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Sample records for position-sensitive ion detection

  1. IonCCD™ for direct position-sensitive charged-particle detection: from electrons and keV ions to hyperthermal biomolecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjar, Omar; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia; Kibelka, Gottfried; Shill, Scott M.; Kuhn, Ken; Cameron, Chad; Kassan, Scott

    2011-04-01

    A novel charged-particle sensitive, pixel based detector array is described and its usage is demonstrated for a variety of applications, from detection of elemental particles (electrons) to hyper-thermal large biomolecular positive and negative ions including keV light atomic and molecular ions. The array detector is a modified light-sensitive charged coupled device (CCD). The IonCCDTM was engineered for direct charged particle detection by replacing the semi-conductor part of the CCD pixel by a conductor1. In contrast with the CCD, where the semi-conductive pixel is responsible for electron-hole pair formation upon photon bombardment, the IonCCD uses a capacitor coupled to the conductive electrode for direct charge integration. The detector can be operated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum since no high voltages are needed. The IonCCD, presented in this work is an array of 2126 active pixels with 21 um pixel width and 3 um pixel gap. The detection area is 1.5x51mm2 where 1.5 mm and 51 mm are pixel and detector array length, respectively. The result is a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector with 24 um spatial resolution and 88 % pixel area ratio (PAR). In this work we demonstrate the capabilities and the performance of the detector. For the first time we show the direct detection of 250 eV electrons providing linearity response and detection efficiency of the IonCCD as function of electron beam current. Using positive ions from and electron impact source (E-I), we demonstrate that the detection efficiency of the IonCCD is virtually independent of particle energy [250 eV, 1250 eV], particle impact angle [45o, 90o] and particle flux. By combining the IonCCD with a double focusing sector field of Mattauch-Herzog geometry (M-H), we demonstrate fast acquisition of mass spectra in direct air sniffing mode. A first step towards fast in vivo breath analysis is presented. Detection of hyper-thermal biomolecular ions produced using an electrospray ionization

  2. Position Sensitive Detection System for Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, E. A.; Favela, F.; Curiel, Q.; Chavez, E; Huerta, A.; Varela, A.; Shapira, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The position sensitive detection system presented in this work employs the Anger logic algorithm to determine the position of the light spark produced by the passage of charged particles on a 170 x 170 x 10 mm3 scintillator material (PILOT-U). The detection system consists of a matrix of nine photomultipliers, covering a fraction of the back area of the scintillators. Tests made with a non-collimated alpha particle source together with a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the data, suggest an intrinsic position resolution of up to 6 mm is achieved.

  3. Position sensitive radioactivity detection for gas and liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Joseph L.; McCarthy, John F.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the position sensitive detection of radioactivity in a fluid stream, particularly in the effluent fluid stream from a gas or liquid chromatographic instrument. The invention represents a significant advance in efficiency and cost reduction compared with current efforts.

  4. Delay-Line Three-Dimensional Position Sensitive Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Manhee

    High-resistivity silicon(Si) in large volumes and with good charge carrier transport properties has been produced and achieved success as a radiation detector material over the past few years due to its relatively low cost as well as the availability of well-established processing technologies. One application of that technology is in the fabrication of various position-sensing topologies from which the incident radiation's direction can be determined. We have succeeded in developing the modeling tools for investigating different position-sensing schemes and used those tools to examine both amplitude-based and time-based methods, an assessment that indicates that fine position-sensing can be achieved with simpler readout designs than are conventionally deployed. This realization can make ubiquitous and inexpensive deployment of special nuclear materials (SNM) detecting technology becomes more feasible because if one can deploy position-sensitive semiconductor detectors with only one or two contacts per side. For this purpose, we have described the delay-line radiation detector and its optimized fabrication. The semiconductor physics were simulated, the results from which guided the fabrication of the guard ring structure and the detector electrode, both of which included metal-field-plates. The measured improvement in the leakage current was confirmed with the fabricated devices, and the structures successfully suppressed soft-breakdown. We also demonstrated that fabricating an asymmetric strip-line structure successfully minimizing the pulse shaping and increases the distance through which one can propagate the information of the deposited charge distribution. With fabricated delay-line detectors we can acquire alpha spectra (Am-241) and gamma spectra (Ba-133, Co-57 and Cd-109). The delay-line detectors can therefore be used to extract the charge information from both ion and gamma-ray interactions. Furthermore, standard charge-sensitive circuits yield high SNR

  5. Michrochannel plate for position sensitive alpha particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Hurley and James Tinsley

    2007-08-31

    This paper will describe the use of a microchannel plate (MCP) as the associated particle detector on a sealed tube neutron generator. The generator produces neutrons and associated alpha particles for use as a probe to locate and identify hidden explosives in associated particle imaging (API). The MCP measures the position in two dimensions and precise timing of the incident alpha particle, information which is then used to calculate the emission time and direction of the corresponding neutron. The MCP replaces the position-sensitive photomultipler tube (PSPMT) which, until recently, had been the only detector available for measuring position and timing for alpha particles in neutron generator applications. Where the PSPMT uses charge division for generating position information, a process that requires a first order correction to each pulse, the MCP uses delay-line timing, which requires no correction. The result is a device with an order of magnitude improvement in both position resolution and timing compared to the PSPMT. Hardware and software development and the measurements made to characterize the MCP for API applications are described.

  6. Three-dimensional, position-sensitive radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    He, Zhong; Zhang, Feng

    2010-04-06

    Disclosed herein is a method of determining a characteristic of radiation detected by a radiation detector via a multiple-pixel event having a plurality of radiation interactions. The method includes determining a cathode-to-anode signal ratio for a selected interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions based on electron drift time data for the selected interaction, and determining the radiation characteristic for the multiple-pixel event based on both the cathode-to-anode signal ratio and the electron drift time data. In some embodiments, the method further includes determining a correction factor for the radiation characteristic based on an interaction depth of the plurality of radiation interactions, a lateral distance between the selected interaction and a further interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions, and the lateral positioning of the plurality of radiation interactions.

  7. Position-sensitive detection of slow neutrons: Survey of fundamental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.

    1992-07-01

    This paper sets forth the fundamental principles governing the development of position-sensitive detection systems for slow neutrons. Since neutrons are only weakly interacting with most materials, it is not generally practical to detect slow neutrons directly. Therefore all practical slow neutron detection mechanisms depend on the use of nuclear reactions to ``convert`` the neutron to one or more charged particles, followed by the subsequent detection of the charged particles. The different conversion reactions which can be used are discussed, along with the relative merits of each. This is followed with a discussion of the various methods of charged particle detection, how these lend themselves to position-sensitive encoding, and the means of position encoding which can be applied to each case. Detector performance characteristics which may be of importance to the end user are discussed and related to these various detection and position-encoding mechanisms.

  8. Position-sensitive detection of slow neutrons: Survey of fundamental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper sets forth the fundamental principles governing the development of position-sensitive detection systems for slow neutrons. Since neutrons are only weakly interacting with most materials, it is not generally practical to detect slow neutrons directly. Therefore all practical slow neutron detection mechanisms depend on the use of nuclear reactions to convert'' the neutron to one or more charged particles, followed by the subsequent detection of the charged particles. The different conversion reactions which can be used are discussed, along with the relative merits of each. This is followed with a discussion of the various methods of charged particle detection, how these lend themselves to position-sensitive encoding, and the means of position encoding which can be applied to each case. Detector performance characteristics which may be of importance to the end user are discussed and related to these various detection and position-encoding mechanisms.

  9. A position sensitive time of flight detector for heavy ion ERD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbaumer, S.; Bergmaier, A.; Dollinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    A new 2D position sensitive time of flight detector for heavy ion ERD has been developed. The detector features separate time and position measurement in a straight geometry. An electrostatic lens focuses the secondary electrons ejected from a carbon foil onto a channel plate stack maintaining the position information despite the electron momentum distribution. For position readout a 2D Backgammon anode is used. A position resolution of <0.6 mm (FWHM) and a time resolution of 96 ps (FWHM) is demonstrated.

  10. Development of position sensitive proportional counters for hot particle detection in laundry and portal monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Schwahn, S.O.; Bennett, T.E.; Misko, D.J.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes research which demonstrates the use of position sensitive proportional counters in contamination monitoring systems. Both laundry monitoring and portal monitoring systems were developed. The laundry monitor was deployed at a nuclear power plant where it was used to monitor clothing during an outage. Position sensitive proportional counter based contamination monitoring systems were shown to have significant advantages over systems using conventional proportional counters. These advantages include the ability to directly measure the area and quantity of contamination. This capability permits identification of hot particles. These systems are also capable of self calibration via internal check sources. Systems deployed with this technology should benefit from reduced complexity, cost and maintenance. The inherent reduction of background that occurs when the counter is electronically divided into numerous detectors permits operation in high background radiation fields and improves detection limits over conventional technology.

  11. Characterization of two resistive anode encoder position sensitive detectors for use in ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham, Robert H.; Bleiler, Roger J.; McNitt, Paul J.; Reed, David A.; Fleming, Ronald H.

    1993-02-01

    Both the standard resistive anode encoder (RAE) position sensitive ion detector and a new faster version have been adapted for use with CAMECA IMS-3f/4f imaging secondary-ion mass spectroscopy instruments. Each detector includes a dual microchannel plate image intensifier mounted in front of a resistive anode. The conversion efficiencies of the standard and fast detectors are 60% and 55%, respectively. The high count rates attainable with the fast detector require high strip-current microchannel plates for optimum performance. The mass bias of these detectors is proportional to (mass)1/2 and can be compensated by adjustment of detector supply voltage. The response across the active area of these detectors is uniform to within 3% with the greatest deviations occurring at the periphery. Distortion and pixel-to-pixel bias are negligible with the standard RAE, but noticeable in the prototype of the fast RAE. Software has been developed that corrects pixel-to-pixel bias. The dead times of the standard and fast RAE systems are 4.3±0.1 μs and 330±2 ns which limit practical count rates to about 40 000 and 600 000 Hz, respectively. For many applications, the higher ion arrival rates and dynamic range of the fast RAE imaging system more than compensate for the increased pixel-to-pixel bias and distortion and the small decrease in conversion efficiency.

  12. Micro Cantilever Movement Detection with an Amorphous Silicon Array of Position Sensitive Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Javier; Costa, Daniel; Pereira, Sonia; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Heerlein, Holger; Ferreira, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The movement of a micro cantilever was detected via a self constructed portable data acquisition prototype system which integrates a linear array of 32 1D amorphous silicon position sensitive detectors (PSD). The system was mounted on a microscope using a metal structure platform and the movement of the 30 μm wide by 400 μm long cantilever was tracked by analyzing the signals acquired by the 32 sensor array electronic readout system and the relevant data algorithm. The obtained results show a linear behavior of the photocurrent relating X and Y movement, with a non-linearity of about 3%, a spatial resolution of less than 2 μm along the lateral dimension of the sensor as well as of less than 3 μm along the perpendicular dimension of the sensor, when detecting just the micro-cantilever, and a spatial resolution of less than 1 μm when detecting the holding structure. PMID:22163648

  13. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wanchun; Broussard, L. J.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Makela, M.; Morris, C. L.; Tang, Z.; Adamek, E. R.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Ding, X.; Geltenbort, P.; Hickerson, K. P.; Holley, A. T.; Ito, T. M.; Leung, K. K.; Liu, C.-Y.; Morley, D. J.; Ortiz, Jose D.; Pattie, R. W.; Ramsey, J. C.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, S. K.; Wexler, J.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-09-01

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15 μm has been achieved, which is equivalent to a UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron-volts through the relation δE =m0 gδx. Here, the symbols δE, δx, m0 and g are the energy resolution, the spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and the gravitational acceleration, respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and then emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through the use of light intensity profile analysis. This method allows different types of UCN spectroscopy and other applications.

  14. Reciprocal space mapping of epitaxial materials using position-sensitive x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Doyle, B.L.; Drummond, T.J.; Medernach, J.W.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    Reciprocal space mapping can be efficiently carried out using a position-sensitive x-ray detector (PSD) coupled to a traditional double-axis diffractometer. The PSD offers parallel measurement of the total scattering angle of all diffracted x-rays during a single rocking-curve scan. As a result, a two-dimensional reciprocal space map can be made in a very short time similar to that of a one-dimensional rocking-curve scan. Fast, efficient reciprocal space mapping offers numerous routine advantages to the x-ray diffraction analyst. Some of these advantages are the explicit differentiation of lattice strain from crystal orientation effects in strain-relaxed heteroepitaxial layers; the nondestructive characterization of the size, shape and orientation of nanocrystalline domains in ordered-alloy epilayers; and the ability to measure the average size and shape of voids in porous epilayers. Here, the PSD-based diffractometer is described, and specific examples clearly illustrating the advantages of complete reciprocal space analysis are presented.

  15. Detection of cosmic ray tracks using scintillating fibers and position sensitive multi-anode photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.; Streets, J.; Wilcer, N.

    1998-02-01

    This experiment demonstrates detection of cosmic ray tracks by using Scintillating fiber planes and multi-anode photomultipliers (MA-PMTs). In a laboratory like this, cosmic rays provide a natural source of high-energy charged particles which can be detected with high efficiency and with nanosecond time resolution.

  16. Simulated Performance of Algorithms for the Localization of Radioactive Sources from a Position Sensitive Radiation Detecting System (COCAE)

    SciTech Connect

    Karafasoulis, K.; Zachariadou, K.; Seferlis, S.; Kaissas, I.; Potiriadis, C.; Lambropoulos, C.; Loukas, D.

    2011-12-13

    Simulation studies are presented regarding the performance of algorithms that localize point-like radioactive sources detected by a position sensitive portable radiation instrument (COCAE). The source direction is estimated by using the List Mode Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (LM-ML-EM) imaging algorithm. Furthermore, the source-to-detector distance is evaluated by three different algorithms based on the photo-peak count information of each detecting layer, the quality of the reconstructed source image, and the triangulation method. These algorithms have been tested on a large number of simulated photons over a wide energy range (from 200 keV to 2 MeV) emitted by point-like radioactive sources located at different orientations and source-to-detector distances.

  17. Reciprocal-Space Analysis of Compositional Modulation in Short-Period Superlattices Using Position-Sensitive X-Ray Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Lee, S.R.; Millunchick, J.M.; Norman, A.G.; Reno, J.L.; Twesten, R.D.

    1998-11-10

    Epitaxial growth of AlAs-InAs short-period superlattices on (001) InP can lead to heterostructures exhibiting strong, quasi-periodic, lateral modulation of the alloy composition; transverse satellites arise in reciprocal space as a signature of the compositional modulation. Using an x-ray diffractometer equipped with a position-sensitive x-ray detector, we demonstrate reciprocal-space mapping of these satellites as an efficient, nondestructive means for detecting and characterizing the occurrence of compositional modulation. Systematic variations in the compositional modulation due to the structural design and the growth conditions of the short-period superlattice are characterized by routine mapping of the lateral satellites. Spontaneous compositional modulation occurs along the growth front during molecular-beam epitaxy of (AlAs) (InAs)n short-period superlattices. The modulation is quasi-periodic and forms a lateral superlattice superimposed on the intended SPS structure. Corresponding transverse satellites arise about each reciprocal lattice point, and x-ray diffraction can be routinely used to map their local reciprocal-space structure. The integrated intensity, spacing, orientation, and shape of these satellites provide a reliable means for nondestructively detecting and characterizing the compositional modulation in short-period superlattices. The analytical efficiency afforded by the use of a PSD has enabled detailed study of systematic vacations in compositional modulation as a function of the average composition, the period, and the growth rate of the short- period superlattice

  18. Direct high-resolution ion beam-profile imaging using a position-sensitive Faraday cup array

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2009-11-15

    Ion sources have wide-spread use in a multitude of applications. For many, an accurate knowledge, or better, an accurate imaging, of the beam profile and intensity is an important criterion. We are developing an ion source to calibrate instruments for space-based measurements of solar wind and suprathermal particles in the energy range from below 1 keV/nuc to above 200 keV/nuc. In order to establish accurate beam profiles for calibration purposes, we have developed a new method based on an array of very small (diameter = 0.3 mm) Faraday cups. Here, we describe the experimental setup and discuss how to achieve several requirements such as a large thermal load due to the {approx}40W of beam power.

  19. Position Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadleir, J. E.; Hammock, C.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Stahle, C. K.; Bandler, S.; Saab, T.; Lindeman, M.; Porter, F. S.; Chervenak, J.; Brown, G.

    2004-01-01

    A Position Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (PoST) is a microcalorimeter device capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. The device consists of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) connected to the ends of a long X-ray absorbing strip. The energy of a photon hitting the absorber and the position of the absorption event along the strip is measured from the response in the two sensors by analyzing the relative signal sizes, pulse rise times, and the sum of the pulses measured at each sensor, We report on the recent PoST effort at Goddard for applications to large field of view, high-energy- resolution, X-ray astrophysics.

  20. Detection of thermal-induced prompt fission neutrons of highly-enriched uranium: A position sensitive technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglione, A.; Di Lorenzo, F.; Mayer, R. E.

    2009-07-01

    Cargo interrogation in search for special nuclear materials like highly-enriched uranium or 239Pu is a first priority issue of international borders security. In this work we present a thermal-pulsed neutron-based approach to a technique which combines the time-of-flight method and demonstrates a capability to detect small quantities of highly-enriched uranium shielded with high or low Z materials providing, in addition, a manner to know the approximate position of the searched material.

  1. A BGO/GSO position sensitive block detector for a high resolution positron emission tomography with depth of interaction detection capability

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.

    1996-12-31

    We developed a position sensitive block detector with depth of interaction detection capability for positron emission tomography (PET). The detector consists of 6 x 8 array of GSO scintillators, 6 x 8 array of BGO scintillators and two dual photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The GSO scintillators are optically coupled to front surface of the BGO scintillators. The position of 6 x 8 scintillators are determined by the Anger principle and depth of interaction position is determined by using the pulse shape analysis of GSOs and BGOs. Performance of the block detector was measured. Position distribution of the developed BGO/GSO block detector was little distorted. However the separation of the spots was still enough to distinguish the scintillators in transaxial and axial directions. Since pulse shape distribution using a developed simple pulse shape analyzer had two peaks, it is possible to separate the GSOs and BGOs for depth of interaction detection. With these results, a high resolution PET with depth of interaction detection capability will be possible using the developed BGO/GSO block detectors.

  2. Dual Position Sensitive MWPC for tracking reaction products at VAMOS++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lemasson, A.; Rejmund, M.; Fremont, G.; Pancin, J.; Navin, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Goupil, J.; Spitaels, C.; Jacquot, B.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and performance of a Dual Position Sensitive Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (DPS-MWPC) used to measure the scattering angle, the interaction position on the target and the velocity of reaction products detected in the VAMOS++ magnetic spectrometer, are reported. The detector consists of a pair of position sensitive low pressure MWPCs and provides both fast timing signals, along with the two-dimensional position coordinates required to define the trajectory of the reaction products. A time-of-flight resolution of 305(11) ps (FWHM) was measured. The measured resolutions (FWHM) were 2.5(3) mrad and 560(70) μm for the scattering angle and the interaction point at the target respectively. The subsequent improvement of the Doppler correction of the energy of the γ-rays, detected in the γ-ray tracking array AGATA in coincidence with isotopically identified ions in VAMOS++, is also discussed.

  3. Relating to ion detection

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

  4. Low-distortion resistive anodes for two-dimensional position-sensitive MCP systems. [Microchannel Plates for ion, electron and photon image sensing and conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Carlson, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are frequently used with resistive anodes to detect charged particles or photons and yield analog signals from which event positions can be decoded. The paper discusses a four-corner concave circular arc terminated resistive anode that permits theoretically distortionless encoding of Cartesian event positions into pulse charge ratios. The theory of the circular arc terminated anode is discussed along with anode design and performance. Electron beam images obtained by using such an anode are presented to confirm the usefulness of the approach.

  5. High speed curved position sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Robert W.; Wilson, Jack W.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

  6. A position-sensitive alpha detector using a thin plastic scintillator combined with a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Iida, Takao

    1998-12-01

    A position-sensitive alpha detector was developed and tested. The alpha detector consists of a thin plastic scintillator, a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube, a position calculation circuit and a personal computer based data acquisition system. Because the thin plastic scintillator has high-detection efficiency for alpha particles while it has low-sensitivity for beta particles or gamma ray, the detector can selectively detect alpha particles with low background counts. The spatial resolution of the detector was approximately 3 mm FWHM. An autoradiographic images of plutonium distribution in the lung of an animal as well as an image of an uranium particle were successively obtained. Spatial and energy distribution of radon daughters could also be measured. We conclude that the developed position-sensitive alpha detector is useful for some applications such as plutonium detection or alpha autoradiography as well as distribution analysis of radon daughters.

  7. Photoelectrochemical detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-07-21

    Depending on the situation, metal ions may either play beneficial roles or be harmful to human health and ecosystems. Sensitive and accurate detection of metal ions is thus a critical issue in the field of analytical sciences and great efforts have been devoted to the development of various metal ion sensors. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) detection is an emerging technique for the bio/chemical detection of metal ions, and features a fast response, low cost and high sensitivity. Using representative examples, this review will first introduce the fundamentals and summarize recent progress in the PEC detection of metal ions. In addition, interesting strategies for the design of particular PEC metal ion sensors are discussed. Challenges and opportunities in this field are also presented. PMID:27297834

  8. Instrumentation for negative ion detection.

    PubMed

    McKeown, M

    1980-06-01

    The instrumentation and practical circuitry required for the detection of negative ions exiting the mass analysis section of a mass spectrometer is examined. The potentials needed to bias the electron multiplier when detecting negative ions from a low ion-energy mass spectrometer, e.g., a quadrupole, are contrasted with the biasing requirements of a mass spectrometer having high ion-energies, e.g., a magnetic sector. Methods of decoupling the biasing high voltage on the signal lead of the multiplier in pulse counting measurements are discussed in detail so that normal, ground referenced input, pulse preamplifiers may be used. Easily understood, practical rules for determining the values of circuit components are given together with a simplified theory of transferring pulse signals from multiplier collector to pulse preamplifier. The changes in circuitry needed when attempting to detect ions by current measurement methods from an electron multiplier area detailed. The effects of leakage currents into athe input of the current preamplifier and their avoidance bay using triaxial shielding on vacuum feed-throughs are explained. The article suggests possible methods of decoupling the high voltage referenced input and the ground referenced output of a current measuring preamplifier. PMID:7428750

  9. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wave length shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event.

  10. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1994-02-22

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wavelength shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event. 6 figures.

  11. Interdigited dual-cell position-sensitive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shie, Jin-Shown

    1992-10-01

    A special one-dimensional position-sensitive device for detection of a light-spot location is designed and fabricated. The device is composed of a pair of photodiodes with complementarily interdigited comb configuration. The width of comb teeth is characterized by a designated distributive function, hence, the coordination information of a light spot falling upon the device can be determined by photo-induced currents of the two diodes. This device is useful as the position sensing element in camera-autofocus application.

  12. Exploring the spatial resolution of position-sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    High amplification and excellent timing make microchannel plate (MCP) detectors excellent devices for detection of photons, electrons, and ions. In addition to providing sub-nanosecond time resolution MCP detectors can also provide spatial resolution, thus making them useful in imaging applications. Use of a resistive anode (RA) is a routinely used approach to make an MCP position-sensitive. The spatial resolution of the RA associated with detection of a single incident electron was determined. Factors impacting the spatial resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved spatial resolution of 64 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Recently, a novel approach has been developed to provide position-sensitivity for an MCP detector. In this approach, namely the induced signal approach, the position of the incident particle is determined by sensing the electron cloud emanating from a MCP stack. By utilizing the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a spatial resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Work to improve the spatial resolution of the induced signal approach further will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  13. Position-Sensitive Scanning Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Joseph P.; Chen, Yan; Müller, Joachim D.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) uses a stationary laser beam to illuminate a small sample volume and analyze the temporal behavior of the fluorescence fluctuations within the stationary observation volume. In contrast, scanning FCS (SFCS) collects the fluorescence signal from a moving observation volume by scanning the laser beam. The fluctuations now contain both temporal and spatial information about the sample. To access the spatial information we synchronize scanning and data acquisition. Synchronization allows us to evaluate correlations for every position along the scanned trajectory. We use a circular scan trajectory in this study. Because the scan radius is constant, the phase angle is sufficient to characterize the position of the beam. We introduce position-sensitive SFCS (PSFCS), where correlations are calculated as a function of lag time and phase. We present the theory of PSFCS and derive expressions for diffusion, diffusion in the presence of flow, and for immobilization. To test PSFCS we compare experimental data with theory. We determine the direction and speed of a flowing dye solution and the position of an immobilized particle. To demonstrate the feasibility of the technique for applications in living cells we present data of enhanced green fluorescent protein measured in the nucleus of COS cells. PMID:15894645

  14. POSITION SENSITIVE GERMANIUM DETECTORS FOR GAMMA-RAY IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gamma-ray imaging with position-sensitive germanium detectors offers the advantages of excellent energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and potentially good sptial resolution. The development of the amorphous-semiconductor electrical contact technology for germanium detec...

  15. Development of a novel position-sensitive microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2015-10-01

    Position sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detectors which measure the position of an incident electron, ion, or photon, are useful in imaging applications. Recently, a novel detector, which utilizes an induced approach to provide position sensitivity, has been developed. In the prototype detector, using only the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a position resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Implementing a differential readout may improve on this resolution. To realize this differential approach, a better understanding of the dependence of the induced signal shape on the position of the electron cloud is required. To characterize the dependence of the induced signal shape on position a resistive anode (RA) has been incorporated into the detector. The RA will allow determination of the centroid of the electron cloud. Factors impacting the position resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved position resolution of 157 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  16. Spectroscopy of Actinide Nuclei - Perspectives with Position Sensitive HPGe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Kotthaus, T.

    Recent advances in in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of actinide nuclei are based on highly efficient arrays of escape-suppressed spectrometers. The sensitivity of these detector arrays is greatly enhanced by the combination with powerful mass separators or particle detector systems. This technique is demonstrated by an experiment to investigate excited states in 234U after the one-neutron-transfer reaction 235U(d,t). In coincidence with the outgoing tritons, γ-rays were detected with the highly efficient MINIBALL spectrometer. In the near future an even enhanced sensitivity will be achieved by utilizing position sensitive HPGe detectors which will exploit the novel detection method of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented germanium detectors. An example for this novel approach is the investigation neutron-rich actinide Th and U nuclei after multi nucleon transfer reactions employing the AGATA demonstrator and PRISMA setup at LNL, Italy. A primary 136Xe beam hitting a 238U target was used to produce the nuclei of interest. Beam-like reaction products after neutron transfer were selected by the PRISMA spectrometer. Coincident γ-rays from excited states in beam and target like particles were measured with the position sensitive AGATA HPGe detectors. Improved Doppler correction and quality of the γ-spectra is based on the novel γ-ray tracking technique, which was successfully exploited in this region.

  17. Emulation workbench for position sensitive gaseous scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L.; Margato, L. M. S.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Fraga, F. A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Position sensitive detectors based on gaseous scintillation proportional counters with Anger-type readout are being used in several research areas such as neutron detection, search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Design and optimization of such detectors are complex and time consuming tasks. Simulations, while being a powerful tool, strongly depend on the light transfer models and demand accurate knowledge of many parameters, which are often not available. Here we describe an alternative approach based on the experimental evaluation of a detector using an isotropic point-like light source with precisely controllable light emission properties, installed on a 3D positioning system. The results obtained with the developed setup at validation conditions, when the scattered light is strongly suppressed show good agreement with simulations.

  18. A Superconducting Ion Detection Scheme for Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttle, Joseph; Kelly, Thomas; McDermott, Robert

    Superconducting detectors are a promising avenue for improving the performance of Atom Probe Microscopes. Many types of superconducting detectors have been developed within the past several decades, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. Many of these detectors are inherently slow, bulky, require complex multiplexing schemes to attain position sensitivity, or require complex read-out electronics. In response to the rigorous demands of atom probe technology, and with the goal of developing an elegant, simple to use solution, we have developed a novel superconducting delay line detector. The principal of detection is to use the kinetic energy of incoming ions to generate excess quasiparticles in a superconducting stripline. These quasiparticles generate a measurable signal which propagates along the delay line. By measuring the timing of the output signals from this delay line, we are able to measure the time of flight for the ion and the position of its impact on the detector. We will be presenting on the performance of this detector as measured in a Field Ion Microscope.

  19. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  20. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  1. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  2. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  3. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  4. READOUT ASIC FOR 3D POSITION-SENSITIVE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; VERNON, E.; ACKLEY, K.; DRAGONE, A.; FRIED, J.; OCONNOR, P.; HE, Z.; HERMAN, C.; ZHANG, F.

    2007-10-27

    We describe an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position-sensitive detectors. It was optimized for pixelated CZT sensors, and it measures, corresponding to an ionizing event, the energy and timing of signals from 121 anodes and one cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping, along with peak- and timing-detection. The cathode's timing can be measured in three different ways: the first is based on multiple thresholds on the charge amplifier's voltage output; the second uses the threshold crossing of a fast-shaped signal; and the third measures the peak amplitude and timing from a bipolar shaper. With its power of 2 mW per channel the ASIC measures, on a CZT sensor Connected and biased, charges up to 100 fC with an electronic resolution better than 200 e{sup -} rms. Our preliminary spectral measurements applying a simple cathode/mode ratio correction demonstrated a single-pixel resolution of 4.8 keV (0.72 %) at 662 keV, with the electronics and leakage current contributing in total with 2.1 keV.

  5. ASIC for High Rate 3D Position Sensitive Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, E.; De Geronimo, G.; Ackley, K.; Fried, J.; He, Z.; Herman, C.; Zhang, F.

    2010-06-16

    We report on the development of an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position sensitive detectors (3D PSD). The ASIC is designed to operate with pixelated wide bandgap sensors like Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), Mercuric Iodide (Hgl2) and Thallium Bromide (TIBr). It measures the amplitudes and timings associated with an ionizing event on 128 anodes, the anode grid, and the cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with peaking time adjustable from 250 ns to 12 {micro}s, gain adjustable to 20 mV/fC or 120 mV/fC (for a dynamic range of 3.2 MeV and 530 keV in CZT), amplitude discrimination with 5-bit trimming, and positive and negative peak and timing detections. The readout can be full or sparse, based on a flag and single- or multi-cycle token passing. All channels, triggered channels only, or triggered with neighbors can be read out thus increasing the rate capability of the system to more than 10 kcps. The ASIC dissipates 330 mW which corresponds to about 2.5 mW per channel.

  6. Conceptual design of elliptical cavities for intensity and position sensitive beam measurements in storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjari, M. S.; Chen, X.; Hülsmann, P.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Nolden, F.; Piotrowski, J.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-11-01

    Position sensitive beam monitors are indispensable for the beam diagnostics in storage rings. Apart from their applications in the measurements of beam parameters, they can be used in non-destructive in-ring decay studies of radioactive ion beams as well as enhancing precision in the isochronous mass measurement technique. In this work, we introduce a novel approach based on cavities with elliptical cross-section, in order to compensate the limitations of known designs for the application in ion storage rings. The design is aimed primarily for future heavy ion storage rings of the FAIR project. The conceptual design is discussed together with simulation results.

  7. Construction and commissioning of a position-sensitive ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwag, M. S.; Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Kim, A.; Kim, M. J.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    A position-sensitive ionization chamber has been constructed and commissioned at the Physics Department of Sungkyunkwan University to extract position information on incident charged particles for future nuclear reaction measurements. By utilizing the newly-designed position-sensitive anodes and the previously-commissioned portable gas-filled ionization chamber by Chae et al., position information on incident particles could be obtained. The device was tested with an 241Am α-emitting source, and the standard deviation of the fitted Gaussian distribution was measured to be 1.76 mm when a collimator with a 2 mm hole was used.

  8. Position sensitivity of MAMA detectors. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. S.; Timothy, J. G.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1988-01-01

    The results of laboratory and telescopic measurements of the position sensitivity of a visible MAMA detector utilizing a 'coarse-fine' array are presented. The photometric accuracy of this detector was determined under point source illumination. It was found that computed centroid positions are accurate across the entire array to within 0.04 pixels.

  9. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis set up for electronic sputtering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Tripathi, A.; Kabiraj, D.; Sugathan, P.; Chaudhary, G. K.; Barua, P.

    2006-04-01

    Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) set up with a large solid angle (greater than or similar to 4.8 msr) Delta E - E position-sensitive telescope detector is developed at Inter University Accelerator Centre as a dedicated facility for the study of electronic sputtering of thin films under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The detector consists of a gas ionization chamber (Delta E ) and a solid-state surface barrier detector ( E ) housed in a same assembly. The electronic sputtering yield (atoms/ion) is determined by analyzing on-line fluence-dependent ERDA data obtained from a variety of thin films. Large erosion (> 10 5 atoms/ion) of carbon from a-C:H by 150 MeV Ag 13+ ions, evolution of nitrogen (greater than or similar to 880 atoms/ion) from copper nitride and depletion of oxygen (greater than or similar to 1000 atoms/ion) from copper oxide film under 200 MeV Au 15+ ion impact are studied and reported in this work. The electronic sputtering of these materials is discussed on the basis of the thermal spike model of SHI and solid interaction.

  10. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Suzaki, F.; Izumikawa, T.; Miyazawa, S.; Morimoto, K.; Suzuki, T.; Tokanai, F.; Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C.; Kitagawa, A.; Kuboki, T.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Suzuki, S.

    2013-12-01

    As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments.

  11. Self-Balancing Position-Sensitive Detector (SBPSD).

    PubMed

    Porrazzo, Ryan; Lydecker, Leigh; Gattu, Suhasini; Bakhru, Hassaram; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James

    2015-01-01

    Optical position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS technology, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. An innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using two back-to-back connected photodiodes. These so called self-balancing position-sensitive detectors (SBPSDs) eliminate the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Fabricated prototype devices demonstrate linear, symmetric coordinate characteristics and a spatial resolution of 200 μm for a 74 mm device. PSDs are commercially available only up to a length of 37 mm. Prototype devices were fabricated with various lengths up to 100 mm and can be scaled down to any size below that. PMID:26205266

  12. Self-Balancing Position-Sensitive Detector (SBPSD)

    PubMed Central

    Porrazzo, Ryan; Lydecker, Leigh; Gattu, Suhasini; Bakhru, Hassaram; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James

    2015-01-01

    Optical position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS technology, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. An innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using two back-to-back connected photodiodes. These so called self-balancing position-sensitive detectors (SBPSDs) eliminate the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Fabricated prototype devices demonstrate linear, symmetric coordinate characteristics and a spatial resolution of 200 μm for a 74 mm device. PSDs are commercially available only up to a length of 37 mm. Prototype devices were fabricated with various lengths up to 100 mm and can be scaled down to any size below that. PMID:26205266

  13. Integrated cooling channels in position-sensitive silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andricek, L.; Boronat, M.; Fuster, J.; Garcia, I.; Gomis, P.; Marinas, C.; Ninkovic, J.; Perelló, M.; Villarejo, M. A.; Vos, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present an approach to construct position-sensitive silicon detectors with an integrated cooling circuit. Tests on samples demonstrate that a very modest liquid flow very effectively cool the devices up to a power dissipation of over 10 W/cm2. The liquid flow is found to have a negligible impact on the mechanical stability. A finite-element simulation predicts the cooling performance to an accuracy of approximately 10%.

  14. Development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Isaac; Huang Rongxin; Henderson, Kevin; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Raizen, Mark G.

    2008-10-15

    We report the development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector. The detector uses a fiber-optic bundle that spatially splits the incident beam, followed by a fast balanced photodetector. The detector is applied to the study of Brownian motion of particles on fast time scales with 1 A spatial resolution. Future applications include the study of molecule motors, protein folding, as well as cellular processes.

  15. Development of real-time position detection system for single-ion hit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, A.; Kada, W.; Satoh, T.; Koka, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Kamiya, T.; Yokota, W.

    2014-08-01

    A real-time position detection system has been developed for a single-ion hit. The system is composed of a position sensitive camera unit and a luminescent scintillator. The camera unit includes 512 × 512 pixel electron-multiplier charge-coupled device, an image intensifier tube, and an object lens with a working distance of 101 mm. To obtain a highly sensitive luminescent scintillator for the detection of a single ion in the mega-electron-volt region, we investigate the photoluminescence properties of α-Al2O3 single-crystals implanted with Eu(Al2O3:Eu) at a fluence ranging from 1014 to 1016 cm-2. The Al2O3:Eu samples were annealed at temperature from 500°C to 900°C. The results of 15-MeV O single-ion hit experiments using Al2O3:Eu with a fluence of 3.0 × 1016 cm-2 annealed for 0.5 h at 600°C indicate that our system is sufficiently sensitive to detect the single-ion hit with a spatial resolution of 1 μm in real time.

  16. Characterization of multilayer reflectors and position sensitive detectors in the 45--300 A region

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, K.; Takahashi, S. ); Kitamoto, S.; Takahama, S.; Tamura, K. ); Hatsukade, I. ); Sakurai, M. ); Watanabe, M. ); Yamaguchi, A. ); Nagata, H.; Ohtani, M. )

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer reflectors and position sensitive detectors have been developed in constructing imaging optical systems in the 45--300 A region. Molybdenum-silicon (2{ital d}=140 A, {ital N}=20) and nickel--carbon (2{ital d}=100 A, {ital N}=20) multilayers were deposited on a spherical mirror (25 cm in diameter) for the normal incidence and on a segment of paraboloidal mirror (20 cm{times}10 cm) for 30{degree} grazing incidence. Their optical characteristics were evaluated by using characteristic x rays and monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the 45--300 A region. A position sensitive detector is made of a tandem microchannel plate (MCP) with a CsI photocathode and resistive plate, which is placed at the focal plane of each mirror. The detection efficiency and position resolution were measured by using characteristic x rays of C{ital K}{alpha} and monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the 45--200 A region.

  17. A position sensitive microchannel photomultiplier for ultraviolet space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1986-01-01

    The 25-mm microchannel-plate, position-sensitive UV astronomy photomultiplier tube presented is intended for the EOM-1 Spacelab Mission's FAUST payload and conducts wide-field imaging surveys in the VUV over the 1400-1800-A range. The sealed detector encompasses a CsI photocathode deposited on the inner surface of a MgF2 window, a stack of microchannel plates, and a wedge-and-strip two-dimensional position-sensing anode. Since the wedge-and-strip principle requires only three anode signals, flight electronics can be reduced to three charge amplifiers and three analog-to-digital converters.

  18. Position-Sensitive Nuclear Spectroscopy with Pixel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Granja, Carlos; Vykydal, Zdenek; Jakubek, Jan; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2007-10-26

    State-of-the-art hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors such as Medipix2 are suitable for energy- and position-sensitive nuclear spectroscopy. In addition to excellent energy- and spatial-resolution, these devices can operate in spectroscopic, single-quantum counting and/or on-line tracking mode. A devoted compact USB-readout interface provides functionality and ease of operation. The compact and versatile Medipix2/USB radiation camera provides visualization, vacuum and room-temperature operation as a real-time portable active nuclear emulsion.

  19. Position-sensitive photodetector for rotation-angle transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurin, N. T.; Novikov, S. G.; Korneev, I. V.; Shtan'ko, A. A.; Rodionov, V. A.

    2011-03-01

    A new position-sensitive photodetector (PSPD) for photoelectric transducers of rotation angle is described, which is based on a three-layer ring sector structure. The output voltage of the PSPD is a linear function of the angle of rotation of a light-emitting diode relative to the PSPD contacts. The proposed device is highly reliable and ensures angle determination to within 7 min of arc. Rotation-angle transducers based on this PSPD are compatible with any measuring, matching, and processing equipment.

  20. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with IonCCD Detection and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-03-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) is demonstrated for the first time with a commercially available ion detector—the IonCCD camera. Because DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique that provides spatially dispersive, simultaneous mass spectrometry, a position-sensitive ion detector is needed for mass-spectral collection. The IonCCD camera is a 5.1-cm long, 1-D array that is capable of simultaneous, multichannel ion detection along a focal plane, which makes it an attractive option for DOFMS. In the current study, the IonCCD camera is evaluated for DOFMS with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source over a relatively short field-free mass-separation distance of 25.3-30.4 cm. The combination of ICP-DOFMS and the IonCCD detector results in a mass-spectral resolving power (FWHM) of approximately 900 and isotope-ratio precision equivalent to or slightly better than current ICP-TOFMS systems. The measured isotope-ratio precision in % relative standard deviation (%RSD) was ≥0.008%RSD for nonconsecutive isotopes at 10-ppm concentration (near the ion-signal saturation point) and ≥0.02%RSD for all isotopes at 1-ppm. Results of DOFMS with the IonCCD camera are also compared with those of two previously characterized detection setups.

  1. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with IonCCD Detection and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Elise A; Ray, Steven J; Enke, Christie G; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2016-03-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) is demonstrated for the first time with a commercially available ion detector-the IonCCD camera. Because DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique that provides spatially dispersive, simultaneous mass spectrometry, a position-sensitive ion detector is needed for mass-spectral collection. The IonCCD camera is a 5.1-cm long, 1-D array that is capable of simultaneous, multichannel ion detection along a focal plane, which makes it an attractive option for DOFMS. In the current study, the IonCCD camera is evaluated for DOFMS with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source over a relatively short field-free mass-separation distance of 25.3-30.4 cm. The combination of ICP-DOFMS and the IonCCD detector results in a mass-spectral resolving power (FWHM) of approximately 900 and isotope-ratio precision equivalent to or slightly better than current ICP-TOFMS systems. The measured isotope-ratio precision in % relative standard deviation (%RSD) was ≥0.008%RSD for nonconsecutive isotopes at 10-ppm concentration (near the ion-signal saturation point) and ≥0.02%RSD for all isotopes at 1-ppm. Results of DOFMS with the IonCCD camera are also compared with those of two previously characterized detection setups. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26552388

  2. A three dimensionally position sensitive large area detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochodzalla, J.; Butsch, R.; Heck, B.; Hlawatsch, G.; Miczaika, A.; Rabe, H. J.; Rosner, G.

    1985-01-01

    A large area detector consisting of a parallel plate avalanche counter (PPAC) and a trapezohedral ionization chamber (TIC) is described. Its active area is 184 cm 2. The time resolution of the PPAC is 175 ps. The energy resolution of the TIC is 0.4%, the energy loss resolution 2.8%, the nuclear charge resolution 2.3%. The TIC is position sensitive in three dimensions. The position x is measured via a saw-tooth anode with a resolution of 0.7 mm; the drift time coordinate shows a resolution of δy ≅ mm. The range z is determined by a new technique, a graded density Frisch grid. It enlarges the dynamic range of the charge measurement down to the Bragg maximum at E/ A ˜ 1 MeV. The resolution is δZ/ Z ≅ 3.5%

  3. Positron camera using position-sensitive detectors: PENN-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Muehllehner, G.; Karp, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    A single-slice positron camera has been developed with good spatial resolution and high count rate capability. The camera uses a hexagonal arrangement of six position-sensitive NaI(Tl) detectors. The count rate capability of NaI(Tl) was extended to 800k cps through the use of pulse shortening. In order to keep the detectors stationary, an iterative reconstruction algorithm was modified which ignores the missing data in the gaps between the six detectors and gives artifact-free images. The spatial resolution, as determined from the image of point sources in air, is 6.5 mm full width at half maximum. We have also imaged a brain phantom and dog hearts.

  4. Detection of the Ammonium Ion in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B.; Fuente, A.; Domenech, J. L.; Cueto, M.; Carrasco, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Marcelino, N.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; Pearson, J.

    2013-07-01

    We report on the detection of a narrow feature at 262816.73 MHz toward Orion and the cold prestellar core B1-bS which we attribute to the 10-00 line of the deuterated ammonium ion, NH3D+. The observations were performed with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope. The carrier has to be a light molecular species as it is the only feature detected over 3.6 GHz of bandwidth. The hyperfine structure is not resolved, indicating a very low value for the electric quadrupolar coupling constant of nitrogen which is expected for NH3D+ as the electric field over the N nucleus is practically zero. Moreover, the feature is right at the predicted frequency for the 10-00 transition of the ammonium ion, 262817 ± 6 MHz (3σ), using rotational constants derived from new infrared data obtained in our laboratory in Madrid. The estimated column density is (1.1 ± 0.2) × 1012 cm-2. Assuming a deuterium enhancement similar to that of NH2D, we derive N(NH_4^+) ~= 2.6 × 1013 cm-2, i.e., an abundance for ammonium of a few 10-11. This work was based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain)

  5. DETECTION OF THE AMMONIUM ION IN SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B.; Fuente, A.; Domenech, J. L.; Cueto, M.; Carrasco, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Marcelino, N.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; Pearson, J.

    2013-07-01

    We report on the detection of a narrow feature at 262816.73 MHz toward Orion and the cold prestellar core B1-bS which we attribute to the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} line of the deuterated ammonium ion, NH{sub 3}D{sup +}. The observations were performed with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope. The carrier has to be a light molecular species as it is the only feature detected over 3.6 GHz of bandwidth. The hyperfine structure is not resolved, indicating a very low value for the electric quadrupolar coupling constant of nitrogen which is expected for NH{sub 3}D{sup +} as the electric field over the N nucleus is practically zero. Moreover, the feature is right at the predicted frequency for the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} transition of the ammonium ion, 262817 {+-} 6 MHz (3{sigma}), using rotational constants derived from new infrared data obtained in our laboratory in Madrid. The estimated column density is (1.1 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. Assuming a deuterium enhancement similar to that of NH{sub 2}D, we derive N(NH{sub 4}{sup +}) {approx_equal} 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, i.e., an abundance for ammonium of a few 10{sup -11}.

  6. Ion-Selective Detection with Glass Nanopipette for Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, T.; Son, J. W.; Kang, E. J.; Deng, X. L.; Kawai, T.; Lee, S.-W.; Park, B. H.

    2013-05-01

    We developed a method to probe local ion concentration with glass nanopipette in which poly(vinyl chloride) membrane containing ionophore for separate ion detection is prepared. Here we demonstrate how ion-selective detections are available for living cells such as HeLa cell, rat vascular myocyte, and neuron cell.

  7. Position sensitive x-ray spectrophotometer using microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Bumble, Bruce; Day, Peter K.; Eckart, Megan E.; Golwala, Sunil; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2006-11-27

    The surface impedance of a superconductor changes when energy is absorbed and Cooper pairs are broken to produce single electron (quasiparticle) excitations. This change may be sensitively measured using a thin-film resonant circuit called a microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID). The practical application of MKIDs for photon detection requires a method of efficiently coupling the photon energy to the MKID. The authors present results on position sensitive x-ray detectors made by using two aluminum MKIDs on either side of a tantalum photon absorber strip. Diffusion constants, recombination times, and energy resolution are reported. MKIDs can easily be scaled into large arrays.

  8. Gamma ray measurement of earth formation properties using a position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, D.S.

    1986-10-21

    This patent describes a system for measuring properties of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole at different radial distances from the borehole, comprising: a fluid tight hollow body member sized and adapted for passage through a well borehole and housing therein; a source of gamma rays and means for directing gamma rays from the source outwardly from the body member into earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole; and a position sensitive scintillation detector for detecting gamma rays scattered back into the body member from the earth formation in the vicinity of the borehole and means for collimating the scattered gamma rays onto the detector.

  9. Position sensitive x-ray spectrophotometer using microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Bumble, Bruce; Day, Peter K.; Eckart, Megan E.; Golwala, Sunil; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2006-11-01

    The surface impedance of a superconductor changes when energy is absorbed and Cooper pairs are broken to produce single electron (quasiparticle) excitations. This change may be sensitively measured using a thin-film resonant circuit called a microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID). The practical application of MKIDs for photon detection requires a method of efficiently coupling the photon energy to the MKID. The authors present results on position sensitive x-ray detectors made by using two aluminum MKIDs on either side of a tantalum photon absorber strip. Diffusion constants, recombination times, and energy resolution are reported. MKIDs can easily be scaled into large arrays.

  10. Measurement of spot dancing for focused beam in atmosphere using position sensitive photomultiplier tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Wenyue; Rao, Ruizhong

    2005-05-01

    The spot dancing of the focused laser beam in the turbulent atmosphere was studied using a two dimensional position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The centroid position of the laser spot was evaluated by means of current-dividing center-of-gravity detection. The system has advantage over detector array system in spatial resolution and over the imaging system in dynamic range and sampling rate. Laser propagation experiments were carried out over 1000m path above the sea level and the fluctuations of laser intensity were measured simultaneously. The frequency spectra were calculated by fast Fourier tansform and the standard deviation of the spot dancing were analyzed.

  11. Position Sensitive Detectors Mounted with Scintillators and Silicon Photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalhaes, Roberto P. M.; Bonifácio, Daniel A. B.; Moralles, Maurício

    2011-08-01

    This work presents the first results obtained in the "Assembly and characterization of position sensitive detectors composed of scintillators coupled to silicon photomultipliers" project. The development of new x and γ radiation detectors have found several technological applications, especially in medical physics, where γ detectors that can be used in high intensity magnetic field are of particular importance. The experimental setup consisted of coupling of two silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) to the small sides of a 3×3×100 mm3 scintillator and the coupling of one SiPM to one of the small sides of a 3×3×10 mm3 scintillator. We found that the detectors used in this study presented an energy resolution that is in agreement with those observed in scintillators of the same family coupled to conventional photomultipliers. Besides that, there is a strong correlation between the difference of the light intensity in both SiPMs of the long detector and the position of the γ source. The results confirm the great potential of application of such detectors.

  12. Beam tests of a 3-D position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Labanti, C.; Hall, C.J.; Agrinier, B.; Byard, K.; Dean, A.J.; Goldwurm, A.; Harding, J.S.

    1989-02-01

    An array of 30 position sensitive scintillator bars has been tested in a gamma-ray beam from I.N.S.T.N. Van de Graff facility at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay, France. The gamma-ray energies ranged from 6 MeV to 17 MeV. The bars are similar to those proposed for use in the GRASP gamma-ray telescope satellite imaging plane. They are manufactured from CsI(T1) covered with a highly reflective diffusive wrapping, and are read out using large area PIN photodiodes. Each bar measures 15.0 cm by 1.3 cm by 1.3 cm. The beam test unit was comprised of 30 bars stacked in a 5 by 6 array. The photodiodes were optically coupled to the end face of each bar and were connected to a processing chain comprised of a low noise preamplifier, a high gain shaping amplifier, and a digitisation and data collection system. Several experiments were performed with the unit to assess the spectral response, position resolution, and background rejection capabilities of the complete detector. The test procedure is explained and some results are presented.

  13. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  14. Canadian Penning Trap Mass Measurements using a Position Sensitive MCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuta, Trenton; Aprahamian, Ani; Marley, Scott; Nystrom, Andrew; Clark, Jason; Perez Galvan, Adrian; Hirsh, Tsviki; Savard, Guy; Orford, Rodney; Morgan, Graeme

    2015-10-01

    The primary focus of the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) located at Argonne National Lab is to determine the masses of various isotopes produced in the spontaneous fission of Californium. Currently, the CPT is operating in conjunction with CARIBU at the ATLAS facility in an attempt to measure neutron-rich nuclei produced by a 1.5 Curie source of Californium 252. The masses of nuclei produced in fission is accomplished by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the isotopes circling within the trap. This frequency is determined by a position sensitive MCP, which records the relative position of the isotope in the trap at different times. Using these position changes over time in connection with a center spot, angles between these positions are calculated and used to determine the frequency. Most of the work currently being conducted on the CPT is focused on the precision of these frequency measurements. The use of traps has revolutionized the measurements of nuclear masses to very high precision. The optimization methods employed here include focusing the beam in order to reduce the spread on the position of the isotope as well as the tuning of the MR-ToF, a mass separator that is intended on removing contaminants in the beam. This work was supported by the nuclear Grant PHY-1419765 for the University of Notre Dame.

  15. A neutralization charge detection method for detecting ions under ambient and liquid-phase conditions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ko-Keng; Cai, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2016-04-14

    The neutralization charge detection method detects induction signals produced from the neutralization of electric charges of ions at metal surfaces. The signals are intense and can propagate through phase boundaries for detection. The detection method can detect ions under ambient and liquid-phase conditions with high senstivity and fast response time. PMID:26996136

  16. Detection method for dissociation of multiple-charged ions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.; Rockwood, Alan L.

    1991-01-01

    Dissociations of multiple-charged ions are detected and analyzed by charge-separation tandem mass spectrometry. Analyte molecules are ionized to form multiple-charged parent ions. A particular charge parent ion state is selected in a first-stage mass spectrometer and its mass-to-charge ratio (M/Z) is detected to determine its mass and charge. The selected parent ions are then dissociated, each into a plurality of fragments including a set of daughter ions each having a mass of at least one molecular weight and a charge of at least one. Sets of daughter ions resulting from the dissociation of one parent ion (sibling ions) vary in number but typically include two to four ions, one or more multiply-charged. A second stage mass spectrometer detects mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of the daughter ions and a temporal or temporo-spatial relationship among them. This relationship is used to correlate the daughter ions to determine which (m/z) ratios belong to a set of sibling ions. Values of mass and charge of each of the sibling ions are determined simultaneously from their respective (m/z) ratios such that the sibling ion charges are integers and sum to the parent ion charge.

  17. Development of a simple test device for spindle error measurement using a position sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Jywe, Wen-Yuh; Lee, Hau-Wei

    2004-09-01

    A new spindle error measurement system has been developed in this paper. It employs a design development rotational fixture with a built-in laser diode and four batteries to replace a precision reference master ball or cylinder used in the traditional method. Two measuring devices with two position sensitive detectors (one is designed for the measurement of the compound X-axis and Y-axis errors and the other is designed with a lens for the measurement of the tilt angular errors) are fixed on the machine table to detect the laser point position from the laser diode in the rotational fixture. When the spindle rotates, the spindle error changes the direction of the laser beam. The laser beam is then divided into two separated beams by a beam splitter. The two separated beams are projected onto the two measuring devices and are detected by two position sensitive detectors, respectively. Thus, the compound motion errors and the tilt angular errors of the spindle can be obtained. Theoretical analysis and experimental tests are presented in this paper to separate the compound errors into two radial errors and tilt angular errors. This system is proposed as a new instrument and method for spindle metrology.

  18. Development of position sensitive scintillation counter for balloon-borne hard x-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Keisuke; Kunieda, Hideyo; Ogasaka, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Shibata, Ryo; Nakamura, Tomokazu; Ohnishi, Katsuhiko; Kanou, Yasufumi; Miyata, Emi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2006-06-01

    We have been developing position sensitive scintillation counter as focal plane detector of hard X-ray telescope onboard a balloon borne experiment. This detector consists NaI(TI) scintillator and position sensitive photo-multiplier tube. Focal plane detector has to have high efficiency in hard X-ray region, enough position resolution and detection area. 3mm thickness of NaI(TI) scintillator can achieve almost 100% efficiency below 80 keV. We measured position resolved energy and position resolution in synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8 BL20B2. Position resolution of 2.4mm at 60keV is about half of plate scale of half power diameter of X-ray telescope. The detector has 6 cm diameter window and it corresponds to 25 arcmin field of view, and it is enough lager than the that of telescope, which is 12 arcmin in FWHM. Balloon borne experiment for observation of the background was performed on May 24, 2005 from Sanriku balloon center. We could obtain background data for 3 hours at altitude of 40 km.

  19. Negative ion spectrometry for detecting nitrated explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, H. G.; Yinon, J.

    1975-01-01

    Ionization procedure is modified to produce mainly negative ions by electron capture. Peaks of negative ions are monitored conventionally. Nitrated organic materials could be identified directly from sample sniff inlet stream by suitably modified mass spectrometer because of unique electronegativity which nitro group imparts to organic material.

  20. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites.

  1. Indirect detection of halide ions via fluorescence quenching of quinine sulfate in microcolumn ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Toyohide; Sumida, Junichi

    2004-06-01

    Halide ions could be visualized via fluorescence quenching in microcolumn ion chromatography. The fluorescence of quinine sulfate, which was contained in an acidic eluent, was quenched by halide ions. The observed fluorescence quenching values increased in this order: iodide, bromide, and chloride. The present detection system was relatively sensitive to halide ions except for fluoride: other anions gave smaller signals than halide ions. The present detection system provided quantitative information, so it could be applied to the determination of chloride in water samples. PMID:15228124

  2. Read-out of scintillating fibres using a weak cross-talk position-sensitive photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agoritsas, V.; Akchurin, N.; Bing, O.; Bravar, A.; Drevenak, R.; Finger, Mic.; Finger, Mir.; Flaminio, V.; Digirolamo, B.; Gorin, A.; Kuroda, K.; Manuilov, I.; Okada, K.; Onel, Y.; Penzo, A.; Rappazzo, G. F.; Riazantsev, A.; Slunecka, M.; Takeutchi, F.; Yoshida, T.

    1998-02-01

    Fast and precise readout of scintillating fibres (SciFi) has a great potential for fast tracking and triggering at high-luminosity particle physics experiments. In the framework of the RD-17 experiment at CERN (FAROS) significant milestones in the development of SciFi detectors using position-sensitive photomultipliers have been achieved. Results obtained with a weak cross-talk multi-anode photomultiplier, Philips XP1724, and a parallel readout of the anodes are reported. With 0.5 mm diameter fibres a spatial resolution of about 125 μm and a detection efficiency in excess of 95% have been obtained. The time dispersion of signals from individual photomultiplier channels has been estimated to be about 1 ns. The possibility of digitising the track position in real time by a peak-sensing circuit is studied for the first time

  3. Measuring relative-story displacement and local inclination angle using multiple position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Matsuya, Iwao; Katamura, Ryuta; Sato, Maya; Iba, Miroku; Kondo, Hideaki; Kanekawa, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Motoichi; Hatada, Tomohiko; Nitta, Yoshihiro; Tanii, Takashi; Shoji, Shuichi; Nishitani, Akira; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel sensor system for monitoring the structural health of a building. The system optically measures the relative-story displacement during earthquakes for detecting any deformations of building elements. The sensor unit is composed of three position sensitive detectors (PSDs) and lenses capable of measuring the relative-story displacement precisely, even if the PSD unit was inclined in response to the seismic vibration. For verification, laboratory tests were carried out using an Xθ-stage and a shaking table. The static experiment verified that the sensor could measure the local inclination angle as well as the lateral displacement. The dynamic experiment revealed that the accuracy of the sensor was 150 μm in the relative-displacement measurement and 100 μrad in the inclination angle measurement. These results indicate that the proposed sensor system has sufficient accuracy for the measurement of relative-story displacement in response to the seismic vibration. PMID:22163434

  4. Frequency-scanning MALDI linear ion trap mass spectrometer for large biomolecular ion detection.

    PubMed

    Lu, I-Chung; Lin, Jung Lee; Lai, Szu-Hsueh; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2011-11-01

    This study presents the first report on the development of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) linear ion trap mass spectrometer for large biomolecular ion detection by frequency scan. We designed, installed, and tested this radio frequency (RF) scan linear ion trap mass spectrometer and its associated electronics to dramatically extend the mass region to be detected. The RF circuit can be adjusted from 300 to 10 kHz with a set of operation amplifiers. To trap the ions produced by MALDI, a high pressure of helium buffer gas was employed to quench extra kinetic energy of the heavy ions produced by MALDI. The successful detection of the singly charged secretory immunoglobulin A ions indicates that the detectable mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of this system can reach ~385 000 or beyond. PMID:21932813

  5. High-sensitivity detection of negative ions in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrumb, J. L.; Arnold, F.

    1981-11-01

    High-sensitivity, in situ measurements of the negative ion composition of the stratosphere are presented which have led to the detection of previously unobserved ion species. The balloon-borne measurements were made by an instrument consisting of a cryogenically pumped quadrupole mass filter with single ion detection by a channel electron multiplier operating in a pulse-saturated ion counting mode, with an ion detection limit of about 1 ion/cu cm. Mass spectra taken during a daytime flight over southwestern France at a float altitude of 34 km reveal the presence of ions in the families NO3(-)(HNO3)(a) and HSO4(-)(H2SO4)(b)(HNO3)(c) at fractional ion count rates between 0.9 and 6.5%. Minor ions detected at count rates between 0.05 and 0.4% include those containing NO3(-) and HSO4(-) cores, as well as CN(-) and CO3 and CO3(-).H2O. Ligands identified for these molecules include HNO3 and H2SO4 and, tentatively, H2O, HCl, HNO2 and HOCl. An atmospheric nitric acid concentration of 7 x 10 to the 7th/cu cm is estimated on the basis of the NO3(-) and HNO3 species data.

  6. Method of detecting luminescent target ions with modified magnetic microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Kaminski, Michael D

    2014-05-13

    This invention provides methods of using modified magnetic microspheres to extract target ions from a sample in order to detect their presence in a microfluidic environment. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules on the surface that allow the target ions in the sample to form complexes with specific ligand molecules on the microsphere surface. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules that sequester the target ions from the sample, but specific ligand molecules in solution subsequently re-extract the target ions from the microspheres into the solution, where the complexes form independent of the microsphere surface. Once the complexes form, they are exposed to an excitation wavelength light source suitable for exciting the target ion to emit a luminescent signal pattern. Detection of the luminescent signal pattern allows for determination of the presence of the target ions in the sample.

  7. Ion Trap with Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes for Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Oleg Y.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm in ion trap (cell) design for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) is the ion detection with wide aperture detection electrodes. Specifically, excitation and detection electrodes are typically 90° wide and positioned radially at a similar distance from the ICR cell axis. Here, we demonstrate that ion detection with narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) positioned radially inward of the cell's axis is feasible and advantageous for FT-ICR MS. We describe design details and performance characteristics of a 10 T FT-ICR MS equipped with a NADEL ICR cell having a pair of narrow aperture (flat) detection electrodes and a pair of standard 90° excitation electrodes. Despite a smaller surface area of the detection electrodes, the sensitivity of the NADEL ICR cell is not reduced attributable to improved excite field distribution, reduced capacitance of the detection electrodes, and their closer positioning to the orbits of excited ions. The performance characteristics of the NADEL ICR cell are comparable with the state-of-the-art FT-ICR MS implementations for small molecule, peptide, protein, and petroleomics analyses. In addition, the NADEL ICR cell's design improves the flexibility of ICR cells and facilitates implementation of advanced capabilities (e.g., quadrupolar ion detection for improved mainstream applications). It also creates an intriguing opportunity for addressing the major bottleneck in FTMS—increasing its throughput via simultaneous acquisition of multiple transients or via generation of periodic non-sinusoidal transient signals.

  8. Ion Source Development for Ultratrace Detection of Uranium and Thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Batchelder, Jon Charles; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Stracener, Daniel W

    2015-01-01

    A hot-cavity surface ionization source and a hot-cavity laser ion source are evaluated in terms of ionization efficiencies for generating ion beams of U and Th. The work is motivated by the need for more efficient ion sources for detecting ultratrace U and Th impurities in a copper matrix by mass spectrometry techniques such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The performances of the ion sources are characterized using uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate sample materials and sample sizes of 20 - 40 g of U or Th. For the surface source, the dominant ion beams observed are UO+ or ThO+ and ionization efficiencies of 2-4% have been obtained with W and Re cavities. Three-step resonant photoionization of U atoms is studied and an ionization efficiency of 8.7% has been obtained with the laser ion source. The positive ion sources promise more than an order of magnitude more efficient than conventional Cs-sputter negative ion sources used for AMS. In addition, the laser ion source is highly selective and effective in suppressing interfering and ions. Work is in progress to improve the efficiencies of both positive ion sources.

  9. Ion detection device and method with compressing ion-beam shutter

    DOEpatents

    Sperline, Roger P [Tucson, AZ

    2009-05-26

    An ion detection device, method and computer readable medium storing instructions for applying voltages to shutter elements of the detection device to compress ions in a volume defined by the shutter elements and to output the compressed ions to a collector. The ion detection device has a chamber having an inlet and receives ions through the inlet, a shutter provided in the chamber opposite the inlet and configured to allow or prevent the ions to pass the shutter, the shutter having first and second shutter elements, a collector provided in the chamber opposite the shutter and configured to collect ions passed through the shutter, and a processing unit electrically connected to the first and second shutter elements. The processing unit applies, during a first predetermined time interval, a first voltage to the first shutter element and a second voltage to the second shutter element, the second voltage being lower than the first voltage such that ions from the inlet enter a volume defined by the first and second shutter elements, and during a second predetermined time interval, a third voltage to the first shutter element, higher than the first voltage, and a fourth voltage to the second shutter element, the third voltage being higher than the fourth voltage such that ions that entered the volume are compressed as the ions exit the volume and new ions coming from the inlet are prevented from entering the volume. The processing unit is electrically connected to the collector and configured to detect the compressed ions based at least on a current received from the collector and produced by the ions collected by the collector.

  10. Detection of gunpowder stabilizers with ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    West, C; Baron, G; Minet, J-J

    2007-03-01

    This study is the first reported ion mobility detection of ethyl centralite and diphenylamine (DPA) smokeless gunpowder stabilizers, together with the nitroso and nitro derivatives of diphenylamine. First, the applicability of the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for the substances of interest was determined. The existence of numerous peaks, both in positive and negative modes, clearly demonstrates the success of these experiments. All mono and di-nitro derivatives of DPA tested were detected with this method. Unfortunately, many of the ions generated were not accurately identified. However, reduced mobility constants representative of each ion generated under defined operating conditions could be used for purpose of compound identification. The method was then successfully tested on real gunpowder samples. By the use of IMS, we managed to establish a rapid, simple and sensitive screening method for the detection and identification of smokeless gunpowder organic components. PMID:16828537

  11. Mass-dependent channel electron multiplier operation. [for ion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, S. A.; Burch, J. L.; Oran, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    The absolute counting efficiency and pulse height distributions of a continuous-channel electron multiplier used in the detection of hydrogen, argon and xenon ions are assessed. The assessment technique, which involves the post-acceleration of 8-eV ion beams to energies from 100 to 4000 eV, provides information on counting efficiency versus post-acceleration voltage characteristics over a wide range of ion mass. The charge pulse height distributions for H2 (+), A (+) and Xe (+) were measured by operating the experimental apparatus in a marginally gain-saturated mode. It was found that gain saturation occurs at lower channel multiplier operating voltages for light ions such as H2 (+) than for the heavier ions A (+) and Xe (+), suggesting that the technique may be used to discriminate between these two classes of ions in electrostatic analyzers.

  12. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Arnold, C. W.; Tovesson, F.; Meierbachtol, K.; Bredeweg, T.; Jandel, M.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Laptev, A.; Rusev, G.; Shields, D. W.; White, M.; et al

    2014-07-09

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) is a 2E–2v spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with α-particles from 229Th and its decay chain and α-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from 252Cf. Each detector module is comprised of thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flightmore » times were measured with 250 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to a precision of 0.5%. As a result, an ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for modestly efficient measurements of light fission fragments with unit mass resolution.« less

  13. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C. W.; Tovesson, F.; Meierbachtol, K.; Bredeweg, T.; Jandel, M.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Laptev, A.; Rusev, G.; Shields, D. W.; White, M.; Blakeley, R. E.; Mader, D. M.; Hecht, A. A.

    2014-07-09

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) is a 2E–2v spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with α-particles from 229Th and its decay chain and α-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from 252Cf. Each detector module is comprised of thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flight times were measured with 250 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to a precision of 0.5%. As a result, an ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for modestly efficient measurements of light fission fragments with unit mass resolution.

  14. High spatial resolution two-dimensional position sensitive detector for the performance of coincidence experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ceolin, D.; Chaplier, G.; Lemonnier, M.; Garcia, G.A.; Miron, C.; Nahon, L.; Simon, M.; Leclercq, N.; Morin, P.

    2005-04-01

    A position sensitive detector (PSD) adapted to the technical and mechanical specifications of our angle and energy resolved electron-ion(s) coincidence experiments is described in this article. The device, whose principle is very similar to the one detailed by J. H. D. Eland [Meas. Sci. Technol. 5, 1501 (1994)], is composed by a set of microchannel plates and a delay line anode. The originality comes from the addition in front of the encoding surface of a ceramic disk covered by a resistive surface. The capacitive coupling between the anode and the resistive plane has the double advantage of eliminating the spatial modulations due to the lattice of the anode and also of sensitizing a greater number of electrodes, increasing thus considerably the accuracy of the position measurements. The tests carried out with a time to digital conversion module of 250 ps resolution showed that a spatial resolution better than 50 {mu}m and a dead time of 160 ns can be achieved. Typical images obtained with the help of the EPICEA and DELICIOUS coincidence setups are also shown.

  15. Performance of resistive-charge position sensitive detectors for RBS/Channeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. A.; Wahl, U.; Catarino, N.; Ribeiro da Silva, M.; Alves, E.

    2014-10-01

    The performance of two types of 1×1 cm2 photodiode position sensitive detectors (PSDs) based on resistive charge division was evaluated for their use in Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling (RBS/C) experiments in blocking geometry. Their energy resolution was first determined for ~ 5.5 MeV alpha particles from a radioactive sources, and values of full width half maximum (FWHM) of 22 keV and 33 keV were achieved using a shaping time constant of τ = 2.0 μs. Additional tests were performed using backscattered 4He particles from the 2.0 MeV beam of a Van de Graaff accelerator. While the 22 keV FWHM detector failed after exposure to less than 5×106 cm-24He particles, the other did not show any noticeable deterioration due to radiation damage for a fluence of 4×108 cm-2. For this type of PSD position resolution (τ = 0.5 μs) standard deviations of ΔL = 0.072 mm at ~ 5.5 MeV and ΔL = 0.247 mm at 1.1 MeV were achieved. RBS/Channeling experiments using PSD were performed on several crystalline samples, showing that this setup seems suitable for lattice location studies, particularly for heavy ions implantation (D ≳1015 at /cm2) on light substrates like Si, SiC, and AlN.

  16. Highly sensitive determination of hydrazine ion by ion-exclusion chromatography with ion-exchange enhancement of conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Xu, Qun; Ikedo, Mikaru; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi

    2004-06-11

    An ion-exclusion chromatography method with ion-exchange enhancement of conductivity was developed for the selective separation and sensitive determination of hydrazine ion from alkali/alkaline earth metal cations and ammonium ion. Hydrazine ion was separated by ion-exclusion/penetration effect from other cations on a weakly basic anion-exchange column in the OH- form (TSKgel DEAE-5PW). Moreover, two different ion-exchange resin columns were inserted between the separating column and conductimetric detector in order to improve the sensitivity of hydrazine ion. The first enhancement column packed with a strongly basic anion-exchange resin in the SO4(2-) form (TSKgel SAX) for hydrazine ion can convert from N2H5OH to (N2H5)2SO4. Moreover, the second enhancement column packed with a strongly acidic cation-change resin in the H+ form (TSKgel SCX) can convert to H2SO4. As a result, the sensitivity of hydrazine ion using two conductivity enhancement columns could be 26.8-times greater than using the separating column alone. This method was effectiveness also for the enhancement of ammonium ion (6.1-times) and sodium ion (1.2-times). The calibration graph of hydrazine ion detected as H2SO4 was linear over the concentration range of 0.001-100 ppm (r2 = 0.9988). The detection limit of hydrazine ion in this system was 0.64 ppb. Therefore, hydrazine ion in real boiler water sample could be accurately determined, avoiding the interference of other cations. PMID:15250415

  17. Ion source development for ultratrace detection of uranium and thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Batchelder, J. C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Chu, R.; Fan, S.; Romero-Romero, E.; Stracener, D. W.

    2015-10-01

    Efficient ion sources are needed for detecting ultratrace U and Th impurities in a copper matrix by mass spectrometry techniques such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Two positive ion sources, a hot-cavity surface ionization source and a resonant ionization laser ion source, are evaluated in terms of ionization efficiencies for generating ion beams of U and Th. The performances of the ion sources are characterized using uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate sample materials with sample sizes between 20 and 40 μg of U or Th. For the surface ion source, the dominant ion beams observed are UO+ or ThO+ and ionization efficiencies of 2-4% have been obtained with W and Re cavities. With the laser ion source, three-step resonant photoionization of U atoms has been studied and only atomic U ions are observed. An ionization efficiency of about 9% has been demonstrated. The performances of both ion sources are expected to be further improved.

  18. Semiconductor diodes as neutron detectors for position-sensitive measurements and for application in personal neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzhaeuser, Michael; Dehoff, A.; Engels, R.; Hoengesberg, F.; Lauter, J.; Luth, Hans; Reetz, M.; Reinartz, Richard; Richter, H.; Schelten, Jim; Schmitz, Th.; Steffen, A.; Vockenberg, Th.

    1997-02-01

    A new design for a position-sensitive detector system for thermal neutrons is introduced. The detection principle with a thin 6LiF converter on the surface of a semiconductor diode is described. In experiments with thermal neutrons, a spatial resolution of 1.25 mm was obtained. The detector is insensitive to (gamma) -rays with energies up to 1.5 MeV. The design of a detector with an improvement of the detection efficiency for thermal neutrons from 2.5 percent up to 35 percent is also proposed and the present state of the process development for its fabrication is described.

  19. Position sensitivity of graphene field effect transistors to X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cazalas, Edward Moore, Michael E.; Jovanovic, Igor; Sarker, Biddut K.; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-06-01

    Device architectures that incorporate graphene to realize detection of electromagnetic radiation typically utilize the direct absorbance of radiation by graphene. This limits their effective area to the size of the graphene and their applicability to lower-energy, less penetrating forms of radiation. In contrast, graphene-based transistor architectures that utilize the field effect as the detection mechanism can be sensitive to interactions of radiation not only with graphene but also with the surrounding substrate. Here, we report the study of the position sensitivity and response of a graphene-based field effect transistor (GFET) to penetrating, well-collimated radiation (micro-beam X-rays), producing ionization in the substrate primarily away from graphene. It is found that responsivity and response speed are strongly dependent on the X-ray beam distance from graphene and the gate voltage applied to the GFET. To develop an understanding of the spatially dependent response, a model is developed that incorporates the volumetric charge generation, transport, and recombination. The model is in good agreement with the observed spatial response characteristics of the GFET and predicts a greater response potential of the GFET to radiation interacting near its surface. The study undertaken provides the necessary insight into the volumetric nature of the GFET response, essential for development of GFET-based detectors for more penetrating forms of ionizing radiation.

  20. Detection of gaseous organophosphorus compounds using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Todd, P.J.

    1985-04-01

    Molecular secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been investigated for sensitivity and selectivity in the analysis of gaseous organophosphorus compounds. Abundant analyte ions were observed when the gaseous organophosphorus compounds were admitted into the secondary ion source, where a matrix was under primary ion bombardment. The best matrix for the detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), trimethyl phosphate (TMP), and diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) was determined to be polyphosphoric acid. The abundance of secondary analyte ions was observed to be linear with the introduction rate of gaseous analyte. The introduction rate necessary to produce a 3:1 signal-to-noise ratio in the intensity of secondary protonated molecular ions from DMMP was estimated to be 4 x 10/sup -11/ mols/sup -1/. Substantially more analyte fragmentation is observed by using SIMS than by using methane chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Ten compounds representative of other compound classes were investigated in the same manner as the organic phosphonates; characteristic secondary protonated molecular ions were detected from amines only.

  1. Gamma ray measurement of earth formation properties using a position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, D.S.; Beard, W.J.

    1987-01-20

    This patent describes a system for measuring properties of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole at different radial distances from the borehole, comprising: a fluid tight hollow body member sized and adapted for passage through a well borehole and housing therein; a source of gamma rays and means for directing gamma rays from the source outwardly from the body member into earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole; and a position sensitive scintillation detector for detecting gamma rays scattered back into the body member from the earth formation in the vicinity of the borehole, means for collimating the scattered gamma rays onto the detector. The detector comprises scintillation crystal means having discrete longitudinally spaced active regions or bins and is longitudinally spaced from the gamma ray source. It has a longitudinal length L and two opposite ends and photomultiplier tubes optically coupled to the opposite ends for providing output voltage signals having voltage amplitudes A and B representative of the intensity of scintillation events occurring in the crystal and impinging at the opposite ends thereof. A means separates the bins for selectively attenuating light passing therebetween, and a means combines the output voltage signals A and B according to a predetermined relationship to derive the discrete bin along the length L of each of the scintillation events in the crystal, thereby providing measurements of the gamma ray scattering properties of the earth formations at different radial distances from the borehole.

  2. Performance of BF{sub 3} Filled Position Sensitive Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Shraddha S.; Devan, Shylaja; Krishna, P. S. R.

    2011-07-15

    {sup 3}He filled position sensitive detectors (PSD)s developed in-house are successfully used for neutron scattering studies at Dhruva. However recent global scarcity of {sup 3}He has made it essential to find an alternative. It is very difficult to meet performance capabilities of {sup 3}He for neutron detection in any of the alternate materials. Among various alternatives, BF{sub 3} gas can be one. We have recently put an effort to evaluate performance of BF{sub 3} based PSD. For that a PSD filled with BF{sub 3} gas at 0.8 bar pressure is fabricated and characterized. Performances of the same with Pu-Be source and at Hi-Q Diffractometer, Dhruva are reported in this paper. Diffraction spectra from standard samples Fe and Si at wavelength 0.783 A were recorded. It is found that while position resolution of the BF{sub 3} filled PSD is comparable but the efficiency is 20 times less than that of a {sup 3}He(12 bar) filled PSD.

  3. Position-sensitive proportional counter with low-resistance metal-wire anode

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.

    1980-01-01

    A position-sensitive proportional counter circuit is provided which allows the use of a conventional (low-resistance, metal-wire anode) proportional counter for spatial resolution of an ionizing event along the anode of the counter. A pair of specially designed active-capacitance preamplifiers are used to terminate the anode ends wherein the anode is treated as an RC line. The preamplifiers act as stabilized active capacitance loads and each is composed of a series-feedback, low-noise amplifier, a unity-gain, shunt-feedback amplifier whose output is connected through a feedback capacitor to the series-feedback amplifier input. The stabilized capacitance loading of the anode allows distributed RC-line position encoding and subsequent time difference decoding by sensing the difference in rise times of pulses at the anode ends where the difference is primarily in response to the distributed capacitance along the anode. This allows the use of lower resistance wire anodes for spatial radiation detection which simplifies the counter construction and handling of the anodes, and stabilizes the anode resistivity at high count rates (>10.sup.6 counts/sec).

  4. Ultrasensitive detection of force and displacement using trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Biercuk, Michael J; Uys, Hermann; Britton, Joe W; VanDevender, Aaron P; Bollinger, John J

    2010-09-01

    The ability to detect extremely small forces and nanoscale displacements is vital for disciplines such as precision spin-resonance imaging, microscopy, and tests of fundamental physical phenomena. Current force-detection sensitivity limits have surpassed 1 aN Hz(-1/2) (refs 6,7) through coupling of nanomechanical resonators to a variety of physical readout systems. Here, we demonstrate that crystals of trapped atomic ions behave as nanoscale mechanical oscillators and may form the core of exquisitely sensitive force and displacement detectors. We report the detection of forces with a sensitivity of 390 +/- 150 yN Hz(-1/2), which is more than three orders of magnitude better than existing reports using nanofabricated devices(7), and discriminate ion displacements of approximately 18 nm. Our technique is based on the excitation of tunable normal motional modes in an ion trap and detection through phase-coherent Doppler velocimetry, and should ultimately allow force detection with a sensitivity better than 1 yN Hz(-1/2) (ref. 16). Trapped-ion-based sensors could enable scientists to explore new regimes in materials science where augmented force, field and displacement sensitivity may be traded against reduced spatial resolution. PMID:20729835

  5. Ultrasensitive detection of force and displacement using trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biercuk, Michael J.; Uys, Hermann; Britton, Joe W.; Vandevender, Aaron P.; Bollinger, John J.

    2010-09-01

    The ability to detect extremely small forces and nanoscale displacements is vital for disciplines such as precision spin-resonance imaging, microscopy, and tests of fundamental physical phenomena. Current force-detection sensitivity limits have surpassed 1 aN Hz-1/2 (refs 6,7) through coupling of nanomechanical resonators to a variety of physical readout systems. Here, we demonstrate that crystals of trapped atomic ions behave as nanoscale mechanical oscillators and may form the core of exquisitely sensitive force and displacement detectors. We report the detection of forces with a sensitivity of 390 +/- 150 yN Hz-1/2, which is more than three orders of magnitude better than existing reports using nanofabricated devices7, and discriminate ion displacements of ~18 nm. Our technique is based on the excitation of tunable normal motional modes in an ion trap and detection through phase-coherent Doppler velocimetry, and should ultimately allow force detection with a sensitivity better than 1 yN Hz-1/2 (ref. 16). Trapped-ion-based sensors could enable scientists to explore new regimes in materials science where augmented force, field and displacement sensitivity may be traded against reduced spatial resolution.

  6. Development of Gamma-Ray Compton Imager Using Room-Temperature 3-D Position Sensitive Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong He; David Whe; Glenn Knoll

    2003-05-14

    During the three years of this project, two 3-dimensional position sensitive CdZnTe spectrometers were upgraded in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A prototype Compton-scattering gamma-ray imager was assembled using the two upgraded CdZnTe detectors. The performance of both gamma-ray spectrometers were individually tested. The angular resolution and detection sensitivity of the imaging system were measured using both a point and a line-shaped 137 Cs radiation source. The measurement results are consistent with that obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations performed during the early phase of the project.

  7. Barium Qubit State Detection and Ba Ion-Photon Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnova, Ksenia; Inlek, Ismail Volkan; Crocker, Clayton; Lichtman, Martin; Monroe, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    A modular ion-trap network is a promising framework for scalable quantum-computational devices. In this architecture, different ion-trap modules are connected via photonic buses while within one module ions interact locally via phonons. To eliminate cross-talk between photonic-link qubits and memory qubits, we use different atomic species for quantum information storage (171 Yb+) and intermodular communication (138 Ba+). Conventional deterministic Zeeman-qubit state detection schemes require additional stabilized narrow-linewidth lasers. Instead, we perform fast probabilistic state detection utilizing efficient detectors and high-NA lenses to detect emitted photons from circularly polarized 493 nm laser excitation. Our method is not susceptible to intensity and frequency noise, and we show single-shot detection efficiency of ~ 2%, meaning that we can discriminate between the two qubits states with 99% confidence after as little as 50 ms of averaging. Using this measurement technique, we report entanglement between a single 138 Ba+ ion and its emitted photon with 86% fidelity. This work is supported by the ARO with funding from the IARPA MQCO program, the DARPA Quiness program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Transduction, and the ARL Center for Distributed Quantum Information.

  8. LABORATORY DETECTION OF PLASTICS IN SEEDCOTTON WITH ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US cotton industry wants to increase market share and value by supplying pure cotton. Removing contamination requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to determine if Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be used to find small amounts of plastic in ...

  9. Fluorescence sensor for sequential detection of zinc and phosphate ions.

    PubMed

    An, Miran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Seo, Hansol; Helal, Aasif; Kim, Hong-Seok

    2016-12-01

    A new, highly selective turn-on fluorescent chemosensor based on 2-(2'-tosylamidophenyl)thiazole (1) for the detection of zinc and phosphate ions in ethanol was synthesized and characterized. Sensor 1 showed a high selectivity for zinc compared to other cations and sequentially detected hydrogen pyrophosphate and hydrogen phosphate. The fluorescence mechanism can be explained by two different mechanisms: (i) the inhibition of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and (ii) chelation-induced enhanced fluorescence by binding with Zn(2+). The sequential detection of phosphate anions was achieved by the quenching and subsequent revival of ESIPT. PMID:27343439

  10. Fluorescence sensor for sequential detection of zinc and phosphate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Miran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Seo, Hansol; Helal, Aasif; Kim, Hong-Seok

    2016-12-01

    A new, highly selective turn-on fluorescent chemosensor based on 2-(2‧-tosylamidophenyl)thiazole (1) for the detection of zinc and phosphate ions in ethanol was synthesized and characterized. Sensor 1 showed a high selectivity for zinc compared to other cations and sequentially detected hydrogen pyrophosphate and hydrogen phosphate. The fluorescence mechanism can be explained by two different mechanisms: (i) the inhibition of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and (ii) chelation-induced enhanced fluorescence by binding with Zn2 +. The sequential detection of phosphate anions was achieved by the quenching and subsequent revival of ESIPT.

  11. Developments in suppressor technology for inorganic ion analysis by ion chromatography using conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Hadda, Paul R; Jackson, Peter E; Shaw, Matthew J

    2003-06-01

    A review is presented detailing the development and use of suppression devices for the conductimetric detection of inorganic ions by ion chromatography (IC). An overview of the general response equation for conductivity detection is also given. Topics of discussion include the role and function of suppressors, the development of early suppressors including packed column and membrane devices from 1975 to 1990 and the subsequent progression towards present day commercially available suppressors and recent innovations. Post-suppression devices for signal enhancement are also discussed. PMID:12877197

  12. Detection of RF Perturbations Using an Ion Beam Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    P. Schoch; K. Connor; J. Si

    2005-09-21

    A Heavy Ion Beam Probe, HIBP, has been installed on a helicon plasma device. The objective was to measure plasma fluctuations at the 13.55MHz RF frequency. This offers a unique challenge for the HIBP, because the transit time of the probing ion is long compared to the fluctuations of interest. For previous HIBPs, the transit time has been short compared to the period of the fluctuations which permits one to assume that the magnetic and electric fields are static. Modeling has shown that the diagnostic will still accurately measure the average potential. The fluctuating potential was to be detected but the absolute magnitude is difficult to determine with signal from a single point. However, modeling indicates multipoint measurements will allow one to resolve the absolute fluctuation magnitude. Work supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-99ER5452985 During the funding of this grant, a helicon plasma discharge device was built and operated. A Heavy Ion Beam Probe primary system was installed and operated. A primary beam detector was installed and primary beam was detected both with and without plasma. Attempts were made to detect secondary ions using the primary beam detector, without success. Given the lack of a detectable signal, the energy analyzer of the HIBP system was never installed. It is available for installation if there is a reason to do so in the future. Analysis of the system indicated that the plasma electron temperature, estimated to be a few eV, was the likely reason for the lack of detectable secondary ions. A change of ion species to either Boron or Magnesium would greatly increase the signal, but neither of these ions have been used in a HIBP system. The ion source used in this system is made by using a charge exchange process to create a zeolite loaded with the desired ion. Attempts were made to use charge exchange to load Magnesium into a zeolite, and were not successful. It is felt that Magnesium and/or Boron zeolite sources could be created, but

  13. Colored thin films for specific metal ion detection.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Caroline L; Chen, Mu-San; Price, Ronald R; Schoen, Paul E; Ligler, Frances S

    2004-08-15

    This paper describes the investigation of chitosan and poly(allylamine) (PAH) for the creation of a multi-film, color-based dipstick for the detection of metal ions in solution. Thin, colored films of chitosan and PAH cross-linked with hexamethylene 1,6-di(aminocarboxysulfonate) (HDACS) are created where color is due to film thickness and optical interference effects. The films are investigated for their ability to selectively detect aqueous metal ions via changes in thickness and/or color. Chitosan-HDACS films were selective for Cr(VI) over all other metal ions tested including Cr(acac)3 and Cr(NO3)3 x 9H2O, and PAH-HDACS films were selective for Cu(II) and Cu(I) salts over all other metal ions tested. The irreversible, selective changes due to metal ion solutions were not caused by varying the pH. Potomac River water was also tested using the two films, with results indicating the presence of Cu(II) in the aqueous sample. PMID:15382871

  14. Automatic detection of mass-resolved ion conics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Mark F.; Bjorklund, Carolyn M.; Peterson, William K.; Collin, Henry L.

    1993-01-01

    A processing algorithm to automatically detect a specific type of ion distribution (called the ion conic distribution) in data obtained from a space-based mass spectrometer has been devised. Automation of this task is necessary due to the sparseness of conic events within the very large databases typical of space plasma instruments. This paper reports on the algorithm used to perform this automated analysis, along with a description of the methods used to verify the algorithm and a summary of initial results on the characterization of the near-earth space plasma.

  15. Theoretical Noise Analysis on a Position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the theoretical noise analysis for a position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter (MMC), consisting of MMC read-out at both ends of a large X-ray absorber. Such devices are under consideration as alternatives to other cryogenic technologies for future X-ray astronomy missions. We use a finite-element model (FEM) to numerically calculate the signal and noise response at the detector outputs and investigate the correlations between the noise measured at each MMC coupled by the absorber. We then calculate, using the optimal filter concept, the theoretical energy and position resolution across the detector and discuss the trade-offs involved in optimizing the detector design for energy resolution, position resolution and count rate. The results show, theoretically, the position-sensitive MMC concept offers impressive spectral and spatial resolving capabilities compared to pixel arrays and similar position-sensitive cryogenic technologies using Transition Edge Sensor (TES) read-out.

  16. A glow discharge ion source with fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Barhick, C M; Eyler, J R

    1992-02-01

    A glow discharge (CD) ion source has been coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer using a four-element electrostatic lens to accelerate and focus ions generated external to the instrument's high magnetic field into its analyzer cell. Like other CD mass spectrometers, GD-FT-ICR can provide a quantitative measure of bulk analyte concentration with good precision and accuracy. Although detection limits currently attainable are several orders of magnitude higher than the commercially available magnetic sector-based instrument, CD-FT-ICR holds promise for ultrahigh resolving power elemental mass analysis. Several schemes are proposed to lower the detection limits of the technique while still providing high enough resolution to resolve isobaric interferences. PMID:24242880

  17. Betabox: a beta particle imaging system based on a position sensitive avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooraghi, A. A.; Vu, N. T.; Silverman, R. W.; Farrell, R.; Shah, K. S.; Wang, J.; Heath, J. R.; Chatziioannou, A. F.

    2013-06-01

    A beta camera has been developed that allows planar imaging of the spatial and temporal distribution of beta particles using a 14 × 14 mm2 position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD). This camera system, which we call Betabox, can be directly coupled to microfluidic chips designed for cell incubation or other biological applications. Betabox allows for imaging the cellular uptake of molecular imaging probes labeled with charged particle emitters such as 18F inside these chips. In this work, we investigate the quantitative imaging capabilities of Betabox for 18F beta particles, in terms of background rate, efficiency, spatial resolution, and count rate. Measurements of background and spatial resolution are considered both at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) and at an elevated operating temperature (37 °C ± 1 °C), as is often required for biological assays. The background rate measured with a 4 keV energy cutoff is below 2 cph mm-2 at both 21 and 37 °C. The absolute efficiency of Betabox for the detection of 18F positron sources in contact with a PSAPD with the surface passivated from ambient light and damage is 46% ± 1%. The lower detection limit is estimated using the Rose Criterion to be 0.2 cps mm-2 for 1 min acquisitions and a 62 × 62 µm2 pixel size. The upper detection limit is approximately 21 000 cps. The spatial resolution at both 21 and 37 °C ranges from 0.4 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view (FOV), and degrades to 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm away from center yielding a useful FOV of approximately 10 × 10 mm2. We also investigate the effects on spatial resolution and sensitivity that result from the use of a polymer based microfluidic chip. For these studies we place varying layers of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between the detector and the source and find that the spatial resolution degrades by ˜180 µm for every 100 µm of LDPE film. Sensitivity is reduced by half with the inclusion of ˜200 µm of additional LDPE film. Lastly

  18. Betabox: a beta particle imaging system based on a position sensitive avalanche photodiode

    PubMed Central

    Dooraghi, AA; Vu, NT; Silverman, RW; Farrell, R; Shah, KS; Wang, J; Heath, JR; Chatziioannou, AF

    2013-01-01

    A beta camera has been developed that allows planar imaging of the spatial and temporal distribution of beta particles using a 14 × 14 mm2 position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD). This camera system, which we call Betabox, can be directly coupled to microfluidic chips designed for cell incubation or other biological applications. Betabox allows for imaging the cellular uptake of molecular imaging probes labeled with charged particle emitters such as 18F inside these chips. In this work, we investigate the quantitative imaging capabilities of Betabox for 18F beta particles, in terms of background rate, efficiency, spatial resolution, and count rate. Measurements of background and spatial resolution are considered both at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) and at an elevated operating temperature (37 °C ± 1 °C), as is often required for biological assays. The background rate measured with a 4 keV energy cutoff is below 2 cph mm−2 at both 21 and 37 °C. The absolute efficiency of Betabox for the detection of 18F positron sources in contact with a PSAPD with the surface passivated from ambient light and damage is 46% ± 1%. The lower detection limit is estimated using the Rose Criterion to be 0.2 cps mm−2 for 1 min acquisitions and a 62 × 62 µm2 pixel size. The upper detection limit is approximately 21 000 cps. The spatial resolution at both 21 and 37 °C ranges from 0.4 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view (FOV), and degrades to 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm away from center yielding a useful FOV of approximately 10 × 10 mm2. We also investigate the effects on spatial resolution and sensitivity that result from the use of a polymer based microfluidic chip. For these studies we place varying layers of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between the detector and the source and find that the spatial resolution degrades by ~180 µm for every 100 µm of LDPE film. Sensitivity is reduced by half with the inclusion of ~200 µm of additional LDPE film

  19. Ion chromatography detection of fluoride in calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Jamie E; Ivey, Michelle M

    2011-09-01

    Fluoride in aquatic systems is increasing due to anthropogenic pollution, but little is known about how this fluoride affects organisms that live in and around aquatic habitats. Fluoride can bioaccumulate in structures comprised of calcium carbonate, such as shells and skeletons of both freshwater and saltwater species as diverse as snails, corals, and coccolithophorid algae. In this article, ion chromatography (IC) techniques are developed to detect and quantify fluoride in a matrix of calcium carbonate. Solid samples are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, pretreated to remove the majority of the chloride ions, and then analyzed using IC. With these methods, the 3σ limit of detection is 0.2 mg of fluoride/kg of calcium carbonate. PMID:21859530

  20. Radio detection of interstellar DCO/+/. [deuterated formyl ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Snyder, L. E.; Lovas, F. J.; Buhl, D.

    1976-01-01

    The J = 1-0 transition of the deuterated formyl ion, DCO(+), has been detected in emission from NGC 2264 and DR 21(OH) and from the cool dust cloud L134. Estimates for the column-density ratios of H(C-13)O(+) to DCO(+) are given for NGC 2264 and DR 21(OH); lower limits for the ratios are given for five other clouds. The DCO(+) detection in L134 provides unique observational evidence in support of chemical fractionation. The L134 results also suggest that the dust clouds may act as repositories for primordial deuterium.

  1. Coherent optical ultrasound detection with rare-earth ion dopants.

    PubMed

    Tay, Jian Wei; Ledingham, Patrick M; Longdell, Jevon J

    2010-08-10

    We describe theoretical and experimental demonstration for optical detection of ultrasound using a spectral hole engraved in cryogenically cooled rare-earth ion-doped solids. Our method utilizes the dispersion effects due to the spectral hole to perform phase-to-amplitude modulation conversion. Like previous approaches using spectral holes, it has the advantage of detection with large étendue. The method also has the benefit that high sensitivity can be obtained with moderate absorption contrast for the spectral holes. PMID:20697433

  2. Recent developments in ion mobility spectrometry detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Robert K.; Kuja, Frank J.; Jackson, Ronald A.; Loveless, Arthur J.; Danylewich-May, Lucy L.

    1994-03-01

    Barringer's new IONSCANTM model 350 provides improved operational flexibility, reliability, and effectiveness in the rapid on-site detection and identification of narcotics and explosives. The model 350 is a modular integrated design, with DC-power capabilities, and wheels or vehicle mounts to facilitate transportation to and operation in a variety of operational locations. Recent developments in IONSCAN ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) technology in the model 350 include a long-life air dryer/purification system and new software for improved substance detection and false alarm rate performance. New multiple peak detection capabilities for more reliable substance identification are described. Studies on IMS temperature and pressure effects are reported and their possible future use to further improve peak detection performance are discussed. Some recent applications in narcotics interdiction are described.

  3. Sealed position sensitive hard X-ray detector having large drift region for all sky camera with high angular resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Perlman, D.; Parsignault, D.; Burns, R.

    1979-01-01

    A sealed position sensitive proportional counter filled with two atmospheres of 95% xenon and 5% methane, and containing a drift region of 24 atm cm, has operated in a stable manner for many months. The detector contains G-10 frames to support the anode and cathode wires. The detector was sealed successfully by a combination of vacuum baking the G-10 frames at 150 C for two weeks followed by assembly into the detector in an environment of dry nitrogen, and the use of passive internal getters. The counter is intended for use with a circumferential cylindrical collimator. Together they provide a very broad field of view detection system with the ability to locate cosmic hard X-ray and soft gamma ray sources to an angular precision of a minute of arc. A set of instruments based on this principle have been proposed for satellites to detect and precisely locate cosmic gamma ray bursts.

  4. Integrating 2-D position sensitive X-ray detectors with low-density alkali halide storage targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, H.-G.; Hoheisel, W.; Hiller, P.

    1986-05-01

    For the use in scattering experiments with synchrotron radiation, integrating position sensitive X-ray detectors are discussed. These detectors store the photon number equivalent charge (PNEC) in low-density alkali halide targets. Performance tests are given for a detector which uses a Gd 2O 2S fluorescence screen for X-ray detection and the low-density KCl storage target of a television SEC vidicon tube for photon integration. Rather than directly by X-rays, this target is charged by 6 keV electrons from the image intensifier section of the vidicon. Its excellent storage capability allows measurements of extremely high-contrast, high-flux X-ray patterns with the same accuracy as achieved with any single photon detection system if the discussed readout techniques are applied.

  5. Ion trap mass spectrometric detection of laser desorbed ions from derivatized fused silica fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.W.; Earl, W.L.; Cisper, M.E.; Nogar, N.S.; Hemberger, P.H.

    1994-12-31

    Solid-phase microextraction of analytes from complex matrices using fused silica fibers has many advantages over traditional chemical sample preparation technique. Microextraction requires small sample sizes little sample preparation (providing rapid sample turnaround time), and greatly reduces the amount of chemical waste generated in sample preparation. These advantages make fused silica fibers attractive for direct sampling and detection experiments using laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry (LITMS). The drawback is the very small area ({approximately}1 mm{sup 2}) exposed to laser irradiation, which limits the amount of material desorbed into the ion trap.

  6. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  7. In vivo dosimetry for gynaecological brachytherapy using a novel position sensitive radiation detector: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Reniers, B.; Landry, G.; Eichner, R.; Hallil, A.; Verhaegen, F.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: In gynecological radiotherapy with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir brachytherapy, the treatment complexity has increased due to improved optimization techniques and dose constraints. As a consequence, it has become more important to verify the dose delivery to the target and also to the organs at risk (e.g., the bladder). In vivo dosimetry, where dosimeters are placed in or on the patient, is one way of verifying the dose but until recently this was hampered by motion of the radiation detectors with respect to the source. The authors present a novel dosimetry method using a position sensitive radiation detector. Methods: The prototype RADPOS system (Best Medical Canada) consists of a metal oxide field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter coupled to a position-sensor, which deduces its 3D position in a magnetic field. To assess the feasibility of in vivo dosimetry based on the RADPOS system, different characteristics of the detector need to be investigated. Using a PMMA phantom, the positioning accuracy of the RADPOS system was quantified by comparing position readouts with the known position of the detector along the x and y-axes. RADPOS dose measurements were performed at various distances from a Nucletron{sup 192}Ir source in a PMMA phantom to evaluate the energy dependence of the MOSFET. A sensitivity analysis was performed by calculating the dose after varying (1) the position of the RADPOS detector to simulate organ motion and (2) the position of the first dwell position to simulate errors in delivery. The authors also performed an uncertainty analysis to determine the action level (AL) that should be used during in vivo dosimetry. Results: Positioning accuracy is found to be within 1 mm in the 1-10 cm range from the origin along the x-axis (away from the transmitter), meeting the requirements for in vivo dosimetry. Similar results are obtained for the other axes. The ALs are chosen to take into account the total uncertainty on the measurements. As a

  8. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Sabrina S.; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F.; Etcheberry, Arnaud A.; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl- N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  9. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoto, G.; Cirillo, E. N. M.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (≈ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  10. Nanoscale detection of bacteriophage triggered ion cascade (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobozi-King, Maria; Seo, Sungkyu; Kim, Jong U.; Cheng, Mosong; Kish, Laszlo B.; Young, Ryland

    2005-05-01

    In an era of potential bioterrorism and pandemics of antibiotic-resistant microbes, bacterial contaminations of food and water supplies is a major concern. There is an urgent need for the rapid, inexpensive and specific identification of bacteria under field conditions. Here we describe a method that combines the specificity and avidity of bacteriophages with fluctuation analysis of electrical noise. The method is based on the massive, transitory ion leakage that occurs at the moment of phage DNA injection into the host cell. The ion fluxes require only that the cells be physiologically viable (i.e., have energized membranes) and can occur within seconds after mixing the cells with sufficient concentrations of phage particles. To detect these fluxes, we have constructed a nano-well, a lateral, micron-size capacitor of titanium electrodes with gap size of 150 nm, and used it to measure the electrical field fluctuations in microliter (mm3) samples containing phage and bacteria. In mixtures where the analyte bacteria were sensitive to the phage, large stochastic waves with various time and amplitude scales were observed, with power spectra of approximately 1/f2 shape over at 1 - 10 Hz. Development of this SEPTIC (SEnsing of Phage-Triggered Ion Cascades) technology could provide rapid detection and identification of live, pathogenic bacteria on the scale of minutes, with unparalleled specificity. The method has a potential ultimate sensitivity of 1 bacterium/microliter (1 bacterium/mm3).

  11. Ion sensors based on novel fiber organic electrochemical transistors for lead ion detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuedan; Zhou, Zhou; Qing, Xing; Zhong, Weibing; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wang, Wenwen; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Dong

    2016-08-01

    Fiber organic electrochemical transistors (FECTs) based on polypyrrole and nanofibers have been prepared for the first time. FECTs exhibited excellent electrical performances, on/off ratios up to 10(4) and low applied voltages below 2 V. The ion sensitivity behavior of the fiber organic electrochemical transistors was investigated. It exhibited that the transfer curve of FECTs shifted to lower gate voltage with increasing cations concentration, the sensitivity reached to 446 μA/dec in the 10(-5)-10(-2) M Pb(2+) concentration range. The ion selective properties of the FECTs have also been systematically studied for the detection of potassium, calcium, aluminum, and lead ions. The devices with different cations showed great difference in response curves. It was suitable for selectively monitoring Pb(2+) with respect to other cations. The results indicated FECTs were very effective for electrochemical sensing of lead ion, which opened a promising perspective for wearable electronics in healthcare and biological application. Graphical Abstract The schematic diagram of fiber organic electrochemical transistors based on polypyrrole and nanofibers for ion sensing. PMID:27342794

  12. Detection of negative pickup ions at Saturn's moon Dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Hand, K. P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Negative ions may be formed in both tenuous and dense planetary atmospheres and have been observed in-situ at Earth, Titan [Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Wellbrock et al., 2013] and Enceladus [Coates et al., 2010] as well as at comet Halley [Chaizy et al., 1991]. In the case of Titan, heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile based ions with masses reaching almost 14,000 amu/q have been observed using the CAPS Electron Spectrometer (ELS) onboard Cassini. These are believed to form even more massive organic aerosols termed tholins which fall to lower altitudes where they make up the distinct haze layers, and eventually rain down onto Titan's surface perhaps forming the organic-rich dunes. Very tenuous atmospheres were predicted at the smaller icy moons of Saturn [Sittler et al., 2004; Saur and Strobel, 2005], and subsequently detected [Teolis et al., 2010; Tokar et al., 2012]. These are produced when charged particles from Saturn's magnetosphere interact with moon surfaces, ejecting neutral species. Some portion of these atmospheric neutrals will in turn become ionized and 'picked up' by Saturn's corotating magnetosphere. These pickup ions will then move in cycloidal trajectories that we may intercept using the Cassini spacecraft, even at considerable distance from the moon itself. In this fashion, negative and positive pickup ions have been used to infer a tenuous CO2-O2 atmosphere at Saturn's moon Rhea [Teolis et al., 2010], and positive pickup ions at Dione [Tokar et al., 2012]. Here we report on the detection of negative pickup ions during a close flyby of Dione by the Cassini CAPS ELS instrument, and the implications that these observations may have for the Dionian atmosphere. Chaizy, P., et al. (1991), Nature, 349(6308), 393-396 Coates, A. J., et al. (2007), Geophys. Res. Lett., 34(22), 6-11 Coates, A. J., et al. (2009), Planet. Space Sci., 57(14-15), 1866-1871 Coates, A. J., et al. (2010), Icarus, 206(2), 618-622 Saur, J., and D. F. Strobel (2005), Astrophys. J. Lett., 620

  13. New position sensitive photomultiplier tubes for high energy physics and nuclear medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, S.; Matsushita, T.; Suzuki, T.; Kimura, S.; Kume, H.

    1988-02-01

    New position sensitive photomultiplier tubes with fine mesh structured dynodes and discrete anode array configurations have been developed. One kind of the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is being used as a photodetector for High Enegy Physics applications in high magnetic field environments. A photomultiplier tube constructed with 88 Multi-Anodes has a spatial resolution of less than 2.6 mm in FWHM in a magnetic field with a density of 500-2000 Gauss. The resolution includes an anode width of 2.6 mm. Another type of Multi-Anode photomultiplier tube which has been developed is the detector with a high spatial resolution for such applications as the PET system and hodoscope in scintillation systems. The tube, by applying additional electro-focusing electrodes, has an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.4 mm in FWHM without the magnetic field.

  14. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Urbain, X; Bech, D; Van Roy, J-P; Géléoc, M; Weber, S J; Huetz, A; Picard, Y J

    2015-02-01

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H3 into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme. PMID:25725834

  15. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Urbain, X. Bech, D.; Van Roy, J.-P.; Géléoc, M.; Weber, S. J.

    2015-02-15

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H{sub 3} into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  16. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbain, X.; Bech, D.; Van Roy, J.-P.; Géléoc, M.; Weber, S. J.; Huetz, A.; Picard, Y. J.

    2015-02-01

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H3 into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  17. Unconventional double bent-crystal diffractometer equipped by position-sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikula, Pavel; Lukas, Petr; Kulda, Jiri; Strunz, Pavel; Saroun, Jan; Wagner, Volker; Scherm, Reinhard; Alefeld, Berthold; Reinartz, Richard

    1992-11-01

    Using Bragg diffraction optics, an unconventional DBC diffractometer was tested for medium resolution small-angle neutron scattering experiments. The diffraction geometry of the analyzer enables to transform the angular beam distribution into the positional distribution and, consequently, to analyze it by means of a one-dimensional position sensitive detector. First experimental results obtained with a sample of PE+graphite proves a compatibility and a higher speed of data collection compared to a standard DBC diffractometer.

  18. Data acquisition system for an advanced x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer using a segmented position-sensitive detector.

    PubMed

    Nam, U W; Lee, S G; Bak, J G; Moon, M K; Cheon, J K; Lee, C H

    2007-10-01

    A versatile time-to-digital converter based data acquisition system for a segmented position-sensitive detector has been developed. This data acquisition system was successfully demonstrated to a two-segment position-sensitive detector. The data acquisition system will be developed further to support multisegmented position-sensitive detector to improve the photon count rate capability of the advanced x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer system. PMID:17979416

  19. Implementation of Complex Signal Processing Algorithms for Position-Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently reported on a theoretical digital signal-processing algorithm for improved energy and position resolution in position-sensitive, transition-edge sensor (POST) X-ray detectors [Smith et al., Nucl, lnstr and Meth. A 556 (2006) 2371. PoST's consists of one or more transition-edge sensors (TES's) on a large continuous or pixellated X-ray absorber and are under development as an alternative to arrays of single pixel TES's. PoST's provide a means to increase the field-of-view for the fewest number of read-out channels. In this contribution we extend the theoretical correlated energy position optimal filter (CEPOF) algorithm (originally developed for 2-TES continuous absorber PoST's) to investigate the practical implementation on multi-pixel single TES PoST's or Hydras. We use numerically simulated data for a nine absorber device, which includes realistic detector noise, to demonstrate an iterative scheme that enables convergence on the correct photon absorption position and energy without any a priori assumptions. The position sensitivity of the CEPOF implemented on simulated data agrees very well with the theoretically predicted resolution. We discuss practical issues such as the impact of random arrival phase of the measured data on the performance of the CEPOF. The CEPOF algorithm demonstrates that full-width-at- half-maximum energy resolution of < 8 eV coupled with position-sensitivity down to a few 100 eV should be achievable for a fully optimized device.

  20. Photonic nanosensor for colorimetric detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Montelongo, Yunuen; Qasim, Malik M; Butt, Haider; Wilkinson, Timothy D; Monteiro, Michael J; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The real-time sensing of metal ions at point of care requires integrated sensors with low energy and sample consumption, reversibility, and rapid recovery. Here, we report a photonic nanosensor that reversibly and quantitatively reports on variation in the concentrations of Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) ions in aqueous solutions (<500 μL) in the visible region of the spectrum (λ(max) ≈ 400-700 nm). A single 6 ns laser pulse (λ = 532 nm) was used to pattern an ∼10 μm thick photosensitive recording medium. This formed periodic AgBr nanocrystal (ø ∼ 5-20 nm) concentrated regions, which produced Bragg diffraction upon illumination with a white light source. The sensor functionalized with 8-hydroxyquinoline allowed sensing through inducing Donnan osmotic pressure and tuning its lattice spacing. The sensor quantitatively measured Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) ion concentrations within the dynamic range of 0.1-10.0 mM with limits of detection of 11.4 and 18.6 μM in under 10 min. The sensor could be reset in 3 min and was reused at least 100 times without compromising its accuracy. The plasmonic nanosensor represents a simple and label-free analytical platform with potential scalability for applications in medical diagnostics and environmental monitoring. PMID:25710792

  1. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems. PMID:27439180

  2. Development of arrays of position-sensitive microcalorimeters for Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kolbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing arrays of position-sensitive transition-edge sensor (POST) X-ray detectors for future astronomy missions such as NASA's Constellation-X. The POST consists of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the TES. This results in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enables position discrimination between the absorber elements. POST'S are motivated by the desire to achieve the largest possible focal plane area with the fewest number of readout channels and are ideally suited to increasing the Constellation-X focal plane area, without comprising on spatial sampling. Optimizing the performance of POST'S requires careful design of key parameters such as the thermal conductances between the absorbers, TES and the heat sink. as well as the absorber heat capacities. Using recently developed signal processing algorithms we have investigated the trade-off between position-sensitivity, energy resolution and pulse decay time. based on different device design parameters for PoST's. Our new generation of PoST's utilize technology successfully developed on high resolution (approximately 2.5eV) single pixels arrays of Mo/Au TESs. also under development for Constellation-X. This includes noise mitigation features on the TES and low resistivity electroplated absorbers. We report on the first experimental results from these new one and two-channel PoST"s, consisting of all Au and composite Au/Bi absorbers, which are designed to achieve an energy resolution of < 10 eV. coupled with count-rates of 100's per pixel per second and position sensitivity over the energy range 0.3-10 keV.

  3. Development of a one-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector for tracking applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lydecker, Leigh Kent, IV

    Optical Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS processing, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. Because they are non-contact, they do not degrade over time from surface friction due to repetitive sliding motion associated with standard full contact sliding potentiometers. This results in long, reliable device lifetimes. In this work, an innovative PSD was developed to replace the linear hard contact potentiometer currently being used in a human-computer interface architecture. First, a basic lateral effect PSD was developed to provide real-time positioning of the mouthpiece used in the interface architecture which tracks along a single axis. During the course of this work, multiple device geometries were fabricated and analyzed resulting in a down selection of a final design. This final device design was then characterized in terms of resolution and responsivity and produced in larger quantities as initial prototypes for the test product integration. Finally, an electronic readout circuit was developed in order to interface the dual- line lateral effect PSD developed in this thesis with specifications required for product integration. To simplify position sensing, an innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using a linear photodiodes with back-to-back connections. This so- called Self-Balancing Position Sensitive Detector (SBPSD) requires significantly fewer processing steps than the basic lateral effect position sensitive detector discussed above and eliminates the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Prototype devices were fabricated in this work, and the performance characteristics of these devices were established paving the way for ultimate integration into the target product as well as additional applications.

  4. Ion trace detection algorithm to extract pure ion chromatograms to improve untargeted peak detection quality for liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Wang, San-Yuan; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Tseng, Yufeng J

    2015-03-01

    Able to detect known and unknown metabolites, untargeted metabolomics has shown great potential in identifying novel biomarkers. However, elucidating all possible liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) ion signals in a complex biological sample remains challenging since many ions are not the products of metabolites. Methods of reducing ions not related to metabolites or simply directly detecting metabolite related (pure) ions are important. In this work, we describe PITracer, a novel algorithm that accurately detects the pure ions of a LC/TOF-MS profile to extract pure ion chromatograms and detect chromatographic peaks. PITracer estimates the relative mass difference tolerance of ions and calibrates the mass over charge (m/z) values for peak detection algorithms with an additional option to further mass correction with respect to a user-specified metabolite. PITracer was evaluated using two data sets containing 373 human metabolite standards, including 5 saturated standards considered to be split peaks resultant from huge m/z fluctuation, and 12 urine samples spiked with 50 forensic drugs of varying concentrations. Analysis of these data sets show that PITracer correctly outperformed existing state-of-art algorithm and extracted the pure ion chromatograms of the 5 saturated standards without generating split peaks and detected the forensic drugs with high recall, precision, and F-score and small mass error. PMID:25622715

  5. A fast position sensitive microstrip-gas-chamber detector at high count rate operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbnya, I. P.; Alberda, H.; Hartjes, F. G.; Udo, F.; Bakker, R. E.; Konijnenburg, M.; Homan, E.; Cerjak, I.; Goedtkindt, P.; Bras, W.

    2002-11-01

    Testing of a newly developed position sensitive high count rate microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) detector at high count rate operation has been carried out at the Dutch-Belgian x-ray scattering beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France) with a high intensity x-ray beam. The measurements show local count rate capabilities up to approx4.5 x105 counts/s/channel. Experimental data taken with this detector are also shown. These tests show that both time resolution down to 1.5 ms/frame and a reliable operation at high counting rates can be achieved.

  6. CdZnTe position-sensitive drift detectors with thicknesses up to 5 cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Chen, E.; Cheng, S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Gallagher, R.; Dedic, V.; De Geronimo, G.; Ocampo Giraldo, L.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; MacKenzie, J. M.; Sellin, P.; Taherion, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; El-hanany, U.; James, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the feasibility of long-drift-time CdZnTe (CZT) gamma-ray detectors, fabricated from CZT material produced by Redlen Technologies. CZT crystals with cross-section areas of 5 × 5 mm2 and 6 × 6 mm2 and thicknesses of 20-, 30-, 40-, and 50-mm were configured as 3D position-sensitive drift detectors and were read out using a front-end ASIC. By correcting the electron charge losses caused by defects in the crystals, we demonstrated high performance for relatively thick detectors fabricated from unselected CZT material.

  7. Detectability of strange matter in heavy ion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffner, J.,; Diener, A.; Stocker, H.,; Greiner, C.,

    1997-06-01

    We discuss the properties of two distinct forms of hypothetical strange matter, small lumps of strange quark matter (strangelets) and of hyperon matter [metastable exotic multihypernuclear objects (MEMO{close_quote}s)], with special emphasis on their relevance for present and future heavy ion experiments. The masses of small strangelets up to A{sub B}=40 are calculated using the MIT bag model with shell mode filling for various bag parameters. The strangelets are checked for possible strong and weak hadronic decays, also taking into account multiple hadron decays. It is found that strangelets which are stable against strong decay are most likely highly negatively charged, contrary to previous findings. Strangelets can be stable against weak hadronic decay but their masses and charges are still rather high. This has serious impact on the present high sensitivity searches in heavy ion experiments at the AGS and CERN facilities. On the other hand, highly charged MEMO{close_quote}s are predicted on the basis of an extended relativistic mean-field model. Those objects could be detected in future experiments searching for short-lived, rare composites. It is demonstrated that future experiments can be sensitive to a much wider variety of strangelets. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Picomolar detection of mercuric ions by means of gold-silver core-shell nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouhui; Liu, Dingbin; Wang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaolian; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-07-01

    We report an ultrasensitive and selective probe for detection of mercuric ions using gold-silver core-shell nanorods as the substrate of surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The detection limit of this probe for mercuric ions can be as low as 1 pM. The efficiency of this probe in complex samples was evaluated by allowing detection of spiked mercuric ions in river water and fish samples.We report an ultrasensitive and selective probe for detection of mercuric ions using gold-silver core-shell nanorods as the substrate of surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The detection limit of this probe for mercuric ions can be as low as 1 pM. The efficiency of this probe in complex samples was evaluated by allowing detection of spiked mercuric ions in river water and fish samples. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01603j

  9. A Monte Carlo simulation comparing hydrocarbons as stopping gases for position sensitive neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumas, A.; Smith, G. C.

    2009-12-01

    Various neutron detectors are being developed for the next generation user facilities, which incorporate new as well as existing approaches for the detection of thermal neutrons. Improvements in neutron detector efficiency, detector size and position resolution have occurred over the last three decades and further advances are expected in the next ten years. Since gas detectors are expected to continue in a key role for future thermal neutron experiments, it is advantageous to review some of the criteria for the choice of proton/triton stopping gases for gas-based detectors. Monte Carlo simulations, using the group of programs "Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter", have been run to determine key performance characteristics for neutron detectors which utilize the reaction 3He(n,p)t. This paper will focus on investigating the use of three common hydrocarbons and CF 4 as stopping gases for thermal neutron detectors. A discussion of these gases will include their behavior in terms of proton and triton range, ion distribution and straggle.

  10. Characterization of contamination through the use of position sensitive detectors and digital image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; DeBord, D.M.; Bennett, T.E.; Weismann, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes development of a significant new method for monitoring radioactive surface contamination. A floor monitor prototype has been designed which uses position sensitive proportional counter based radiation detectors. The system includes a novel operator interface consisting of an enhanced reality display providing the operator with 3 dimensional contours of contamination and background subtracted stereo clicks. The process software saves electronic files of survey data at very high rates along with time stamped video recording and provides completely documented surveys in a visualization oriented data management system. The data management system allows simple re-assembly of strips of data that are taken with a linear PSPC and allows visualization and treatment of the data using algorithms developed for processing images from earth resource satellites. This report includes a brief history of the development path for the floor monitor, a discussion of position sensitive proportional counter technology, and details concerning the process software, post processor and hardware. The last chapter discusses the field tests that were conducted at five sites and an application of the data management system for data not associated with detector systems.

  11. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  12. Development of Position-sensitive Transition-edge Sensor X-ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckard, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. s.; Sad (eor. K/ E/); Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of position-sensitive transition-edge sensors (PoST's) for future x-ray astronomy missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), currently under study by NASA and ESA. PoST's consist of multiple absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). This differential thermal coupling between absorbers and TES's results in different characteristic pulse shapes and allows position discrimination between the different pixels. The development of PoST's is motivated by a desire to achieve maximum focal-plane area with the least number of readout channels and as such. PoST's are ideally suited to provide a focal-plane extension to the Constellation-X microcalorimeter array. We report the first experimental results of our latest one and two channel PoST's, which utilize fast thermalizing electroplated Au/Bi absorbers coupled to low noise Mo/Au TES's - a technology already successfully implemented in our arrays of single pixel TES's. We demonstrate 6 eV energy resolution coupled with spatial sensitivity in the keV energy range. We also report on the development of signal processing algorithms to optimize energy and position sensitivity of our detectors.

  13. An improved method of energy calibration for position-sensitive silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Dao; Huang, Tian-Heng; Liu, Zhong; Ding, Bing; Yang, Hua-Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ma, Long; Yu, Lin; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Gan, Zai-Guo; Xiao-Hong, Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors is achieved by parabolic fitting in the traditional method, where the systematic variations of vertex and curvature of the parabola with energy must be considered. In this paper we extend the traditional method in order to correct the fitting function, simplify the procedure of calibration and improve the experimental data quality. Instead of a parabolic function as used in the traditional method, a new function describing the relation of position and energy is introduced. The energy resolution of the 8.088 MeV α decay of 213Rn is determined to be about 87 keV (FWHM), which is better than the result of the traditional method, 104 keV (FWHM). The improved method can be applied to the energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors with various performances. Supported by ‘100 Person Project’ of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405224 and 11435014)

  14. Position sensitivity in 3"×3" Spectroscopic LaBr3:Ce Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, N.; Giaz, A.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.

    2015-06-01

    The position sensitivity of a thick, cylindrical and continuous 3" × 3" (7.62 cm × 7.62 cm) LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces was investigated. Nuclear physics basic research uses thick LaBr3:Ce crystals (> 3cm) to measure medium or high energy gamma rays (0.5 MeV < Eγ< 20 MeV). In the first measurement the PMT photocathode entrance window was covered by black absorber except for a small window 1 cm × 1cm wide. A complete scan of the detector over a 0.5 cm step grid was performed. The data show that even in a 3" thick LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces the position of the full energy peak centroid depends on the source position. The position of the full energy peak centroids are sufficient to identify the collimated gamma source position. The crystal was then coupled to four Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT). We acquired the signals from the 256 segments of the four PSPMTs grouping them into 16 elements. An event by event analysis shows a positon resolution of the order of 2 cm.

  15. Position-sensitive detectors of the detector group at Jülich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, R.; Clemens, U.; Kemmerling, G.; Nöldgen, H.; Schelten, J.

    2009-06-01

    The detector group of the Central Institute of Electronics at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH was founded in 1968. First developments aimed at a detector system with a position-sensitive BF 3 proportional counter for small-angle neutron scattering, which was later used at a beamline of the research reactor FRJ2. At the end of the 1970s first measurements were carried out with photomultiplier (PM)-based detector systems linked with a LiI crystal from Harshaw. Based on this experience we started with the spectrum of position-sensitive neutron scintillation detectors, which have been developed and designed in our institute during the last three decades comprising several high-resolution linear and two-dimensional detectors. The general design of those detectors is based on a modified Anger principle using an array of PMs and a 1 mm 6Li glass scintillator. The sensitive detector area varies on the type of the PMs used and is related to the spatial resolution of the detector type. The neutron sensitivity at 1 Å is about 65% and the remaining gamma sensitivity is less than 10 -4 with a maximum count rate up to 500 kHz depending on the used detector system.

  16. Detection and characterization of smokeless powders with ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Neiza M.; Rosario, Santa V.; Hernandez, Samuel P.; Mina, Nairmen

    2005-05-01

    Smokeless Powders are a class of propellants that were developed in the late 19th century to replace black powder; it has been used as an explosive in shotguns, rifles, firearms and many other larger caliber weapons. These propellants can be placed into one of three different classes according to the chemical composition of their primary energetic ingredients. Advance equipment have been designed and used for the detection of explosives devices and compounds potentially energetic. In this research we are developing an analytical methodology to detect different formulation of smokeless powders: Alliant-American Select, Alliant-Bullseye, and Alliant-Red Dot using the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) technique. We used different surfaces like computer diskettes, CD"s, book covers and plastics to study their adsorption/desorption process. Using micropipettes, we delivered solutions with different amounts of Smokeless Powders from a 1000 ppm solution and deposit it on various types of filters to make a calibration curve. Several amounts of Smokeless Powder were deposited to the different surfaces and collected with filter paper. The samples were desorbed directly from the filter to the instrument inlet port. Subsequently, the percentage of explosive recovered was calculated.

  17. Development of a scintillating-fibre detector with position-sensitive photomultipliers for high-rate experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, S.; Daito, I.; Gorin, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Horikawa, N.; Iwata, T.; Kuroda, K.; Manuilov, I.; Matsuda, T.; Miyachi, Y.; Riazantsev, A.; Sidorov, A.; Takabayashi, N.; Toeda, T.

    2004-01-01

    An extensive study was performed on the development of fast and precise scintillating-fibre detectors with position-sensitive photomultipliers (PSPM) for application in high-rate experiments. Several detector prototypes with Kuraray multi-cladding fibres of 0.5 mm diameter and Hamamatsu 16-channel H6568 PSPMs were constructed and tested under different beam conditions at the CERN PS and SPS beam lines. High time resolution of the order of 300 ps (r.m.s.) was obtained with spatial resolution of about 125 μm (r.m.s.) and with detection efficiency in excess of 98%. The detector prototype equipped with a 3-m-long light guide was also tested and showed a time resolution of about 540 ps (r.m.s.). Results of tests using a high-intensity muon beam show excellent stability of the detector performances in time and spatial resolutions as well as in detection efficiency under beam fluxes of up to 1.4×10 8 muons per 2.4-second spill.

  18. A Beta-Particle Hodoscope Constructed Using Scintillating Optical Fibers and Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fast, Jim; Hossbach, Todd W.; Lidey, Lance S.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2006-09-19

    A hodoscopic detector was constructed using a position-sensitive plastic scintillator active area to determine the location of beta-active micron-sized particulates on air filters. The ability to locate beta active particulates on airsample filters is a tool for environmental monitoring of anthropogenic production of radioactive material. A robust, field-deployable instrument can provide localization of radioactive particulate with position resolution of a few millimeters. The detector employs a novel configuration of scintillating plastic elements usually employed at much higher charged particle energies. A filter is placed on this element for assay. The detector is intended to be sensitive to activity greater than 1 Bq. The physical design, position reconstruction method, and expected detector sensitivity are reported.

  19. Position-sensitive CdTe detector using improved crystal growth method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-09-01

    The feasibility of developing a position-sensitive CdTe detector array for astronomical observations in the hard X-ray, soft gamma ray region is demonstrated. In principle, it was possible to improve the resolution capability for imaging measurements in this region by orders of magnitude over what is now possible through the use of CdTe detector arrays. The objective was to show that CdTe crystals of the quality, size and uniformity required for this application can be obtained with a new high pressure growth technique. The approach was to fabricate, characterize and analyze a 100 element square array and several single-element detectors using crystals from the new growth process. Results show that detectors fabricated from transversely sliced, 7 cm diameter wafers of CdTe exhibit efficient counting capability and a high degree of uniformity over their entire areas. A 100 element square array of 1 sq mm detectors was fabricated and operated.

  20. Position-sensitive CdTe detector using improved crystal growth method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of developing a position-sensitive CdTe detector array for astronomical observations in the hard X-ray, soft gamma ray region is demonstrated. In principle, it was possible to improve the resolution capability for imaging measurements in this region by orders of magnitude over what is now possible through the use of CdTe detector arrays. The objective was to show that CdTe crystals of the quality, size and uniformity required for this application can be obtained with a new high pressure growth technique. The approach was to fabricate, characterize and analyze a 100 element square array and several single-element detectors using crystals from the new growth process. Results show that detectors fabricated from transversely sliced, 7 cm diameter wafers of CdTe exhibit efficient counting capability and a high degree of uniformity over their entire areas. A 100 element square array of 1 sq mm detectors was fabricated and operated.

  1. Separate Detection of Sodium and Potassium Ions with Sub-micropipette Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Tomohide; Son, Jong Wan; Lee, Joo-Kyung; Park, Bae Ho; Kawai, Tomoji

    2011-08-01

    A novel method of detecting sodium and potassium ions separately with a sub-micropipette probe of approximately 100 nm inner diameter has been demonstrated. A poly(vinyl chloride) film containing crown ether ligands in sub-micropipettes filtered the ions. Sodium ions were trapped with bis(12-crown-4), whereas potassium ions were trapped with bis(benzo-15-crown-5). Alternate and direct bias voltages were applied to the counter electrode in the sub-micropipette so that the local ion concentrations could be observed as current signals after conversion to milivolt output signals with our low-current detection system prepared for this study.

  2. Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for the Detection and Identification of Organisms

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Stephenson, James L., Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Current electrospray ion trap methodology for rapid mixture analysis of proteins used for the identification of microorganisms is described. Development of ion/ion reaction techniques (e.g. reactions of multiply-charged protein cations with singly-charged anions) from both a fundamental and practical approach are presented, detailing the necessary steps and considerations involved in complex mixture analysis. Data describing the reduction of the initial charge states of electrospray ions to arbitrarily low values, the utility of ion/ion reactions for mixture separation on the millisecond time scale, and effects of excess singly-charged reactants on detection and storage efficiency are illustrated.

  3. Triboelectrification-Enabled Self-Powered Detection and Removal of Heavy Metal Ions in Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoling; Chen, Jun; Guo, Hengyu; Fan, Xing; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Yu, Chongwen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-01

    A fundamentally new working principle into the field of self-powered heavy-metal-ion detection and removal using the triboelectrification effect is introduced. The as-developed tribo-nanosensors can selectively detect common heavy metal ions. The water-driven triboelectric nanogenerator is taken as a sustainable power source for heavy-metal-ion removal by recycling the kinetic energy from flowing wastewater. PMID:26913810

  4. A simple technique to increase the linearity and field-of-view in position sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, R.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Robar, J.L.; Bergman, A.M.

    1996-12-31

    Crossed anode wire position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMTs) detect the location of a light source and provide the X and Y axis coordinates of the event. These coordinates are typically generated using Anger logic, where a resistor chain divides the current flow into two signals for each coordinate (X{sup +}, X{sup -} & Y{sup +}, Y{sup -}). In the standard readout, identical resistor values are used across the entire resistor chain. While this arrangement provides a linear readout in the central portion of the photomultiplier face, the readout is non-linear and sometimes even double valued near the edges of the PS-PMT due to the truncation of the charge beyond the last anode wire. To counter this effect, we have increased the value of the resistance near the ends of each resistor chain in order to compensate for the charge lost beyond the anode wires. Measurements were made using a Hamamatsu R-3941 PS-PMT coupled to a pixellated BGO matrix of cut crystals with a 2mm pitch in each direction. After changing the end resistors, the usable field-of-view increased by 39%. This simple modification should enhance the operation of PS-PMTs in applications such as positron emission mammography, and small animal PET imaging.

  5. Intermediate Energies for Nuclear Astrophysics and the Development of a Position Sensitive Microstrip Detector System

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, Lee G.; Blackmon, J.; Bertulani, C.

    2015-12-30

    The chemical elements are made at astrophysical sites through a sequence of nuclear reactions often involving unstable nuclei. The overarching aim of this project is to construct a system that allows for the inverse process of nucleosynthesis (i.e. breakup of heavier nuclei into lighter ones) to be studied in high efficiency. The specific problem to be overcome with this grant is inadequate dynamic range and (triggering) threshold to detect the products of the breakup which include both heavy ions (with large energy and large deposited energy in a detector system) and protons (with little energy and deposited energy.) Early on in the grant we provided both TAMU and RIKEN (the site of the eventual experiments) with working systems based on the existing technology. This technology could be used with either an external preamplifier that was to be designed and fabricated by our RIKEN collaborators or upgraded by replacing the existing chip with one we designed. The RIKEN external preamplifier project never can to completion but our revised chip was designed, fabricated, used in a test experiment and performs as required.

  6. Theory for broadband detection of ion cyclotron resonance signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIver, Robert T.; Ledford, Edward B.; Hunter, Richard L.

    1980-02-01

    A complete line shape theory is developed for the transient response of a new type of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) detector circuit. The detector is basically a balanced capacitance bridge which is sensitive to the abundance of gaseous ions stored in a static magnetic ion trap. For the first time, the equations of motion of ions in the ICR analyzer cell are shown to be coupled to the circuit equations of the detector. Also, the effect of nonreactive ion-molecule collisions on line shapes and on the transient response of the detector are analyzed and shown to allow measurement of ion-molecule collisions frequencies as a function of ion translational energy. One of the most important features of the capacitance bridge detector is its broadband sensitivity to a wide range of ion cyclotron resonance frequencies. This allows a mass spectrum of ions stored in the ICR analyzer cell to be obtained by scanning the frequency ω1 of the irradiating rf electric field at a fixed magnetic field strength. The capacitance bridge circuit can serve not only as a direct replacement for marginal oscillator circuits traditionally used in ICR experiments, but also as the detector for recently developed Fourier Transform and Rapid Scan ICR experiments.

  7. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Direct Detection of Transmitted Helium Ions with a Multichannel Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor; White, Ryan; Keller, Robert

    A multichannel plate was used as an ion sensitive transmission detector in a commercial helium ion microscope for annular dark-field imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy. In contrast to previous transmission helium ion microscopy approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach directly detects transmitted helium ions on an annular detector. Monte Carlo simulations are used to predict detector collection angles at which annular dark-field images with atomic number contrast are obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. While the resolution of this transmission technique is limited by beam broadening in the substrate, we image magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field scanning transmission ion microscopy will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques, such as direct mass-thickness determination, and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  8. Sensitive electrochemical detection of copper ions based on the copper(II) ion assisted etching of Au@Ag nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tianxiang; Xu, Teng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2015-12-01

    A new sensitive electrochemical sensor for the detection of copper ions based on the copper ion assisted etching of Au@Ag nanoparticles was developed in this work. Since copper ions could greatly catalyze the etching process of the silver shell of Au@Ag nanoparticles in the presence of thiosulfate solutions, leading to an obvious decrease of the linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) signals of silver, the concentration of the copper ions, therefore, can be measured. Under the optimized conditions, the electrochemical sensor exhibited excellent sensitivity and selectivity for Cu(2+), with wide linear ranges of 1 nM to 100 μM, and the detection limit of 0.3 nM. In addition, this method was successfully applied for the analysis of Cu(2+) in river water and exhibited good analytical performance. PMID:26501137

  9. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Lead Ions in Drinking Water Based on a Strip Immunosensor

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Hua; Xing, Changrui; Hao, Changlong; Liu, Liqiang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have first developed a rapid and sensitive strip immunosensor based on two heterogeneously-sized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) probes for the detection of trace lead ions in drinking water. The sensitivity was 4-fold higher than that of the conventional LFA under the optimized conditions. The visual limit of detection (LOD) of the amplified method for qualitative detection lead ions was 2 ng/mL and the LOD for semi-quantitative detection could go down to 0.19 ng/mL using a scanning reader. The method suffered from no interference from other metal ions and could be used to detect trace lead ions in drinking water without sample enrichment. The recovery of the test samples ranged from 96% to 103%. As the detection method could be accomplished within 15 min, this method could be used as a potential tool for preliminary monitoring of lead contamination in drinking water. PMID:23539028

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  11. Tentative detection of the nitrosylium ion in space

    SciTech Connect

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B.; Bailleux, S.; Alekseev, E.; Fuente, A.; Bachiller, R.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; Treviño-Morales, S. P.; Marcelino, N.; Lefloch, B.

    2014-11-01

    We report the tentative detection in space of the nitrosylium ion, NO{sup +}. The observations were performed toward the cold dense core Barnard 1-b. The identification of the NO{sup +} J = 2-1 line is supported by new laboratory measurements of NO{sup +} rotational lines up to the J = 8-7 transition (953207.189 MHz), which leads to an improved set of molecular constants: B {sub 0} = 59597.1379(62) MHz, D {sub 0} = 169.428(65) kHz, and eQq {sub 0}(N) = –6.72(15) MHz. The profile of the feature assigned to NO{sup +} exhibits two velocity components at 6.5 and 7.5 km s{sup –1}, with column densities of 1.5 × 10{sup 12} and 6.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –2}, respectively. New observations of NO and HNO, also reported here, allow us to estimate the following abundance ratios: X(NO)/X(NO{sup +}) ≅ 511, and X(HNO)/X(NO{sup +}) ≅ 1. This latter value provides important constraints on the formation and destruction processes of HNO. The chemistry of NO{sup +} and other related nitrogen-bearing species is investigated by the means of a time-dependent gas phase model which includes an updated chemical network according to recent experimental studies. The predicted abundance for NO{sup +} and NO is found to be consistent with the observations. However, that of HNO relative to NO is too high. No satisfactory chemical paths have been found to explain the observed low abundance of HNO. HSCN and HNCS are also reported here with an abundance ratio of ≅ 1. Finally, we have searched for NNO, NO{sub 2}, HNNO{sup +}, and NNOH{sup +}, but only upper limits have been obtained for their column density, except for the latter for which we report a tentative 3σ detection.

  12. Field ion spectrometry: a new technology for cocaine and heroin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnahan, Byron L.; Day, Stephen; Kouznetsov, Viktor; Tarassov, Alexandre

    1997-02-01

    Field ion spectrometry, also known as transverse field compensation ion mobility spectrometry, is a new technique for trace gas analysis that can be applied to the detection of cocaine and heroin. Its principle is based on filtering ion species according to the functional dependence of their mobilities with electric field strength. Field ion spectrometry eliminates the gating electrodes needed in conventional IMS to pulse ions into the spectrometer; instead, ions are injected in to the spectrometer and reach the detector continuously, resulting in improved sensitivity. The technique enables analyses that are difficult with conventional constant field strength ion mobility spectrometers. We have shown that a filed ion spectrometer can selectively detect the vapors from cocaine and heroin emitted from both their base and hydrochloride forms. The estimated volumetric limits of detection are in the low pptv range, based on testing with standardized drug vapor generation systems. The spectrometer can detect cocaine base in the vapor phase, at concentrations well below its estimated 100 pptv vapor pressure equivalent at 20 degrees C. This paper describes the underlying principles of field ion spectrometry in relation to narcotic drug detection, and recent results obtained for cocaine and heroin. The work has been sponsored in part by the United States Advanced Research Projects Agency under contract DAAB10-95C-0004, for the DOD Counterdrug Technology Development Program.

  13. Using metal complex ion-molecule reactions in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer to detect chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Graichen, Adam M; Vachet, Richard W

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n](y+) complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n](2+) complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations. PMID:23532782

  14. Using Metal Complex Ion-Molecule Reactions in a Miniature Rectilinear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer to Detect Chemical Warfare Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graichen, Adam M.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n]y+ complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n]2+ complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  15. Fourier synthesis image reconstruction by use of one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Okada, Yuu; Negoro, Hitoshi; Terada, Yukikatsu; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oda, Minoru

    2003-07-10

    An improvement of Fourier synthesis optics for hard x-ray imaging is described, and the basic performance of the new optics is confirmed through numerical simulations. The original concept of the Fourier synthesis imager utilizes nonposition-sensitive hard x-ray detectors coupled to individual bigrid modulation collimators. The improved concept employs a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (such as a CdTe strip detector) instead of the second grid layer of each bigrid modulation collimator. This improves the imaging performance in several respects over the original design. One performance improvement is a two-fold increase in the average transmission, from 1/4 to 1/2. The second merit is that both the sine and cosine components can be derived from a single grid-detector module, and hence the number of imaging modules can be halved. Furthermore, it provides information along the depth direction simultaneously. This in turn enables a three-dimensional imaging hard x-ray microscope for medical diagnostics, incorporating radioactive tracers. A conceptual design of such a microscope is presented, designed to provide a field of view of 4 mm and a spatial resolution of 400 microm. PMID:12856730

  16. Development of Position-Sensitive Magnetic Calorimeters for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, SImon; Stevenson, Thomas; Hsieh, Wen-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMC) are one of the most promising devices to provide very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray spectroscopy. MMC detectors can be built to large detector arrays having thousands of pixels. Position-sensitive magnetic (PoSM) microcalorimeters consist of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one magnetic micro calorimeter. Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the MMC, resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enabling position discrimination between the absorber elements. PoSMs therefore achieve the large focal plane area with fewer number of readout channels without compromising spatial sampling. Excellent performance of PoSMs was achieved by optimizing the designs of key parameters such as the thermal conductance among the absorbers, magnetic sensor, and heat sink, as well as the absorber heat capacities. Micro fab ri - cation techniques were developed to construct four-absorber PoSMs, in which each absorber consists of a two-layer composite of bismuth and gold. The energy resolution (FWHM full width at half maximum) was measured to be better than 5 eV at 6 keV x-rays for all four absorbers. Position determination was demonstrated with pulse-shape discrimination, as well as with pulse rise time. X-ray microcalorimeters are usually designed to thermalize as quickly as possible to avoid degradation in energy resolution from position dependence to the pulse shapes. Each pixel consists of an absorber and a temperature sensor, both decoupled from the cold bath through a weak thermal link. Each pixel requires a separate readout channel; for instance, with a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device). For future astronomy missions where thousands to millions of resolution elements are required, having an individual SQUID readout channel for each pixel becomes difficult. One route to attaining these goals is a position-sensitive detector in which a large continuous or

  17. Measuring the cantilever-position-sensitive detector distance and cantilever curvature for cantilever sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Tian, Ye; Coates, M L; Beaulieu, L Y

    2009-09-01

    Measuring cantilever sensor deflections using an optical beam deflection system is more complicated than often assumed. The direction of the reflected beam is dependent on the surface normal of the cantilever, which in turn is dependent on the state of the cantilever. It is often assumed that the cantilever is both straight and perfectly level before the onset of sensing experiments although this assumption, especially the former, is rarely true. Failure to characterize the initial state of the cantilever can lead to irreproducibility in cantilever sensor measurements. We have developed three new methods for characterizing the initial state of the cantilever. In the first case we show how to define the initial angle of inclination beta of the chip on which the cantilever is attached. This method was tested using an aluminum block with a known angle of inclination. A new method for determining the initial distance L(o) between the cantilever and the position-sensitive detector (PSD) is also presented. This parameter which behaves as an amplification factor of the PSD signal is critical for obtaining precise cantilever sensor data. Lastly, we present a method for determining the initial curvature of the cantilever which often results from depositing the sensing platform on the lever. Experiments conducted using deflected cantilevers showed the model to be accurate. The characterization methods presented in this work are simple to use, easy to implement, and can be incorporated into most cantilever sensor setups. PMID:19791971

  18. Hard x-ray polarimetry with a thick CdTe position sensitive spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, Ezio; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Cola, Adriano; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Donati, Ariano; Dusi, Waldes; Landini, Gianni; Siffert, Paul; Sampietro, Marco; Stephen, John B.

    2000-12-01

    Even though it is recognized that the study of polarization from cosmic high-energy sources can give very important information about the nature of the emission mechanism, to date very few measurements have been attempted. For several years we have proposed the use of a thick CdTe array as a position sensitive spectrometer for hard X- and soft gamma-ray astronomy, a design which is also efficient for use as a polarimeter at energies above approximately 100 keV. Herein we describe the preliminary results of our study of a polarimeter based on 4096 CdTe microcrystals that we would like to develop for a high altitude balloon experiment. We present the telescope concept with a description of each subsystem together with some results on activities devoted to the optimization of the CdTe detector units' response. Furthermore we give an evaluation of the telescope performance in terms of achievable spectroscopic and polarimetric performance. In particular we will show the results of Monte Carlo simulations developed to evaluate the efficiency of our detector as a hard X ray polarimeter.

  19. The particle background of the Rosat PSPC. [Position Sensitive Proportional Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Briel, U.; Hasinger, G.; Pfeffermann, E.

    1992-01-01

    In order to permit quantitative studies of the diffuse cosmic X-ray background and of extended X-ray sources, the particle induced background of the Roentgen Satellite, Rosat, Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) is parameterized. Data collected during 210,000 s of PSPC operation have been analyzed and the temporal, spectral, and spatial distributions investigated. About 77 percent of the residual events originate within the detector while the remainder enter through the counter window. During typical conditions, the count rate of the residual events is well correlated with the Master Veto (MV) count rate. The spectrum of these events is well described by a flat component plus a soft power law and an Al K-alpha line at 1.5 keV. Also during typical conditions, the ratio between the power law and flat components remains constant to +/- 4 while the relative Al K-alpha contribution increases with increasing MV count rate. The distribution of the counts over the field of view is uniform except for a slight radial dependence and shadowing caused by blockage of the externally produced component by the window support structure.

  20. A Prototype Three-Dimensional Position Sensitive CdZnTe Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; He, Zhong; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2007-08-01

    A new CdZnTe gamma-ray spectrometer system that employs two layers of modular detector arrays is being developed under the collaboration between the University of Michigan and the Pacific Northwest National Labaratory (PNNL). Each layer can accommodate up to three by three 3-dimensional position sensitive CdZnTe gamma-ray spectrometers. This array system is based on the newly developed VAS_UM/TAT4 ASIC readout electronics. Each of the nine detector modules consists of a pixellated CdZnTe detector and a VAS_UM/TAT4 ASIC frontend board. Each 1.5´1.5´1.0 cm3 CdZnTe detector employs an array of 11 by 11 pixellated anodes and a planar cathode. The energy depositions and 3-dimensional positions of individual interactions of each incident gamma ray can be obtained from pulse amplitude, location of each pixel anode and the drift time of electrons. Ten detectors were tested individually and half of them achieved resolution of <1.0% FWHM at 662 keV for single-pixel events (~30% of all 662 keV full energy deposition events). Two of them were tested in a simple array to verify that the upgrade to an array system does not sacrifice the performance of individual detectors. Experimental results of individual detectors and a twodetector array system are presented, and possible causes for several worse performing detectors are discussed.

  1. Position-sensitive change in the transition metal L-edge fine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gulec, Ahmet; Phillips, Patrick J.; Klie, Robert F.

    2015-10-05

    Studying the structure and composition of solid-state materials on the atomic scale has become nearly routine in transmission electron microscopy with the development of novel electron optics and electron sources. In particular, with spatial resolutions better than 0.1 nm and energy resolution smaller than 100 meV, the stoichiometry, bonding, and coordination can now be examined on similar scales. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) have played a crucial role in identifying charge ordering, valence, and as spin state transitions in transition metal perovskite oxides. In this letter, we investigate the effects of ever-decreasing electron-probe sizes on the measured near-edge fine-structure of the transition metal core-loss edge using EELS. We find that for certain transition metal perovskites, the position of the electron probe with respect to the atomic column is crucial in determining the correct valence state. Several reasons for the observed position-sensitive EELS fine-structure are discussed.

  2. Development of Position-Sensitive Magnetic Calorimeter X-ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porst, Jan-Patrick; Bandler, Simon R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Rotzinger, Hannes; Seidel, George M.; Smith, Stephen J.; Stevenson, Thomas R.

    2009-12-01

    We are developing arrays of position-sensitive magnetic calorimeter (PoSM) X-ray detectors for future astronomy missions. The PoSM consists of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one magnetic sensor. Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the sensor. This results in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enables position discrimination between the absorber elements. PoSMs are motivated by the desire to achieve the largest possible focal plane area with the fewest number of readout channels without compromising on spatial sampling. Optimizing the performance of PoSMs requires careful design of key parameters such as the thermal conductances between the absorbers, magnetic sensor and the heat sink, as well as the absorber heat capacities. We report on the first experimental results from four-absorber PoSMs, each absorber consisting of a two layer composite of bismuth and gold. The measured energy resolution (FWHM) was less than 5 eV for 6 keV X-rays into all four absorbers. Straightforward position discrimination by means of rise-time is also demonstrated.

  3. Performance characteristics of a compact position-sensitive LSO detector module.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J J; Seidel, J; Siegel, S; Gandler, W R; Green, M V

    1998-12-01

    We assembled a compact detector module comprised of an array of small, individual crystals of lutetium oxyorthosilicate:Ce (LSO) coupled directly to a miniature, metal-can, position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). We exposed this module to sources of 511-keV annihilation radiation and beams of 30- and 140-keV photons and measured spatial linearity; spatial variations in module gain, energy resolution, and event positioning; coincidence timing; the accuracy and sensitivity of identifying the crystal-of-first-interaction at 511 keV; and the effects of intercrystal scatter and LSO background radioactivity. The results suggest that this scintillator/phototube combination should be highly effective in the coincidence mode and can be used, with some limitations, to image relatively low-energy single photon emitters. Photons that are completely absorbed on their first interaction at 511 keV are positioned by the module at the center of a crystal. Intercrystal scatter events, even those that lead to total absorption of the incident photon, are placed by the module in a regular "connect-the-dot" pattern that joins crystal centers. As a result, the accuracy of event positioning can be made to exceed 90%, though at significantly reduced sensitivity, by retaining only events that occur within small regions-of-interest around each crystal center and rejecting events that occur outside these regions in the connect-the-dot pattern. PMID:10048853

  4. Development of Position-Sensitive Magnetic Calorimeter X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Porst, Jan-Patrick; Bandler, Simon R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Smith, Stephen J.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Rotzinger, Hannes; Seidel, George M.

    2009-12-16

    We are developing arrays of position-sensitive magnetic calorimeter (PoSM) X-ray detectors for future astronomy missions. The PoSM consists of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one magnetic sensor. Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the sensor. This results in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enables position discrimination between the absorber elements. PoSMs are motivated by the desire to achieve the largest possible focal plane area with the fewest number of readout channels without compromising on spatial sampling. Optimizing the performance of PoSMs requires careful design of key parameters such as the thermal conductances between the absorbers, magnetic sensor and the heat sink, as well as the absorber heat capacities. We report on the first experimental results from four-absorber PoSMs, each absorber consisting of a two layer composite of bismuth and gold. The measured energy resolution (FWHM) was less than 5 eV for 6 keV X-rays into all four absorbers. Straightforward position discrimination by means of rise-time is also demonstrated.

  5. Position sensitive and energy dispersive x-ray detector based on silicon strip detector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.; Fink, J.; Fiutowski, T.; Krane, H.-G.; Loyer, F.; Schwamberger, A.; Świentek, K.; Venanzi, C.

    2015-04-01

    A new position sensitive detector with a global energy resolution for the entire detector of about 380 eV FWHM for 8.04 keV line at ambient temperature is presented. The measured global energy resolution is defined by the energy spectra summed over all strips of the detector, and thus it includes electronic noise of the front-end electronics, charge sharing effects, matching of parameters across the channels and other system noise sources. The target energy resolution has been achieved by segmentation of the strips to reduce their capacitance and by careful optimization of the front-end electronics. The key design aspects and parameters of the detector are discussed briefly in the paper. Excellent noise and matching performance of the readout ASIC and negligible system noise allow us to operate the detector with a discrimination threshold as low as 1 keV and to measure fluorescence radiation lines of light elements, down to Al Kα of 1.49 keV, simultaneously with measurements of the diffraction patterns. The measurement results that demonstrate the spectrometric and count rate performance of the developed detector are presented and discussed in the paper.

  6. Mathematical modelling and study of the encoding readout scheme for position sensitive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiaoguang; Zeng, Ming; Zeng, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xuewu; Zhao, Ziran; Cheng, Jianping; Kang, Kejun

    2016-04-01

    Encoding readout methods based on different schemes have been successfully developed and tested with different types of position-sensitive detectors with strip-readout structures. However, how to construct an encoding scheme in a more general and systematic way is still under study. In this paper, we present a graph model for the encoding scheme. With this model, encoding schemes can be studied in a more systematic way. It is shown that by using an encoding readout method, a maximum of n (n - 1)/2 + 1 strips can be processed with n channels if n is odd, while a maximum of n (n - 2)/2 + 2 strips can be processed with n channels if n is even. Furthermore, based on the model, the encoding scheme construction problem can be translated into a problem in graph theory, the aim of which is to construct an Eulerian trail such that the length of the shortest subcycle is as long as possible. A more general approach to constructing the encoding scheme is found by solving the associated mathematical problem. In addition, an encoding scheme prototype has been constructed, and verified with MRPC detectors.

  7. A multiplex readout method for position sensitive boron coated straw neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Gong, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Xuewu; Li, Yuanjing; Kang, Kejun

    2015-10-01

    A 1 m×1 m boron coated straw neutron detector is expected to be used to build the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument of the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) in Tsinghua University. A multiplex readout method based on summing circuits in columns and rows is studied for this large area position sensitive detector. In this method, the outputs of charge sensitive preamplifiers are combined by columns and rows at two ends of the detector, and then the shaped signals are sampled by flash ADCs. With the position reconstructed algorithm implemented in FPGA which analyzes the charge division and column and row number of signals, the 3-D position information of neutron events can be obtained. The position resolution and counting rate performance of this method are analyzed, and the comparison to the delay-line readout method is also given. With the multiplex readout method, the scale of readout electronics can be greatly reduced and a good position resolution can be reached. A readout electronics system for a detector module which consists 4 × 10 straw tubes is designed based on this method, and the test with neutron beam shows an average 3-D spatial resolution of 4 × 4 × 6.8mm3.

  8. Detection of DNA damage induced by heavy ion irradiation in the individual cells with comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, S.; Natsuhori, M.; Ito, N.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2003-05-01

    Investigating the biological effects of high-LET heavy ion irradiation at low fluence is important to evaluate the risk of charged particles. Especially it is important to detect radiation damage induced by the precise number of heavy ions in the individual cells. Thus we studied the relationship between the number of ions traversing the cell and DNA damage produced by the ion irradiation. We applied comet assay to measure the DNA damage in the individual cells. Cells attached on the ion track detector CR-39 were irradiated with ion beams at TIARA, JAERI-Takasaki. After irradiation, the cells were stained with ethidium bromide and the opposite side of the CR-39 was etched. We observed that the heavy ions with higher LET values induced the heavier DNA damage. The result indicated that the amount of DNA damage induced by one particle increased with the LET values of the heavy ions.

  9. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level. PMID:25778101

  10. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  11. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level. PMID:25778101

  12. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation. PMID:27153003

  13. Possible detection of energetic Jovian heavy ions at Skylab orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of sodium ions at a concentration about 10% that of oxygen among the particles with energies 10 to 20 MeV/nucleon seen with a detector on Skylab suggests that Jupiter is a significant source of energetic heavy particles inside the earth's magnetosphere. A numerical estimate based on the density of energetic sodium ions at 50 Jupiter radii measured on Voyager 1 indicates that the source strength is adequate.

  14. Study of capillary tracking detectors with position-sensitive photomultiplier readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardini, A.; Cavasinni, V.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dolinsky, S. I.; Flaminio, V.; Golovkin, S. V.; Gorin, A. M.; Medvedkov, A. M.; Pyshev, A. I.; Tyukov, V. E.; Vasilchenko, V. G.; Zymin, K. V.

    1995-02-01

    Measurements have been carried out on light yield and attenuation length in glass capillaries filled with new liquid scintillators (LS) and compared with analogous measurements made on 0.5 mm diameter plastic fibres Kuraray SCSF-38 and 3HF. It is found that, at a distance of 1 m, the light output in the capillary filled with green LS based on 1-methylnaphthalene doped with a new dye 3M15 is greater by a factor of 2 to 3 than for plastic fibres. A tracking detector consisting of a capillary bundle read out by a 100 channel position-sensitive microchannel plate photomultiplier (2MCP-100) has been built and tested in the laboratory using a cosmic ray trigger. A comparison has been made between the performance of such a detector and that of a similar one, read out by a 96 channel Philips XP1724/A photomultiplier. It was found that a bundle made of 20 μm diameter capillaries with a tapered end giving a magnification of 2.56, filled with the new IPN+3M15 liquid scintillator, read out by the 2MCP-100, provides a space resolution of σ = 170 μm, a two-track resolution of the same value and a hit density of n = 1.9/mm for tracks crossing the detector at a distance of 20 cm from the photocathode. If the same detector is read out by the Philips XP1724/A, the space resolution becomes 200 μm, the two-track resolution 600 μm and the hit density n = 1.7/mm. The worse performance in the latter case is caused by the larger crosstalk compared with that of the 2MCP-100 PSPM. The results indicate that a LS-filled capillary detector is a very promising device for fast fibre tracking.

  15. Theory and Development of Position-Sensitive Quantum Calorimeters. Degree awarded by Stanford Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Quantum calorimeters are being developed as imaging spectrometers for future X-ray astrophysics observatories. Much of the science to be done by these instruments could benefit greatly from larger focal-plane coverage of the detector (without increasing pixel size). An order of magnitude more area will greatly increase the science throughput of these future instruments. One of the main deterrents to achieving this goal is the complexity of the readout schemes involved. We have devised a way to increase the number of pixels from the current baseline designs by an order of magnitude without increasing the number of channels required for readout. The instrument is a high energy resolution, distributed-readout imaging spectrometer called a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (POST). A POST is a quantum calorimeter consisting of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESS) on the ends of a long absorber capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. Comparing rise time and energy information from the two TESS, the position of the event in the POST is determined. The energy of the event is inferred from the sum of the two pulses. We have developed a generalized theoretical formalism for distributed-readout calorimeters and apply it to our devices. We derive the noise theory and calculate the theoretical energy resolution of a POST. Our calculations show that a 7-pixel POST with 6 keV saturation energy can achieve 2.3 eV resolution, making this a competitive design for future quantum calorimeter instruments. For this thesis we fabricated 7- and 15-pixel POSTS using Mo/Au TESs and gold absorbers, and moved from concept drawings on scraps of napkins to a 32 eV energy resolution at 1.5 keV, 7-pixel POST calorimeter.

  16. A location system based on two-dimensional position sensitive detector used in interactive projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kai; Zhou, Qian; Chen, Liangjun; Sun, Peng; Xu, Honglei; Gao, Yuan; Ma, Jianshe; Li, Yi; Liu, Minxia

    2010-11-01

    The interactive projection systems have been widely used in people's life. Currently the major type is based on interactive whiteboard (IWB). In recent years, a new type based on CCD/CMOS sensor is greatly developed. Compared to IWB, CCD/CMOS implements non-contact sensing, which can use any surface as the projection screen. This makes them more flexible in many applications. However, the main defect is that the location accuracy and tracing speed are limited by the resolution and frame rate of the CCD/CMOS. In this paper, we introduced our recent progress on constructing a new type of non-contact interactive projection system by using a two-dimensional position sensitive detector (PSD). The PSD is an analog optoelectronic position sensor utilizing photodiode surface resistance, which provides continuous position measuring and features high position resolution (better than 1.5μm) and high speed response (less than 1μs). By using the PSD, both high positioning resolution and high tracing speed can be easily achieved. A specially designed pen equipped with infrared LEDs is used as a cooperative target. A high precision signal processing system is designed and optimized. The nonlinearity of the PSD as well as the aberration of the camera lens is carefully measured and calibrated. Several anti-interference methods and algorithms are studied. Experimental results show that the positioning error is about 2mm over a 1200mm×1000mm projection screen, and the sampling rate is at least 100Hz.

  17. Detection Efficiency of a ToF Spectrometer from Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara, E. de; Marti, G. V.; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Mingolla, M. G.; Negri, A. E.; Arazi, A.; Figueira, J. M.; Pacheco, A. J.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.

    2010-08-04

    The detection efficiency of a time-of-flight system based on two micro-channel plates (MCP) time zero detectors plus a conventional silicon surface barrier detector was obtained from heavy ion elastic recoil measurements (this ToF spectrometer is mainly devoted to measurements of total fusion cross section of weakly bound projectiles on different mass-targets systems). In this work we have used beams of {sup 7}Li, {sup 16}O, {sup 32}S and {sup 35}Cl to study the mass region of interest for its application to measurements fusion cross sections in the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 27}Al systems at energies around and above the Coulomb barrier (0.8V{sub B{<=}}E{<=}2.0V{sub B}). As the efficiency of a ToF spectrometer is strongly dependent on the energy and mass of the detected particles, we have covered a wide range of the scattered particle energies with a high degree of accuracy at the lowest energies. The different experimental efficiency curves obtained in that way were compared with theoretical electronic stopping power curves on carbon foils and were applied.

  18. A position-sensitive γ-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koji; Saito, Haruo; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Muramatsu, Shinichi; Nagai, Shota; Masuda, Keisuke

    2002-07-01

    A new position-sensitive γ-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi 4Ge 3O 12 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mm×2.6 mm×18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV γ-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mm×160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the γ-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation γ-rays.

  19. Superthermal ions detected in Venus' dayside ionosheath, ionopause, and magnetic barrier regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Hartle, R. E.; Mahajan, K. K.; Wagner, T. C. G.

    1993-05-01

    Results of a comprehensive morphological analysis of the dayside superthermal ion presence in the dayside ionopause region of Venus made using the Orbiter Ion Mass Spectrometer measurements are presented. There is a strong inbound-outbound difference in both the number and intensity of the superthermal ions with most events detected on the inbound crossing of the ionopause. The ambient energy of the detected ions is comparable to the ram energy of cold ions relative to the moving spacecraft. A comparison of the locations of the superthermal O(+) ion occurrences with respect to other parameters shows that the superthermals are a characteristic of the ionopause transition separating the essentially stationary ionosphere plasma from the flowing ionosheath plasma as deduced by Taylor et al. (1980) from individual examples.

  20. Superthermal ions detected in Venus' dayside ionosheath, ionopause, and magnetic barrier regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Hartle, R. E.; Mahajan, K. K.; Wagner, T. C. G.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a comprehensive morphological analysis of the dayside superthermal ion presence in the dayside ionopause region of Venus made using the Orbiter Ion Mass Spectrometer measurements are presented. There is a strong inbound-outbound difference in both the number and intensity of the superthermal ions with most events detected on the inbound crossing of the ionopause. The ambient energy of the detected ions is comparable to the ram energy of cold ions relative to the moving spacecraft. A comparison of the locations of the superthermal O(+) ion occurrences with respect to other parameters shows that the superthermals are a characteristic of the ionopause transition separating the essentially stationary ionosphere plasma from the flowing ionosheath plasma as deduced by Taylor et al. (1980) from individual examples.

  1. Performance improvement of small gamma camera using NaI(Tl) plate and position sensitive photo-multiplier tubes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Myung Hwan; Choi, Yong; Chung, Yong Hyun; Song, Tae Yong; Jung, Jin Ho; Hong, Key Jo; Min, Byung Jun; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the performance of a small gamma camera, utilizing a NaI(Tl) plate and a 5" position sensitive PMT. We attempted to build a NaI(Tl) plate crystal system which retained all its advantages, while at the same time integrating some of the advantages inherent in an array-type scintillation crystal system. Flood images were obtained with a lead hole mask, and position mapping was performed by detecting hole positions in the flood image. Energy calibration was performed using the energy spectra obtained from each hole position. Flood correction was performed using a uniformity correction table containing the relative efficiency of each image element. The spatial resolution was improved about 16% after correction at the centre field of view. Resolution deterioration at the outer field of view (OFOV) was considerably ameliorated, from 6.7 mm to 3.2 mm after correction. The sensitivity at the OFOV was also increased after correction, from 0.7 cps microCi(-1) to 2.0 cps microCi(-1). The correction also improved uniformity, from 5.2% to 2.1%, and linearity, from 0.5 mm to 0 mm. The results of this study indicate that the revised correction method can be employed to considerably improve the performance of a small gamma camera using a NaI(Tl) plate-type crystal. This method also provides high spatial resolution and linearity, like array-type crystals do, while retaining the specific advantages of plate-type crystals. PMID:15584530

  2. Ion-pair reversed phase liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection for analysis of ultraviolet transparent cations.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Cook, Kenneth S; Littlepage, Eric; Cundy, John; Mangalathillam, Ratish; Jones, Michael T

    2015-08-21

    This paper describes the use of an anionic ion-pair reagent (IPR) to impove the ultraviolet (UV) detection and hydrophobic retention of polar and UV transparent cations. Anionic IPR added to the mobile phase forms an ion-pair with cations. Formation of the ion-pair causes a redshift in the absorption wavength, making it possible for direct UV detection of UV-inactive cations. The ion-pairs with increased hydrophobicity were separated by reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). Different perfluorinated caboxylic acids (trifluoroacetic acid, heptafluorobutyric acid, nonafluoropentanoic acid) were evaluted as IPR in the separation and detection of the common cations sodium, ammonium and Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris). The effects of the IPR type and concentration on separation and detection have been investigated to understand the separation and detection mechanisms. The optimal separation and detection condtions were attained with mobile phase containing 0.1% nonafluoropentanoic acid and with the UV detection at 210nm. UV detection and charged aerosol detection (CAD) were compared in the quantitation of the cations. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) of sodium and Tris with UV detection is comparable to that by CAD. The LOQ of ammonium with UV detection (1ppm or 3ng) is about 20-fold lower than that (20ppm or 60ng) by CAD. The RPLC-UV method was used to monitor ammonium clearance during ultrafiltration and diafiltration in the manfucaturing of biopharmceutical drug substance. PMID:26195039

  3. POSS-containing red fluorescent nanoparticles for rapid detection of aqueous fluoride ions.

    PubMed

    Du, Fanfan; Bao, Yinyin; Liu, Bin; Tian, Jiao; Li, Qianbiao; Bai, Ruke

    2013-05-21

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-containing red fluorescent nanoparticles were designed and prepared for rapid detection of aqueous fluoride ions by virtue of the fluoride-triggered self-quenching of perylene bisimide dyes in nanoparticle cores. PMID:23575958

  4. Detection of artificially created negative ion clouds with incoherent scatter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultan, Peter J.; Mendillo, Michael; Oliver, William L.; Holt, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The physical mechanisms by which negative ions change the shape of the incoherent scatter spectrum, and the way in which shape changes may be used to detect the presence of heavy positive and negative ions in an ambient ionosphere are investigated. In order to detect heavy negative ions, the temperature structure of the ionosphere is fixed to a prevent average measurement, and any changes in spectral shape during the experiment are interpreted as being caused by changes in composition, and not by changes in the temperature ratio Te/Ti. The spatial and temporal development of heavy negative ion plasma clouds created during four active chemical release experiments was observed. Concentrations of 10-40-percent SF6(-) were detected in SPINEX 1, SPINEX 2, and IMS data sets. An average uncertainty of +/-10-percent SF6(-) is present in all three experiments. Concentrations of 30-percent Br(-) were detected in the NICARE 1 release, with uncertainties of +/-4 percent.

  5. Non-destructive state detection for quantum logic spectroscopy of molecular ions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Fabian; Wan, Yong; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-02-25

    Precision laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool in fundamental physics--used, for example, in determining fundamental constants, testing for their possible variation in the laboratory, and searching for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. However, the absence of cycling transitions in molecules poses a challenge for direct laser cooling of the ions, and for controlling and detecting their quantum states. Previously used state-detection techniques based on photodissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient, restricting the achievable resolution in laser spectroscopy. Here, we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive detection of the quantum state of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well controlled, co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force changes the internal state of the atom according to the internal state of the molecule. We show that individual quantum states in the molecular ion can be distinguished by the strength of their coupling to the optical dipole force. We also observe quantum jumps (induced by black-body radiation) between rotational states of a single molecular ion. Using the detuning dependence of the state-detection signal, we implement a variant of quantum logic spectroscopy of a molecular resonance. Our state-detection technique is relevant to a wide range of molecular ions, and could be applied to state-controlled quantum chemistry and to spectroscopic investigations of molecules that serve as probes for interstellar clouds. PMID:26855427

  6. Highly luminescent Ag+ nanoclusters for Hg2+ ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xun; Yeow, Teik Jin; Zhang, Qingbo; Lee, Jim Yang; Xie, Jianping

    2012-03-01

    A simple, low-cost and label-free Hg2+ ion sensor has been developed by using novel luminescent Ag+ nanoclusters (NCs) with an excellent optical property (quantum yield = 15%), an ultra-high ratio of active Ag+ species in the NC surface (~100%), and an ultra-short diffusion path length of Hg2+ ions to access the NC surface (~0.5 nm).A simple, low-cost and label-free Hg2+ ion sensor has been developed by using novel luminescent Ag+ nanoclusters (NCs) with an excellent optical property (quantum yield = 15%), an ultra-high ratio of active Ag+ species in the NC surface (~100%), and an ultra-short diffusion path length of Hg2+ ions to access the NC surface (~0.5 nm). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details of the synthesis of b-Ag NCs; time-resolved evolution of photoemission spectra of the b-Ag NCs in toluene; photoexcitation spectrum of the b-Ag NCs in toluene; comparison of the luminescence of b-Ag NCs at different temperatures (4 and 25 °C) TEM image of the b-Ag NCs in toluene; optical properties of r-Ag NCs obtained by the reduction of b-Ag NCs in toluene; XPS spectra of b-Ag NCs, thiolate-Ag+ complexes, r-Ag NCs, and large Ag nanoparticles; TEM image of the Hg2+-Ag NCs; photostability of the b-Ag NCs; tolerance studies of the b-Ag NCs over other metal ions; tolerance studies of the b-Ag NCs over common thiol ligands (e.g., GSH) and anions; relative luminescence of the b-Ag NCs in different real water samples in the presence of Hg2+ ions; and relative luminescence of the b-Ag NCs in NaCl solution with different concentrations. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11999d

  7. Large ions: Their vaporization, detection and structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.; Ng, C.Y.; Powis, I.

    1997-12-31

    This book focuses on some of the fundamental chemistry and physics associated with the behavior of large ions, with the contributors addressing the issues in a quantitative fashion, in order to elucidate clearly some of the key recent advances which have taken place. As such, Large Ions provides an excellent snapshot of current research in this fascinating and important area. The six chapters are written by some of the leading experts in the field, and together they will be of great interest to experts and newcomers, both of whom will benefit from the in-depth discussion of the latest methods and results.

  8. Chitosan-hydrogel-based fiber optic sensor for heavy metal ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Raghunandhan; Chen, Li Han; Chan, Chi Chiu; So, Ping Lam; Tou, Zhi Qiang; Peng, Zu

    2015-09-01

    A no-core fiber (NCF) based intermodal sensor for nickel ion (Ni2+) detection is proposed. Bilayers of chitosan and Poly Acrylic acid (PAA) functionalized on the sensor surface serve as adsorption sites for nickel ions thereby causing change in refractive index (RI) along the cladding bilayer boundary. Nickel adsorption at different concentrations was monitored continuously through measurement of wavelength shifts. As observed, the proposed sensor exhibits Ni2+ detection sensitivity of 0.0237 nm/μM.

  9. Detection and classification of explosive compounds utilizing laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmeier, A.; Heep, W.; Oberhuettinger, C.; Oberpriller, H.; Kessler, M.; Goebel, J.; Mueller, G.

    2009-05-01

    Detection of explosives by ion mobility spectroscopy has become common in recent years. We demonstrate explosive detection with a novel Laser Ion Mobility Spectrometer (LIMS) developed at EADS Innovation Works. A Laser operating at 266nm was used for the two-photon ionisation of dopant and calibrant substances. Quantitative measurements of trace residues of explosives have been performed to quantify the sensitivity of the LIMS system. Findings demonstrate the suitability of this technique as a screening tool for explosive compounds.

  10. A Study of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Signal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Du, Junwei; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Dokhale, Purushottam; Christian, James; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the signal properties of a position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) that has an integrated resistive network for position sensing. Attractive features of PS-SSPMs are their large area and ability to resolve small scintillator crystals. However, the large area leads to a high detector capacitance, and in order to achieve high spatial resolution a large network resistor value is required. These inevitably create a low-pass filter that drastically slows what would be a fast micro-cell discharge pulse. Significant changes in the signal shape of the PS-SSPM cathode output as a function of position are observed, which result in a position-dependent time delay when using traditional time pick-off methods such as leading edge discrimination and constant fraction discrimination. The timing resolution and time delay, as a function of position, were characterized for two different PS-SSPM designs, a continuous 10 mm × 10 mm PS-SSPM and a tiled 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs. After time delay correction, the block timing resolution, measured with a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 × 1.3 × 20 mm3 LSO crystals, was 8.6 ns and 8.5 ns, with the 10 mm PS-SSPM and 5 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The effect of crystal size on timing resolution was also studied, and contrary to expectation, a small improvement was measured when reducing the crystal size from 1.3 mm to 0.5 mm. Digital timing methods were studied and showed great promise for allowing accurate timing by implementation of a leading edge time pick-off. Position-dependent changes in signal shape on the anode side also are present, which complicates peak height data acquisition methods used for positioning. We studied the effect of trigger position on signal amplitude, flood histogram quality, and depth-of-interaction resolution in a dual-ended readout detector configuration. We conclude that detector timing and positioning can be significantly improved by implementation of digital timing

  11. A Study of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Signal Properties.

    PubMed

    Schmall, Jeffrey P; Du, Junwei; Judenhofer, Martin S; Dokhale, Purushottam; Christian, James; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-06-12

    We present an analysis of the signal properties of a position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) that has an integrated resistive network for position sensing. Attractive features of PS-SSPMs are their large area and ability to resolve small scintillator crystals. However, the large area leads to a high detector capacitance, and in order to achieve high spatial resolution a large network resistor value is required. These inevitably create a low-pass filter that drastically slows what would be a fast micro-cell discharge pulse. Significant changes in the signal shape of the PS-SSPM cathode output as a function of position are observed, which result in a position-dependent time delay when using traditional time pick-off methods such as leading edge discrimination and constant fraction discrimination. The timing resolution and time delay, as a function of position, were characterized for two different PS-SSPM designs, a continuous 10 mm × 10 mm PS-SSPM and a tiled 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs. After time delay correction, the block timing resolution, measured with a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 × 1.3 × 20 mm(3) LSO crystals, was 8.6 ns and 8.5 ns, with the 10 mm PS-SSPM and 5 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The effect of crystal size on timing resolution was also studied, and contrary to expectation, a small improvement was measured when reducing the crystal size from 1.3 mm to 0.5 mm. Digital timing methods were studied and showed great promise for allowing accurate timing by implementation of a leading edge time pick-off. Position-dependent changes in signal shape on the anode side also are present, which complicates peak height data acquisition methods used for positioning. We studied the effect of trigger position on signal amplitude, flood histogram quality, and depth-of-interaction resolution in a dual-ended readout detector configuration. We conclude that detector timing and positioning can be significantly improved by implementation of digital timing

  12. Double beta decay daughter ion detection in a solid xenon matrix for EXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mong, Brian; Cook, Shon; Fairbank, William

    2009-10-01

    0 νββ experiments are the possibly the most sensitive means available to measure the absolute mass of the neutrino as long as backgrounds can be sufficiently suppressed. The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment may be able to eliminate all backgrounds by detecting the daughter of the 0 νββ ( ^136Xe ->^136Ba +2e^- ) through optical fluorescence. We propose to grab the ion in the detector by freezing it in xenon ice on a cold probe, possibly an optical fiber, and then detecting it in the ice. We present progress in the detection of barium ions generated by an ion beam, and detected in a solid xenon matrix using CW laser excitation and efficient fluorescence detection.

  13. A colorimetric chemosensor for Cu2+ ion detection based on an iridium(III) complex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Modi; Leung, Ka-Ho; Lin, Sheng; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Kwong, Daniel W. J.; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2014-01-01

    We report herein the synthesis and application of a series of novel cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes 1−3 bearing a rhodamine-linked NˆN ligand for the detection of Cu2+ ions. Under the optimised conditions, the complexes exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity for Cu2+ ions over a panel of other metal ions, and showed consistent performance in a pH value range of 6 to 8. Furthermore, the potential application of this system for the monitoring of Cu2+ ions in tap water or natural river water samples was demonstrated. PMID:25348724

  14. Selective fluorogenic and chromogenic probe for detection of silver ions and silver nanoparticles in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Amrita; Santra, Mithun; Won, Nayoun; Kim, Sungjee; Kim, Jae Kyung; Kim, Seung Bin; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2009-02-18

    A novel rhodamine-based fluorogenic and chromogenic probe for Ag(+) ions in aqueous media is developed, which can be also used for the detection of AgNPs. The sensing mechanism is based on irreversible tandem ring-opening and -forming processes promoted by Ag(+)-coordination to the iodide of the probe, which is accompanied by both color and turn-on type fluorescence changes. The probe shows remarkably high selectivity over other metal ions and detects silver ions up to 14 ppb. PMID:19159289

  15. Graphene-DNAzyme Junctions: A Platform for Direct Metal Ion Detection with Ultrahigh Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Li, Le-Le; Wang, Xiaolong; Wu, Peiwen; Cao, Yang; Liang, Bo; Li, Xin; Lin, Yuanwei

    2015-01-01

    Many metal ions are present in biology and in the human body in trace amounts. Despite numerous efforts, metal sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity (< a few picomolar) are rarely achieved. Here, we describe a platform method that integrates a Cu2+-dependent DNAzyme into graphene-molecule junctions and its application for direct detection of paramagnetic Cu2+ with femtomolar sensitivity and high selectivity. Since DNAzymes specific for other metal ions can be obtained through in vitro selection, the method demonstrated here can be applied to the detection of a broad range of other metal ions. PMID:26417425

  16. New, high-efficiency ion trap mobility detection system for narcotics and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.; Bradley, V.; Borsody, A.; Lepine, S.

    1994-10-01

    A new patented Ion Trap Mobility Spectrometer (ITMS) design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1% efficiency. This is due primarily to electric field driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9% of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost in this discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an `ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a `field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. Many applications for this new detector are now being considered including the detection of narcotics and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra, reduced mobility data and sensitivity data are presented for fifteen narcotics, including cocaine, THC and LSD are reported.

  17. New high-efficiency ion-trap mobility detection system for narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.

    1997-02-01

    A new patented Ion Trap Mobility Spectrometer design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1 percent efficiency. This is due primarily to electric field driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9 percent of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost int his discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an 'ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a 'field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. One application for this new detector is now being developed, a portable, hand-held system with switching capability for the detection of drugs and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra and sensitivity data are presented for cocaine and heroin using a hand sniffer configuration.

  18. New high-efficiency ion trap mobility detection system for narcotics and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.; Jenkins, Anthony; Ribiero, K.; Napoli, J.

    1994-03-01

    A new patented ion trap mobility spectrometer design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1% efficiency. This is due primarily to electrical-field-driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9% of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost in this discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an `ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a `field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. Many applications for this new detector are now being considered including the detection of narcotics and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra, reduced mobility data and sensitivity data are presented for fifteen narcotics, including cocaine, THC, and LSD are reported.

  19. Analysis of high-altitude planetary ion velocity space distributions detected by the Ion Mass Analyzer aboard Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fraenz, M.; Curry, S.; Mitchell, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    We present observations of planetary ion velocity space distributions from the Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) onboard Mars Express (MEX). The magnetometer data from Mars Global Surveyor is used to obtain a rough estimate of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Characteristic features of the velocity space distributions will be examined and discussed for orbits aligned with the convective electric field and those in the Mars terminator plane. This study will focus on the high (keV) energy ions, as well as the relative importance of a high-altitude magnetosheath source of escaping planetary ions. Furthermore, this paper will examine various methods for converting the IMA detector counts to species-specific fluxes. After mimicking the methods previously used by researchers, we apply each of these methods of species extraction to data collected during the same time intervals. We discuss the implications for planetary ion motion around Mars, using the details of the velocity space observations to better understand the solar wind interaction with Mars. Comparisons to virtual detections using a test particle simulation will also provide insight into ion origins and trajectories.

  20. Detections of lunar exospheric ions by the LADEE neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Poppe, A. R.; Delory, G. T.

    2015-07-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS), operating in ion mode, provides sensitive detections of ions from the lunar exosphere. By analyzing ion-mode data from the entire mission, utilizing Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) plasma and magnetic field measurements to organize NMS data and eliminate background sources, we identify highly significant detections of lunar ions at mass per charge of 2, 4, 12, 20, 28, 39, and 40, moderately significant detections at 14 and 23, and weak detections at 24, 25, and 36. Unlike many previous observations of Moon-derived ions, an outward pointing viewing geometry ensures that these ions originate from the exosphere, rather than directly from the surface. For species with known neutral distributions, inferred ion production rates appear consistent with expectations for both magnitude and spatial distribution, assuming photoionization as the predominant source mechanism. Unexpected signals at mass per charge 12 and 28 suggest the presence of a significant exospheric population of carbon-bearing molecules.

  1. Nanoporous gold based optical sensor for sub-ppt detection of mercury ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Chang, Haixin; Hirata, Akihiko; Wu, Hongkai; Xue, Qi-Kun; Chen, Mingwei

    2013-05-28

    Precisely probing heavy metal ions in water is important for molecular biology, environmental protection, and healthy monitoring. Although many methods have been reported in the past decade, developing a quantitative approach capable of detecting sub-ppt level heavy metal ions with high selectivity is still challenging. Here we report an extremely sensitive and highly selective nanoporous gold/aptamer based surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor. The optical sensor has an unprecedented detection sensitivity of 1 pM (0.2 ppt) for Hg(2+) ions, the most sensitive Hg(2+) optical sensor known so far. The sensor also exhibits excellent selectivity. Dilute Hg(2+) ions can be identified in an aqueous solution containing 12 metal ions as well as in river water and underground water. Moreover, the SERRS sensor can be reused without an obvious loss of the sensitivity and selectivity even after 10 cycles. PMID:23590120

  2. Reactant ion chemistry for detection of TNT, RDX, and PETN using an ion mobility spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, S.E.; Rodacy, P.; Silva, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the responses of three energetic materials (TNT, RDX, and PETN) to varying reactant ion chemistries and IMS cell temperatures. The following reactant ion chemistries were evaluated; air-dry; air-wet; methylene chloride-dry; methylene chloride-wet; methylene bromide-dry; nitrogen dioxide-wet; sulfur dioxide-wet. The temperature was varied between 160 - 220{degrees}C.

  3. Single 19F Probe for Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Metal Ions Using miCEST MRI

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The local presence and concentration of metal ions in biological systems has been extensively studied ex vivo using fluorescent dyes. However, the detection of multiple metal ions in vivo remains a major challenge. We present a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based method for noninvasive detection of specific ions that may be coexisting, using the tetrafluorinated derivative of the BAPTA (TF-BAPTA) chelate as a 19F chelate analogue of existing optical dyes. Taking advantage of the difference in the ion-specific 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift offset (Δω) values between the ion-bound and free TF-BAPTA, we exploited the dynamic exchange between ion-bound and free TF-BAPTA to obtain MRI contrast with multi-ion chemical exchange saturation transfer (miCEST). We demonstrate that TF-BAPTA as a prototype single 19F probe can be used to separately visualize mixed Zn2+ and Fe2+ ions in a specific and simultaneous fashion, without interference from potential competitive ions. PMID:25523816

  4. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.

    1985-01-16

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  5. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Young, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  6. Ultrasensitive quantum dot fluorescence quenching assay for selective detection of mercury ions in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg(2+) ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples. PMID:25005836

  7. Ultrasensitive Quantum Dot Fluorescence quenching Assay for Selective Detection of Mercury Ions in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg2+ ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples. PMID:25005836

  8. Ultrasensitive Quantum Dot Fluorescence quenching Assay for Selective Detection of Mercury Ions in Drinking Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-07-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg2+ ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples.

  9. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin. PMID:23217311

  10. Ion chemistry of VX surrogates and ion energetics properties of VX: new suggestions for VX chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Midey, Anthony J; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, A A; Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    Room temperature rate constants and product ion branching ratios have been measured for the reactions of numerous positive and negative ions with VX chemical warfare agent surrogates representing the amine (triethylamine) and organophosphonate (diethyl methythiomethylphosphonate (DEMTMP)) portions of VX. The measurements have been supplemented by theoretical calculations of the proton affinity, fluoride affinity, and ionization potential of VX and the simulants. The results show that many proton transfer reactions are rapid and that the proton affinity of VX is near the top of the scale. Many proton transfer agents should detect VX selectively and sensitively in chemical ionization mass spectrometers. Charge transfer with NO(+) should also be sensitive and selective since the ionization potential of VX is small. The surrogate studies confirm these trends. Limits of detection for commercial and research grade CIMS instruments are estimated at 80 pptv and 5 ppqv, respectively. PMID:20384284

  11. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data is treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters in both a conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and a miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The current review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and to the sections that configures both a conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. Those reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  12. Detection of trace heavy metal ions in water by nanostructured porous Si biosensors.

    PubMed

    Shtenberg, Giorgi; Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Segal, Ester

    2015-07-01

    A generic biosensing platform, based on nanostructured porous Si (PSi), Fabry-Pérot thin films, for label-free monitoring of heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions by enzymatic activity inhibition, is described. First, we show a general detection assay by immobilizing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) within the oxidized PSi nanostructure and monitor its catalytic activity in real time by reflective interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy. Optical studies reveal the high specificity and sensitivity of the HRP-immobilized PSi towards three metal ions (Ag(+) > Pb(2+) > Cu(2+)), with a detection limit range of 60-120 ppb. Next, we demonstrate the concept of specific detection of Cu(2+) ions (as a model heavy metal) by immobilizing Laccase, a multi-copper oxidase, within the oxidized PSi. The resulting biosensor allows for specific detection and quantification of copper ions in real water samples by monitoring the Laccase relative activity. The optical biosensing results are found to be in excellent agreement with those obtained by the gold standard analytical technique (ICP-AES) for all water samples. The main advantage of the presented biosensing concept is the ability to detect heavy metal ions at environmentally relevant concentrations using a simple and portable experimental setup, while the specific biosensor design can be tailored by varying the enzyme type. PMID:25988196

  13. Ionoluminescence analysis of glass scintillators and application to single-ion-hit real-time detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Akihito; Kada, Wataru; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Shimada, Keisuke; Yokoata, Yuya; Miura, Kenta; Hanaizumi, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose and test a real-time detection system for single-ion hits using mega-electronvolt (MeV)-heavy ions. The system was constructed using G2000 and G9 glass scintillators, as well as an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera combined with an inverted microscope with a 10× objective lens. Commercially available G2000 and G9 glass scintillators, which have been reported to exhibit strong photoluminescence at 489, 543, 585, and 622 nm as a result of the Tb3+ f-f transition, were employed for highly accurate ionized particle detection. The EMCCD camera had a resolution of 512 × 512 pixels, each with a size of 16 μm × 16 μm, and a maximum linear gain of 8 × 105 electrons. For 260-MeV Ne, 3 ion hits/s were detected by our system. The intensity of the ionoluminescence (IL) peak induced by the heavy ions was 140 times the noise intensity. In contrast, the luminous diameter at the full width at half maximum (FWHM) in both the horizontal and vertical directions was calculated to be approximately 4.5 μm. These results suggest that our detection system can accurately detect single-ion hits with a diameter of the order of 1 μm.

  14. Positive corona discharge ion source with IMS/MS to detect impurities in high purity Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabo, M.; Klas, M.; Wang, H.; Huang, C.; Chu, Y.; Matejčík, Š.

    2011-07-01

    We have applied the Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (IMS/MS) and the Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionisation/Mass Spectrometry (APCI/MS) techniques to study the formation of the ions in the positive corona discharge (CD) in highly purified nitrogen with impurities at 100 ppt level. The main products observed were H3O+(H2O)n ions (reduced ion mobility of 2.15 cm2 V-1 s-1). Additionally, we have observed ions with reduced mobilities 2.42 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 2.30 cm2 V-1 s-1. The intensity of these ions was increasing with the increasing discharge current. We associated these peaks with NH4+ and NO+(H2O)n. The formation of these ions results from trace amounts of O2 and NH3 in nitrogen. The time evolution of the ions in corona discharge has been studied using the APCI/MS technique in the time windows ranging from 100 μs to 2 ms. The present work indicates the ability of the IMS technique equipped with CD ions source to detect impurities below 100 ppt level.

  15. Evaluation of Pulse Counting for the Mars Organic Mass Analyzer (MOMA) Ion Trap Detection Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Amerom, Friso H.; Short, Tim; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; Kleyner, Igor; Cotter, Robert J.; Pinnick, Veronica; Hoffman, Lars; Danell, Ryan M.; Lyness, Eric I.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Organic Mass Analyzer is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to identify organics and possible biological compounds on Mars. In the process of characterizing mass spectrometer size, weight, and power consumption, the use of pulse counting was considered for ion detection. Pulse counting has advantages over analog-mode amplification of the electron multiplier signal. Some advantages are reduced size of electronic components, low power consumption, ability to remotely characterize detector performance, and avoidance of analog circuit noise. The use of pulse counting as a detection method with ion trap instruments is relatively rare. However, with the recent development of high performance electrical components, this detection method is quite suitable and can demonstrate significant advantages over analog methods. Methods A prototype quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer with an internal electron ionization source was used as a test setup to develop and evaluate the pulse-counting method. The anode signal from the electron multiplier was preamplified. The an1plified signal was fed into a fast comparator for pulse-level discrimination. The output of the comparator was fed directly into a Xilinx FPGA development board. Verilog HDL software was written to bin the counts at user-selectable intervals. This system was able to count pulses at rates in the GHz range. The stored ion count nun1ber per bin was transferred to custom ion trap control software. Pulse-counting mass spectra were compared with mass spectra obtained using the standard analog-mode ion detection. Prelin1inary Data Preliminary mass spectra have been obtained for both analog mode and pulse-counting mode under several sets of instrument operating conditions. Comparison of the spectra revealed better peak shapes for pulse-counting mode. Noise levels are as good as, or better than, analog-mode detection noise levels. To artificially force ion pile-up conditions, the ion trap was overfilled

  16. Proportional counter for X-ray analysis of lunar and planetary surfaces. [a position sensitive scintillating imaging proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A position sensitive proportional scintillation detector was developed and evaluated for use in applications involving X-ray imaging as well as spectroscopy. Topics covered include limitations of the proportional scintillation counter for use in space; purification of the xenon gas in the detector, and the operation of the detector system. Results show that the light signal in a proportional scintillation detector remains well localized. With modest electric fields in xenon, the primary electrons from a photoelectric absorption of an X-ray can be brought a distance of a few millimeters to a higher field region without spreading more than a millimeter or so. Therefore, it is possible to make a proportional scintillation detector with good position sensitivity that could be used to calibrate out the difference in light collection over its sensitive volume.

  17. Software modules of DAQ PCI board (DeLiDAQ) for positive-sensitive MWPC detectors with delay line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchanovsky, F. V.; Litvinenko, E. I.; Nikiforov, A. S.; Gebauer, B.; Schulz, Ch.; Wilpert, Th.

    2006-12-01

    The data acquisition system for the position-sensitive delay line detectors on basis of the reprogrammable PCI DAQ board (DeLiDAQ) began to be used for scientific measurements with one- and two-dimensional position-sensitive MWPC detectors on the neutron reactors IBR-2 (JINR, Dubna) and BERII (HMI, Berlin). A stand-alone version of the system with the graphical user interface on the basis of packet ROOT can be used on any PC with the operating system Windows 2000 or Windows XP. Architecture of the created software ensures several ways of interfacing to experiment control systems. In the paper we provide a description of the DeLiDAQ software modules, their features and results of some performance tests.

  18. Count rate studies of a box-shaped PET breast imaging system comprised of position sensitive avalanche photodiodes utilizing monte carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Foudray, Angela M K; Habte, Frezghi; Chinn, Garry; Zhang, Jin; Levin, Craig S

    2006-01-01

    We are investigating a high-sensitivity, high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) system for clinical use in the detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Using conventional figures of merit, design parameters were evaluated for count rate performance, module dead time, and construction complexity. The detector system modeled comprises extremely thin position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes coupled to lutetium oxy-orthosilicate scintillation crystals. Previous investigations of detector geometries with Monte Carlo indicated that one of the largest impacts on sensitivity is local scintillation crystal density when considering systems having the same average scintillation crystal densities (same crystal packing fraction and system solid-angle coverage). Our results show the system has very good scatter and randoms rejection at clinical activity ranges ( approximately 200 muCi). PMID:17645997

  19. Detection of singly ionized energetic lunar pick-up ions upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Moebius, E.

    1992-01-01

    Singly ionized suprathermal ions upstream of the earth's bow shock have been detected by using the time-of-flight spectrometer SULEICA on the AMPTE/IRM satellite. The data were collected between August and December 1985. The flux of the ions in the mass range between 23 and 37 amu is highly anisotropic towards the earth. The ions are observed with a period of about 29 days around new moon (+/- 3 days). The correlation of the energy of the ions with the solar wind speed and the interplanetary magnetic field orientation indicates the relation to the pick-up process. We conclude that the source of these pick-up ions is the moon. We argue that due to the impinging solar wind, atoms are sputtered off the lunar surface, ionized in the sputtering process or by ensuing photoionization and picked up by the solar wind.

  20. Detection of explosives by positive corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Ilbeigi, Vahideh

    2010-04-15

    In this work, thermal decomposition has been used to detect explosives by IMS in positive polarity. Explosives including Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN), Cyclo-1,3,5-Trimethylene-2,4,6-Trinitramine (RDX), 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-Dihydro-5-nitro-3H-1,2,4-triazol-3-one (NTO), 1,3,5,7-Tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), have been evaluated at temperatures between 150 and 250 degrees C in positive polarity in air. Explosives yield NO(x) which causes NO(+) peak to increase. Additional peaks may be used to identify the type of explosive. The limit of detection for RDX, HMX, PETN, NTO, and TNT were obtained to be 1, 10, 40, 1000, and 1000 ng, respectively. PMID:20004055

  1. Noninvasive Detection of Metallic Ions in a Hybrid Rocket Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, John Hunter; Dunn, Robert

    2000-03-01

    This project utilizes a system of Gaussian cylinders to detect charged particles in a hybrid rocket plume. The approach is based on the phenomenon that moving charges will induce electric currents in nearby conductive surfaces. Consequently, charged particles in a rocket plume will induce electrical currents in a surrounding conductive cylindrical surface. Since these currents are proportional to the net charge being transported in a plume at any particular time, their measurement provides a method for determining the net charge ejected from the rocket motor. The Gaussian surfaces used in this project were conducting cylinders coated with an insulated material in order to differentiate contact charges from induced charges. Two configurations were used as noninvasive detectors. Single cylinders located around the plume produced results in particle detection. The second configuration consisted of two Gaussian surfaces, which allowed a differential amplifier to measure the potential difference between the cylinders while simultaneously canceling the common electromagnetic noise.

  2. Position sensitive detectors for synchrotron radiation studies: the tortoise and the hare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Rob

    2003-11-01

    The huge gulf between the high photon fluxes available from synchrotrons and the capabilities of detectors to measure the resulting photon, electron or ion signals is well known. Whilst accelerator technology continues to advance at a rapid pace, it is detector performance which represents the limiting factor for many synchrotron experiments. In some cases there are still single channel counting detectors based on 40-year-old designs operational on synchrotron beamlines. The dream of many researchers is a detector which is able to simultaneously image and perform spectroscopy at the required data rates. A solution is the massive integration of parallel electronics into detectors on a pixel by pixel basis. These ideas have been in gestation for very many years awaiting sufficient funding, nevertheless, several prototypes are now at the testing stage. The current status of these and other detector developments targeted at synchrotron science are briefly reviewed.

  3. Ion-induced gamma-ray detection of fast ions escaping from fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Mushiake, T.; Doi, K.; Wada, M.; Taniike, A.; Matsuki, T.; Shimazoe, K.; Yoshino, M.; Nagasaka, T.; Tanaka, T.; Kisaki, M.; Fujimoto, Y.; Fujioka, K.; Yamaoka, H.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2014-11-15

    A 12 × 12 pixel detector has been developed and used in a laboratory experiment for lost fast-ion diagnostics. With gamma rays in the MeV range originating from nuclear reactions {sup 9}Be(α, nγ){sup 12}C, {sup 9}Be(d, nγ){sup 12}C, and {sup 12}C(d, pγ){sup 13}C, a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector measured a fine-energy-resolved spectrum of gamma rays. The HPGe detector enables the survey of background-gamma rays and Doppler-shifted photo peak shapes. In the experiments, the pixel detector produces a gamma-ray image reconstructed from the energy spectrum obtained from total photon counts of irradiation passing through the detector's lead collimator. From gamma-ray image, diagnostics are able to produce an analysis of the fast ion loss onto the first wall in principle.

  4. Gold nanoflowers based colorimetric detection of Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalawade, Pradnya; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2013-12-01

    An optical detection method based on the interaction of gold nanoflowers with Hg2+ and Pb2+ has been described. After interaction, gold nanoflowers change the color from violet to wine red. The nanoflowers are capable of determining Hg2+ and Pb2+ over a dynamic range of 1.0 × 10-6 and 1.0 × 10-5 M, respectively. The response time of nanoflowers depends on the concentration of ions. The presence of both Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions in the mixture having Au nanoflowers induced color changes of the solution within several seconds even at 1.0 × 10-6 M. Common metal ions were chosen to investigate their interference in Hg2+ and Pb2+ detection, and the concentration of each metal ion studied was 1.0 × 10-5 M. Other metallic ions could not induce color change even at 1.0 × 10-5 M. The feasibility of our method to detect Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions at high concentration in real water samples was verified. Water samples were from our own laboratory and no pretreatment was made. As the particles are stable they can be used for more than 3 months without observing any major deviation.

  5. Piezoelectric detection of ion pairs between sulphonate and catecholamines for flow injection analysis of pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Mo, Z; Long, X; Zhang, M

    1999-03-01

    Fundamentals of ion-pair flow injection with piezoelectric detection were investigated experimentally and theoretically for the adsorption of dodecyl phenylsulfonate and interfacial ion-pair formation with epinephrine and l-dopa on silver electrode of quartz crystal microbalance. The influences of sulfonate concentration and operating parameters on the frequency response were demonstrated and provided the possibility for the discriminating determination of mixtures. The selected system of ion-pair flow injection with piezoelectric detection was applied to the determination of epinephrine and l-dopa. Calibration curves were linear in ranges 4.00-850 and 3.50-730 mug ml(-1), with detection limits of 1.22 and 1.05 mug ml(-1) and sampling frequencies of 120 samples h(-1), for epinephrine and l-dopa, respectively. The method has been satisfactorily applied to the determination of catecholamines in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:18967504

  6. Ion-sensitive field effect transistors for pH and potassium ion concentration sensing: towards detection of myocardial ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Pratyush; Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2008-03-01

    Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) for sensing change in ionic concentration in biological systems can be used for detecting critical conditions like Myocardial Ischemia. Having the ability to yield steady signal characteristics can be used to observe the ionic concentration gradients which mark the onset of ischemia. Two ionic concentrations, pH and [K +], have been considered as the indicator for Myocardial Ischemia in this study. The ISFETs in this study have an organic semi-conductor film as the electronically active component. Poly-3 hexylthiophene was chosen for its compatibility to the solution processing, which is a simple and economical method of thin film fabrication. The gate electrode, which regulates the current in the active layer, has been employed as the sensor element. The devices under study here were fabricated on a flexible substrate PEN. The pH sensor was designed with the Tantalum Oxide gate dielectric as the ion selective component. The charge accumulated on the surface of the metal oxide acts as the source of the effecter electric field. The device was tested for pH values between 6.5 and 7.5, which comprises the variation observed during ischemic attack. The potassium ion sensor has got a floating gate electrode which is functionalized to be selective to potassium ion. The device was tested for potassium ion concentration between 5 and 25 mM, which constitutes the variation in extra cellular potassium ion concentration during ischemic attack. The device incorporated a monolayer of Valinomycin, a potassium specific ionophore, on top of the gate electrode.

  7. Anion-intercalated layered double hydroxides modified test strips for detection of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Sun, Jianchao; Fan, Hai; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a novel approach for facile and rapid detection of heavy metal ions using anion-intercalated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) modified test strips is demonstrated. By intercalating Fe(CN)6(4-) or S(2-) anions into the interlayers of LDHs on the filter paper, various heavy metal ions can be easily detected based on the color change before and after reaction between the anions and the heavy metal ions. Upon the dropping of heavy metal ions solutions to the test strips, the colors of the test strips changed instantly, which can be easily observed by naked eyes. With the decrease of the concentration, the color depth changed obviously. The lowest detection concentration can be up to 1×10(-6) mol L(-1). Due to the easily intercalation of anions into the interlayer of the LDHs on test trips, this procedure provides a general method for the construction of LDHs modified test strips for detection of heavy metal ions. The stability of the prepared test strips is investigated. Furthermore, all the results were highly reproducible. The test strips may have potential applications in environmental monitoring fields. PMID:26653453

  8. Scintillator diagnostics for the detection of laser accelerated ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, N.; Tresca, O.; Lefferts, R.

    2014-09-01

    Laser plasma interaction with ultraintense pulses present exciting schemes for accelerating ions. One of the advantages conferred by using a gaseous laser and target is the potential for a fast (several Hz) repetition rate. This requires diagnostics which are not only suited for a single shot configuration, but also for repeated use. We consider several scintillators as candidates for an imaging diagnostic for protons accelerated to MeV energies by a CO2 laser focused on a gas jet target. We have measured the response of chromium-doped alumina (chromox) and polyvinyl toluene (PVT) screens to protons in the 2-8 MeV range. We have calibrated the luminescent yield in terms of photons emitted per incident proton for each scintillator. We also discuss how light scattering and material properties affect detector resolution. Furthermore, we consider material damage and the presence of an afterglow under intense exposures. Our analysis reveals a near order of magnitude greater yield from chromox in response to proton beams at > 8 MeV energies, while scattering effects favor PVT-based scintillators at lower energies.

  9. Detecting Extra Dimension by Helium-Like Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Xiao; Zhang, Xin-Hui; Duan, Yi-Shi

    Considering that gravitational force might deviate from Newton's inverse-square law and become much stronger in small scale, we present a method to detect the possible existence of extra dimensions in the ADD model. By making use of an effective variational wave function, we obtain the nonrelativistic ground energy of a helium atom and its isoelectronic sequence. Based on these results, we calculate gravity correction of the ADD model. Our calculation may provide a rough estimation about the magnitude of the corresponding frequencies which could be measured in later experiments.

  10. Femtomolar detection of mercuric ions using polypyrrole, pectin and graphene nanocomposites modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2016-12-01

    Several nanomaterials and techniques for the detection of mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) have been developed in the past decade. However, simple, low-cost and rapid sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions yet remains an important task. Herein, we present a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the femtomolar detection of Hg(2+) based on polypyrrole, pectin, and graphene (PPy/Pct/GR) which was prepared by one step electrochemical potentiodyanamic method. The effect of concentration of pectin, polypyrrole and graphene were studied for the detection of Hg(2+). The influence of experimental parameters including effect of pH, accumulation time and accumulation potential were also studied. Different pulse anodic stripping voltammetry was chosen to detect Hg(2+) at PPy/Pct/GR/GCE modified electrode. The fabricated sensor achieved an excellent performance towards Hg(2+) detection such as higher sensitivity of 28.64μAμM(-1) and very low detection limit (LOD) of 4 fM at the signal to noise ratio of 3. The LOD of our sensor offered nearly 6 orders of magnitude lower than that of recommended concentration of Hg(2+) in drinking water by United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization. Compared to all previously reported electrochemical sensors towards Hg(2+) detection, our newly fabricated sensor attained a very LOD in the detection of Hg(2+). The practicality of our proposed sensor for the detection of Hg(2+) was successfully demonstrated in untreated tap water. PMID:27565958

  11. A Semi-Synthetic Ion Channel Platform for Detection of Phosphatase and Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Macrae, Michael X.; Blake, Steven; Jiang, Xiayun; Capone, Ricardo; Estes, Daniel J.; Mayer, Michael; Yang, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Sensitive methods to probe the activity of enzymes are important for clinical assays and for elucidating the role of these proteins in complex biochemical networks. This paper describes a semi-synthetic ion channel platform for detecting the activity of two different classes of enzymes with high sensitivity. In the first case, this method uses single ion channel conductance measurements to follow the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of a phosphate group attached to the C-terminus of gramicidin A (gA, an ion channel-forming peptide) in the presence of alkaline phosphatase (AP). Enzymatic hydrolysis of this phosphate group removes negative charges from the entrance of the gA pore, resulting in a product with measurably reduced single ion channel conductance compared to the original gA-phosphate substrate. This technique employs a standard, commercial bilayer setup and takes advantage of the catalytic turnover of enzymes and the amplification characteristics of ion flux through individual gA pores to detect picomolar concentrations of active AP in solution. Furthermore, this technique makes it possible to study the kinetics of an enzyme and provides an estimate for the observed rate constant (kcat) and the Michaelis constant (KM) by following the conversion of the gA-phosphate substrate to product over time in the presence of different concentrations of AP. In the second case, modification of gA with a substrate for proteolytic cleavage by anthrax lethal factor (LF) afforded a sensitive method for detection of LF activity, illustrating the utility of ion channel-based sensing for detection of a potential biowarfare agent. This ion channel-based platform represents a powerful, novel approach to monitor the activity of femtomoles to picomoles of two different classes of enzymes in solution. Furthermore, this platform has the potential for realizing miniaturized, cost-effective bioanalytical assays that complement currently established assays. PMID:19860382

  12. Highly Sensitive and Selective Detection of Nanomolar Ferric Ions Using Dopamine Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Dutta Chowdhury, Ankan; Doong, Ruey-An

    2016-08-17

    The good stability, low cytotoxicity, and excellent photoluminescence property of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) make them an emerging class of promising materials in various application fields ranging from sensor to drug delivery. In the present work, the dopamine-functionalized GQDs (DA-GQDs) with stably bright blue fluorescence were successfully synthesized for low level Fe(3+) ions detection. The as-synthesized GQDs are uniform in size with narrow-distributed particle size of 4.5 ± 0.6 nm and high quantum yield of 10.2%. The amide linkage of GQDs with dopamine, confirmed by using XPS and FTIR spectra, results in the specific interaction between Fe(3+) and catechol moiety of dopamine at the interfaces for highly sensitive and selective detection of Fe(3+). A linear range of 20 nM to 2 μM with a detection limit of 7.6 nM is obtained for Fe(3+) detection by DA-GQDs. The selectivity of DA-GQDs sensing probe is significantly excellent in the presence of other interfering metal ions. In addition, the reaction mechanism for Fe(3+) detection based on the complexation and oxidation of dopamine has been proposed and validated. Results obtained in this study clearly demonstrate the superiority of surface functionalized GQDs to Fe(3+) detection, which can pave an avenue for the development of high performance and robust sensing probes for detection of metal ions and other organic metabolites in environmental and biomedical applications. PMID:27472083

  13. Protein-Modified-Paramagnetic-Particles as a Tool for Detection of Silver(I) Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizek, R.; Krizkova, S.; Adam, V.; Huska, D.; Hubalek, J.; Trnkova, L.

    2009-04-01

    In a number of published articles the toxic effect of silver(I) ions on aquatic organisms is described. Silver(I) ions in aquatic environment are stable in a wide range of pH. Under alkali pH AgOH and Ag(OH)2- can be formed. However, in water environment there are many compounds to interact with silver(I) ions. The most important ones are chloride anions, which forms insoluble precipitate with silver(I) ions (AgCl). The insoluble silver containing compounds do not pose any threat to aquatic organisms. Toxicity of silver ions is probably caused by their very good affinity to nucleic acids and also proteins. The binding into active enzyme site leads to the expressive enzyme reaction inhibition. Silver(I) ions are into living environment introduced thanks to anthropogenic activities. They easily contaminate atmosphere as well as aquatic environment or soils. Several authors described using of carbon electrode as working electrode for determination of silver. Recently, we have suggested heavy metal biosensor based on interaction of metal ions with low molecular mass protein called metallothionein (MT), which was adsorbed on the surface of hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The biosensor was successfully used for detection of cadmium(II) and zinc(II) ions, cisplatin, cisplatin-DNA adducts and palladium(II) ions. Due to the convincing results with MT as biological component we report on suggesting of heavy metal biosensor based on immobilization of metallothionein (MT) on the surface of carbon paste electrode (CPE) via MT-antibodies. Primarily we studied of basic electrochemical behaviour of MT at surface of carbon paste electrode by using of square wave voltammetry (SWV). Detection limit (3 S/N) for MT was evaluated as 0.1 μg/ml. After that we have evaluated the electroactivity of MT at surface of SWV, we aimed our attention on the way of capturing of MT on the surface of CPE. We choose antibody against MT obtained from chicken eggs for these purposes. Antibodies

  14. Fast detection of narcotics by single photon ionization mass spectrometry and laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudien, Robert; Schultze, Rainer; Wieser, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution two analytical devices for the fast detection of security-relevant substances like narcotics and explosives are presented. One system is based on an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with single photon ionization (SPI). This soft ionization technique, unlike electron impact ionization (EI), reduces unwanted fragment ions in the mass spectra allowing the clear determination of characteristic (usually molecular) ions. Their enrichment in the ion trap and identification by tandem MS investigations (MS/MS) enables the detection of the target substances in complex matrices at low concentrations without time-consuming sample preparation. For SPI an electron beam pumped excimer light source of own fabrication (E-Lux) is used. The SPI-ITMS system was characterized by the analytical study of different drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, and some precursors. Additionally, it was successfully tested on-site in a closed illegal drug laboratory, where low quantities of MDMA could be directly detected in samples from floors, walls and lab equipments. The second analytical system is based on an ion mobility (IM) spectrometer with resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm), used for ionization, a selective and sensitive detection of aromatic compounds is possible. By application of suited aromatic dopants, in addition, also non-aromatic polar compounds are accessible by ion molecule reactions like proton transfer or complex formation. Selected drug precursors could be successfully detected with this device as well, qualifying it to a lower-priced alternative or useful supplement of the SPI-ITMS system for security analysis.

  15. Wedge-and-strip anodes for centroid-finding position-sensitive photon and particle detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C.; Jelinsky, P.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    The paper examines geometries employing position-dependent charge partitioning to obtain a two-dimensional position signal from each detected photon or particle. Requiring three or four anode electrodes and signal paths, images have little distortion and resolution is not limited by thermal noise. An analysis of the geometrical image nonlinearity between event centroid location and the charge partition ratios is presented. In addition, fabrication and testing of two wedge-and-strip anode systems are discussed. Images obtained with EUV radiation and microchannel plates verify the predicted performance, with further resolution improvements achieved by adopting low noise signal circuitry. Also discussed are the designs of practical X-ray, EUV, and charged particle image systems.

  16. Thickness dependence of surface plasmon resonance sensor response for metal ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seung-A.; Lee, Taek-Sung; Kim, Won Mok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Wook Seong; Kim, Inho

    2013-08-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is one of the most viable technologies for portable and highly sensitive sensing in clinical and environmental applications. A lot of research on SPR sensors based on plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) sensing layers for detection of various metal ions has been well reported, but a study on their correlation between sensing layer thickness and sensor response has been rarely done. The purpose of this study is to investigate thickness dependence of sensing layers on the response time and the sensitivity of SPR sensors based on plasticized PVC. Calcium ionophore was incorporated in the sensing layers for calcium ion detection. Our experimental results showed that thicker sensing layers exhibited higher sensitivity and wider detection range but longer response time. We discussed metal ion diffusion in plasticized sensing layers by correlating numerical calculations with experimental ones in order to understand temporal response of our SPR sensor. The response time also relied on the flow rate of calcium ion solutions, indicating that metal ion diffusion in bulk media is one of the limiting factors.

  17. Sub-surface single ion detection in diamond: A path for deterministic color center creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, John; Aguirre, Brandon; Pacheco, Jose; Camacho, Ryan; Bielejec, Edward; Sandia National Laboratories Team

    Deterministic single color center creation remains a critical milestone for the integrated use of diamond color centers. It depends on three components: focused ion beam implantation to control the location, yield improvement to control the activation, and single ion implantation to control the number of implanted ions. A surface electrode detector has been fabricated on diamond where the electron hole pairs generated during ion implantation are used as the detection signal. Results will be presented demonstrating single ion detection. The detection efficiency of the device will be described as a function of implant energy and device geometry. It is anticipated that the controlled introduction of single dopant atoms in diamond will provide a basis for deterministic single localized color centers. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Tetrabutylammonium-modified clay film electrodes: characterization and application to the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Maghear, Adela; Tertiş, Mihaela; Fritea, Luminţa; Marian, Iuliu O; Indrea, Emil; Walcarius, Alain; Săndulescu, Robert

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of smectite clay partially exchanged with tetrabutylammonium ions (TBA(+)) and its subsequent deposition onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for application to the preconcentration electroanalysis of metal ions (Cd, Pb, and Cu). Such partial exchange of TBA(+) induces the expansion of the interlayer region between the clay sheets (as ascertained by XRD) while maintaining its ion exchange capacity, which resulted in enhanced mass transport rates (as pointed out by electrochemical monitoring of permeability properties of these thin (organo)clay films on GCE). This principle was applied here to the anodic stripping square wave voltammetric analysis of metal ions after accumulation at open circuit. Among others, detection limits as low as 3.6×10(-8)M for copper and 7.2×10(-8)M for cadmium have been achieved. PMID:24840412

  19. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by self assembled chemical field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Hang; Kang, Yuhong; Gladwin, Elizabeth; Claus, Richard O.

    2015-04-01

    Multiple layer-by-layer sensor material modifications were designed and implemented to achieve selectivity of semiconductor based chemical field effect transistors (ChemFETs) to particular heavy metal ions. The ChemFET sensors were fabricated and modified in three ways, with the intent to initially target first mercury and lead ions and then chromium ions, respectively. Sensor characterization was performed with the gate regions of the sensor elements exposed to different concentrations of target heavy metal ion solutions. A minimum detection level in the range of 0.1 ppm and a 10%-90% response time of less than 10 s were demonstrated. By combining layer-by-layer gold nanoparticles and lead ionophores, a sensor is produced that is sensitive and selective not only to chromium but also to Cr3+ and Cr6+. This result supports the claim that high selectivity can be achieved by designing self-assembled bonding for lead, arsenic, chromium, cesium, mercury, and cadmium.

  20. The detection of energetic materials with a laser ionization ion mobility spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alistair; Deas, Robert M.; Kosmidis, Constantinos; Ledingham, Kenneth W. D.; Marshall, Archibald; Singhal, Ravi P.

    1995-04-01

    Laser induced multiphoton ionization (MPI) has been used to produce positive and negative ions at atmospheric pressure in an ion mobility spectrometer. This paper deals particularly with the application of this technique to the ultra-trace detection of a number of energetic materials such as RDX and PETN. In conventional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), a radioactive 63Ni β-foil is used as the ionization source. The laser IMS spectra will be compared with the 63Ni spectra and it will be shown that the analyte ions produced by laser ionization have a wavelength dependent fingerprint which provides an additional degree of selectivity. It is felt that this new approach to IMS will develop considerably the scope and applicability of this powerful technique.

  1. Method of detecting defects in ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells by chemochromic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Brooker, Robert Paul; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2016-01-05

    A method of detecting defects in membranes such as ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells. The electrochemical cell includes an assembly having an anode side and a cathode side with the ion exchange membrane in between. In a configuration step a chemochromic sensor is placed above the cathode and flow isolation hardware lateral to the ion exchange membrane which prevents a flow of hydrogen (H.sub.2) between the cathode and anode side. The anode side is exposed to a first reactant fluid including hydrogen. The chemochromic sensor is examined after the exposing for a color change. A color change evidences the ion exchange membrane has at least one defect that permits H.sub.2 transmission therethrough.

  2. Highly sensitive detection of chromium (III) ions by resonance Rayleigh scattering enhanced by gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Cai, Huai-Hong; Yang, Fen; Lin, Dewen; Yang, Pei-Hui; Cai, Jiye

    2014-01-01

    Simple and sensitive determination of chromium (III) ions (Cr3+) has potential applications for detecting trace contamination in environment. Here, the assay is based on the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) by Cr3+-induced aggregation of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy were employed to characterize the nanostructures and spectroscopic properties of the Cr3+-AuNP system. The experiment conditions, such as reaction time, pH value, salt concentration and interfering ions, were investigated. The combination of signal amplification of Cr3+-citrate chelation with high sensitivity of RRS technique allow a selective assay of Cr3+ ions with a detection limit of up to 1.0 pM. The overall assay can be carried out at room temperature within only twenty minutes, making it suitable for high-throughput routine applications in environment and food samples.

  3. Biomolecular ion detection using high-temperature superconducting MgB2 strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, N.; Shibata, H.; Mawatari, Y.; Koike, M.; Ohkubo, M.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting strip ion detectors (SSIDs) are promising for realization of ideal ion detection with 100% efficiency and nanosecond-scale time response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We have detected single biomolecular ions in the keV range using a 10-nm-thick and 250-nm-wide strip of a high temperature superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), at temperatures of up to 13 K. The output pulse shape is explained remarkably well using circuit simulations and time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations coupled with a heat diffusion equation. The simulations show that the hot spot model is applicable to the proposed MgB2-SSIDs and the normal region expansion is completed within 16 ps, which corresponds to a maximum length of 1010 nm.

  4. Bucky-gel coated glassy carbon electrodes, for voltammetric detection of femtomolar leveled lead ions.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qijin; Yu, Fen; Zhu, Lina; Wang, Xiaoxia; Yang, Nianjun

    2010-10-15

    Femtomolar (fM) leveled lead ions were electrochemically detected using a bucky-gel coated glassy carbon electrode and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. The bucky-gel was composed of dithizone, ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The fabrication of the bucky-gel coated electrode was optimized. The modified electrode was characterized with voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and chronoamperometry. After the accumulation of lead ions into the bucky-gel modified electrode at -1.2V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) for 5 min in a pH 4.4 sodium acetate-acetate acid buffer solution, differential pulse anodic stripping voltammograms of the accumulated lead show an anodic wave at -0.58 V. The anodic peak current is detectable for lead ions in the concentration range from 1.0 μM down to 500 fM. The detection limit is calculated to be 100 fM. The proposed method was successfully applied for the detection of lead ions in lake water. PMID:20875583

  5. Functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles for detecting zinc ions in living cells and their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gyusik; Son, Hyunjong; Lim, Jung Mi; Kweon, Hee-Seek; Lee, In Soo; Kang, Dongmin; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2012-05-01

    The zinc tank: A new fluoro-chromogenic chemosensor based on BODIPY-functionalized Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (1) has been prepared. Chemoprobe 1 exhibits high selectivity for Zn(2+) over other competing metal ions tested. Moreover, confocal microscopy experiments established that 1 can be used for detecting Zn(2+) levels in living cells (see figure). PMID:22517629

  6. Fast detection of toxic industrial compounds by laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhuettinger, Carola; Langmeier, Andreas; Oberpriller, Helmut; Kessler, Matthias; Goebel, Johann; Mueller, Gerhard

    2009-05-01

    Trace detection of toxic industrial compounds has been investigated with the help of a laser ion mobility spectrometer (LIMS). The LIMS was equipped with a tuneable UV laser source for enabling two-photon ionization of the analyte gases and an ion drift tube for the measurement of the ion mobility. Different aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons as well as amines were investigated. We find that the first class of molecules can be well ionized due to the delocalization of their valence electron shells and the second due to the presence of non-bonding electrons in lone-pair orbitals. Selectivity of detection is attained on the basis of molecule-specific photo-ionization and drift time spectra. Ion currents were found to scale linearly with the substance concentration over several orders of magnitude down to the detection limits in the ppt range. As besides toxic industrial compounds, similar electron configurations also occur in illicit drugs, toxins and pharmaceutical substances, LIMS can be applied in a variety of fields ranging from environmental analysis, air pollution monitoring, drug detection and chemical process monitoring.

  7. A position-sensitive germanium detector for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L. S.; Ling, J. C.; Mahoney, W. A.; Jacobson, A. S.; Pehl, R. H.; Goulding, F. S.; Landis, D. A.; Luke, P. N.; Madden, N. W.

    1984-01-01

    The critical problem in high-resolution cosmic gamma-ray spectroscopy in the energy range from 0.02 to 10 MeV is the limited spectral sensitivity of the detectors used. This results from the small effective area of the detectors and the high background noise due to induced radioactivity and scattering in the detectors' high-energy particle environment. The effective area can be increased by increasing the number of detectors, but this becomes prohibitive because of the size and expense of the resulting instrument. We have taken a new approach: a segmented large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector which can effectively discriminate against internal background yet maintain the high spectral resolution and efficiency of conventional coaxial Ge detectors. To verify this concept, a planar detector divided into two segments has been fabricated and laboratory measurements agree well with Monte Carlo calculations. A large coaxial detector which will be divided into five segments is being built using the techniques developed for the planar detector. Monte Carlo calculations show that the sensitivity (minimum detectable flux) of the segmented coaxial detector is a factor of 2-3 better than conventional detectors because of the reduction in the internal background.

  8. Development of a Position Sensitive Neutron Detector with High Efficiency and Energy Resolution for Use at High-Flux Beam Sources.

    PubMed

    Markoff, Diane M; Cianciolo, Vince; Britton, Chuck L; Cooper, Ronald G; Greene, Geoff L

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a high-efficiency neutron detector with 1 cm position resolution and coarse energy resolution for use at high-flux neutron source facilities currently proposed or under construction. The detector concept integrates a segmented (3)He ionization chamber with the position sensitive, charged particle collection methods of a MicroMegas detector. Neutron absorption on the helium produces protons and tritons that ionize the fill gas. The charge is amplified in the field region around a wire mesh and subsequently detected in current mode by wire strips mounted on a substrate. One module consisting of a high-voltage plate, a field-shaping high-voltage plate, a grid and wire strips defines a detection region. For 100 % efficiency, detector modules are consecutively placed along the beam axis. Analysis over several regions with alternating wire strip orientation provides a two-dimensional beam profile. By using (3)He, a 1/v absorption gas, each axial region captures neutrons of a different energy range, providing an energy-sensitive detection scheme especially useful at continuous beam sources. PMID:27308166

  9. Development of a Position Sensitive Neutron Detector with High Efficiency and Energy Resolution for Use at High-Flux Beam Sources

    PubMed Central

    Markoff, Diane M.; Cianciolo, Vince; Britton, Chuck L.; Cooper, Ronald G.; Greene, Geoff L.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a high-efficiency neutron detector with 1 cm position resolution and coarse energy resolution for use at high-flux neutron source facilities currently proposed or under construction. The detector concept integrates a segmented 3He ionization chamber with the position sensitive, charged particle collection methods of a MicroMegas detector. Neutron absorption on the helium produces protons and tritons that ionize the fill gas. The charge is amplified in the field region around a wire mesh and subsequently detected in current mode by wire strips mounted on a substrate. One module consisting of a high-voltage plate, a field-shaping high-voltage plate, a grid and wire strips defines a detection region. For 100 % efficiency, detector modules are consecutively placed along the beam axis. Analysis over several regions with alternating wire strip orientation provides a two-dimensional beam profile. By using 3He, a 1/v absorption gas, each axial region captures neutrons of a different energy range, providing an energy-sensitive detection scheme especially useful at continuous beam sources. PMID:27308166

  10. Detection of the Carbon Monoxide Ion (CO+) in the Interstellar Medium and a Planetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latter, William B.; Walker, Christopher K.; Maloney, Philip R.

    1993-01-01

    We report detection of the carbon monoxide ion (CO+) in the interstellar medium (Ml7SW) and a planetary nebula (NGC 7027). These detections are based on observations of three millimeter and submillimeter transitions in M17SW and one in NGC 7027. Chemical models suggest that CO+ should be most abundant where complex molecules are least likely to be present. In our search for CO+ we therefore minimized the chance of confusion while maximizing the probability of detection by observing regions whose chemistry is dominated by the effects of ultraviolet radiation.

  11. Development of a portable preconcentrator/ion mobility spectrometer system for the trace detection of narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Parmeter, J.E.; Custer, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This project was supported by LDRD funding for the development and preliminary testing of a portable narcotics detection system. The system developed combines a commercial trace detector known as an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with a preconcentrator originally designed by Department 5848 for the collection of explosives molecules. The detector and preconcentrator were combined along with all necessary accessories onto a push cart, thus yielding a fully portable detection unit. Preliminary testing with both explosives and narcotics molecules shown that the system is operational, and that it can successfully detect drugs as marijuana, methamphetamine (speed), and cocaine based on their characteristics IMS signatures.

  12. Copper ion detection using novel silver nanoclusters stabilized with amido black 10B.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fangfang; Liang, Sheng; Peng, Yibo; Kuang, Yangfang; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Shu; Long, Yunfei; Zeng, Rongjin

    2016-05-01

    Novel fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) were synthesized using amido black 10B (AB) as a stabilizing agent and then employed for the detection of copper ions (Cu(2+)). The AB-stabilized AgNCs (AB-AgNCs) were well dispersed in aqueous solution with an average diameter of around 1.3 nm and exhibited illustrious blue fluorescence emission. Moreover, the fluorescence of AB-AgNCs could be quenched efficiently by Cu(2+), which might be a result of the coordination between Cu(2+) and the free recognition group of AB on surfaces of AB-AgNCs, inducing the aggregation of AB-AgNCs. Based on the linear decrease of fluorescence intensity, the Cu(2+) concentration was determined in the range of 0.01-1.1 μmol L(-1) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 4.0 nΜ. In addition, the detection of Cu(2+) could be performed with AB-AgNCs in the presence of other ions, including 13 kinds of conventional metal ions and 11 kinds of anions. Based on the above experiment, the developed AB-AgNC probe was successfully further applied to detect Cu(2+) in three electroplating effluents, which showed high accuracy. Graphical abstract The process of synthesised silver nanoclusters and the application for Cu(2+) detection. PMID:26873219

  13. Visual sensor for the detection of trace Cu(II) ions using an immunochromatographic strip.

    PubMed

    Xing, Changrui; Feng, Min; Hao, Changlong; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and simple immunochromatography method based on a gold nanoparticle-labeled monoclonal antibody was developed for the on-site detection of copper (Cu) in water samples. This monoclonal antibody, obtained by a cell fusion technique, recognized the Cu-ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) complex, but not metal-free EDTA, with high sensitivity and specificity. In optimized conditions, the visual limit of detection for qualitative detection of Cu(II) ions was 10 ng/mL and the LOD for semi-quantitative detection decreased to 0.45 ng/mL with the help of a scanning reader system. The detection process was achieved within 10 min with no cross-reactivity from other heavy metal ions. The recovery of the test samples ranged from 98% to 109%. To our knowledge, this antibody-based test strip for Cu(II) ions has not been previously reported. Based on the above results, this strip sensor could be used as an alternative tool for screening heavy metal pollution in the environment. PMID:23461614

  14. Colorimetric Detection of Cadmium Ions Using DL-Mercaptosuccinic Acid-Modified Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Chen, Jun; Yang, Jing-Hua; Bai, Lian-Yang; Zhang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    A colorimetric assay has been developed for detection of Cd²⁺ utilizing DL-mercaptosuccinic acid-modified gold nanoparticles (MSA-AuNPs). The method showed good selectivity for Cd²⁺ over other metal ions. As a result, the linear relationships (r > 0.9606) between concentration 0.07 mM and 0.20 mM for cadmium ion were obtained. The detection limit was as low as 0.07 mM by the naked eye. The effect of pH on the aggregation was optimized. The MSA-AuNPs probe could be used to detect Cd²⁺ in an aqueous solution based on the aggregation-induced color change of MSA-AuNPs. PMID:27398533

  15. Selective Detection of Low-Velocity Ions Using Nuclear Emulsion Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naka, Tatsuhiro; Kuge, Ken'ichi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2013-11-01

    We focused on the difference between the photographic sensitivities of nuclear emulsion films by the electronic stopping power (ESP) and nuclear stopping power (NSP) of charged particles. The effects of high-velocity particles, in which ESP was dominant, and of low-velocity particles, where both ESP and NSP were effective, were compared. Low-velocity Kr ions formed internal latent images by the interaction with NSP. This may be due to the formation of crystal defects by atomic collisions along the route of these ions in silver halide crystals, and such defects are detected only by internal development. On the other hand, high-velocity ions like α-rays did not form internal latent images in the emulsion with Au+S sensitization, because sensitization centers on the surface of crystals accumulated excited electrons by ESP and only surface latent images were formed. It is demonstrated that internal latent images are characteristic signals by NSP. Low-velocity ions are selectively detectable by the internal development, even in high background fields like γ-rays, β-rays, or other high-velocity ions.

  16. Label free and high specific detection of mercury ions based on silver nano-liposome.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, Eepsita; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Pradhan, Arun K; Pradhan, Pallavi

    2016-06-15

    Herein, we report an eco-friendly, mild and one-pot approach for synthesis of silver nanoparticles via a lipopeptide biosurfactant - CHBS. The biosurfactant forms liposome vesicles when dispersed in an aqueous medium. The amino acid groups of the biosurfactant assists in the reduction of Ag(+) ions leading to the production of homogeneous silver nanoparticles, encapsulated within the liposome vesicle, as confirmed from TEM analysis. Rate of synthesis and size of particle were greatly dependent on pH and reaction temperature. Kinetic analysis suggests the involvement of an autocatalytic reaction and the observed rate constant (kobs) was found to decrease with temperature, suggesting faster reaction with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the silver nanoparticles served as excellent probes for highly selective and sensitive recognition of Hg(2+) ions. Interaction with Hg(2+) ions results in an immediate change in colour of nanoparticle solution form brownish red to milky white. With increasing Hg(2+) ions concentration, a gradual disappearance of SPR peak was observed. A linear relationship (A420/660) with an R(2) value of 0.97 was observed in the range of 20 to 100ppm Hg(2+) concentration. Hg(2+) ions are reduced to their elemental forms which thereby interact with the vesicles, leading to aggregation and precipitation of particles. The detection method avoids the need of functionalizing ligands and favours Hg(2+) detection in aqueous samples by visible range spectrophotometry and hence can be used for simple and rapid analysis. PMID:27045785

  17. Label free and high specific detection of mercury ions based on silver nano-liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshini, Eepsita; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Pradhan, Arun K.; Pradhan, Pallavi

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we report an eco-friendly, mild and one-pot approach for synthesis of silver nanoparticles via a lipopeptide biosurfactant - CHBS. The biosurfactant forms liposome vesicles when dispersed in an aqueous medium. The amino acid groups of the biosurfactant assists in the reduction of Ag+ ions leading to the production of homogeneous silver nanoparticles, encapsulated within the liposome vesicle, as confirmed from TEM analysis. Rate of synthesis and size of particle were greatly dependent on pH and reaction temperature. Kinetic analysis suggests the involvement of an autocatalytic reaction and the observed rate constant (kobs) was found to decrease with temperature, suggesting faster reaction with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the silver nanoparticles served as excellent probes for highly selective and sensitive recognition of Hg2 + ions. Interaction with Hg2 + ions results in an immediate change in colour of nanoparticle solution form brownish red to milky white. With increasing Hg2 + ions concentration, a gradual disappearance of SPR peak was observed. A linear relationship (A420/660) with an R2 value of 0.97 was observed in the range of 20 to 100 ppm Hg2 + concentration. Hg2 + ions are reduced to their elemental forms which thereby interact with the vesicles, leading to aggregation and precipitation of particles. The detection method avoids the need of functionalizing ligands and favours Hg2 + detection in aqueous samples by visible range spectrophotometry and hence can be used for simple and rapid analysis.

  18. Colorimetric detection of Hg2+ ions in aqueous media using CA-Au NPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zening; Hu, Jiao; Tong, Sijia; Cao, Qihua; Yuan, Hong

    2012-11-01

    Based on the selective interaction between Hg2+ ions and cyanuric acid (CA) and the anti-aggregation of CA stabilized gold nanoparticles (CA-Au NPs), a simple colorimetric method was developed for detecting Hg2+ ions. In a medium of pH 7.4 tris-HCl buffer containing 8 × 10-3 M NaCl, the CA-Au NPs solution was red, which was due to CA adsorbed onto the surface of Au NPs, stabilizing Au NPs against aggregation. When CA-HgII-CA complex was formed in the presence of Hg2+, the stability of CA-Au NPs reduced, and then aggregation of Au NPs occurred. Consequently, the color of the solution changed from red to blue and could easily be measured with a common spectrophotometer. The aggregation of Au NPs was also validated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The controlled experiment showed that other ions including Ba2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Co2+, Mn2+, Cu2+, Mg2+, and Ni2+ ions did not induce any distinct spectral changes, which constituted a Hg2+-selective sensor. A dynamic range of 1.6-16 × 10-6 M Hg2+ ions was observed at the optimized reaction condition. This method provides a potentially useful tool for Hg2+ detection.

  19. Imaging and timing performance of 1 cm x 1 cm position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokhale, P.; Schmall, J.; Stapels, C.; Christian, J.; Cherry, S. R.; Squillante, M. R.; Shah, K.

    2013-02-01

    We have designed and built a large-area 1cm × 1cm position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) for use in detector design for medical imaging applications. Our new large-area PS-SSPM concept implements resistive network between the micro-pixels, which are photodiodes operated in Geiger mode, called Geiger Photodiodes (GPDs), to provide continuous position sensitivity. Here we present imaging and timing performance of the large-area PS-SSPM for different temperatures and operating biases to find the optimum operating parameters for the device in imaging applications. A detector module was built by coupling a polished 8 × 8 LYSO array, with 1 × 1 × 20 mm3 elements, to a 1 × 1 cm2 PS-SSPM. Flood images recorded at room temperature show good crystal separation as all 64 elements were separated from each other. Cooling the device at 10 °C showed significant improvement. The device optimum bias voltage was ~ 4.5V over breakdown voltage. The coincidence timing resolution was improved significantly by increasing the operating bias, as well as by lowering the temperature to 0 °C. Results show excellent imaging performance and good timing response with a large-area PS-SSPM device.

  20. A Critical Review of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for the Detection of Explosives and Explosive Related Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert Gordon; Atkinson, David Alan; Eiceman, G. A.; Ewing, G. J.

    2001-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry has become the most successful and widely used technology for the detection of trace levels of nitro-organic explosives on handbags and carry on-luggage in airports throughout the US. The low detection limits are provided by the efficient ionization process, namely, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) reactions in negative polarity. An additional level of confidence in a measurement is imparted by characterization of ions for mobilities in weak electric fields of a drift tube at ambient pressure. Findings from over 30 years of investigations into IMS response to these explosives have been collected and assessed to allow a comprehensive view of the APCI reactions characteristic of nitro-organic explosives. Also, the drift tube conditions needed to obtain particular mobility spectra have been summarized. During the past decade, improvements have occurred in IMS on the understanding of reagent gas chemistries, the influence of temperature on ion stability, and sampling methods. In addition, commercial instruments have been refined to provide fast and reliable measurements for on-site detection of explosives. The gas phase ion chemistry of most explosives is mediated by the fragile C---ONO2 bonds or the acidity of protons. Thus, M- or M·Cl- species are found with only a few explosives and loss of NO2, NO3 and proton abstraction reactions are common and complicating pathways. However, once ions are formed, they appear to have stabilities on time scales equal to or longer than ion drift times from 5–20 ms. As such, peak shapes in IMS are suitable for high selectivity and sensitivity.

  1. Ion funnel augmented Mars atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry for in situ detection of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul V; Hodyss, Robert; Beauchamp, J L

    2014-11-01

    Laser desorption is an attractive technique for in situ sampling of organics on Mars given its relative simplicity. We demonstrate that under simulated Martian conditions (~2.5 Torr CO(2)) laser desorption of neutral species (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), followed by ionization with a simple ultraviolet light source such as a discharge lamp, offers an effective means of sampling organics for detection and identification with a mass spectrometer. An electrodynamic ion funnel is employed to provide efficient ion collection in the ambient Martian environment. This experimental methodology enables in situ sampling of Martian organics with minimal complexity and maximum flexibility. PMID:24986759

  2. Multiphoton dissociation of electrosprayed megadalton-sized DNA ions in a charge-detection mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Doussineau, Tristan; Paletto, Pierre; Dugourd, Philippe; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry in combination with a linear electrostatic ion trap coupled to a continuous wavelength infrared CO2 laser has been used to study the multiphoton dissociation of DNA macromolecular ions. Samples, with masses ranging from 2.23 to 31.5 MDa, include single strand circular M13mp18, double strand circular M13mp18, and double strand linear LambdaPhage DNA fragments. Their activation energies for unimolecular dissociation were determined. Activation energy values slightly increase as a function of the molecular weight. The most important result is the difference between the fragmentations observed for hybridized double-strands and dimers of single strands. PMID:25348472

  3. Detection of low energy single ion impacts in micron scaletransistors at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, A.; Weis, C.D.; Reijonen, J.; Persaud, A.; Schenkel, T.; Cabrini, S.; Lo, C.C.; Bokor, J.

    2007-10-15

    We report the detection of single ion impacts throughmonitoring of changes in the source-drain currents of field effecttransistors (FET) at room temperature. Implant apertures are formed inthe interlayer dielectrics and gate electrodes of planar, micro-scaleFETs by electron beam assisted etching. FET currents increase due to thegeneration of positively charged defects in gate oxides when ions(121Sb12+, 14+, Xe6+; 50 to 70 keV) impinge into channel regions. Implantdamage is repaired by rapid thermal annealing, enabling iterative cyclesof device doping and electrical characterization for development ofsingle atom devices and studies of dopant fluctuationeffects.

  4. Highly sensitive heavy metal ion detection using AlQ3 microwire functionalized QCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can, Nursel; Aǧar, Meltem; Altındal, Ahmet

    2016-03-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) microwires was successfully synthesized for the fabrication of Alq3 microwires-coated QCM sensors to detect the heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. AT-cut quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) of 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency having gold electrodes were used as transducers. Typical measuring cycle consisted of repeated flow of target measurands through the flow cell and subsequent washing to return the baseline. The QCM results indicated that the Alq3 microwires exhibit excellent sensitivity, stability and short response-recovery time, which are much attractive for the development of portable and highly sensitive heavy metal ion sensors in water samples.

  5. A New Radio Frequency Plasma Oxygen Primary Ion Source on Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Improved Lateral Resolution and Detection of Electropositive Elements at Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Julien; Penen, Florent; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Frank, Julia; Hause, Gerd; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Gontier, Etienne; Horréard, François; Hillion, François; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-07-19

    An important application field of secondary ion mass spectrometry at the nanometer scale (NanoSIMS) is the detection of chemical elements and, in particular, metals at the subcellular level in biological samples. The detection of many trace metals requires an oxygen primary ion source to allow the generation of positive secondary ions with high yield in the NanoSIMS. The duoplasmatron oxygen source is commonly used in this ion microprobe but cannot achieve the same quality of images as the cesium primary ion source used to produce negative secondary ions (C(-), CN(-), S(-), P(-)) due to a larger primary ion beam size. In this paper, a new type of an oxygen ion source using a rf plasma is fitted and characterized on a NanoSIMS50L. The performances of this primary ion source in terms of current density and achievable lateral resolution have been characterized and compared to the conventional duoplasmatron and cesium sources. The new rf plasma oxygen source offered a net improvement in terms of primary beam current density compared to the commonly used duoplasmatron source, which resulted in higher ultimate lateral resolutions down to 37 nm and which provided a 5-45 times higher apparent sensitivity for electropositive elements. Other advantages include a better long-term stability and reduced maintenance. This new rf plasma oxygen primary ion source has been applied to the localization of essential macroelements and trace metals at basal levels in two biological models, cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27291826

  6. Detection of Nitro-Based and Peroxide-Based Explosives by Fast Polarity-Switchable Ion Mobility Spectrometer with Ion Focusing in Vicinity of Faraday Detector

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qinghua; Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haiyang

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been widely deployed for on-site detection of explosives. The common nitro-based explosives are usually detected by negative IMS while the emerging peroxide-based explosives are better detected by positive IMS. In this study, a fast polarity-switchable IMS was constructed to detect these two explosive species in a single measurement. As the large traditional Faraday detector would cause a trailing reactant ion peak (RIP), a Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity was developed by reducing the detector radius to 3.3 mm and increasing the voltage difference between aperture grid and its front guard ring to 591 V, which could remove trailing peaks from RIP without loss of signal intensity. This fast polarity-switchable IMS with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector was employed to detect a mixture of 10 ng 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 50 ng hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) by polarity-switching, and the result suggested that [TNT-H]− and [HMTD+H]+ could be detected in a single measurement. Furthermore, the removal of trailing peaks from RIP by the Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity also promised the accurate identification of KClO4, KNO3 and S in common inorganic explosives, whose product ion peaks were fairly adjacent to RIP. PMID:26021282

  7. Improved ion-selective detection method using nanopipette with poly(vinyl chloride)-based membrane.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eun Ji; Takami, Tomohide; Deng, Xiao Long; Son, Jong Wan; Kawai, Tomoji; Park, Bae Ho

    2014-05-15

    Ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) are widely used to detect targeted ions in solution selectively. Application of an ISE to a small area detection system with a nanopipette requires a special measurement method in order to avoid the enhanced background signal problem caused by a cation-rich layer near the charged inner surface of the nanopipette and the selectivity change problem due to relatively fast saturation of the ISE inside the nanopipette. We developed a novel ion-selective detection system using a nanopipette that measures an alternating current (AC) signal mediated by saturated ionophores in a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane located at the conical shank of the nanopipette to solve the above problems. Small but reliable K(+) and Na(+) ionic current passing through a PVC membrane containing saturated bis(benzo-15-crown-5) and bis(12-crown-4) ionophore, respectively, could be selectively detected using the AC signal measurement system equipped with a lock-in amplifier. PMID:24766420

  8. Cu nanoclusters-based ratiometric fluorescence probe for ratiometric and visualization detection of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Chao; Qi, Jian-Wen; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Li; Song, Wei; Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2015-10-01

    Copper is a highly toxic environmental pollutant with bioaccumulative properties. Therefore, sensitive detection of Cu(2+) is very important to prevent over-ingestion, and visual detection is preferred for practical applications. In this work, we developed a simple and environmental friendly approach to synthesize hyperbranched polyethyleneimine-protected copper nanoclusters (hPEI-Cu NCs) with great stability against extreme pH, high ionic strength, thiols etching and light illumination, which were then conjugated to the surface of silica coated CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to design a ratiometric fluorescence probe. In the presence of different amounts of Cu(2+) ions, the fluorescence of Cu NCs can be drastically quenched, while the emission from QDs stayed constant to serve as a reference signal and the color of the probe changed from yellow-green to red, resulting in ratiometric and visualization detection of Cu(2+) ion with high accuracy. The detection limit for Cu(2+) was estimated to be 8.9 nM, much lower than the allowable level of Cu(2+) in drinking water (∼20 μM) set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Additionally, this probe can be also applied for the determination of Cu(2+) ion in complex real water samples. PMID:26454464

  9. Oligonucleotide-based fluorogenic sensor for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Hao, Changlong; Xua, Liguang; Xing, Changrui; Kuang, Hua; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report a new fluorogenic sensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for detection of heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. The method showed the advantage of being simple, highly sensitive and selective, and rapid. The donor (CdTe QDs) and acceptor (TAMRA or Cy5) are brought into close proximity to one another due to Hg(2+) and Ag(+) form strong and stable T-Hg(2+)-T complexes and C-Ag(+)-C complexes, which quenches the fluorescent intensity of CdTe QDs and enables the energy transfer from donor to acceptor. This sensor showed high sensitivity and selectivity when only one kind of ion (Ag(+) or Hg(2+)) exists. Furthermore, the assay can also simultaneously detect Ag(+) and Hg(2+) in water media with the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.5 and 1.8 nM, separately, which satisfactorily meets the sensitivity demands of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and World Health Organization (WHO). This assay also exhibits excellent selectivity toward Ag(+) and Hg(2+). Therefore, this method is of great practical and theoretical importance for detecting heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. PMID:22560162

  10. Dual-color encoded DNAzyme nanostructures for multiplexed detection of intracellular metal ions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjiao; Liang, Wenbing; Li, Daxiu; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-11-15

    The detection of intracellular metal ions is of great importance in understanding metal homeostasis in cells and related diseases, and yet it remains a significant challenge to achieve this goal. Based on a new self-assembled and dual-color encoded DNAzyme nanostructure, we describe here an approach for multiplexed sensing of UO2(2+) and Pb(2+) in living cells. The fluorescently quenched nanoprobes can be prepared by simple thermal annealing of four ssDNAs containing the metal ion-dependent enzymatic and substrate sequences. The self-assembly formation of the nanostructures are verified by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The target metal ions can cleave the substrate sequences in the DNAzyme nanostructures to recover fluorescent emissions at different wavelengths for sensitive and selective in vitro multiplexed detection of UO2(2+) and Pb(2+) with the detection limits of 0.6nM and 3.9nM, respectively. Importantly, we demonstrate that these nanoprobes are stable in cell lysates and can enter cells without the aid of any transfection agents for simultaneous imaging intracellular UO2(2+) and Pb(2+). Moreover, the nanoprobes offer excellent biocompatibility and non-cytotoxicity. With these unique features, the dual-color encoded nanostructures presented here can thus offer new opportunities for multiplexed detection of specific intracellular species. PMID:27236722

  11. Ultra-sensitive detection of Ag+ ions based on Ag+-assisted isothermal exponential degradation reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Fan, Qi; Zhu, Sha; Duan, Aiping; Yin, Yongmei; Li, Genxi

    2013-01-15

    Ag(+) ions are greatly toxic to a lot of algae, fungi, viruses and bacteria, which can also induce harmful side-effects to environments and human health. Herein we report an ultra-sensitive method for the selective detection of Ag(+) ions with electrochemical technique based on Ag(+)-assisted isothermal exponential degradation reaction. In the presence of Ag(+), mismatched trigger DNA can transiently bind to template DNA immobilized on an electrode surface through the formation of C-Ag(+)-C base pair, which then initiates the isothermal exponential degradation reaction. As a result, the mismatched trigger DNA may melt off the cleaved template DNA to trigger rounds of elongation and cutting. After the cyclic degradation reactions, removal of the template DNA immobilized on the electrode surface can be efficiently monitored by using electrochemical technique to show the status of the electrode surface, which can be then used to determine the presence of Ag(+). Further studies reveal that the proposed method can be ultra-sensitive to detect Ag(+) at a picomolar level. The selectivity of the detection can also be satisfactory, thus the proposed method for the Ag(+) ions detection may be potentially useful in the future. PMID:22921090

  12. Method for selective detection of explosives in mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at parts-per-quadrillion level

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2015-09-01

    A method for selective detection of volatile and non-volatile explosives in a mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at a parts-per-quadrillion level without preconcentration is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of ionizing a carrier gas with an ionization source to form reactant ions or reactant adduct ions comprising nitrate ions (NO.sub.3.sup.-); selectively reacting the reactant ions or reactant adduct ions with at least one volatile or non-volatile explosive analyte at a carrier gas pressure of at least about 100 Ton in a reaction region disposed between the ionization source and an ion detector, the reaction region having a length which provides a residence time (tr) for reactant ions therein of at least about 0.10 seconds, wherein the selective reaction yields product ions comprising reactant ions or reactant adduct ions that are selectively bound to the at least one explosive analyte when present therein; and detecting product ions with the ion detector to determine presence or absence of the at least one explosive analyte.

  13. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  14. The ATR noninvasive detection of transported medicinal ions and the performance of newly designed iontophoresis instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Toyotoshi; Watanabe, Yukio; Suzuki, Harue

    2005-02-01

    The attenuated total reflection and near-infrared diffusive-reflection methods are proposed as safe and powerful ways to detect and measure the quantity of medication transported by iontophoresis. Especially, the former method can evaluate the quantity of such negative ions as L-ascorbyl-2-phosphate in the top (horny) layer of epidermis (about 1 μm under the skin surface) using, respectively, characteristic ion's bands. Factors making iontophoresis more effective are discussed from the points of electric currents, duty ratio, frequency of superposing intermittent current, simultaneous supersonic perforation, etc. The use of intermittent direct current superposed by 40 kHz pulsed current and pulse irradiation of supersonic waves accelerated drastically the disappearing rate of transported ions from the horny layer with a life of 10 h to 1 min. This technique may be applied to a new and powerful drug delivery system into topical deep tissues.

  15. A novel Schiff base: Synthesis, structural characterisation and comparative sensor studies for metal ion detections.

    PubMed

    Köse, Muhammet; Purtas, Savas; Güngör, Seyit Ali; Ceyhan, Gökhan; Akgün, Eyup; McKee, Vickie

    2015-02-01

    A novel Schiff base ligand was synthesized by the condensation reaction of 2,6-diformylpyridine and 4-aminoantipyrine in MeOH and characterised by its melting point, elemental analysis, FT-IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR and mass spectroscopic studies. Molecular structure of the ligand was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The electrochemical properties of the Schiff base ligand were studied in different solvents at various scan rates. Sensor ability of the Schiff base ligand was investigated by colorimetric and fluorometric methods. Visual colour change of the ligand was investigated in MeOH solvent in presence of various metal ions Na(+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), K(+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+). Upon addition of Al(3+) ion into a MeOH solution of the ligand, an orange colour developed which is detectable by naked eye. Fluorescence emission studies showed that the ligand showed single emission band at 630-665nm upon excitation at 560nm. Addition of metal ions Na(+), Mg(2+), K(+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) (1:1M ratio) cause fluorescence quenching, however addition of Al(+3) resulted in an increase in fluorescence intensity. No significant variation was observed in the fluorescence intensity caused by Al(3+) in presence of other metal ions. Therefore, the Schiff base ligand can be used for selective detection of Al(3+) ions in the presence of the other metal ions studied. PMID:25459697

  16. Highly sensitive and selective fluorescence detection of copper (II) ion based on multi-ligand metal chelation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shan; Yu, Tao; Sun, Mingtai; Yu, Huan; Zhang, Zhongping; Wang, Suhua; Jiang, Hui

    2014-08-01

    A fluorescent probe was synthesized and demonstrated to be highly selective and sensitive in the reaction with copper (II) ion, generating a large variation of the fluorescence intensity in a dose-response manner. The probe contains a dansyl moiety as fluorophore and a multidentate ligand for copper (II) ion recognition. The reaction of the molecular probe with copper (II) ion proceeds rapidly and irreversibly in a 1 to 1 stoichiometric way, leading to the production of stable copper (II) complex, which subsequently results in the quenching of fluorescence. The detection limit for copper (II) ion was measured to be about 2ppb. It was also shown that the probe has high selectivity for copper (II) ion and good anti-interference ability against other transition metal ions. The herein reported very simple and reliable fluorescence probe could be employed for copper (II) ion detection in many aspects. PMID:24881551

  17. Using corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry for detection of 2,4,6-Trichloroanisole.

    PubMed

    Lichvanová, Zuzana; Ilbeigi, Vahideh; Sabo, Martin; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Matejčík, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    In this work possible application of the corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometer (CD-IMS) for detection of 2,4,6-Trichloroanisole (TCA) has been investigated. We applied CD-IMS interfaced with orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometer (CD-IMS-oaTOF) to study the ion processes within the CD-IMS technique. The CD-IMS instrument was operated in two modes, (i) standard and (ii) reverse flow modes resulting in different chemical ionisation schemes by NO3(-)(HNO3)n (n=0,1,2) and O2(-)(H2O)n (n=0,1,2), respectively. The O2(-)(H2O)n ionisation was associated with formation of Cl(-) and (TCA-CH3)(-) ions from TCA. The NO3(-)(HNO3)n ionisation, resulted in formation of NO3(-)(HNO3)(TCA-Cl) adduct ions. Limit of detection (LOD) for TCA was determined in gas (100 ppb) and solid phases (150 ng). PMID:24913882

  18. Implementing Silicon Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors as Arrays for Multiple Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ralph L; Wipf, Mathias; Müller, Steffen; Bedner, Kristine; Wright, Iain A; Martin, Colin J; Constable, Edwin C; Fanget, Axel; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ionic gradients play a crucial role in the physiology of the human body, ranging from metabolism in cells to muscle contractions or brain activities. To monitor these ions, inexpensive, label-free chemical sensing devices are needed. Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on silicon (Si) nanowires or nanoribbons (NRs) have a great potential as future biochemical sensors as they allow for the integration in microscopic devices at low production costs. Integrating NRs in dense arrays on a single chip expands the field of applications to implantable electrodes or multifunctional chemical sensing platforms. Ideally, such a platform is capable of detecting numerous species in a complex analyte. Here, we demonstrate the basis for simultaneous sodium and fluoride ion detection with a single sensor chip consisting of arrays of gold-coated SiNR FETs. A microfluidic system with individual channels allows modifying the NR surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of two types of ion receptors sensitive to sodium and fluoride ions. The functionalization procedure results in a differential setup having active fluoride- and sodium-sensitive NRs together with bare gold control NRs on the same chip. Comparing functionalized NRs with control NRs allows the compensation of non-specific contributions from changes in the background electrolyte concentration and reveals the response to the targeted species. PMID:27164151

  19. Development of an ion mobility spectrometer with UV ionization source to detect ketones and BTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kai; Guo, Jingran; Ou, Guangli; Lei, Yu; Wang, Xiaohao

    2014-11-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an attractive material analysis technology for developing a miniaturized volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on-site monitoring sensor. Having simple instrumentation, IMS is especially suitable when portability and sensitivity are required. In this work, we designed an ion mobility spectrometer with UV ionization. The geometric parameters of the UV-IMS were optimized based on a numerical simulation. The simulation results demonstrated that the drift electric field in the drift region was approximately homogenous and in the reaction region had an ion focusing effect, which could improve the sensitivity and resolving power of the IMS. The UV-IMS has been constructed and used to detect VOCs, such as acetone, benzene, toluene and m-xylene (BTX). The resolution of these substance measured from the UV-IMS in the atmospheric conditions are about 30 and the limit of detection (LOD) is low to ppmv. The ion mobility module and electric circuit are integrated in a main PCB, which can facilitate mass production and miniaturization. The present UV-IMS is expected to become a tool of choice for the on-site monitoring for VOCs.

  20. Implementing Silicon Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors as Arrays for Multiple Ion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Stoop, Ralph L.; Wipf, Mathias; Müller, Steffen; Bedner, Kristine; Wright, Iain A.; Martin, Colin J.; Constable, Edwin C.; Fanget, Axel; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ionic gradients play a crucial role in the physiology of the human body, ranging from metabolism in cells to muscle contractions or brain activities. To monitor these ions, inexpensive, label-free chemical sensing devices are needed. Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on silicon (Si) nanowires or nanoribbons (NRs) have a great potential as future biochemical sensors as they allow for the integration in microscopic devices at low production costs. Integrating NRs in dense arrays on a single chip expands the field of applications to implantable electrodes or multifunctional chemical sensing platforms. Ideally, such a platform is capable of detecting numerous species in a complex analyte. Here, we demonstrate the basis for simultaneous sodium and fluoride ion detection with a single sensor chip consisting of arrays of gold-coated SiNR FETs. A microfluidic system with individual channels allows modifying the NR surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of two types of ion receptors sensitive to sodium and fluoride ions. The functionalization procedure results in a differential setup having active fluoride- and sodium-sensitive NRs together with bare gold control NRs on the same chip. Comparing functionalized NRs with control NRs allows the compensation of non-specific contributions from changes in the background electrolyte concentration and reveals the response to the targeted species. PMID:27164151

  1. A novel approach to increasing cocaine detection confidence utilizing ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadamec, J. Richard; Su, Chih-Wu; Rigdon, Stephen; Norwood, Lavan

    1995-01-01

    When a positive detection of a narcotic occurs during the search of a vessel, a decision has to be made whether further intensive search is warranted. In terms of unwarranted delays of vessels and possible property damage, the accuracy of the analytical determination is very important. Analytical accuracy becomes critical when the data may be used in court actions as evidence. For this purpose, the U.S. Coast Guard has been investigating several confirmatory ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) field methods for the detection and identification of cocaine. This paper presents the findings of our investigations on the use of catalytic pyrolysis and base hydrolysis as confirmatory methods. The catalytic effects of various metals on the pyrolysis reaction are reported. In addition, the effects of several different ion mobility spectrometer sample transfer mediums and varying laboratory conditions on the base hydrolysis of the cocaine molecule are also be reported.

  2. Facile synthesis of soluble graphene quantum dots and its improved property in detecting heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chengfeng; Jiang, Wei; Via, Brian K

    2014-06-01

    An effective approach to produce graphene quantum dots (GQDs) has been developed, which based on the cutting of graphene oxide (GO) powder into smaller pieces and being reduced by a green approach, using sodium polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) as a dispersant and l-ascorbic acid (l-AA) as the reducing agent, which is environmentally friendly. Then the as-prepared GQDs were further used for the detection of heavy metal ions Pb(2+). This kind of GQDs has greater solubility in water and is more biocompatible than GO that has been reduced by hydrazine hydrate. The few-layers of GQDs with defects and residual OH groups were shown to be particularly well suited for the determination of metal ions in the liquid phase using an electrochemical method, in which a remarkably low detection limit of 7×10(-9)M for Pb(2+) was achieved. PMID:24732395

  3. A fluorescent aptasensor for potassium ion detection-based triple-helix molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Verdian-Doghaei, A; Housaindokht, M R; Abnous, Kh

    2014-12-01

    Here, a biosensor based on a quadruplex-forming aptamer for the determination of potassium ion (K(+)) is presented. The aptamer was used as a molecular recognition element; it was adjacent to two arm fragments and a dual-labeled oligonucleotide serving as a signal transduction probe (STP) that is complementary of the arm fragment sequence. In the presence of K(+), the aptamer was displaced from the STP, which was accompanied by decreased signal. The quenching percentage of fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration of K(+) in the range of 0.05 to 1.4mM. A detection limit of 0.014 mM was achieved. Furthermore, other metal ions, such as Na(+), Li(+), NH4(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), caused no notable interference on the detection of K(+). PMID:25173515

  4. Positive-ion thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: detection of organic acidurias.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, D N; Muenzer, J; Thoene, J G

    1990-12-14

    Positive-ion thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (TSP-LC-MS) is used to detect organic acids via the direct injection of untreated urine from newborns and infants. Two methods are reported for the separation of organic acids. The separation of urinary organic acids is effected in either an acidic, pH 2.5 sulfuric acid, or a non-acidic, 0.05 M ammonium acetate, pH 6.8, mobile phase. Use of pH 2.5 sulfuric acid and an HPX-87H organic acid column produces better separation but has less sensitivity than the use of 0.05 M ammonium acetate, pH 6.8 and a C18 column. Positive ion TSP-LC-MS has been used to detect methylmalonic aciduria, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria, propionic aciduria, isovaleric aciduria and argininosuccinic aciduria. PMID:1709942

  5. Determination of surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate by ion pairing chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, M.Y.; Walkup, R.G.; Hill, K.D. )

    1994-01-01

    A method for the determination of the anionic Steol CS-330 surfactant is described. CS-330 is a complex mixture of oligomers due to the various sizes of fatty alcohols and the number of moles of the ethoxylation. The main component of CS-330 is sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES). Since a SLES molecule has a hydrophilic sulfate head and a hydrophobic alkyl ethoxyl tail, it is very difficult to separate these molecules with conventional reverse phase chromatography or ion exchange chromatography. This work uses ion pairing chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection. The separation of oligomers in CS-330 is achieved. SLES does not have UV-absorbing chromophores, therefore an optical detector is not very sensitive. Suppressed conductivity detection technique significantly increases sensitivity and a quantitation limit of 56.60 ppm is achieved.

  6. Design and development of a position-sensitive γ-camera for SPECT imaging based on PCI electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, V.; Giokaris, N. D.; Karabarbounis, A.; Loudos, G. K.; Maintas, D.; Papanicolas, C. N.; Paschalis, P.; Stiliaris, E.

    2004-07-01

    A position-sensitive γ-camera is being currently designed at IASA. This camera will be used experimentally (development mode) in order to obtain an integrated knowledge of its function and perhaps to improve its performance in parallel with an existing one, which has shown a very good performance in phantom, small animal, SPECT technique and is currently being tested for clinical applications. The new system is a combination of a PSPMT (Hamamatsu, R2486-05) and a PMT for simultaneous or independent acquisition of energy and position information, respectively. The resistive chain technique resulting in two signals at each ( X, Y) direction will perform the readout of the PSPMT's anode signals; the system is based on PCI electronics. Status of the system's development and the ongoing progress is presented.

  7. Use of a YAP:Ce matrix coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier for high resolution positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Del Guerra, A.; Zavattini, G. |; Notaristefani, F. de |; Di Domenico, G. |; Giganti, M.; Piffanelli, A.; Pani, R.; Turra, A.

    1996-06-01

    A new scintillation detector system has been designed for application in high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The detector is a bundle of small YAlO{sub 3}:Ce (YAP) crystals closely packed (0.2 x 0.2 x 3.0 cm{sup 3}), coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The preliminary results obtained for spatial resolution, time resolution, energy resolution and efficiency of two such detectors working in coincidence are presented. These are 1.2 mm for the FWHM spatial resolution, 2.0 ns for the FWHM time resolution and 20% for the FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. The measured efficiency is (44 {+-} 3)% with a 150 keV threshold and (20 {+-} 2)% with a 300 keV threshold.

  8. Mass determination of megadalton-DNA Electrospray Ions usingCharge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Jocelyn C.; Hack, Christopher; Benner, Henry W.

    1997-10-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CD-MS) has been used to determine the mass of double-stranded, circular DNA and single-stranded, circular DNA in the range of 2500 to 8000 base pairs (1.5-5.0 MDa). Simultaneous measurement of the charge and velocity of an electrostatically accelerated ion allows a mass determination of the ion, with instrument calibration determined independently of samples. Positive ion mass spectra of electrosprayed commercial DNA samples supplied in tris(hydroxymethyl)ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid buffer, diluted in 50 vol. percent acetonitrile, were obtained without cleanup of the sample. ACD mass spectrum constructed from 3000 ion measurements takes 10 min to acquire and yields the DNA molecular mass directly (mass resolution = 6). The data collected represent progress toward a more automatable alternative to sizing of DNA by gel electrophoresis. In addition to the mass spectra, CD-MS generates charge versus mass plots, which provide another means to investigate the creation and fate of large electrospray ions.

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing Detection of Mercury and Lead Ions Based on Conducting Polymer Composite

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Mahnaz M.; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Sadrolhosseini, Amir R.; Mat Yunus, Wan Mahmood; Moksin, Mohd Maarof; Tahir, Paridah Md.

    2011-01-01

    A new sensing area for a sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury and lead ions. The gold surface used for SPR measurements were modified with polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CHI) conducting polymer composite. The polymer layer was deposited on the gold surface by electrodeposition. This optical sensor was used for monitoring toxic metal ions with and without sensitivity enhancement by chitosan in water samples. The higher amounts of resonance angle unit (ΔRU) were obtained for PPy-CHI film due to a specific binding of chitosan with Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions. The Pb2+ ion bind to the polymer films most strongly, and the sensor was more sensitive to Pb2+ compared to Hg2+. The concentrations of ions in the parts per million range produced the changes in the SPR angle minimum in the region of 0.03 to 0.07. Data analysis was done by Matlab software using Fresnel formula for multilayer system. PMID:21931763

  10. Selective Detection of Mercury (II) Ion Using Nonlinear Optical Properties of Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Darbha, Gopala Krishna; Singh, Anant Kumar; Rai, Uma Shanker; Yu, Eugene; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Contamination of the environment with heavy metal ions has been an important concern throughout the world for decades. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of mercury in environmental samples, this article demonstrates for the first time that nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of MPA–HCys–PDCA-modified gold nanoparticles can be used for rapid, easy and reliable screening of Hg(II) ions in aqueous solution, with high sensitivity (5 ppb) and selectivity over competing analytes. The hyper Rayleigh scattering (HRS) intensity increases 10 times after the addition of 20 ppm Hg2+ ions to modified gold nanoparticle solution. The mechanism for HRS intensity change has been discussed in detail using particle size-dependent NLO properties as well as a two-state model. Our results show that the HRS assay for monitoring Hg(II) ions using MPA–HCys–PDCA-modified gold nanoparticles has excellent selectivity over alkali, alkaline earth (Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+), and transition heavy metal ions (Pb2+, Pb+, Mn2+, Fe2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cd2+). PMID:18517205

  11. Controlled fabrication of nanopores using a direct focused ion beam approach with back face particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, N.; Adams, D. P.; Hodges, V. C.; Vasile, M. J.; Michael, J. R.; Kotula, P. G.

    2008-06-01

    We report a direct, ion drilling technique that enables the reproducible fabrication and placement of nanopores in membranes of different thickness. Using a 30 keV focused Ga ion beam column combined with an in situ, back face, multi-channelplate particle detector, nanopores are sputtered in Si3N4 and W/Si3N4 to have diameters as small as 12 nm. Transmission electron microscopy shows that focused ion beam-drilled holes are near-conical with the diameter decreasing from entry to exit side. By monitoring the detector signal during ion exposure, the drilled hole width can be minimized such that the exit-side diameter is smaller than the full width at half-maximum of the nominally Gaussian-shaped incident beam. Judicious choice of the beam defining aperture combined with back face particle detection allows for reproducible exit-side hole diameters between 18 and 100 nm. The nanopore direct drilling technique does not require potentially damaging broad area exposure to tailor hole sizes. Moreover, this technique successfully achieves breakthrough despite the effects of varying membrane thickness, redeposition, polycrystalline grain structure, and slight ion beam current fluctuations.

  12. Controlled fabrication of nanopores using a direct focused ion beam approach with back face particle detection.

    PubMed

    Patterson, N; Adams, D P; Hodges, V C; Vasile, M J; Michael, J R; Kotula, P G

    2008-06-11

    We report a direct, ion drilling technique that enables the reproducible fabrication and placement of nanopores in membranes of different thickness. Using a 30 keV focused Ga ion beam column combined with an in situ, back face, multi-channelplate particle detector, nanopores are sputtered in Si(3)N(4) and W/Si(3)N(4) to have diameters as small as 12 nm. Transmission electron microscopy shows that focused ion beam-drilled holes are near-conical with the diameter decreasing from entry to exit side. By monitoring the detector signal during ion exposure, the drilled hole width can be minimized such that the exit-side diameter is smaller than the full width at half-maximum of the nominally Gaussian-shaped incident beam. Judicious choice of the beam defining aperture combined with back face particle detection allows for reproducible exit-side hole diameters between 18 and 100 nm. The nanopore direct drilling technique does not require potentially damaging broad area exposure to tailor hole sizes. Moreover, this technique successfully achieves breakthrough despite the effects of varying membrane thickness, redeposition, polycrystalline grain structure, and slight ion beam current fluctuations. PMID:21825787

  13. A novel donor-acceptor receptor for selective detection of Pb2+ and Fe3+ ions.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Kamlakar P; Puyad, Avinash L; Bhosale, Sheshanath V; Bhosale, Sidhanath V

    2014-12-01

    An efficient and highly selective colorimetric and fluorescent receptor DTPDA has been synthesized for sensitive detection of Pb(2+) and Fe(3+) cations. The sensor DTPDA produces a facile, cost-effective and naked eye sensing platform to determine trace amounts of Pb(2+) and Fe(3+) metal ions by complexation with pendent S-termini of thiophenes, which commonly coordinates to central N-termini of pyridine. PMID:25159385

  14. Evaluation of the ion trap MS performance for quantification of flavonoids and comparison to UV detection.

    PubMed

    Stanoeva, Jasmina Petreska; Stefova, Marina

    2012-11-01

    The application of an ion trap mass spectrometer, usually employed for identification, has been here systematically evaluated for quantitative analysis of various conjugated forms of flavonoids and compared with UV quantification. Three MS methods were tested to assess the potential and limits of the ion trap for quantification of flavonoids: full-scan experiment MS(2) , isolated ion experiment MS, and full-scan experiment MS. The test was performed using nine reference standards of flavonoids with six different aglycones: luteolin, apigenin, hypolaetin, 4'-O-methylhypolaetin, isoscutellarein and 4'-O-methylisoscutellarein in the form of 7-O-glucosides and diglucosides, mono or diacetylated, isolated from Sideritis scardica. The analytical characteristics of the tested MS methods were shown to be comparable to UV with regards to precision and accuracy, and superior for selectivity and sensitivity especially when using extracted ion chromatograms. Detection limits did not differ significantly between the MS methods but were significantly lower than those obtained with UV detection by one order of magnitude. Another issue addressed by these results was the choice of most suitable standard substances for quantification of flavonoids with various substituents attached when using MS. In UV detection, the nature of the aglycone is crucial for the absorbance properties, and various derivatives can be quantified with the available one with the same aglycone. Here, it was shown that in MS detection, one flavone derivative can be quantified using other available derivatives with similar substitution pattern with regards to attached and acetylated sugars, whereas the nature of the aglycone is not crucial. PMID:23147814

  15. Resolution of Ion Mobility Spectra for the Detection of Hazardous Substances in Real Sampling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Montoliu, I.; Kalms, A.; Pardo, A.; Pomareda, V.; Marco, S.; Goebel, J.; Kessler, M.; Mueller, G.

    2009-05-23

    This work presents the possibilities offered by a blind source separation method such Multivariate Curve Resolution- Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) in the analysis of Ion Mobility Spectra (IMS). Two security applications are analyzed in this context: the detection of TNT both in synthetic and real samples. Results obtained show the possibilities offered by the direct analysis of the drift time spectra when an appropriate resolution method is used.

  16. Chemical amination of graphene oxides and their extraordinary properties in the detection of lead ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Luo, Bin; Liang, Minghui; Wang, Ali; Wang, Jie; Fang, Yan; Chang, Yanhong; Zhi, Linjie

    2011-12-01

    A strategy for the ultra-sensitive detection of Pb(2+) in aqueous media has been developed. The combination of oxidative exfoliation of graphite and subsequent chemical amination resulted in an amine functionalized graphene oxide, which showed ultra-high sensitivity in detecting Pb(2+), as it is an active material in modified anodic stripping voltammetry. A detection limit of as low as 10(-13) M (0.1 pM) has been reached, which is comparable to the result obtained from atomic absorption spectrometry, but is dramatically lower than that from other reported electrochemical analysis methods. This simple and economic approach opens up a new window for the portable, quick, and ultra-sensitive detection of lead ions. PMID:22041992

  17. Ion mobility spectrometry fingerprints: A rapid detection technology for adulteration of sesame oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Shuai, Qian; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Wen; Ding, Xiaoxia

    2016-02-01

    A simple and rapid detection technology was proposed based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) fingerprints to determine potential adulteration of sesame oil. Oil samples were diluted by n-hexane and analyzed by IMS for 20s. Then, chemometric methods were employed to establish discriminant models for sesame oils and four other edible oils, pure and adulterated sesame oils, and pure and counterfeit sesame oils, respectively. Finally, Random Forests (RF) classification model could correctly classify all five types of edible oils. The detection results indicated that the discriminant models built by recursive support vector machine (R-SVM) method could identify adulterated sesame oil samples (⩾ 10%) with an accuracy value of 94.2%. Therefore, IMS was shown to be an effective method to detect the adulterated sesame oils. Meanwhile, IMS fingerprints work well to detect the counterfeit sesame oils produced by adding sesame oil essence into cheaper edible oils. PMID:26304320

  18. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keselman, A.; Glickman, Y.; Akerman, N.; Kotler, S.; Ozeri, R.

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped 88Sr+ ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  19. Selective calcium ion detection with functionalized ZnO nanorods-extended gate MOSFET.

    PubMed

    Asif, M H; Nur, O; Willander, M; Danielsson, B

    2009-07-15

    Zinc oxide nanorod-extended gate field effect transistor (MOSFET) is demonstrated for the detection of calcium (Ca(2+)) ions. ZnO nanorods were grown on the surface of a silver wire to produce an electrochemical nanosensor for selectively detecting Ca(2+). The electrochemical response from the interaction between the ZnO nanorods and Ca(2+) in an aqueous solution is coupled directly to the gate of a field effect transistor (MOSFET). The induced voltage change on the gate results in a measureable current response. In order to adapt the sensors for Ca(2+) ions measurements in biological fluids with sufficient selectivity and stability, a plastic membrane coating containing ionophores was applied on the nanorods. The sensor exhibited a linear response within the range of interest from 1 microM to 1 mM. This work demonstrates a simple technique for sensitive detection of Ca(2+) ions by efficient transfer of the chemical response directly to a standard electronic component producing a low impedance signal. PMID:19442511

  20. Ion chromatography with the indirect ultraviolet detection of alkali metal ions and ammonium using imidazolium ionic liquid as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Indirect ultraviolet detection was conducted in ultraviolet-absorption-agent-added mobile phase to complete the detection of the absence of ultraviolet absorption functional group in analytes. Compared with precolumn derivatization or postcolumn derivatization, this method can be widely used, has the advantages of simple operation and good linear relationship. Chromatographic separation of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid/organic solvent as the mobile phase, in which imidazolium ionic liquids acted as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluting agent. The retention behaviors of four kinds of cations are discussed, and the mechanism of separation and detection are described. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background ultraviolet absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in the ion chromatography-indirect ultraviolet detection. The successful separation and detection of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) within 13 min was achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.02, 0.11, 0.30, and 0.06 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and analysis method of alkali metal ions and ammonium by ion chromatography with indirect ultraviolet detection method was developed, and the application range of ionic liquid was expanded. PMID:27377245

  1. High-gain effects minimized at the ends of the anodes in position sensitive gas proportional counters for SSM on ASTROSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadevi, M. C.; Babu, V. C.; Ashoka, B. N.; Seetha, S.

    2015-03-01

    The Scanning Sky Monitor (SSM) on ASTROSAT is a position-sensitive gas-filled proportional counter with a wide field of view. The science objective of SSM is to scan the sky to detect and locate transient X-ray sources in the outburst phase. The energy range of operation of SSM is 2.5 to 10 keV. Gas-filled proportional counters are known to have distorted electric fields at the ends of the anodes inside the detector. The electric field and hence the gas gain is different at the ends of the anodes compared to that of the central region. In SSM, the ends of the anode wires were found to have high electric field values and hence high gas gain initially. These effects had to be minimized as they would result in huge charge collection for incidence of highly energetic photons and charged particles, leading to probable discharge effects which would limit the life time of the detector. They also result in undesirable signals, the amplitude of which may not be proportional to the energy of the incident photon. In this paper, we discuss the technique which we use to reduce the field at the ends of the anodes in SSM detectors.

  2. Characterization and Detection of Uranyl Ion Sorption on Silver Surfaces using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T; Wells, Sabrina M; Sepaniak, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The study of the chemical behavior of uranyl species and its rapid detection is of primary environmental and non-proliferation concern. Herein we report on a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of uranyl ion (UO22+) sorption onto the thermally vapor deposited silver particle surface. The ability of vibrational spectroscopy to characterize surface phenomenon and the remarkable sensitivity of the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) have been introduced as an appropriate combination for the surface characterization and detection of UO22+ onto the silver surface. The appearance of symmetric stretching frequency of UO22+ around 700 cm-1 and the disappearance of the 854 cm-1 band is attributed to the development of a chemical bond between silver surface and uranyl species. The effects of temperature, solute-surface interaction time, and pH have been studied using silver modified polypropylene filter (PPF) substrates. Results show that under appropriate conditions, the concentration of uranyl ion as low as 20 ng/mL can be easily detected using the discussed SERS approach without any surface modification of silver nanoparticles. Moreover, an alteranative SERS approach of uranyl detection is demonstrated using nano-lithographically fabricated SERS substrates.

  3. Fluorescence switch for silver ion detection utilizing dimerization of DNA-Ag nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyun; Park, Juhee; Hee Lee, Hong; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Hugh I; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-06-15

    A fluorescence switch that consists of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) triggered by silver ion (Ag(+)) is developed to detect Ag(+). The mechanism of the fluorescence switching of DNA-AgNCs is investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, DNA hybridization assay and mass spectrometry. Ag(+) induces a dimeric structure of Cyt12-AgNCs by forming a bridge between two Cyt12-AgNCs, where Cyt12 is cytosine 12-mer; this dimer formation causes the fluorescence change of Cyt12-AgNCs from red to green. Using this Ag(+)-triggered fluorescence switch, we successfully detected Ag(+) at concentrations as low as 10nM. Furthermore, we quantitatively detected the Ag(+) in the Silmazin(®), which is dermatological burn ointment having silver sulfadiazine. Ag(+) detection using this fluorescence switch has high selectivity and sensitivity, and short response time, and can be used successfully even in the presence of other metal ions. PMID:25658488

  4. Highly photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals for rapid, label-free and recyclable detection of mercuric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg2+) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg2+ with the thiol group, the fluorescence can be fully recovered by biothiols such as cysteine and glutathione, therefore, a regenerative strategy has been proposed and successfully applied to detect Hg2+ by the same sensor for at least five cycles. Endowed with relatively high sensitivity and selectivity, the present sensor holds the potential to be applied for mercuric assay in water.Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg2+) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg2+ with the

  5. Sequestration, fluorometric detection, and mass spectroscopy analysis of lanthanide ions using surface modified magnetic microspheres for microfluidic manipulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I. A.; Kaminski, M. D.; Mertz, C. J.; Rickert, P. G.; Derzon, M. S.; Rahimian, K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; SNL

    2009-11-04

    Several methods for rapid sequestration, fluorometric detection, and the subsequent mass spectroscopic analysis of lanthanide ions using surface modified polystyrene magnetic microspheres are demonstrated. Mixed-ligand antenna complexes of Eu{sup 3+} in which one of the ligands is attached to the surface of the microspheres have been used as a means for the sequestration, immobilization, and detection of these ions. Using the ion-exchange properties of these microspheres, this scheme has been extended to the detection of nonluminescent ions. The principles of these assays form the basis for operation of a portable microfluidic device for general analytical and nuclear forensics applications and indicate the manner in which the established methods of analytical chemistry, such as liquid-liquid extraction and ion-exchange chromatography, can be adapted for such miniature devices.

  6. Laser desorption with corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for direct surface detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Sabo, M; Malásková, M; Matejčík, S

    2014-10-21

    We present a new highly sensitive technique for the detection of explosives directly from the surface using laser desorption-corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry (LD-CD-IMS). We have developed LD based on laser diode modules (LDM) and the technique was tested using three different LDM (445, 532 and 665 nm). The explosives were detected directly from the surface without any further preparation. We discuss the mechanism of the LD and the limitations of this technique such as desorption time, transport time and desorption area. After the evaluation of experimental data, we estimated the potential limits of detection of this method to be 0.6 pg for TNT, 2.8 pg for RDX and 8.4 pg for PETN. PMID:25118619

  7. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe; Tu, Yi; Ren, Zhifeng

    2005-06-20

    We describe an ultrasensitive voltammetric detection of trace heavy metal ions using nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) that are based on low-site density carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The NEAs were prepared by sealing the side-walls of CNTs with an epoxy passive layer that reduces the current leakage and eliminates the electrode capacitance, leading to a low background current. This provides a high signal-to-noise ratio. The CNTs-NEAs coated with a bismuth film were used successfully for voltammetric detection of trace cadmium and lead (II) at the sub-ppb level. The detection limit of 0.04 {micro}g/L was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. The attractive behavior of the new carbon NEA sensing platform holds great promise for onsite environmental monitoring and biomonitoring of toxic metals.

  8. Magnetic detection of mercuric ion using giant magnetoresistance-based biosensing system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Tu, Liang; Klein, Todd; Feng, Yinglong; Li, Qin; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-04-15

    We have demonstrated a novel sensing strategy employing a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor and DNA chemistry for the detection of mercuric ion (Hg(2+)). This assay takes advantages of high sensitivity and real-time signal readout of GMR biosensor and high selectivity of thymine-thymine (T-T) pair for Hg(2+). The assay has a detection limit of 10 nM in both buffer and natural water, which is the maximum mercury level in drinking water regulated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The magnitude of the dynamic range for Hg(2+) detection is up to three orders (10 nM to 10 μM). Herein, GMR sensing technology is first introduced into a pollutant monitoring area. It can be foreseen that the GMR biosensor could become a robust contender in the areas of environmental monitoring and food safety testing. PMID:24654958

  9. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by self assembled chemical field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Hang Kang, Yuhong; Gladwin, Elizabeth; Claus, Richard O.

    2015-04-20

    Multiple layer-by-layer sensor material modifications were designed and implemented to achieve selectivity of semiconductor based chemical field effect transistors (ChemFETs) to particular heavy metal ions. The ChemFET sensors were fabricated and modified in three ways, with the intent to initially target first mercury and lead ions and then chromium ions, respectively. Sensor characterization was performed with the gate regions of the sensor elements exposed to different concentrations of target heavy metal ion solutions. A minimum detection level in the range of 0.1 ppm and a 10%–90% response time of less than 10 s were demonstrated. By combining layer-by-layer gold nanoparticles and lead ionophores, a sensor is produced that is sensitive and selective not only to chromium but also to Cr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6+}. This result supports the claim that high selectivity can be achieved by designing self-assembled bonding for lead, arsenic, chromium, cesium, mercury, and cadmium.

  10. Comparison of the performance of Ion Torrent chips in noninvasive prenatal trisomy detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlin; Wen, Zujia; Shen, Jiawei; Cheng, Weiwei; Li, Jun; Qin, Xiaolan; Ma, Duan; Shi, Yongyong

    2014-07-01

    Semiconductor high-throughput sequencing, represented by Ion Torrent PGM/Proton, proves to be feasible in the noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal aneuploidies. It is commendable that, with less data and relevant cost also, an accurate result can be achieved owing to the high sensitivity and specificity of such kind of technology. We conducted a comparative analysis of the performance of four different Ion chips in detecting fetal chromosomal aneuploidies. Eight maternal plasma DNA samples, including four pregnancies with normal fetuses and four with trisomy 21 fetuses, were sequenced on Ion Torrent 314/316/318/PI chips, respectively. Results such as read mapped ratio, correlation coefficient and phred quality score were calculated and parallelly compared. All samples were correctly classified even with low-throughput chip, and, among the four chips, the 316 chip had the highest read mapped ratio, correlation coefficient, mean read length and phred quality score. All chips were well consistent with each other. Our results showed that all Ion chips are applicable in noninvasive prenatal fetal aneuploidy diagnosis. We recommend researchers or clinicians to use the appropriate chip with barcoding technology on the basis of the sample number. PMID:24919645

  11. Detection efficiency and spatial resolution of the SIRAD ion electron emission microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisello, D.; Giubilato, P.; Kaminsky, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Nigro, M.; Pantano, D.; Silvestrin, L.; Tessaro, M.; Wyss, J.; Bertazzoni, S.; Mongiardo, L.; Salmeri, M.; Salsano, A.

    2009-06-01

    An axial ion electron emission microscope (IEEM) has been built at the SIRAD irradiation facility at the 15 MV Tandem accelerator of INFN Legnaro National Laboratory (Padova, Italy) to obtain a micrometric sensitivity map to single event effects (SEE) of electronic devices. In this contribution we report on two experiments performed with the IEEM. Si 3N 4 ultra-thin membranes with a gold deposition were placed on the device under test (DUT) to ensure a uniform and abundant secondary electron emission In the first experiment we measured an IEEM ion detection efficiency of 83% with a 58Ni (220 MeV) beam, in good agreement with the expected value. The second experiment allowed us to estimate the lateral resolution of the IEEM. The positions of ion induced single event upsets (SEU) in a synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM), used as a reference target, were compared with the corresponding ion impact points reconstructed by the IEEM. The result (FWHM ˜4.4 μm with a 79Br beam of 214 MeV) is encouraging because of the residual presence of distortions of the image and mechanical vibrations.

  12. Sensitive ion detection device and method for analysis of compounds as vapors in gases

    DOEpatents

    Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger P

    2014-02-18

    An ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for the detection of trace gaseous molecular compounds dissolved or suspended in a carrier gas, particularly in ambient air, without preconcentration or the trapping of analyte particles. The IMS of the invention comprises an ionization volume of greater than 5 cm.sup.3 and preferably greater than 100 cm.sup.3. The larger size ionizers of this invention enable analysis of trace (<1 ppb) of sample compounds in the gas phase. To facilitate efficient ion motion through the large volume ionization and reaction regions of the IMS, an electric field gradient can be provided in the ionization region or in both the ionization and reaction regions. The systems can be implemented with radioactive ionization sources, corona discharge ion sources or ions can be formed by photoionization. In specific embodiments, particularly when the sample gas is ambient air, the sample gas is heater prior to entry into the instrument, the instrument is run at temperatures above ambient, and the instrument can be heated by contact with heated sample gas exiting the instrument.

  13. Sensitive ion detection device and method for analysis of compounds as vapors in gases

    DOEpatents

    Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger P.

    2015-09-15

    An ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for the detection of trace gaseous molecular compounds dissolved or suspended in a carrier gas, particularly in ambient air, without preconcentration or the trapping of analyte particles. The IMS of the invention comprises an ionization volume of greater than 5 cm.sup.3 and preferably greater than 100 cm.sup.3. The larger size ionizers of this invention enable analysis of trace (<1 ppb) of sample compounds in the gas phase. To facilitate efficient ion motion through the large volume ionization and reaction regions of the IMS, an electric field gradient can be provided in the ionization region or in both the ionization and reaction regions. The systems can be implemented with radioactive ionization sources, corona discharge ion sources or ions can be formed by photoionization. In specific embodiments, particularly when the sample gas is ambient air, the sample gas is heater prior to entry into the instrument, the instrument is run at temperatures above ambient, and the instrument can be heated by contact with heated sample gas exiting the instrument.

  14. Detection of nitrite and nitrate ions in water by graphene oxide as a potential fluorescence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ing Hua; Sundari, Rita; Lintang, Hendrik O.; Yuliati, Leny

    2016-02-01

    In this study, graphene oxide (GO) was used as a new fluorescence sensor for detection of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) ions. The GO was synthesized via an improved Hummers’ method, and the properties of GO were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The XRD pattern showed the presence of (002) plane at 2θ of 9.5o while the FTIR spectrum showed the presence of C-OH, C=O, C=C, C-O chemical bonds in the GO. The layer structure of the GO was confirmed from the TEM image. The sensing performance of the GO for NO2- and NO3- was evaluated by monitoring the emission sites of the GO at 567 nm, which was corresponded to the oxygen functional groups. Fluorescence quenching was observed, suggesting that the GO interacted well with both NO2- and NO3- ions. The linear Stern-Volmer plots were obtained in the concentration range of 1-10 mM, indicating the potential ability of the GO as the fluorescence sensor. The quenching constants for the detections of NO2- and NO3- were 4.8 × 10-2 and 1.2 × 10-2 mM-1, respectively, suggesting that the GO has greater sensitivity towards the NO2- than the NO3- ion.

  15. Gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometry as a hyphenated technique for improved explosives detection and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercado, AL; Marsden, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is currently being successfully applied to the problem of on-line trace detection of plastic and other explosives in airports and other facilities. The methods of sample retrieval primarily consist of batch sampling for particulate residue on a filter card for introduction into the IMS. The sample is desorbed into the IMS using air as the carrier and negative ions of the explosives are detected, some as an adduct with a reagent ion such as Cl(-). Based on studies and tests conducted by different airport authorities, this method seems to work well for low vapor pressure explosives such as RDX and PETN, as well as TNT that are highly adsorptive and can be found in nanogram quantities on contaminated surfaces. Recently, the changing terrorist threat and the adoption of new marking agents for plastic explosives has meant that the sample introduction and analysis capabilities of the IMS must be enhanced in order to keep up with other detector developments. The IMS has sufficient analytical resolution for a few threat compounds but the IMS Plasmogram becomes increasingly more difficult to interpret when the sample mixture gets more complex.

  16. Ion mobility spectrometer, spectrometer analyte detection and identification verification system, and method

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for ion mobility spectrometry and analyte detection and identification verification system are disclosed. The apparatus is configured to be used in an ion mobility spectrometer and includes a plurality of reactant reservoirs configured to contain a plurality of reactants which can be reacted with the sample to form adducts having varying ion mobilities. A carrier fluid, such as air or nitrogen, is used to carry the sample into the spectrometer. The plurality of reactants are configured to be selectively added to the carrier stream by use inlet and outlet manifolds in communication with the reagent reservoirs, the reservoirs being selectively isolatable by valves. The invention further includes a spectrometer having the reagent system described. In the method, a first reactant is used with the sample. Following a positive result, a second reactant is used to determine whether a predicted response occurs. The occurrence of the second predicted response tends to verify the existence of a component of interest within the sample. A third reactant can also be used to provide further verification of the existence of a component of interest. A library can be established of known responses of compounds of interest with various reactants and the results of a specific multi-reactant survey of a sample can be compared against the library to determine whether a component detected in the sample is likely to be a specific component of interest.

  17. Optical detection of a single rare-earth ion in a crystal

    PubMed Central

    Kolesov, R.; Xia, K.; Reuter, R.; Stöhr, R.; Zappe, A.; Meijer, J.; Hemmer, P.R.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2012-01-01

    Rare-earth-doped laser materials show strong prospects for quantum information storage and processing, as well as for biological imaging, due to their high-Q 4f↔4f optical transitions. However, the inability to optically detect single rare-earth dopants has prevented these materials from reaching their full potential. Here we detect a single photostable Pr3+ ion in yttrium aluminium garnet nanocrystals with high contrast photon antibunching by using optical upconversion of the excited state population of the 4f↔4f optical transition into ultraviolet fluorescence. We also demonstrate on-demand creation of Pr3+ ions in a bulk yttrium aluminium garnet crystal by patterned ion implantation. Finally, we show generation of local nanophotonic structures and cell death due to photochemical effects caused by upconverted ultraviolet fluorescence of praseodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet in the surrounding environment. Our study demonstrates versatile use of rare-earth atomic-size ultraviolet emitters for nanoengineering and biotechnological applications. PMID:22929786

  18. Optical detection of a single rare-earth ion in a crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, R.; Xia, K.; Reuter, R.; Stöhr, R.; Zappe, A.; Meijer, J.; Hemmer, P. R.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2012-08-01

    Rare-earth-doped laser materials show strong prospects for quantum information storage and processing, as well as for biological imaging, due to their high-Q 4f↔4f optical transitions. However, the inability to optically detect single rare-earth dopants has prevented these materials from reaching their full potential. Here we detect a single photostable Pr3+ ion in yttrium aluminium garnet nanocrystals with high contrast photon antibunching by using optical upconversion of the excited state population of the 4f↔4f optical transition into ultraviolet fluorescence. We also demonstrate on-demand creation of Pr3+ ions in a bulk yttrium aluminium garnet crystal by patterned ion implantation. Finally, we show generation of local nanophotonic structures and cell death due to photochemical effects caused by upconverted ultraviolet fluorescence of praseodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet in the surrounding environment. Our study demonstrates versatile use of rare-earth atomic-size ultraviolet emitters for nanoengineering and biotechnological applications.

  19. Silver(I) Ions Ultrasensitive Detection at Carbon Electrodes—Analysis of Waters, Tobacco Cells and Fish Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Krizkova, Sona; Krystofova, Olga; Trnkova, Libuse; Hubalek, Jaromir; Adam, Vojtech; Beklova, Miroslava; Horna, Ales; Havel, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2009-01-01

    We used carbon paste electrodes and a standard potentiostat to detect silver ions. The detection limit (3 Signal/Noise ratio) was estimated as 0.5 μM. A standard electrochemical instrument microanalysis of silver(I) ions was suggested. As a working electrode a carbon tip (1 mL) or carbon pencil was used. Limits of detection estimated by dilution of a standard were 1 (carbon tip) or 10 nM (carbon pencil). Further we employed flow injection analysis coupled with carbon tip to detect silver(I) ions released in various beverages and mineral waters. During first, second and third week the amount of silver(I) ions releasing into water samples was under the detection limit of the technique used for their quantification. At the end of a thirteen weeks long experiment the content of silver(I) ions was several times higher compared to the beginning of release detected in the third week and was on the order of tens of nanomoles. In subsequent experiments the influence of silver(I) ions (0, 5 and 10 μM) on a plant model system (tobacco BY-2 cells) during a four-day exposition was investigated. Silver(I) ions were highly toxic to the cells, which was revealed by a double staining viability assay. Moreover we investigated the effect of silver(I) ions (0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2 and 2.5 μM) on guppies (Poecilia reticulata). Content of Ag(I) increased with increasing time of the treatment and applied concentrations in fish tissues. It can be concluded that a carbon tip or carbon pencil coupled with a miniaturized potentiostat can be used for detection of silver(I) ions in environmental samples and thus represents a small, portable, low cost and easy-to-use instrument for such purposes. PMID:22399980

  20. Iron oxide nanostructured electrodes for detection of copper(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Santos, J G M; Souza, J R; Letti, C J; Soler, M A G; Morais, P C; Pereira-da-Silva, M A; Paterno, L G

    2014-09-01

    Iron oxide nanostructured (ION) electrodes were assembled layer-by-layer onto ITO-coated glass substrates and their structure, morphology, and electrochemical properties were investigated, the latter aiming at the development of a chemical sensor for Cu2+. The electrodes were built by immersing the substrate alternately into an aqueous colloidal suspension of positively charged magnetite nanoparticles (np-Fe3O4, 8 nm) and an aqueous solution of anionic sodium sulfonated polystyrene (PSS). The adsorbed amount of both materials was monitored ex-situ by UV-vis spectroscopy and it was found to increase linearly with the number of deposition cycles. The resulting films feature a densely-packed structure of magnetite nanoparticles, as suggested by AFM and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Cyclic voltammograms of electrodes immersed in acetate buffer (pH 4.6) displayed three electrochemical events that were tentatively ascribed to the reduction of Fe(III) oxy-hydroxide to magnetite, reduction of maghemite to magnetite, and finally oxidation of magnetite to maghemite. The effect of np-Fe3O4/PSS bilayers on the ION electrode performance was to increase the anodic and cathodic currents produced during electrochemical oxidation-reduction of the Fe(CN)(3-/4-) redox couple. With more bilayers, the ION electrode provided higher anodic/cathodic currents. Moreover, the redox couple exhibited a quasi-reversible behavior at the ION electrode as already observed with other working electrode systems. Fitting of voltammetry data provided the apparent electron transfer constants, which were found to be higher in ION electrodes for both redox couples (Fe(CN)(3-/4-) and Cu(2+/0)). By means of differential pulsed anodic stripping voltammetry, the ION electrodes were found to respond linearly to the presence of Cu2+ in aqueous samples in the range between 1.0 and 8.0 x 10(-6) mol x L(-1) and displayed a limit of detection of 0.3 x 10(-8) mol x L(-1). The sensitivity was - 0.6μA/μmol x L

  1. Fluorescence and visual detection of fluoride ions using a photoluminescent graphene oxide paper sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaochun; Yu, Shaoming; Yang, Liang; Wang, Jianping; Jiang, Changlong

    2016-07-01

    The instant and on-site detection of trace aqueous fluoride ions is still a challenge for environmental monitoring and protection. This work demonstrates a new analytical method and its utility of a paper sensor for visual detection of F- on the basis of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between photoluminescent graphene oxide (GO) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through the formation of cyclic esters between phenylborinic acid and diol. The fluorescence of GO was quenched by the AgNPs, and trace F- can recover the fluorescence of the quenched photoluminescent GO. The increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of F- in the range of 0.05-0.55 nM, along with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 9.07 pM. Following the sensing mechanism, a paper-based sensor for the visual detection of aqueous F- has been successfully developed. The paper sensor showed high sensitivity for aqueous F-, and the LOD could reach as low as 0.1 μM as observed by the naked eye. The very simple and effective strategy reported here could be extended to the visual detection of a wide range of analytes in the environment by the construction of highly efficient FRET nanoprobes.The instant and on-site detection of trace aqueous fluoride ions is still a challenge for environmental monitoring and protection. This work demonstrates a new analytical method and its utility of a paper sensor for visual detection of F- on the basis of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between photoluminescent graphene oxide (GO) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through the formation of cyclic esters between phenylborinic acid and diol. The fluorescence of GO was quenched by the AgNPs, and trace F- can recover the fluorescence of the quenched photoluminescent GO. The increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of F- in the range of 0.05-0.55 nM, along with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 9.07 pM. Following the sensing mechanism

  2. Determination of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling process by ion pair chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, L. H.; Judkins, J. E.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A direct approach utilizing ion pairing reversed-phase chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detection was developed to monitor biodegradation of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling through hydroponic plant growth systems and fixed-film bioreactors. Samples of hydroponic nutrient solution and bioreactor effluent with high concentrations (up to 120 mS electrical conductance) of inorganic ions can be analyzed without pretreatment or interference. The presence of non-ionic surfactants did not significantly affect the analysis. Dynamic linear ranges for tested surfactants [Igepon TC-42, ammonium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate and sodium alkyl (C10-C16) ether sulfate] were 2 to approximately 500, 1 to approximately 500, 2.5 to approximately 550 and 3.0 to approximately 630 microg/ml, respectively.

  3. Renovating the chromoionophores and detection modes in carrier-based ion-selective optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaojiang

    2016-04-01

    Ion-selective optical sensing is an important branch of analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. Conventional ion-selective optodes are based on H(+) chromoionophores. These sensors are known to be pH dependent and usually operated in a passive mode. In view of the applications in complex real samples, the sensors must exhibit not only excellent chemical selectivity but also the ability to eliminate the optical background interference such as autofluorescence and light scattering. In this article, recent advances to renovate the chromoionophores and detection modes to overcome the pH cross-response and to eliminate the background optical interference are summarized. Topics include sensors based on solvatochromic dyes, alternative chromoionophores, photoswitchable sensors, upconverting nanoparticles, luminescence decay time, and others. PMID:26922342

  4. A rhodamine B-based fluorescent sensor toward highly selective mercury (II) ions detection.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Peng

    2016-04-01

    This work presented the design, syntheses and photophysical properties of a rhodamine B-based fluorescence probe, which exhibited a sensitive and selective recognition towards mercury (II). The chemosensor RA (Rhodamine- amide- derivative) contained a 5-aminoisophthalic acid diethyl ester and a rhodamine group, and the property of spirolactone of this chemosensor RA was detected by X-ray crystal structure analyses. Chemosensor RA afforded turn-on fluorescence enhancement and displayed high brightness for Hg(2+), which leaded to the opening of the spirolactone ring and consequently caused the appearance of strong absorption at visible range, moreover, the obvious and characteristic color changed from colorless to pink was observed. We envisioned that the chemosensor RA exhibited a considerable specificity with two mercury (II) ions which was attributed to the open of spirolactone over other interference metal ions. PMID:26838376

  5. Hydrogels Triggered by Metal Ions as Precursors of Network CuS for DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiqiao; Song, Shasha; Hao, Jingcheng; Song, Aixin

    2015-08-17

    The gelation behavior of lithocholate (LC(-) ) with different metal ions in water was investigated. The microstructures of hydrogels were determined to be three-dimensional (3D) networks of fibrous aggregates. The formation of fibrils was speculated to be mainly driven by the coordination between carboxylate of LC(-) and metal ions, accompanied by the assistance of noncovalent interactions such as electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The hydrogels, which can maintain the mechanical strength at higher temperature, exhibit thermal stability. Their gelation capability was enhanced with the increase in acidity. The hydrogels of LC(-) and Cu(2+) mixtures served as the precursors for producing network nanostructures of CuS nanoparticles. These new CuS networks exhibit high fluorescence quenching ability and can act as an effective fluorescent sensing platform for ssDNA detection. PMID:26179250

  6. Detection of copper ions from aqueous solutions using layered double hydroxides thin films deposited by PLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, A.; Birjega, R.; Matei, A.; Luculescu, C.; Nedelcea, A.; Dinescu, M.; Zavoianu, R.; Pavel, O. D.

    2015-10-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) thin films with Mg-Al were deposited using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. We studied the ability of our films to detect copper ions in aqueous solutions. Copper is known to be a common pollutant in water, originating from urban and industrial waste. Clay minerals, including layered double hydroxides (LDHs), can reduce the toxicity of such wastes by adsorbing copper. We report on the uptake of copper ions from aqueous solution on LDH thin films obtained via PLD. The obtained thin films were characterized using X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis. The results in this study indicate that LDHs thin films obtained by PLD have potential as an efficient adsorbent for removing copper from aqueous solution.

  7. Optical detection of ion impurity sites in doped LiNbO[sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Sole, J.G.; Macalik, B.; Bausa, L.E.; Cusso, F.; Camarillo, E.; Lorenzo, A.; Nunez, L.; Jaque, F. . Dept. de Fisica de Materiales); Monteil, A.; Boulon, G. . Lab. de Physico Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents); Santiuste, J.E.M.; Vergara, I. . Escuela Politecnica Superior)

    1993-07-01

    In this work the site location of several M[sup 3+] (m[equals]Cr, Nd, Eu, Ho, Er, Tm) dopant ions in LiNbO[sub 3] has been investigated by using optical (absorption and site-selective fluorescence) techniques. Experimental results reveal that the regular cation sites, Li[sup +] and Nb[sup 5+], are occupied in all cases and can be characterized optically. Additional crystal field sites, for M[equals]Nd and M[equals]Eu, have been detected by site selective spectroscopy. The effects on the M[sup 3+] optical spectra of the stoichiometry and the codoping with MgO have been systematically investigated. The appearance of new sites for the M[sup 3+] ions, M[sup 3+] [minus]Mg[sup 2+], is ascertained for M[equals]Cr, Nd, Ho, Ho, and Tm.

  8. A Photochromic Sensor Microchip for High-performance Multiplex Metal Ions Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Li, Fengyu; Ye, Changqing; Qin, Meng; Ran, Wei; Song, Yanlin

    2015-04-01

    Current multi-analytes chips are limited with requiring numbers of sensors, complex synthesis and compounds screen. It is expected to develop new principles and techniques to achieve high-performance multi-analytes testing with facile sensors. Here, we investigated the correlative multi-states properties of a photochromic sensor (spirooxazine), which is capable of a selective and cross-reactive sensor array for discriminated multi-analytes (11 metal ions) detection by just one sensing compound. The multi-testing sensor array performed in dark, ultraviolet or visual stimulation, corresponding to different molecular states of spirooxazine metal ions coordination. The facile photochromic microchip contributes a multi-states array sensing method, and will open new opportunities for the development of advanced discriminant analysis for complex analytes.

  9. A photochromic sensor microchip for high-performance multiplex metal ions detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Li, Fengyu; Ye, Changqing; Qin, Meng; Ran, Wei; Song, Yanlin

    2015-01-01

    Current multi-analytes chips are limited with requiring numbers of sensors, complex synthesis and compounds screen. It is expected to develop new principles and techniques to achieve high-performance multi-analytes testing with facile sensors. Here, we investigated the correlative multi-states properties of a photochromic sensor (spirooxazine), which is capable of a selective and cross-reactive sensor array for discriminated multi-analytes (11 metal ions) detection by just one sensing compound. The multi-testing sensor array performed in dark, ultraviolet or visual stimulation, corresponding to different molecular states of spirooxazine metal ions coordination. The facile photochromic microchip contributes a multi-states array sensing method, and will open new opportunities for the development of advanced discriminant analysis for complex analytes. PMID:25853794

  10. Metal-clad optical waveguide fluorescence device for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo; Zoppi, Angela; Lascialfari, Luisa; Cicchi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    We developed Hg-sensing chips by decorating the external surface of metal-clad optical waveguides with a monolayer of Hg-sensitive fluorescent molecular probes. The emission properties of the original water-soluble form of the molecule were previously found to be selectively quenched in the presence of Hg ions. The fabricated samples were tested with optical waveguide fluorescence spectroscopy by putting them in contact with a 5-μM water solution of Hg ions and recording the emission spectra versus incubation time. The estimate of the limit of detection was 150 nM. A preliminary evaluation of the selectivity of the structure was also performed by using Cd as possible interfering analytes.

  11. A Photochromic Sensor Microchip for High-performance Multiplex Metal Ions Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Li, Fengyu; Ye, Changqing; Qin, Meng; Ran, Wei; Song, Yanlin

    2015-01-01

    Current multi-analytes chips are limited with requiring numbers of sensors, complex synthesis and compounds screen. It is expected to develop new principles and techniques to achieve high-performance multi-analytes testing with facile sensors. Here, we investigated the correlative multi-states properties of a photochromic sensor (spirooxazine), which is capable of a selective and cross-reactive sensor array for discriminated multi-analytes (11 metal ions) detection by just one sensing compound. The multi-testing sensor array performed in dark, ultraviolet or visual stimulation, corresponding to different molecular states of spirooxazine metal ions coordination. The facile photochromic microchip contributes a multi-states array sensing method, and will open new opportunities for the development of advanced discriminant analysis for complex analytes. PMID:25853794

  12. Ratiometric fluorescence detection of silver ions using thioflavin T-based organic/inorganic hybrid supraparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Yun; Zhang, Min; Lu, Ling-Fei; Zhu, Anwei; Xia, Fei; Zhou, Tianshu; Shi, Guoyue

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we present a new type of functional organic/inorganic hybrid supraparticle that spontaneously assembles from silver ions (Ag(+)), iodide ions (I(-)) and thioflavin T (ThT) under aqueous solution conditions. ThT alone in aqueous solution was weakly fluorescent with an emission band at 494 nm, which was related to the monomer. However, in the above-mentioned hybrid supraparticle (i.e., ThT@AgI SP) structure, the ThT monomer can form a dimer with a new emission band. The new band shifted to 546 nm and the emission intensity increased. We further present a facile strategy of reversible fluorescence switching of ThT by a simple cation (Ag(+)) and anions (I(-) and S(2-)), which can be employed for the ratiometric fluorescence detection of Ag(+) with high sensitivity and selectivity. The linear range of detecting Ag(+) was from 100 nM to 10 μM, with a limit of detection as low as approximately 50 nM. Moreover, it can be successfully applied for the operation of a logic gate system and to the sensing of Ag(+) in real water samples. PMID:26212864

  13. Highly photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals for rapid, label-free and recyclable detection of mercuric ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-04-21

    Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg(2+) over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg(2+) with the thiol group, the fluorescence can be fully recovered by biothiols such as cysteine and glutathione, therefore, a regenerative strategy has been proposed and successfully applied to detect Hg(2+) by the same sensor for at least five cycles. Endowed with relatively high sensitivity and selectivity, the present sensor holds the potential to be applied for mercuric assay in water. PMID:24604008

  14. Highly Sensitive and Selective Label-Free Optical Detection of Mercuric Ions Using Photon Upconverting Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Zhang, Peng

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a fluorescence-based, label-free detection scheme that reports the presence of Hg(II) ion using photon upconverting nanoparticles. A single-stranded DNA containing a number of thymine bases to be used as the Hg2+-capturing element is covalently attached to the photon upconverting NaYF4:Yb3+,Tm3+ nanoparticles. Under the illumination of 980 nm laser, energy transfer takes place between the NaYF4:Yb3+,Tm3+ nanoparticles as the donor and SYBR green I, a DNA intercalating dye, as the acceptor. By monitoring the ratio of the acceptor emission to the donor emission, we can quantitatively detect the presence of the mercuric ions with a directly observed detection limit of 0.06 nM. The remarkably high signal-to-noise ratio of photon upconverting particles leads to very high sensitivity and specificity without the need of fluorophore labeling. The sensor also does not suffer from photobleaching. PMID:20456935

  15. New biosensor for detection of copper ions in water based on immobilized genetically modified yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Vopálenská, Irena; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-10-15

    Contamination of water by heavy metals represents a potential risk for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, including humans. Heavy metals in water resources can come from various industrial activities, and drinking water can be ex-post contaminated by heavy metals such as Cu(2+) from house fittings (e.g., water reservoirs) and pipes. Here, we present a new copper biosensor capable of detecting copper ions at concentrations of 1-100 μM. This biosensor is based on cells of a specifically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain immobilized in alginate beads. Depending on the concentration of copper, the biosensor beads change color from white, when copper is present in concentrations below the detection limit, to pink or red based on the increase in copper concentration. The biosensor was successfully tested in the determination of copper concentrations in real samples of water contaminated with copper ions. In contrast to analytical methods or other biosensors based on fluorescent proteins, the newly designed biosensor does not require specific equipment and allows the quick detection of copper in many parallel samples. PMID:25982723

  16. Logic control of enzyme-like gold nanoparticles for selective detection of lead and mercury ions.

    PubMed

    Lien, Chia-Wen; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2014-02-18

    Functional logic gates based on lead ions (Pb(2+)) and mercury ions (Hg(2+)) that induce peroxidase-like activities in gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in the presence of platinum (Pt(4+)) and bismuth ions (Bi(3+)) are presented. The "AND" logic gate is constructed using Pt(4+)/Pb(2+) as the input and the peroxidase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output; this logic gate is denoted as "Pt(4+)/Pb(2+)(AND)-Au NPPOX". When Pt(4+) and Pb(2+) coexist, strong metallophilic interactions (between Pt and Pb atoms/ions) and aurophilic interactions (between Au and Pb/Pt atoms/ions) result in significant increases in the deposition of Pt and Pb atoms/ions onto the Au NPs, leading to enhanced peroxidase-like activity. The "INHIBIT" logic gate is fabricated by using Bi(3+) and Hg(2+) as the input and the peroxidase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output; this logic gate is denoted as "Bi(3+)/Hg(2+)(INHIBIT)-Au NPPOX". High peroxidase-like activity of Au NPs in the presence of Bi(3+) is a result of the various valence (oxidation) states of Bi(3+) and Au (Au(+)/Au(0)) atoms on the nanoparticle's surface. When Bi(3+) and Hg(2+) coexist, strong Hg-Au amalgamation results in a large decrease in the peroxidase-like activity of the Au NPs. These two probes (Pt(4+)/Pb(2+)(AND)-Au NPPOX and Bi(3+)/Hg(2+)(INHIBIT)-Au NPPOX) allow selective detection of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+) down to nanomolar quantities. The practicality of these two probes has been validated by analysis of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+) in environmental water samples (tap water, river water, and lake water). In addition, an integrated logic circuit based on the color change (formation of reddish resorufin product) and generation of O2 bubbles from these two probes has been constructed, allowing visual detection of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+) in aqueous solution. PMID:24451013

  17. Guidelines for Improving the Lower Detection Limit of Ion-Selective Electrodes: A Systematic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Radu, Aleksandar; Peper, Shane M.; Bakker, Eric; Diamond, Dermot

    2007-01-01

    Zero-current membrane fluxes are the principal source of bias that has prohibited researchers from obtaining true, thermodynamic selectivity coefficients for membrane-based ion selective electrodes (ISEs). They are also responsible for the mediocre detection limits historically seen with these types of potentiometric sensors. By choosing an experimental protocol that suppresses these fluxes, it becomes possible to obtain unbiased thermodynamic selectivity coefficients that are needed to produce ISEs with greatly improved detection limits. In this work, a Cs+-selective electrode based on calix[6]arene-hexaacetic acid hexaethyl ester (Cs I) is used to systematically demonstrate how unbiased selectivity coefficients can be obtained, and how they can be used to optimize inner filling solutions for low detection limit measurements. A comparison of biased selectivity methods (e.g., classical separate solution method (SSM), fixed interference method (FIM), matched potential method (MPM)) with the unbiased modified separate solution method (MSSM) found that selectivity coefficients were underestimated in several cases by more than 4 orders of magnitude. The importance of key experimental parameters, including diffusion coefficients and diffusion layer thicknesses in the aqueous and organic phases, on the minimization of ion fluxes and the improvement of lower detection limits is also described. A dramatic reduction of membrane fluxes by the covalent attachment of a Ca2+-selective ionophore to a methyl methacrylate-decyl methacrylate copolymer matrix is also demonstrated. The ionophore-immobilized ISE exhibited no super-Nernstian response and yielded a detection limit of 40 ppt with an inner filling solution of 1 x 10-3 M KCl. Finally, a set of guidelines for experimental protocols leading to obtaining unbiased selectivity coefficients and producing ISEs for trace level analyses is given.

  18. Detection limits of thin layer coulometry with ionophore based ion-selective membranes.

    PubMed

    Shvarev, Alexey; Neel, Bastien; Bakker, Eric

    2012-09-18

    We report here on a significant improvement in lowering the low detection limit of thin layer coulometric sensors based on liquid ion-selective membranes, using a potassium-selective system as a model example. Various possible processes that may result in an elevated residual current reading after electrolysis were eliminated. Self-dissolution of AgCl on the Ag/AgCl inner element may result in a residual ion flux that could adversely affect the lower detection limit. It was here replaced with an Ag/AgI inner pseudoreference electrode where the self-dissolution equilibrium is largely suppressed. Possible residual currents originating from a direct contact between inner element and ion-selective membranes were eliminated by introducing an inert PVDF separator of 50 μm diameter that was coiled around the inner element by a custom-made instrument. Finally, the influence of electrolyte fluxes from the outer solution across the membrane into the sample was evaluated by altering its lipophilic nature and reducing its concentration. It was found that this last effect is most likely responsible for the observed residual current for the potassium-selective membranes studied here. For the optimized conditions, the calibration curves demonstrated a near zero intercept, thereby paving the way to the coulometric calibration-free sensing of ionic species. A linear calibration curve for the coulometric cell with valinomycin potassium-selective membrane was obtained in the range of 100 nM to 10 μM potassium in the presence of a 10 μM sodium background. In the presence of a higher (100 μM) concentration of sodium, a reliable detection of 1-100 μM of potassium was achieved. PMID:22917023

  19. Negative ion mass spectrometry and the detection of carbonyls and HCN from clover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Thomas G.; Kato, Shuji; Fall, Ray; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2000-12-01

    We have demonstrated that negative ion-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) can be used to distinguish several isomeric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted from wounded plants. Reaction chemistry with HO-, hydrogen/deuterium exchange patterns, and collision-induced dissociation spectra allow identification of the isomers. Laboratory studies of emissions from wounded clover using NI-CIMS show several previously detected VOCs, but also clearly demonstrate the emission of HCN. This compound is presumably formed by the decomposition of cyanogenic glycosides which also form aldehyde and ketone byproducts. These results suggest that NI-CIMS may be a valuable tool for investigating VOCs and HCN release from vegetation.

  20. Demonstrated Potential of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Detection of Adulterated Perfumes and Plant Speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Jared Matthew; Daum, Keith Alvin; Kalival, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    This initial study evaluates the use of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as a rapid test procedure for potential detection of adulterated perfumes and speciation of plant life. Sample types measured consist of five genuine perfumes, two species of sagebrush, and four species of flowers. Each sample type is treated as a separate classification problem. It is shown that discrimination using principal component analysis with K-nearest neighbors can distinguish one class from another. Discriminatory models generated using principal component regressions are not as effective. Results from this examination are encouraging and represent an initial phase demonstrating that perfumes and plants possess characteristic chemical signatures that can be used for reliable identification.

  1. Quantitative confirmation of dimetridazole and ipronidazole in swine feed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with multiple ion detection.

    PubMed

    Morris, W J; Nandrea, G J; Roybal, J E; Munns, R K; Shimoda, W; Skinner, H R

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from 4 types of swine feed containing 0.11 ppm each of dimetridazole (DMZ) and ipronidazole (IPR) were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using multiple ion detection (MID) techniques. We demonstrate in this paper that the quantitative results obtained by capillary GC/MS with MID are comparable for both compounds to results obtained by liquid chromatography and have a lower coefficient of variation for DMZ. Moreover, consistency in the ion ratios (5 ions in DMZ and 6 ions in IPR) permits identification of these compounds by electron ionization MS. PMID:3624166

  2. First detection and energy measurement of recoil ions following beta decay in a Penning trap with the WITCH experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, M.; Coeck, S.; Kozlov, V. Yu.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Delahaye, P.; Friedag, P.; Glück, F.; Herbane, M.; Herlert, A.; Kraev, I. S.; Mader, J.; Tandecki, M.; Van Gorp, S.; Wauters, F.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wenander, F.; Severijns, N.

    2011-03-01

    The WITCH experiment (Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles) will search for exotic interactions by investigating the β - ν angular correlation via the measurement of the recoil energy spectrum after β -decay. As a first step the recoil ions from the β-_{} -decay of 124In stored in a Penning trap have been detected. The evidence for the detection of recoil ions is shown and the properties of the ion cloud that forms the radioactive source for the experiment in the Penning trap are presented.

  3. A new detector for mass spectrometry: Direct detection of low energy ions using a multi-pixel photon counter

    SciTech Connect

    Wilman, Edward S.; Gardiner, Sara H.; Vallance, Claire; Nomerotski, Andrei; Turchetta, Renato; Brouard, Mark

    2012-01-15

    A new type of ion detector for mass spectrometry and general detection of low energy ions is presented. The detector consists of a scintillator optically coupled to a single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) array. A prototype sensor has been constructed from a LYSO (Lu{sub 1.8}Y{sub 0.2}SiO{sub 5}(Ce)) scintillator crystal coupled to a commercial SPAD array detector. As proof of concept, the detector is used to record the time-of-flight mass spectra of butanone and carbon disulphide, and the dependence of detection sensitivity on the ion kinetic energy is characterised.

  4. Fluorescence and visual detection of fluoride ions using a photoluminescent graphene oxide paper sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochun; Yu, Shaoming; Yang, Liang; Wang, Jianping; Jiang, Changlong

    2016-07-14

    The instant and on-site detection of trace aqueous fluoride ions is still a challenge for environmental monitoring and protection. This work demonstrates a new analytical method and its utility of a paper sensor for visual detection of F(-) on the basis of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between photoluminescent graphene oxide (GO) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through the formation of cyclic esters between phenylborinic acid and diol. The fluorescence of GO was quenched by the AgNPs, and trace F(-) can recover the fluorescence of the quenched photoluminescent GO. The increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of F(-) in the range of 0.05-0.55 nM, along with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 9.07 pM. Following the sensing mechanism, a paper-based sensor for the visual detection of aqueous F(-) has been successfully developed. The paper sensor showed high sensitivity for aqueous F(-), and the LOD could reach as low as 0.1 μM as observed by the naked eye. The very simple and effective strategy reported here could be extended to the visual detection of a wide range of analytes in the environment by the construction of highly efficient FRET nanoprobes. PMID:27376510

  5. Ambient pressure laser desorption and laser-induced acoustic desorption ion mobility spectrometry detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Sven; Walte, Andreas; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-11-19

    The development of fast, mobile, and sensitive detection systems for security-relevant substances is of enormous importance. Because of the low vapor pressures of explosives and improvised explosive devices, adequate sampling procedures are crucial. Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) are fast and sensitive instruments that are used as detection systems for explosives. Ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD) and ambient pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption (AP-LIAD) are new tools suitable to evaporate explosives in order to detect them in the vapor phase. Indeed, the most important advantage of APLD or AP-LIAD is the capability to sample directly from the surface of interest without any transfer of the analyte to other surfaces such as wipe pads. A much more gentle desorption, compared to classical thermal-based desorption, is possible with laser-based desorption using very short laser pulses. With this approach the analyte molecules are evaporated in a very fast process, comparable to a shock wave. The thermal intake is reduced considerably. The functionality of APLD and AP-LIAD techniques combined with a hand-held IMS system is shown for a wide range of common explosives such as EGDN (ethylene glycol dinitrate), urea nitrate, PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), HMTD (hexamethylene triperoxide diamine), RDX (hexogen), tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine), and TNT (trinitrotoluene). Detection limits down to the low nanogram range are obtained. The successful combination of IMS detection and APLD/AP-LIAD sampling is shown. PMID:24116702

  6. Cyclometallated ruthenium complex-modified upconversion nanophosphors for selective detection of Hg2+ ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianghong; Wu, Yongquan; Liu, Yi; Zou, Xianmei; Yao, Liming; Li, Fuyou; Feng, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Upconversion detection nanocomposites were assembled for the selective luminescent detection of mercury ions in water. A hydrophobic cyclometallated ruthenium complex [RuII(bpy)2(thpy)]PF6 (abbreviated as Ru1; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and thpy = 2-(2-thienyl)pyridine) is employed as a chemodosimeter to assemble on amphiphilic polymer-coating upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) based on the hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. Upon addition of Hg2+, the nanocomposite not only exhibits a remarkable color change from deep-red to yellow, but also an enhanced upconversion luminescence (UCL) emission by hindering the luminescent resonance energy transfer (LRET) process from the upconversion emission of UCNPs to Ru1. Using the ratiometric UCL emission as a detection signal, the detection limit of Hg2+ for this nanoprobe in aqueous solution is 8.2 ppb, which is much lower than that (329 ppb) determined by UV/Vis technology. Such an Hg2+-tunable LRET process provides a general strategy for fabricating a water-soluble upconversion-based nanoprobe for some special analyte.Upconversion detection nanocomposites were assembled for the selective luminescent detection of mercury ions in water. A hydrophobic cyclometallated ruthenium complex [RuII(bpy)2(thpy)]PF6 (abbreviated as Ru1; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and thpy = 2-(2-thienyl)pyridine) is employed as a chemodosimeter to assemble on amphiphilic polymer-coating upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) based on the hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. Upon addition of Hg2+, the nanocomposite not only exhibits a remarkable color change from deep-red to yellow, but also an enhanced upconversion luminescence (UCL) emission by hindering the luminescent resonance energy transfer (LRET) process from the upconversion emission of UCNPs to Ru1. Using the ratiometric UCL emission as a detection signal, the detection limit of Hg2+ for this nanoprobe in aqueous solution is 8.2 ppb, which is much lower than that (329 ppb) determined by UV/Vis technology

  7. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kyaw, Htet Htet; Boonruang, Sakoolkan E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th; Mohammed, Waleed S. E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-10-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an external electric field in the flow channel. The exerted electrical force on the ions pushes them against the surface for enhanced adsorption; hence it is referred to as “Electric-Field assisted SPR system”. High system sensitivity is achieved by monitoring the time dynamics of the signal shift. The ion deposition dynamics are discussed using a derived theoretical model based on ion mobility in water. On the application of an appropriate force, the target ions stack onto the sensor surface depending on the ionic concentration of target solution, ion mass, and flow rate. In the experimental part, a broad detection range of target cadmium ions (Cd{sup 2+}) in water from several parts per million (ppm) down to a few parts per billion (ppb) can be detected.

  8. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyaw, Htet Htet; Boonruang, Sakoolkan; Mohammed, Waleed S.; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-10-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an external electric field in the flow channel. The exerted electrical force on the ions pushes them against the surface for enhanced adsorption; hence it is referred to as "Electric-Field assisted SPR system". High system sensitivity is achieved by monitoring the time dynamics of the signal shift. The ion deposition dynamics are discussed using a derived theoretical model based on ion mobility in water. On the application of an appropriate force, the target ions stack onto the sensor surface depending on the ionic concentration of target solution, ion mass, and flow rate. In the experimental part, a broad detection range of target cadmium ions (Cd2+) in water from several parts per million (ppm) down to a few parts per billion (ppb) can be detected.

  9. Time-of-flight detection of monoatomic ions generated by femtosecond laser ablation from large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kurata-Nishimura, Mizuki; Okamura-Oho, Yuko; Sano, Takuma; Oyama, Rieko; Matsumura, Yonehiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Matsuo, Yukari; Kawai, Jun

    2008-03-01

    Single-shot femtosecond laser ablation (fsLA) was applied to large molecules to analyze elemental composition through out wide range of mass-to-charge ratio. Molecular samples such as Eu-DNA and cosmetic powders were atomized and ionized simultaneously by the single-shot fsLA and positive atomic ions were detected using a reflectron time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The ratios among the signal intensity of the detected stable isotopes including 151,153Eu and 182-184,186W were consistent with the respective natural abundances of the isotopes. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the fsLA-TOF method as a high-throughput analytical technique for elemental microanalysis of large molecular samples in small quantities.

  10. Ion generation and CPC detection efficiency studies in sub 3-nm size range

    SciTech Connect

    Kangasluoma, J.; Junninen, H.; Sipilae, M.; Kulmala, M.; Petaejae, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mikkilae, J.; Vanhanen, J.; Attoui, M.; Worsnop, D.

    2013-05-24

    We studied the chemical composition of commonly used condensation particle counter calibration ions with a mass spectrometer and found that in our calibration setup the negatively charged ammonium sulphate, sodium chloride and tungsten oxide are the least contaminated whereas silver on both positive and negative and the three mentioned earlier in positive mode are contaminated with organics. We report cut-off diameters for Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6 and 1.6-1.8 nm for negative sodium chloride, ammonium sulphate, tungsten oxide, silver and positive organics, respectively. To study the effect of sample relative humidity on detection efficiency of the PSM we used different humidities in the differential mobility analyzer sheath flow and found that with increasing relative humidity also the detection efficiency of the PSM increases.

  11. Ultra-Sensitive Collinear Fast Ion Beam Trace Detection of {sup 85}Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Lioubimov, V.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.; Belic, M.; Lassen, J.; Iimura, H.; Li, X.

    2009-03-17

    A novel scheme of collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy for the detection of the long lived rare isotope {sup 85}Kr by observing the optical hyperfine structure spectrum is presented. The technique utilizes cascade two-step excitation to pump metastable krypton atoms to a high-lying Rydberg level. The present work on krypton was motivated by the fact that {sup 85}Kr is a major tracer gas for exploring the reservoir structure of large oil fields. {sup 85}Kr detection in ambient air is also of importance for monitoring nuclear activities on a world wide scale. The technique has been successfully applied to stable krypton isotopes and to {sup 85}Kr. The selectivity is at the one part in 10{sup 10} level and the sensitivity at a few hundred ions/s.

  12. Optical detection of lead and potassium ions using a quantum-dot-based aptamer nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Meshik, Xenia; Xu, Ke; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Quantum-dot (QD) based nanosensors can be used to detect a wide range of molecules. This study examined a nanosensor comprised of thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) with 700NC InGaP QD on the 5 (') terminus and an Au nanoparticle quencher on the 3 (') terminus. Both K(+) and Pb(2+) bind to TBA, resulting in a conformational change that brings the Au quencher closer to the QD. Photoluminescence measurements indicated a decrease in fluorescence corresponding to an increase in either K(+) or Pb(2+) concentration. For healthy blood serum K(+) concentrations (3.5-5 mM), the beacon exhibited 15-17% quenching efficiency. Pb(2+) concentration of 0.48 μM, the threshold for toxicity in serum, yielded 14% quenching. The beacon's ability to detect changes in ion levels in a critical range of concentrations can make it an effective diagnostic tool. PMID:24771595

  13. Rapid, quantitative and sensitive immunochromatographic assay based on stripping voltammetric detection of a metal ion label

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Fang; Wang, Kaihua; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-10-10

    A novel, sensitive immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) which combines an immunochromatographic strip technique with an electrochemical detection technique is demonstrated. The IEB takes advantages of the speed and low-cost of the conventional immunochromatographic test kits and high-sensitivity of stripping voltammetry. Bismuth ions (Bi3+) have been coupled with the antibody through the bifunctional chelating agent diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). After immunoreactions, Bi3+ was released and quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry at a built-in single-use screen-printed electrode. As an example for the applications of such novel device, the detection of human chorionic gonadotronphin (HCG) in a specimen was performed. This biosensor provides a more user-friendly, rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive immunoassay for such analysis in specimens than currently available test kits.

  14. Guiding of slow Ne{sup 7+} ions through nanocapillaries in insulating polyethylene terephthalate: Incident current dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Stolterfoht, N.; Hellhammer, R.; Bundesmann, J.; Fink, D.; Kanai, Y.; Kambara, T.; Ikeda, T.; Hoshino, M.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2007-08-15

    The transmission of highly charged ions through nanocapillaries in insulating polyethylene terephthalate (PET) polymers was investigated. In experiments at laboratories in RIKEN (Japan) and HMI (Germany) different detection methods were applied to study the ion current dependence in a wide range covering two orders of magnitude. At HMI an electrostatic ion spectrometer was used and at RIKEN a two-dimensional position sensitive detector was implemented. New PET samples with parallel capillaries and low density were manufactured. For tilted capillaries, the ions are guided along the capillary axis, since the majority of ions are deflected in a charge patch created in the capillary entrance. The results provide insights into the mechanisms of capillary guiding. The fraction of transmitted ions was found to be nearly independent on the incident ion current indicating a sudden increase in the discharge current depleting the entrance charge patch. The experimental results were well-reproduced by model calculations based on a nonlinear (exponential) expression for the discharge current.

  15. Development of Linear Mode Detection for Top-down Ion Implantation of Low Energy Sb Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Jose; Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication of donor spin qubits for quantum computing applications requires deterministic control over the number of implanted donors and the spatial accuracy to within which these can be placed. We present an ion implantation and detection technique that allows us to deterministically implant a single Sb ion (donor) with a resulting volumetric distribution of <10 nm. This donor distribution is accomplished by implanting 30keV Sb into Si which yields a longitudinal straggle of <10 nm and combined with a <50 nm spot size using the Sandia NanoImplanter (nI). The ion beam induced charge signal is collected using a MOS detector that is integrated with a Si quantum dot for transport measurments. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Detection of very large ions in aircraft gas turbine engine combustor exhaust: charged small soot particles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, S.; Haverkamp, H.; Sorokin, A.; Arnold, F.

    Small electrically charged soot particles (CSP) present in the exhaust of a jet aircraft engine combustor have been detected by a Large Ion Mass Spectrometer and quantitatively measured by an Ion Mobility Analyzer. The size and concentration measurements which took place at an aircraft gas-turbine engine combustor test-rig at the ground covered different combustor conditions (fuel flow=FF, fuel sulphur content=FSC). At the high-pressure turbine stage of the engine, CSP-diameters were mostly around 6 nm and CSP-concentrations reached up to 4.8×10 7 cm -3 (positive and negative) corresponding to a CSP-emission index ECSP=2.5×10 15 CSP kg -1 fuel burnt. The ECSP increased with FF but did not increase with FSC. The latter indicates that sulphur was not a major component of the large ions. Possible CSP-sources and CSP-sinks as well as CSP-roles are discussed.

  17. Detection of microlesions induced by heavy ions using liposomes filled with fluorescent dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koniarek, J. P.; Thomas, J. L.; Vazquez, M.

    2004-01-01

    In cells irradiation by heavy ions has been hypothesized to produce microlesions, regions of local damage. In cell membranes this damage is thought to manifest itself in the form of holes. The primary evidence for microlesions comes from morphological studies of cell membranes, but this evidence is still controversial, especially since holes also have been observed in membranes of normal, nonirradiated, cells. However, it is possible that damage not associated with histologically discernable disruptions may still occur. In order to resolve this issue, we developed a system for detecting microlesions based on liposomes filled with fluorescent dye. We hypothesized that if microlesions form in these liposomes as the result of irradiation, then the entrapped dye will leak out into the surrounding medium in a measurable way. Polypropylene vials containing suspensions of vesicles composed of either dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, or a combination of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol were irradiated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory using 56Fe ions at 1 GeV/amu. In several cases we obtained a significant loss of the entrapped dye above the background level. Our results suggest that holes may form in liposomes as the result of heavy ion irradiation, and that these holes are large enough to allow leakage of cell internal contents that are at least as large as a 1 nm diameter calcein molecule. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rhodamine based dual probes for selective detection of mercury and fluoride ions in water using two mutually independent sensing pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Namita; Dey, Nilanjan; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-05-21

    New rhodamine based molecules have been designed as dual probes for the ppb-level selective detection of Hg(2+) and F(-) ions in aqueous medium at physiological pH 7.4. The probes have been designed in such a way to utilize both the properties of the metal ion induced 'turn-on' detection mechanism of the spirolactam ring opening of the rhodamine moiety and the reaction based cleavage of the O-silyl bond in presence of the fluoride ion. The probes have been synthesized conveniently by coupling rhodamine hydrazone with O-silyl protected mono- and di-hydroxybenzaldehydes. Both the probes showed a 'turn-on' detection of the fluoride ion due to the cleavage of the O-silyl bond upon treatment with the added F(-) ion. However, the probes showed selective 'turn-on' detection of Hg(2+) ion by opening of the spirolactam ring. The two detection mechanisms worked in isolation and hence the corresponding spectral responses appeared completely independent of each other. The presence of Hg(2+) in solution induced generation of an intense pink color with bright green fluorescence emission. In contrast a deep yellow color with yellow fluorescence was observed upon addition of the fluoride ion to the probe solution. Two different mechanisms of interactions have been proposed on the basis of (1)H-NMR, IR and mass spectrometric studies. Thus, using a single probe the selective sensing of two different ions could be achieved in aqueous medium well below their permitted limit of detection. PMID:24669370

  19. Handy Compton camera using 3D position-sensitive scintillators coupled with large-area monolithic MPPC arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Kato, T.; Nakamori, T.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    The release of radioactive isotopes (mainly 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I) from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant remains a serious problem in Japan. To help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation, we are developing a novel Compton camera weighting only 1 kg and measuring just ∼10 cm2 in size. Despite its compactness, the camera realizes a wide 180° field of vision with a sensitivity about 50 times superior to other cameras being tested in Fukushima. We expect that a hotspot producing a 5 μSv/h dose at a distance of 3 m can be imaged every 10 s, with angular resolution better than 10° (FWHM). The 3D position-sensitive scintillators and thin monolithic MPPC arrays are the key technologies developed here. By measuring the pulse-height ratio of MPPC-arrays coupled at both ends of a Ce:GAGG scintillator block, the depth of interaction (DOI) is obtained for incident gamma rays as well as the usual 2D positions, with accuracy better than 2 mm. By using two identical 10 mm cubic Ce:GAGG scintillators as a scatterer and an absorber, we confirmed that the 3D configuration works well as a high-resolution gamma camera, and also works as spectrometer achieving typical energy resolution of 9.8% (FWHM) for 662 keV gamma rays. We present the current status of the prototype camera (weighting 1.5 kg and measuring 8.5×14×16 cm3 in size) being fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Although the camera still operates in non-DOI mode, angular resolution as high as 14° (FWHM) was achieved with an integration time of 30 s for the assumed hotspot described above.

  20. Organic Position-Sensitive Detectors Based on ZnO:Al and CuPc:C60.

    PubMed

    Morimune, Taichiro; Kajii, Hirotake; Nishimaru, Hiroki; Ono, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Organic position-sensitive detector (OPSD) based on copper phthalocyanine CuPc:fullerene C60 bulk-heterojunction with an inverted structure have been fabricated using aluminum doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) as a resistive layer, which is prepared by sol-gel method. The resistance length of the one-dimensional PSD is fixed at 5 mm, and the Ag common electrode is fabricated by vacuum evaporation within the 100-µm width. The current density-voltage characteristics with different structures of photodetector, the influence of ZnO:Al resistivity on the thickness and the position characteristics of PSDs are investigated. The experimental results indicate that the architecture, which uses an inverted structure, increases sensitivity under red light illumination compared to the conventional structure. In addition, the thickness of the ZnO:Al has influence on the position characteristics. The resistivity of ZnO:A film with Al doping concentration of 2 mol% prepared in this study is around 150 Ωcm and it increases from less than approximately 400 nm-thickness. These characteristics seem to be correlated with the properties of ZnO:AI resistive layer. For a device with a 620 nm-thick ZnO:Al layer, the measured position values obtained from the output photocurrent agree with the actual position values under red laser light illumination. CuPc:C60 OPSD with an inverted structure exhibits red light sensitivity, high incident-photon-to-current conversion efficiency of above 80% at -3 V and linearity error of 5.9% at -2 V. PMID:27451643

  1. A data acquisition system for two-dimensional position sensitive micropattern gas detectors with delay-line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanu, A. R.; Prestwich, W. V.; Byun, S. H.

    2015-04-01

    We present a data acquisition (DAQ) system for two-dimensional position sensitive micropattern gas detectors using the delay-line method for readout. The DAQ system consists of a field programmable gate array (FPGA) as the main data processor and our time-to-digital (TDC) mezzanine card for making time measurements. We developed the TDC mezzanine card around the Acam TDC-GPX ASIC and it features four independent stop channels referenced to a common start, a typical timing resolution of ~81 ps, and a 17-bit measurement range, and is compliant with the VITA 57.1 standard. For our DAQ system, we have chosen the Xilinx SP601 development kit which features a single Spartan 6 FPGA, 128 MB of DDR2 memory, and a serial USB interface for communication. Output images consist of 1024×1024 square pixels, where each pixel has a 32-bit depth and corresponds to a time difference of 162 ps relative to its neighbours. When configured for a 250 ns acquisition window, the DAQ can resolve periodic event rates up to 1.8×106 Hz without any loses and will report a maximum event rate of 6.11×105 Hz for events whose arrival times follow Poisson statistics. The integral and differential non-linearities have also been measured and are better than 0.1% and 1.5%, respectively. Unlike commercial units, our DAQ system implements the delay-line image reconstruction algorithm entirely in hardware and is particularly attractive for its modularity, low cost, ease of integration, excellent linearity, and high throughput rate.

  2. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar(13+)) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections. PMID:26628124

  3. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Birkl, Gerhard; Andelkovic, Zoran; Vogel, Manuel; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan

    2015-11-15

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles’ beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar{sup 13+}) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  4. Flow Chronopotentiometry with Ion-Selective Membranes for Cation, Anion, and Polyion Detection.

    PubMed

    Ghahraman Afshar, Majid; Crespo, Gastón A; Bakker, Eric

    2016-04-01

    We report here on the development of a chronopotentiometric readout for ion-selective electrodes that allows one to record transition times in continuous flow conditions without the necessity to stop the flow. A sample plug of 150 μL is injected into the carrier solution (0.5 mM NaCl) and subsequently transported to the detection cell (∼20 μL) at moderate flow rates (∼0.5 mL min(-1)), where a short current pulse (5s) is applied between the ionophore-based working electrode and a biocompatible and nonpolarizable Donnan exclusion anion-exchanger membrane reference/counter electrode. Flow conditions bear an influence on the thickness of the aqueous diffusion layer and result in a shift of the chronopotentiometric transition time with respect to stopped flow. Two models based on rotating disk electrodes and flow chronopotentiometry at metal-based electrodes were used to corroborate the data. The method was successfully applied to the determination of calcium, chloride, alkalinity, acidity, and protamine with a range of ion-selective membranes. Because of the limiting exposure time of ca. 20 s of the membranes with the sample, this approach is demonstrated to be useful for the detection of protamine in the therapeutic range of undiluted human blood. PMID:26932542

  5. Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Zhang, Wei; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Watson, David B; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  6. Nonspecific detection of lead ions in water using a simple integrated optical polarimetric interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dan-feng; Li, Jinyang; Qi, Zhi-mei

    2013-06-01

    Real-time detection of heavy metal ions in water was implemented by using a composite optical waveguide (COWG) based polarimetric interferometer. The COWG was made by local deposition of a tapered nanometric layer of high-index materials onto a single-mode slab glass waveguide, and it is a low-cost robust waveguide with a locally large modal birefringence. The COWG-based polarimetric interferometer operates with a single incident laser beam and uses the transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes as the sensing and reference beams, respectively, and it can easily detect 0.1 ppm lead(II) ions in water via nonspecific adsorption on the tapered layer of TiO2. The excellent linearity was obtained between the lead(II) concentration and the ratio of concentration to the phase-difference change (Δϕ), suggesting that adsorption of lead(II) ions on the TiO2 film follows the Langmuir isotherm model. The saturation adsorption leads to Δϕmax = 7.485π. By use of the eigenvalue equations for a homogeneous waveguide to fit the measured refractive-index (RI) sensitivity of the interferometer, the equivalent thickness of Teq = 26.05 nm for the tapered TiO2 layer used was achieved. With Teq = 26.05 nm and Δϕmax = 7.485π and the thickness of 0.264 nm for the lead(II) adlayer, the adlayer RI was derived to be nad ≈ 1.945 at the maximum coverage.

  7. Application of an ion mobility spectrometer with pulsed ionisation source in the detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate and toluene diisocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baether, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Stefan; Gunzer, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a well known technique; offering small size and a sensitivity in the ppb range makes it a typical technique for the detection of explosives or chemical warfare agents. Ordinary IMS devices use in general a continuously working radioactive ionization source. We use a pulsed non-radioactive electron source for ionization which offers the innovative possibility of introducing delay times in between ionization and ion detection. The application and benefits of such a pulsed ionization source in the detection of the chemical warfare agent simulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and the toxic toluene diisocyanate (TDI) will be demonstrated.

  8. Programming nanopore ion flow for encoded multiplex microRNA detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Yong; Fricke, Brandon L; Gu, Li-Qun

    2014-04-22

    Many efforts are being made in translating the nanopore into an ultrasensitive single-molecule platform for various genetic and epigenetic detections. However, compared with current approaches including PCR, the low throughput limits the nanopore applications in biological research and clinical settings, which usually requires simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers for accurate disease diagnostics. Herein we report a barcode probe approach for multiple nucleic acid detection in one nanopore. Instead of directly identifying different targets in a nanopore, we designed a series of barcode probes to encode different targets. When the probe is bound with the target, the barcode group polyethylene glycol attached on the probe through click chemistry can specifically modulate nanopore ion flow. The resulting signature serves as a marker for the encoded target. Therefore counting different signatures in a current recording allows simultaneous analysis of multiple targets in one nanopore. The principle of this approach was verified by using a panel of cancer-derived microRNAs as the target, a type of biomarker for cancer detection. PMID:24654890

  9. A differentially selective molecular probe for detection of trivalent ions (Al(3+), Cr(3+) and Fe(3+)) upon single excitation in mixed aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sima; Manna, Abhishek; Goswami, Shyamaprosad

    2015-07-14

    A chemosensor was developed which could selectively detect and differentiate trivalent metal ions (Al(3+), Cr(3+) and Fe(3+)) upon single excitation at two different wavelengths in aqueous medium. This probe selectively detects trivalent ions in the presence of different metal ions in aqueous medium. It shows an excellent performance in the "dipstick" method. PMID:26051708

  10. Virgin silver nanoparticles as colorimetric nanoprobe for simultaneous detection of iodide and bromide ion in aqueous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothra, Shilpa; Kumar, Rajender; Pati, Ranjan K.; Kuwar, Anil; Choi, Heung-Jin; Sahoo, Suban K.

    2015-10-01

    A simple colorimetric nanoprobe based on virgin silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed for the selective detection of iodide and bromide ions via aggregation and anti-aggregation mechanism. With addition of I- ions, virgin AgNPs, in presence of Fe3+, showed perceptible color change from yellow to colorless along with disappearance of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of AgNPs at 400 nm. But in presence of Cr3+, AgNPs turned yellow upon addition of I-and Br- anions. The developed virgin AgNPs probe showed high specificity and selectivity with the detection limits down to 0.32 μM and 1.32 μM for I- ions via two different mechanistic routes. Also, the designed probe detects Br- with a detection limit down to 1.67 μM.

  11. Virgin silver nanoparticles as colorimetric nanoprobe for simultaneous detection of iodide and bromide ion in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Bothra, Shilpa; Kumar, Rajender; Pati, Ranjan K; Kuwar, Anil; Choi, Heung-Jin; Sahoo, Suban K

    2015-01-01

    A simple colorimetric nanoprobe based on virgin silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed for the selective detection of iodide and bromide ions via aggregation and anti-aggregation mechanism. With addition of I(-) ions, virgin AgNPs, in presence of Fe(3+), showed perceptible color change from yellow to colorless along with disappearance of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of AgNPs at 400 nm. But in presence of Cr(3+), AgNPs turned yellow upon addition of I(-)and Br(-) anions. The developed virgin AgNPs probe showed high specificity and selectivity with the detection limits down to 0.32 μM and 1.32 μM for I(-) ions via two different mechanistic routes. Also, the designed probe detects Br(-) with a detection limit down to 1.67 μM. PMID:25950637

  12. Transmission measurement based on STM observation to detect the penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Sixue; Du, Guanhua; Zhao, Weijiang

    2003-01-01

    The penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples was detected with a new transmission measurement. In the measurement, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) pieces were placed behind the botanic samples with certain thickness. During the irradiation of heavy ions with energy of tens of keV, the energetic particles transmitted from those samples were received by the HOPG pieces. After irradiation, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was applied to observe protrusion-like damage induced by these transmitted ions on the surface of the HOPG. The statistical average number density of protrusions and the minimum transmission rate of the low-energy heavy ions can be obtained. The detection efficiency of the new method for low-energy heavy ions was about 0.1-1 and the background in the measurement can be reduced to as low as 1.0 x 10(8) protrusions/cm2. With this method, the penetration depth of the energetic particles was detected to be no less than 60 micrometers in kidney bean slices when the slices were irradiated by 100 keVAr+ ion at the fluence of 5 x 10(16) ions/cm2. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Amperometric detection of heavy metal ions in ion pair chromatography at an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wilke, S; Wang, H; Muraczewska, M; Müller, H

    1996-09-01

    A novel amperometric detector for heavy metal ions has been developed and successfully applied for ion pair chromatography. The detector is based on the electrochemical transfer of the metal ions across an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces. The ion transfer is facilitated by the neutral ionophores methylenebis(diphenylphosphineoxide) and methylenebis(di- phenylphosphinesulfide). More than eight metals are separated in less than 15 min on an RP18 column using octyl sulfonate as ion pair reagent. For the heavy metals, the limits of decision are 19(Pb(2+)), 9(Zn(2+)), 9l (Co(2+)), 8(Cd(2+)) and 1.6(Mn(2+)) microg/L. The applicability of the new method for water samples is demonstrated. PMID:15048359

  14. A portable lab-on-a-chip system for gold-nanoparticle-based colorimetric detection of metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Zhong, Guowei; Kim, Da-Eun; Liu, Jinxia; Liu, Xinyu

    2014-09-01

    Heavy metal ions released into various water systems have a severe impact on the environment and human beings, and excess exposure to toxic metal ions through drinking water poses high risks to human health and causes life-threatening diseases. Thus, there is high demand for the development of a rapid, low-cost, and sensitive method for detection of metal ions in water. We present a portable analytical system for colorimetric detection of lead (Pb(2+)) and aluminum (Al(3+)) ions in water based on gold nanoparticle probes and lab-on-a-chip instrumentation. The colorimetric detection of metal ions is conducted via single-step assays with low limits of detection (LODs) and high selectivity. We design a custom-made microwell plate and a handheld colorimetric reader for implementing the assays and quantifying the signal readout. The calibration experiments demonstrate that this portable system provides LODs of 30 ppb for Pb(2+) and 89 ppb for Al(3+), both comparable to bench-top analytical spectrometers. It promises an effective platform for metal ion analysis in a more economical and convenient way, which is particularly useful for water quality monitoring in field and resource-poor settings. PMID:25332734

  15. Platinum porous nanoparticles hybrid with metal ions as probes for simultaneous detection of multiplex cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zifeng; Liu, Na; Ma, Zhanfang

    2014-03-15

    In this work, platinum porous nanoparticles (PtPNPs) absorbed metal ions as electrochemical signals were fabricated. Clean-surface PtPNPs were prepared by a surfactant-free method and decorated with amino groups via 2-aminoethanethiol. Amino capped PtPNPs complexation with Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) to form PtPNPs-Cd(2+) and PtPNPs-Cu(2+) hybrids, respectively. Anti-CEA and Anti-AFP separately labeled with PtPNPs-Cd(2+) and PtPNPs-Cu(2+) were used as distinguishable signal tags for capturing antigens. The metal ions were detected in a single run through differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) without acid dissolution, electric potentials and peak heights of which reflected the identity and concentrations of the corresponding antigen. Ionic liquid reduced graphene oxide (IL-rGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was used as a substrate, which was rich in amino groups to immobilize antibodies by glutaraldehyde through cross-link between aldehyde groups and amino groups. Using the proposed probes and platform, a novel sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for simultaneous detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was successfully developed. This immunoassay possessed good linearity from 0.05 ng mL(-1) to 200 ng mL(-1) for both CEA and AFP. The detection limit of CEA was 0.002 ng mL(-1) and that of AFP was 0.05 ng mL(-1) (S/N=3). Furthermore, analysis of clinical serum samples using this immunosensor was well consistent with the data determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It suggested that the proposed electrochemical immunoassay provided a potential application of clinical screening for early-stage cancers. PMID:24176967

  16. A FRET based aptasensor coupled with non-enzymatic signal amplification for mercury (II) ion detection.

    PubMed

    Chu-Mong, Ketsarin; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Buranachai, Chittanon

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the idea of incorporating a non-enzymatic signal amplification with a regular aptasensor was tested. In this proof of principle, the sensor was designed for the detection of mercury (II) ions (Hg(2+)) based on the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), and the catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) technique that was used as the signal amplification method. This sensor comprised a mercury aptamer-catalyst complex (Apt-C) and two types of hairpin DNA: H1 labeled with fluorescein and H2 labeled with tetramethylrhodamine. In the presence of Hg(2+), two facing thymine bases in the mercury aptamer strand were coordinated with one mercury ion. This caused the release of the catalyst for the catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) reaction that turned H1 and H2 hairpins into H1-H2 hybrids. FRET was then used to report the hairpin-duplex transformation. The sensor showed excellent specificity towards Hg(2+) over other possible interfering cations present at even a 100 fold greater concentrations. It had a linear range of 10.0-200.0nM, and a good detection limit of 7.03±0.18nM, which is lower than the regulatory mercury limit for drinking water (10nM or 2ppb). The sensor was used to detect spiked Hg(2+) in nine real surface water samples collected from three different areas. Acceptable recoveries and small standard deviations indicated that the sensor was practically applicable, and the proposed idea to incorporate a CHA amplification in a regular aptasensor was not only feasible but beneficial. The same principles can be applied to develop sensors for various different targets. PMID:27216687

  17. A dual-channel detection of mercuric ions using a label free G-quadruplex-based DNAzyme molecule.

    PubMed

    Ma, Long; Liu, Haiyan; Wu, Guanrong; Sun, Nana; Meng, Lingpei; Li, Yuyin; Liu, Zhenxing; Diao, Aipo

    2016-06-20

    We have constructed a 'turn-off' and label free bio-sensor using a DNAzyme molecule. This facile bio-sensor is capable of selective detection of mercuric ions with a high sensitivity and satisfactory dynamic range. More importantly, it is able to generate both fluorescent and colourimetric signals for detection. This dual-channel bio-sensor is expected to afford high detection confidence and overcome false-positive readout especially when assaying complex biological samples. PMID:27197879

  18. Ion detection with a cryogenic detector compared to a microchannel plate detector in MALDI TOF-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, W H; Frank, M; Labov, S; Westmacott, G; Zhong, F

    1999-06-29

    Detection of molecular ions in mass spectrometry is typically accomplished by an ion colliding with a surface and then amplifying the emitted secondary electrons. It is well established that the secondary electron yield decreases as the mass of the primary ion increases [1-3], thus limiting the detection efficiency of large molecular ions. One way around this limitation is to use secondary ion detectors because the emission efficiency of secondary ions does not seem to decrease for increasing primary ion mass [1]. However this technique has limitations in timing resolution because of the mass spread of the emitted secondary ions. To find other ways around high mass detection limitations it is important to understand existing mechanisms of detection and to explore alternative detector types. To this end, a superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector was used in measuring the secondary electron emission efficiency, se, for a MCP detector. STJ detectors are energy sensitive and do not rely on secondary emission to produce a signal. Using a linear MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer, a STJ detector is mounted directly behind the hole in an annular MCP detector. This mounting arrangement allows ions to be detected simultaneously by each detector. The STJ detector sits in a liquid helium cryostat and is operated at 1.3 K to minimize thermal noise (see [4,5] for more details). Primary ions passing through the center hole of the MCP detector collide with the 0.04 mm{sup 2} STJ surface and generate a detector-pulse that is approximately proportional to the ion's total energy. A mask with a small hole in it was placed in front of the MCP detector so that the MCP and STJ detectors have approximately the same effective active areas. The ion beam diameter near the MCP is over 2.5 cm (measured with a MCP-phosphorus screen detector) and the axial separation of the two detectors is about 4 mm. Both detectors were operated in pulse-counting mode and set to have the same effective

  19. A novel upconversion, fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensor (FRET) for sensitive detection of lead ions in human serum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sai; Xu, Shihan; Zhu, Yongsheng; Xu, Wen; Zhou, Pingwei; Zhou, Chunyang; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2014-11-01

    There has been great progress in the development of fluorescence biosensors based on quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of lead ions. However, most methods are detecting lead ions in aqueous solution rather than in human serum due to the influence of protein autofluorescence in serum excited by visible light. Thus, we developed a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor by choosing the upconversion NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) nanoparticles as the energy donor and the CdTe QDs as the energy acceptor for lead ion detection. It is the first near infrared (NIR)-excited fluorescent probe for determination of lead ions in serum that is capable of overcoming self-luminescence from serum excitation with visible light. The sensor also shows high selectivity, a low detection limit (80 nm) and good linear Stern-Volmer characteristics (R = 0.996), both in the buffer and serum. This biosensor has great potential for versatile applications in lead ion detection in biological and analytical fields. PMID:25184968

  20. Integrating a DNA Strand Displacement Reaction with a Whispering Gallery Mode Sensor for Label-Free Mercury (II) Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengchi; Wu, Yuqiang; Niu, Zhongwei; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is an extremely toxic chemical pollutant of our environment. It has attracted the world's attention due to its high mobility and the ease with which it accumulates in organisms. Sensitive devices and methods specific for detecting mercury ions are, hence, in great need. Here, we have integrated a DNA strand displacement reaction with a whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensor for demonstrating the detection of Hg(2+) ions. Our approach relies on the displacement of a DNA hairpin structure, which forms after the binding of mercury ions to an aptamer DNA sequence. The strand displacement reaction of the DNA aptamer provides highly specific and quantitative means for determining the mercury ion concentration on a label-free WGM sensor platform. Our approach also shows the possibility for manipulating the kinetics of a strand displacement reaction with specific ionic species. PMID:27483277

  1. Highly sensitive and selective detection of Al(III) ions in aqueous buffered solution with fluorescent peptide-based sensor.

    PubMed

    In, Byunggyu; Hwang, Gi Won; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2016-09-15

    A fluorescent sensor based on a tripeptide (SerGluGlu) with a dansyl fluorophore detected selectively Al(III) among 16 metal ions in aqueous buffered solutions without any organic cosolvent. The peptide-based sensor showed a highly sensitive turn on response to aluminium ion with high binding affinity (1.84×10(4)M(-1)) in aqueous buffered solutions. The detection limit (230nM, 5.98ppb) of the peptide-based sensor was much lower than the maximum allowable level (7.41μM) of aluminium ions in drinking water demanded by EPA. The binding mode of the peptide sensor with aluminium ions was characterized using ESI mass spectrometry, NMR titration, and pH titration experiments. PMID:27503680

  2. Detection of a new interstellar molecular ion, H2COH+ (protonated formaldehyde).

    PubMed

    Ohishi, M; Ishikawa, S I; Amano, T; Oka, H; Irvine, W M; Dickens, J E; Ziurys, L M; Apponi, A J

    1996-11-01

    A new interstellar molecular ion, H2COH+ (protonated formaldehyde), has been detected toward Sgr B2, Orion KL, W51, and possibly in NGC 7538 and DR21(OH). Six transitions were detected in Sgr B2(M). The 1(1,0)-1(0,1) transition was detected in all sources listed above. Searches were also made toward the cold, dark clouds TMC-1 and L134N, Orion (3N, 1E), and a red giant, IRC + 10216, without success. The excitation temperatures of H2COH+ are calculated to be 60-110 K, and the column densities are on the order of 10(12)-10(14) cm-2 in Sgr B2, Orion KL, and W51. The fractional abundance of H2COH+ is on the order of 10(-11) to 10-(9), and the ratio of H2COH+ to H2CO is in the range 0.001-0.5 in these objects. The values in Orion KL seem to be consistent with the "early time" values of recent model calculations by Lee, Bettens, & Herbst, but they appear to be higher than the model values in Sgr B2 and W51 even if we take the large uncertainties of column densities of H2CO into account. We suggest production routes starting from CH3OH may play an important role in the formation of H2COH+. PMID:11541244

  3. Nanomaterial-based optical sensors for sensitive detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shasha; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-07-01

    Nanometerial-based optical nanoprobes have been extensively developed because of their high sensitivity, good specificity, and potential for easy quantification of species in chemical and biological analysis. With the development of nanotechnology, various kinds of nanomaterials with novel optical properties have heen generated, laying the foundation of optical nanoprobes. By further integrating receptors (chemical ligand, aptamer, molecular imprinting polymer, etc.), the information of binding specific targets will transform into analytically optical signals by employing different detection techniques including colorimetry/UV-Vis spectra, fluorometry and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this presentation, firstly, we introduced a simple, rapid and ultrasensitive SERS nanosensor for mercury ion (Hg2+) detection based on the 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPY) functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the presence of spermine; then, a novel colorimetric nanosensor for mercury species was developed for the first time due to the analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the assistance of a thiol-containing ligand of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC); finally, the sensitive and selective recognition and detection of trypsin was realized in a SERS strategy by using anti-aggregation of 4-MPY-functionalized AgNPs on the basis of the interaction between protamine and trypsin.

  4. MoS2-based nanoprobes for detection of silver ions in aqueous solutions and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Liu, Teng; Cheng, Liang; Song, Guosheng; Liu, Zhuang; Chen, Meiwan

    2015-04-15

    Silver as an extensively used antibacterial agent also poses potential threats to the environment and human health. Hence, in this work, we design a fluorescent nanoprobe by using rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RhoBS) adsorbed MoS2 nanosheets to realize sensitive and selective detection of Ag(+). On the surface of RhoBS-loaded MoS2 nanosheets, Ag(+) can be reduced to Ag nanoparticles, which afterward could not only lead to the detachment of RhoBS molecules and thus their recovered fluorescence but also the surface-enhanced fluorescence from RhoBS remaining adsorbed on MoS2. Such an interesting mechanism allows highly sensitive detection of Ag(+) (down to 10 nM) with great selectivity among other metal ions. Moreover, we further demonstrate that our MoS2-RhoBS complex could act as a nontoxic nanoprobe to detect Ag(+) in live bacteria samples. Our work resulted from an unexpected finding and suggests the promise of two-dimensional transition-metal sulfide nanosheets as a novel platform for chemical and biological sensing. PMID:25776005

  5. Development of Voltammetric Double-Polymer-Modified Electrodes for Nanomolar Ion Detection for Environmental and Biological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yushin

    Qualitative and quantitative electrochemical methods for trace ion analysis of organic and inorganic species with environmental and biological attention have been developed and reported during past decades. The development of fast and accurate electrochemical methods is critical for field applications with various blocking contaminants. Voltammetric method is attractive not only to analyze selective ion species due to its characteristic based on ion lipophilicity, but also to lower the limit of detection by combining with stripping analysis. In my PhD work, I have developed and studied a highly selective and sensitive electrochemical method that can be used to characterize fundamental transport dynamics and to develop electrochemical sensors at liquid/liquid interfaces based on electrochemically-controlled ion transfer and recognition. The understanding of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the voltammetric ion transfer through polymer-modified ion-selective electrodes leads to realize the highly selective and sensitive analytical method. The ultrathin polymer membrane is used to maximize a current response by complete exhaustion of preconcentrated ions. Therefore, nanomolar detection is achieved and confirmed by a thermodynamic mechanism that controls the detection limit. It was also demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that more lipophilic ionic species gives a significantly lower detection limit. The voltammetric method was expanded into inexpensive and disposable applications based on pencil lead modified with the thin polymer membrane. In the other hand, micropipet/nanopipet voltammetry as an artificial cell membrane was used to study the interface between two immiscible solutions for environmental and biomedical applications. It is very useful to get quantitative kinetic and thermodynamic information by studying numerical simulations of ion transfer and diffusion. Molecular recognition and transport of heparin and low

  6. Colocalization of the ganglioside G(M1) and cholesterol detected by secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Mónica M; Liu, Zhao; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas; Kumar, Krishna; Boxer, Steven G

    2013-04-17

    The characterization of the lateral organization of components in biological membranes and the evolution of this arrangement in response to external triggers remain a major challenge. The concept of lipid rafts is widely invoked; however, direct evidence of the existence of these ephemeral entities remains elusive. We report here the use of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to image the cholesterol-dependent cohesive phase separation of the ganglioside GM1 into nano- and microscale assemblies in a canonical lipid raft composition of lipids. This assembly of domains was interrogated in a model membrane system composed of palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), cholesterol, and an unsaturated lipid (dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, DOPC). Orthogonal isotopic labeling of every lipid bilayer component and monofluorination of GM1 allowed generation of molecule specific images using a NanoSIMS. Simultaneous detection of six different ion species in SIMS, including secondary electrons, was used to generate ion ratio images whose signal intensity values could be correlated to composition through the use of calibration curves from standard samples. Images of this system provide the first direct, molecule specific, visual evidence for the colocalization of cholesterol and GM1 in supported lipid bilayers and further indicate the presence of three compositionally distinct phases: (1) the interdomain region; (2) micrometer-scale domains (d > 3 μm); (3) nanometer-scale domains (d = 100 nm to 1 μm) localized within the micrometer-scale domains and the interdomain region. PSM-rich, nanometer-scale domains prefer to partition within the more ordered, cholesterol-rich/DOPC-poor/GM1-rich micrometer-scale phase, while GM1-rich, nanometer-scale domains prefer to partition within the surrounding, disordered, cholesterol-poor/PSM-rich/DOPC-rich interdomain phase. PMID:23514537

  7. Improved electron ionization ion source for the detection of supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirav, Aviv; Fialkov, Alexander; Gordin, Alexander

    2002-08-01

    An improved electron ionization (EI) ion source is described, based on the modification of a Brink-type EI ion source through the addition of a second cage with a fine mesh outside the ion chamber. The added outer cage shields the inner ion cage (ionization zone) against the penetration of the filament and electron repeller potentials, and thus results in the provision of ions with narrower ion energy distribution, hence improved ion-beam quality. The closer to zero electrical field inside the ion cage enables improved filtration (rejection) of ions that are produced from vacuum background compounds, based on difference in ion energies of beam and background species. The improved background ion filtration and ion-beam quality resulted in 2.6 times higher mass spectrometric ion signal, combined with 6.4 times better signal to noise ratio, in comparison with the same ion source having a single cage. The dual cage ion source further provides a smaller or no reduction of the electron emission current upon lowering the electron energy for achieving softer EI and/or electron attachment ionization. It also improves the long-term mass spectral and signal reproducibility and enables fast, automated change of the electron energy. Consequently, the dual cage EI ion source is especially effective for use with gas chromatography mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams (SMB), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with SMB, ion guns with SMB, and any other experimental systems with SMB or nonthermal molecular beams.

  8. Tuning Piezo ion channels to detect molecular-scale movements relevant for fine touch

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Kate; Herget, Regina; Lapatsina, Liudmila; Ngo, Ha-Duong; Lewin, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    In sensory neurons, mechanotransduction is sensitive, fast and requires mechanosensitive ion channels. Here we develop a new method to directly monitor mechanotransduction at defined regions of the cell-substrate interface. We show that molecular-scale (~13 nm) displacements are sufficient to gate mechanosensitive currents in mouse touch receptors. Using neurons from knockout mice, we show that displacement thresholds increase by one order of magnitude in the absence of stomatin-like protein 3 (STOML3). Piezo1 is the founding member of a class of mammalian stretch-activated ion channels, and we show that STOML3, but not other stomatin-domain proteins, brings the activation threshold for Piezo1 and Piezo2 currents down to ~10 nm. Structure–function experiments localize the Piezo modulatory activity of STOML3 to the stomatin domain, and higher-order scaffolds are a prerequisite for function. STOML3 is the first potent modulator of Piezo channels that tunes the sensitivity of mechanically gated channels to detect molecular-scale stimuli relevant for fine touch. PMID:24662763

  9. The assessment of cholinesterase from the liver of Puntius javanicus as detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan; Sulaiman, Mohd Rosni; Abd Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Syed, Mohd Arif; Shamaan, Nor Aripin; Khalid, Ariff; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima

    2014-01-01

    Crude extract of ChE from the liver of Puntius javanicus was purified using procainamide-sepharyl 6B. S-Butyrylthiocholine iodide (BTC) was selected as the specific synthetic substrate for this assay with the highest maximal velocity and lowest biomolecular constant at 53.49 µmole/min/mg and 0.23 mM, respectively, with catalytic efficiency ratio of 0.23. The optimum parameter was obtained at pH 7.5 and optimal temperature in the range of 25 to 30°C. The effect of different storage condition was assessed where ChE activity was significantly decreased after 9 days of storage at room temperature. However, ChE activity showed no significant difference when stored at 4.0, 0, and -25°C for 15 days. Screening of heavy metals shows that chromium, copper, and mercury strongly inhibited P. javanicus ChE by lowering the activity below 50%, while several pairwise combination of metal ions exhibited synergistic inhibiting effects on the enzyme which is greater than single exposure especially chromium, copper, and mercury. The results showed that P. javanicus ChE has the potential to be used as a biosensor for the detection of metal ions. PMID:25401148

  10. Ultrafast state detection and 2D ion crystals in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Michael; Ransford, Anthony; Campbell, Wesley

    2016-05-01

    Projective readout of quantum information stored in atomic qubits typically uses state-dependent CW laser-induced fluorescence. This method requires an often sophisticated imaging system to spatially filter out the background CW laser light. We present an alternative approach that instead uses simple pulse sequences from a mode-locked laser to affect the same state-dependent excitations in less than 1 ns. The resulting atomic fluorescence occurs in the dark, allowing the placement of non-imaging detectors right next to the atom to improve the qubit state detection efficiency and speed. We also study 2D Coulomb crystals of atomic ions in an oblate Paul trap. We find that crystals with hundreds of ions can be held in the trap, potentially offering an alternative to the use of Penning traps for the quantum simulation of 2D lattice spin models. We discuss the classical physics of these crystals and the metastable states that are supported in 2D. This work is supported by the US Army Research Office.

  11. Chemically Modulated Carbon Nitride Nanosheets for Highly Selective Electrochemiluminescent Detection of Multiple Metal-ions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixin; Shang, Qiuwei; Shen, Yanfei; Zhang, Linqun; Zhang, Yuye; Lv, Yanqin; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-06-01

    Chemical structures of two-dimensional (2D) nanosheet can effectively control the properties thus guiding their applications. Herein, we demonstrate that carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNS) with tunable chemical structures can be obtained by exfoliating facile accessible bulk carbon nitride (CN) of different polymerization degree. Interestingly, the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) properties of as-prepared CNNS were significantly modulated. As a result, unusual changes for different CNNS in quenching of ECL because of inner filter effect/electron transfer and enhancement of ECL owing to catalytic effect were observed by adding different metal ions. On the basis of this, by using various CNNS, highly selective ECL sensors for rapid detecting multiple metal-ions such as Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Cd(2+) were successfully developed without any labeling and masking reagents. Multiple competitive mechanisms were further revealed to account for such enhanced selectivity in the proposed ECL sensors. The strategy of preparing CNNS with tunable chemical structures that facilely modulated the optical properties would open a vista to explore 2D carbon-rich materials for developing a wide range of applications such as sensors with enhanced performances. PMID:27187874

  12. The Assessment of Cholinesterase from the Liver of Puntius Javanicus as Detection of Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan; Sulaiman, Mohd Rosni; Shukor, Mohd Yunus Abd; Syed, Mohd Arif

    2014-01-01

    Crude extract of ChE from the liver of Puntius javanicus was purified using procainamide-sepharyl 6B. S-Butyrylthiocholine iodide (BTC) was selected as the specific synthetic substrate for this assay with the highest maximal velocity and lowest biomolecular constant at 53.49 µmole/min/mg and 0.23 mM, respectively, with catalytic efficiency ratio of 0.23. The optimum parameter was obtained at pH 7.5 and optimal temperature in the range of 25 to 30°C. The effect of different storage condition was assessed where ChE activity was significantly decreased after 9 days of storage at room temperature. However, ChE activity showed no significant difference when stored at 4.0, 0, and −25°C for 15 days. Screening of heavy metals shows that chromium, copper, and mercury strongly inhibited P. javanicus ChE by lowering the activity below 50%, while several pairwise combination of metal ions exhibited synergistic inhibiting effects on the enzyme which is greater than single exposure especially chromium, copper, and mercury. The results showed that P. javanicus ChE has the potential to be used as a biosensor for the detection of metal ions. PMID:25401148

  13. Using L-arginine-functionalized gold nanorods for visible detection of mercury(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jiehao; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2015-04-01

    A rapid and simple approach for visible determination of mercury ions (Hg(2+) ) in aqueous solutions was developed based on surface plasmon resonance phenomenon using L-arginine-functionalized gold nanorods (AuNRs). At pH greater than 9, the deprotonated amine group of L-arginine on the AuNRs bound with Hg(2+) leading to the side-by-side assembly of AuNRs, which was verified by transmission electron microscopy images. Thus, when Hg(2+) was present in the test solution, a blue shift of the typical longitudinal plasmon band of the AuNRs was observed in the ultra violet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) spectra, along with a change in the color of the solution, which occurred within 5 min. After carefully optimizing the potential factors affecting the performance, the L-arginine/AuNRs sensing system was found to be highly sensitive to Hg(2+) , with the limit of detection of 5 nM (S/N = 3); it is also very selective and free of interference from 10 other metal ions (Ba(2+) , Ca(2+) , Cd(2+) , Co(2+) , Cs(+) , Cu(2+) , K(+) , Li(+) , Ni(2+) , Pb(2+) ). The result suggests that the L-arginine-functionalized AuNRs can potentially serve as a rapid, sensitive, and easy-to-use colorimetric biosensor useful for determining Hg(2+) in food and environmental samples. PMID:25754066

  14. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder. Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Lamarche, Brian L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-09-05

    We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

  15. A planar ion trapping microdevice with integrated planar waveguide for optical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ms. Linan; Whitten, William B; Pau, Dr. Stanley

    2011-01-01

    A planar ion trap with an integrated waveguide was fabricated and characterized. The microdevice, consisting of a 1 mm-diameter one-hole ring trap and multi-mode optical waveguides, was made on a glass wafer using microfabrication techniques. The experimental results demonstrate that the microdevice can trap 1.5 m-150 m diameter charged particles in air under an alternating electric field with the amplitude and frequency varying from 100V-750V, and 100Hz-700Hz, respectively. The on-chip waveguide is capable of detecting the presence of a particle in the trap, and the particle secular motion frequency was found to depend on the input alternating signal amplitude and frequency.

  16. Novel indole based dual responsive "turn-on" chemosensor for fluoride ion detection.

    PubMed

    Jeyanthi, Dharmaraj; Iniya, Murugan; Krishnaveni, Karuppiah; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2015-02-01

    An efficient new dual channel chemosensor 2,3-bis((E)-(1H-indole-3-yl)methyleneamino)maleonitrile (DN) which exhibits selective sensing of F(-) ions in DMSO, was synthesized by a facile one step condensation reaction of indole-3-carboxaldehyde with diaminomaleonitrile. The probe DN was characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H, (13)C-NMR, ESI-MS and IR spectral techniques. Upon addition of F(-), DN induces remarkable changes in both absorption and fluorescence spectra on the basis of charge transfer mechanism. The receptor DN serves for highly selective, sensitive detection of F(-) without the interference of other relevant anions. The Job's plot analysis indicates the binding stoichiometry to be 1:1 (host/guest). PMID:25456669

  17. Rapid Short-Read Sequencing and Aneuploidy Detection Using MinION Nanopore Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shan; Williams, Zev

    2016-01-01

    MinION is a memory stick–sized nanopore-based sequencer designed primarily for single-molecule sequencing of long DNA fragments (>6 kb). We developed a library preparation and data-analysis method to enable rapid real-time sequencing of short DNA fragments (<1 kb) that resulted in the sequencing of 500 reads in 3 min and 40,000–80,000 reads in 2–4 hr at a rate of 30 nt/sec. We then demonstrated the clinical applicability of this approach by performing successful aneuploidy detection in prenatal and miscarriage samples with sequencing in <4 hr. This method broadens the application of nanopore-based single-molecule sequencing and makes it a promising and versatile tool for rapid clinical and research applications. PMID:26500254

  18. A mitochondria-targeted ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe for biological zinc ions detection.

    PubMed

    Ning, Peng; Jiang, Jiacheng; Li, Longchun; Wang, Shuxin; Yu, Haizhu; Feng, Yan; Zhu, Manzhou; Zhang, Buchang; Yin, Hang; Guo, Qingxiang; Meng, Xiangming

    2016-03-15

    A mitochondria-targeted ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe (Mito-MPVQ) for biological zinc ions detection was developed based on quinolone platform. Mito-MPVQ showed large red shifts (68 nm) and selective ratiometric signal upon Zn(2+) binding. The ratio of emission intensity (I488 nm/I420 nm) increases dramatically from 0.45 to 3.79 (ca. 8-fold). NMR titration and theoretical calculation confirmed the binding of Mito-MPVQ and Zn(2+). Mito-MPVQ also exhibited large two-photon absorption cross sections (150 GM) at nearly 720 nm and insensitivity to pH within the biologically relevant pH range. Cell imaging indicated that Mito-MPVQ could efficiently located in mitochondria and monitor mitochondrial Zn(2+) under two-photon excitation with low cytotoxicity. PMID:26528806

  19. New detection system and signal processing for the tokamak ISTTOK heavy ion beam diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, R. B.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Malaquias, A.; Fernandes, H.

    2012-10-15

    The tokamak ISTTOK heavy ion beam diagnostic (HIBD) operates with a multiple cell array detector (MCAD) that allows for the plasma density and the plasma density fluctuations measurements simultaneously at different sampling volumes across the plasma. To improve the capability of the plasma density fluctuations investigations, a new detection system and new signal conditioning amplifier have been designed and tested. The improvements in MCAD design are presented which allow for nearly complete suppression of the spurious plasma background signal by applying a biasing potential onto special electrodes incorporated into MCAD. The new low cost and small size transimpedance amplifiers are described with the parameters of 400 kHz, 10{sup 7} V/A, 0.4 nA of RMS noise, adequate for the plasma density fluctuations measurements.

  20. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, S.H.; Hart, K.J.; Vass, A.A.; Wise, M.B.; Wolf, D.A.

    1999-06-14

    Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Simulants A new detector for chemical and biological agents is being developed for the U. S. Army under the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II program. The CBMS Block II is designed to optimize detection of both chemical and biological agents through the use of direct sampling inlets [I], a multi- ported sampling valve and a turbo- based vacuum system to support chemical ionization. Unit mass resolution using air as the buffer gas [2] has been obtained using this design. Software to control the instrument and to analyze the data generated from the instrument has also been newly developed. Detection of chemical agents can be accomplished. using the CBMS Block II design via one of two inlets - a l/ I 6'' stainless steel sample line -Chemical Warfare Air (CW Air) or a ground probe with enclosed capillary currently in use by the US Army - CW Ground. The Block II design is capable of both electron ionization and chemical ionization. Ethanol is being used as the Cl reagent based on a study indicating best performance for the Biological Warfare (BW) detection task (31). Data showing good signal to noise for 500 pg of methyl salicylate injected into the CW Air inlet, 50 ng of dimethylmethylphosphonate exposed to the CW Ground probe and 5 ng of methyl stearate analyzed using the pyrolyzer inlet were presented. Biological agents are sampled using a ''bio-concentrator'' unit that is designed to concentrate particles in the low micron range. Particles are collected in the bottom of a quartz pyrolyzer tube. An automated injector is being developed to deliver approximately 2 pL of a methylating reagent, tetramethylamonium- hydroxide to 'the collected particles. Pyrolysis occurs by rapid heating to ca. 55OOC. Biological agents are then characterized by their fatty acid methyl ester profiles and by other biomarkers. A library of ETOH- Cl/ pyrolysis MS data of microorganisms used for a recently published study [3] has been

  1. Rapid detection of CW residues on soil using an ion trap SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Ingram, J.C.; Dahl, D.A.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    Technology for the rapid detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) residues on soil samples is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The development effort is being undertaken because of a need for rapid and specific characterization for possibly contaminated soils samples, preferably in the field. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is being pursued for these applications because SIMS combines rapid, specific and sensitive surface analyses with the potential for small instrument size. This latter attribute suggests that field characterization using SIMS is possible, and this avenue is being supported by the Army at the INEEL. This paper describes ongoing development efforts focused on the development of small-scale, transportable SIMS instrumentation, and on the application of the technology to likely contamination scenarios.

  2. Boosting the Detection Potential of Liquid Chromatography-Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using a Ceramic Coated Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Termopoli, Veronica; Cappiello, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Detection of target and non-target substances and their characterization in complex samples is a challenging task. Here we demonstrate that coating the electron ionization (EI) ion source of an LC-MS system with a sol-gel ceramic film can drastically improve the detection of high-molecular weight and high-boiling analytes. A new ion source coated with a ceramic material was developed and tested with a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with an increasing number of rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those for an uncoated stainless steel (SS) ion source shows a dramatic improvement in the MS signals, with a nearly 40-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio. We also demonstrate the ability of the new system to produce excellent chromatographic profiles for hard-to-detect hormones.

  3. Boosting the Detection Potential of Liquid Chromatography-Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using a Ceramic Coated Ion Source.

    PubMed

    Magrini, Laura; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Termopoli, Veronica; Cappiello, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Detection of target and non-target substances and their characterization in complex samples is a challenging task. Here we demonstrate that coating the electron ionization (EI) ion source of an LC-MS system with a sol-gel ceramic film can drastically improve the detection of high-molecular weight and high-boiling analytes. A new ion source coated with a ceramic material was developed and tested with a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with an increasing number of rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those for an uncoated stainless steel (SS) ion source shows a dramatic improvement in the MS signals, with a nearly 40-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio. We also demonstrate the ability of the new system to produce excellent chromatographic profiles for hard-to-detect hormones. PMID:26350384

  4. Sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions by fluorescent Ag nanoclusters synthesized via a hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Ren, Xiangling; Meng, Xianwei; Fang, Zheng; Tang, Fangqiong

    2013-09-01

    An easily prepared fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions was developed here. The Ag NCs were synthesized by using polymethacrylic acid sodium salt as a template via a convenient hydrothermal process. The as-prepared fluorescent Ag NCs were monodispersed, uniform and less than 2 nm in diameter, and can be quenched in the presence of mercury (Hg2+) or copper (Cu2+) ions. Excellent linear relationships existed between the quenching degree of the Ag NCs and the concentrations of Hg2+ or Cu2+ ions in the range of 10 nM to 20 μM or 10 nM to 30 μM, respectively. By using ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) as the masking agent of Cu2+, Hg2+ was exclusively detected in coexistence with Cu2+ with high sensitivity (LOD = 10 nM), which also provided a reusable detection method for Cu2+. Furthermore, the different quenching phenomena caused by the two metals ions such as changes in visible colour, shifts of UV absorbance peaks and changes in size of Ag NCs make it easy to distinguish between them. Therefore the easily synthesized fluorescent Ag NCs may have great potential as Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions sensors.An easily prepared fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions was developed here. The Ag NCs were synthesized by using polymethacrylic acid sodium salt as a template via a convenient hydrothermal process. The as-prepared fluorescent Ag NCs were monodispersed, uniform and less than 2 nm in diameter, and can be quenched in the presence of mercury (Hg2+) or copper (Cu2+) ions. Excellent linear relationships existed between the quenching degree of the Ag NCs and the concentrations of Hg2+ or Cu2+ ions in the range of 10 nM to 20 μM or 10 nM to 30 μM, respectively. By using ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) as the masking agent of Cu2+, Hg2+ was exclusively detected in coexistence with Cu2+ with high sensitivity (LOD = 10 nM), which also provided a

  5. New method for comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents using an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kishi, Shintaro; Makita, Mika; Nagamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Toda, Masayoshi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a detection technology for vapor forms of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) with an element analysis system using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. After the vapor sample was introduced directly into the ion source, the molecular material was decomposed into elements using electron cyclotron resonance plasma and ionized. The following CWAs and stimulants were examined: diisopropyl fluorophosphonate (DFP), 2-chloroethylethylsulfide (2CEES), cyanogen chloride (CNCl), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The type of chemical warfare agents, specifically, whether it was a nerve agent, blister agent, blood agent, or choking agent, could be determined by measuring the quantities of the monatomic ions or CN(+) using mass spectrometry. It was possible to detect gaseous CWAs that could not be detected by a conventional mass spectrometer. The distribution of electron temperature in the plasma could be closely controlled by adjusting the input power of the microwaves used to generate the electron cyclotron resonance plasma, and the target compounds could be detected as molecular ions or fragment ions, enabling identification of the target agents. PMID:21242103

  6. New method for comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents using an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kishi, Shintaro; Makita, Mika; Nagamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Toda, Masayoshi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a detection technology for vapor forms of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) with an element analysis system using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. After the vapor sample was introduced directly into the ion source, the molecular material was decomposed into elements using electron cyclotron resonance plasma and ionized. The following CWAs and stimulants were examined: diisopropyl fluorophosphonate (DFP), 2-chloroethylethylsulfide (2CEES), cyanogen chloride (CNCl), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The type of chemical warfare agents, specifically, whether it was a nerve agent, blister agent, blood agent, or choking agent, could be determined by measuring the quantities of the monatomic ions or CN + using mass spectrometry. It was possible to detect gaseous CWAs that could not be detected by a conventional mass spectrometer. The distribution of electron temperature in the plasma could be closely controlled by adjusting the input power of the microwaves used to generate the electron cyclotron resonance plasma, and the target compounds could be detected as molecular ions or fragment ions, enabling identification of the target agents.

  7. Electrochemical sensor for glutathione detection based on mercury ion triggered hybridization chain reaction signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghong; Jiang, Lun; Leng, Qinggang; Wu, Yaohui; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we design a new simple and highly sensitive strategy for electrochemical detection of glutathione (GSH) via mercury ion (Hg(2+)) triggered hybridization chain reaction (HCR) signal amplification. It is observed that in the absence of GSH, a specific thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination can fold into hairpin structures. While in the presence of GSH, it thus can be chelated with Hg(2+), resulting in Hg(2+) released from the T-Hg(2+)-T hairpin complex which then forms into ssDNA structure to further hybridize with the surface-immobilized capture DNA probe on the gold electrode with a sticky tail left. The presence of two hairpin helper probes through HCR leads to the formation of extended dsDNA superstructure on the electrode surface, which therefore causes the intercalation of numerous electroactive species ([Ru(NH3)6](3+)) into the dsDNA grooves, followed by a significantly amplified signal output whose intensity is related to the concentration of the GSH. Taking advantage of merits of enzyme-free amplification power of the HCR, the inherent high sensitivity of the electrochemical technique, and label-free detection which utilizes an electroactive species as a signaling molecule that binds to the anionic phosphate backbone of DNA strands via electrostatic force, not only does the proposed strategy enable sensitive detection of GSH, but show high selectivity against other amino acid, making our method a simple and sensitive addition to the amplified GSH detection. PMID:26528805

  8. Application of mercapto ordered carbohydrate-derived porous carbons for trace detection of cadmium and copper ions in agricultural products.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mohammad; Abolhasani, Jafar; Amini, Mostafa M; Sadeghi, Omid; Omidi, Fariborz; Bagheri, Akbar; Salarian, Mani

    2015-04-15

    In this paper, we have introduced nanoporous carbon modified with mercapto groups as a new solid-phase method for extraction of cadmium(II) and copper(II) ions. The modified nanoporous carbon sorbent was characterised by thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption surface area (BET) measurements. Effects of pH value, flow rates, type, concentration and volume of the eluent, breakthrough volume, and effect of other ions were studied. The experimental results show that simultaneous trace cadmium(II) and copper(II) ions can be quantitatively preconcentrated at pH 6.0 with recoveries >97%. Under optimised conditions, limits of detection are 0.04 and 0.09 ng mL(-1) for the ions of cadmium and copper respectively, and the precision of the method for analysis of cadmium and copper ions (5.0 μg of each target ions, N=8) are 2.4% and 2.1%, respectively. The obtained capacities of mercapto-nanoporous carbon were found to be 145 and 95 mg g(-1) for cadmium and copper ions, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was verified by analysing standard reference material. Finally, the introduced sorbent was successfully applied for trace determination of cadmium and copper ions in food samples. PMID:25466145

  9. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-25

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs. PMID:25305618

  10. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E.; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs.

  11. Systematic Design of a Quorum Sensing-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Detection of Metal Ion in Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Bing-Kun; Hu, Rei-Hsing; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-06-01

    With the recent industrial expansion, heavy metals and other pollutants have increasingly contaminated our living surroundings. The non-degradability of heavy metals may lead to accumulation in food chains and the resulting toxicity could cause damage in organisms. Hence, detection techniques have gradually received attention. In this study, a quorum sensing (QS)-based amplifier is introduced to improve the detection performance of metal ion biosensing. The design utilizes diffusible signal molecules, which freely pass through the cell membrane into the environment to communicate with others. Bacteria cooperate via the cell-cell communication process, thereby displaying synchronous behavior, even if only a minority of the cells detect the metal ion. In order to facilitate the design, the ability of the engineered biosensor to detect metal ion is described in a steady state model. The design can be constructed according to user-oriented specifications by selecting adequate components from corresponding libraries, with the help of a genetic algorithm (GA)-based design method. The experimental results validate enhanced efficiency and detection performance of the quorum sensing-based biosensor of metal ions. PMID:26800545

  12. Ion-chromatographic determination of carbocisteine in pharmaceuticals based on non-suppressed conductimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Megoulas, Nikolaos C; Koupparis, Michael A

    2004-02-13

    A novel method for the determination of carbocisteine (S-CMC), a mucolytic and expectorant drug with an acidic amino acid structure, was developed and validated, using non-suppressed ion-chromatographic system with conductimetric detection, and anion or cation exchange columns. Among the various combinations of column type and eluent composition tested, a cation exchange column with a 0.25 mM tri-fluoroacetic acid (TFA) as eluent in isocratic mode at 1.2 ml/min gave the best results. S-CMC was very well separated from all common amino acids (resolution > 2.6). The retention time was 3.5 min and the asymmetry factor 1.1. A linear calibration curve from 17 to 400 microg/ml (r = 0.99994), with a detection limit of 0.14 microg (5.6 microg/ml-25 microl injection volume) and a precision of 1.5% R.S.D. (100 microg/ml, n = 3) was achieved. The proposed method was applied for the determination of S-CMC content in intensely colored commercial formulations (syrups). No interference from excipients was found and the only pretreatment step was the appropriate dilution with the mobile phase. Recovery from standard additions was ranged from 96.0 to 104.9% and precision (R.S.D., n = 3) 1.8-3.6%. PMID:14763743

  13. Detection of explosives as negative ions directly from surfaces using a miniature mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Nathaniel L; Kothari, Sameer; Huang, Guangming; Salazar, Gary; Cooks, R Graham

    2010-06-15

    A miniature mass spectrometer was modified by incorporating a conversion dynode detector system and the appropriate electronics to allow the detection of negatively charged ions. The system was fitted with a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface to allow external ionization by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). It was used to identify the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl-N-methylnitramine (Tetryl), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX) present in trace amounts on surfaces (500 pg/cm(2) to 1 microg/cm(2)) both individually and as components of mixtures. Detection of explosives was demonstrated in the presence of an interfering matrix. A large surface (5 cm x15 cm) on which 1 microg/cm(2) samples of TNT, Tetryl, and HMX had been spotted randomly was interrogated in 22 s in the full scan mode, and signals characteristic of each of the explosives were observed in the DESI mass spectrum. PMID:20496904

  14. Detection of metabolites of trapped humans using ion mobility spectrometry coupled with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vautz, Wolfgang; Slodzynski, Rafael; Hariharan, Chandrasekhara; Seifert, Luzia; Nolte, Jürgen; Fobbe, Rita; Sielemann, Stefanie; Lao, Bolan C; Huo, Ran; Thomas, C L Paul; Hildebrand, Lars

    2013-02-19

    For the first time, ion mobility spectrometry coupled with rapid gas chromatography, using multicapillary columns, was applied for the development of a pattern of signs of life for the localization of entrapped victims after disaster events (e.g., earthquake, terroristic attack). During a simulation experiment with entrapped volunteers, 12 human metabolites could be detected in the air of the void with sufficient sensitivity to enable a valid decision on the presence of a living person. Using a basic normalized summation of the measured concentrations, all volunteers involved in the particular experiments could be recognized only few minutes after they entered the simulation void and after less than 3 min of analysis time. An additional independent validation experiment enabled the recognition of a person in a room of ∼25 m(3) after ∼30 min with sufficiently high sensitivity to detect even a person briefly leaving the room. Undoubtedly, additional work must be done on analysis time and weight of the equipment, as well as on validation during real disaster events. However, the enormous potential of the method as a significantly helpful tool for search-and-rescue operations, in addition to trained canines, could be demonstrated. PMID:23249433

  15. Electrochemical Microsensors for the Detection of Cadmium(II) and Lead(II) Ions in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Krystofova, Olga; Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Zehnalek, Josef; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Routine determination of trace metals in complex media is still a difficult task for many analytical instruments. The aim of this work was to compare three electro-chemical instruments [a standard potentiostat (Autolab), a commercially available miniaturized potentiostat (PalmSens) and a homemade micropotentiostat] for easy-to-use and sensitive determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) ions. The lowest detection limits (hundreds of pM) for both metals was achieved by using of the standard potentiostat, followed by the miniaturized potentiostat (tens of nM) and the homemade instrument (hundreds of nM). Nevertheless, all potentiostats were sensitive enough to evaluate contamination of the environment, because the environmental limits for both metals are higher than detection limits of the instruments. Further, we tested all used potentiostats and working electrodes on analysis of environmental samples (rainwater, flour and plant extract) with artificially added cadmium(II) and lead(II). Based on the similar results obtained for all potentiostats we choose a homemade instrument with a carbon tip working electrode for our subsequent environmental experiments, in which we analyzed maize and sunflower seedlings and rainwater obtained from various sites in the Czech Republic. PMID:22219663

  16. Development of portable mass spectrometer with electron cyclotron resonance ion source for detection of chemical warfare agents in air.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Michiko; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (miniECRIS-MS) was developed. It was used for in situ monitoring of trace amounts of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in atmospheric air. Instrumental construction and parameters were optimized to realize a fast response, high sensitivity, and a small body size. Three types of CWAs, i.e., phosgene, mustard gas, and hydrogen cyanide were examined to check if the mass spectrometer was able to detect characteristic elements and atomic groups. From the results, it was found that CWAs were effectively ionized in the miniECRIS-MS, and their specific signals could be discerned over the background signals of air. In phosgene, the signals of the 35Cl+ and 37Cl+ ions were clearly observed with high dose-response relationships in the parts-per-billion level, which could lead to the quantitative on-site analysis of CWAs. A parts-per-million level of mustard gas, which was far lower than its lethal dosage (LCt50), was successfully detected with a high signal-stability of the plasma ion source. It was also found that the chemical forms of CWAs ionized in the plasma, i.e., monoatomic ions, fragment ions, and molecular ions, could be detected, thereby enabling the effective identification of the target CWAs. Despite the disadvantages associated with miniaturization, the overall performance (sensitivity and response time) of the miniECRIS-MS in detecting CWAs exceeded those of sector-type ECRIS-MS, showing its potential for on-site detection in the future. PMID:24211802

  17. A calixarene-based ion-selective electrode for thallium(I) detection.

    PubMed

    Chester, Ryan; Sohail, Manzar; Ogden, Mark I; Mocerino, Mauro; Pretsch, Ernö; De Marco, Roland

    2014-12-01

    Three new calixarene Tl(+) ionophores have been utilized in Tl(+) ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) yielding Nernstian response in the concentration range of 10(-2)-10(-6)M TlNO3 with a non-optimized filling solution in a conventional liquid contact ISE configuration. The complex formation constants (logβIL) for two of the calixarene derivatives with thallium(I) (i.e. 6.44 and 5.85) were measured using the sandwich membrane technique, with the other ionophore immeasurable due to eventual precipitation of the ionophore during these long-term experiments. Furthermore, the unbiased selectivity coefficients for these ionophores displayed excellent selectivity against Zn(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Al(3+) with moderate selectivity against Pb(2+), Li(+), Na(+), H(+), K(+), NH4(+) and Cs(+), noting that silver was the only significant interferent with these calixarene-based ionophores. When optimizing the filling solution in a liquid contact ISE, it was possible to achieve a lower limit of detection of approximately 8nM according to the IUPAC definition. Last, the new ionophores were also evaluated in four solid-contact (SC) designs leading to Nernstian response, with the best response noted with a SC electrode utilizing a gold substrate, a poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) ion-to-electron transducer and a poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(decyl methacrylate) (PMMA-PDMA) co-polymer membrane. This electrode exhibited a slope of 58.4mVdecade(-1) and a lower detection limit of 30.2nM. Due to the presence of an undesirable water layer and/or leaching of redox mediator from the graphite redox buffered SC, a coated wire electrode on gold and graphite redox buffered SC yielded grossly inferior detection limits against the polypyrrole/PVC SC and POT/PMMA-PDMA SC ISEs that did not display signs of a water layer or leaching of SC ingredients into the membrane. PMID:25440668

  18. A highly selective voltammetric sensor for nanomolar detection of mercury ions using a carbon ionic liquid paste electrode impregnated with novel ion imprinted polymeric nanobeads.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Azam; Besharati-Seidani, Abbas; Abbaspour, Abdolkarim; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    2015-03-01

    This work reports the preparation of a voltammetric sensor for selective recognition and sensitive determination of mercury ions using a carbon ionic liquid paste electrode (CILE) impregnated with novel Hg(2+)-ion imprinted polymeric nanobeads (IIP) based on dithizone, as a suitable ligand for complex formation with Hg(2+) ions. The differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric technique was employed to investigate the performance of the prepared IIP-CILE for determination of hazardous mercury ions. The designed modified electrode revealed linear responses in the ranges of 0.5nM-10nM and 0.08μM-2μM with a limit of detection of 0.1nM (S/N=3). It was found that the peak currents of the modified electrode for Hg(2+) ions were at a maximum value in phosphate buffer of pH4.5. The optimized preconcentration potential and accumulation time were to be -0.9V and 35s, respectively. The applicability of the proposed sensor to mercury determination in waste water samples is reported. PMID:25579915

  19. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for ion beam etch monitoring and end-point detection of multilayer structures.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Yalin, A P; Yamamoto, N

    2008-11-01

    This contribution reports on the development of in situ sputter monitoring and end-point detection for ion beam etch systems using continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). The demonstrated system is based on the detection of sputtered manganese atoms using a tunable external cavity diode laser in the vicinity of 403.07 nm. The cw-CRDS system is described and measurements from a manganese-iron target are presented. End-point detection is demonstrated by monitoring the time dependence of manganese concentration for a multilayer target comprised of alternating layers of manganese/iron and titanium. Detection limits are shown to be adequate for today's commercial ion beam sputter systems. PMID:19045913

  20. Selective fluorescence sensors for detection of nitroaniline and metal Ions based on ligand-based luminescent metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zongchao; Wang, Fengqin; Lin, Xiangyi; Wang, Chengmiao; Fu, Yiyuan; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhao, Yongnan; Li, Guodong

    2015-12-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous crystalline materials with high potential for applications in fluorescence sensors. In this work, two solvent-induced Zn(II)-based metal-organic frameworks, Zn3L3(DMF)2 (1) and Zn3L3(DMA)2(H2O)3 (2) (L=4,4‧-stilbenedicarboxylic acid), were investigated as selective sensing materials for detection of nitroaromatic compounds and metal ions. The sensing experiments show that 1 and 2 both exhibit selective fluorescence quenching toward nitroaniline with a low detection limit. In addition, 1 exhibits high selectivity for detection of Fe3+ and Al3+ by significant fluorescence quenching or enhancement effect. While for 2, it only exhibits significant fluorescence quenching effect for Fe3+. The results indicate that 1 and 2 are both promising fluorescence sensors for detecting and recognizing nitroaniline and metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  1. Hairpin oligonucleotides anchored terbium ion: a fluorescent probe to specifically detect lead(II) at sub-nM levels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yueteng; Liu, Ru; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Yuliang; Cai, Zhifang; Gao, Xueyun

    2013-04-21

    A terbium based fluorescent probe was synthesized by coordinating terbium ions with a designed oligonucleotides (5'-ATATGGGGGATAT-3', termed GH5). GH5 improved the fluorescence of terbium ions by four orders of magnitude. The fluorescence enhancement of terbium ions by different oligonucleotides sequences indicated that the polyguanine loop of the hairpin GH5 is key to enhance terbium ion emission. The quantum yield of Tb-GH5 probe was 10.5% and the probe was photo-stable. The result of conductivity titration indicated that the stoichiometry of the probe is 3.5 Tb: 1 GH5, which is confirmed by fluorescence titration. This probe had high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of lead ions. The fluorescence intensity of this probe was linear with respect to lead concentration over a range 0.3-2.1 nM (R(2) = 0.99). The limit of detection for lead ions was 0.1 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. PMID:23446487

  2. Peak Detection Method Evaluation for Ion Mobility Spectrometry by Using Machine Learning Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hauschild, Anne-Christin; Kopczynski, Dominik; D’Addario, Marianna; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Rahmann, Sven; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry with pre-separation by multi-capillary columns (MCC/IMS) has become an established inexpensive, non-invasive bioanalytics technology for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with various metabolomics applications in medical research. To pave the way for this technology towards daily usage in medical practice, different steps still have to be taken. With respect to modern biomarker research, one of the most important tasks is the automatic classification of patient-specific data sets into different groups, healthy or not, for instance. Although sophisticated machine learning methods exist, an inevitable preprocessing step is reliable and robust peak detection without manual intervention. In this work we evaluate four state-of-the-art approaches for automated IMS-based peak detection: local maxima search, watershed transformation with IPHEx, region-merging with VisualNow, and peak model estimation (PME). We manually generated a gold standard with the aid of a domain expert (manual) and compare the performance of the four peak calling methods with respect to two distinct criteria. We first utilize established machine learning methods and systematically study their classification performance based on the four peak detectors’ results. Second, we investigate the classification variance and robustness regarding perturbation and overfitting. Our main finding is that the power of the classification accuracy is almost equally good for all methods, the manually created gold standard as well as the four automatic peak finding methods. In addition, we note that all tools, manual and automatic, are similarly robust against perturbations. However, the classification performance is more robust against overfitting when using the PME as peak calling preprocessor. In summary, we conclude that all methods, though small differences exist, are largely reliable and enable a wide spectrum of real-world biomedical applications. PMID:24957992

  3. Fluorescent single-stranded DNA-based assay for detecting unchelated Gadolinium(III) ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Edogun, Osafanmwen; Nguyen, Nghia Huu; Halim, Marlin

    2016-06-01

    The main concern pertaining to the safety of Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) is the toxicity caused by the unchelated ion, which may be inadvertently present in the solution due most commonly to excess unreacted starting material or dissociation of the complexes. Detecting the aqueous free ion during the synthesis and preparation of GBCA solutions is therefore instrumental in ensuring the safety of the agents. This paper reports the development of a sensitive fluorogenic sensor for aqueous unchelated Gadolinium(III) (Gd(III)). Our design utilizes single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides with a specific sequence of 44 bases as the targeting moiety. The fluorescence-based assay may be run at ambient pH with very small amounts of samples in 384-well plates. The sensor is able to detect nanomolar concentration of Gd(III), and is relatively unresponsive toward a range of biologically relevant ions and the chelated Gd(III). Although some cross-reactivity with other trivalent lanthanide ions, such as Europium(III) and Terbium(III), is observed, these are not commonly found in biological systems and contrast agents. This convenient and rapid method may be useful in ascertaining a high purity of GBCA solutions. Graphical abstract Fluorescent aptamer-based assay for detecting unchelated Ln(III) ions in aqueous solution. PMID:27071762

  4. Sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions by fluorescent Ag nanoclusters synthesized via a hydrothermal method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Ren, Xiangling; Meng, Xianwei; Fang, Zheng; Tang, Fangqiong

    2013-10-21

    An easily prepared fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) ions was developed here. The Ag NCs were synthesized by using polymethacrylic acid sodium salt as a template via a convenient hydrothermal process. The as-prepared fluorescent Ag NCs were monodispersed, uniform and less than 2 nm in diameter, and can be quenched in the presence of mercury (Hg(2+)) or copper (Cu(2+)) ions. Excellent linear relationships existed between the quenching degree of the Ag NCs and the concentrations of Hg(2+) or Cu(2+) ions in the range of 10 nM to 20 μM or 10 nM to 30 μM, respectively. By using ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) as the masking agent of Cu(2+), Hg(2+) was exclusively detected in coexistence with Cu(2+) with high sensitivity (LOD = 10 nM), which also provided a reusable detection method for Cu(2+). Furthermore, the different quenching phenomena caused by the two metals ions such as changes in visible colour, shifts of UV absorbance peaks and changes in size of Ag NCs make it easy to distinguish between them. Therefore the easily synthesized fluorescent Ag NCs may have great potential as Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) ions sensors. PMID:24056730

  5. A new approach for detection of explosives based on ion mobility spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzishchin, Yury; Kotkovskii, Gennadii; Martynov, Igor; Dovzhenko, Dmitriy; Chistyakov, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new way for detection ultralow concentration of explosives in this study. It combines an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and a promising method of laser desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The DIOS is widely used in mass spectrometry due to the possibility of small molecule detection and high sensitivity. It is known that IMS based on laser ion source is a power method for the fast detection of ultralow concentration of organic molecules. However requirement of using high energy pulse ultraviolet laser increases weight and size of the device. The use of DIOS in an ion source of IMS could decrease energy pulse requirements and allows one to construct both compact and high sensitive device for analyzing gas and liquid probes. On the other hand mechanisms of DIOS in gas media is poorly studied, especially in case of nitroaromatic compounds. The investigation of the desorption/ionization on porous silicon (pSi) surface of nitroaromatic compounds has been carried out for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) using IMS and mass spectrometry (MS). It has been demonstrated that TNT ion formation in a gas medium is a complicated process and includes both an electron emission from the pSi surface with subsequent ion-molecular reactions in a gas phase and a proton transfer between pSi surface and TNT molecule.

  6. The minimum detection limits of RDX and TNT deposited on various surfaces as determined by ion mobility spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodacy, P.

    1993-08-01

    An Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) was used to determine the detection limits of RDX and TNT on six different substrates. The preparation of the explosive deposits on the surfaces is examined as well as effects due to the size, uniformity, method of application, and time that a deposit has been on a surface. Sampling methods are discussed along with effects of the surface topology. The transfer of explosives from a hand to a surface, and methods to reduce the detection limits are presented.

  7. A sensitive whole-cell biosensor for the simultaneous detection of a broad-spectrum of toxic heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cerminati, S; Soncini, F C; Checa, S K

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial biosensors are simple, cost-effective and efficient analytical tools for detecting bioavailable heavy metals in the environment. This work presents the design, construction and calibration of a novel whole-cell fluorescent biosensory device that, simultaneously and with high sensitivity, reports the presence of toxic mercury, lead, cadmium and/or gold ions in aqueous samples. This bio-reporter can be easily applied as an immediate alerting tool for detecting the presence of harmful pollutants in drinking water. PMID:25730473

  8. Zn nanoparticles irradiated with swift heavy ions at low fluences: Optically-detected shape elongation induced by nonoverlapping ion tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Amekura, H.; Mitsuishi, K.; Nakayama, Y.; Kishimoto, N.; Ishikawa, N.; Okubo, N.; Ridgway, M. C.; Giulian, R.; Buchal, Ch.; Mantl, S.

    2011-05-15

    Elongation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in silica (SiO{sub 2}) induced by swift heavy-ion (SHI) irradiation, from spheres to spheroids, has been evaluated mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at high fluences, where tens to thousands of ion tracks were overlapped each other. It is important to clarify whether the high fluences, i.e., track overlaps, are essential for the elongation. In this study the elongation of metal NPs was evaluated at low fluences by linearly polarized optical absorption spectroscopy. Zn NPs embedded in silica were irradiated with 200-MeV Xe{sup 14+} ions with an incident angle of 45 deg. The fluence ranged from 1.0x10{sup 11} to 5.0x10{sup 13} Xe/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to the track coverage ratio (CR) of 0.050 to 25 by ion tracks. A small but certain dichroism was observed down to 5.0x10{sup 11} Xe/cm{sup 2} (CR = 0.25). The comparison with numerical simulation suggested that the elongation of Zn NPs was induced by nonoverlapping ion tracks. After further irradiation each NP experienced multiple SHI impacts, which resulted in further elongation. TEM observation showed the elongated NPs whose aspect ratio (AR) ranged from 1.2 to 1.7 at 5.0x10{sup 13} Xe/cm{sup 2}. Under almost the same irradiation conditions, Co NPs with the same initial mean radius showed more prominent elongation with AR of {approx}4 at the same fluence, while the melting point (m.p.) of Co is much higher than that of Zn. Less efficient elongation of Zn NPs while lower m.p. is discussed.

  9. Molecular Heterogeneity of Ewing Sarcoma as Detected by Ion Torrent Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nana; Liu, Haijing; Yue, Guanjun; Zhang, Yan; You, Jiangfeng; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most common malignant bone and soft tissue tumor in children and adolescents. Despite advances in comprehensive treatment, patients with ES metastases still suffer poor outcomes, thus, emphasizing the need for detailed genetic profiles of ES patients to identify suitable molecular biomarkers for improved prognosis and development of effective and targeted therapies. In this study, the next generation sequencing Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 was used to identify cancer-related gene mutations in the tissue samples from 20 ES patients. This platform targeted 207 amplicons of 2800 loci in 50 cancer-related genes. Among the 20 tissue specimens, 62 nonsynonymous hotspot mutations were identified in 26 cancer-related genes, revealing the molecular heterogeneity of ES. Among these, five novel mutations in cancer-related genes (KDR, STK11, MLH1, KRAS, and PTPN11) were detected in ES, and these mutations were confirmed with traditional Sanger sequencing. ES patients with KDR, STK11, and MLH1 mutations had higher Ki-67 proliferation indices than the ES patients lacking such mutations. Notably, more than half of the ES patients harbored one or two possible ‘druggable’ mutations that have been previously linked to a clinical cancer treatment option. Our results provided the foundation to not only elucidate possible mechanisms involved in ES pathogenesis but also indicated the utility of Ion Torrent sequencing as a sensitive and cost-effective tool to screen key oncogenes and tumor suppressors in order to develop personalized therapy for ES patients. PMID:27077911

  10. Spatial distributions of photons in plastic scintillator detected by multi-anode photomultiplier for heavy-ion position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omika, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Fukuda, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Matsunaga, S.; Nagae, D.; Nishimura, D.; Nishimura, T.; Ozawa, A.; Sato, S.; Sawahata, K.; Suzuki, T.; Takeuchi, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The spatial distributions of scintillation photons in a plastic scintillation detector were measured using a multi-anode photomultiplier H7546A coupled with 1-mm-diameter optical fibers. A row of several tens of fibers connected to the scintillator generates one-dimensional spatial distributions of photons induced by the swift passage of heavy ions. The pulse heights from each channel change depending on the beam position. This can be utilized to determine the positions of the heavy ions. To test the performance of the proposed detection method, an experiment using a 84Kr beam with intermediate energies ranging from 40 to 85 MeV/nucleon was performed at the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). The photon spatial distributions were successfully observed. By optimizing the photomultiplier bias voltage and threshold in the pulse height analyses, a detection efficiency of 98% and a position resolution of 1.1 mm in σ were achieved simultaneously.

  11. A new turn-off fluorescence probe based on graphene quantum dots for detection of Au(III) ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjadi, Mohammad; Shokri, Roghayeh; Hallaj, Tooba

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new turn-off fluorescence probe based on the graphene quantum dots (GQDs) was designed for detection and quantification of Au(III) ion. GQDs were prepared by two simple carbonization methods using glucose (g-GQDs) and citric acid (c-GQDs) as carbon sources. The effect of some metal ions on the fluorescence intensity of the prepared GQDs was studied. It was found that the fluorescence of both GQDs is significantly quenched by Au(III) ions but the sensitivity and analytical performances are different for two prepared GQDs. Using g-GQDs, a new analytical method was developed for the determination of Au(III) in the concentration range of 1.0-80 μM, with a detection limit of 0.5 μM. The developed method was applied to the determination of Au(III) in water and plasma samples with satisfactory results.

  12. Intense-field ionization of atoms and molecules: Spatially resolved ion detection and ultrashort optical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohaber, James

    The interaction of light and matter has for many years provided a venue in which scientists have been able to increase their understanding of fundamental quantum mechanics and electromagnetism. The advent of the laser in the early sixties significantly changed the way in which experiments were performed. These coherent sources of radiation played a pivotal role in the investigations of new phenomenon such as multiphoton ionization. As time progressed many significant advances have been made in laser technology. For instance, the development of mode-locking techniques such as Q-switching and the nonlinear Kerr effect have made pulsed lasers possible (now down to ˜ 5 fs), the discovery of Chirped-Pulse-Amplification allowed for these ultrashort pulses to be amplified up to Joules in energy per pulse. As a result of these new advances in laser technology, new and exciting physics have been illuminated. When ultrashort intense laser fields interact with matter, one possible outcome is the ionization of the target into its constituents (atoms, molecules, electrons or photons). Because the constituents are usually ions which may have different masses and charges, time-of-flight (TOF) techniques are often employed in the analysis of the ionization yields. In these experiments, the usual quantity of physical interest is the ionization probability as a function of a well known intensity. However, in reality the impinging laser radiation possesses a distribution of intensities. To further add to this annoyance, it is difficult for a TOF spectrometer to distinguish between ions created at different intensities and the usual course of action is to integrate ions from over the entire focal volume. The inevitable result of this so-called spatial averaging is to limit information about the underlying physical process. Additionally, coherent sources of radiation have captured the attention of researchers whose main interests are in spatially modulating the phase and amplitude of

  13. ‘Druggable’ alterations detected by Ion Torrent in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    FANG, WEIJIA; RADOVICH, MILAN; ZHENG, YULONG; FU, CAI-YUN; ZHAO, PENG; MAO, CHENGYU; ZHENG, YI; ZHENG, SHUSEN

    2014-01-01

    The frequency and poor prognosis of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) emphasizes the requirement for improved biomarkers for use in the treatment and prognosis of mCRC. In the present study, somatic variants in exonic regions of key cancer genes were identified in mCRC patients. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues obtained by biopsy of the metastases of mCRC patients were collected, and the DNA was extracted and sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. For the targeted amplification of known cancer genes, the Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Panel, which is designed to detect 739 Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) mutations in 604 loci from 46 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes using as little as 10 ng of input DNA, was used. The sequencing results were then analyzed using the Ampliseq™ Variant Caller plug-in within the Ion Torrent Suite software. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway software was used to perform a pathway analysis. The Cox regression analysis was also conducted to investigate the potential correlation between alteration numbers and clinical factors, including response rate, disease-free survival and overall survival. Among 10 specimens, 65 genetic alterations were identified in 24 genes following the exclusion of germline mutations using the SNP database, whereby 41% of the alterations were also present in the COSMIC database. No clinical factors were found to significantly correlate with the alteration numbers in the patients by statistical analysis. However, pathway analysis identified ‘colorectal cancer metastasis signaling’ as the most commonly mutated canonical pathway. This analysis further revealed mutated genes in the Wnt, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/SMAD signaling pathways. Notably, 11 genes, including the expected APC, BRAF, KRAS, PIK3CA and TP53 genes, were mutated in at least two samples. Notably, 90% (9/10) of mCRC patients harbored at least

  14. A label-free colorimetric detection of lead ions by controlling the ligand shells of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Lun; Hsiung, Tung-Ming; Chen, Yi-You; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2010-07-15

    We have developed a simple, colorimetric and label-free gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-based probe for the detection of Pb(2+) ions in aqueous solution, operating on the principle that Pb(2+) ions change the ligand shell of thiosulfate (S(2)O(3)(2-))-passivated Au NPs. Au NPs reacted with S(2)O(3)(2-) ions in solution to form Au(+).S(2)O(3)(2-) ligand shells on the Au NP surfaces, thereby inhibiting the access of 4-mercaptobutanol (4-MB). Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-TOF MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements revealed that PbAu alloys formed on the surfaces of the Au NPs in the presence of Pb(2+) ions; these alloys weakened the stability of the Au(+).S(2)O(3)(2-) ligand shells, enhancing the access of 4-MB to the Au NP surfaces and, therefore, inducing their aggregation. As a result, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption of the Au NPs red-shifted and broadened, allowing quantitation of the Pb(2+) ions in the aqueous solution. This 4-MB/S(2)O(3)(2-)-Au NP probe is highly sensitive (linear detection range: 0.5-10 nM) and selective (by at least 100-fold over other metal ions) toward Pb(2+) ions. This cost-effective sensing system allows the rapid and simple determination of the concentrations of Pb(2+) ions in real samples (in this case, river water, Montana soil and urine samples). PMID:20602929

  15. Generic detection of basic taxoids in wood of European Yew (Taxus baccata) by liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kite, Geoffrey C; Rowe, Emily R; Veitch, Nigel C; Turner, Jill E; Dauncey, Elizabeth A

    2013-02-01

    The occurrence of the cardiotoxin taxine (comprising taxine B and several other basic taxoids) in leaves of Taxus baccata L. (European yew) is well known and has led to public concerns about the safety of eating or drinking from utensils crafted from the wood of this poisonous species. The occurrence of basic taxoids in the heartwood of T. baccata had not been examined in detail, although the bark is known to contain 2'β-deacetoxyaustrospicatine. Initial examination of heartwood extracts for 2'β-deacetoxyaustrospicatine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) revealed the presence of this basic taxoid at about 0.0007% dry weight, using a standard isolated from bark. Analyses for taxine B, however, proved negative at the extract concentration analysed. Observing other basic taxoids within the heartwood extracts was facilitated by developing generic LC-MS methods that utilised a fragment arising from the N-containing acyl group of basic taxoids as a reporter ion. Of the various MS strategies available on a hybrid ion trap-orbitrap instrument that allowed observation of this reporter ion, combining all-ion collisions with high resolution ion filtering by the orbitrap was most effective, both in terms of the number of basic taxoids detected and sensitivity. Numerous basic taxoids, in addition to 2'β-deacetoxyaustrospicatine, were revealed by this method in heartwood extracts of T. baccata. Red wine readily extracted the basic taxoids from heartwood while coffee extracted them less efficiently. Contamination with basic taxoids could also be detected in soft cheese that had been spread onto wood. The generic LC-MS method for detecting basic taxoids complements specific methods for detecting taxine B when investigating yew poisoning cases in which the analysis of complex extracts may be required or taxine B has not been detected. PMID:23314400

  16. A Metal-Organic Framework/DNA Hybrid System as a Novel Fluorescent Biosensor for Mercury(II) Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan-Lan; Wang, Zhuo; Zhao, Shu-Na; Meng, Xing; Song, Xue-Zhi; Feng, Jing; Song, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-11

    Mercury(II) ions have emerged as a widespread environmental hazard in recent decades. Despite different kinds of detection methods reported to sense Hg(2+) , it still remains a challenging task to develop new sensing molecules to replenish the fluorescence-based apparatus for Hg(2+) detection. This communication demonstrates a novel fluorescent sensor using UiO-66-NH2 and a T-rich FAM-labeled ssDNA as a hybrid system to detect Hg(2+) sensitively and selectively. To the best of our knowledge, it has rarely been reported that a MOF is utilized as the biosensing platform for Hg(2+) assay. PMID:26555340

  17. Detection of trace levels of triclopyr using capillary gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Begley, P; Foulger, B E

    1988-04-01

    Triclopyr, after esterification, is shown to be a suitable candidate for detection by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry forming a characteristic carboxylate anion which offers a high detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 70 fg reaching the ionizer is indicated. Low backgrounds and an absence of chemical interferences are shown for vegetation extracts, using a simple method of extraction and derivatisation. A similar behaviour is demonstrated for 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. PMID:3379116

  18. Fast ion beta limit measurements by collimated neutron detection in MST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecchi, William; Anderson, Jay; Bonofiglo, Phillip; Kim, Jungha; Sears, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Fast ion orbits in the reversed field pinch (RFP) are well ordered and classically confined despite magnetic field stochasticity generated by multiple tearing modes. Classical TRANSP modeling of a 1MW tangentially injected hydrogen neutral beam in MST deuterium plasmas predicts a core-localized fast ion density that can be up to 25% of the electron density and a fast ion beta of many times the local thermal beta. However, neutral particle analysis of an NBI-driven mode (presumably driven by a fast ion pressure gradient) shows mode-induced transport of core-localized fast ions and a saturated fast ion density. The TRANSP modeling is presumed valid until the onset of the beam-driven mode and gives an initial estimate of the volume-averaged fast ion beta of 1-2% (local core value up to 10%). A collimated neutron detector for fusion product profile measurements will be used to determine the spatial distribution of fast ions, allowing for a first measurement of the critical fast-ion pressure gradient required for mode destabilization. Testing/calibration data and initial fast-ion profiles will be presented. Characterization of both the local and global fast ion beta will be done for deuterium beam injection into deuterium plasmas for comparison to TRANSP predictions. Work supported by US DOE.

  19. A selectively fluorescein-based colorimetric probe for detecting copper(II) ion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Xianhong

    2014-12-10

    A novel fluorescein derivative 3-bromo-5-methylsalicylaldehyde fluorescein hydrazone (BMSFH) has been synthesized by reacting fluorescein hydrazide with 3-bromo-5-methylsalicylaldehyde and was developed as a new colorimetric probe for detection of Cu(2+). In the presence of Cu(2+) the BMSFH exhibits a rapid color change from colorless to yellow together with an obvious new band appeared at 502nm in the UV-vis absorption spectra. However, other common alkali-, alkaline earth-, transition- and rare earth metal ions induced no or minimal spectral changes. This change is attributed to BMSFH via coordination with Cu(2+) in a 1:1 stoichiometry and this binding to Cu(2+) is reversible, as indicated by the bleaching of the color when the Cu(2+) is extracted with EDTA. Experimental results indicate that the BMSFH can provide a rapid, selective and sensitive response to Cu(2+) with a linear dynamic range 3.0-330μmol/L and can be used as a potential Cu(2+) colorimetric probe in aqueous solution. PMID:24929315

  20. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation metal ions release detection in the human mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueerova, Hana; Dostalova, Tatjana; Prochazkova, J.

    2002-06-01

    Presence of more dental alloys in oral cavity often causes pathological symptoms. Due to various and multi-faced symptomatology, they tend to be a source of significant problems not only for the patient but also for the dentist. Metal ions released from alloys can cause subjective and objective symptoms in mouth. The aim of this study was detection of metal elements presence in saliva. There were 4 groups of examined persons: with intact teeth (15 individuals) with metallic restorations, pathological currents 5-30 (mu) A, multi-faced subjective symptomatology and uncharacteristic objective diagnosis (32 patients), with metallic restorations and no subjective symptoms (14 persons) and with metallic restorations, without pathological currents and with problems related to galvanism (13 patients). Presence of 14 metal elements was checked by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation. Nd:YAG laser detector was used. There were significant differences in content of silver, gold and mercury between persons with intact teeth and other three groups. There were no differences found between subjects with and without galvanic currents, and presence of subjective and objective symptoms.

  1. Graphene ultrathin film electrode for detection of lead ions in acetate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Liu, Erjia

    2013-01-15

    Few-layer graphene ultrathin films were synthesized via solid-state carbon diffusion from amorphous carbon (a-C) thin layers sputtering coated on Si substrates with or without a SiO(2) layer, which an a-C layer was covered by a nickel (Ni) layer as a catalyst. When the Ni/a-C bilayer coated samples were heated at 1000°C the carbon (C) atoms from the a-C layers diffused into the top Ni layers to form a C rich surface. Upon rapid cooling, the C atoms accumulated on the surface of the Ni layers and formed graphene ultrathin films through nucleation and growth processes. The formation of graphene ultrathin films was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), electron diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and 4-point probe. The synthesized graphene ultrathin films were used as working electrodes for detection of trace heavy metal ions (Pb(2+), as low as 7 nM) in acetate buffer solutions (pH 5.3) using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). The effects of substrate surface condition and Ni layer thickness on the structure and electrochemical properties of graphene ultrathin film electrodes were investigated in detail. Compared to conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) electrodes, the graphene electrodes developed in this study had better repeatability, higher sensitivity and higher resistance to passivation caused by surface active species. PMID:23200357

  2. Determination of sulfite in foods and beverages by ion exclusion chromatography with electrochemical detection: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J

    1990-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method for determination of total sulfite in foods and beverages by alkali extraction followed by ion exclusion chromatographic separation and electrochemical detection (IEC-EC) was collaboratively studied by 9 laboratories. Blind duplicate samples of starch, diluted lemon juice, wine cooler, dehydrated seafood, and instant mashed potatoes were analyzed without spiking and with added sulfite at 2 levels. The initial sulfite levels varied from 0 to 384 ppm SO2, and the levels added varied from 10 to 400 ppm. The initial sulfite levels determined by the IEC-EC method and the Monier-Williams method were in good agreement. Recovery of added sulfite by the IEC-EC method was generally higher than that by the Monier-Williams method. Within-laboratory repeatability (RSDr) for the IEC-EC method varied from 4.4 to 26.0%, and overall reproducibility (RSDR) varied from 8.5 to 39.3%. The collaborators found the method to be fast, sensitive, and easy to use, which makes it a useful alternative to the Monier-Williams method. The method has been adopted official first action. PMID:2324032

  3. A novel EIS field effect structures coated with TESUD-PPy-PVC-dibromoaza[7]helicene matrix for potassium ions detection.

    PubMed

    Tounsi, Moncef; Ben Braiek, Mourad; Barhoumi, Houcine; Baraket, Abdoullatif; Lee, Michael; Zine, Nadia; Maaref, Abderrazak; Errachid, Abdelhamid

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we describe the development of new Aza[7]helicene-containing PVC-based membranes for the K(+) ions quantification. Here, silicon nitride-based structures (Si-p/SiO2/Si3N4) were developed and the surface was activated, functionalized with an aldehyde-silane (11-(Triethoxysilyl)undecanal (TESUD)), functionalized with polypyrrole (PPy), and coated with the polyvinylchloride (PVC)-membrane containing the Aza[7]helicene as ionophore. All stages of functionalization process have been thoroughly studied by contact angle measurements (CAMs) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The developed ion-selective electrode (ISE) was then applied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for the detection of potassium ions. A linear range was observed between 1.0 × 10(-8) M to 1.0 × 10(-3) M and a detection limit of 1.0 × 10(-8) M was observed. The EIS results have showed a good sensitivity to potassium ion using this novel technique. The target helicene exhibited good solubility and excellent thermal stability with a high decomposition temperature (Td > 300 °C) and it indicates that helicene may be a promising material as ionophore for ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) elaboration. PMID:26838889

  4. Application of Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Detection and Identification of Oxidized Organic Species during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Krechmer, J.; Kimmel, J.; Junninen, H.; Knochenmuss, R.; Cubison, M.; Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present results obtained with a chemical ionization ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-IMS-TOF) that was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Supersite in Centreville, AL. This two dimensional technique, which separates ions on the basis of their interactions with buffer gases before analysis by high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry, allows for detailed separation and identification of isomeric and isobaric species. During SOAS the IMS-TOF was coupled to a chemical ionization source that utilized NO3- as the reagent ion. The NO3- reagent ion clusters with highly oxidized species and allows for a unique means of directly detecting particle phase precursors in the gas phase. Gas phase molecules corresponding to oxidized products of isoprene and terpenes were detected throughout the campaign with a time resolution of 5 minutes. Ion mobility separation and trends observed for several of these key species are discussed. In addition to ambient sampling, the CI-IMS-TOF was also operated behind a potential aerosol mass (PAM) flow reactor which exposed ambient air to high levels of OH radical. Ambient CI-IMS-TOF spectra obtained with and without the flow reactor are presented and compared with laboratory flow reactor spectra generated from isoprene and terpene precursors.

  5. Low-energy neutron spectrometer using position sensitive proportional counter—Feasibility study based on numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, I.; Miyamaru, H.

    2008-05-01

    There is no direct technique to measure a neutron energy spectrum, particularly in the lower energy region, because the reaction Q value for detection is much larger than the neutron energy to be measured. However, such techniques are becoming a necessity, for example, in medical applications such as boron neutron capture therapy. In this study, a new spectrometer to measure low-energy neutrons (from thermal to 100 eV) is investigated numerically. We propose a unique approach of estimating the neutron energy spectrum by analyzing the distribution of neutron detection depths in the detector using an exact relation between the neutron energy and nuclear reaction cross-section. The proposed spectrometer has been established to be feasible to manufacture. The conversion performance of the neutron detection depth distribution to the neutron energy spectrum has also been proven to be acceptable, with the unfolding process based on Bayes' theorem, even though the detector response function is non-distinctive (without peaks or edges). The present spectrometer is now under development, and its practical performance will be reported as soon as the prototype detector is completed.

  6. Kinetic energy distributions in ion-induced CO fragmentation: Signature of shallow states in multiply charged CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, Jyoti; Safvan, C. P.

    2007-06-01

    Ion-induced molecular fragmentation of CO has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy with position sensitive detectors in multihit coincidence mode. Ar8+ ions having a velocity of 1.1 a.u. were used as projectiles. The features observed in the kinetic energy release (KER) spectra for all the detected fragmentation channels are discussed in light of the existing and calculated ab initio potential energy curves. The preference of the symmetric breakup over the asymmetric one is clearly observed. For fragmentation channels originating from the same parent molecular ion, it is observed that the most probable KER value is higher for the dissociation channel having a higher charge on the oxygen ion. Occurrence of sharp peaks in KER spectra of some of the fragmentation channels hints towards the existence of shallow (possibly metastable) excited states of COq+ (q=4,5) molecular ions and calls for further theoretical investigations.

  7. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering from Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach to C-14 Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Galutschek, Ernst; Hotchkis, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical 14C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. 12CH2 and 13CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance ({approx}15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO2 from ANSTO will be described.

  8. Multiphoton Dissociation of Electrosprayed MegaDalton-Sized DNA Ions in a Charge-Detection Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussineau, Tristan; Paletto, Pierre; Dugourd, Philippe; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry in combination with a linear electrostatic ion trap coupled to a continuous wavelength infrared CO2 laser has been used to study the multiphoton dissociation of DNA macromolecular ions. Samples, with masses ranging from 2.23 to 31.5 MDa, include single strand circular M13mp18, double strand circular M13mp18, and double strand linear LambdaPhage DNA fragments. Their activation energies for unimolecular dissociation were determined. Activation energy values slightly increase as a function of the molecular weight. The most important result is the difference between the fragmentations observed for hybridized double-strands and dimers of single strands.

  9. Detection and clearing of trapped ions in the high current Cornell photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Full, S.; Bartnik, A.; Bazarov, I. V.; Dobbins, J.; Dunham, B.; Hoffstaetter, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    We have recently performed experiments to test the effectiveness of three ion-clearing strategies in the Cornell high intensity photoinjector: DC clearing electrodes, bunch gaps, and beam shaking. The photoinjector reaches a new regime of linac beam parameters where high continuous wave beam currents lead to ion trapping. Therefore ion mitigation strategies must be evaluated for this machine and other similar future high current linacs. We have developed several techniques to directly measure the residual trapped ions. Our two primary indicators of successful clearing are the amount of ion current removed by a DC clearing electrode, and the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation generated by beam-ion interactions. Measurements were taken for an electron beam with an energy of 5 MeV and continuous wave beam currents in the range of 1-20 mA. Several theoretical models have been developed to explain our data. Using them, we are able to estimate the clearing electrode voltage required for maximum ion clearing, the creation and clearing rates of the ions while employing bunch gaps, and the sinusoidal shaking frequency necessary for clearing via beam shaking. In all cases, we achieve a maximum ion clearing of at least 70% or higher, and in some cases our data is consistent with full ion clearing.

  10. Ionization mechanism of the ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) and its applications to chemical nerve agent detection.

    PubMed

    Neidholdt, Evan L; Beauchamp, J L

    2009-11-01

    We present studies of the ionization mechanism operative in the ambient pressure pyroelectric ionization source (APPIS), along with applications that include detection of simulants for chemical nerve agents. It is found that ionization by APPIS occurs in the gas-phase. As the crystal is thermally cycled over a narrow temperature range, electrical discharges near the surface of the crystal produce energetic species which, through reactions with atmospheric molecules, result in reactant ions such as protonated water clusters or clusters of hydroxide and water. Reactant ions can be observed directly in the mass spectrometer. These go on to react with trace neutrals via proton transfer reactions to produce the ions observed in mass spectra, which are usually singly protonated or deprotonated species. Further implicating gas-phase ionization, observed product distributions are highly dependent on the composition of ambient gases, especially the concentration of water vapor and oxygen surrounding the source. For example, basic species such as triethylamine are observed as singly protonated cations at a water partial pressure of 10 torr. At a water pressure of 4 torr, reactive oxygen species are formed and lead to observation of protonated amine oxides. The ability of the APPIS source to detect basic molecules with high proton affinities makes it highly suited for the detection of chemical nerve agents. We demonstrate this application using simulants corresponding to VX and GA (Tabun). With the present source configuration pyridine is detected readily at a concentration of 4 ppm, indicating ultimate sensitivity in the high ppb range. PMID:19682922

  11. A novel aptasensor based on single-molecule force spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection of mercury ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Michaelis, Monika; Wei, Gang; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a novel aptasensor based on single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) capable of detecting mercury ions (Hg(2+)) with sub-nM sensitivity. The single-strand (ss) DNA aptamer used in this work is rich in thymine (T) and readily forms T-Hg(2+)-T complexes in the presence of Hg(2+). The aptamer was conjugated to an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe, and the adhesion force between the probe and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). The presence of Hg(2+) ions above a concentration threshold corresponding to the affinity constant of the ions for the aptamer (about 5 × 10(9) M(-1)) could be easily detected by a change of the measured adhesion force. With our chosen aptamer, we could reach an Hg(2+) detection limit of 100 pM, which is well below the maximum allowable level of Hg(2+) in drinking water. In addition, this aptasensor presents a very high selectivity for Hg(2+) over other metal cations, such as K(+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), and Cd(2+). Furthermore, the effects of the ionic strength and loading rate on the Hg(2+) detection were evaluated. Its simplicity, reproducibility, high selectivity and sensitivity make our SMFS-based aptasensor advantageous with respect to other current Hg(2+) sensing methods. It is expected that our strategy can be exploited for monitoring the pollution of water environments and the safety of potentially contaminated food. PMID:26075518

  12. Simultaneous detection and localization of secondary ions and electrons from single large cluster impacts

    PubMed Central

    Eller, M. J.; Verkhoturov, S. V.; Fernandez-Lima, F. A.; DeBord, J. D.; Schweikert, E. A.; Della-Negra, S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of large cluster primary ions (e.g. C60, Au400) in secondary ion mass spectrometry has become prevalent in recent years due to their enhanced emission of secondary ions, in particular, molecular ions (MW ≤ 1500 Da). The co-emission of electrons with SIs was investigated per projectile impact. It has been found that SI and electrons yields increased with increasing projectile energy and size. The use of the emitted electrons from impacts of C60 for localization has been demonstrated for cholesterol deposited on a copper grid. The instrumentation, methodologies, and results from these experiments are presented. PMID:24163488

  13. Colloidal gold nanoparticle probe-based immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of chromium ions in water and serum samples

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xi; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Fu, Qiang-Qiang; Zou, Jun-Hui; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-09-01

    An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using gold nanoparticles coated with monoclonal antibody (McAb) for the detection of chromium ions (Cr) in water and serum samples was developed, optimized, and validated. Gold nanoparticles coated with affinity- purified monoclonal antibodies against isothiocyanobenzyl-EDTA (iEDTA)-chelated Cr3+ were used as the detecting reagent in this completive immunoassay-based one- step test strip. The ICA was investigated to measure chromium speciation in water samples. Chromium standard samples of 0-80 ng/mL in water were determined by the test strips. The results showed that the visual lowest detection limit (LDL) of the test strip was 50.0 ng/mL. A portable colorimetric lateral flow reader was used for the quantification of Cr. The results indicated that the linear range of the ICA with colorimetric detection was 5-80 ng/mL. The ICA was also validated for the detection of chromium ions in serum samples. The test trips showed high stability in that they could be stored at at 37 C for at least 12 weeks without significant loss of activity. The test strip also showed good selectivity for Cr detection with negligible interference from other heavy metals. Because of its low cost and short testing time (within 5 min), the test strip is especially suitable for on-site large- scale screening of Cr-polluted water samples, biomonitoring of Cr exposure, and many other field applications.

  14. Dissociative Recombination of Molecular Ions for Astrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Daniel W.; Novotný, O.; Becker, A.; Buhr, H.; Geppert, W.; Hamberg, M.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Schwalm, D.; Spruck, K.; Stützel, J.; Wolf, A.; Yang, B.

    2013-06-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions is a key chemical process in the cold interstellar medium (ISM). DR affects the composition, charge state, and energy balance of such environments. Astrochemical models of the ISM require reliable total DR cross sections as well as knowledge of the chemical composition and excitation states of the neutral DR products. Theory cannot reliably provide these data. We have systematically measured DR for many astrophysically relevant molecular ions utilizing the TSR storage ring at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. We used the merged ion-electron beam technique combined with an energy- and position-sensitive imaging detector and are able to study DR down to plasma temperatures of 10 K. The DR count rate is used to obtain absolute DR rate coefficient. Additionally we determine the masses of the DR products by measuring their kinetic energy. This allows us to assign particular DR fragmentation channels and to obtain their branching ratios. Moreover, the distribution of detected fragment distances provides information on the kinetic energy released in DR and thus also on the internal excitation of the DR products. All this information is particularly important for understanding DR of heteronuclear polyatomic ions. We will present DR results for several ions recently investigated at TSR. This work is supported in part by NASA and the NSF.

  15. Negative-ion formation in the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT by using the reversal electron attachment detection technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boumsellek, S.; Alajajian, S. H.; Chutjian, A.

    1992-01-01

    First results of a beam-beam, single-collision study of negative-ion mass spectra produced by attachment of zero-energy electrons to the molecules of the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT are presented. The technique used is reversal electron attachment detection (READ) wherein the zero-energy electrons are produced by focusing an intense electron beam into a shaped electrostatic field which reverses the trajectory of electrons. The target beam is introduced at the reversal point, and attachment occurs because the electrons have essentially zero longitudinal and radial velocity. The READ technique is used to obtain the 'signature' of molecular ion formation and/or fragmentation for each explosive. Present data are compared with results from atmospheric-pressure ionization and negative-ion chemical ionization methods.

  16. Optimized thermal desorption for improved sensitivity in trace explosives detection by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Najarro, Marcela; Dávila Morris, Melissa E; Staymates, Matthew E; Fletcher, Robert; Gillen, Greg

    2012-06-01

    In this work we evaluate the influence of thermal desorber temperature on the analytical response of a swipe-based thermal desorption ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for detection of trace explosives. IMS response for several common high explosives ranging from 0.1 ng to 100 ng was measured over a thermal desorber temperature range from 60 °C to 280 °C. Most of the explosives examined demonstrated a well-defined maximum IMS signal response at a temperature slightly below the melting point. Optimal temperatures, giving the highest IMS peak intensity, were 80 °C for trinitrotoluene (TNT), 100 °C for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), 160 °C for cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and 200 °C for cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX). By modifying the desorber temperature, we were able to increase cumulative IMS signal by a factor of 5 for TNT and HMX, and by a factor of 10 for RDX and PETN. Similar signal enhancements were observed for the same compounds formulated as plastic-bonded explosives (Composition 4 (C-4), Detasheet, and Semtex). In addition, mixtures of the explosives exhibited similar enhancements in analyte peak intensities. The increases in sensitivity were obtained at the expense of increased analysis times of up to 20 seconds. A slow sample heating rate as well as slower vapor-phase analyte introduction rate caused by low-temperature desorption enhanced the analytical sensitivity of individual explosives, plastic-bonded explosives, and explosives mixtures by IMS. Several possible mechanisms that can affect IMS signal response were investigated such as thermal degradation of the analytes, ionization efficiency, competitive ionization from background, and aerosol emission. PMID:22498665

  17. Mixing characteristics of mixers in flow analysis. Application to two-dimensional detection in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hongzhu; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Srinivasan, Kannan; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Three mixer designs, a back-flow tee mixer (BT), an end-blocked membrane tee mixer (EMT), and a tubular membrane mixer (TM), were fabricated and compared to three commercially available mixers, Visco-Jet Micro mixer (VJM) and HS binary tee mixer with 2 and 10 μL volume (HS-2 and HS-10) mixing cartridges. Internal volumes ranged from 8.3 to 20.3 μL. Performance characteristics were evaluated by the Villermaux-Dushman reaction, noise in baseline conductance upon mixing an electrolyte solution with water, and dispersion/relative dispersion of an injected solute. No single characteristic would uniquely qualify a particular device. In typical postcolumn use when a small reagent flow is added to a principal flow stream using a low-pulsation high-end chromatographic pump, with the worst of these mixers, imperfect mixing accounted for 99.6% of the observed noise. EMT, BT, and TM with asymmetric inlets provided better mixing performances relative to VJM, HS-2, and HS-10 with symmetric inlet ports, especially when the secondary liquid flow rate was much lower than the principal stream-flow rate. Dispersion per unit residence time was singularly large for HS-2. Based on its mixing efficiency and small dispersion, the BT design was found to be the best for practicing postcolumn reaction. As an illustrative application, this was then used to introduce electrogenerated LiOH in a suppressed ion chromatography system to perform sensitive detection of weak acids in a second dimension. PMID:25426864

  18. Colorimetric detection of fluoride ions by anthraimidazoledione based sensors in the presence of Cu(ii) ions.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Amrita; Bhattacharyya, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Arindam

    2016-01-21

    Anthraquinone based anion receptors have gained importance due to their colorimetric response on sensing a specific anion and the possibility of tuning this property by varying the conjugated moiety (the donor) to the diamine. In this work, we have synthesized and characterized four anthraimidazoledione compounds having 2,5-dihydroxy benzene, 4-(bis(2-chloroethyl)amino)benzene, imidazole and 4-methylthiazole moieties respectively (1-4). All of them were probed for their potential as anion sensors to study the effect of changes in the hydrogen bond donor-acceptor. The p-hydroquinone bound anthraimidazoledione (1) and thioimidazole bound anthraimidazoledione (4) were able to detect both F(-) and CN(-) in the presence of other anions Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), H2PO4(-), OAc(-), NO3(-)and ClO4(-). Both 1 and 4 could not differentiate F(-) from CN(-) and provided a similar response to both. The 1H NMR studies of 1 and 4 with F(-) showed the formation of [HF2](-) at 16.3 ppm and the 19F NMR showed a sharp peak at -145 ppm in both cases. However, although there may be NMR evidence of [HF2](-) formation F(-) may not be detected colorimetrically if the CT band remains almost unchanged, as found for 3. The results emphasize that the change of a hetero atom in the donor moiety of an anthraimidazoledione may render a large difference in sensitivity. In the case of 4 selective detection of F(-) was possible in the presence of 0.5 equivalent of Cu2+ with the exhibition of a distinct green colour with a Δλ shift of ca. 50 nm in contrast to CN(-) which showed orange colouration with a Δλ shift of only 15 nm. In the presence of Cu2+ the F(-) detection limit was 0.038(5) ppm (below the WHO specified level) at a receptor concentration of 25 μM. PMID:26659520

  19. A library-screening approach for developing a fluorescence sensing array for the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Smith, David G; Sajid, Naveed; Rehn, Simone; Chandramohan, Ramya; Carney, Isaac J; Khan, Misbahul A; New, Elizabeth J

    2016-08-01

    Detection of individual metal ions is of importance across a range of fields of chemistry including environmental monitoring, and health and disease. Fluorescence is a highly sensitive technique and small fluorescent molecules are widely used for the detection and quantification of metal ions in various applications. Achieving specificity for a single metal from a single sensor is always a challenge. An alternative to selective sensing is the use of a number of non-specific sensors, in an array, which together respond in a unique pattern to each analyte. Here we show that screening a library of compounds can give a small sensor set that can be used to identify a range of metal ions following PCA and LDA. We explore a method for screening the initial compounds to identify the best performing sensors. We then present our method for reducing the size of the sensor array, resulting in a four-membered system, which is capable of identifying nine distinct metal ion species in lake water. PMID:27291513

  20. Direct analysis in real time coupled to multiplexed drift tube ion mobility spectrometry for detecting toxic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Harris, Glenn A; Kwasnik, Mark; Fernández, Facundo M

    2011-03-15

    Current and future chemical threats to homeland security motivate the need for new chemical detection systems to provide border, transportation, and workplace security. We present the first successful coupling of a commercial direct analysis in real time (DART) ion source to a resistive glass monolithic drift tube ion mobility spectrometer (DTIMS) as the basis for a low maintenance, versatile, and robust chemical monitoring system. in situ ionization within the electric field gradient of the instrument enhances sensitivity and provides a safe sampling strategy. The instrument uses nitrogen as both the DART discharge and DTIMS drift gases, allowing for a high electric field to be used for ion separation while keeping cost-of-use low. With the use of a traditional signal averaging acquisition mode, the 95% probability of detection (POD) for analytes sampled from melting point capillary tubes was 11.81% v/v for DMMP, 1.13% v/v for 2-CEES, and 10.61 mM for methamidophos. Sensitivity was improved via a prototype transmission-mode geometry interface, resulting in an almost 2 orders of magnitude decrease in the POD level for DMMP (0.28% v/v). As an alternative to transmission mode operation, digital multiplexing of the DTIMS ion injection step was also implemented, finding a 3-fold improvement in signal-to-noise ratios for 200 μs gate injections and a 4.5-fold for 400 μs gate injections. PMID:21319810

  1. A reversible fluorescence "off-on-off" sensor for sequential detection of aluminum and acetate/fluoride ions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Mergu, Naveen; Kumawat, Lokesh Kumar; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2015-11-01

    A new rhodamine functionalized fluorogenic Schiff base CS was synthesized and its colorimetric and fluorescence responses toward various metal ions were explored. The sensor exhibited highly selective and sensitive colorimetric and "off-on" fluorescence response towards Al(3+) in the presence of other competing metal ions. These spectral changes are large enough in the visible region of the spectrum and thus enable naked-eye detection. Studies proved that the formation of CS-Al(3+) complex is fully reversible and can sense to AcO(-)/F(-) via dissociation. The results revealed that the sensor provides fluorescence "off-on-off" strategy for the sequential detection of Al(3+) and AcO(-)/F(-). PMID:26452794

  2. Development of an anion probe: detection of sulfate ion by two-photon fluorescence of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Kentaro; Ishioka, Toshio; Harata, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Anion-selective detection is demonstrated for sulfate ion in aqueous solutions by using two-photon excited fluorescence of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified with a thiourea-based anion receptor, bis[2-(3-(4-nitrophenyl)thioureido)ethyl]disulfide. The fluorescent intensity increased with the change of the sulfate concentration in the solution from 10(-4) to 10(-3) M. In comparison with an unadsorbed receptor molecule in bulk acetonitrile solution, the molecule on AuNPs in water showed improved affinity for sulfate ion. The controllability of the hydrophobicity around receptor molecules on AuNPs is considered a dominant contributing factor for improved sulfate affinity. This unique feature of the surface enables us to detect anionic species in an aqueous phase where a dye-type indicator has poor sensitivity. PMID:23232232

  3. Colloidal gold nanoparticle probe-based immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of chromium ions in water and serum samples

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xi; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Fu, Qiang-Qiang; Zou, Jun-Hui; Lin, YueHe

    2012-01-01

    An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using gold nanoparticles coated with monoclonal antibody (McAb) for the detection of chromium ions (Cr) in water and serum samples was developed, optimized and validated. Gold nanoparticles coated with affinity-purified monoclonal antibodies against isothiocyanobenzyl-EDTA (iEDTA)-chelated Cr3+ were used as the detecting reagent in this completive immunoassay-based one-step test strip. The ICA was investigated to measure chromium speciation (Cr3+ and Cr6+ ions) in water samples. Chromium standard samples of 0-80 ng/mL in water were determined by the test strips. The results showed that the visual lowest detection limit (LDL) of the test strip was 50.0 ng/mL. A portable colorimetric lateral flow reader was used for the quantification of Cr. The results indicated that the linear range of the ICA with colorimetric detection was 5-80 ng/mL. The ICA was also validated for the detection of chromium ions in serum samples. The test trips showed high stability in that they could be stored at 37°C for at least 12 weeks without significant loss of activity. The test strip also showed good selectivity for Cr detection with negligible interference from other heavy metals. Because of its low cost and short testing time (within 5 min), the test strip is especially suitable for on-site large-scale screening of Cr-polluted water samples, biomonitoring of Cr exposure, and many other field applications. PMID:22938612

  4. A novel voltammetric sensor for sensitive detection of mercury(II) ions using glassy carbon electrode modified with graphene-based ion imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Ghanei-Motlagh, Masoud; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Heydari, Abolfazl; Ghanei-Motlagh, Reza; Gupta, Vinod K

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a novel strategy was proposed to prepare ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) on the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Polymerization was performed using methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, 2,2'-((9E,10E)-1,4-dihydroxyanthracene-9,10-diylidene) bis(hydrazine-1-carbothioamide) (DDBHCT) as the chelating agent and ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator, via surface imprinted technique. The RGO-IIP was characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The electrochemical procedure was based on the accumulation of Hg(II) ions at the surface of a modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with RGO-IIP. The prepared RGO-IIP sensor has higher voltammetric response compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP), traditional IIP and RGO. The RGO-IIP modified electrode exhibited a linear relationship toward Hg(II) concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 80 μg L(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.02 μg L(-1) (S/N=3), below the guideline value from the World Health Organization (WHO). The applicability of the proposed electrochemical sensor to determination of mercury(II) ions in different water samples was reported. PMID:27040231

  5. Influence of C-Trap Ion Accumulation Time on the Detectability of Analytes in IR-MALDESI MSI.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Elias P; Bokhart, Mark T; Nazari, Milad; Muddiman, David C

    2015-10-20

    Laser desorption followed by post electrospray ionization requires synchronized timing of the key events (sample desorption/ionization, mass spectrometry analysis, and sample translation) necessary to conduct mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with adequate analyte sensitivity. In infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) MSI analyses, two laser pulses are used for analysis at each volumetric element, or voxel, of a biological sample and ion accumulation in the C-trap exceeding 100 ms is necessary to capture all sample-associated ions using an infrared laser with a 20 Hz repetition rate. When coupled to an Orbitrap-based mass spectrometer like the Q Exactive Plus, this time window for ion accumulation exceeds dynamically controlled trapping of samples with comparable ion flux by Automatic Gain Control (AGC), which cannot be used during MSI analysis. In this work, a next-generation IR-MALDESI source has been designed and constructed that incorporates a mid-infrared OPO laser capable of operating at 100 Hz and allows requisite C-trap inject time during MSI to be reduced to 30 ms. Analyte detectability of the next-generation IR-MALDESI integrated source has been evaluated as a function of laser repetition rate (100-20 Hz) with corresponding C-trap ion accumulation times (30-110 ms) in both untargeted and targeted analysis of biological samples. Reducing the C-trap ion accumulation time resulted in increased ion abundance by up to 3 orders of magnitude for analytes ranging from xenobiotics to endogenous lipids, and facilitated the reduction of voxel-to-voxel variability by more than 3-fold. PMID:26414177

  6. Qualitative analysis of some carboxylic acids by ion-exclusion chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Helale, Murad I H; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Haddad, Paul R

    2002-05-17

    A simple, selective and sensitive method for the determination of carboxylic acids has been developed. A mixture of formic, acetic, propionic, valeric, isovaleric, isobutyric, and isocaproic acids has been separated on a polymethacrylate-based weak acidic cation-exchange resin (TSK gel OA pak-A) based on an ion-exclusion chromatographic mechanism with detection using UV-photodiode array, conductivity and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). A mobile phase consisting of 0.85 mM benzoic acid in 10% aqueous methanol (pH 3.89) was used to separate the above carboxylic acids in about 40 min. For LC-MS, the APCI interface was used in the negative ionization mode. Linear plots of peak area versus concentration were obtained over the range 1-30 mM (r2=0.9982) and 1-30 mM (r2=0.9958) for conductimetric and MS detection, respectively. The detection limits of the target carboxylic acids calculated at S/N=3 ranged from 0.078 to 2.3 microM for conductimetric and photometric detection and from 0.66 to 3.82 microM for ion-exclusion chromatography-APCI-MS. The reproducibility of retention times was 0.12-0.16% relative standard deviation for ion-exclusion chromatography and 1.21-2.5% for ion-exclusion chromatography-APCI-MS. The method was applied to the determination of carboxylic acids in red wine, white wine, apple vinegar, and Japanese rice wine. PMID:12108651

  7. Detection and quantification of chemical warfare agent precursors and surrogates by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Francis, Gregory J; Milligan, Daniel B; McEwan, Murray J

    2009-11-01

    The rate coefficients and branching ratios of 15 chemical warfare agent precursor and surrogate compounds reacting with H(3)O(+), NO(+), and O(2)(+) have been measured in the laboratory using the selected ion flow tube (SIFT) technique. Measurement of the relevant kinetic parameters for these agents has enabled quantitative monitoring using the SIFT-MS analytical technique. Thirteen of the 15 compounds studied were found to have real-time detection limits in the parts-per-trillion-by-volume concentration range when measured on a standard commercial Voice100 instrument, with specific compounds having detection limits below 100 parts-per-trillion-by-volume. PMID:19788274

  8. Collection method for chemical particulates on surfaces with detection using thermal desorption-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ewing, K J; Gibson, D; Sanghera, J; Miklos, F

    2013-05-01

    Successful analysis of particulate/low vapor pressure analytes such as explosives and toxic chemicals, and commercial pesticides require new sampling tools that enable detection of these analytes using current vapor phase detection instruments. We describe a sampling approach that uses stainless steel screens coated with a sticky polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) coating to capture particulates from surfaces. Preliminary results for the collection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) sorbed onto silica gel (SG) particulates (DMMP/SG) from a surface with subsequent analysis by thermal desorption-cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometry (TD-CITMS) are reported. PMID:23601282

  9. A Simple Fluorescence Probe Based on Aggregation-Induced Emission (AIE) Property for the Detection of Mg(2+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yan-Jiang; Wang, Lu-Qiong; Cao, Fu-Xiang; Tang, Li-Jun

    2016-01-01

    A simple aggregation-induced emission-based fluorescence probe (1) for Mg(2+) was synthesized by condensation of benzene-1, 2-diamine with 5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde, This compound shows favourable character of the AIE-active molecules. More importantly, after addition of Mg(2+) to probe (1) in acetonitrile, the solution changed from colorless to yellow colour solution under ultraviolet (UV) radiation obtained from hand-held UV lamp, this finding suggested that probe (1) can be used to detect Mg(2+) by colorimetric detection. Detection limit can reach 2.31 × 10(-5) M(-1). The practical value of the selective and sensitive fluorescence indicators was confirmed by its application to detection of magnesium ion in acetonitrile. PMID:26547420

  10. Carbon nanoparticle for highly sensitive and selective fluorescent detection of mercury(II) ion in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Zhai, Junfeng; Tian, Jingqi; Luo, Yonglan; Sun, Xuping

    2011-08-15

    In this article, carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) were used as a novel fluorescent sensing platform for highly sensitive and selective Hg(2+) detection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of CNPs obtained from candle soot used in this type of sensor. The general concept used in this approach is based on that adsorption of the fluorescently labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe by CNP via π-π stacking interactions between DNA bases and CNP leads to substantial dye fluorescence quenching; however, in the presence of Hg(2+), T-Hg(2+)-T induced hairpin structure does not adsorb on CNP and thus retains the dye fluorescence. A detection limit as low as 10nM was achieved. The present CNP-based biosensor for Hg(2+) detection exhibits remarkable specificity against other possible metal ions. Furthermore, superior selectivity performance was observed when Hg(2+) detection was carried out in the presence of a large amount of other interference ions. Finally, in order to evaluate its potential practical application, Hg(2+) detection was conducted with the use of lake water other than pure buffer and it is believed that it holds great promise for real sample analysis upon further development. PMID:21719271

  11. Separation and detection of ammonia, amines, and alkanolamines with single-column ion chromatography. [Alkylamines, ethanolamine and methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Poulson, R.E.; Borg, H.M.

    1986-03-01

    A single-column ion chromatographic method was developed for separation and detection of aqueous ammonia, C/sub 1/-, C/sub 2/-, and C/sub 3/- alkylamines, ethanolamine, and methyldiethanolamine. A precolumn concentrator was used to take detection of ammonium ion by electrical conductivity to fractional ppB levels and detection of the organic cations to ppB levels. Analysis of ppM ammonia levels in 3 wt % alkanolamine scrubber-type solutions was possible, but resolution of alkylamines was lost. A post-column reaction system for fluorescence detection of primary amine o-phthalaldehyde derivatives with reversed-phase separation allowed amine separation in the presence of large amounts of ammonia. The same system might be used in place of concentration and conductivity for determination of the alkylamine levels. A large variety of oil shale retort by-product waters and one underground coal gasification condensate were screened for alkylamines, but none were detected. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon dots for highly selective and sensitive detection of Hg (II) ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo; Yu, Bin; You, Tianyan

    2015-12-15

    Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon dots (N,S/C-dots) with high fluorescence quantum yields (FLQY, 25%) was successfully synthesized by a one-step microwave-assisted method. In comparison with nitrogen doped C-dots (N/C-dots) prepared using the same method, the resulting N,S/C-dots featured small particle size, uniform surface state, insensitive FL properties to excitation wavelengths and environmental conditions, negligible cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. Simultaneous doping of N and S effectively promoted electron-transfer and coordination interaction between N,S/C-dots and Hg(2+). Thus, when used as fluorescence probe for Hg(2+) label-free detection, the resulting N,S/C-dots showed good detection sensitivity and ion selectivity. The limit of detection was 2 μM; among 15 metal ions investigated, only Fe(3+) showed interference to the Hg(2+) detection. Fortunately, this interference could be effectively shielded using a chelating agent sodium hexametaphoshpate. The applicability of N,S/C-dots as fluorescence probe for Hg(2+) detection in lake water and tap water was demonstrated. Finally, based on its favorable features of negligible cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility, the N,S/C-dots were successfully applied to probe Hg(2+) in living cells, which broaden its application in biological system. PMID:26143466

  13. DNA derived fluorescent bio-dots for sensitive detection of mercury and silver ions in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting; Zhu, Xuefeng; Zhou, Shenghai; Yang, Guang; Gan, Wei; Yuan, Qunhui

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the high affinity between heavy metal ions and bio-molecules as well as the low toxicity of carbon-based quantum dots, we demonstrated the first application of a DNA derived carbonaceous quantum dots, namely bio-dots, in metal ion sensing. The present DNA-derived bio-dots contain graphitic carbon layers with 0.242 nm lattice fringes, exhibit excellent fluorescence property and can be obtained via a facile hydrothermal preparation procedure. Hg(II) and Ag(I) are prone to be captured by the bio-dots due to the existence of residual thymine (T) and cytosine (C) groups, resulting in a quenched fluorescence while other heavy metal ions would cause negligible changes on the fluorescent signals of the bio-dots. The bio-dots could be used as highly selective toxic-free biosensors, with two detecting linear ranges of 0-0.5 μM and 0.5-6 μM for Hg(II) and one linear range of 0-10 μM for Ag(I). The detection limits (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) were estimated to be 48 nM for Hg(II) and 0.31 μM for Ag(I), respectively. The detection of Hg(II) and Ag(I) could also be realized in the real water sample analyses, with satisfying recoveries ranging from 87% to 100%.

  14. Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer detection limits and thermal energy analyzer interface status report and present capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A.; Andresen, B.; Martin, W.

    1990-10-18

    A new Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer was purchased and installed at LLNL. Over a period of several months the instrument was tested under a variety of conditions utilizing a capillary gas chromatography interface which allowed separated organic compounds to be carried directly into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. This direct interface allowed maximum analytical sensitivity. A variety of critical tests were performed in order to optimize the sensitivity of the system under a variety of analysis conditions. These tests altered the critical time cycles of the ionization, ion trapping, and detection. Various carrier gas pressures were also employed in order to ascertain the overall sensitivity of the instrument. In addition we have also interfaced a thermal energy analyzer (TEA) to the gas chromatograph in order to simultaneously detect volatile nitrogen containing compounds while mass spectral data is being acquired. This is the first application at this laboratory of simultaneous ultra-trace detections while utilizing two orthogonal analytical techniques. In particular, explosive-related compound and/or residues are of interest to the general community in water, soil and gas sampler. In this paper are highlighted a few examples of the analytical power of this new GC-TEA-ITMS technology.

  15. Generation and detection of metal ions and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the pretreatment processes for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Guangxu; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    The recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries brings benefits to both economic and environmental terms, but it can also lead to contaminants in a workshop environment. This study focused on metals, non-metals and volatile organic compounds generated by the discharging and dismantling pretreatment processes which are prerequisite for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries. After discharging in NaCl solution, metal contents in supernate and concentrated liquor were detected. Among results of condition #2, #3, #4 and #5, supernate and concentrated liquor contain high levels of Na, Al, Fe; middle levels of Co, Li, Cu, Ca, Zn; and low levels of Mn, Sn, Cr, Zn, Ba, K, Mg, V. The Hg, Ag, Cr and V are not detected in any of the analyzed supernate. 10wt% NaCl solution was a better discharging condition for high discharge efficiency, less possible harm to environment. To collect the gas released from dismantled LIB belts, a set of gas collecting system devices was designed independently. Two predominant organic vapour compounds were dimethyl carbonate (4.298mgh(-1)) and tert-amylbenzene (0.749mgh(-1)) from one dismantled battery cell. To make sure the concentrations of dimethyl carbonate under recommended industrial exposure limit (REL) of 100mgL(-1), for a workshop on dismantling capacity of 1000kg spent LIBs, the minimum flow rate of ventilating pump should be 235.16m(3)h(-1). PMID:27021697

  16. Intracellular detection of Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions through a quinazoline functionalized benzimidazole-based new fluorogenic differential chemosensor.

    PubMed

    Paul, Anup; Anbu, Sellamuthu; Sharma, Gunjan; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Koch, Biplob; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2015-10-14

    A new quinazoline functionalized benzimidazole-based fluorogenic chemosensor H3L is synthesized and fully characterized by conventional techniques including single crystal X-ray analysis. It acts as a highly selective colorimetric and fluorescence sensor for Cu(2+) ions in DMF/0.02 M HEPES (1 : 1, v/v, pH = 7.4) medium. Reaction of H3L with CuCl2 forms a mononuclear copper(ii) [Cu(Cl)(H2L)(H2O)] (H2L-Cu(2+)) complex which is characterized by conventional techniques and quantum chemical calculations. Electronic absorption and fluorescence titration studies of H3L with different metal cations show a distinctive recognition only towards Cu(2+) ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting ions such as Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+). Moreover, H2L-Cu(2+) acts as a metal based highly selective and sensitive chemosensor for S(2-) ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting anions such as F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), SO4(2-), SCN(-), AcO(-), H2PO4(-), PO4(3-), NO3(-), ClO4(-), NO2(-), HSO4(-), HSO4(2-), S2O3(2-), S2O8(2-), CN(-), CO3(2-) and HCO3(-) in DMF/0.02 M HEPES (1 : 1, v/v, pH = 7.4) medium. Quantification analysis indicates that these receptors, H3L and H2L-Cu(2+), can detect the presence of Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions at very low concentrations of 1.6 × 10(-9) M and 5.2 × 10(-6) M, respectively. The propensity of H3L as a bio-imaging fluorescent probe for detection of Cu(2+) ions and sequential detection of S(2-) ions by H2L-Cu(2+) in Dalton lymphoma (DL) cancer cells is also shown. PMID:26370442

  17. Negative-ion formation in the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT using the Reversal Electron Attachment Detection (READ) technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutijian, Ara; Boumsellek, S.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the search for high sensitivity and direct atmospheric sampling of trace species, techniques have been developed such as atmospheric-sampling, glow-discharge ionization (ASGDI), corona discharge, atmospheric pressure ionization (API), electron-capture detection (ECD), and negative-ion chemical ionization (NICI) that are capable of detecting parts-per-billion to parts-per-trillion concentrations of trace species. These techniques are based on positive- or negative-ion formation via charge-transfer to the target, or electron capture under multiple-collision conditions in a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies at the source temperature. One drawback of the high-pressure, corona- or glow-discharge devices is that they are susceptible to interferences either through indistinguishable product masses, or through undesired ion-molecule reactions. The ASGDI technique is relatively immune from such interferences, since at target concentrations of less than 1 ppm the majority of negative ions arises via electron capture rather than through ion-molecule chemistry. A drawback of the conventional ECD, and possibly of the ASGDI, is that they exhibit vanishingly small densities of electrons with energies in the range 0-10 millielectron volts (meV), as can be seen from a typical Maxwellian electron energy distribution function at T = 300 K. Slowing the electrons to these subthermal (less than 10 meV) energies is crucial, since the cross section for attachment of several large classes of molecules is known to increase to values larger than 10(exp -12) sq cm at near-zero electron energies. In the limit of zero energy these cross sections are predicted to diverge as epsilon(exp -1/2), where epsilon is the electron energy. In order to provide a better 'match' between the electron energy distribution function and attachment cross section, a new concept of attachment in an electrostatic mirror was developed. In this scheme, electrons are brought to a momentary halt by

  18. Selective and simultaneous determination of phosphate and silicate ions in leaching process waters for ceramics glaze raw materials of narutal origin by ion-exclusion chromatography coupled with UV-detection after postcolumn derivatization.

    PubMed

    Ikedo, Mikaru; Mori, Masanobu; Kurachi, Kazumasa; Hu, Wenzhi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The selective and simultaneous ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) with UV-detection on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column in the H+ -form (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) was developed and applied for the simultaneous determination of phosphate and silicate ions as the water quality parameters required for optimizing the water-leaching process for ceramics glaze raw materials of natural origin including feldspar, woods-ash, and straw-ash. Phosphate and silicate ions in these water-leaching process water samples were separated selectively from the coexisting anions such as sulfate, chloride, nitrate and carbonate ions, based on the ion-exclusion separation mechanism. They were detected selectively and simultaneously by a postcolumn derivatization with molybdenum-yellow using the UV-detector. Under the optimized separation and detection conditions (eluent, 0-1 mM sulfuric acid; reactant, 10 mM sodium molybdate-25 mM sulfuric acid; detector, UV at 370 nm; temperature, 45 degrees C), the linearity of calibration was in the range 0.1 - 10 ppm for both phosphate and silicate ions, and the detection limits at S/N = 3 were 2.58 ppb for silicate ions and 4.75 ppb for phosphate ions. The effectiveness of this method was demonstrated in practical applications to the water-leaching process for some ceramics glaze raw materials. PMID:16429785

  19. Note: Optimized circuit for excitation and detection with one pair of electrodes for improved Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, T; Beu, S C; Kaiser, N K; Hendrickson, C L

    2014-06-01

    A conventional Fourier transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ICR) detection cell is azimuthally divided into four equal sections. One pair of opposed electrodes is used for ion cyclotron excitation, and the other pair for ion image charge detection. In this work, we demonstrate that an appropriate electrical circuit facilitates excitation and detection on one pair of opposed electrodes. The new scheme can be used to minimize the number of electrically independent ICR cell electrodes and/or improve the electrode geometry for simultaneously increased ICR signal magnitude and optimal post-excitation radius, which results in higher signal-to-noise ratio and decreased space-charge effects. PMID:24985871

  20. Single glass nanopore-based regenerable sensing platforms with a non-immobilized polyglutamic acid probe for selective detection of cupric ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lizhen; He, Haili; Xu, Xiaolong; Jin, Yongdong

    2015-08-19

    A single glass capillary nanopore-based sensing platform for rapid and selective detection of cupric ions is demonstrated by utilizing polyglutamic acid (PGA) as a non-immobilized probe. The detection is based on the significant decrease of ionic current through nanopore and the reversal of ion current rectification responses induced by the chelated cupric ions on the probes when in the presence of cupric ions. PGA shows high selectivity for detecting cupric ions rather than other metal ions. The sensitivity of the sensing platform can be improved about 1-2 orders of magnitude by employing asymmetric salt gradients during the measurements. And the PGA-based nanopore sensing platform shows excellent regenerability for Cu(2+) sensing applications. In addition, the method is found effective and reliable for the detection of cupric ions in real samples with small volume down to 20 μL. This nanopore-based sensing platform will find promising practical applications for the detection of cupric ions. PMID:26343431