are found by using a conformal mapping from a pre-image annulus with those potentials expressed in terms of the Schottky–Klein prime function for the annulus. Solutions for a three-parameter family of elastic bodies with two equal symmetric pores are presented and the compressibility of a special family of pore pairs is studied in detail. The methodology extends to two unequal pores. The importance for boundary value problems of plane elasticity of a special class of planar domains known as quadrature domains is also elucidated. This observation provides the route to generalization of the mathematical approach here to finding analytical solutions for the stress fields in bodies containing any finite number of pores. PMID:26339198

  3. Crystal structure of listeriolysin O reveals molecular details of oligomerization and pore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Hudel, Martina; Leustik, Martin; Rhinow, Daniel; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Chakraborty, Trinad; Yildiz, Özkan

    2014-04-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is an essential virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes that causes listeriosis. Listeria monocytogenes owes its ability to live within cells to the pH- and temperature-dependent pore-forming activity of LLO, which is unique among cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. LLO enables the bacteria to cross the phagosomal membrane and is also involved in activation of cellular processes, including the modulation of gene expression or intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Neither the pore-forming mechanism nor the mechanisms triggering the signalling processes in the host cell are known in detail. Here, we report the crystal structure of LLO, in which we identified regions important for oligomerization and pore formation. Mutants were characterized by determining their haemolytic and Ca2+ uptake activity. We analysed the pore formation of LLO and its variants on erythrocyte ghosts by electron microscopy and show that pore formation requires precise interface interactions during toxin oligomerization on the membrane.

  4. Man-in-the-control-loop simulation of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. L.; Lin, Tsung-Chieh; Yae, K. Harold

    1989-01-01

    A method to achieve man-in-the-control-loop simulation is presented. Emerging real-time dynamics simulation suggests a potential for creating an interactive design workstation with a human operator in the control loop. The recursive formulation for multibody dynamics simulation is studied to determine requirements for man-in-the-control-loop simulation. High speed computer graphics techniques provides realistic visual cues for the simulator. Backhoe and robot arm simulations are implemented to demonstrate the capability of man-in-the-control-loop simulation.

  5. Nanofiltration membranes with narrowed pore size distribution via pore wall modification.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Lv, Yan; Qiu, Wen-Ze; Wu, Jian; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2016-06-30

    We propose a novel strategy for narrowing down the pore size distribution of ready-made nanofiltration membranes (NFMs) via pore wall modification. NFMs were subjected to the filtration of a highly reactive molecule solution, during which large pores were selectively reduced in size. The as-treated NFMs have high monovalent ion/divalent ion selectivity. PMID:27321407

  6. General Anesthetics Predicted to Block the GLIC Pore with Micromolar Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Klein, Michael L.; Brannigan, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Although general anesthetics are known to modulate the activity of ligand-gated ion channels in the Cys-loop superfamily, there is at present neither consensus on the underlying mechanisms, nor predictive models of this modulation. Viable models need to offer quantitative assessment of the relative importance of several identified anesthetic binding sites. However, to date, precise affinity data for individual sites has been challenging to obtain by biophysical means. Here, the likely role of pore block inhibition by the general anesthetics isoflurane and propofol of the prokaryotic pentameric channel GLIC is investigated by molecular simulations. Microscopic affinities are calculated for both single and double occupancy binding of isoflurane and propofol to the GLIC pore. Computations are carried out for an open-pore conformation in which the pore is restrained to crystallographic radius, and a closed-pore conformation that results from unrestrained molecular dynamics equilibration of the structure. The GLIC pore is predicted to be blocked at the micromolar concentrations for which inhibition by isofluorane and propofol is observed experimentally. Calculated affinities suggest that pore block by propofol occurs at signifcantly lower concentrations than those for which inhibition is observed: we argue that this discrepancy may result from binding of propofol to an allosteric site recently identified by X-ray crystallography, which may cause a competing gain-of-function effect. Affinities of isoflurane and propofol to the allosteric site are also calculated, and shown to be 3 mM for isoflurane and for propofol; both anesthetics have a lower affinity for the allosteric site than for the unoccupied pore. PMID:22693438

  7. Silver Nanoparticle Transport Through Soil: Illuminating the Pore-Scale Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, I. L.; Willson, C. S.; Gerhard, J.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    For nanoparticle transport through soil, the pore-scale (i.e., tens to hundreds of grains and pores) is a crucial intermediate scale which links nanoparticle-surface interactions with field-scale transport behaviour. However, very little information exists on how nanoparticles behave within real three-dimensional pore spaces. As a result, pore-scale processes are poorly characterized for nanoparticle systems and, subsequently, continuum-scale transport models struggle to describe commonly observed 'anomalous' behaviour such as extended tailing. This knowledge gap is due to two primary factors: an inability to experimentally observe nanoparticles within real pore spaces, and the computationally expensive models required to simulate nanoparticle movement. However, due to recent advances in Synchrotron X-Ray Computed Microtomography (SXCMT), it is now possible to quantify in-situ pore-scale nanoparticle concentrations during transport through real 3-dimensional porous media [1]. Employing this SXCMT quantification method to examine real nanoparticle/soil transport experiments has yielded new insights into the pore-scale processes governing nanoparticle transport. By coupling SXCMT nanoparticle quantification method with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations we are able to construct a better picture of how nanoparticles flow through real pore spaces. This talk presents SXCMT/CFD analyses of three silver nanoparticle transport experiments. Silver nanoparticles were flushed through three different sands to characterize the influence of grain distribution and retention rates on pore-scale flow and transport processes. These CFD/SXCMT analyses illuminate how processes such as temporary hydraulic retention govern nanoparticle transport. In addition, the observed distributions of pore water velocities and nanoparticle mass flow rates challenge the standard conceptual model of nanoparticle transport, suggesting that pore-scale processes require explicit consideration

  8. Wilson-loop instantons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.

    1987-01-01

    Wilson-loop symmetry breaking is considered on a space-time of the form M4 x K, where M4 is a four-dimensional space-time and K is an internal space with nontrivial and finite fundamental group. It is shown in a simple model that the different vacua obtained by breaking a non-Abelian gauge group by Wilson loops are separated in the space of gauge potentials by a finite energy barrier. An interpolating gauge configuration is then constructed between these vacua and shown to have minimum energy. Finally some implications of this construction are discussed.

  9. Automatic one-loop calculations with Sherpa+OpenLoops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cascioli, F.; Höche, S.; Krauss, F.; Maierhöfer, P.; Pozzorini, S.; Siegert, F.

    2014-06-01

    We report on the OpenLoops generator for one-loop matrix elements and its application to four-lepton production in association with up to one jet. The open loops algorithm uses a numerical recursion to construct the numerator of one-loop Feynman diagrams as functions of the loop momentum. In combination with tensor integrals this results in a highly efficient and numerically stable matrix element generator. In order to obtain a fully automated setup for the simulation of next-to-leading order scattering processes we interfaced OpenLoops to the Sherpa Monte Carlo event generator.

  10. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizationsmore » and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.« less

  11. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R. D.

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizations and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.

  12. Fluids in micropores. II. Self-diffusion in a simple classical fluid in a slit pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, M.; Cushman, J. H.; Diestler, D. J.; Rhykerd, C. L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Self-diffusion coefficients D are computed for a model slit pore consisting of a rare-gas fluid confined between two parallel face-centered cubic (100) planes (walls) of rigidly fixed rare-gas atoms. By means of an optimally vectorized molecular-dynamics program for the CYBER 205, the dependence of D on the thermodynamic state (specified by the chemical potential μ, temperature T, and the pore width h) of the pore fluid has been explored. Diffusion is governed by Fick's law, even in pores as narrow as 2 or 3 atomic diameters. The diffusion coefficient oscillates as a function of h with fixed μ and T, vanishing at critical values of h, where fluid-solid phase transitions occur. A shift of the pore walls relative to one another in directions parallel with the walls can radically alter the structure of the pore fluid and consequently the magnitude of D. Since the pore fluid forms distinct layers parallel to the walls, a local diffusion coefficient D(i)∥ associated with a given layer i can be defined. D(i)∥ is least for the contact layer, even for pores as wide as 30 atomic diameters (˜100 Å). Moreover, D(i)∥ increases with increasing distance of the fluid layer from the wall and, for pore widths between 16 and 30 atomic diameters, D(i)∥ is larger in the center of the pore than in the bulk fluid that is in equilibrium with the pore fluid. The opposite behavior is observed in corresponding smooth-wall pores, in which the discrete fluid-wall interactions have been averaged by smearing the wall atoms over the plane of the wall. The temperature dependence of D for fixed h is determined and the nature of melting of a pore solid is examined. It is found that the solid tends to melt first in the middle of the pore. All of the various results are related to the structural properties of the pore fluid, as manifested by the local density and pair correlation functions.

  13. How Lipid Membranes Affect Pore Forming Toxin Activity.

    PubMed

    Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-12-15

    , events associated with pore formation can modulate properties of the lipid membrane and affect its organization. Model membranes do not necessarily reproduce the physicochemical properties of the native cellular membrane, and caution is needed when transferring results from model to native lipid membranes. In this context, the utilization of novel approaches that enable studying PFTs on living cells at a single molecule level should reveal complex protein-lipid membrane interactions in greater detail. PMID:26641659

  14. Nonlinear transport of soft droplets in pore networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernerey, Franck; Benet Cerda, Eduard; Koo, Kanghyeon

    A large number of biological and technological processes depend on the transport of soft colloidal particles through porous media; this includes the transport and separation of cells, viruses or drugs through tissues, membranes and microfluidic devices. In these systems, the interactions between soft particles, background fluid and the surrounding pore space yield complex, nonlinear behaviors such as non-Darcy flows, localization and jamming. We devise a computational strategy to investigate the transport of non-wetting and deformable water droplets in a microfluidic device made of a random distribution of cylindrical obstacles. We first derive scaling laws for the entry of the droplet in a single pore and discuss the role of surface tension, contact angle and size in this process. This information is then used to study the transport of multiple droplets in an obstacle network. We find that when the droplet size is close to the pore size, fluid flow and droplet trafficking strongly interact, leading to local redistributions in pressure fields, intermittent clogging and jamming. Importantly, it is found that the overall droplet and fluid transport display three different scaling regimes depending on the forcing pressure, and that these regimes can be related to droplet properties.

  15. New general pore size distribution model by classical thermodynamics application: Activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A model is developed using classical thermodynamics to characterize pore size distributions (PSDs) of materials containing micropores and mesopores. The thermal equation of equilibrium adsorption (TEEA) is used to provide thermodynamic properties and relate the relative pore filling pressure of vapors to the characteristic pore energies of the adsorbent/adsorbate system for micropore sizes. Pore characteristic energies are calculated by averaging of interaction energies between adsorbate molecules and adsorbent pore walls as well as considering adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. A modified Kelvin equation is used to characterize mesopore sizes by considering variation of the adsorbate surface tension and by excluding the adsorbed film layer for the pore size. The modified-Kelvin equation provides similar pore filling pressures as predicted by density functional theory. Combination of these models provides a complete PSD of the adsorbent for the micropores and mesopores. The resulting PSD is compared with the PSDs from Jaroniec and Choma and Horvath and Kawazoe models as well as a first-order approximation model using Polanyi theory. The major importance of this model is its basis on classical thermodynamic properties, less simplifying assumptions in its derivation compared to other methods, and ease of use.

  16. Three-dimensional analysis of pore effect on composite elasticity by means of finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, A.

    2015-12-01

    A three-dimensional buffer-layer finite element method (FEM) model was developed to investigate the porosity effect on macroscopic elasticity. Using the three-dimensional model, the effect of pores on bulk effective elastic properties were systematically analyzed by changing the degree of porosity, the aspect ratio of the ellipsoidal pore, and the elasticity of the material. The present results in 3D space was compared with the previous ones in 2D space. Derivatives of normalized elastic stiffness constants with respect to needle-type porosity are integers, if the Poisson ratio of a matrix material is zero; those derivatives of normalized stiffness elastic constants for C33, C44, C11, and C66 converge to -1, -2, -3, and -4, respectively, at the corresponding condition. We proposed a criterion of R <~1/3, where the mutual interaction between pores becomes negligible for macroscopic composite elasticity. These derivatives are nearly constant below 5% porosity in the case of spherical pore, suggesting that the interaction between neighboring pores is insignificant if the representative size of the pore is less than one-third of the mean distance between neighboring pores. The relations we obtained in this work were successfully applied to invert bulk modulus and rigidity of Cmcm-CaIrO3 as a case study; the performance of the inverting scheme was confirmed through this assessment. Thus the present scheme is applicable to predict macroscopic elasticity of porous object as well.

  17. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  18. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-26

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  19. Loops: Twisting and Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    Loop-like structures are the fundamental magnetic building blocks of the solar atmosphere. Recent space-based EUV and X-ray satellite observations (from Yohkoh SOHO and TRACE) have challenged the view that these features are simply static gravitationally stratified plasma pipes. Rather it is now surmised that each loop may consist of a bundle of fine plasma threads that are twisted around one another and can brighten independently. This invited review will outline the latest developments in ""untangling"" the topology of these features through three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic modelling and how their properties are being deduced through spectroscopic observations coupled to theoretical scaling laws. In particular recent interest has centred on how the observed thermal profile along loops can be employed as a tool to diagnose any localised energy input to the structure and hence constrain the presence of a particular coronal heating mechanism. The dynamic nature of loops will be highlighted and the implications of superior resolution plasma thread observations (whether spatial temporal or spectral) from future space missions (SolarB STEREO SDO and Solar Orbiter) will be discussed.

  20. RNA in the Loop

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Johnny T.Y.; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2013-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in a variety of biological roles, particularly as cis or trans gene expression regulators. Reporting recently in Nature, Lai et al. (2013) show that a class of gene-activating lncRNAs combines two gene regulation paradigms: enhancer-directed chromosomal looping and RNA-mediated protein effector recruitment. PMID:23537627

  1. Closing the Loop Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    Closing the Loop (CTL) is a science curriculum designed to introduce students to integrated waste management through awareness. This document presents five lesson plans focusing on developing an understanding of natural resources, solid wastes, conservation, and the life of landfills. Contents include: (1) "What Are Natural Resources?"; (2)…

  2. Evaporative modeling for idealized lithographic pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinuma, Ryoji; Best, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    As a demand for the high performance and small size electronics devices increased, the heat removal from those electronic devices for space use is getting critical factor more than devices on the earth due to the limitation of the size. The purpose of this paper is to show a study of optimized size of coherent pores or slits in the evaporative wick of a heat pipe to cool down the high heat flux density heat source. Our system considered in this paper consists of a plate heat source, the evaporative wick with coherent pores and conducting walls connecting between the heat source and the evaporator. The evaporation rate of working fluid along the meniscus interface in a micro-order pore or slit was calculated based on the kinetic theory and the statistical rate theory to find a proper diameter of pores to cool down the heat source effectively. The results show the smaller diameter of pores is preferred to achieve the smallest total size of the evaporator although it will involve the cost issue. As a demand for the high performance and small size electronics devices increased, the heat removal from those electronic devices for space use is getting critical factor more than devices on the earth due to the limitation of the size. The purpose of this paper is to show a study of optimized size of coherent pores or slits in the evaporative wick of a heat pipe to cool down the high heat flux density heat source. Our system considered in this paper consists of a plate heat source, the evaporative wick with coherent pores and conducting walls connecting between the heat source and the evaporator. The evaporation rate of working fluid along the meniscus interface in a micro-order pore or slit was calculated based on the kinetic theory and the statistical rate theory to find a proper diameter of pores to cool down the heat source effectively. The results show that the smaller diameter of pores uses the pore for evaporation effectively and is preferred to achieve the smallest

  3. A mutant with aberrant extracellular LcrV-YscF interactions fails to form pores and translocate Yop effector proteins but retains the ability to trigger Yop secretion in response to host cell contact.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Dana E; Murphy, Julia L; Davis, Alison J; Mecsas, Joan

    2013-05-01

    The plasmid-encoded type three secretion system (TTSS) of Yersinia spp. is responsible for the delivery of effector proteins into cells of the innate immune system, where these effectors disrupt the target cells' activity. Successful translocation of effectors into mammalian cells requires Yersinia to both insert a translocon into the host cell membrane and sense contact with host cells. To probe the events necessary for translocation, we investigated protein-protein interactions among TTSS components of the needle-translocon complex using a chemical cross-linking-based approach. We detected extracellular protein complexes containing YscF, LcrV, and YopD that were dependent upon needle formation. The formation of these complexes was evaluated in a secretion-competent but translocation-defective mutant, the YscFD28AD46A strain (expressing YscF with the mutations D28A and D46A). We found that one of the YscF and most of the LcrV and YopD cross-linked complexes were nearly absent in this mutant. Furthermore, the YscFD28AD46A strain did not support YopB insertion into mammalian membranes, supporting the idea that the LcrV tip complex is required for YopB insertion and translocon formation. However, the YscFD28AD46A strain did secrete Yops in the presence of host cells, indicating that a translocation-competent tip complex is not required to sense contact with host cells to trigger Yop secretion. In conclusion, in the absence of cross-linkable LcrV-YscF interactions, translocon insertion is abolished, but Yersinia still retains the ability to sense cell contact. PMID:23475976

  4. Investigation of Biogrout processes by numerical analysis at pore scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergwerff, Luke; van Paassen, Leon A.; Picioreanu, Cristian; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.

    2013-04-01

    Biogrout is a soil improving process that aims to improve the strength of sandy soils. The process is based on microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP). In this study the main process is based on denitrification facilitated by bacteria indigenous to the soil using substrates, which can be derived from pretreated waste streams containing calcium salts of fatty acids and calcium nitrate, making it a cost effective and environmentally friendly process. The goal of this research is to improve the understanding of the process by numerical analysis so that it may be improved and applied properly for varying applications, such as borehole stabilization, liquefaction prevention, levee fortification and mitigation of beach erosion. During the denitrification process there are many phases present in the pore space including a liquid phase containing solutes, crystals, bacteria forming biofilms and gas bubbles. Due to the amount of phases and their dynamic changes (multiphase flow with (non-linear) reactive transport), there are many interactions making the process very complex. To understand this complexity in the system, the interactions between these phases are studied in a reductionist approach, increasing the complexity of the system by one phase at a time. The model will initially include flow, solute transport, crystal nucleation and growth in 2D at pore scale. The flow will be described by Navier-Stokes equations. Initial study and simulations has revealed that describing crystal growth for this application on a fixed grid can introduce significant fundamental errors. Therefore a level set method will be employed to better describe the interface of developing crystals in between sand grains. Afterwards the model will be expanded to 3D to provide more realistic flow, nucleation and clogging behaviour at pore scale. Next biofilms and lastly gas bubbles may be added to the model. From the results of these pore scale models the behaviour of the system may be

  5. COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, TJ

    2003-10-22

    A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement

  6. Analytical applications for pore-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Kasianowicz, John J; Balijepalli, Arvind K; Ettedgui, Jessica; Forstater, Jacob H; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Huisheng; Robertson, Joseph W F

    2016-03-01

    Proteinaceous nanometer-scale pores are ubiquitous in biology. The canonical ionic channels (e.g., those that transport Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Cl(-) across cell membranes) play key roles in many cellular processes, including nerve and muscle activity. Another class of channels includes bacterial pore-forming toxins, which disrupt cell function, and can lead to cell death. We describe here the recent development of these toxins for a wide range of biological sensing applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale. PMID:26431785

  7. High temperature ion channels and pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Xiaofeng (Inventor); Gu, Li Qun (Inventor); Cheley, Stephen (Inventor); Bayley, Hagan (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention includes an apparatus, system and method for stochastic sensing of an analyte to a protein pore. The protein pore may be an engineer protein pore, such as an ion channel at temperatures above 55.degree. C. and even as high as near 100.degree. C. The analyte may be any reactive analyte, including chemical weapons, environmental toxins and pharmaceuticals. The analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element to produce a detectable electrical current signal. Possible signals include change in electrical current. Detection of the signal allows identification of the analyte and determination of its concentration in a sample solution. Multiple analytes present in the same solution may also be detected.

  8. Enlarged facial pores: an update on treatments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Joanna; Lanoue, Julien; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-07-01

    Enlarged facial pores remain a common dermatologic and cosmetic concern from acne and rosacea, among other conditions, that is difficult to treat due to the multifactorial nature of their pathogenesis and negative impact on patients' quality of life. Enlarged facial pores are primarily treated through addressing associative factors, such as increased sebum production and cutaneous aging. We review the current treatment modalities for enlarged or dense facial pores, including topical retinoids, chemical peels, oral antiandrogens, and lasers and devices, with a focus on newer therapies. PMID:27529707

  9. Novel residues lining the CFTR chloride channel pore identified by functional modification of introduced cysteines.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis (SCAM) has been used widely to identify pore-lining amino acid side chains in ion channel proteins. However, functional effects on permeation and gating can be difficult to separate, leading to uncertainty concerning the location of reactive cysteine side chains. We have combined SCAM with investigation of the charge-dependent effects of methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents on the functional permeation properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. We find that cysteines substituted for seven out of 21 continuous amino acids in the eleventh and twelfth transmembrane (TM) regions can be modified by external application of positively charged [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS bromide (MTSET) and negatively charged sodium [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS (MTSES). Modification of these cysteines leads to changes in the open channel current-voltage relationship at both the macroscopic and single-channel current levels that reflect specific, charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation through the channel from the external solution. This approach therefore identifies amino acid side chains that lie within the permeation pathway. Cysteine mutagenesis of pore-lining residues also affects intrapore anion binding and anion selectivity, giving more information regarding the roles of these residues. Our results demonstrate a straightforward method of screening for pore-lining amino acids in ion channels. We suggest that TM11 contributes to the CFTR pore and that the extracellular loop between TMs 11 and 12 lies close to the outer mouth of the pore. PMID:19381710

  10. Interaction of thrombin des-ETW with antithrombin III, the Kunitz inhibitors, thrombomodulin and protein C. Structural link between the autolysis loop and the Tyr-Pro-Pro-Trp insertion of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Le Bonniec, B F; Guinto, E R; Esmon, C T

    1992-09-25

    X-ray diffraction studies of human thrombin revealed that compared with trypsin, two insertions (B and C) potentially limit access to the active site groove. When amino acids Glu146, Thr147, and Trp148, adjacent to the C-insertion (autolysis loop), are deleted the resulting thrombin (des-ETW) has dramatically altered interaction with serine protease inhibitors. Whereas des-ETW resists antithrombin III inactivation with a rate constant (Kon) approximately 350-fold slower than for thrombin, des-ETW is remarkably sensitive to the Kunitz inhibitors, with inhibition constants (Ki) decreased from 2.6 microM to 34 nM for the soybean trypsin inhibitor and from 52 microM to 1.8 microM for the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The affinity for hirudin (Ki = 5.6 pM) is weakened at least 30-fold compared with recombinant thrombin. The mutation affects the charge stabilizing system and the primary binding pocket of thrombin as depicted by a decrease in Kon for diisopropylfluorophosphate (9.5-fold) and for N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine-chloromethyl ketone (51-fold) and a 39-fold increase in the Ki for benzamidine. With peptidyl p-nitroanilide substrates, the des-ETW deletion results in changes in the Michaelis (Km) and/or catalytic (kcat) constants, worsened as much as 85-fold (Km) or 100-fold (kcat). The specific clotting activity of des-ETW is less than 5% that of thrombin and the kcat/Km for protein C activation in the absence of cofactor less than 2%. Thrombomodulin binds to des-ETW with a dissociation constant of approximately 2.5 nM and partially restores its ability to activate protein C since, in the presence of the cofactor, kcat/Km rises to 6.5% that of thrombin. This study suggests that the ETW motif of thrombin prevents (directly or indirectly) its interaction with the two Kunitz inhibitors and is not essential for the thrombomodulin-mediated enhancement of protein C activation. PMID:1326550

  11. Two-pore channels: Regulation by NAADP and customized roles in triggering calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip; Marchant, Jonathan S; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2010-06-01

    NAADP is a potent regulator of cytosolic calcium levels. Much evidence suggests that NAADP activates a novel channel located on an acidic (lysosomal-like) calcium store, the mobilisation of which results in further calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we discuss the recent identification of a family of poorly characterized ion channels (the two-pore channels) as endo-lysosomal NAADP receptors. The generation of calcium signals by these channels is likened to those evoked by depolarisation during excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. We discuss the idea that two-pore channels can mediate a trigger release of calcium which is then amplified by calcium-induced calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. This is similar to the activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels and subsequent mobilisation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in cardiac tissue. We suggest that two-pore channels may physically interact with ryanodine receptors to account for more direct release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in analogy with the conformational coupling of voltage-sensitive calcium channels and ryanodine receptors in skeletal muscle. Interaction of two-pore channels with other calcium release channels likely occurs between stores "trans-chatter" and possibly within the same store "cis-chatter". We also speculate that trafficking of two-pore channels through the endo-lysosomal system facilitates interactions with calcium entry channels. Strategic placing of two-pore channels thus provides a versatile means of generating spatiotemporally complex cellular calcium signals. PMID:20621760

  12. PolyA Single Strand DNA Translocation Through an Alpha-Hemolysin Pore Stem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OKeeffe, James; Cozmuta, Ioana; Stolc, Viktor

    2003-01-01

    A new model for the polymer-pore interaction energy is introduced, based on an atomic-scale description of coulombic polymer-pore interaction. The enhanced drift velocity, experimentally observed for short polymers, is successfully accounted for, using this interaction energy model. For R/R(sub 0)>4 (R(sub 0)=7 angstroms) the translocation velocity approaches the free space drift velocity v(sub 0). This motivates the need to appropriately derivatize artificial nanopores, where R>R(sub 0).

  13. Compositional control of pore geometry in multivariate metal-organic frameworks: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Cadman, Laura K; Bristow, Jessica K; Stubbs, Naomi E; Tiana, Davide; Mahon, Mary F; Walsh, Aron; Burrows, Andrew D

    2016-03-14

    A new approach is reported for tailoring the pore geometry in five series of multivariate metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) based on the structure [Zn2(bdc)2(dabco)] (bdc = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate, dabco = 1,8-diazabicyclooctane), DMOF-1. A doping procedure has been adopted to form series of MOFs containing varying linker ratios. The series under investigation are [Zn2(bdc)(2-x)(bdc-Br)x(dabco)]·nDMF 1 (bdc-Br = 2-bromo-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate), [Zn2(bdc)(2-x)(bdc-I)x(dabco)]·nDMF 2 (bdc-I = 2-iodo-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate), [Zn2(bdc)(2-x)(bdc-NO2)x(dabco)]·nDMF 3 (bdc-NO2 = 2-nitro-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate), [Zn2(bdc)(2-x)(bdc-NH2)x(dabco)]·nDMF 4 (bdc-NH2 = 2-amino-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) and [Zn2(bdc-Br)(2-x)(bdc-I)x(dabco)]·nDMF 5. Series 1-3 demonstrate a functionality-dependent pore geometry transition from the square, open pores of DMOF-1 to rhomboidal, narrow pores with increasing proportion of the 2-substituted bdc linker, with the rhomboidal-pore MOFs also showing a temperature-dependent phase change. In contrast, all members of series 4 and 5 have uniform pore geometries. In series 4 this is a square pore topology, whilst series 5 exhibits the rhomboidal pore form. Computational analyses reveal that the pore size and shape in systems 1 and 2 is altered through non-covalent interactions between the organic linkers within the framework, and that this can be controlled by the ligand functionality and ratio. This approach affords the potential to tailor pore geometry and shape within MOFs through judicious choice of ligand ratios. PMID:26660286

  14. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA–core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA–core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  15. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-06-20

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA-core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA-core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  16. Inner mappings of Bruck loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    K-loops have their origin in the theory of sharply 2-transitive groups. In this paper a proof is given that K-loops and Bruck loops are the same. For the proof it is necessary to show that in a (left) Bruck loop the left inner mappings L(b)L(a) L(ab)[minus sign]1 are automorphisms. This paper generalizes results of Glauberman [3], Kist [8] and Kreuzer [9].

  17. Block copolymer structures in nano-pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Marco; Guo, Xiaohu; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2010-03-01

    We present results of coarse-grained computer modelling of block copolymer systems in cylindrical and spherical nanopores on Cell Dynamics Simulation. We study both cylindrical and spherical pores and systematically investigate structures formed by lamellar, cylinders and spherical block copolymer systems for various pore radii and affinity of block copolymer blocks to the pore walls. The obtained structures include: standing lamellae and cylinders, ``onions,'' cylinder ``knitting balls,'' ``golf-ball,'' layered spherical, ``virus''-like and mixed morphologies with T-junctions and U-type defects [1]. Kinetics of the structure formation and the differences with planar films are discussed. Our simulations suggest that novel porous nano-containers can be formed by confining block copolymers in pores of different geometries [1,2]. [4pt] [1] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, Polymer 49, 2797 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 214902 (2009).

  18. The open pore conformation of potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Youxing; Lee, Alice; Chen, Jiayun; Cadene, Martine; Chait, Brian T.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2002-05-01

    Living cells regulate the activity of their ion channels through a process known as gating. To open the pore, protein conformational changes must occur within a channel's membrane-spanning ion pathway. KcsA and MthK, closed and opened K+ channels, respectively, reveal how such gating transitions occur. Pore-lining `inner' helices contain a `gating hinge' that bends by approximately 30°. In a straight conformation four inner helices form a bundle, closing the pore near its intracellular surface. In a bent configuration the inner helices splay open creating a wide (12Å) entryway. Amino-acid sequence conservation suggests a common structural basis for gating in a wide range of K+ channels, both ligand- and voltage-gated. The open conformation favours high conduction by compressing the membrane field to the selectivity filter, and also permits large organic cations and inactivation peptides to enter the pore from the intracellular solution.

  19. DESIGN MANUAL: FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual presents the best current practices for selecting, designing, operating, maintaining, and controlling fine pore aeration systems used in the treatment of municipal wastewater. It was prepared by the American Society of Civil Engineers Committee on Oxygen Transfer unde...

  20. Functional Loop Dynamics of the Streptavidin-Biotin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jianing; Li, Yongle; Ji, Changge; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulation is employed to study the functional dynamics of the flexible loop3-4 in the strong-binding streptavidin-biotin complex system. Conventional molecular (cMD) simulation is also performed for comparison. The present study reveals the following important properties of the loop dynamics: (1) The transition of loop3-4 from open to closed state is observed in 200 ns aMD simulation. (2) In the absence of biotin binding, the open-state streptavidin is more stable, which is consistent with experimental evidences. The free energy (ΔG) difference is about 5 kcal/mol between two states. But with biotin binding, the closed state is more stable due to electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the loop3-4 and biotin. (3) The closure of loop3-4 is concerted to the stable binding of biotin to streptavidin. When the loop3-4 is in its open-state, biotin moves out of the binding pocket, indicating that the interactions between the loop3-4 and biotin are essential in trapping biotin in the binding pocket. (4) In the tetrameric streptavidin system, the conformational change of the loop3-4 in each monomer is independent of each other. That is, there is no cooperative binding for biotin bound to the four subunits of the tetramer. PMID:25601277

  1. Functional Loop Dynamics of the Streptavidin-Biotin Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jianing; Li, Yongle; Ji, Changge; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulation is employed to study the functional dynamics of the flexible loop3-4 in the strong-binding streptavidin-biotin complex system. Conventional molecular (cMD) simulation is also performed for comparison. The present study reveals the following important properties of the loop dynamics: (1) The transition of loop3-4 from open to closed state is observed in 200 ns aMD simulation. (2) In the absence of biotin binding, the open-state streptavidin is more stable, which is consistent with experimental evidences. The free energy (ΔG) difference is about 5 kcal/mol between two states. But with biotin binding, the closed state is more stable due to electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the loop3-4 and biotin. (3) The closure of loop3-4 is concerted to the stable binding of biotin to streptavidin. When the loop3-4 is in its open-state, biotin moves out of the binding pocket, indicating that the interactions between the loop3-4 and biotin are essential in trapping biotin in the binding pocket. (4) In the tetrameric streptavidin system, the conformational change of the loop3-4 in each monomer is independent of each other. That is, there is no cooperative binding for biotin bound to the four subunits of the tetramer.

  2. Loop Heat Pipes and Capillary Pumped Loops: An Applications Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Theodore; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLS) and loop heat pipes (LHPS) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices which have recently gained increasing acceptance in space applications. Both systems work based on the same principles and have very similar designs. Nevertheless, some differences exist in the construction of the evaporator and the hydro-accumulator, and these differences lead to very distinct operating characteristics for each loop. This paper presents comparisons of the two loops from an applications perspective, and addresses their impact on spacecraft design, integration, and test. Some technical challenges and issues for both loops are also addressed.

  3. Closed-loop anesthesia.

    PubMed

    LE Guen, Morgan; Liu, Ngai; Chazot, Thierry; Fischler, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Automated anesthesia which may offer to the physician time to control hemodynamic and to supervise neurological outcome and which may offer to the patient safety and quality was until recently consider as a holy grail. But this field of research is now increasing in every component of general anesthesia (hypnosis, nociception, neuromuscular blockade) and literature describes some successful algorithms - single or multi closed-loop controller. The aim of these devices is to control a predefined target and to continuously titrate anesthetics whatever the patients' co morbidities and surgical events to reach this target. Literature contains many randomized trials comparing manual and automated anesthesia and shows feasibility and safety of this system. Automation could quickly concern other aspects of anesthesia as fluid management and this review proposes an overview of closed-loop systems in anesthesia. PMID:26554614

  4. Verification of Loop Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Lionello, R.; Mok, Y.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Many different techniques have been used to characterize the plasma in the solar corona: density-sensitive spectral line ratios are used to infer the density, the evolution of coronal structures in different passbands is used to infer the temperature evolution, and the simultaneous intensities measured in multiple passbands are used to determine the emission measure. All these analysis techniques assume that the intensity of the structures can be isolated through background subtraction. In this paper, we use simulated observations from a 3D hydrodynamic simulation of a coronal active region to verify these diagnostics. The density and temperature from the simulation are used to generate images in several passbands and spectral lines. We identify loop structures in the simulated images and calculate the loop background. We then determine the density, temperature and emission measure distribution as a function of time from the observations and compare with the true temperature and density of the loop. We find that the overall characteristics of the temperature, density, and emission measure are recovered by the analysis methods, but the details of the true temperature and density are not. For instance, the emission measure curves calculated from the simulated observations are much broader than the true emission measure distribution, though the average temperature evolution is similar. These differences are due, in part, to inadequate background subtraction, but also indicate a limitation of the analysis methods.

  5. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  6. Loops of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opolski, Antoni

    2014-12-01

    Professor Antoni Opolski was actively interested in astronomy after his retirement in 1983. He especially liked to study the works of the famous astronomer Copernicus getting inspiration for his own work. Opolski started his work on planetary loops in 2011 continuing it to the end of 2012 . During this period calculations, drawings, tables, and basic descriptions of all the planets of the Solar System were created with the use of a piece of paper and a pencil only. In 2011 Antoni Opolski asked us to help him in editing the manuscript and preparing it for publication. We have been honored having the opportunity to work on articles on planetary loops with Antoni Opolski in his house for several months. In the middle of 2012 the detailed material on Jupiter was ready. However, professor Opolski improved the article by smoothing the text and preparing new, better drawings. Finally the article ''Loops of Jupiter'', written by the 99- year old astronomer, was published in the year of his 100th birthday.

  7. Effect of homologous serotonin receptor loop substitutions on the heterologous expression in Pichia of a chimeric acetylcholine-binding protein with alpha-bungarotoxin-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joao A; Hawrot, Edward

    2009-10-01

    The molluscan acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) is a soluble homopentameric homolog of the extracellular domain of various ligand-gated ion channels. Previous studies have reported that AChBP, when fused to the ion pore domain of the serotonin receptor (5HT(3A)R), can form a functional ligand-gated chimeric channel only if the AChBP loop regions between beta-strands beta1 and beta2 (beta1-beta2), beta6 and beta7 (beta6-beta7), and beta8 and beta9 (beta8-beta9) are replaced with those of the 5HT(3A)R. To investigate further the potential interactions among these three important loop regions in a membrane- and detergent-free system, we designed AChBP constructs in which loops beta1-beta2, beta6-beta7, and beta8-beta9 of the AChBP were individually and combinatorially substituted in all permutations with the analogous loops of the 5HT(3A)R. These chimeras were expressed as secreted proteins using the Pichia pastoris yeast expression system. [(125)I]-alpha-Bungarotoxin-binding was detected in the culture media obtained from homologous recombinant clones expressing the wild-type AChBP, the beta1-beta2 loop-only chimera, and the chimera containing all three 5HT(3A)R loop substitutions. The remaining chimeras failed to show [(125)I]-alpha-bungarotoxin binding, and further analysis of cellular extracts allowed us to determine that these binding-negative chimeric constructs accumulated intracellularly and were not secreted into the culture medium. Our results demonstrate that coordinated interactions among loops beta1-beta2, beta6-beta7, and beta8-beta9 are essential for the formation of a functional ligand-binding site, as evidenced by [(125)I]-alpha-bungarotoxin-binding, and for efficient protein secretion. In addition, the constructs described here demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing soluble scaffolds to explore functionally important interactions within the extracellular domain of membrane-bound proteins. PMID:19427904

  8. Unstable Pore-Water Flow in Intertidal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Shen, C.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important intertidal wetlands strongly influenced by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Bordered by coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur over vastly different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil condition, particularly aeration, which influences the marsh plant growth. Numerous studies have been carried out to examine the pore-water flow process in the marsh soil driven by tides, focusing on stable flow with the assumption of homogeneity in soil and fluid properties. This assumption, however, is questionable given the actual inhomogeneous conditions in the field. For example, the salinity of surface water in the tidal creek varies temporally and spatially due to the influence of rainfall and evapotranspiration as well as the freshwater input from upland areas to the estuary, creating density gradients across the marsh surface and within the marsh soil. Many marshes possess soil stratigraphy with low-permeability mud typically overlying high-permeability sandy deposits. Macropores such as crab burrows are commonly distributed in salt marsh sediments. All these conditions are prone to the development of non-uniform, unstable preferential pore-water flow in the marsh soil, for example, funnelling and fingering. Here we present results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to explore such unstable flow. In particular, the analysis aims to address how the unstable flow modifies patterns of local pore-water movement and solute transport, as well as the overall exchange between the marsh soil and

  9. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    Experiments in various porous media have shown that multiple parameters come into play when an oleic phase is displaced by an aqueous solution of surfactant. In general, the displacement efficiency is improved when the fluids become quasi-miscible. Understanding the phase behavior oil/water/surfactant systems is important because microemulsion has the ability to generate ultralow interfacial tension (<10(-2) mN m(-1)) that is required for miscibility to occur. Many studies focus on microemulsion formation and the resulting properties under equilibrium conditions. However, the majority of applications where microemulsion is present also involve flow, which has received relatively less attention. It is commonly assumed that the characteristics of an oil/water/surfactant system under flowing conditions are identical to the one under equilibrium conditions. Here, we show that this is not necessarily the case. We studied the equilibrium phase behavior of a model system consisting of n-decane and an aqueous solution of olefin sulfonate surfactant, which has practical applications for enhanced oil recovery. The salt content of the aqueous solution was varied to provide a range of different microemulsion compositions and oil-water interfacial tensions. We then performed microfluidic flow experiments to study the dynamic in situ formation of microemulsion by coinjecting bulk fluids of n-decane and surfactant solution into a T-junction capillary geometry. A solvatochromatic fluorescent dye was used to obtain spatially resolved compositional information. In this way, we visualized the microemulsion formation and the flow of it along with the excess phases. A complex interaction between the flow patterns and the microemulsion properties was observed. The formation of microemulsion influenced the flow regimes, and the flow regimes affected the characteristics of the microemulsion formation. In particular, at low flow rates, slug flow was observed, which had profound

  10. Hydrogeology and hydrodynamics of coral reef pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Oberdorfer, J.A.

    1988-06-29

    A wide variety of forces can produce head gradients that drive the flow and advective mixing of internal coral reef pore waters. Oscillatory gradients that produce mixing result from wave and tide action. Sustained gradients result from wave and tide-induced setup and ponding, from currents impinging on the reef structure, from groundwater heads, and from density differenced (temperature or salinity gradients). These gradients and the permeabilities and porosities of reef sediments are such that most macropore environments are dominated by advection rather than diffusion. The various driving forces must be analyzed to determine the individual and combined magnitudes of their effects on a specific reef pore-water system. Pore-water movement controls sediment diagenesis, the exchange of nutrients between sediments and benthos, and coastal/island groundwater resources. Because of the complexity of forcing functions, their interactions with specific local reef environments, experimental studies require careful incorporation of these considerations into their design and interpretation. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Characterization of horizontal flows around solar pores from high-resolution time series of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Domínguez, S.; de Vicente, A.; Bonet, J. A.; Martínez Pillet, V.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Though there is increasing evidence linking the moat flow and the Evershed flow along the penumbral filaments, there is not a clear consensus regarding the existence of a moat flow around umbral cores and pores, and the debate is still open. Solar pores appear to be a suitable scenario to test the moat-penumbra relation as they correspond to a direct interaction between the umbra and the convective plasma in the surrounding photosphere without any intermediate structure in between. Aims: We study solar pores based on high-resolution ground-based and satellite observations. Methods: Local correlation tracking techniques were applied to different-duration time series to analyze the horizontal flows around several solar pores. Results: Our results establish that the flows calculated from different solar pore observations are coherent among each other and show the determining and overall influence of exploding events in the granulation around the pores. We do not find any sign of moat-like flows surrounding solar pores, but a clearly defined region of inflows surrounding them. Conclusions: The connection between moat flows and flows associated to penumbral filaments is hereby reinforced.

  12. Mechanical properties, pore size distribution, and pore solution of fly ash-belite cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, A.; Goni, S.; Macias, A.; Luxan, M.P.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanical properties, pore size distribution, and extracted pore solution of fly ash-belite cement (FABC) mortars were studied for a period of 200 days. The influence of the calcination temperature, which ranged from 700 to 900 C, of the fly ash-belite cement was discussed. The evolution with hydration time of the pore size distribution was followed by mercury intrusion porosimetry, and the results correlated with those of flexural and compressive strength. The pore solution was expressed and analyzed at different times of hydration.

  13. Active pore space utilization in nanoporous carbon-based supercapacitors: Effects of conductivity and pore accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredych, Mykola; Koscinski, Mikolaj; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, Malgorzata; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2012-12-01

    Composites of commercial graphene and nanoporous sodium-salt-polymer-derived carbons were prepared with 5 or 20 weight% graphene. The materials were characterized using the adsorption of nitrogen, SEM/EDX, thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy and potentiometric titration. The samples' conductivity was also measured. The performance of the carbon composites in energy storage was linked to their porosity and electronic conductivity. The small pores (<0.7) were found as very active for double layer capacitance. It was demonstrated that when double layer capacitance is a predominant mechanism of charge storage, the degree of the pore space utilization for that storage can be increased by increasing the conductivity of the carbons. That active pore space utilization is defined as gravimetric capacitance per unit pore volume in pores smaller than 0.7 nm. Its magnitude is affected by conductivity of the carbon materials. The functional groups, besides pseudocapacitive contribution, increased the wettability and thus the degree of the pore space utilization. Graphene phase, owing to its conductivity, also took part in an insitu increase of the small pore accessibility and thus the capacitance of the composites via enhancing an electron transfer to small pores and thus imposing the reduction of groups blocking the pores for electrolyte ions.

  14. Pore pressure embrittlement in a volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Varley, Nick R.

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode of porous rock in compression—dilatant or compactant—is largely governed by the overlying lithostatic pressure and the pressure of pore fluids within the rock (Wong, Solid Earth 102:3009-3025, 1997), both of which are subject to change in space and time within a volcanic edifice. While lithostatic pressure will tend to increase monotonously with depth due to the progressive accumulation of erupted products, pore pressures are prone to fluctuations (during periods of volcanic unrest, for example). An increase in pore fluid pressure can result in rock fracture, even at depths where the lithostatic pressure would otherwise preclude such dilatant behaviour—a process termed pore fluid-induced embrittlement. We explore this phenomenon through a series of targeted triaxial experiments on typical edifice-forming andesites (from Volcán de Colima, Mexico). We first show that increasing pore pressure over a range of timescales (on the order of 1 min to 1 day) can culminate in brittle failure of otherwise intact rock. Irrespective of the pore pressure increase rate, we record comparable accelerations in acoustic emission and strain prior to macroscopic failure. We further show that oscillating pore fluid pressures can cause iterative and cumulative damage, ultimately resulting in brittle failure under relatively low effective mean stress conditions. We find that macroscopic failure occurs once a critical threshold of damage is surpassed, suggesting that only small increases in pore pressure may be necessary to trigger failure in previously damaged rocks. Finally, we observe that inelastic compaction of volcanic rock (as we may expect in much of the deep edifice) can be overprinted by shear fractures due to this mechanism of embrittlement. Pore fluid-induced embrittlement of edifice rock during volcanic unrest is anticipated to be highest closer to the conduit and, as a result, may assist in the development of a fractured halo zone surrounding the

  15. Vortex loops: Are they always doomed to die

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ya'acov, U. )

    1995-03-15

    The effective equations of motion of relativistic strings in material media are derived and applied to moving rings with a time-dependent radius. The equations contain the Magnus force, due to the motion of the ring relative to the medium, whose eventual effect is the possible stabilization of the ring against shrinking. A constant solution is identified, and small fluctuations around it are bound, demonstrating the stability of the solution. If the string loops created in the cosmological cosmic string scenario interact via this mechanism with a formed-up Higgs particle condensate, then the stabilizing velocities are [similar to][delta][sub loop]/[ital R][sub loop], and the overall effect of this phenomenon is to stabilize large loops and reduce the general disappearance rate of the string loops.

  16. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study.

    PubMed

    Flament, Frederic; Francois, Ghislain; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Hanaya, Tomoo; Batisse, Dominique; Cointereau-Chardon, Suzy; Seixas, Mirela Donato Gianeti; Dal Belo, Susi Elaine; Bazin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Skin pores (SP), as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc) that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage) on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 μm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm(2)) and determination of their respective sizes in mm(2). Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage) that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1) were recorded in all studied subjects; 2) varied greatly with ethnicity; 3) plateaued with age in most cases; and 4) globally refected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having "enlarged pores" like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly distinct from other ethnicities in having very low density and sizes. Analyzing the present results suggests that facial skin pore's morphology as perceived by human eye less result from functional criteria of associated appendages such as sebaceous glands. To what extent skin pores may be viewed as additional criteria of a photo-altered skin is an issue to be further addressed. PMID:25733918

  17. Low pore connectivity in natural rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    As repositories for CO2 and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air-water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  18. Low pore connectivity in natural rock.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO(2) and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air-water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior. PMID:22507286

  19. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO₂ and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  20. Pore characteristics for improving luminous efficacy of phosphor-in-glass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunil; Yie, Hoyong; Choi, Seunggon; Sung, Aram; Kim, Hyungsun

    2015-11-30

    Pores formed during the sintering of a glass/phosphor mixture affect the scattering and path of light within the resulting phosphor-in-glass (PIG) plate. An investigation of the interactions between blue light from an LED chip and pores within a PIG plate is therefore needed to understand the effect of light scattering on the optical properties. To this end, various glass compositions based on SiO2-B2O3-ZnO were prepared so as to better understand the effect of modifiers (i.e., Li2O, Na2O, La2O3, WO3) on the viscosity and pore properties at different sintering temperatures. This study found that PIGs sintered within a given viscosity range exhibit different optical properties depending on their pore size and overall porosity; a higher luminous efficacy observed in the case of intermediate scattering length values was due to an improved interaction between pores and light. This is a significant finding, as ensuring suitable PIG pore characteristics is an important factor in achieving a desired spectrum and high efficacy from white LEDs. PMID:26698798

  1. Nucleation in mesoscopic systems under transient conditions: Peptide-induced pore formation in vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Höök, Fredrik

    2013-04-01

    Attachment of lytic peptides to the lipid membrane of virions or bacteria is often accompanied by their aggregation and pore formation, resulting eventually in membrane rupture and pathogen neutralization. The membrane rupture may occur gradually via formation of many pores or abruptly after the formation of the first pore. In academic studies, this process is observed during interaction of peptides with lipid vesicles. We present an analytical model and the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations focused on the pore formation in such situations. Specifically, we calculate the time of the first nucleation-limited pore-formation event and show the distribution of this time in the regime when the fluctuations of the number of peptides attached to a vesicle are appreciable. The results obtained are used to clarify the mechanism of the pore formation and membrane destabilization observed recently during interaction of highly active α-helical peptide with sub-100-nm lipid vesicles that mimic enveloped viruses with nanoscale membrane curvature. The model proposed and the analysis presented are generic and may be applicable to other meso- and nanosystems.

  2. Architecture of the symmetric core of the nuclear pore.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daniel H; Stuwe, Tobias; Schilbach, Sandra; Rundlet, Emily J; Perriches, Thibaud; Mobbs, George; Fan, Yanbin; Thierbach, Karsten; Huber, Ferdinand M; Collins, Leslie N; Davenport, Andrew M; Jeon, Young E; Hoelz, André

    2016-04-15

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) controls the transport of macromolecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm, but its molecular architecture has thus far remained poorly defined. We biochemically reconstituted NPC core protomers and elucidated the underlying protein-protein interaction network. Flexible linker sequences, rather than interactions between the structured core scaffold nucleoporins, mediate the assembly of the inner ring complex and its attachment to the NPC coat. X-ray crystallographic analysis of these scaffold nucleoporins revealed the molecular details of their interactions with the flexible linker sequences and enabled construction of full-length atomic structures. By docking these structures into the cryoelectron tomographic reconstruction of the intact human NPC and validating their placement with our nucleoporin interactome, we built a composite structure of the NPC symmetric core that contains ~320,000 residues and accounts for ~56 megadaltons of the NPC's structured mass. Our approach provides a paradigm for the structure determination of similarly complex macromolecular assemblies. PMID:27081075

  3. Crystal structure of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumolysin provides key insights into early steps of pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Sara L.; Feil, Susanne C.; Morton, Craig J.; Farrand, Allison J.; Mulhern, Terrence D.; Gorman, Michael A.; Wade, Kristin R.; Tweten, Rodney K.; Parker, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Pore-forming proteins are weapons often used by bacterial pathogens to breach the membrane barrier of target cells. Despite their critical role in infection important structural aspects of the mechanism of how these proteins assemble into pores remain unknown. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the world’s leading cause of pneumonia, meningitis, bacteremia and otitis media. Pneumolysin (PLY) is a major virulence factor of S. pneumoniae and a target for both small molecule drug development and vaccines. PLY is a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), a family of pore-forming toxins that form gigantic pores in cell membranes. Here we present the structure of PLY determined by X-ray crystallography and, in solution, by small-angle X-ray scattering. The crystal structure reveals PLY assembles as a linear oligomer that provides key structural insights into the poorly understood early monomer-monomer interactions of CDCs at the membrane surface. PMID:26403197

  4. Characterizing pore sizes and water structure in stimuli-responsive hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A.S.; Antonsen, K.P.; Ashida, T.; Bohnert, J.L.; Dong, L.C.; Nabeshima, Y.; Nagamatsu, S.; Park, T.G.; Sheu, M.S.; Wu, X.S.; Yan, Q.

    1993-12-31

    Hydrogels have been extensively investigated as potential matrices for drug delivery. In particular, hydrogels responsive to pH and temperature changes have been of greatest interest most recently. Proteins and peptide drugs are especially relevant for delivery from such hydrogel matrices due to the relatively {open_quotes}passive{close_quotes} and biocompatible microenvironment which should exist within the hydrogel aqueous pores. The large molecular size of many proteins requires an interconnected large pore structure. Furthermore, the gel pore {open_quotes}walls{close_quotes} should not provide hydrophobic sites for strong interactions with proteins. In the special case of ion exchange release the protein would be attracted by opposite charges on the polymer backbones. Therefore, it is important both to control and to characterize the pore structure and the water character within a hydrogel to be used or protein or peptide drug delivery. This talk will critically review techniques for estimating these two key parameters in hydrogels.

  5. Crystal structure of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumolysin provides key insights into early steps of pore formation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Sara L; Feil, Susanne C; Morton, Craig J; Farrand, Allison J; Mulhern, Terrence D; Gorman, Michael A; Wade, Kristin R; Tweten, Rodney K; Parker, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Pore-forming proteins are weapons often used by bacterial pathogens to breach the membrane barrier of target cells. Despite their critical role in infection important structural aspects of the mechanism of how these proteins assemble into pores remain unknown. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the world's leading cause of pneumonia, meningitis, bacteremia and otitis media. Pneumolysin (PLY) is a major virulence factor of S. pneumoniae and a target for both small molecule drug development and vaccines. PLY is a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), a family of pore-forming toxins that form gigantic pores in cell membranes. Here we present the structure of PLY determined by X-ray crystallography and, in solution, by small-angle X-ray scattering. The crystal structure reveals PLY assembles as a linear oligomer that provides key structural insights into the poorly understood early monomer-monomer interactions of CDCs at the membrane surface. PMID:26403197

  6. Dynamics of Confined Flexible and Unentangled Polymer Melts in Highly Adsorbing Cylindrical Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the recent neutron spin echo experiments (NSE) designed to address the dynamic phenomena in polymer melts that are induced by interactions with a confining surface, we performed coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to replicate the experimental results in order to provide new molecular insight for the observations. The results show excellent agreement in the values obtained for the normalized coherent single chain dynamic structure factor, S(Q;Dt)/S(Q;0) , between experiments and simulations. The simulations indicate that using different chain molecular weights that are used to achieve scattering contrast results in the uneven distribution of scatterers in the radial direction because lower molecular weight chains prefer to adsorb in the confining surface. In the bulk configuration, both simulations and experiments confirm that the polymer chains follow Rouse dynamics. However, under confinement, the Rouse modes are suppressed. The mean-squared radius of gyration, R2g, and the average relative shape anisotropy k2 of the conformation of the polymer chains indicate a pancake-like conformation near the surface and a bulk-like conformation near the center of the confining cylinder. Direct visualization of the polymers in the simulation confirm the pancake-like conformation of the adsorbed chains and the presence of trains, loops and tails in the region between the adsorbed chains and the chains not in contact with the surface. Despite the presence of these different conformations, the average form factor of the confined chains still follows the Debye function which describes linear ideal chains, which is in agreement with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments. The experimentally inaccessible mean squared displacement of the confined monomers, calculated as a function of radial distance from the pore surface, was obtained in the simulations. The simulation shows a gradual increase of the MSD from the adsorbed, but mobile layer, to that

  7. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  8. Hydrochromic Approaches to Mapping Human Sweat Pores.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Hoon; Park, Bum Jun; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-06-21

    Hydrochromic materials, which undergo changes in their light absorption and/or emission properties in response to water, have been extensively investigated as humidity sensors. Recent advances in the design of these materials have led to novel applications, including monitoring the water content of organic solvents, water-jet-based rewritable printing on paper, and hydrochromic mapping of human sweat pores. Our interest in this area has focused on the design of hydrochromic materials for human sweat pore mapping. We recognized that materials appropriate for this purpose must have balanced sensitivities to water. Specifically, while they should not undergo light absorption and/or emission transitions under ambient moisture conditions, the materials must have sufficiently high hydrochromic sensitivities that they display responses to water secreted from human sweat pores. In this Account, we describe investigations that we have carried out to develop hydrochromic substances that are suitable for human sweat pore mapping. Polydiacetylenes (PDAs) have been extensively investigated as sensor matrices because of their stimulus-responsive color change property. We found that incorporation of headgroups composed of hygroscopic ions such as cesium or rubidium and carboxylate counterions enables PDAs to undergo a blue-to-red colorimetric transition as well as a fluorescence turn-on response to water. Very intriguingly, the small quantities of water secreted from human sweat pores were found to be sufficient to trigger fluorescence turn-on responses of the hydrochromic PDAs, allowing precise mapping of human sweat pores. Since the hygroscopic ion-containing PDAs developed in the initial stage display a colorimetric transition under ambient conditions that exist during humid summer periods, a new system was designed. A PDA containing an imidazolium ion was found to be stable under all ambient conditions and showed temperature-dependent hydrochromism corresponding to a

  9. Closing the loop.

    PubMed

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2011-02-01

    Closed-loop algorithms can be found in every aspect of everyday modern life. Automation and control are used constantly to provide safety and to improve quality of life. Closed-loop systems and algorithms can be found in home appliances, automobiles, aviation and more. Can one imagine nowadays driving a car without ABS, cruise control or even anti-sliding control? Similar principles of automation and control can be used in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM). The idea of an algorithmic/technological way to control glycaemia is not new and has been researched for more than four decades. However, recent improvements in both glucose-sensing technology and insulin delivery together with advanced control and systems engineering made this dream of an artificial pancreas possible. The artificial pancreas may be the next big step in the treatment of DM since the use of insulin analogues. An artificial pancreas can be described as internal or external devices that use continuous glucose measurements to automatically manage exogenous insulin delivery with or without other hormones in an attempt to restore glucose regulation in individuals with DM using a control algorithm. This device as described can be internal or external; can use different types of control algorithms with bi-hormonal or uni-hormonal design; and can utilise different ways to administer them. The different designs and implementations have transitioned recently from in silico simulations to clinical evaluation stage with practical applications in mind. This may mark the beginning of a new era in diabetes management with the introduction of semi-closed-loop systems that can prevent or minimise nocturnal hypoglycaemia, to hybrid systems that will manage blood glucose (BG) levels with minimal user intervention to finally fully automated systems that will take the user out of the loop. More and more clinical trials will be needed for the artificial pancreas to become a reality but initial encouraging

  10. Analysis of a spatially deconvolved solar pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ichimoto, K.

    2016-08-01

    Solar pores are active regions with large magnetic field strengths and apparent simple magnetic configurations. Their properties resemble the ones found for the sunspot umbra although pores do not show penumbra. Therefore, solar pores present themselves as an intriguing phenomenon that is not completely understood. We examine in this work a solar pore observed with Hinode/SP using two state of the art techniques. The first one is the spatial deconvolution of the spectropolarimetric data that allows removing the stray light contamination induced by the spatial point spread function of the telescope. The second one is the inversion of the Stokes profiles assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium that let us to infer the atmospheric physical parameters. After applying these techniques, we found that the spatial deconvolution method does not introduce artefacts, even at the edges of the magnetic structure, where large horizontal gradients are detected on the atmospheric parameters. Moreover, we also describe the physical properties of the magnetic structure at different heights finding that, in the inner part of the solar pore, the temperature is lower than outside, the magnetic field strength is larger than 2 kG and unipolar, and the line-of-sight velocity is almost null. At neighbouring pixels, we found low magnetic field strengths of same polarity and strong downward motions that only occur at the low photosphere, below the continuum optical depth log τ = -1. Finally, we studied the spatial relation between different atmospheric parameters at different heights corroborating the physical properties described before.

  11. Analysis of a spatially deconvolved solar pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Cobo, B. Ruiz; Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ichimoto, K.

    2016-05-01

    Solar pores are active regions with large magnetic field strengths and apparent simple magnetic configurations. Their properties resemble the ones found for the sunspot umbra although pores do not show penumbra. Therefore, solar pores present themselves as an intriguing phenomenon that is not completely understood. We examine in this work a solar pore observed with Hinode/SP using two state of the art techniques. The first one is the spatial deconvolution of the spectropolarimetric data that allows removing the stray light contamination induced by the spatial point spread function of the telescope. The second one is the inversion of the Stokes profiles assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium that let us to infer the atmospheric physical parameters. After applying these techniques, we found that the spatial deconvolution method does not introduce artefacts, even at the edges of the magnetic structure, where large horizontal gradients are detected on the atmospheric parameters. Moreover, we also describe the physical properties of the magnetic structure at different heights finding that, in the inner part of the solar pore, the temperature is lower than outside, the magnetic field strength is larger than 2 kG and unipolar, and the LOS velocity is almost null. At neighbouring pixels, we found low magnetic field strengths of same polarity and strong downward motions that only occur at the low photosphere, below the continuum optical depth log τ = -1. Finally, we studied the spatial relation between different atmospheric parameters at different heights corroborating the physical properties described before.

  12. Performance of Small Pore Microchannel Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Ravinett, T.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Edgar, M.

    1995-01-01

    Small pore size microchannel plates (MCP's) are needed to satisfy the requirements for future high resolution small and large format detectors for astronomy. MCP's with pore sizes in the range 5 micron to 8 micron are now being manufactured, but they are of limited availability and are of small size. We have obtained sets of Galileo 8 micron and 6.5 micron MCP's, and Philips 6 micron and 7 micron pore MCP's, and compared them to our larger pore MCP Z stacks. We have tested back to back MCP stacks of four of these MCP's and achieved gains greater than 2 x 1O(exp 7) with pulse height distributions of less than 40% FWHM, and background rates of less than 0.3 events sec(exp -1) cm(exp -2). Local counting rates up to approx. 100 events/pore/sec have been attained with little drop of the MCP gain. The bare MCP quantum efficiencies are somewhat lower than those expected, however. Flat field images are characterized by an absence of MCP fixed pattern noise.

  13. Organization of the Mitochondrial Apoptotic BAK Pore

    PubMed Central

    Aluvila, Sreevidya; Mandal, Tirtha; Hustedt, Eric; Fajer, Peter; Choe, Jun Yong; Oh, Kyoung Joon

    2014-01-01

    The multidomain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins BAK and BAX are believed to form large oligomeric pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane during apoptosis. Formation of these pores results in the release of apoptotic factors including cytochrome c from the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm, where they initiate the cascade of events that lead to cell death. Using the site-directed spin labeling method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we have determined the conformational changes that occur in BAK when the protein targets to the membrane and forms pores. The data showed that helices α1 and α6 disengage from the rest of the domain, leaving helices α2-α5 as a folded unit. Helices α2-α5 were shown to form a dimeric structure, which is structurally homologous to the recently reported BAX “BH3-in-groove homodimer.” Furthermore, the EPR data and a chemical cross-linking study demonstrated the existence of a hitherto unknown interface between BAK BH3-in-groove homodimers in the oligomeric BAK. This novel interface involves the C termini of α3 and α5 helices. The results provide further insights into the organization of the BAK oligomeric pores by the BAK homodimers during mitochondrial apoptosis, enabling the proposal of a BAK-induced lipidic pore with the topography of a “worm hole.” PMID:24337568

  14. Modeling Tissue Growth Within Nonwoven Scaffolds Pores

    PubMed Central

    Church, Jeffrey S.; Alexander, David L.J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Ingham, Eileen; Ramshaw, John A.M.; Werkmeister, Jerome A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we present a novel approach for predicting tissue growth within the pores of fibrous tissue engineering scaffolds. Thin nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate scaffolds were prepared to characterize tissue growth within scaffold pores, by mouse NR6 fibroblast cells. On the basis of measurements of tissue lengths at fiber crossovers and along fiber segments, mathematical models were determined during the proliferative phase of cell growth. Tissue growth at fiber crossovers decreased with increasing interfiber angle, with exponential relationships determined on day 6 and 10 of culture. Analysis of tissue growth along fiber segments determined two growth profiles, one with enhanced growth as a result of increased tissue lengths near the fiber crossover, achieved in the latter stage of culture. Derived mathematical models were used in the development of a software program to visualize predicted tissue growth within a pore. This study identifies key pore parameters that contribute toward tissue growth, and suggests models for predicting this growth, based on fibroblast cells. Such models may be used in aiding scaffold design, for optimum pore infiltration during the tissue engineering process. PMID:20687775

  15. Point mutations in the pore region directly or indirectly affect glibenclamide block of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jyoti; Linsdell, Paul

    2002-03-01

    The sulfonylurea glibenclamide is a relatively potent inhibitor of the CFTR Cl(-) channel. This inhibition is thought to be via an open channel block mechanism. However, nothing is known about the physical nature of the glibenclamide-binding site on CFTR. Here we show that mutations in the pore-forming 6th and 12th transmembrane regions of CFTR affect block by intracellular glibenclamide, confirming previous suggestions that glibenclamide enters the pore in order to block the channel. Two mutations in the 6th transmembrane region, F337A and T338A, significantly weakened glibenclamide block, consistent with a direct interaction between glibenclamide and this region of the pore. Interestingly, two mutations in the 12th transmembrane region (N1138A and T1142A) significantly strengthened block. These two mutations also abolished the dependence of block on the extracellular Cl(-) concentration, which in wild-type CFTR suggests an interaction between Cl(-) and glibenclamide within the channel pore that limits block. We suggest that mutations in the 12th transmembrane region strengthen glibenclamide block not by directly altering interactions between glibenclamide and the pore walls, but indirectly by reducing interactions between Cl(-) ions and glibenclamide within the pore. This work demonstrates that glibenclamide binds within the CFTR channel pore and begins to define its intrapore binding site. PMID:11889571

  16. A negative feedback loop at the nuclear periphery regulates GAL gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Green, Erin M.; Jiang, Ying; Joyner, Ryan; Weis, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    The genome is nonrandomly organized within the nucleus, but it remains unclear how gene position affects gene expression. Silenced genes have frequently been found associated with the nuclear periphery, and the environment at the periphery is believed to be refractory to transcriptional activation. However, in budding yeast, several highly regulated classes of genes, including the GAL7-10-1 gene cluster, are known to translocate to the nuclear periphery concurrent with their activation. To investigate the role of gene positioning on GAL gene expression, we monitored the effects of mutations that disrupt the interaction between the GAL locus and the periphery or synthetically tethered the locus to the periphery. Localization to the nuclear periphery was found to dampen initial GAL gene induction and was required for rapid repression after gene inactivation, revealing a function for the nuclear periphery in repressing endogenous GAL gene expression. Our results do not support a gene-gating model in which GAL gene interaction with the nuclear pore ensures rapid gene expression, but instead they suggest that a repressive environment at the nuclear periphery establishes a negative feedback loop that enables the GAL locus to respond rapidly to changes in environmental conditions. PMID:22323286

  17. Involvement of hydrophobic amino acid residues in C7-C8 loop of Aspergillus oryzae hydrophobin RolA in hydrophobic interaction between RolA and a polyester.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takumi; Tanabe, Hiroki; Uehara, Kenji; Takahashi, Toru; Abe, Keietsu

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobins are amphipathic secretory proteins with eight conserved cysteine residues and are ubiquitous among filamentous fungi. The Cys3-Cys4 and Cys7-Cys8 loops of hydrophobins are thought to form hydrophobic segments involved in adsorption of hydrophobins on hydrophobic surfaces. When the fungus Aspergillus oryzae is grown in a liquid medium containing the polyester polybutylene succinate-co-adipate (PBSA), A. oryzae produces hydrophobin RolA, which attaches to PBSA. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of RolA adsorption on PBSA by using a PBSA pull-down assay and a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with PBSA-coated electrodes. We constructed RolA mutants in which hydrophobic amino acids in the two loops were replaced with serine, and we examined the kinetics of mutant adsorption on PBSA. QCM analysis revealed that mutants with replacements in the Cys7-Cys8 loop had lower affinity than wild-type RolA for PBSA, suggesting that this loop is involved in RolA adsorption on PBSA. PMID:25273133

  18. Pore-lining composition and capillary breakthrough pressure of mudstone caprocks : sealing efficiency of geologic CO2 storage sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrusak, Robin; Heath, Jason E.; McPherson, Brian J. O. L.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2010-08-01

    Subsurface containment of CO2 is predicated on effective caprock sealing. Many previous studies have relied on macroscopic measurements of capillary breakthrough pressure and other petrophysical properties without direct examination of solid phases that line pore networks and directly contact fluids. However, pore-lining phases strongly contribute to sealing behavior through interfacial interactions among CO2, brine, and the mineral or non-mineral phases. Our high resolution (i.e., sub-micron) examination of the composition of pore-lining phases of several continental and marine mudstones indicates that sealing efficiency (i.e., breakthrough pressure) is governed by pore shapes and pore-lining phases that are not identifiable except through direct characterization of pores. Bulk X-ray diffraction data does not indicate which phases line the pores and may be especially lacking for mudstones with organic material. Organics can line pores and may represent once-mobile phases that modify the wettability of an originally clay-lined pore network. For shallow formations (i.e., < {approx}800 m depth), interfacial tension and contact angles result in breakthrough pressures that may be as high as those needed to fracture the rock - thus, in the absence of fractures, capillary sealing efficiency is indicated. Deeper seals have poorer capillary sealing if mica-like wetting dominates the wettability.

  19. Pore-lining composition and capillary breakthrough pressure of mudstone caprocks : sealing efficiency at geologic CO2 storage sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Nemer, Martin B.; McPherson, Brian J. O. L.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2010-12-01

    Subsurface containment of CO2 is predicated on effective caprock sealing. Many previous studies have relied on macroscopic measurements of capillary breakthrough pressure and other petrophysical properties without direct examination of solid phases that line pore networks and directly contact fluids. However, pore-lining phases strongly contribute to sealing behavior through interfacial interactions among CO2, brine, and the mineral or non-mineral phases. Our high resolution (i.e., sub-micron) examination of the composition of pore-lining phases of several continental and marine mudstones indicates that sealing efficiency (i.e., breakthrough pressure) is governed by pore shapes and pore-lining phases that are not identifiable except through direct characterization of pores. Bulk X-ray diffraction data does not indicate which phases line the pores and may be especially lacking for mudstones with organic material. Organics can line pores and may represent once-mobile phases that modify the wettability of an originally clay-lined pore network. For shallow formations (i.e., < {approx}800 m depth), interfacial tension and contact angles result in breakthrough pressures that may be as high as those needed to fracture the rock - thus, in the absence of fractures, capillary sealing efficiency is indicated. Deeper seals have poorer capillary sealing if mica-like wetting dominates the wettability. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and the Southeast and Southwest Carbon Sequestration Partnerships for supporting this work.

  20. Ekpyrotic loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2013-08-01

    We consider the ekpyrotic paradigm in the context of loop quantum cosmology. In loop quantum cosmology the classical big-bang singularity is resolved due to quantum gravity effects, and so the contracting ekpyrotic branch of the universe and its later expanding phase are connected by a smooth bounce. Thus, it is possible to explicitly determine the evolution of scalar perturbations, from the contracting ekpyrotic phase through the bounce and to the post-bounce expanding epoch. The possibilities of having either one or two scalar fields have been suggested for the ekpyrotic universe, and both cases will be considered here. In the case of a single scalar field, the constant mode of the curvature perturbations after the bounce is found to have a blue spectrum. On the other hand, for the two scalar field ekpyrotic model where scale-invariant entropy perturbations source additional terms in the curvature perturbations, the power spectrum in the post-bounce expanding cosmology is shown to be nearly scale-invariant and so agrees with observations.

  1. Accelerating the loop expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-07-29

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi/sup 4/ theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs.

  2. PORE STRUCTURE MODEL OF CEMENT HYDRATES CONSIDERING PORE WATER CONTENT AND REACTION PROCESS UNDER ARBITRARY HUMIDITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikura, Yusuke; Oshita, Hideki

    A simulation model to estimate the pore structure of cement hydrates by curing in arbitrary relative humidity is presented. This paper describes procedures for predicting phase compositions based on the classical hydration model of Portland cement, calculating the particle size distribution of constituent phases and evaluating the pore size distribution by stereological and statistical considerations. And to estimate the water content in pore structure under any relative humidity, we proposed the simulation model of adsorption isotherm model based on the pore structure. To evaluate the effectiveness of this model, simulation results were compared with experimental results of the pore size distribution measured by mercury porosimetry. As a result, it was found that the experimental and simulated results were in close agreement, and the simulated results indicated characterization of the po re structure of cement hydrates.

  3. Emulsion formation at the Pore-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. T.; Van Den Bos, P.; Berg, S.

    2012-12-01

    The use of surfactant cocktails to produce ultra-low interfacial tension between water and oil is an enhanced oil recovery method. In phase behavior tests three distinct emulsion phases are observed: (1) oil-in-water emulsion; (2) microemulsion; and (3) water-in-oil emulsion. However, it is unknown how phase behavior manifests at the pore-scale in a porous media system. What is the time scale needed for microemulsion formation? Where in the pore-space do the microemulsions form? And in what order do the different emulsion phases arrange during oil bank formation? To answer these questions micromodel experiments were conducted. These experiments are used to build a conceptual model for phase behavior at the pore-scale.

  4. Modeling Soil Pore Oxygen in Restored Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubol, S.; Loecke, T.; Burgin, A. J.; Franz, T.

    2015-12-01

    Soil pore oxygen (O2) is usually modeled indirectly as a function of soil moisture. However, using soil moisture to describe the oxic /anoxic status of a soil may not be sufficient accurate, especially when soil pore O2 rapidly changes, as following hydrological forcing. As first step, we use the dataset collected in the constructed wetland near Dayton, OH, by Loecke and Burgin, to reconstruct the environmental functions and re-aeration status of the soil. The dataset consist of 24 Apogee sensors and 24 soil moisture and temperature sensors located at 10 cm depth in upland, transitional and submerged zone (see Figure 1). Data were recorded over two years at temporal interval of 30 minutes. Then, we explore the capability of existing biogeochemical models to predict metabolic activity and the soil pore O2. Figure1: Restored wetland field site with soil O2 sensors (yellow stars) in upland (red), transitional (green) and submerged (blue) zones.

  5. Optical detection of pores in adipocyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanina, I. Yu.; Doubrovski, V. A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    Structures that can be interpreted as cytoplasm droplets leaking through the membrane are experimentally detected on the membranes of adipocytes using optical digital microscopy. The effect of an aqueous alcohol solution of brilliant green on the amount and sizes of structures is studied. It is demonstrated that the optical irradiation of the adipocytes that are sensitized with the aid of the brilliant green leads to an increase in the amount of structures (pores) after the irradiation. The experimental results confirm the existence of an earlier-proposed effect of photochemical action on the sensitized cells of adipose tissue that involves additional formation of pores in the membrane of the sensitized cell under selective optical irradiation. The proposed method for the detection of micropores in the membrane of adipose tissue based on the detection of the cytoplasm droplets leaking from the cell can be considered as a method for the optical detection of nanosized pores.

  6. Pore structure analysis of American coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, D.P.; Smith, D.M.; Stermer, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The pore structure of 19 American coals, representing a wide range of rank and geographic origin, has been studied via gas adsorption, mercury porosimetry, helium displacement and NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements. Nitrogen adsorption at 77 K was used to determine surface area in the pore range of r/sub p/ > approx. = 1nm and carbon dioxide adsorption at 273 K was used to obtain the total surface area. Porosimetry results were complicated by inter-particle void filling, surface roughness/porosity and sample compression. By employing a range of particle sizes, information concerning the relative magnitude of these mechanisms was ascertained as a function of pressure. Spin-lattice relaxation measurements of water contained in saturated coal were used to find pore size distributions over a broad range of T/sub 1/, the spin-lattice relaxation time. Good qualitative agreement was obtained between these measurements and gas adsorption/condensation results. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Scaling Soil Microbe-Water Interactions from Pores to Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, S.; Katul, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial scales relevant to soil microbial activity are much finer than scales relevant to whole-ecosystem function and biogeochemical cycling. On the one hand, how to link such different scales and develop scale-aware biogeochemical and ecohydrological models remains a major challenge. On the other hand, resolving these linkages is becoming necessary for testing ecological hypotheses and resolving data-theory inconsistencies. Here, the relation between microbial respiration and soil moisture expressed in water potential is explored. Such relation mediates the water availability effects on ecosystem-level heterotrophic respiration and is of paramount importance for understanding CO2 emissions under increasingly variable rainfall regimes. Respiration has been shown to decline as the soil dries in a remarkably consistent way across climates and soil types (open triangles in Figure). Empirical models based on these respiration-moisture relations are routinely used in Earth System Models to predict moisture effects on ecosystem respiration. It has been hypothesized that this consistency in microbial respiration decline is due to breakage of water film continuity causing in turn solute diffusion limitations in dry conditions. However, this hypothesis appears to be at odds with what is known about soil hydraulic properties. Water film continuity estimated from soil water retention (SWR) measurements at the 'Darcy' scale breaks at far less negative water potential (<-0.1 MPa) levels than where microbial respiration ceases (approximately -15 MPa) as shown in the Figure (violet frequency distribution). Also, this threshold point inferred from SWR shows strong texture dependence, in contrast to the respiration curves. Employing theoretical tools from percolation theory, it is demonstrated that hydrological measurements can be spatially downscaled at a micro-level relevant to microbial activity. Such downscaling resolves the inconsistency between respiration thresholds and hydrological thresholds. This result, together with observations of residual microbial activity well below -15 MPa (dashed back curve in Figure), lends support to the hypothesis that soil microbes are substrate-limited in dry conditions.

  8. The pore dimensions of gramicidin A.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, O S; Goodfellow, J M; Wallace, B A

    1993-01-01

    The ion channel forming peptide gramicidin A adopts a number of distinct conformations in different environments. We have developed a new method to analyze and display the pore dimensions of ion channels. The procedure is applied to two x-ray crystal structures of gramicidin that adopt distinct antiparallel double helical dimer conformations and a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure for the beta6.3 NH2-terminal to NH2-terminal dimer. The results are discussed with reference to ion conductance properties and dependence of pore dimensions on the environment. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:7508762

  9. Computer Simulations of Interstitial Loop Growth Kinetics in irradiated bcc Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Deng, Huiqiu; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-08-01

    The growth kinetics of (001) [001] interstitial loops in bcc Fe is studied by phase-field modeling. The effect of defect (vacancy/interstitial) concentration, generation, recombination, sink strength, and elastic interaction on the growth kinetics of interstitial loops is systematically simulated. Results show that the elastic interaction between the defects and interstitial loops speeds up the growth kinetics and affects the morphology of the interstitial loops. Linear growth rate, i.e., the loop average radius is linear to time, under both aging and irradiation are predicted, which is in agreement with experimental observation. The results also show that the interstitial loop growth rate, which is directly related to the sink strength of the interstitial loop for interstitials, increases linearly with the initial interstitial concentration during aging while changing logarithmically with the interstitial generation rate under irradiation.

  10. The double loop mattress suture

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone, John; Samuel, Madan; Creagh, Terry; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    An interrupted stitch type with favorable tissue characteristics will reduce local wound complications. We describe a novel high-strength, low-tension repair for the interrupted closure of skin, cartilage, and muscle, the double loop mattress stitch, and compare it experimentally with other interrupted closure methods. The performance of the double loop mattress technique in porcine cartilage and skeletal muscle is compared with the simple, mattress, and loop mattress interrupted sutures in both a novel porcine loading chamber and mechanical model. Wound apposition is assessed by electron microscopy. The performance of the double loop mattress in vivo was confirmed using a series of 805 pediatric laparotomies/laparoscopies. The double loop mattress suture is 3.5 times stronger than the loop mattress in muscle and 1.6 times stronger in cartilage (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, the double loop mattress reduces tissue tension by 66% compared with just 53% for the loop mattress (p ≤ 0.001). Wound gapping is equal, and wound eversion appears significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) compared with the loop mattress in vitro. In vivo, the double loop mattress performs as well as the loop mattress and significantly better than the mattress stitch in assessments of wound eversion and dehiscence. There were no episodes of stitch extrusion in our series of patients. The mechanical advantage of its intrinsic pulley arrangement gives the double loop mattress its favorable properties. Wound dehiscence is reduced because this stitch type is stronger and exerts less tension on the tissue than the mattress stitch. We advocate the use of this novel stitch wherever a high-strength, low-tension repair is required. These properties will enhance wound repair, and its application will be useful to surgeons of all disciplines. PMID:24698436

  11. Pore-Scale Modeling of Pore Structure Effects on P-Wave Scattering Attenuation in Dry Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  12. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  13. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  14. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  15. Heating Profiles of Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Joseph; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Martens, Petrus C.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the temperature and density profiles of coronal loops, as a function of their length, using data from SDO/AIA and Hinode/EIS. The analysis considers the location of the heating along the loop's length, and we conduct a more throrough investigation of our previous preliminary result that heating is concentrated near the loop footpoints. The work now features a larger selection of coronal loops, compared to our previous presentations, and examines their scale-height temperatures to ascertain the extent to which they are hydrostatic.

  16. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  17. Unstable anisotropic loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2009-09-15

    We study stability conditions of the full Hamiltonian constraint equation describing the quantum dynamics of the diagonal Bianchi I model in the context of loop quantum cosmology. Our analysis has shown robust evidence of an instability in the explicit implementation of the difference equation, implying important consequences for the correspondence between the full loop quantum gravity theory and loop quantum cosmology. As a result, one may question the choice of the quantization approach, the model of lattice refinement, and/or the role of the ambiguity parameters; all these should, in principle, be dictated by the full loop quantum gravity theory.

  18. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations. PMID:26416747

  19. The Effect of Nonspecific Binding of Lambda Repressor on DNA Looping Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; Zurla, Chiara; Dunlap, David D.; Finzi, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The λ repressor (CI) protein-induced DNA loop maintains stable lysogeny, yet allows efficient switching to lysis. Herein, the kinetics of loop formation and breakdown has been characterized at various concentrations of protein using tethered particle microscopy and a novel, to our knowledge, method of analysis. Our results show that a broad distribution of rate constants and complex kinetics underlie loop formation and breakdown. In addition, comparison of the kinetics of looping in wild-type DNA and DNA with mutated o3 operators showed that these sites may trigger nucleation of nonspecific binding at the closure of the loop. The average activation energy calculated from the rate constant distribution is consistent with a model in which nonspecific binding of CI between the operators shortens their effective separation, thereby lowering the energy barrier for loop formation and broadening the rate constant distribution for looping. Similarly, nonspecific binding affects the kinetics of loop breakdown by increasing the number of loop-securing protein interactions, and broadens the rate constant distribution for this reaction. Therefore, simultaneous increase of the rate constant for loop formation and reduction of that for loop breakdown stabilizes lysogeny. Given these simultaneous changes, the frequency of transitions between the looped and the unlooped state remains nearly constant. Although the loop becomes more stable thermodynamically with increasing CI concentration, it still opens periodically, conferring sensitivity to environmental changes, which may require switching to lytic conditions. PMID:23083719

  20. Idealized Shale Sorption Isotherm Measurements to Determine Pore Volume, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R.; Wang, B.; Aljama, H.; Rupp, E.; Wilcox, J.

    2014-12-01

    One method for mitigating the impacts of anthropogenic CO2-related climate change is the sequestration of CO2 in depleted gas and oil reservoirs, including shale. The accurate characterization of the heterogeneous material properties of shale, including pore volume, surface area, pore size distributions (PSDs) and composition is needed to understand the interaction of CO2 with shale. Idealized powdered shale sorption isotherms were created by varying incremental amounts of four essential components by weight. The first two components, organic carbon and clay, have been shown to be the most important components for CO2 uptake in shales. Organic carbon was represented by kerogen isolated from a Silurian shale, and clay groups were represented by illite from the Green River shale formation. The rest of the idealized shale was composed of equal parts by weight of SiO2 to represent quartz and CaCO3 to represent carbonate components. Baltic, Eagle Ford, and Barnett shale sorption measurements were used to validate the idealized samples. The idealized and validation shale sorption isotherms were measured volumetrically using low pressure N2 (77K) and CO2 (273K) adsorbates on a Quantachrome Autosorb IQ2. Gravimetric isotherms were also produced for a subset of these samples using CO2 and CH4adsorbates under subsurface temperature and pressure conditions using a Rubotherm magnetic suspension balance. Preliminary analyses were inconclusive in validating the idealized samples. This could be a result of conflicting reports of total organic carbon (TOC) content in each sample, a problem stemming from the heterogeneity of the samples and different techniques used for measuring TOC content. The TOC content of the validation samples (Eagle Ford and Barnett) was measured by Rock-Eval pyrolysis at Weatherford Laboratories, while the TOC content in the Baltic validation samples was determined by LECO TOC. Development of a uniform process for measuring TOC in the validation samples is

  1. Final Report for Subcontract B541028, Pore-Scale Modeling to Support "Pore Connectivity" Research Work

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R P

    2009-02-25

    This report covers modeling aspects of a combined experimental and modeling task in support of the DOE Science and Technology Program (formerly OSTI) within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). Research Objectives The research for this project dealt with diffusive retardation: solute moving through a fracture diffuses into and out of the rock matrix. This diffusive exchange retards overall solute movement, and retardation both dilutes waste being released, and allows additional decay. Diffusive retardation involves not only fracture conductivity and matrix diffusion, but also other issues and processes: contaminants may sorb to the rock matrix, fracture flow may be episodic, a given fracture may or may not flow depending on the volume of flow and the fracture's connection to the overall fracture network, the matrix imbibes water during flow episodes and dries between episodes, and so on. The objective of the project was to improve understanding of diffusive retardation of radionuclides due to fracture / matrix interactions. Results from combined experimental/modeling work were to (1) determine whether the current understanding and model representation of matrix diffusion is valid, (2) provide insights into the upscaling of laboratory-scale diffusion experiments, and (3) help in evaluating the impact on diffusive retardation of episodic fracture flow and pore connectivity in Yucca Mountain tuffs. Questions explored included the following: (1) What is the relationship between the diffusion coefficient measured at one scale, to that measured or observed at a different scale? In classical materials this relationship is trivial; in low-connectivity materials it is not. (2) Is the measured diffusivity insensitive to the shape of the sample? Again, in classical materials there should be no sample shape effect. (3) Does sorption affect diffusive exchange in low-connectivity media differently than in classical media? (4) What is the effect of matrix

  2. MAGNETIC RECONNECTION: FROM 'OPEN' EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LOOPS TO CLOSED POST-FLARE ONES OBSERVED BY SDO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Li, Leping; Jiang, Chaowei E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2013-10-10

    We employ Solar Dynamics Observatory observations and select three well-observed events including two flares and one extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) brightening. During the three events, the EUV loops clearly changed. One event was related to a major solar flare that took place on 2012 July 12 in active region NOAA AR 11520. 'Open' EUV loops rooted in a facula of the AR deflected to the post-flare loops and then merged with them while the flare ribbon approached the facula. Meanwhile, 'open' EUV loops rooted in a pore disappeared from top to bottom as the flare ribbon swept over the pore. The loop evolution was similar in the low-temperature channels (e.g., 171 Å) and the high-temperature channels (e.g., 94 Å). The coronal magnetic fields extrapolated from the photospheric vector magnetograms also show that the fields apparently 'open' prior to the flare become closed after it. The other two events were associated with a B1.1 flare on 2010 May 24 and an EUV brightening on 2013 January 03, respectively. During both of these two events, some 'open' loops either disappeared or darkened before the formation of new closed loops. We suggest that the observations reproduce the picture predicted by the standard magnetic reconnection model: 'open' magnetic fields become closed due to reconnection, manifesting as a transformation from 'open' EUV loops to closed post-flare ones.

  3. Loop-the-Loop: Bringing Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwonjandee, N.; Asavapibhop, B.

    2012-01-01

    During the Thai high-school physics teacher training programme, we used an aluminum loop-the-loop system built by the Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology (IPST) to demonstrate a circular motion and investigate the concept of the conservation of mechanical energy. There were 27 high-school teachers from three provinces,…

  4. Dynamic PID loop control

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  5. Influence of pore pressure and production-induced changes in pore pressure on in situ stress

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L.W.

    1996-02-01

    Knowledge of in situ stress and how stress changes with reservoir depletion and pore pressure drawdown is important in a multi-disciplinary approach to reservoir characterization, reservoir management, and improved oil recovery projects. This report summarizes a compilation of in situ stress data from six fields showing the effects of pore pressure and production-induced changes in pore pressure on the minimum horizontal stress. The in situ stress data and corresponding pore pressure data were obtained from field records of the operating companies and published reports. Horizontal stress was determined from closure pressure data of hydraulic fractures and leak-off tests. The stress measurements clearly demonstrate that the total minimum-horizontal stress is dependent on pore pressure. A decrease in pore pressure either by geologic processes or production of a reservoir will result in a decrease in the total minimum-horizontal stress. The magnitude of changes in stress state with net changes in pore pressure is dependent on local field conditions and cannot be accurately predicted by the uniaxial strain model that is commonly used by the petroleum industry.

  6. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study

  7. The RTX pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: progress and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, Travis J; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Members of the RTX family of protein toxins are functionally conserved among an assortment of bacterial pathogens. By disrupting host cell integrity through their pore-forming and cytolytic activities, this class of toxins allows pathogens to effectively tamper with normal host cell processes, promoting pathogenesis. Here, we focus on the biology of RTX toxins by describing salient properties of a prototype member, α-hemolysin, which is of ten encoded by strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. It has long been appreciated that RTX toxins can have distinct effects on host cells aside from outright lysis. Recently, advances in modeling and analysis of host–pathogen interactions have led to novel findings concerning the consequences of pore formation during host–pathogen interactions. We discuss current progress on longstanding questions concerning cell specificity and pore formation, new areas of investigation that involve toxin-mediated perturbations of host cell signaling cascades and perspectives on the future of RTX toxin investigation. PMID:23252494

  8. Loop-the-Loop: An Easy Experiment, A Challenging Explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asavapibhop, B.; Suwonjandee, N.

    2010-07-01

    A loop-the-loop built by the Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology (IPST) was used in Thai high school teachers training program to demonstrate a circular motion and investigate the concept of the conservation of mechanical energy. We took videos using high speed camera to record the motions of a spherical steel ball moving down the aluminum inclined track at different released positions. The ball then moved into the circular loop and underwent a projectile motion upon leaving the track. We then asked the teachers to predict the landing position of the ball if we changed the height of the whole loop-the-loop system. We also analyzed the videos using Tracker, a video analysis software. It turned out that most teachers did not realize the effect of the friction between the ball and the track and could not obtain the correct relationship hence their predictions were inconsistent with the actual landing positions of the ball.

  9. Pore-scale imaging and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko; Dong, Hu; Gharbi, Oussama; Iglauer, Stefan; Mostaghimi, Peyman; Paluszny, Adriana; Pentland, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Pore-scale imaging and modelling - digital core analysis - is becoming a routine service in the oil and gas industry, and has potential applications in contaminant transport and carbon dioxide storage. This paper briefly describes the underlying technology, namely imaging of the pore space of rocks from the nanometre scale upwards, coupled with a suite of different numerical techniques for simulating single and multiphase flow and transport through these images. Three example applications are then described, illustrating the range of scientific problems that can be tackled: dispersion in different rock samples that predicts the anomalous transport behaviour characteristic of highly heterogeneous carbonates; imaging of super-critical carbon dioxide in sandstone to demonstrate the possibility of capillary trapping in geological carbon storage; and the computation of relative permeability for mixed-wet carbonates and implications for oilfield waterflood recovery. The paper concludes by discussing limitations and challenges, including finding representative samples, imaging and simulating flow and transport in pore spaces over many orders of magnitude in size, the determination of wettability, and upscaling to the field scale. We conclude that pore-scale modelling is likely to become more widely applied in the oil industry including assessment of unconventional oil and gas resources. It has the potential to transform our understanding of multiphase flow processes, facilitating more efficient oil and gas recovery, effective contaminant removal and safe carbon dioxide storage.

  10. Pore collapse in an energetic material from the micro-scale to the macro-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther Jackson, Thomas; Buckmaster, John David; Zhang, Ju; Anderson, Michael James

    2015-05-01

    We examine a pore in an energetic material whose collapse following the passage of a strong genesis shock wave, the subsequent ignition of reactive gases within it produced by pyrolysis at the pore boundary, and the emission of shock waves as a consequence of this ignition, can lead to a detonation. The interest in such a problem arises from the interest in knowing the sensitivity and therefore the safe-handling protocol of energetic materials. We follow the initial pore collapse, before melting occurs, using rational analytical strategies, but to describe the later stages, with full coupling between the physics in the condensate and those in the pore cavity, we describe a numerical strategy. The results provide a description of the power deposition into the energetic material and lead to a power deposition model for the macro-scale, one that encompasses a number of pores. For suitable parameter choices, shock waves generated by the pores interact to form a detonation upstream of the genesis shock.

  11. Structural insights into the oligomerization and architecture of eukaryotic membrane pore-forming toxins.

    PubMed

    Mechaly, Ariel E; Bellomio, Augusto; Gil-Cartón, David; Morante, Koldo; Valle, Mikel; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Guérin, Diego M A

    2011-02-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are proteins that are secreted as soluble molecules and are inserted into membranes to form oligomeric transmembrane pores. In this paper, we report the crystal structure of Fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a PFT isolated from the sea anemone Actinia fragacea, at 1.8 Å resolution. It consists of a crown-shaped nonamer with an external diameter of about 11.0 nm and an internal diameter of approximately 5.0 nm. Cryoelectron microscopy studies of FraC in lipid bilayers reveal the pore structure that traverses the membrane. The shape and dimensions of the crystallographic oligomer are fully consistent with the membrane pore. The FraC structure provides insight into the interactions governing the assembly process and suggests the structural changes that allow for membrane insertion. We propose a nonameric pore model that spans the membrane by forming a lipid-free α-helical bundle pore. PMID:21300287

  12. Phase transitions in a 3 dimensional lattice loop gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Richard; Nebia-Rahal, F.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2010-06-01

    We investigate, via Monte Carlo simulations, the phase structure of a system of closed, nonintersecting but otherwise noninteracting, loops in 3 Euclidean dimensions. The loops correspond to closed trajectories of massive particles and we find a phase transition as a function of their mass. We identify the order parameter as the average length of the loops at equilibrium. This order parameter exhibits a sharp increase as the mass is decreased through a critical value, the behavior seems to be a crossover transition. We believe that the model represents an effective description of the broken-symmetry sector of the 2+1 dimensional Abelian Higgs model, in the extreme strong coupling limit. The massive gauge bosons and the neutral scalars are decoupled, and the relevant low-lying excitations correspond to vortices and antivortices. The functional integral can be approximated by a sum over simple, closed vortex loop configurations. We present a novel fashion to generate nonintersecting closed loops, starting from a tetrahedral tessellation of three space. The two phases that we find admit the following interpretation: the usual Higgs phase and a novel phase which is heralded by the appearance of effectively infinitely long loops. We compute the expectation value of the Wilson loop operator and that of the Polyakov loop operator. The Wilson loop exhibits perimeter law behavior in both phases implying that the transition corresponds neither to the restoration of symmetry nor to confinement. The effective interaction between external charges is screened in both phases, however there is a dramatic increase in the polarization cloud in the novel phase as shown by the energy shift introduced by the Wilson loop.

  13. Functions of the Periplasmic Loop of the Porin MspA from Mycobacterium smegmatis*

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Jason; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Sukumaran, Suja; Niederweis, Michael

    2009-01-01

    MspA is the major porin of Mycobacterium smegmatis and mediates diffusion of small and hydrophilic solutes across the outer membrane. The octameric structure of MspA, its sharply defined constriction zone, and a large periplasmic loop L6 represent novel structural features. L6 consists of 13 amino acids and is directly adjacent to the constriction zone. Deletion of 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 amino acids of the L6 loop resulted in functional pores that restored glucose uptake and growth of a porin mutant of M. smegmatis. Lipid bilayer experiments revealed that all mutant channels were noisier than wild type (wt) MspA, indicating that L6 is required for pore stability in vitro. Voltage gating of the Escherichia coli porin OmpF was attributed to loops that collapse into the channel in response to a strong electrical field. Here, we show that deletion mutants Δ7, Δ9, and Δ11 had critical voltages similar to wt MspA. This demonstrated that the L6 loop is not the primary voltage-dependent gating mechanism of MspA. Surprisingly, large deletions in L6 resulted in 3-6-fold less extractable pores, whereas small deletions did not alter expression levels of MspA. Pores with large deletions in L6 were more permissive for glucose than smaller deletion mutants, whereas their single channel conductance was similar to that of wt MspA. These results indicate that translocation of ions through the MspA pore is governed by different mechanisms than that of neutral solutes. This is the first study identifying a molecular determinant of solute translocation in a mycobacterial porin. PMID:19208627

  14. Functions of the periplasmic loop of the porin MspA from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Huff, Jason; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Sukumaran, Suja; Niederweis, Michael

    2009-04-10

    MspA is the major porin of Mycobacterium smegmatis and mediates diffusion of small and hydrophilic solutes across the outer membrane. The octameric structure of MspA, its sharply defined constriction zone, and a large periplasmic loop L6 represent novel structural features. L6 consists of 13 amino acids and is directly adjacent to the constriction zone. Deletion of 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 amino acids of the L6 loop resulted in functional pores that restored glucose uptake and growth of a porin mutant of M. smegmatis. Lipid bilayer experiments revealed that all mutant channels were noisier than wild type (wt) MspA, indicating that L6 is required for pore stability in vitro. Voltage gating of the Escherichia coli porin OmpF was attributed to loops that collapse into the channel in response to a strong electrical field. Here, we show that deletion mutants Delta7, Delta9, and Delta11 had critical voltages similar to wt MspA. This demonstrated that the L6 loop is not the primary voltage-dependent gating mechanism of MspA. Surprisingly, large deletions in L6 resulted in 3-6-fold less extractable pores, whereas small deletions did not alter expression levels of MspA. Pores with large deletions in L6 were more permissive for glucose than smaller deletion mutants, whereas their single channel conductance was similar to that of wt MspA. These results indicate that translocation of ions through the MspA pore is governed by different mechanisms than that of neutral solutes. This is the first study identifying a molecular determinant of solute translocation in a mycobacterial porin. PMID:19208627

  15. Cryo-EM structure of aerolysin variants reveals a novel protein fold and the pore-formation process.

    PubMed

    Iacovache, Ioan; De Carlo, Sacha; Cirauqui, Nuria; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F Gisou; Zuber, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their pathogenical role and unique ability to exist both as soluble proteins and transmembrane complexes, pore-forming toxins (PFTs) have been a focus of microbiologists and structural biologists for decades. PFTs are generally secreted as water-soluble monomers and subsequently bind the membrane of target cells. Then, they assemble into circular oligomers, which undergo conformational changes that allow membrane insertion leading to pore formation and potentially cell death. Aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, is the founding member of a major PFT family found throughout all kingdoms of life. We report cryo-electron microscopy structures of three conformational intermediates and of the final aerolysin pore, jointly providing insight into the conformational changes that allow pore formation. Moreover, the structures reveal a protein fold consisting of two concentric β-barrels, tightly kept together by hydrophobic interactions. This fold suggests a basis for the prion-like ultrastability of aerolysin pore and its stoichiometry. PMID:27405240

  16. Cryo-EM structure of aerolysin variants reveals a novel protein fold and the pore-formation process

    PubMed Central

    Iacovache, Ioan; De Carlo, Sacha; Cirauqui, Nuria; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Zuber, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their pathogenical role and unique ability to exist both as soluble proteins and transmembrane complexes, pore-forming toxins (PFTs) have been a focus of microbiologists and structural biologists for decades. PFTs are generally secreted as water-soluble monomers and subsequently bind the membrane of target cells. Then, they assemble into circular oligomers, which undergo conformational changes that allow membrane insertion leading to pore formation and potentially cell death. Aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, is the founding member of a major PFT family found throughout all kingdoms of life. We report cryo-electron microscopy structures of three conformational intermediates and of the final aerolysin pore, jointly providing insight into the conformational changes that allow pore formation. Moreover, the structures reveal a protein fold consisting of two concentric β-barrels, tightly kept together by hydrophobic interactions. This fold suggests a basis for the prion-like ultrastability of aerolysin pore and its stoichiometry. PMID:27405240

  17. Cryo-EM structure of aerolysin variants reveals a novel protein fold and the pore-formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovache, Ioan; de Carlo, Sacha; Cirauqui, Nuria; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Zuber, Benoît

    2016-07-01

    Owing to their pathogenical role and unique ability to exist both as soluble proteins and transmembrane complexes, pore-forming toxins (PFTs) have been a focus of microbiologists and structural biologists for decades. PFTs are generally secreted as water-soluble monomers and subsequently bind the membrane of target cells. Then, they assemble into circular oligomers, which undergo conformational changes that allow membrane insertion leading to pore formation and potentially cell death. Aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, is the founding member of a major PFT family found throughout all kingdoms of life. We report cryo-electron microscopy structures of three conformational intermediates and of the final aerolysin pore, jointly providing insight into the conformational changes that allow pore formation. Moreover, the structures reveal a protein fold consisting of two concentric β-barrels, tightly kept together by hydrophobic interactions. This fold suggests a basis for the prion-like ultrastability of aerolysin pore and its stoichiometry.

  18. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study

    PubMed Central

    Flament, Frederic; Francois, Ghislain; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Hanaya, Tomoo; Batisse, Dominique; Cointereau-Chardon, Suzy; Seixas, Mirela Donato Gianeti; Dal Belo, Susi Elaine; Bazin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Skin pores (SP), as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc) that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage) on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 μm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm2) and determination of their respective sizes in mm2. Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage) that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1) were recorded in all studied subjects; 2) varied greatly with ethnicity; 3) plateaued with age in most cases; and 4) globally refected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having “enlarged pores” like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly distinct from other ethnicities in having very low density and sizes. Analyzing the present results suggests that facial skin pore’s morphology as perceived by human eye less result from functional criteria of associated appendages such as sebaceous glands. To what extent skin pores may be viewed as additional criteria of a photo-altered skin is an issue to be further addressed. PMID:25733918

  19. Assembly of the Bak Apoptotic Pore

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Stephen; Hockings, Colin; Anwari, Khatira; Kratina, Tobias; Fennell, Stephanie; Lazarou, Michael; Ryan, Michael T.; Kluck, Ruth M.; Dewson, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Bak and Bax are the essential effectors of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Following an apoptotic stimulus, both undergo significant changes in conformation that facilitates their self-association to form pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane. However, the molecular structures of Bak and Bax oligomeric pores remain elusive. To characterize how Bak forms pores during apoptosis, we investigated its oligomerization under native conditions using blue native PAGE. We report that, in a healthy cell, inactive Bak is either monomeric or in a large complex involving VDAC2. Following an apoptotic stimulus, activated Bak forms BH3:groove homodimers that represent the basic stable oligomeric unit. These dimers multimerize to higher-order oligomers via a labile interface independent of both the BH3 domain and groove. Linkage of the α6:α6 interface is sufficient to stabilize higher-order Bak oligomers on native PAGE, suggesting an important role in the Bak oligomeric pore. Mutagenesis of the α6 helix disrupted apoptotic function because a chimera of Bak with the α6 derived from Bcl-2 could be activated by truncated Bid (tBid) and could form BH3:groove homodimers but could not form high molecular weight oligomers or mediate cell death. An α6 peptide could block Bak function but did so upstream of dimerization, potentially implicating α6 as a site for activation by BH3-only proteins. Our examination of native Bak oligomers indicates that the Bak apoptotic pore forms by the multimerization of BH3:groove homodimers and reveals that Bak α6 is not only important for Bak oligomerization and function but may also be involved in how Bak is activated by BH3-only proteins. PMID:23893415

  20. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal's structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties. A special NMR probe will be constructed which will allow the concurrent measurement of NMR properties and adsorption uptake at a variety of temperatures. All samples will be subjected to a suite of conventional'' pore structure analyses. These include nitrogen adsorption at 77 K with BET analysis, CO[sub 2] and CH[sub 4] adsorption at 273 K with D-R (Dubinin-Radushkevich) analysis, helium pycnometry, and small angle X-ray scattering as well as gas diffusion measurements.

  1. Syndapin 3 modulates fusion pore expansion in mouse neuroendocrine chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Samasilp, Prattana; Lopin, Kyle; Chan, Shyue-An; Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Adrenal neuroendocrine chromaffin cells receive excitatory synaptic input from the sympathetic nervous system and secrete hormones into the peripheral circulation. Under basal sympathetic tone, modest amounts of freely soluble catecholamine are selectively released through a restricted fusion pore formed between the secretory granule and the plasma membrane. Upon activation of the sympathoadrenal stress reflex, elevated stimulation drives fusion pore expansion, resulting in increased catecholamine secretion and facilitating release of copackaged peptide hormones. Thus regulated expansion of the secretory fusion pore is a control point for differential hormone release of the sympathoadrenal stress response. Previous work has shown that syndapin 1 deletion alters transmitter release and that the dynamin 1-syndapin 1 interaction is necessary for coupled endocytosis in neurons. Dynamin has also been shown to be involved in regulation of fusion pore expansion in neuroendocrine chromaffin cells through an activity-dependent association with syndapin. However, it is not known which syndapin isoform(s) contributes to pore dynamics in neuroendocrine cells. Nor is it known at what stage of the secretion process dynamin and syndapin associate to modulate pore expansion. Here we investigate the expression and localization of syndapin isoforms and determine which are involved in mediating fusion pore expansion. We show that all syndapin isoforms are expressed in the adrenal medulla. Mutation of the SH3 dynamin-binding domain of all syndapin isoforms shows that fusion pore expansion and catecholamine release are limited specifically by mutation of syndapin 3. The mutation also disrupts targeting of syndapin 3 to the cell periphery. Syndapin 3 exists in a persistent colocalized state with dynamin 1. PMID:24500282

  2. The Influence of Pores in Track Etched Membranes and Prepared on their Base Polymer/Metal Composites on their Fracture Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumirova, V. N.; Bedin, S. A.; Abdurashidova, G. S.; Razumovskaya, I. V.

    The strength of track etched membranes and prepared on their base polymer/metal composites is analysed in point of view of the pores form evolution during the extension and the interaction of elastic mechanical fields on closely positioned pores. The stress-strain curves for track membranes and composites PET/Cu are demonstrated for pore density 1.2×107сm-2 and diameters from 0.06 μm to 2.9 μm

  3. Wilson Loop Diagrams and Positroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Susama; Marin-Amat, Eloi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a new application of the positive Grassmannian to Wilson loop diagrams (or MHV diagrams) for scattering amplitudes in N= 4 Super Yang-Mill theory (N = 4 SYM). There has been much interest in studying this theory via the positive Grassmannians using BCFW recursion. This is the first attempt to study MHV diagrams for planar Wilson loop calculations (or planar amplitudes) in terms of positive Grassmannians. We codify Wilson loop diagrams completely in terms of matroids. This allows us to apply the combinatorial tools in matroid theory used to identify positroids (non-negative Grassmannians) to Wilson loop diagrams. In doing so, we find that certain non-planar Wilson loop diagrams define positive Grassmannians. While non-planar diagrams do not have physical meaning, this finding suggests that they may have value as an algebraic tool, and deserve further investigation.

  4. Higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The isotropic and homogeneous cosmological model in n+1 dimensions is quantized by the loop quantization method. Interestingly, we find that the underlying quantum theories are divided into two qualitatively different sectors according to spacetime dimensions. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of n+1 dimensional LQC are obtained. Moreover, our results indicate that the classical big bang singularity is resolved in arbitrary spacetime dimensions by a quantum bounce. We also briefly discuss the similarities and differences between the n+1 dimensional model and the 3+1 dimensional one. Our model serves as a first example of higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology and offers the possibility to investigate quantum gravity effects in higher dimensional cosmology.

  5. Loop-bed combustion apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Mei, Joseph S.; Slagle, Frank D.; Notestein, John E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a combustion apparatus in the configuration of a oblong annulus defining a closed loop. Particulate coal together with a sulfur sorbent such as sulfur or dolomite is introduced into the closed loop, ignited, and propelled at a high rate of speed around the loop. Flue gas is withdrawn from a location in the closed loop in close proximity to an area in the loop where centrifugal force imposed upon the larger particulate material maintains these particulates at a location spaced from the flue gas outlet. Only flue gas and smaller particulates resulting from the combustion and innerparticle grinding are discharged from the combustor. This structural arrangement provides increased combustion efficiency due to the essentially complete combustion of the coal particulates as well as increased sulfur absorption due to the innerparticle grinding of the sorbent which provides greater particle surface area.

  6. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The start-up transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe start-up behaviors. Topics include the four start-up scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the start-up scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power start-up, and methods to enhance the start-up success. Also addressed are the thermodynamic constraint between the evaporator and reservoir in the loop heat pipe operation, the superheat requirement for nucleate boiling, pressure spike and pressure surge during the start-up transient, and repeated cycles of loop start-up andshutdown under certain conditions.

  7. Quantification of fluid shear stress in bone tissue engineering scaffolds with spherical and cubical pore architectures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feihu; Vaughan, Ted J; McNamara, Laoise M

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that mechanical stimulation, in the form of fluid perfusion and mechanical compression, can enhance osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and bone cells within tissue engineering scaffolds in vitro. The precise nature of mechanical stimulation within tissue engineering scaffolds is not only dictated by the exogenously applied loading regime, but also depends on the geometric features of the scaffold, in particular architecture, pore size and porosity. However, the precise contribution of each geometric feature towards the resulting mechanical stimulation within a scaffold is difficult to characterise due to the wide range of interacting parameters. In this study, we have applied a fluid-structure interaction model to investigate the role of scaffold geometry (architecture, pore size and porosity) on pore wall shear stress (WSS) under a range of different loading scenarios: fluid perfusion, mechanical compression and a combination of perfusion and compression. It is found that scaffold geometry (spherical and cubical pores), in particular the pore size, has a significant influence on the stimulation within scaffolds. Furthermore, we observed an amplified WSS within scaffolds under a combination of fluid perfusion and mechanical compression, which exceeded that caused by individual fluid perfusion or mechanical compression approximately threefold. By conducting this comprehensive parametric variation study, an expression was generated to allow the design and optimisation of 3D TE scaffolds and inform experimental loading regimes so that a desired level of mechanical stimulation, in terms of WSS is generated within the scaffold. PMID:26224148

  8. Overview of Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    1999-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHP's) are two-phase heat transfer devices that utilize the evaporation and condensation of a working fluid to transfer heat, and the capillary forces developed in the porous wicks to circulate the fluid. The LHP was first developed in the former Soviet Union in the early 1980s, about the same time that the capillary pumped loop (CPL) was developed in the United States. The LHP is known for its high pumping capability and robust operation mainly due to the use of fine-pored metal wicks and an integral evaporator/hydro-accumulator design. The LHP technology is rapidly gaining acceptance in aerospace community. It is the baseline design for thermal control of several spacecraft, including NASA's GLAS and Chemistry, ESA's ATLID, CNES' STENTOR, RKA's OBZOR, and several commercial satellites. Numerous LHP papers have been published since the mid-1980's. Most papers presented test results and discussions on certain specific aspects of the LHP operation. LHP's and CPL's show many similarities in their operating principles and performance characteristics. However, they also display significant differences in many aspects of their operation. Some of the LHP behaviors may seem strange or mysterious, even to experienced CPL practitioners. The main purpose of this paper is to present a systematic description of the operating principles and thermal-hydraulic behaviors of LHP'S. LHP operating principles will be given first, followed by a description of the thermal-hydraulics involved in LHP operation. Operating characteristics and important parameters affecting the LHP operation will then be described in detail. Peculiar behaviors of the LHP, including temperature hysteresis and temperature overshoot during start-up, will be explained. For simplicity, most discussions will focus upon LHP's with a single evaporator and a single condenser, but devices with multiple evaporators and condensers will also be discussed. Similarities and differences between LHP's and

  9. Interactions of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Mark G.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We develop methods by which cosmic superstring interactions can be studied in detail. These include the reconnection probability and emission of radiation such as gravitons or small string loops. Loop corrections to these are discussed, as well as relationships to (p; q)-strings. These tools should allow a phenomenological study of string models in anticipation of upcoming experiments sensitive to cosmic string radiation.

  10. Pore size distribution and accessible pore size distribution in bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurovs, Richard; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell; Blach, Tomasz P

    2012-01-01

    The porosity and pore size distribution of coals determine many of their properties, from gas release to their behavior on carbonization, and yet most methods of determining pore size distribution can only examine a restricted size range. Even then, only accessible pores can be investigated with these methods. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) are increasingly used to characterize the size distribution of all of the pores non-destructively. Here we have used USANS/SANS to examine 24 well-characterized bituminous and subbituminous coals: three from the eastern US, two from Poland, one from New Zealand and the rest from the Sydney and Bowen Basins in Eastern Australia, and determined the relationships of the scattering intensity corresponding to different pore sizes with other coal properties. The range of pore radii examinable with these techniques is 2.5 nm to 7 {micro}m. We confirm that there is a wide range of pore sizes in coal. The pore size distribution was found to be strongly affected by both rank and type (expressed as either hydrogen or vitrinite content) in the size range 250 nm to 7 {micro}m and 5 to 10 nm, but weakly in intermediate regions. The results suggest that different mechanisms control coal porosity on different scales. Contrast-matching USANS and SANS were also used to determine the size distribution of the fraction of the pores in these coals that are inaccessible to deuterated methane, CD{sub 4}, at ambient temperature. In some coals most of the small ({approx} 10 nm) pores were found to be inaccessible to CD{sub 4} on the time scale of the measurement ({approx} 30 min - 16 h). This inaccessibility suggests that in these coals a considerable fraction of inherent methane may be trapped for extended periods of time, thus reducing the effectiveness of methane release from (or sorption by) these coals. Although the number of small pores was less in higher rank coals, the fraction of total

  11. Formation of chromosomal domains in interphase by loop extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey

    While genomes are often considered as one-dimensional sequences, interphase chromosomes are organized in three dimensions with an essential role for regulating gene expression. Recent studies have shown that Topologically Associating Domains (TADs) are fundamental structural and functional building blocks of human interphase chromosomes. Despite observations that architectural proteins, including CTCF, demarcate and maintain the borders of TADs, the mechanisms underlying TAD formation remain unknown. Here we propose that loop extrusion underlies the formation TADs. In this process, cis-acting loop-extruding factors, likely cohesins, form progressively larger loops, but stall at TAD boundaries due to interactions with boundary proteins, including CTCF. This process dynamically forms loops of various sizes within but not between TADs. Using polymer simulations, we find that loop extrusion can produce TADs as determined by our analyses of the highest-resolution experimental data. Moreover, we find that loop extrusion can explain many diverse experimental observations, including: the preferential orientation of CTCF motifs and enrichments of architectural proteins at TAD boundaries; TAD boundary deletion experiments; and experiments with knockdown or depletion of CTCF, cohesin, and cohesin-loading factors. Together, the emerging picture from our work is that TADs are formed by rapidly associating, growing, and dissociating loops, presenting a clear framework for understanding interphase chromosomal organization.

  12. Yang-Mills vacuum: An attempt of lattice loop calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, W.; Kolawa, A.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to derive and to solve the Schrodinger equation in the low energy region (vacuum, first excitation, etc.) of the Yang-Mills theory on the lattice. The complete orthonormal basis in the physical Hilbert space is constructed by classifying independent solutions of Gauss's law. Loops of electric flux are chosen as elementary variables. The loop space Hamiltonian is derived, an ansatz is made for the low energy wave functionals and the Schrodinger equation is solved in the (truncated) loop basis. The resulting physical picture for the Yang-Mills vacuum in the cross-over region is that of, still quite dilute, gas of fluctuating loops. Definite candidate for the confining force emerges: the repulsive non-abelian loop-loop interaction (rather weak but persistent) generates an effective external field (''external pressure'') prohibiting unbounded loop size fluctuations. The negative sign (repulsion) is universal for all compact groups. Preliminary numerical results, so far mainly of illustrative character, are presented. 8 refs., 22 figs.

  13. Direct Measurement of Pore Dynamics and Leakage Induced by a Model Antimicrobial Peptide in Single Vesicles and Cells.

    PubMed

    Burton, Matthew G; Huang, Qi M; Hossain, Mohammed A; Wade, John D; Palombo, Enzo A; Gee, Michelle L; Clayton, Andrew H A

    2016-06-28

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising therapeutic alternatives to counter growing antimicrobial resistance. Their precise mechanism of action remains elusive, however, particularly with respect to live bacterial cells. We investigated the interaction of a fluorescent melittin analogue with single giant unilamellar vesicles, giant multilamellar vesicles, and bilamellar Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Time-lapse fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was employed to determine the population distribution of the fluorescent melittin analogue between pore state and membrane surface state, and simultaneously measure the leakage of entrapped fluorescent species from the vesicle (or bacterium) interior. In giant unilamellar vesicles, leakage from vesicle interior was correlated with an increase in level of pore states, consistent with a stable pore formation mechanism. In giant multilamellar vesicles, vesicle leakage occurred more gradually and did not appear to correlate with increased pore states. Instead pore levels remained at a low steady-state level, which is more in line with coupled equilibria. Finally, in single bacterial cells, significant increases in pore levels were observed over time, which were correlated with only partial loss of cytosolic contents. These observations suggested that pore formation, as opposed to complete dissolution of membrane, was responsible for the leakage of contents in these systems, and that the bacterial membrane has an adaptive capacity that resists peptide attack. We interpret the three distinct pore dynamics regimes in the context of the increasing physical and biological complexity of the membranes. PMID:27281288

  14. Dissecting protein-induced DNA looping dynamics in real time

    PubMed Central

    Laurens, Niels; Bellamy, Stuart R. W.; Harms, August F.; Kovacheva, Yana S.; Halford, Stephen E.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Many proteins that interact with DNA perform or enhance their specific functions by binding simultaneously to multiple target sites, thereby inducing a loop in the DNA. The dynamics and energies involved in this loop formation influence the reaction mechanism. Tethered particle motion has proven a powerful technique to study in real time protein-induced DNA looping dynamics while minimally perturbing the DNA–protein interactions. In addition, it permits many single-molecule experiments to be performed in parallel. Using as a model system the tetrameric Type II restriction enzyme SfiI, that binds two copies of its recognition site, we show here that we can determine the DNA–protein association and dissociation steps as well as the actual process of protein-induced loop capture and release on a single DNA molecule. The result of these experiments is a quantitative reaction scheme for DNA looping by SfiI that is rigorously compared to detailed biochemical studies of SfiI looping dynamics. We also present novel methods for data analysis and compare and discuss these with existing methods. The general applicability of the introduced techniques will further enhance tethered particle motion as a tool to follow DNA–protein dynamics in real time. PMID:19586932

  15. One-loop corrections to vector Galileon theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmchi, Farid; Haghani, Zahra; Shahidi, Shahab; Shahkarami, Leila

    2016-06-01

    The effective action of the recently proposed vector Galileon theory is considered. Using the background field method, we obtain the one-loop correction to the propagator of the Proca field from vector Galileon self-interactions. Contrary to the so-called scalar Galileon interactions, the two-point function of the vector field gets renormalized at the one-loop level, indicating that there is no nonrenormalization theorem in the vector Galileon theory. Using dimensional regularization, we remove the divergences and obtain the counterterms of the theory. The finite term is analytically calculated, which modifies the propagator and the mass term and generates some new terms also.

  16. Coupled movement of permeant and blocking ions in the CFTR chloride channel pore

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiandi; Linsdell, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel pore is blocked in a voltage-dependent manner by a broad range of anionic substances added to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Here we investigate the origin of the voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2−, a highly permeant lyotropic anion which also acts as a high-affinity blocker of Cl− permeation. Not only the affinity, but also the voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2− ions is strongly dependent on extracellular Cl− concentration; following replacement of most extracellular Cl− by glucose or by impermeant anions, block by Au(CN)2− shows greatly weakened voltage dependence. This suggests that coupled movement of Au(CN)2− and Cl− ions within the pore contributes to the voltage dependence of block. This explanation requires that interactions between different anions take place within the pore, implying simultaneous binding of multiple anions to intrapore sites. Other anions are able to substitute for extracellular Cl− and interact with intracellular Au(CN)2− ions. Analysis of the effects of different extracellular anions on the apparent affinity and voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2− ions suggests that extracellular anions do not need to permeate through the channel in order to destabilize Au(CN)2− binding within the pore, implying that this destabilizing effect results from binding to an externally accessible site in the permeation pathway. We propose that multiple anions can bind simultaneously within the CFTR channel pore, and that repulsive interactions between bound anions speeds anion exit from the pore. PMID:12679371

  17. Coupled movement of permeant and blocking ions in the CFTR chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiandi; Linsdell, Paul

    2003-06-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel pore is blocked in a voltage-dependent manner by a broad range of anionic substances added to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Here we investigate the origin of the voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2-, a highly permeant lyotropic anion which also acts as a high-affinity blocker of Cl- permeation. Not only the affinity, but also the voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2- ions is strongly dependent on extracellular Cl- concentration; following replacement of most extracellular Cl- by glucose or by impermeant anions, block by Au(CN)2- shows greatly weakened voltage dependence. This suggests that coupled movement of Au(CN)2- and Cl- ions within the pore contributes to the voltage dependence of block. This explanation requires that interactions between different anions take place within the pore, implying simultaneous binding of multiple anions to intrapore sites. Other anions are able to substitute for extracellular Cl- and interact with intracellular Au(CN)2- ions. Analysis of the effects of different extracellular anions on the apparent affinity and voltage dependence of block by intracellular Au(CN)2- ions suggests that extracellular anions do not need to permeate through the channel in order to destabilize Au(CN)2- binding within the pore, implying that this destabilizing effect results from binding to an externally accessible site in the permeation pathway. We propose that multiple anions can bind simultaneously within the CFTR channel pore, and that repulsive interactions between bound anions speeds anion exit from the pore. PMID:12679371

  18. Signal Transduction to the Permeability Transition Pore

    PubMed Central

    Rasola, Andrea; Sciacovelli, Marco; Pantic, Boris; Bernardi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The permeability transition pore (PTP) is an inner mitochondrial membrane channel that has been thoroughly characterized functionally, yet remains an elusive molecular entity. The best characterized PTP-regulatory component, cyclophilin (CyP) D, is a matrix protein that favors pore opening. CyP inhibitors, CyPD null animals, and in situ PTP readouts have established the role of PTP as an effector mechanism of cell death, and the growing definition of PTP signaling mechanisms. This review briefly covers the functional features of the PTP and the role played by its dysregulation in disease pathogenesis. Recent progress on PTP modulation by kinase/phosphatase signal transduction is discussed, with specific emphasis on hexokinase and on the Akt-ERK-GSK3 axis, which might modulate the PTP through CyPD phosphorylation. PMID:20153328

  19. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular

  20. Pores and Void in Asclepiades' Physical Theory.

    PubMed

    Leith, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a fundamental, though relatively understudied, aspect of the physical theory of the physician Asclepiades of Bithynia, namely his doctrine of pores. My principal thesis is that this doctrine is dependent on a conception of void taken directly from Epicurean physics. The paper falls into two parts: the first half addresses the evidence for the presence of void in Asclepiades' theory, and concludes that his conception of void was basically that of Epicurus; the second half focuses on the precise nature of Asclepiadean pores, and seeks to show that they represent void interstices between the primary particles of matter which are the constituents of the human body, and are thus exactly analogous to the void interstices between atoms within solid objects in Epicurus' theory. PMID:22984299

  1. Pores and Void in Asclepiades’ Physical Theory

    PubMed Central

    Leith, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a fundamental, though relatively understudied, aspect of the physical theory of the physician Asclepiades of Bithynia, namely his doctrine of pores. My principal thesis is that this doctrine is dependent on a conception of void taken directly from Epicurean physics. The paper falls into two parts: the first half addresses the evidence for the presence of void in Asclepiades’ theory, and concludes that his conception of void was basically that of Epicurus; the second half focuses on the precise nature of Asclepiadean pores, and seeks to show that they represent void interstices between the primary particles of matter which are the constituents of the human body, and are thus exactly analogous to the void interstices between atoms within solid objects in Epicurus’ theory. PMID:22984299

  2. Structures of Lysenin Reveal a Shared Evolutionary Origin for Pore-Forming Proteins And Its Mode of Sphingomyelin Recognition

    PubMed Central

    De Colibus, Luigi; Sonnen, Andreas F.-P.; Morris, Keith J.; Siebert, C. Alistair; Abrusci, Patrizia; Plitzko, Jürgen; Hodnik, Vesna; Leippe, Matthias; Volpi, Emanuela; Anderluh, Gregor; Gilbert, Robert J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pore-forming proteins insert from solution into membranes to create lesions, undergoing a structural rearrangement often accompanied by oligomerization. Lysenin, a pore-forming toxin from the earthworm Eisenia fetida, specifically interacts with sphingomyelin (SM) and may confer innate immunity against parasites by attacking their membranes to form pores. SM has important roles in cell membranes and lysenin is a popular SM-labeling reagent. The structure of lysenin suggests common ancestry with other pore-forming proteins from a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The complex with SM shows the mode of its recognition by a protein in which both the phosphocholine headgroup and one acyl tail are specifically bound. Lipid interaction studies and assays using viable target cells confirm the functional reliance of lysenin on this form of SM recognition. PMID:22819216

  3. Solution NMR analysis of the interaction between the actinoporin sticholysin I and DHPC micelles--correlation with backbone dynamics.

    PubMed

    López-Castilla, Aracelys; Pazos, Fabiola; Schreier, Shirley; Pires, José Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    Sticholysin I (StI), an actinoporin expressed as a water-soluble protein by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, binds to natural and model membranes, forming oligomeric pores. It is proposed that the first event of a multistep pore formation mechanism consists of the monomeric protein attachment to the lipid bilayer. To date there is no high-resolution structure of the actinoporin pore or other membrane-bound form available. Here we evaluated StI:micelle complexes of variable lipid composition to look for a suitable model for NMR studies. Micelles of pure or mixed lysophospholipids and of dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) were examined. The StI:DHPC micelle was found to be the best system, yielding a stable sample and good quality spectra. A comprehensive chemical shift perturbation analysis was performed to map the StI membrane recognition site in the presence of DHPC micelles. The region mapped (residues F(51), R(52), S(53) in loop 3; F(107), D(108), Y(109), W(111), Y(112), W(115) in loop 7; Q(129), Y(132), D(134), M(135), Y(136), Y(137), G(138) in helix-α2) is in agreement with previously reported data, but additional residues were found to interact, especially residues V(81), A(82), T(83), G(84) in loop 5, and A(85), A(87) in strand-β5. Backbone dynamics measurements of StI free in solution and bound to micelles highlighted the relevance of protein flexibility for membrane binding and suggested that a conformer selection process may take place during protein-membrane interaction. We conclude that the StI:DHPC micelles system is a suitable model for further characterization of an actinoporin membrane-bound form by solution NMR. PMID:24218049

  4. Energetics of Transport through the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Ali; van der Giessen, Erik; Onck, Patrick R

    2016-01-01

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells is solely controlled by the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The NPC provides two types of nucleocytoplasmic transport: passive diffusion of small molecules and active chaperon-mediated translocation of large molecules. It has been shown that the interaction between intrinsically disordered proteins that line the central channel of the NPC and the transporting cargoes is the determining factor, but the exact mechanism of transport is yet unknown. Here, we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the energy barrier that has to be overcome for molecules to pass through the NPC. We focus on two aspects of transport. First, the passive transport of model cargo molecules with different sizes is studied and the size selectivity feature of the NPC is investigated. Our results show that the transport probability of cargoes is significantly reduced when they are larger than ∼5 nm in diameter. Secondly, we show that incorporating hydrophobic binding spots on the surface of the cargo effectively decreases the energy barrier of the pore. Finally, a simple transport model is proposed which characterizes the energy barrier of the NPC as a function of diameter and hydrophobicity of the transporting particles. PMID:26894898

  5. Further characterization of Closed Pore Insulation (CPI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russak, M.; Feldman, C.

    1973-01-01

    The thermophysical and mechanical properties of closed pore insulation (CPI) were measured after exposure to 25 simulated reentry thermal cycles. In addition, mechanical properties were obtained at elevated temperatures before and after cycling. The properties of CPI were not compromised by the cycling. High temperature creep studies were done on three CPI compositions (4, 8, and 12 Wt% CoO additive). CPI-4 had the best creep resistance at temperatures up to 1363 K.

  6. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  7. Cadmium trapping in an epithelial sodium channel pore mutant.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Armelle-Natsuo; Gautschi, Ivan; van Bemmelen, Miguel X; Schild, Laurent

    2007-11-01

    The putative selectivity filter of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) comprises a three-residue sequence G/SXS, but it remains uncertain whether the backbone atoms of this sequence or whether their side chains are lining the pore. It has been reported that the S589C mutation in the selectivity filter of alphaENaC renders the channel sensitive to block by externally applied Cd2+; this was interpreted as evidence for Cd2+ coordination with the thiol group of the side chain of alpha589C, pointing toward the pore lumen. Because the alphaS589C mutation alters the monovalent to divalent cation selectivity ratio of ENaC and because internally applied Cd2+ blocks wild-type ENaC with high affinity, we hypothesized that the inhibition of alphaS589C ENaC by Cd2+ results rather from the coordination of this cation with native cysteine residues located in the internal pore of ENaC. We show here that Cd2+ inhibits not only ENaC alphaS589C and alphaS589D but also alphaS589N mutants and that Ca2+ weakly interacts with the S589D mutant. The block of alphaS589C, -D, and -N mutants is characterized by a slow on-rate, is nearly irreversible, is voltage-dependent, and can be prevented by amiloride. The C546S mutation in the second transmembrane helix of gamma subunit in the background of the ENaC alphaS589C, -D, or -N mutants reduces the sensitivity to block by Cd2+ and renders the block rapidly reversible. We conclude therefore that the block by Cd2+ of the alphaS589C, -D, and -N mutants results from the trapping of Cd2+ ions in the internal pore of the channel and involves Cys-546 in the second transmembrane helix of the gammaENaC subunit. PMID:17804416

  8. Pore destruction resulting from mechanical thermal expression

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, S.A.; Wheeler, R.A.; Hoadley, A.F.A.

    2007-07-01

    Mechanical thermal expression (MTE) is a dewatering technology ideally suited for the dewatering of internally porous biomaterials. For such materials, the combined application of temperature and compressive force in the MTE process enhances the collapse of the porous structure, resulting in effective water removal. In this article, a comparison of the dewatering of titanium dioxide, which is an ideal incompressible, non-porous material, and lignite, which is a porous plant-based biomaterial, is presented. The comparison is based on the parameters critical to dewatering, namely the material compressibility and the permeability. With the aid of mercury porosimetry results, a detailed discussion of the pore destruction of lignite resulting from MTE processing is presented. It is illustrated that there is a well-defined relationship between the pore size distribution after MTE dewatering and the MTE temperature and pressure. The discussion is extended to an investigation of the effects of MTE processing conditions on the effective and noneffective porosity. The effective porosity is defined as the interconnected porosity, which contributes to flow through the compressed matrix, while the non-effective porosity is the remaining porosity, which does not contribute to flow. It is illustrated that there is a linear relationship in both the effective and non-effective porosity with the total porosity. The linear relationship is independent of the processing conditions. It is also shown that MTE processing collapses the effective and non-effective pores at roughly the same rate.

  9. Pore morphology study of silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, D.W.; Anderson, J.; Haereid, S.; Smith, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    Silica aerogels have numerous properties which suggest applications such as ultra high efficiency thermal insulation. These properties relate directly to the aerogel`s pore size distribution. The micro and meso pore size ranges can be investigated by normal small angle x-ray scattering and possibly, nitrogen adsorption. However, the measurement of larger pores (> 250 {angstrom}) is more difficult. Due to their limited mechanical strength, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation can disrupt the gel structure and electron microscopy provides only limited large scale structure information. The use of small angle light scattering techniques seems to have promise, the only hurdle is that aerogels exhibit significant multiple scattering. This can be avoided if one observes the gels in the wet stage since the structure of the aerogel should be very similar to the wet gel (as the result of supercritical drying). Thus, if one can match the refractive index, the morphology can be probed. The combination of certain alcoholic solvents fit this index matching criteria. Preliminary results for the gel network (micron range) and primary particle structure (manometer) are reported by using small angle light scattering and ultra-small angle x-ray scattering. The effects on structure over the length scale range of <1 nm to >5 {mu}m under different conditions (precursors, pH, etc.) are presented. The change in structure of an aerogel during isostatic compaction to 228 MPa (to simulate drying from wetting solvents) are also discussed.

  10. CFTR: what's it like inside the pore?

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehong; Smith, Stephen S; Dawson, David C

    2003-11-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Conductance Regulator (CFTR) functions as a cAMP-activated, anion-selective channel, but the structural basis for anion permeation is not well understood. Here we summarize recent studies aimed at understanding how anions move through the CFTR channel, and the nature of the environment anions experience inside the pore. From these studies it is apparent that anion permeability selectivity and anion binding selectivity of the pore are consistent with a model based on a "dielectric tunnel." The selectivity pattern for halides and pseudohalides can be predicted if it is assumed that permeant anions partition between bulk water and a polarizable space that is characterized by an effective dielectric constant of about 19. Covalent labeling of engineered cysteines and pH titration of engineered cysteines and histidines lead to the conclusion that the CFTR anion conduction path includes a positively charged outer vestibule. A residue in transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) (R334) appears to reside in the outer vestibule of the CFTR pore where it creates a positive electrostatic potential that enhances anion conduction. PMID:14598388

  11. Biomimetic collagen scaffolds with anisotropic pore architecture.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, N; Gibb, T; Schuster, C; Best, S M; Campbell, J J; Watson, C J; Cameron, R E

    2012-02-01

    Sponge-like matrices with a specific three-dimensional structural design resembling the actual extracellular matrix of a particular tissue show significant potential for the regeneration and repair of a broad range of damaged anisotropic tissues. The manipulation of the structure of collagen scaffolds using a freeze-drying technique was explored in this work as an intrinsically biocompatible way of tailoring the inner architecture of the scaffold. The research focused on the influence of temperature gradients, imposed during the phase of crystallisation of collagen suspensions, upon the degree of anisotropy in the microstructures of the scaffolds produced. Moulding technology was employed to achieve differences in heat transfer rates during the freezing processes. For this purpose various moulds with different configurations were developed with a view to producing uniaxial and multi-directional temperature gradients across the sample during this process. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of different cross-sections (longitudinal and horizontal) of scaffolds revealed that highly aligned matrices with axially directed pore architectures were obtained where single unidirectional temperature gradients were induced. Altering the freezing conditions by the introduction of multiple temperature gradients allowed collagen scaffolds to be produced with complex pore orientations, and anisotropy in pore size and alignment. PMID:22005330

  12. Digital phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An digital phase-locked loop is provided for deriving a loop output signal from an accumulator output terminal. A phase detecting exclusive OR gate is fed by the loop digital input and output signals. The output of the phase detector is a bi-level digital signal having a duty cycle indicative of the relative phase of the input and output signals. The accumulator is incremented at a first rate in response to a first output level of the phase detector and at a second rate in response to a second output level of the phase detector.

  13. Shocked clouds in the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.

    1994-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ROSAT PSPC and HRI images of the Cygnus Loop, an elderly supernova remnant. The project, as proposed, includes not only the usual analysis of ROSAT data; the ROSAT data is being combined with optical and UV data, and new model calculations are being performed. The status is reported on optical imagery, echelle data, IUE data, ROSAT data, and the grain model. The major question being addressed is whether the blastwave-cloud interaction in the feature known as XA is basically a converging shock in a fairly large cloud or turbulent stripping of material from the edges of a smaller cloud.

  14. Shocked clouds in the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.

    1994-02-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ROSAT PSPC and HRI images of the Cygnus Loop, an elderly supernova remnant. The project, as proposed, includes not only the usual analysis of ROSAT data; the ROSAT data is being combined with optical and UV data, and new model calculations are being performed. The status is reported on optical imagery, echelle data, IUE data, ROSAT data, and the grain model. The major question being addressed is whether the blastwave-cloud interaction in the feature known as XA is basically a converging shock in a fairly large cloud or turbulent stripping of material from the edges of a smaller cloud.

  15. Kissing-loop interaction between 5′ and 3′ ends of tick-borne Langat virus genome ‘bridges the gap’ between mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses in mechanisms of viral RNA cyclization: applications for virus attenuation and vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Tsetsarkin, Konstantin A.; Liu, Guangping; Shen, Kui; Pletnev, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Insertion of microRNA target sequences into the flavivirus genome results in selective tissue-specific attenuation and host-range restriction of live attenuated vaccine viruses. However, previous strategies for miRNA-targeting did not incorporate a mechanism to prevent target elimination under miRNA-mediated selective pressure, restricting their use in vaccine development. To overcome this limitation, we developed a new approach for miRNA-targeting of tick-borne flavivirus (Langat virus, LGTV) in the duplicated capsid gene region (DCGR). Genetic stability of viruses with DCGR was ensured by the presence of multiple cis-acting elements within the N-terminal capsid coding region, including the stem-loop structure (5′SL6) at the 3′ end of the promoter. We found that the 5′SL6 functions as a structural scaffold for the conserved hexanucleotide motif at its tip and engages in a complementary interaction with the region present in the 3′ NCR to enhance viral RNA replication. The resulting kissing-loop interaction, common in tick-borne flaviviruses, supports a single pair of cyclization elements (CYC) and functions as a homolog of the second pair of CYC that is present in the majority of mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Placing miRNA targets into the DCGR results in superior attenuation of LGTV in the CNS and does not interfere with development of protective immunity in immunized mice. PMID:26850640

  16. Effects of Antimicrobial Peptide Revealed by Simulations: Translocation, Pore Formation, Membrane Corrugation and Euler Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of the peripheral and transmembrane antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using the coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling. PMID:23579956

  17. Open-loop and closed-loop excitation of the wake behind a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David; Cohen, Kelly; Siegel, Stefan; McLaughlin, Tom

    2006-11-01

    Both open loop and closed loop control were used to modify the flow around a circular cylinder at Re = 20,000. Independent plasma actuators were installed on the sides of the cylinder at +/- 90^o from the forward stagnation line. The actuators could be excited in-phase or 180^o out of phase with one another. In the case of open-loop forcing, in-phase excitation at twice the von Karman vortex shedding frequency produced large changes in the wake structure, similar to the experiments done by Williams, Mansy & Amato (JFM, 1992.) Negligible changes in wake structure occurred when the out-of-phase actuation was used, although the lock-on phenomenon was observed, suggesting that the wake structure modification resulting from the interaction between the forcing field and near wake is independent of Reynolds number. Closed-loop excitation using a proportional-derivative controller was done using a hot-film probe positioned at x/D=1.5, y/D = 1.5. The amplitude of the wake oscillation was shown to be sensitive to both the gain and phase of the controller. The amplitude of oscillations at a fixed controller gain are enhanced or suppressed relative to the non-forced level, depending on the controller phase. The vortex shedding frequency is changed when the PD controller is in a region of suppression. The expert assistance of SSgt. Mary S. Church is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. INVESTIGATION INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. ine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewate...

  19. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser