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1

Assessment of Anger Coping Skills in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent controlled studies have supported the effectiveness of anger management training for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). This report describes an evaluation instrument designed to assess their usage of specific anger coping skills. The Profile of Anger Coping Skills (PACS) is designed for completion by a staff member or carer.…

Willner, P.; Brace, N.; Phillips, J.

2005-01-01

2

Coping Skills Training and the Prevention of Fears.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a systematic research program examining the remedial and preventive effects of coping skills training for the management of anxiety. The general conceptual/methodological frameworks guiding the project, the rationale behind selection of fears as the target problem, and the coping skills training as the preventive intervention…

Barrios, Billy A.; And Others

3

Peer Attachment, Coping, and Self-Esteem in Institutionalized Adolescents: The Mediating Role of Social Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study analyzes the contribution of peer attachment in predicting active coping and self-esteem in a sample of 109 institutionalized adolescents. It also explores the mediating role of social skills in the association between peer attachment, coping, and self-esteem. Structural equation modeling identified a model able to predict a positive

Mota, Catarina Pinheiro; Matos, Paula Mena

2013-01-01

4

Coping Skills Among Adolescent Suicide Attempters: Results of a Multisite Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives: A multisite study was undertaken to advance our understanding of how coping skills, depression, and suicidal ideation are related among adolescents who attempt suicide. Two hypotheses were postulated: productive coping and nonproductive coping would be associated, respectively, with lower and higher depression scores when age, sex, and stressful life events (SLEs) were controlled; and productive coping and nonproductive coping would be associated, respectively, with the presence and absence of suicidal ideation when age, sex, and SLEs were controlled. Methods: Participants were 167 adolescents (13 to 17 years of age) hospitalized for attempting suicide in 5 pediatric departments across France. Four instruments were administered: the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia—Present and Lifetime Version, the Adolescent Coping Scale, the Life Events Questionnaire, and the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Descriptive analyses and univariate and multiple regression models were completed. Results: Both hypotheses were confirmed. Focus on the positive emerged as a significant variable in both models; depression emerged as a significant variable in the suicidal ideation model. The only sex difference observed was that girls made greater use of wishful thinking and seek social support. Conclusions: These findings suggest that coping skills are important mechanisms through which depression and suicidal ideation are maintained after attempting suicide. In intervening with adolescents who have attempted suicide, it may be useful to emphasize cognitive work geared to looking on the bright side, positive thinking, and fighting depression.

Mirkovic, Bojan; Labelle, Réal; Guilé, Jean-Marc; Belloncle, Vincent; Bodeau, Nicolas; Knafo, Alexandra; Condat, Agnès; Bapt-Cazalets, Nathalie; Marguet, Christophe; Breton, Jean-Jacques; Cohen, David; Gérardin, Priscille

2015-01-01

5

Midwifery and Nursing Students’ Communication Skills and Life Orientation: Correlation with Stress Coping Approaches  

PubMed Central

Background: Methods learnt by nursing and midwifery students’ such as communication skills, optimisim and coping with stress would be used in their profeesional life. It is very important to promote their positive thinking and communication skills to raise coping with stress. Objectives: This cross sectional study was performed to examine the nursing and midwifery students’ communication skills and optimistic life orientation and its correlation with coping strategies with stress. Materials and Methods: The study population included 2572 students who were studying in departments of nursing and midwifery in Istanbul. The sample was included 1419 students. Three questionnaires including Communication Skills Test, Life Orientation Test and Ways of Coping Inventory were used for data collection. The data were evaluated by calculating frequency, percentage, arithmetic mean, standard deviation and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Students’ total mean score from the Communication Skills Scale was 165.27 ± 15.39 and for the Life Orientation Test was 18.51 ± 4.54. There was a positive correlation between their Life Orientation scores and the scores for self confidence (r = 0.34, P < 0.001), optimistic approach (r = 0.42, P < 0.001), and seeking social help (r = 0.17, P < 0.001). Also there was a significant positive correlation between Communication skill scores and self confidence (r = 0.46, P < 0.001), optimistic (r = 0.37, P < 0.001) and seeking social help approaches (r = 0.29, P < 0.001), but there was a significant negative correlation between communication skill scores and scores for helpless (r = -0.29, P < 0.001) and submissive approaches (r = -0.36, P < 0.001). Conclusions: As scores of students in optimistic life orientation and communication skills increased self confidence approach, optimistic, and social support seeking scores increased, whereas helpless, and submissive scores decreased. PMID:25414859

Özdemir, Gülsün; Kaya, Hatice

2013-01-01

6

Treatment Expectation for Pain Coping Skills Training: Relationship to Osteoarthritis Patients' Baseline Psychosocial Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study examined predictors of treatment expectation among osteoarthritis (OA) patients in a multi-site clinical trial of pain coping strategies training (CST). Methods Patients (N=171) completed a pre-treatment assessment battery that asked questions about treatment expectations, pain coping variables, pain, physical function, psychological distress, quality of life, and depression as well as background demographic and medical variables. Results Regression analyses indicated that several variables accounted for 21% of the variance in treatment expectations (p < .0001). Patients who were classified as adaptive copers, reported higher self efficacy and social interaction, had higher quality of life, and who had lower levels of affective distress and depression had more positive expectations about engaging in pain coping skills training. Variables that were not associated with treatment expectation were level of pain and physical dysfunction, duration of disease, and disability status as well as demographic variables. Discussion Thus, while many OA patients will approach pain coping skills training with positive expectations, others have lower expectations. This study suggests that a multidimensional assessment of OA patients with chronic pain can identify those who have higher expectations versus lower expectations. The results suggest that patients who are psychologically distressed are less optimistic about engaging in treatment and that these patients, in particular, may benefit from and need pre-treatment motivational interviewing to enhance their uptake of pain coping skills PMID:21178591

Broderick, Joan E.; Junghaenel, Doerte U.; Schneider, Stefan; Bruckenthal, Patricia; Keefe, Francis J.

2010-01-01

7

Positive and Negative Religious Coping in German Breast Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

A growing interest has been focusing on the relationship between religious coping and psychosocial adjustment among cancer patients. However, previous research mostly has not differentiated between positive and negative components of religious coping. The current cross-sectional study investigated the role of both positive religious coping, i.e., a confident and constructive turning to religion, and negative religious coping, i.e., religious struggle

Christian Zwingmann; Markus Wirtz; Claudia Müller; Jürgen Körber; Sebastian Murken

2006-01-01

8

The Effects of a Coping Skills Training Program on the Coping Skills, Hopelessness, and Stress Levels of Mothers of Children with Autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to explore the effects of a coping skills training program on stress, and hopelessness levels and coping skills of mothers of children with autism the age range of children was 12–19 for the experimental group and 11–17 for the control group. Twenty mothers of children with autism were assigned to a treatment group and

B. Ergüner-Tekinalp; F. Akkök

2004-01-01

9

Coping Effectively with Heart Failure (COPE-HF): Design and Rationale of a Telephone-based Coping Skills Intervention  

PubMed Central

Background Coping Effectively with Heart Failure (COPE-HF) is an ongoing randomized clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health to evaluate if a Coping Skills Training (CST) intervention will result in improved health status and quality of life as well as reduced mortality and hospitalizations compared to a Heart Failure Education (HFE) intervention. Methods Two hundred heart failure (HF) patients recruited from Duke University Medical Center and the University of North Carolina Hospital systems will be randomized to a CST intervention (16 weekly, 30 minute telephone counselling sessions including motivational interviewing and individually tailored cognitive behavioral therapy) or to an HFE intervention (16 weekly, 30 minute telephone sessions including education and symptom monitoring). Primary outcomes will include post-intervention effects on HF biomarkers (B-Type naturetic peptide, ejection fraction) and quality of life, as well as long-term clinical outcomes (hospitalizations and death). Secondary analyses will include an evaluation of treatment effects across subpopulations, and potential mechanisms by which CST may improve clinical outcomes. Conclusions COPE-HF is a proof-of-concept study that should provide important insights into the health benefits of a CST intervention designed to enhance HF self-management, improve health behaviors, and reduce psychological distress. PMID:21362527

Sherwood, Andrew; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Routledge, Faye S.; Hinderliter, Alan L.; Watkins, Lana L.; Babyak, Michael A.; Koch, Gary G.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Dupree, Carla Sueta; Chang, Patricia P.; Hoffman, Benson M.; Johnson, Julie; Bowers, Margaret; Johnson, Kristy S.; Blumenthal, James A.

2010-01-01

10

Group Coping Skills Instruction and Supportive Group Therapy for Cancer Patients: A Comparison of Strategies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared relative efficacy of comprehensive group coping skills training and supportive group therapy for enhancing cancer patients' adjustment to their disease. Subjects were 41 cancer patients exhibiting a marked degree of psychosocial distress. Results demonstrated a consistent superiority of coping skills intervention over supportive group…

Telch, Christy F.; Telch, Michael J.

1986-01-01

11

Group Coping Skills Instruction and Supportive Group Therapy for Cancer Patients: A Comparison of Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study compared the relative efficacy of comprehensive group coping skills training and supportive group therapy for enhancing cancer patients' adjustment to their disease. Forty-one cancer patients exhibiting a marked degree of psychosocial distress were randomized to one of three conditions: (a) group coping skills instruction, (b) support group therapy, and (c) no-treatment control. Support group sessions were nondirective

Christy F. Telch; Michael J. Telch

1986-01-01

12

Coping Skills Training for Children: Effects on Distress Before, During, and After Hospitalization for Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-three parent–child dyads (children’s mean age = 7.2 years, SD = 1.2) were randomly assigned to information, anxiety reduction, or coping skills presurgical preparatory interventions. All groups received the \\

Thomas R. Zastowny; Daniel S. Kirschenbaum; Anne L. Meng

1986-01-01

13

Grief and trauma intervention for children after disaster: exploring coping skills versus trauma narration.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the differential effects of the Grief and Trauma Intervention (GTI) with coping skills and trauma narrative processing (CN) and coping skills only (C). Seventy African American children (6-12 years old) were randomly assigned to GTI-CN or GTI-C. Both treatments consisted of a manualized 11-session intervention and a parent meeting. Measures of trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, depression, traumatic grief, global distress, social support, and parent reported behavioral problems were administered at pre, post, 3 and 12 months post intervention. In general, children in both treatment groups demonstrated significant improvements in distress related symptoms and social support, which, with the exception of externalizing symptoms for GTI-C, were maintained up to 12 months post intervention. Results suggest that building coping skills without the structured trauma narrative may be a viable intervention to achieve symptom relief in children experiencing trauma-related distress. However, it may be that highly distressed children experience more symptom relief with coping skills plus narrative processing than with coping skills alone. More research on the differential effects of coping skills and trauma narration on child distress and adaptive functioning outcomes is needed. PMID:22317753

Salloum, Alison; Overstreet, Stacy

2012-03-01

14

Parents of Children with Special Health Care Needs Who have Better Coping Skills have Fewer Depressive Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives Describe and quantify coping skills and prevalence of depressive symptoms in parents of children with special health care\\u000a needs (CSHCN). Describe the association of coping skills with parental depressive symptoms, severity of child’s condition\\u000a and family demographic characteristics. Methods A baseline questionnaire was administered to parents of CSHCN 2–11 years old. Data were analyzed cross-sectionally. Coping\\u000a skills were assessed using

Shervin S. Churchill; Nanci L. Villareale; Teresa A. Monaghan; Virginia L. Sharp; Gail M. Kieckhefer

2010-01-01

15

How they cope: a qualitative study of the coping skills of hospice volunteers.  

PubMed

The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the coping techniques utilized by hospice volunteers. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 hospice volunteers who had at least 1 year of experience, working as a hospice volunteer with direct patient care. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed utilizing qualitative research methods. The results indicated the volunteers used problem-focused coping (seeking advice from members of the hospice interdisciplinary team), emotion-focused coping (talking with others, going to funerals), meaning making through appraisal (religious beliefs, downward comparison), and physical techniques (walking, deep breathing). The most significant coping mechanism utilized for the volunteer was talking with the volunteer coordinator. Implications for hospice volunteer coordinators are also discussed. PMID:21262760

Brown, Mary V

2011-09-01

16

Web-Based Coping Skills Training for Women Whose Partner Has a Drinking Problem.  

PubMed

Spouses whose partner has an alcohol use disorder can experience considerable psychological distress. Yet, because of social, financial, relationship, and psychological barriers they often remain hidden and underserved. To partially reduce treatment barriers for this population, this study evaluated the short-term efficacy of a self-paced, web-delivered coping skills training program for women experiencing distress as a result of living with a partner with an alcohol use disorder. Participants (N = 89) were randomly assigned to either 8 weeks of an Internet-administered coping skills training program (iCST), or an 8-week delayed treatment control (DTC). Participation in, and satisfaction with iCST was high. At the end of the 8-week access/delay period, iCST participants exhibited a significantly higher level of coping skills relative to DTC, d = 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI; .64, 1.51], and reported significantly fewer depressive symptoms, d = -.65, 95% CI [-1.21, -.35], and situational anger, d = -.70, 95% CI [-1.62, -.64]. Moreover, iCST appeared to prevent an increase in symptoms among those with low baseline symptom levels; DTC did not. Skill acquisition appeared to partially mediate changes observed. Online coping skills training may be an effective way of reaching and helping a large number of this frequently underserved population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25347016

Rychtarik, Robert G; McGillicuddy, Neil B; Barrick, Christopher

2014-10-27

17

Checklist of Coping Skills: An Early Childhood Special Education Observation Schedule.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is a checklist developed by the Austin Early Childhood Special Education Program to help teachers evaluate children's classroom behavior and coping skills. It is explained that results of the checklist should provide information on such factors as possible underlying problems experienced by a student, situations in which a student…

Becker, Ruth W.

18

Acculturation, Coping Styles, and Health Risk Behaviors Among HIV Positive Latinas  

PubMed Central

This study examined the relationships among acculturation, coping styles, substance use, sexual risk behavior, and medication non-adherence among 219 Latinas living with HIV/AIDS in Los Angeles, CA. Coping styles were hypothesized to mediate the link between acculturation and health risk behaviors for HIV positive Latinas. Structural equation modeling revealed that greater acculturation was related to less positive coping and more negative coping. In turn, negative coping was associated with more health risk behaviors and more non-adherence. Positive coping was associated with less substance use as reflected in use of cigarettes and alcohol and less non-adherence. Coping styles mediated the relationship between acculturation and health risk behaviors. Findings echo previous works examining the Hispanic Health Paradox wherein more acculturated Latinos exhibit increased risk behavior and maladaptive coping styles. HIV/AIDS interventions need to be mindful of cultural differences within Hispanic populations and be tailored to address these differences. PMID:19847637

Sánchez, Mónica; Stein, Judith; Milburn, Norweeta G.; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

2010-01-01

19

Positive and Negative Religious Coping and Well-Being in Women with Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Positive and Negative Religious Coping and Well-Being in Women with Breast Cancer Randy Hebert, M with breast cancer turned to religion to cope. Religious coping can be conceptualized in different ways. Most with stage IV stage breast cancer were recruited. Standardized assessment instruments and structured

Sheikh, Yaser Ajmal

20

The Unique Contributions of Positive and Negative Religious Coping to Posttraumatic Growth and PTSD  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study assessed relationships between religious coping, gender, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posttraumatic growth (PTG). A sample of 1,016 participants completed measures of these constructs during an online mass testing procedure. Overall, positive religious coping was more strongly related to PTG and negative religious coping was more strongly related to PTSD. These relationships remained significant after controlling for

Monica M. Gerber; Adriel Boals; Darnell Schuettler

2011-01-01

21

A controlled examination of two coping skills for daily alcohol use and PTSD symptom severity among dually diagnosed individuals.  

PubMed

Investigations of targeted coping skills could help guide initial treatment decisions for individuals with co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol dependence (AD) who often endorse worse coping skills than those with AD but not PTSD. Although improvement in coping skills is associated with enhanced alcohol use outcomes, no study has evaluated the utility of teaching specific coping skills in the context of comorbid PTSD/AD. We compared the effects of teaching two coping skills (cognitive restructuring [CR] and experiential acceptance [EA]) or an attention control condition on drinking and PTSD symptoms among 78 men and women with comorbid PTSD/AD during a 5-week daily follow-up assessment. Both CR and EA skills were associated with decreased drinking compared to control, and that change in drinking over time did not significantly differ between those who received CR and EA. Individuals who received CR skills, however, consumed less alcohol on a given day than those who received EA skills. Neither CR nor EA was associated with a decrease in PTSD symptom severity. These results provide preliminary support for clinicians to prioritize CR and EA skills during initial treatment sessions when working with individuals with PTSD/AD, and offer ideas for continued investigation and intervention refinement. PMID:25617814

Stappenbeck, Cynthia A; Luterek, Jane A; Kaysen, Debra; Rosenthal, Christina F; Gurrad, Bethann; Simpson, Tracy L

2015-03-01

22

Preliminary Evaluation of a Coping Skills Training Program for Those with a Pathological-Gambling Partner  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals living with a pathological-gambling partner can experience significant psychological distress. In this report, we conduct a preliminary evaluation of a coping skills training program (CST) for this population. Twenty-three individuals experiencing stress from living with a pathological-gambling partner who was not in treatment were randomly assigned to either CST or a delayed treatment control (DTC) condition. CST consisted of

Robert G. Rychtarik; Neil B. McGillicuddy

2006-01-01

23

Influence of Personal Social Network and Coping Skills on Risk for Suicidal Ideation in Chinese University Students  

PubMed Central

Background Personal social network and coping skills have important influences on suicidality of young people and such influences must be understood in the context of other factors. This study aims to assess the influences of social contacts and coping skills on risk for suicidal ideation and to disentangle their possible pathways using a large sample of university students from China. Methods 5972 students, randomly selected from 6 universities in China, completed the questionnaire survey for the study. Logistic regression was performed to estimate individual effect of social contacts and coping skills on risk for suicidal ideation. A partial least squares path model (PLSPM) was used to probe possible paths of their effects in the context of psychopathology. Results Of the 5972 students, 16.39% reported the presence of suicidal ideation. Poor social contacts were significantly associated with an increased risk for suicidal ideation. The influence of coping skills varied by coping styles adapted toward problems. A high score of skills on seeking guidance and support, problem solving as well as seeking alternative rewards was associated with a reduced risk of suicidal ideation; whereas a high score of acceptance or resignation, emotional discharge as well as logical analysis was associated with a significantly increased risk. Modeling the data with PLSPM indicated that the avoidance coping skills conferred the most important dimensional variable in suicidal ideation prediction, followed by the approach coping skills and social network. Conclusions Poor social contacts and deficient coping skills are strong risk factors for suicidal ideation in young students. Prevention program focusing on these problems may have an enduring effect on reducing suicidal behavior in this population. PMID:25803665

Tang, Fang; Qin, Ping

2015-01-01

24

Automated Internet-based pain coping skills training to manage osteoarthritis pain: a randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) places a significant burden on worldwide public health because of the large and growing number of people affected by OA and its associated pain and disability. Pain coping skills training (PCST) is an evidence-based intervention targeting OA pain and disability. To reduce barriers that currently limit access to PCST, we developed an 8-week, automated, Internet-based PCST program called PainCOACH and evaluated its potential efficacy and acceptability in a small-scale, 2-arm randomized controlled feasibility trial. Participants were 113 men and women with clinically confirmed hip or knee OA and associated pain. They were randomized to a group completing PainCOACH or an assessment-only control group. Osteoarthritis pain, pain-related interference with functioning, pain-related anxiety, self-efficacy for pain management, and positive and negative affect were measured before intervention, midway through the intervention, and after intervention. Findings indicated high acceptability and adherence: 91% of participants randomized to complete PainCOACH finished all 8 modules over 8 to 10 weeks. Linear mixed models showed that, after treatment, women who received the PainCOACH intervention reported significantly lower pain than that in women in the control group (Cohen d = 0.33). Intervention effects could not be tested in men because of their low pain and small sample size. Additionally, both men and women demonstrated increases in self-efficacy from baseline to after intervention compared with the control group (d = 0.43). Smaller effects were observed for pain-related anxiety (d = 0.20), pain-related interference with functioning (d = 0.13), negative affect (d = 0.10), and positive affect (d = 0.24). Findings underscore the value of continuing to develop an automated Internet-based approach to disseminate this empirically supported intervention. PMID:25734997

Rini, Christine; Porter, Laura S; Somers, Tamara J; McKee, Daphne C; DeVellis, Robert F; Smith, Meredith; Winkel, Gary; Ahern, David K; Goldman, Roberta; Stiller, Jamie L; Mariani, Cara; Patterson, Carol; Jordan, Joanne M; Caldwell, David S; Keefe, Francis J

2015-05-01

25

Acculturation, Coping Styles, and Health Risk Behaviors Among HIV Positive Latinas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationships among acculturation, coping styles, substance use, sexual risk behavior, and medication\\u000a non-adherence among 219 Latinas living with HIV\\/AIDS in Los Angeles, CA. Coping styles were hypothesized to mediate the link\\u000a between acculturation and health risk behaviors for HIV positive Latinas. Structural equation modeling revealed that greater\\u000a acculturation was related to less positive coping and more

Mónica Sánchez; Eric Rice; Judith Stein; Norweeta G. Milburn; Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus

2010-01-01

26

A Feasibility Study of Virtual Reality-Based Coping Skills Training for Nicotine Dependence  

PubMed Central

Objective Virtual reality (VR)-based cue reactivity has been successfully used for the assessment of drug craving. Going beyond assessment of cue reactivity, a novel VR-based treatment approach for smoking cessation was developed and tested for feasibility. Method In a randomized experiment, 10-week treatment feasibility trial, 46 nicotine-dependent adults, completed the10-week program. Virtual reality skills training (VRST) combined with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) was compared to NRT alone. Participants were assessed for smoking behavior and coping skills during, at end of treatment, and at posttreatment follow-up. Results Smoking rates and craving for nicotine were significantly lower for the VRST group compared to NRT-only group at the end of treatment. Self-confidence and coping skills were also significantly higher for the VRST group, and number of cigarettes smoked was significantly lower, compared to the control group at follow-up. Conclusions Feasibility of VRST was supported in the current study. PMID:25484549

Bordnick, Patrick S.; Traylor, Amy C.; Carter, Brian L.; Graap, Ken M.

2014-01-01

27

Positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and coping with stress by attachment styles in Turkish students.  

PubMed

The purpose was to investigate positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and coping with stress in relation to attachment styles. Undergraduate students (N=421) completed the Relationship Scales Questionnaire, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, the Satisfaction With Life Scale, and the Coping with Stress Scale. Results indicated that secure attachment style was the unique predictor of positive affect while fearful and preoccupied attachment styles significantly predicted negative affect. Regarding life satisfaction, a positive correlation with secure attachment style and a negative correlation with fearful and preoccupied styles were seen. However, the unique predictor of life satisfaction was preoccupied attachment style. In terms of coping with stress, there was no significant association between attachment variables and avoidance coping style, but significant links were observed between problem-focused coping and dismissing, and fearful and preoccupied attachment styles. PMID:21117473

Deniz, M Engin; I?ik, Erkan

2010-10-01

28

Adding voucher-based incentives to coping skills and motivational enhancement improves outcomes during treatment for marijuana dependence.  

PubMed

Sixty individuals seeking outpatient treatment for marijuana dependence were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: motivational enhancement (M), M plus behavioral coping skills therapy (MBT), or MBT plus voucher-based incentives (MBTV). In the voucher-based incentive program, participants earned vouchers exchangeable for retail items contingent on them submitting cannabinoid-negative urine specimens. MBTV engendered significantly greater durations of documented marijuana abstinence during treatment compared with MBT and M, and a greater percentage of participants in the MBTV group compared with the MBT or M groups were abstinent at the end of treatment. No significant differences in marijuana abstinence were observed between the MBT and M groups. The positive effects of the voucher program in this study support the utility of incentive-based interventions for the treatment of substance dependence disorders including marijuana dependence. PMID:11142539

Budney, A J; Higgins, S T; Radonovich, K J; Novy, P L

2000-12-01

29

Positive and Negative Religious Coping and Well-Being in Women with Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Although religions is important to many people with cancer, few studies have explored the relationship between religious coping and well-being in a prospective manner, using validated measures, while controlling for important covariates. Methods One hundred ninety-eight women with stage I or II and 86 women with stage IV stage breast cancer were recruited. Standardized assessment instruments and structured questions were used to collect data at study entry and 8 to 12 months later. Religious coping was measured with validated measures of positive and negative religious coping. Linear regression models were used to explore the relationships between positive and negative religious coping and overall physical and mental well-being, depression, and life satisfaction. Results The percentage of women who used positive religious coping (i.e., partnering with God or looking to God for strength, support, or guidance) “a moderate amount” or “a lot” was 76%. Negative religious coping (i.e., feeling abandoned by or anger at God) was much less prevalent; 15% of women reported feeling abandoned by or angry at God at least “a little.” Positive religious coping was not associated with any measures of well-being. Negative religious coping predicted worse overall mental health, depressive symptoms, and lower life satisfaction after controlling for sociodemographics and other covariates. In addition, changes in negative religious coping from study entry to follow-up predicted changes in these well-being measures over the same time period. Cancer stage did not moderate the relationships between religious coping and well-being. Conclusions Negative religious coping methods predict worse mental heath and life satisfaction in women with breast cancer. PMID:19508140

Zdaniuk, Bozena; Schulz, Richard; Scheier, Michael

2009-01-01

30

Coping Skills Training in a Telephone Health Coaching Program for Youth at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Introduction The purpose of this paper is to describe components of a health coaching intervention based on coping skills training delivered via telephone. This intervention was provided to urban adolescents at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), reinforcing a school-based curriculum designed to promote a healthy lifestyle and prevent T2DM. Method Health coaching via telephone was provided to at-risk, urban youth enrolled in a study of an intervention to reduce risk for T2DM. Vignettes are used to describe the use of several coping skills in this high risk youth population. Results A variety of vignettes illustrate how telephone health coaching reinforced lifestyle changes in students by incorporating coping skills training. Discussion Given the benefits and the challenges of the telephone health coaching intervention, several suggestions for others who plan to use a similar method are described. PMID:21514490

Jefferson, Vanessa; Jaser, Sarah S.; Lindemann, Evie; Galasso, Pamela; Beale, Alison; Holl, Marita G.; Grey, Margaret

2010-01-01

31

Beyond Stress and Coping: The Positive Psychology of Transformation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Often, it is easier to study a subject than to define it. Anyone foolish enough to attempt a comprehensive and universally acceptable definition of human culture would be like a blind person trying to describe an elephant. A similar difficulty exists in defining the psychology of stress and coping. Nevertheless, we cannot simply run away from these challenges; we still

Paul T. P. Wong; Lilian C. J. Wong; Carolyn Scott

32

The Shortage of Skilled Workers. Position Papers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence gathered through interviews with members of trade associations, unions, professional societies, business, and industry as well as data obtained from the Department of Labor, congressional testimony, and publications of the commerical and trade press reveals that the shortage of skilled workers in America is reaching crisis proportions.…

American Vocational Association, Arlington, VA.

33

Positive and negative responses to personal discrimination: does coping make a difference?  

PubMed

Although researches (e.g., K. L. Dion, K. K. Dion, & A. W.-p. Pak, 1992) have associated perceiving personal discrimination with negative psychological symptoms, group consciousness theorists (e.g., S. L. Bartky, 1977) have suggested that perceiving personal discrimination can be empowering. To attempt to reconcile these presumably opposing findings, the author suggested that the method of coping with perceiving personal discrimination would better predict whether the outcomes are negative or positive than would the perception of personal discrimination alone. Female university students (N = 262) in the United States completed questionnaires assessing perceptions of personal discrimination, psychological symptoms, and psychosocial behaviors. Coping mechanisms predicted psychosocial behaviors better than did personal discrimination: The more the participants used social support to cope, the more collective action and less helplessness behavior they reported. Also, the more the participants used avoidance to cope, the more helplessness behavior they reported. PMID:10705672

Foster, M D

2000-02-01

34

Exploring the Language of Youth Purpose: References to Positive States and Coping Styles by Adolescents with Different Kinds of Purpose  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used an exploratory mixed methods design to address the questions: (1) "Is there a positive language of youth purpose, and if so, what is it like?" and (2) "Which kinds of purpose best predict reports of positive states and coping styles?" Qualitative coding identified references to positive states and coping strategies in 172…

Mariano, Jennifer Menon; Savage, Jessica

2009-01-01

35

Dyslexic entrepreneurs: the incidence; their coping strategies and their business skills.  

PubMed

This comparative study explores the incidence of dyslexia in entrepreneurs, corporate managers and the general population. It examines the suggestion that dyslexic entrepreneurs develop coping strategies to manage their weaknesses, which are subsequently of benefit in the new venture creation process. Results of this study suggest that there is a significantly higher incidence of dyslexia in entrepreneurs than in the corporate management and general US and UK populations and some of the strategies they adopt to overcome dyslexia (such as delegation of tasks) may be useful in business. The study was undertaken in two parts. First, entrepreneurs and corporate managers completed an online questionnaire, which combined questions about their company, their management or leadership role and their business skills together with questions that were designed to explore the likely incidence of dyslexia. A follow-up study that made use of a semi-structured questionnaire explored business issues and educational experience in more depth with those who had been diagnosed as dyslexic and those who did not have any history of dyslexia or any other learning difficulty. PMID:19378286

Logan, Julie

2009-11-01

36

Social Pressure-Induced Craving in Patients with Alcohol Dependence: Application of Virtual Reality to Coping Skill Training  

PubMed Central

Objective This study was conducted to assess the interaction between alcohol cues and social pressure in the induction of alcohol craving. Methods Fourteen male patients with alcohol dependence and 14 age-matched social drinkers completed a virtual reality coping skill training program composed of four blocks according to the presence of alcohol cues (×2) and social pressure (×2). Before and after each block, the craving levels were measured using a visual analogue scale. Results Patients with alcohol dependence reported extremely high levels of craving immediately upon exposure to a virtual environment with alcohol cues, regardless of social pressure. In contrast, the craving levels of social drinkers were influenced by social pressure from virtual avatars. Conclusion Our findings imply that an alcohol cue-laden environment should interfere with the ability to use coping skills against social pressure in real-life situations. PMID:20046344

Lee, Jung Suk; Namkoong, Kee; Ku, Jeonghun; Cho, Sangwoo; Park, Ji Yeon; Choi, You Kyong; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, In Young; Kim, Sun I.

2008-01-01

37

Anxiety, Depression, and Coping Skills Among Mexican School Children: A Comparison of Students With and Without Learning Disabilities  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to compare severity and risk status for anxiety and depression with coping skills among 130 Mexican school children with learning disabilities (LD) and 130 school children without LD. This research is the first to explore the emotional difficulties of Mexican children with LD. Children completed the Spanish version of the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale and Children’s Depression Inventory, and the Cuestionario de Afrontamiento (Coping Skills Questionnaire). Results indicated that a higher percentage of children with LD were at risk for anxiety (22.3% vs. 11.5%) and depression (32% vs. 18%). No statistically significant differences were found for coping skills. Results support the idea that there is an increased awareness of comorbid depression and anxiety among students with LD and a need to promote early identification and intervention in schools. Efforts should focus on better understanding the relationship between social-emotional difficulties and academic achievement and on developing effective interventions to support children with LD. PMID:24223470

Gallegos, Julia; Langley, Audra; Villegas, Diana

2012-01-01

38

Silver linings and candles in the dark: differences among positive coping strategies in predicting subjective well-being.  

PubMed

Ideal coping strategies enhance positive aspects of well-being as well as reduce distress. Although researchers have identified several "positive coping" strategies, it is unclear which are most strongly associated with well-being or whether all strategies are equally appropriate for all kinds of stressors. Participants completed well-being measures, and described the most negative event of the day and their emotion regulation strategies for the next 7 days. Dispositional use of positive emotion-inducing coping strategies was most strongly associated with positive aspects of well-being. Use of positive coping did not decrease with increased objective stress during the week, and use of particular strategies was partly predicted by the types of stressors that were reported. Implications for theories of positive coping are discussed. PMID:16768566

Shiota, Michelle N

2006-05-01

39

Self-Concept and Coping Skills of Female Early Adolescents in South Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the coping strategies and self-concept of Korean female early adolescents. These adolescents (n = 351) were enrolled in a middle school in Seoul. The subjects completed the Multidimensional Self-Concept Scale and Coping Responses Inventory questionnaires. The subjects exhibited the greatest…

Sung, Kyung Mi

2011-01-01

40

Immediate Psychological Impact of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Symptoms of PTSD and Coping Skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five hundred eighty-eight participants completed the Short Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Rating Interview (SPRINT; Connor & Davidson, 2001) and the Brief COPE (Carver, 1997) to determine the psychological impacts and coping styles of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Gulf Coast residents. Participants were divided into at-risk and nonrisk groups based on their occupations. Results indicated that 28% of the

Michael D. Mong; Kenji Noguchi; Brennan Ladner

2012-01-01

41

Coping Skills Help Explain How Future-Oriented Adolescents Accrue Greater Well-Being Over Time.  

PubMed

Adolescents who endorse greater levels of future orientation report greater well-being over time, but we do not know the mechanism by which this happens. The present longitudinal study examined whether both adaptive as well as maladaptive coping strategies might explain how future orientation leads to ill-being and well-being over time in young New Zealanders. A sample of 1,774 preadolescents and early adolescents (51.9 % female) aged 10-15 years at Time 1 completed a self-report survey three times with 1 year intervals in between. Longitudinal mediation path models were constructed to determine whether and how maladaptive and adaptive coping strategies at Time 2 functioned as mediators between future orientation at Time 1 and ill-being and well-being at Time 3. Results showed that future orientation predicted lower maladaptive coping, which in turn predicted lower substance use and self-harming behavior. All three well-being outcomes (i.e., happiness with weight, vitality, and sleep) were consistently predicted by future orientation, and all three pathways were mediated by both lower maladaptive and higher adaptive coping strategies (with the exception of happiness with weight, which was mediated only by lower maladaptive coping). The results suggest that several pathways by which future orientation leads to greater well-being occurs through an increased use of adaptive coping, a decreased use of maladaptive coping, or both. PMID:25427783

Chua, Li Wen; Milfont, Taciano L; Jose, Paul E

2014-11-27

42

Accentuate the Positive to Mitigate the Negative: Mother Psychological Coping Resources and Family Adjustment in Childhood Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Mothers' cognitive appraisal of the family impact of childhood disability and their positive affect as a psychological coping resource, both key elements of the process model of stress and coping, were tested as explanatory variables of family adjustment. Method: In a sample of Canadian families, 195 mothers of children with…

Trute, Barry; Benzies, Karen M.; Worthington, Catherine; Reddon, John R.; Moore, Melanie

2010-01-01

43

Pain Coping Skills Training and Lifestyle Behavioral Weight Management in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study  

PubMed Central

Overweight and obese patients with osteoarthritis (OA) experience more OA pain and disability than patients who are not overweight. This study examined the long-term efficacy of a combined pain coping skills training (PCST) and lifestyle behavioral weight management (BWM) intervention in overweight and obese OA patients. Patients (N=232) were randomized to a 6-month program of: 1) PCST + BWM; 2) PCST-only; 3) BWM-only; or 4) standard care control. Assessments of pain, physical disability (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales [AIMS] physical disability, stiffness, activity, and gait), psychological disability (AIMS psychological disability, pain catastrophizing, arthritis self-efficacy, weight self-efficacy), and body weight were collected at four time points (pretreatment, post-treatment, and 6 months and 12 months after the completion of treatment). Patients randomized to PCST+ BWM demonstrated significantly better treatment outcomes (average of all three post-treatment values) in terms of pain, physical disability, stiffness, activity, weight self-efficacy, and weight when compared to the other three conditions (p’s <.05). PCST+BWM also did significantly better than at least one of the other conditions (i.e., PCST-only, BWM-only, or standard care) in terms of psychological disability, pain catastrophizing, and arthritis self-efficacy. Interventions teaching overweight and obese OA patients pain coping skills and weight management simultaneously may provide the more comprehensive long-term benefits. PMID:22503223

Somers, Tamara J.; Blumenthal, James A.; Guilak, Farshid; Kraus, Virginia B.; Schmitt, Daniel O.; Babyak, Michael A.; Craighead, Linda W.; Caldwell, David S.; Rice, John R.; McKee, Daphne C.; Shelby, Rebecca A.; Campbell, Lisa C.; Pells, Jennifer J.; Sims, Ershela L.; Queen, Robin; Carson, James W.; Connelly, Mark; Dixon, Kim E.; LaCaille, Lara J.; Huebner, Janet L.; Rejeski, W. Jack; Keefe, Francis J.

2012-01-01

44

The Dynamics of Relationships: A Guide for Developing Self-Esteem and Coping Skills for Teens and Young Adults. Teacher Manual Books 1 and 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Dynamics of Relationships" program was originally designed as a preventive approach to the many social ills affecting young people and families today. This teacher's manual for the program provides objectives and activities for helping students develop and maintain a strong and secure self-image, effective communication and coping skills, and…

Kramer, Patricia; Hockman, Fyllis, Ed.

45

Substance Abuse, Coping Strategies, Adaptive Skills and Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Clients with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability Admitted to a Treatment Facility: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many clients with mild to borderline intellectual disability (ID) who are admitted to a treatment facility show serious problems in alcohol and/or drugs use. In the present case file study, we explored differences in coping strategies, adaptive skills and emotional and behavioral problems between clients who showed substance abuse and clients who…

Didden, Robert; Embregts, Petri; van der Toorn, Mirjam; Laarhoven, Nina

2009-01-01

46

The Interplay of Teacher and Student Characteristics that Affect Student Learning, Attitudes, and Coping Skills. Final Report of the Teaching-Learning Interaction Study. Volumes I-III.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Teaching-Learning Interaction Study tested the separate and interactive effects of teacher and student entry characteristics on their subsequent classroom behavior, and the effect of that behavior on students' regressed gain, over a school year, in achievement, attitudes toward school, self-esteem, and coping skills. Fifty-three tri-ethnic…

Peck, Robert F.; And Others

47

Expecting the Unexpected: Coping Skills for Dealing with Unexpected Classroom Situations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Every experienced management instructor has faced unexpected circumstances that precipitate a quick preparation for a class session in an ongoing course. Issues of being unprepared are put in context of both the instructor's personal feelings and the particular course and students. The article focuses on design skills and solutions that have worked for the author and her colleagues. Seven design

Sandra Morgan

1992-01-01

48

Positive Coping, Self-Efficacy, and Self-Esteem as Mediators between Seizure Severity and Life Satisfaction in Epilepsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the impact of positive psychological traits (positive coping, self-efficacy, and self-esteem) on the relationship between seizure severity and life satisfaction among individuals with epilepsy. Hierarchical regression analysis and correlation techniques were used to test a hypothesized tri-mediation model of life satisfaction…

Sung, Connie; Muller, Veronica R.; Ditchman, Nicole; Phillips, Brian; Chan, Fong

2013-01-01

49

Development and Alpha Testing of QuitIT: An Interactive Video Game to Enhance Skills for Coping With Smoking Urges  

PubMed Central

Background Despite many efforts at developing relapse prevention interventions, most smokers relapse to tobacco use within a few months after quitting. Interactive games offer a novel strategy for helping people develop the skills required for successful tobacco cessation. Objective The objective of our study was to develop a video game that enables smokers to practice strategies for coping with smoking urges and maintaining smoking abstinence. Our team of game designers and clinical psychologists are creating a video game that integrates the principles of smoking behavior change and relapse prevention. We have reported the results of expert and end-user feedback on an alpha version of the game. Methods The alpha version of the game consisted of a smoking cue scenario often encountered by smokers. We recruited 5 experts in tobacco cessation research and 20 current and former smokers, who each played through the scenario. Mixed methods were used to gather feedback on the relevance of cessation content and usability of the game modality. Results End-users rated the interface from 3.0 to 4.6/5 in terms of ease of use and from 2.9 to 4.1/5 in terms of helpfulness of cessation content. Qualitative themes showed several user suggestions for improving the user interface, pacing, and diversity of the game characters. In addition, the users confirmed a high degree of game immersion, identification with the characters and situations, and appreciation for the multiple opportunities to practice coping strategies. Conclusions This study highlights the procedures for translating behavioral principles into a game dynamic and shows that our prototype has a strong potential for engaging smokers. A video game modality exemplifies problem-based learning strategies for tobacco cessation and is an innovative step in behavioral management of tobacco use. PMID:24025236

Fiske, Jeff

2013-01-01

50

A parallel-group, randomised controlled trial of a multimedia, self-directed, coping skills training intervention for patients with cancer and their partners: design and rationale  

PubMed Central

Introduction Coping skills training interventions have been found to be efficacious in helping both patients and their partners manage the physical and emotional challenges they face following a cancer diagnosis. However, many of these interventions are costly and not sustainable. To overcome these issues, a self-directed format is increasingly used. The efficacy of self-directed interventions for patients has been supported; however, no study has reported on the outcomes for their partners. This study will test the efficacy of Coping-Together—a multimedia, self-directed, coping skills training intervention for patients with cancer and their partners. Methods and analysis The proposed three-group, parallel, randomised controlled trial will recruit patients diagnosed in the past 4?months with breast, prostate, colorectal cancer or melanoma through their treating clinician. Patients and their partners will be randomised to (1) a minimal ethical care (MEC) condition—selected Cancer Council New South Wales booklets and a brochure for the Cancer Council Helpline, (2) Coping-Together generic—MEC materials, the six Coping-Together booklets and DVD, the Cancer Council Queensland relaxation audio CD and login to the Coping-Together website or (3) Coping-Together tailored—MEC materials, the Coping-Together DVD, the login to the website and only those Coping-Together booklet sections that pertain to their direct concerns. Anxiety (primary outcome), distress, depression, dyadic adjustment, quality of life, illness or caregiving appraisal, self-efficacy and dyadic and individual coping will be assessed before receiving the study material (ie, baseline) and again at 3, 6 and 12?months postbaseline. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analysis will be conducted. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the relevant local area health and University ethics committees. Study findings will be disseminated not only through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations but also through educational outreach visits, publication of lay research summaries in consumer newsletters and publications targeting clinicians. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000491763 (03/05/2013) PMID:23883890

Lambert, Sylvie D; Girgis, Afaf; McElduff, Patrick; Turner, Jane; Levesque, Janelle V; Kayser, Karen; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Shih, Sophy T F; Barker, Daniel

2013-01-01

51

Emotion-Oriented Coping, Avoidance Coping, and Fear of Pain as Mediators of the Relationship between Positive Affect, Negative Affect, and Pain-Related Distress among African American and Caucasian College Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors tested whether coping styles and fear of pain mediate the relationship between positive affect and negative affect on one hand and pain-related distress (PD) on the other. Among African American and Caucasian female college students, negative affect, fear of pain, and emotion-oriented coping together accounted for 34% of the variance…

Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Wells, Anita G.; Wang, Mei-Chuan; Pietruszka, Todd; Ciftci, Ayse; Stancil, Brett

2009-01-01

52

Down or up? Explaining Positive and Negative Emotions in Parents of Children with Down's Syndrome: Goals, Cognitive Coping, and Resources  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Some studies find that parents of children with Down's syndrome may experience symptoms of depression, while other studies find that parents adapt well. This study aimed to clarify this variability in adaptive strength by investigating a stress-coping model to explain depressive symptoms and positive affect. Method: Questionnaires were…

Van Der Veek, Shelley M. C.; Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

2009-01-01

53

Engagement as Flourishing: The Contribution of Positive Emotions and Coping to Adolescents' Engagement at School and with Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fredrickson's (1998, 2001) broaden and build theory postulates that the experience of frequent positive emotions serves to broaden humans' thoughts and behaviors, resulting in accrual of resources, including coping resources, which catalyze upward spirals toward future well-being. Initial research supports the tenets of broaden and build; however,…

Reschly, Amy L.; Huebner, E. Scott; Appleton, James J.; Antaramian, Susan

2008-01-01

54

Coping With Psychological Distress Associated to Positive Symptoms of Schizophrenia: A Brief Cognitive Behavioral Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

This case study examined the assessment, treatment, and outcomes of a 53-year-old man presenting with chronic paranoid schizophrenia. This individual presented with significant anxiety, stress, and depression symptoms resulting from his inability to cope with persistent and persecutory auditory hallucinations and delusions. The treatment approach was drawn from principles of cognitive behavioral therapy, in particular the Coping Strategy Enhancement Approach

Luke Hatzipetrou; Tian Po Oei

2010-01-01

55

Improving women's adjustment to HIV infection: results of the Positive Life Skills Workshop Project.  

PubMed

Women face many challenges as they adjust to life with HIV infection. This report describes the results of a program designed to assist HIV-infected women to reframe negative meanings associated with HIV infection and adjust to HIV infection. The idea for the Positive Life Skills (PLS) workshop emerged from the results of a study of adjustment to chronic illness among HIV-infected women, guided by the cognitive appraisal model of stress and coping. Small-group sessions (6-15 women) met weekly for 10 consecutive weeks to identify and dialogue about personal and group learning needs. Women explored the power of art, science, and alternative therapies as venues for reframing the meaning of HIV in their lives. The workshop participants included 187 HIV-infected women (mean age, 39 years; range, 23-62 years). Responses from the workshop participants over a 6-year time frame suggested that the PLS workshop was effective at increasing antiretroviral adherence, improving mental well-being, and reducing stress. PMID:18191769

Bova, Carol; Burwick, Tobey Nestor; Quinones, Maritza

2008-01-01

56

Positive interpersonal relationships mediate the association between social skills and psychological well-being  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the association between social skills and psychological well-being, operationalized through a variety of positive psychological states. It was hypothesized that positive relations with other people would mediate the association between social skills and psychological well-being. A community based sample of 703 adults, aged 18–87 completed measures of social skills, positive relations with others, and the following indicators

Chris Segrin; Melissa Taylor

2007-01-01

57

Positive Adjustment in Youth Post-Katrina: The Impact of Child and Maternal Social Support and Coping  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter presents results of a longitudinal study conducted with youth and their parents post-Katrina. The study sought\\u000a to identify both individual and family factors predictive of long-term positive adjustment in youth. Results indicated that\\u000a family factors, such as parent-provided social support and coping through family routines and support, were paramount in predicting\\u000a positive outcomes in youth 25–28 months post-Katrina.

Julia F. Vigna; Brittany C. Hernandez; Valerie Paasch; Arlene T. Gordon; Mary L. Kelley

58

Positive aspects of the coping of mothers of adolescent children with developmental disability in the Bedouin community in Israel.  

PubMed

This research examines the positive aspects of coping experienced by 270 mothers of adolescent children with and without a developmental disability in the Bedouin community. The mothers completed the Sociodemographic Data Questionnaire, the Grandparents Functional Support Assessment, the Gratitude Questionnaire, and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. Mothers of adolescent children with developmental disability reported higher levels of social support, gratitude, and personal growth than did mothers of adolescent children without developmental disability. Additionally, mothers demonstrated a higher level of gratitude toward their spouse's parents. Positive correlation was also found between gratitude and personal growth and between gratitude and support from the husband's parents. The findings highlight the important need to develop awareness and culturally appropriate intervention programs based on these positive aspects, to enhance these mothers' coping abilities. PMID:24691353

Manor-Binyamini, Iris

2014-06-01

59

Positive teacher and peer relations combine to predict primary school students' academic skill development.  

PubMed

This study examined cross-lagged associations between positive teacher and peer relations and academic skill development. Reading and math skills were tested among 625 students in kindergarten and Grade 4. Teacher reports of positive affect toward each student and classmate reports of peer acceptance were gathered in Grades 1-3. The results showed, first, that positive teacher affect toward the student and peer acceptance were reciprocally associated: Positive teacher affect predicted higher peer acceptance, and higher peer acceptance predicted a higher level of positive teacher affect. Second, the effect of positive teacher affect on academic skill development was partly mediated via peer acceptance, while the effect of early academic skills on peer acceptance was partly mediated via positive teacher affect. The results suggest that a warm and supportive teacher can increase a student's peer acceptance, which, in turn, is positively associated with learning outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25751095

Kiuru, Noona; Aunola, Kaisa; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Pakarinen, Eija; Poskiparta, Elisa; Ahonen, Timo; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

2015-04-01

60

Problem coping skills, psychosocial adversities and mental health problems in children and adolescents as predictors of criminal outcomes in young adulthood.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to test child and adolescent psychosocial and psychopathological risk factors as predictors of adult criminal outcomes in a Swiss community sample. In particular, the role of active and avoidant problem coping in youths was analysed. Prevalence rates of young adult crime convictions based on register data were calculated. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to analyse the prediction of adult criminal convictions 15 years after assessment in a large Swiss community sample of children and adolescents (n = 1,086). Risk factors assessed in childhood and adolescence included socio-economic status (SES), migration background, perceived parental behaviour, familial and other social stressors, coping styles, externalizing and internalizing problems and drug abuse including problematic alcohol consumption. The rate of any young adult conviction was 10.1 %. Besides externalizing problems and problematic alcohol consumption, the presence of any criminal conviction in young adulthood was predicted by low SES and avoidant coping even after controlling for the effects of externalizing problems and problematic alcohol use. The other predictors were significant only when externalizing behaviours and problematic alcohol use were not controlled. In addition to child and adolescent externalizing behaviour problems and substance use, low SES and inadequate problem-solving skills, in terms of avoidant coping, are major risk factors of young adult criminal outcomes and need to be considered in forensic research and criminal prevention programs. PMID:23949100

Aebi, Marcel; Giger, Joël; Plattner, Belinda; Metzke, Christa Winkler; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph

2014-05-01

61

Measuring use of positive thinking skills: psychometric testing of a new scale.  

PubMed

Positive thinking interventions improve adaptive functioning and quality of life in many populations. However, no direct measure of positive thinking skills taught during intervention exists. This psychometric study of a convenience sample of 109 autism spectrum disorder (ASD) caregivers examined a new eight-item Positive Thinking Skills Scale (PTSS), which measures the frequency of use of positive thinking skills. The PTSS was found to be internally consistent (? = .90). Construct validity was supported by significant correlations (p < .01) with positive cognitions (r = .53), resourcefulness (r = .63), depression (r = -.45), and general well-being (r = .40). The findings support use of the PTSS as a potential indicator of intervention fidelity among ASD caregivers. However, because it is not specific for ASD caregivers, the PTSS has the potential for wider usage in other populations for whom the identification of specific positive thinking skills could provide direction for future intervention. PMID:23509101

Bekhet, Abir K; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

2013-09-01

62

The Effects of a Telehealth Coping Skills Intervention on Outcomes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Primary Results from the INSPIRE-II Study  

PubMed Central

Objective Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and reduced quality of life. Novel interventions are needed to improve outcomes in COPD patients. The present study assessed the effects of a telephone-based coping skills intervention on psychological and somatic quality of life and on the combined medical endpoint of COPD-related hospitalizations and all-cause mortality. Methods We conducted a dual-site, randomized clinical trial with assessments at baseline and after 16 weeks of treatment. The study population comprised 326 outpatients with COPD aged 38 to 81 years, randomized to Coping Skills training (CST) or to COPD Education (COPD-ED). Patients completed a battery of quality of life (QoL) instruments, pulmonary function tests, and functional measures and were followed for up to 4.4 years to assess medical outcomes. Results The CST group exhibited greater improvements in psychological QoL compared to controls (P = .001), including less depression (Cohen’s d=0.22 [95%CI 0.08, 0.36]) and anxiety (d=0.17 [95%CI 0.02, 0.33]), and better overall mental health (d=0.17 [95%CI 0.03, 0.32]), emotional role functioning (d= 0.29 [95%CI 0.10, 0.48]), vitality (d= 0.27 [95%CI 0.11, 0.42]), and social functioning (d= 0.21 [95%CI 0.03, 0.38]). A significant baseline psychological QoL by Treatment group interaction revealed that CST with lower QoL at baseline achieved even greater improvements in psychological QoL compared to COPE-ED. CST participants also exhibited greater improvements in Somatic QoL (P = .042), including greater improvements in pulmonary QoL (d= 0.13 [95%CI 0.01, 0.24]), less fatigue (d= 0.34 [95%CI 0.18, 0.50]), and less shortness of breath (d= 0.11 [95%CI ?0.01, 0.23]) and greater improvement in distance walked on the 6 Minute Walk Test (d= 0.09 [95%CI 0.01, 0.16]). However, there was no significant difference in risk of time to COPD-related hospitalization or all-cause mortality between CST (34 events) and COPD-ED (32 events) (P= 0.430). Conclusions A telehealth coping skills training intervention produced clinically meaningful improvements in quality of life and functional capacity, but no overall improvement in risk of COPD-related hospitalization and all-cause mortality. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT00736268 PMID:25251888

Blumenthal, James A.; Emery, Charles F.; Smith, Patrick J.; Keefe, Francis J.; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Mabe, Stephanie; Martinu, Tereza; Johnson, Julie J.; Babyak, Michael A.; O’Hayer, Virginia F.; Diaz, Philip T.; Durheim, Michael; Baucom, Donald; Palmer, Scott M.

2014-01-01

63

The suppressive power of positive thinking: Aiding suppression-induced forgetting in repressive coping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participants scoring high and low on a measure of repressive coping style (Mendolia, 2002) first learned a series of related word pairs (cue–target). Half of the cues were homographs. In the subsequent think\\/no-think phase (Anderson & Green, 2001), they responded with targets on some trials and suppressed thoughts of targets on others. Suppressed targets were always emotionally negative, as were

Paula Hertel; Leda McDaniel

2010-01-01

64

The effectiveness of program developed from cognitive-experiential self-theory and life skills technique on adolescent coping with stress.  

PubMed

Many methodologies to decrease stress in adolescents have been introduced and implemented. However, it seems that the problems in their physical, mental, emotional, and learning conditions still exist, especially for long-term. The proposed program with some booster was used to solve the long run problems. To examine the effectiveness of program developed from cognitive-experiential self-theory and life skills technique on adolescent coping with stress. A quasi-experimental research in two groups is used to modify theoretical concepts of cognitive-experiential self-theory and life skills technique on adolescent coping with stress. The students of secondary schools in Nakhon Sawan Province Thailand were the target population. Two schools were randomly chosen, one for control and the other for experiment. The sample size of 84 students was randomly selected and requested to be volunteers and 44 volunteers were trained on concept of thinking, strategies to resolve the problem and control emotion for 5 days and booster in school for 9 months in every fortnight and was measured 5 times, before and after interventions at 3rd, 6th and 9th months. We used independent t-test, paired t-test, analysis of variance and covariance for data analysis. There were no difference in the mean of summation of knowledge, attitude and practice of pre-test score between treatment and control group (P = 0.124). After the training program, the volunteers showed significant improvement of knowledge, attitude and practice (P < 0.05) and the level of stress decreased was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The results indicated that the training program with modify theoretical concepts of cognitive-experiential self-theory and life skills technique on adolescent enabled the participants to improve knowledge, attitude and practice in coping with stress. PMID:20635598

Monkong, L; Pongpanich, S; Viwatwongkasem, C; Chantavanich, S; Wongpiromsarn, Y; Katz, L S

2009-12-01

65

Too much of a good thing?: Positive religious coping predicts worse diurnal salivary cortisol patterns for overwhelmed African-American female dementia family caregivers  

PubMed Central

Objectives Religious coping arguably prevents negative health outcomes for stressed persons. This study examined the moderating role of religious coping (positive, negative, and combined) in the connection of care recipient functional status with diurnal salivary cortisol patterns among dementia family caregivers. Methods Thirty African-American (AA) female dementia caregivers and 48 AA noncaregivers completed the Religious Coping (RCOPE) scale, Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scale and Revised Memory and Behavior Problem checklist (RMBPC) and collected five saliva samples daily (at awakening, 9am, 12pm, 5pm, and 9pm) for two straight days. Results Hierarchical regression tests with mean diurnal cortisol slope as the outcome illustrated surprisingly that higher combined and positive (but not negative) RCOPE scores were associated with increasingly flatter or worse cortisol slope scores for caregivers (but not non-caregivers). Of note, the RCOPE by RMBPC interaction was significant. Among caregivers who reported higher RMBPC scores, higher combined and positive (but not negative) RCOPE scores were unexpectedly associated with increasingly flatter cortisol slopes. Conclusions These results extend current findings by showing that being AA, a caregiver, and high in positive religious coping may predict increased daily stress responses, mainly for those with higher patient behavioral problems. Since religious coping is a central coping strategy for AA caregivers, it is vital that epidemiological assessments of religious coping in health and aging as well as tailored interventions focus on the unique reasons for this disparity. PMID:23290202

Merritt, Marcellus M.; McCallum, T. J.

2012-01-01

66

Promoting Children's Positive Intergroup Attitudes towards Stigmatized Groups: Extended Contact and Multiple Classification Skills Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two studies were conducted to evaluate interventions, based upon the extended contact hypothesis and multiple classification skills training, which aimed to promote children's positive intergroup attitudes towards two stigmatized groups. Study 1 tested whether extended contact and multiple classification skills training changed out-group attitudes…

Cameron, Lindsey; Rutland, Adam; Brown, Rupert

2007-01-01

67

Effects of a Training Intervention to Foster Argumentation Skills While Processing Conflicting Scientific Positions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argumentation skills play a crucial role in science education and in preparing school students to act as informed citizens. While processing conflicting scientific positions regarding topics such as sustainable development in the domain of ecology, argumentation skills such as evaluating arguments or supporting theories with evidence are…

Hefter, Markus H.; Berthold, Kirsten; Renkl, Alexander; Riess, Werner; Schmid, Sebastian; Fries, Stefan

2014-01-01

68

2012/2013SF State Extended Learning Practical Applications of Positive Psychology and Coaching Skills  

E-print Network

of the stages of behavioral change through an evidence-based model. They also learn and practice coaching skills of Positive Psychology and Coaching Skills research-based practices and experiential learning that you can negative emotion and overcom- ing weaknesses. The theoretical framework, research-based practices

69

The Relationship between Principal Leadership Skills and School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated key principal leadership skills associated with socially proactive school environments and examined the relationship between School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS) implementation and increased evidence of those skills. Findings indicated the following: (a) certified staff members and principals from all schools rated…

Richter, Mary Miller; Lewis, Timothy J.; Hagar, John

2012-01-01

70

Teaching the Dance Class: Strategies to Enhance Skill Acquisition, Mastery and Positive Self-Image  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effective teaching of dance skills is informed by a variety of theoretical frameworks and individual teaching and learning styles. The purpose of this paper is to present practical teaching strategies that enhance the mastery of skills and promote self-esteem, self-efficacy, and positive self-image. The predominant thinking and primary research…

Mainwaring, Lynda M.; Krasnow, Donna H.

2010-01-01

71

Pain Coping Skills Training for Patients with Elevated Pain Catastrophizing who are Scheduled for Knee Arthroplasty: A Quasi-Experimental Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To (1) describe a behavioral intervention designed for patients with elevated pain catastrophizing who are scheduled for knee arthroplasty, and (2) use a quasi-experimental design to evaluate the potential efficacy of the intervention on pain severity, catastrophizing cognitions, and disability. Design Quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design with a 2 month follow-up. Setting Two university-based Orthopedic Surgery departments. Participants Adults scheduled for knee replacement surgery who reported elevated levels of pain catastrophizing. Patients were recruited from two clinics and were assessed prior to surgery and 2 months following surgery. Intervention A group of 18 patients received a psychologist directed pain coping skills training intervention comprising 8 sessions and the other group, a historical cohort of 45 patients, received usual care. Main Outcome Measures WOMAC Pain and Disability scores as well as scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Results Two months following surgery, the patients who received pain coping skills training reported significantly greater reductions in pain severity and catastrophizing, and greater improvements in function as compared to the usual care cohort. Conclusion Pain catastrophizing is known to increase risk of poor outcome following knee arthroplasty. The findings provide preliminary evidence that the treatment may be highly efficacious for reducing pain, catastrophizing, and disability, in patients reporting elevated catastrophizing prior to knee arthroplasty. A randomized clinical trial is warranted to confirm these effects. PMID:21530943

Riddle, Daniel L.; Keefe, Francis J.; Nay, William T.; McKee, Daphne; Attarian, David E.; Jensen, Mark P.

2011-01-01

72

Self-Control and Coping Skills as Factors in Pain Perception, Perceived Health and Psychological Adjustment in the Elderly.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Self-control and self-efficacy have played a central role in recent behavioral medicine work on the control of chronic physical pain. Little work investigating the concepts of self-control and self-efficacy has been done with the elderly in spite of the fact that coping strategies in the elderly have been associated with a variety of health and…

Dietrich, Coralie; And Others

73

Analysis of Academic Self-Efficacy, Self-Esteem and Coping with Stress Skills Predictive Power on Academic Procrastination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this research is to analyze the predictive power level of academic self-efficacy, self-esteem and coping with stress on academic procrastination behavior. Relational screening model is used in the research whose research group is made of 374 students in Kirikkale University, Education Faculty in Turkey. Students in the research group…

Kandemir, Mehmet; Ilhan, Tahsin; Ozpolat, Ahmed Ragip; Palanci, Mehmet

2014-01-01

74

The Life Skills Program IPSY: Positive Influences on School Bonding and Prevention of Substance Misuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigated whether a life skills program (LSP) for the prevention of adolescent substance misuse can have positive influences on a school context and on school bonding. The study also explored whether effects on alcohol use are mediated by positive effects on school bonding resulting from program participation. The LSP IPSY…

Wenzel, Victoria; Weichold, Karina; Silbereisen, Rainer K.

2009-01-01

75

Teaching the Dance Class: Strategies to Enhance Skill Acquisition, Mastery and Positive Self-Image  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective teaching of dance skills is informed by a variety of theoretical frameworks and individual teaching and learning styles. The purpose of this paper is to present practical teaching strategies that enhance the mastery of skills and promote self-esteem, self-efficacy, and positive self-image. The predominant thinking and primary research findings from dance pedagogy, education, physical education and sport pedagogy, and

Lynda M. Mainwaring; Donna H. Krasnow

2010-01-01

76

Retaining Critical Therapeutic Elements of Behavioral Interventions Translated For Delivery via the Internet: Recommendations and an Example Using Pain Coping Skills Training  

PubMed Central

Evidence supporting the efficacy of behavioral interventions based on principles of cognitive behavioral therapies has spurred interest in translating these interventions for delivery via the Internet. However, the benefits of this dissemination method cannot be realized unless the translated interventions are as effective as possible. We describe a challenge that must be overcome to ensure this occurs—Internet interventions must retain therapeutic components and processes underlying the success of face-to-face interventions on which they are based. These components and processes vary in the ease with which they can be translated to the online environment. Moreover, some are subtle and may be overlooked, despite being recognized as essential to the success of face-to-face interventions. We provide preliminary guidance for retaining critical therapeutic components and processes in the translation process, using Pain Coping Skills Training for osteoarthritis pain to illustrate methods. Directions for future research are also discussed. PMID:25532216

Porter, Laura S; Somers, Tamara J; McKee, Daphne C; Keefe, Francis J

2014-01-01

77

Chronic Medical Conditions and Major Depressive Disorder: Differential Role of Positive Religious Coping among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and Non-Hispanic Whites  

PubMed Central

Background: This study was aimed to investigate the main and buffering effects of positive religious coping on the association between the number of chronic medical conditions and major depressive disorder (MDD) among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and Non-Hispanic Whites. Methods: This cross-sectional study used data from the National Survey of American Life, 2001 and 2003. This study enrolled 3,570 African Americans, 1,438 Caribbean Blacks and 891 Non-Hispanic Whites. Number of chronic conditions and positive religious coping were independent variables, 12-month MDD was the outcome and socio-economic characteristics were controls. We fitted the following three ethnic-specific logistic regressions for data analysis. In Model I, we included the number of chronic conditions and controls. In Model II, we added the main effect of religious coping. In Model III, we included an interaction between religious coping and number of chronic conditions. Results: Based on Model I, number of chronic conditions was associated with higher odds of 12-month MDD among all race/ethnic groups. Model II showed a significant and negative association between religious coping and MDD among Caribbean Blacks (odds ratio [OR] =0.55, 95% confidence Interval [CI] =0.39-0.77), but not African Americans or Hispanic Whites. Model III suggested that, only among Caribbean Blacks, the effect of chronic medical conditions on MDD is smaller in the presence of high positive religious coping (OR for interaction = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.55-0.96). Conclusions: Although the association between multiple chronic conditions and MDD may exist regardless of race and ethnicity, race/ethnicity may shape how positive religious coping buffers this association. This finding sheds more light onto race and ethnic differences in protective effects of religiosity on mental health of populations. PMID:24829727

Assari, Shervin

2014-01-01

78

Student Teachers' Development of a Positive Attitude towards Research and Research Knowledge and Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to investigate the experiences of student teachers participating in an introductory course, designed to stimulate the development of a positive attitude towards research and to stimulate the development of research knowledge and skills by second-year student teachers of an institute of primary teacher education. A…

van der Linden, Wietse; Bakx, Anouke; Ros, Anje; Beijaard, Douwe; Vermeulen, Marc

2012-01-01

79

The Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning is carefully crafted to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to obtain positions in a variety of public and  

E-print Network

with the knowledge and skills needed to obtain positions in a variety of public and private organizations, including of individual students as well as the student cohort. CRITICAL THINKING (Analytical Skills, Practical Skills) and CONTENT KNOWLEDGE (Research Skills, Technical Skills): Students will develop skills in (1) Problem

Fernandez, Eduardo

80

Capitalizing on everyday positive events uniquely predicts daily intimacy and well-being in couples coping with breast cancer.  

PubMed

Capitalization is the relational process of savoring positive life events by sharing them with responsive relationship partners. The purpose of the present study was to use dyadic intensive longitudinal methods to examine novel hypotheses regarding links between capitalization processes and daily intimacy and well-being in women with breast cancer and their intimate partners. Although couples coping with cancer often experience an increase in negative daily life events, we hypothesized that it would be important for them to share and capitalize on positive events in addition to sharing negative events. Female patients with early stage breast cancer and their intimate partners (99 couples) completed electronic daily diaries for 7 to 10 consecutive days tapping everyday processes of sharing negative and positive events with each other. Dyadic multilevel process modeling revealed that on days when capitalization attempts (i.e., sharing the best event of the day) occurred, daily feelings of intimacy in the sharer were higher for both patients and partners. Moreover, greater perceived partner responsiveness to capitalization attempts was associated with increases in the sharer's daily feelings of intimacy and decreases in the sharer's daily negative affect. When the patient's partner was the sharer, perceived partner responsiveness also was associated with increased daily positive affect. More important, all effects of capitalization were observed above and beyond the effects of event positivity and sharing negative events (i.e., social support attempts). Findings suggest that, even in the midst of significant life adversity, sharing daily good news with intimate partners enhances relationship well-being independently of sharing bad news. PMID:25528074

Otto, Amy K; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Siegel, Scott D; Belcher, Amber J

2015-02-01

81

The Yellow Brick Road and the Emerald City: Benefit Finding, Positive Reappraisal Coping, and Posttraumatic Growth in Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predictors and outcomes of benefit finding, positive reappraisal coping, and posttraumatic growth were examined using interviews and questionnaires from a longitudinal study of women with early-stage breast cancer followed from primary medical treatment completion to 3 (n = 92) and 12 months (n = 60) later. Most women (83%) reported at least 1 benefit of their breast cancer experience. Benefit

Sharon R. Sears; Annette L. Stanton; Sharon Danoff-Burg

2003-01-01

82

Positive Adaptation and Coping Strengths of Families who have Children with Disabilities  

E-print Network

perception, and tend to view the family as a whole as embroiled in a series of acute crises interspersed with chronic sorrow (Olshansky, 1962). Thus the task of family support is seen as ameliorating the deadly pall of tragedy that hangs over the family... studies have found evidence of positive contributions, in some cases as an incidental finding to the major interest of the investigation. Wikler, Wasow, and Hatfield (1983), in the conduct of a study concerning chronic sorrow experienced by parents...

Summers, Jean Ann; Behr, Shirley K.; Turnbull, Ann P.

1988-01-01

83

Coping strategies to manage acculturative stress: Meaningful activity participation, social support, and positive emotion among Korean immigrant adolescents in the USA  

PubMed Central

During acculturation, Asian immigrant adolescents have numerous challenges such as language barriers, cultural and ethnic differences, different school environments, discrimination experiences, and intergroup conflicts and tension. These challenges generate acculturative stress, which negatively affects the perception of health and well-being among Asian immigrant adolescents. This article explored how Asian immigrant adolescents perceive and cope with acculturative stress. In particular, this study examined the stress-coping strategies in the adaptation process as experienced by Korean immigrant adolescents. Three main themes associated with the stress-coping strategies were captured: (a) engagement in meaningful activities; (b) social support; and (c) positive emotion. This finding implies that Asian immigrant adolescents create and develop their own strategies to deal with acculturative stress, which results in a sense of happiness and psychological well-being. This study discuss the future implications on how to improve the perception of health and well-being among Asian immigrant adolescents. PMID:23195747

Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Sooyeon; Gopalan, Himanshu

2012-01-01

84

Facilitating Healthy Coping in Patients with Diabetes: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose of this study is to summarize recent literature on approaches to supporting healthy coping in diabetes, in two specific areas: 1) impact of different approaches to diabetes treatment on healthy coping; and 2) effectiveness of interventions specifically designed to support healthy coping. Methods A PubMed search identified 129 articles published August 1, 2006 – April 30, 2011, addressing diabetes in relation to emotion, quality of life, depression, adjustment, anxiety, coping, family therapy, behavior therapy, psychotherapy, problem-solving, couples therapy, or marital therapy. Results Evidence suggests that treatment choice may significantly influence quality of life, with treatment intensification in response to poor metabolic control often improving quality of life. The recent literature provides support for a variety of healthy coping interventions in diverse populations, including diabetes self-management education, support groups, problem-solving approaches, and coping skills interventions for improving a range of outcomes, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and collaborative care for treating depression, and family therapy for improving coping in youths. Conclusions Healthy coping in diabetes has received substantial attention in the past five years. A variety of approaches show positive results. Research is needed to compare effectiveness of different approaches in different populations and determine how to overcome barriers to intervention dissemination and implementation. PMID:23073967

Thorpe, Carolyn T.; Fahey, Lauren E.; Johnson, Heather; Deshpande, Maithili; Thorpe, Joshua M.; Fisher, Edwin B.

2012-01-01

85

Knowledge, skills, and abilities for key radiation protection positions at DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document provides detailed qualification criteria for contractor key radiation protection personnel. Although federal key radiation protection positions are also identified, qualification standards for federal positions are provided in DOE O 360.1 and the DOE Technical Qualifications Program. Appendices B and D provide detailed listings for knowledge, skills, and abilities for contractor and DOE federal key radiation protection positions. This information may be used in developing position descriptions and individual development plans. Information provided in Appendix C may be useful in developing performance measures and assessing an individual`s performance in his or her specific position. Additionally, Federal personnel may use this information to augment their Office/facility qualification standards under the Technical Qualifications Program.

NONE

1997-01-01

86

Creative coping: a description of experiences of families coping with chronic illness in a child  

E-print Network

Chronic illness impacts numerous families in the United States. Children are increasingly among those affected by a chronic illness. The families undergo trials and experiences that tax their coping skills and require extensive coping strategies...

McGough, Marnique

2006-08-16

87

Positive Resolution of Childhood Sexual Abuse Experiences: The Role of Coping, Benefit-Finding and Meaning-Making  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resolution of the trauma of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and the current adjustment of 60 adult female CSA survivors were\\u000a explored through qualitative and quantitative analyses of their coping strategies, perceived benefits, and meaning-making\\u000a attempts. While the majority of the women (87%) perceived at least some benefit resulting from coping with the CSA experience,\\u000a many (29%) found it impossible to

Margaret O’Dougherty Wright; Emily Crawford; Katherine Sebastian

2007-01-01

88

Caregiver-assisted coping skills training for patients with COPD: background, design, and methodological issues for the INSPIRE-II study  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a progressive illness characterized by airflow obstruction and dyspnea that afflicts over 12 million people and represents a leading cause of death in the United States. Not surprisingly, COPD is often associated with emotional distress and reduced psychosocial adjustment, which can negatively impact physical functioning and impair quality of life. However, the psychosocial consequences of COPD remain largely untreated. A previous randomized trial from our research team demonstrated that coping skills training (CST) can improve pulmonary-specific quality of life among pulmonary patients awaiting lung transplant (the INSPIRE study). To date, however, no studies have examined the effects of a caregiver-assisted CST intervention in patients with COPD with less severe disease. Purpose INSPIRE II is a randomized clinical trial (RCT) funded by the NHLBI to evaluate the effects of telephone-based enhanced CST for patients with COPD and their caregivers compared to standardized medical care (SMC) including COPD education and symptom monitoring on medical outcomes, physical functioning, and quality of life. Methods Six hundred COPD patients and their respective caregivers recruited from Duke University and Ohio State University will be evaluated and randomized (in a 1:1 ratio) to enhanced CST (including sessions promoting physical activity, relaxation, cognitive restructuring, communication skills, and problem solving) or to SMC. The primary outcomes include all-cause mortality, COPD-related hospitalizations/ physician visits, and quality of life. These endpoints will be measured through self-report questionnaires, behavioral measures of functional capacity (i.e., accelerometer and six minute walk test) and pulmonary function tests (e.g., FEV1). Results This article reviews prior studies in the area and describes the design of INSPIRE-II. Several key methodological issues are discussed including the delivery of CST over the telephone, encouraging physical activity, and inclusion of caregivers as patient coaches to enhance the effectiveness of the intervention. Limitations We recognize that SMC does not adequately control for attention, support, and non-specific factors, and that, in theory, non-specific effects of the intervention could account for some, or all, of the observed benefits. However, our fundamental question is whether the telephone intervention produces benefits over-and-above the usual care that patients typically receive. The SMC condition will provide education and additional weekly telephone contact, albeit less than the attention received by the CST group. We recognize that this attention control condition may not provide equivalent patient contact, but it will minimize group differences due to attention. We considered several alternative designs including adding a third usual care only arm as well as an education only control arm. However, these alternatives would require more patients, reduce the power to detect significant effects of our primary medical endpoints, and add a significant additional expense to the cost of the study that would make such an undertaking neither scientifically or financially viable. Conclusions We believe that this novel approach to patient care in which caregivers are used to assist in the delivery of coping skills training to patients with COPD has the potential to change the way in which COPD patients are routinely managed in order to reduce distress, enhance quality of life, and potentially improve medical outcomes. PMID:19342470

Blumenthal, James A; Keefe, Francis J; Babyak, Michael A; Fenwick, C Virginia; Johnson, Julie M; Stott, Kylie; Funk, Rachel K; McAdams, Meredith J; Palmer, Scott; Martinu, Tereza; Baucom, Don; Diaz, Philip T; Emery, Charles F

2009-01-01

89

Coping Strategies Inventory for Statistics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Coping Strategies Inventory for Statistics (CSIS) is designed to identify beginning statistics students with non-facilitative test-taking and study-coping skills. The self-administered CSIS consists of directions followed by two scenarios. The student reads each scenario, decides how he or she would react to the situation, and rates each of…

Jarrell, Michele G.; Burry, Judith A.

90

Coping With Acute Stress in Sport: Linking Athletes' Coping Style, Coping Strategies, Affect, and Motor Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary purpose of this experiment was to test the extent to which highly skilled table tennis players used coping strategies that were consistent with their coping style, both of which were categorized as approach and avoidance, in response to performance-related sources of acute stress on a table tennis task. Competitive Australian male table tennis competitors ( N = 36),

Mark Anshel; David Anderson

2002-01-01

91

Recall of Briefly Presented Chess Positions and Its Relation to Chess Skill  

PubMed Central

Individual differences in memory performance in a domain of expertise have traditionally been accounted for by previously acquired chunks of knowledge and patterns. These accounts have been examined experimentally mainly in chess. The role of chunks (clusters of chess pieces recalled in rapid succession during recall of chess positions) and their relations to chess skill are, however, under debate. By introducing an independent chunk-identification technique, namely repeated-recall technique, this study identified individual chunks for particular chess players. The study not only tested chess players with increasing chess expertise, but also tested non-chess players who should not have previously acquired any chess related chunks in memory. For recall of game positions significant differences between players and non-players were found in virtually all the characteristics of chunks recalled. Size of the largest chunks also correlates with chess skill within the group of rated chess players. Further research will help us understand how these memory encodings can explain large differences in chess skill. PMID:25774693

Moxley, Jerad H.

2015-01-01

92

Recall of briefly presented chess positions and its relation to chess skill.  

PubMed

Individual differences in memory performance in a domain of expertise have traditionally been accounted for by previously acquired chunks of knowledge and patterns. These accounts have been examined experimentally mainly in chess. The role of chunks (clusters of chess pieces recalled in rapid succession during recall of chess positions) and their relations to chess skill are, however, under debate. By introducing an independent chunk-identification technique, namely repeated-recall technique, this study identified individual chunks for particular chess players. The study not only tested chess players with increasing chess expertise, but also tested non-chess players who should not have previously acquired any chess related chunks in memory. For recall of game positions significant differences between players and non-players were found in virtually all the characteristics of chunks recalled. Size of the largest chunks also correlates with chess skill within the group of rated chess players. Further research will help us understand how these memory encodings can explain large differences in chess skill. PMID:25774693

Gong, Yanfei; Ericsson, K Anders; Moxley, Jerad H

2015-01-01

93

Evaluating the Mindfulness-based Coping Program: An Effectiveness Study Using a Mixed Model Approach  

PubMed Central

Since more than 450 million people worldwide suffer from mental disorders, interventions that promote mental health have been called for. Mindfulness-based coping (MBC) is an intervention based on coping skills from cognitive behavioral therapy integrating mindfulness practices. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the MBC program for psychiatric outpatients. The study employed a mixed research method with a qualitative approach using semi-structured patient interviews and clinical assessments from patients’ therapists and a quantitative approach using instruments measuring mindful coping, mental ill health, and life satisfaction. The study sample included 38 psychiatric outpatients from a district psychiatric outpatient service in Norway. Results suggested that although use of the different skills varied, participants had a positive experience with the program and positive changes in psychological functioning were observed. Findings provide knowledge regarding the design of interventions integrating mindfulness to promote more adequate psychological coping. PMID:25478104

Bru, Edvin

2012-01-01

94

Coping Checklist for Caregivers  

MedlinePLUS

... all of these, look at ways you can start working toward those that appeal to you. They can help you expand and strengthen your coping skills. I have a supportive family around me. I pursue a hobby or project for work, church, or my community. I take ...

95

Political Skills That Superintendents Need to Embrace in Order to Maintain a Positive Working Relationship with Their Board Members  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to the literature, school districts are becoming increasingly political and complex. For superintendents to be successful in this environment they must exhibit great political skills in order to maintain positive working relationships with their boards of education. Thus, this study aimed to identify political skills that superintendents…

Muhammed, Anil Salim

2012-01-01

96

Temperament and coping: Advantages of an individual differences perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the advantages that arise from an individual differences approach to children's coping and vulnerabilities. It suggests that the basic motivational and attentional systems involved in temperament constitute relatively primitive coping mechanisms. With development, these primitive coping skills are aided by representational and other cortical functions, allowing the coping process to begin before a stressful event and thereby

DOUGLAS DERRYBERRY; MARJORIE A. REED

2003-01-01

97

The Relationship between Socio-demographic Characteristics, Family Environment, and Caregiver Coping in Families of Children with Cancer  

PubMed Central

The factors that influence caregiver coping mechanism preferences after a child’s diagnosis with cancer are not fully understood. This study examines the relationship between caregivers’ socio-demographic characteristics and the coping strategies they use to adapt to childhood cancer. Sixty caregivers of pediatric cancer patients completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Family Environment Scale, and the COPE inventory. There were no significant differences in family environment by income or education. Caregiver educational attainment was positively associated with use of planning and active coping styles, while income was not associated with caregiver coping style. Mothers were more likely than fathers to use active coping, instrumental support, religious coping, and emotional support. Men with lower education engaged in greater substance use coping and lower planning. The findings show that educational attainment and caregiver gender influence caregiver coping styles following a pediatric cancer diagnosis and suggest that educational attainment rather than financial resources drive the association between SES and coping. Programs that address educational gaps and teach caregivers planning and active coping skills may be beneficial for parents with lower educational attainment, particularly men. PMID:23670676

Devine, Katie A.; Heckler, Charles E.

2013-01-01

98

The relationship between socio-demographic characteristics, family environment, and caregiver coping in families of children with cancer.  

PubMed

The factors that influence caregiver coping mechanism preferences after a child's diagnosis with cancer are not fully understood. This study examines the relationship between caregivers' socio-demographic characteristics and the coping strategies they use to adapt to childhood cancer. Sixty caregivers of pediatric cancer patients completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Family Environment Scale, and the COPE inventory. There were no significant differences in family environment by income or education. Caregiver educational attainment was positively associated with use of planning and active coping styles, while income was not associated with caregiver coping style. Mothers were more likely than fathers to use active coping, instrumental support, religious coping, and emotional support. Men with lower education engaged in greater substance use coping and lower planning. The findings show that educational attainment and caregiver gender influence caregiver coping styles following a pediatric cancer diagnosis and suggest that educational attainment rather than financial resources drive the association between SES and coping. Programs that address educational gaps and teach caregivers planning and active coping skills may be beneficial for parents with lower educational attainment, particularly men. PMID:23670676

Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth A; Devine, Katie A; Heckler, Charles E

2013-12-01

99

I think therefore I om: cognitive distortions and coping style as mediators for the effects of mindfulness meditation on anxiety, positive and negative affect, and hope.  

PubMed

This study examined cognitive distortions and coping styles as potential mediators for the effects of mindfulness meditation on anxiety, negative affect, positive affect, and hope in college students. Our pre- and postintervention design had four conditions: control, brief meditation focused on attention, brief meditation focused on loving kindness, and longer meditation combining both attentional and loving kindness aspects of mindfulness. Each group met weekly over the course of a semester. Longer combined meditation significantly reduced anxiety and negative affect and increased hope. Changes in cognitive distortions mediated intervention effects for anxiety, negative affect, and hope. Further research is needed to determine differential effects of types of meditation. PMID:19241400

Sears, Sharon; Kraus, Sue

2009-06-01

100

Informal science participation positively affects the communication and pedagogical skills of university physics students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many undergraduate and graduate physics students choose to participate in an informal science program at the University of Colorado Boulder (Partnerships for Informal Science Education in the Community (PISEC)). They coach elementary and middle school students in inquiry-based physics activities during weekly, afterschool sessions. Observations from the afterschool sessions, field notes from the students, and pre/post surveys are collected. University students are also pre/post- videotaped explaining a textbook passage on a physics concept to an imagined audience for the Communications in Everyday Language assessment (CELA). We present findings from these data that indicate informal experiences improve the communication and pedagogical skills of the university student as well as positively influence their self-efficacy as scientific communicators and teachers.

Hinko, Kathleen; Finkelstein, Noah

2013-04-01

101

An online positive affect skills intervention reduces depression in adults with type 2 diabetes  

PubMed Central

Positive affect predicts improved glycemic control and longevity in adults with type 2 diabetes. We tested DAHLIA, a self-paced online intervention for type 2 diabetes that teaches positive affect skills such as savoring, gratitude, and acts of kindness. Participants (n=49) were randomized to the 5-week DAHLIA course or an emotion-reporting waitlist control. DAHLIA was understood and accepted by participants and showed good retention (78%). At post-intervention, DAHLIA participants showed a significantly greater decrease in depression than controls (?4.3 vs. +0.6 points on the CES-D, p =.05). Secondary analyses found that this effect was considerably stronger in intervention recipients recruited online than those recruited in person. Intervention recipients recruited online also showed significantly increased positive affect, reduced negative affect, and reduced perceived stress. There were no effects on measures of diabetes-specific efficacy or sense of burden, or preliminary measures of health behaviors. This successful feasibility and efficacy trial provides support for a larger trial focusing more specifically on health behavior. PMID:25214877

Cohn, Michael A.; Pietrucha, Martha E.; Saslow, Laura R.; Hult, Jen R.; Moskowitz, Judith T.

2014-01-01

102

The effect of positive and negative verbal feedback on surgical skills performance and motivation.  

PubMed

There is considerable effort and time invested in providing feedback to medical students and residents during their time in training. However, little effort has been made to measure the effects of positive and negative verbal feedback on skills performance and motivation to learn and practice. To probe these questions, first-year medical students (n = 25) were recruited to perform a peg transfer task on Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery box trainers. Time to completion and number of errors were recorded. The students were then randomized to receive either positive or negative verbal feedback from an expert in the field of laparoscopic surgery. After this delivery of feedback, the students repeated the peg transfer task. Differences in performance pre- and post-feedback and also between the groups who received positive feedback (PF) vs negative feedback (NF) were analyzed. A survey was then completed by all the participants. Baseline task times were similar between groups (PF 209.3 seconds; NF 203 seconds, p = 0.58). The PF group averaged 1.83 first-time errors while the NF group 1 (p = 0.84). Post-feedback task times were significantly decreased for both groups (PF 159.75 seconds, p = 0.05; NF 132.08 seconds, p = 0.002). While the NF group demonstrated a greater improvement in mean time than the PF group, this was not statistically significant. Both groups also made fewer errors (PF 0.33 errors, p = 0.04; NF 0.38 errors, p = 0.23). When surveyed about their responses to standardized feedback scenarios, the students stated that both positive and negative verbal feedback could be potent stimulants for improved performance and motivation. Further research is required to better understand the effects of feedback on learner motivation and the interpersonal dynamic between mentors and their trainees. PMID:23111049

Kannappan, Aarthy; Yip, Dana T; Lodhia, Nayna A; Morton, John; Lau, James N

2012-01-01

103

Predictors of Positive Psychosocial Functioning of Older Adults in Residential Care Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined the contributions of active and passive coping for health problems, and meaning-based coping, to positive psychosocial functioning in a sample of 100 individuals in residential care with a mean age of 83.11 years old. Study participants resided in skilled care, intermediate care, or assisted living facilities. Based on interview data collected on site in participants' residential settings,

Jeff Y. Schanowitz; Perry M. Nicassio

2006-01-01

104

Children and Adults Both See "Pirates" in "Parties": Letter-Position Effects for Developing Readers and Skilled Adult Readers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developing readers often make anagrammatical errors (e.g. misreading pirates as parties), suggesting they use letter position flexibly during word recognition. However, while it is widely assumed that the occurrence of these errors decreases with increases in reading skill, empirical evidence to support this distinction is lacking. Accordingly, we…

Paterson, Kevin B.; Read, Josephine; McGowan, Victoria A.; Jordan, Timothy R.

2015-01-01

105

Coping with the cold: the cold shock response in the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis.  

PubMed Central

All organisms examined to date, respond to a sudden change in environmental temperature with a specific cascade of adaptation reactions that, in some cases, have been identified and monitored at the molecular level. According to the type of temperature change, this response has been termed heat shock response (HSR) or cold shock response (CSR). During the HSR, a specialized sigma factor has been shown to play a central regulatory role in controlling expression of genes predominantly required to cope with heat-induced alteration of protein conformation. In contrast, after cold shock, nucleic acid structure and proteins interacting with the biological information molecules DNA and RNA appear to play a major cellular role. Currently, no cold-specific sigma factor has been identified. Therefore, unlike the HSR, the CSR appears to be organized as a complex stimulon rather than resembling a regulon. This review has been designed to draw a refined picture of our current understanding of the CSR in Bacillus subtilis. Important processes such as temperature sensing, membrane adaptation, modification of the translation apparatus, as well as nucleoid reorganization and some metabolic aspects, are discussed in brief. Special emphasis is placed on recent findings concerning the nucleic acid binding cold shock proteins, which play a fundamental role, not only during cold shock adaptation but also under optimal growth conditions. PMID:12171653

Weber, Michael H W; Marahiel, Mohamed A

2002-01-01

106

Coping Power. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Coping Power" is based on the earlier "Anger Coping Power" program. It emphasizes social and emotional skills that are needed during the transition to middle school. The program incorporates child and parent components. The child component consists of thirty-four 50-minute group sessions and periodic individual sessions over the course of 15-18…

What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

2011-01-01

107

Coping with the Impact of Incontinence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents Part 2 of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. In this article, the author contends that it is extremely important to teach children coping skills

Gartley, Cheryle

2008-01-01

108

Coping by Caring.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a Texas elementary school's efforts to cope with the special needs of Kenneth, a fourth grader slowly dying of kidney cancer. Besides learning their subjects like other students, Kenneth's classmates learned how to care. Every student volunteered to be Kenneth's assistant and was enriched by the boy's positive attitude and determination…

Lidstone, Sheila S.

1992-01-01

109

Interrelationships between Coping, School Connectedness and Wellbeing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the interrelationships between coping styles, emotional wellbeing, and school connectedness using path analysis. A total of 536 Year 8 students (241 boys and 295 girls) responded to an in-class survey and the "Adolescent Coping Scale" (Frydenberg & Lewis, 1993a) as part of a larger study. Productive coping style was positively

Frydenberg, Erica; Care, Esther; Freeman, Elizabeth; Chan, Esther

2009-01-01

110

Hemodialysis: Stressors and coping strategies.  

PubMed

End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is an irreversible and life-threatening condition. In Jordan, the number of ESRD patients treated with hemodialysis is on the rise. Identifying stressors and coping strategies used by patients with ESRD may help nurses and health care providers to gain a clearer understanding of the condition of these patients and thus institute effective care planning. The purpose of this study was to identify stressors perceived by Jordanian patients on hemodialysis, and the coping strategies used by them. A convenience sample of 131 Jordanian men and women was recruited from outpatients' dialysis units in four hospitals. Stressors perceived by participants on hemodialysis and the coping strategies were measured using Hemodialysis Stressor Scale, and Ways of Coping Scale-Revised. Findings showed that patients on hemodialysis psychosocial stressors scores mean was higher than the physiological stressors mean. Positive reappraisal coping strategy had the highest mean among the coping strategies and the lowest mean was accepting responsibility. Attention should be focused towards the psychosocial stressors of patients on hemodialysis and also helping patients utilize the coping strategies that help to alleviate the stressors. The most used coping strategy was positive reappraisal strategy which includes faith and prayer. PMID:25158058

Ahmad, Muayyad M; Al Nazly, Eman K

2015-06-01

111

Primary and Secondary Control among Children Undergoing Medical Procedures: Adjustment as a Function of Coping Style.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Obtained reports of coping and goals from 33 children being treated for leukemia. Coping strategies were classified as primary control coping (attempts to alter objective conditions), secondary control coping (attempts to adjust to objective conditions), or relinquished control (no attempt to cope). Secondary control coping was positively

Weisz, John R.; And Others

1994-01-01

112

Relationship between alexithymia and coping strategies in patients with somatoform disorder  

PubMed Central

Purpose A multidimensional intervention integrating alexithymia, negative affect, and type of coping strategy is needed for the effective treatment of somatoform disorder; however, few studies have applied this approach to the three different dimensions of alexithymia in patients with somatoform disorder. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between type of coping strategy and three different dimensions of alexithymia expressed in patients. Patients and methods A total of 196 patients with somatoform disorder completed the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, the Spielberger State–Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Somatosensory Amplification Scale, and the Lazarus Stress Coping Inventory. The relationships between alexithymia (Toronto Alexithymia Scale – 20 score and subscales), demographic variables, and psychological inventory scores were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficients and stepwise multiple regression analysis. Results The mean Toronto Alexithymia Scale – 20 total score (56.1±10.57) was positively correlated with the number of physical symptoms as well as with psychopathology scores (Self-Rating Depression Scale, State–Trait Anxiety Inventory trait, state, and Somatosensory Amplification Scale), but negatively correlated with planful problem solving, confrontive coping, seeking social support, and positive reappraisal coping scores. With respect to coping strategy, multiple regression analyses revealed that “difficulty in identifying feelings” was positively associated with an escape–avoidance strategy, “difficulty in describing feelings” was negatively associated with a seeking social support strategy, and “externally oriented thinking” was negatively associated with a confrontive coping strategy. Conclusion Alexithymia was strongly associated with the number of somatic symptoms and negative affect. Patients with high “difficulty in describing feelings” tend to rely less on seeking social support, and patients with high “externally oriented thinking” tend to rely less on confrontive coping strategies. The coping skills intervention implemented should differ across individuals and should be based on the alexithymia dimension of each patient. PMID:24403835

Tominaga, Toshiyuki; Choi, Hyungin; Nagoshi, Yasuhide; Wada, Yoshihisa; Fukui, Kenji

2014-01-01

113

The importance of perceived stress management skills for patients with prostate cancer in active surveillance.  

PubMed

Little is known about whether and how stress management skills may improve adjustment for men diagnosed with prostate cancer who opt for active surveillance. This study examined whether two types of perceived stress management skills, specifically the ability to relax and confidence in coping, moderated the relationship between prostate cancer (PC) concerns and psychological distress. Participants were 71 ethnically diverse men in active surveillance. Coping confidence moderated the relationship between PC concerns and intrusive thoughts (p < .01). At low levels of coping confidence, PC concerns was positively related to intrusive thoughts, ? = .95, p < .001, but not when coping confidence was high, ? = .19, p > .05. Coping confidence also moderated the relationship between PC treatment concerns (a subscale of PC concerns) and intrusive thoughts. At low levels of coping confidence, PC treatment concerns was positively associated with intrusive thoughts, ? = .73, p < .001, but not when coping confidence was high, ? = .20, p > .05. Findings underscore the importance of interventions aimed at improving coping in men undergoing active surveillance. PMID:25234859

Yanez, Betina; Bustillo, Natalie E; Antoni, Michael H; Lechner, Suzanne C; Dahn, Jason; Kava, Bruce; Penedo, Frank J

2015-04-01

114

Integrating psychoeducation in a basic computer skills course for people suffering from social anxiety: participants’ experiences  

PubMed Central

We describe a psychoeducational program integrated in a basic computer skills course for participants suffering from social anxiety. The two main aims of the course were: that the participants learn basic computer skills, and that the participants learn to cope better with social anxiety. Computer skills were taught by a qualified teacher. Psychoeducation and cognitive therapy skills, including topics such as anxiety coping, self-accept, and self-regulation, were taught by a clinical psychologist. Thirteen of 16 participants completed the course, which lasted 11 weeks. A qualitative analysis was performed, drawing on observations during the course and on interviews with the participants. The participants were positive about the integration of psychoeducation sessions in the computer course, and described positive outcomes for both elements, including improved computer skills, improved self-esteem, and reduced social anxiety. Most participants were motivated to undertake further occupational rehabilitation after the course. PMID:21966225

Löhr, Hildegard D; Rosenvinge, Jan H; Wynn, Rolf

2011-01-01

115

Online Databases in the History Curriculum: Encouraging Historical Thinking Skills and Positive Discussion Strategies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How can students use technology as a tool to further learning in the classroom? How can an online database discussion improve participation and encourage historical thinking skills for all students? How can FileMaker Pro help students transcend the constraints of classroom time and space to facilitate a more global design of classroom discussion?…

Rhodes, Sara

116

Does Being Friendly Help in Making Friends? The Relation between the Social Position and Social Skills of Pupils with Special Needs in Mainstream Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pupils with special needs can have difficulties in building relationships with peers in inclusive education. An important condition for developing positive relationships with peers is having the age-group appropriate social skills. It seems likely that pupils with an insufficient set of social skills face a larger risk of being excluded. This…

Frostad, Per; Pijl, Sip Jan

2007-01-01

117

Living Skills as a Core Curriculum Component.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Schools should help students develop daily living skills in addition to basic cognitive skills such as reading, writing, and figuring. Living skills are interpreted to include those skills which help students cope with rapid social change. Skills need to be taught on health and nutrition, safety and first aid, interpersonal relationships, family…

Dufty, David

118

Coping and quality of life after tumor surgery: personal and social resources promote different domains of quality of life.  

PubMed

Personal and social resources facilitate the adaptation to critical life events. The present study investigates whether general self-efficacy beliefs and received social support elevate cancer patients' physical, emotional, and social well-being directly, or whether these effects are rather mediated by active or meaning-focused coping. Gastrointestinal, colorectal, and lung cancer patients were approached at 1 month and at 6 months after surgery (N=175). Structural equation models indicate that self-efficacy at 1 month after surgery exerted a positive direct effect on all three domains of health-related quality of life at 6 months after surgery, but indirect effects through active and meaning-focused coping were also observed. Initial received support elevated later emotional well-being, but not the other two quality of life domains. This effect was not mediated by coping. Results suggest the development of interventions to increase optimistic self-beliefs and coping skills in tumor-surgery patients. PMID:17999215

Boehmer, Sonja; Luszczynska, Aleksandra; Schwarzer, Ralf

2007-03-01

119

Religious Coping and Psychological Distress in Military Veteran Cancer Survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on the relationship between religious coping and psychological well-being in cancer survivors is limited. Forty-eight\\u000a veteran cancer survivors completed measures of psychological distress, posttraumatic growth, and positive and negative religious\\u000a coping. Negative religious coping was associated with greater distress and growth. Positive religious coping was associated\\u000a with greater growth. Gender, race, and religious affiliation were significant predictors of positive

Kelly M. TrevinoElizabeth; Elizabeth Archambault; Jennifer Schuster; Peter Richardson; Jennifer Moye

120

Coping with work and family: How do dual-earners interact?  

PubMed

Juggling the demands of both work and family has become increasingly difficult, especially for dual-earner households; nevertheless, families have developed strategies to deal with work-family challenges. This paper uses couple level analyses (APIM models) with 100 dual-earner couples to provide insight about partners' mutual influence on the use of work-family coping strategies. The results show that women's use of coping strategies is more associated with work-family conflict and work-family enrichment than men's coping. In addition, using partner coping, having a positive attitude towards multiple roles, using planning and management skills and avoiding having to cut back on professional responsibilities is associated with better outcomes (more enrichment and less conflict). Surprisingly, the use of childcare facilities is associated with women's conflict and partner effects were only found concerning the use of management and planning skills. These skills, however, have distinct effects for men and women's outcomes: their use by men reduces their own conflict but increases their wives', while their use by women decreases their own conflict and increases their own and their partner's enrichment. These results point to the fact that gender roles continue to be a hallmark of work-family issues. Our design and results point out the need for new interventions that take couple interdependences into account. PMID:25600426

Matias, Marisa; Fontaine, Anne Marie

2015-04-01

121

Gender differences in adolescent coping behaviors and suicidal ideation: findings from a sample of 73,238 adolescents.  

PubMed

Suicide among adolescents is an emerging global public health problem as well as a socioeconomic problem. Stress-coping strategies have been shown to be associated with suicidal ideation. We examined coping behaviors related to suicidal ideation and gender differences in adolescents using the data from the 2010 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey (ages 12-19 years; N = 73,238). Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between suicidal ideation and specific coping behaviors while controlling for potentially confounding variables. In both male and female groups, the coping behavior "drinking alcoholic beverages" and "smoking cigarettes" were positively associated with suicidal ideation. "Watching TV," "playing online/mobile games," and "sleeping" were negatively associated with suicidal ideation in both groups. In males, "engaging in sports" was negatively related to suicidal ideation. In females, "venting by talking to others" and "eating" were negatively related to suicidal ideation. The results indicate that there are gender differences in the effects of coping behaviors on adolescent suicidal ideation, and that developing adaptive coping strategies may function to reduce suicidality. Future studies are needed to examine whether improving coping skills can reduce suicidal ideation in a gender-specific manner. PMID:24344782

Kim, Sun Mi; Han, Doug Hyun; Trksak, George H; Lee, Young Sik

2014-01-01

122

Religious Coping and Psychological and Behavioral Adjustment After Hurricane Katrina.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT Positive and negative religious coping are related to positive and negative psychological adjustment, respectively. The current study examined the relation between religious coping and PTSD, major depression, quality of life, and substance use among residents residing in Mississippi at the time of Hurricane Katrina. Results indicated that negative religious coping was positively associated with major depression and poorer quality of life and positive religious coping was negatively associated with PTSD, depression, poorer quality of life, and increased alcohol use. These results suggest that mental health providers should be mindful of the role of religious coping after traumatic events such as natural disasters. PMID:25275223

Henslee, Amber M; Coffey, Scott F; Schumacher, Julie A; Tracy, Melissa; H Norris, Fran; Galea, Sandro

2014-10-01

123

The efficacy of the enhanced Aussie Optimism Positive Thinking Skills Program in improving social and emotional learning in middle childhood  

PubMed Central

The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of the modified and enhanced Aussie Optimism Positive Thinking Skills Program (AO-PTS) on Year 4 and 5 children's social and emotional learning (SEL) skills. AO-PTS is a universal-school based program that is implemented by class teachers as part of regular school curricula and was developed for the prevention of depression and anxiety. The study comprised a total of 683 Year 4 and 5 students from 10 private primary schools in Western Australia. Students were assessed on two subscales of emotional attribution at school whilst parents reported on their children's externalizing and internalizing problems outside of school and at home. Two analyses were conducted: seven intervention schools were assessed at pre- and post-test (Analysis 1) and pre-post change in three intervention schools were compared to pre-post change in three matched control schools (Analysis 2). Results from Analysis 1 showed that the intervention children had increased in their overall emotional attribution accuracy and decreased in total difficulties and hyperactivity; Results from Analysis 2 revealed no intervention effect on emotional attribution accuracy or internalizing or externalizing problems. These findings suggest that the enhanced AO-PTS's effects on SEL were not evident in the short-term period after intervention. The non-significant findings and future directions for AO-PTS research and program modification were discussed. PMID:25177310

Myles-Pallister, Jacqueline D.; Hassan, Sharinaz; Rooney, Rosanna M.; Kane, Robert T.

2014-01-01

124

The efficacy of the enhanced Aussie Optimism Positive Thinking Skills Program in improving social and emotional learning in middle childhood.  

PubMed

The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of the modified and enhanced Aussie Optimism Positive Thinking Skills Program (AO-PTS) on Year 4 and 5 children's social and emotional learning (SEL) skills. AO-PTS is a universal-school based program that is implemented by class teachers as part of regular school curricula and was developed for the prevention of depression and anxiety. The study comprised a total of 683 Year 4 and 5 students from 10 private primary schools in Western Australia. Students were assessed on two subscales of emotional attribution at school whilst parents reported on their children's externalizing and internalizing problems outside of school and at home. Two analyses were conducted: seven intervention schools were assessed at pre- and post-test (Analysis 1) and pre-post change in three intervention schools were compared to pre-post change in three matched control schools (Analysis 2). Results from Analysis 1 showed that the intervention children had increased in their overall emotional attribution accuracy and decreased in total difficulties and hyperactivity; Results from Analysis 2 revealed no intervention effect on emotional attribution accuracy or internalizing or externalizing problems. These findings suggest that the enhanced AO-PTS's effects on SEL were not evident in the short-term period after intervention. The non-significant findings and future directions for AO-PTS research and program modification were discussed. PMID:25177310

Myles-Pallister, Jacqueline D; Hassan, Sharinaz; Rooney, Rosanna M; Kane, Robert T

2014-01-01

125

Intervention for Positive Use of Leisure Time among College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College student excessive alcohol use is a pressing public health concern, and many of the negative events associated with heavy drinking occur during leisure or free time. Positive use of leisure can lead to coping skills, stress reduction, and healthy development. Negative use of leisure, including heavy alcohol use, is associated with physical…

Yarnal, Careen; Qian, Xinyi; Hustad, John; Sims, Damon

2013-01-01

126

Adolescent Coping in Different Chinese Family Environments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study explored relationship between family environment and adolescent coping in Chinese sample. Chinese adolescents tended to mobilize personal resources, seek help from social resources, and adopt a philosophy of doing nothing as their major coping style when they had a positive perception of their family environment. Girls relied more on social…

Hamid, P. Nicholas; Yue, Xiao Dong; Leung, Chi Mei

2003-01-01

127

Childlessness: Strategies for Coping with Infertility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the coping strategies adopted by 50 infertile men and women. All interviewed had sought medical help, and many became knowledgeable about reproduction and infertility. Redefining the problem and managing negative concepts about infertility were other coping strategies. Seeking social support, positive identities, and other ways of meeting…

Woollett, Anne

1985-01-01

128

Response to the DIAC Discussion Paper: "Review of the General Skilled Migration Points Test". Go8 Position Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Group of Eight (Go8) applauds the government's intention to comprehensively reform the skilled migration program, and it welcomes the opportunity to submit this response to the General Skilled Migration (GSM) Points Test Discussion Paper. The Go8 has argued for some time that it is inappropriate to link international education to the skilled

Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

2010-01-01

129

Helping Children Cope with Fears: Using Children's Literature in  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many children are dealing with adult fears such as death, crime, and war at early ages. School counselors can help children cope with these fears using stories from children's literature. The role that children's lit- erature can play in teaching these coping skills is dis- cussed along with strategies for choosing books. Several books and recommended counseling activities are described

Classroom Guidai; Janice I. Nicholson

130

Project COPE, 1983-1984: OEA Evaluation Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Project COPE provides supportive services, basic skills, career development, and occupational training to limited English proficient (LEP) students at three New York City high schools. Many COPE students are also limited in their ability to read and write in their native languages. Program participants in 1983-84 included: 173 Spanish-dominant…

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

131

Stress Coping Mechanisms in Elderly Adults: An Initial Study of Recreational and Other Coping Behaviors in Nursing Home Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Residents (N = 32) of 3 skilled nursing homes participated in a study designed to document the nature of the stressors they experienced and the coping mechanisms they used. Medical issues were the most common stressors. The most common coping responses were prayer, reading, watching television, listening to music, and talking to friends and…

Hunter, I. Roy; Gillen, Mark C.

2009-01-01

132

Coping Strategies and Attachment in Pedophiles: Implications for Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to investigate the use of coping styles in pedophiles (n = 25) and how that use might differ in nonoffending victims (n= 22) and a control group from the general population (n = 23). TheWays of Coping Questionnaire is employed for this purpose. The results indicate significant differences. The pedophiles, although employing positive coping

Jon Kear-Colwell; Gary A. Sawle

2001-01-01

133

Reactive, Anticipatory, Preventive, and Proactive Coping: A Theoretical Distinction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Proactive coping is an innovative coping theory that may help facilitate the design of educational and psychological interventions to overcome adolescent risk behaviors and to promote personal growth. It broadens stress and coping research by including positive strivings which take into account such aspects as goals, purpose, and meaning.…

Schwarzer, Ralf; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

2008-01-01

134

Religion and Spirituality as Resources for Coping with Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of coping with cancer have often included variables concerned with religion or spirituality. Unfortunately, the variables chosen have generally had limited salience for the overall coping process and limited usefulness for the development of clinical interventions. Despite these drawbacks, existing research suggests that religious and spiritual coping may have positive impacts on cancer patients' adjustment, and some evidence exists

Richard A. Jenkins; Kenneth I. Pargament

1995-01-01

135

Future-Oriented Coping and Job Hunting among College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a sample of Chinese college students (n = 216), the present study showed that future-oriented coping negatively correlated with perceived pressure and positively correlated with successful job hunting. The relationship between proactive coping and preventive coping was also explored. Structural equation modeling suggested that a sequence…

Hu, Yueqin; Gan, Yiqun

2011-01-01

136

Internet addiction: coping styles, expectancies, and treatment implications  

PubMed Central

Internet addiction (IA) has become a serious mental health condition in many countries. To better understand the clinical implications of IA, this study tested statistically a new theoretical model illustrating underlying cognitive mechanisms contributing to development and maintenance of the disorder. The model differentiates between a generalized Internet addiction (GIA) and specific forms. This study tested the model on GIA on a population of general Internet users. The findings from 1019 users show that the hypothesized structural equation model explained 63.5% of the variance of GIA symptoms, as measured by the short version of the Internet Addiction Test. Using psychological and personality testing, the results show that a person’s specific cognitions (poor coping and cognitive expectations) increased the risk for GIA. These two factors mediated the symptoms of GIA if other risk factors were present such as depression, social anxiety, low self-esteem, low self-efficacy, and high stress vulnerability to name a few areas that were measured in the study. The model shows that individuals with high coping skills and no expectancies that the Internet can be used to increase positive or reduce negative mood are less likely to engage in problematic Internet use, even when other personality or psychological vulnerabilities are present. The implications for treatment include a clear cognitive component to the development of GIA and the need to assess a patient’s coping style and cognitions and improve faulty thinking to reduce symptoms and engage in recovery. PMID:25426088

Brand, Matthias; Laier, Christian; Young, Kimberly S.

2014-01-01

137

Internet addiction: coping styles, expectancies, and treatment implications.  

PubMed

Internet addiction (IA) has become a serious mental health condition in many countries. To better understand the clinical implications of IA, this study tested statistically a new theoretical model illustrating underlying cognitive mechanisms contributing to development and maintenance of the disorder. The model differentiates between a generalized Internet addiction (GIA) and specific forms. This study tested the model on GIA on a population of general Internet users. The findings from 1019 users show that the hypothesized structural equation model explained 63.5% of the variance of GIA symptoms, as measured by the short version of the Internet Addiction Test. Using psychological and personality testing, the results show that a person's specific cognitions (poor coping and cognitive expectations) increased the risk for GIA. These two factors mediated the symptoms of GIA if other risk factors were present such as depression, social anxiety, low self-esteem, low self-efficacy, and high stress vulnerability to name a few areas that were measured in the study. The model shows that individuals with high coping skills and no expectancies that the Internet can be used to increase positive or reduce negative mood are less likely to engage in problematic Internet use, even when other personality or psychological vulnerabilities are present. The implications for treatment include a clear cognitive component to the development of GIA and the need to assess a patient's coping style and cognitions and improve faulty thinking to reduce symptoms and engage in recovery. PMID:25426088

Brand, Matthias; Laier, Christian; Young, Kimberly S

2014-01-01

138

The Coexistence of Coping Resources and Specific Coping Styles in Stress: Evidence from Full Information Item Bifactor Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Knowledge of coping styles is useful in clinical diagnosis and suggesting specific therapeutic interventions. However, the latent structures and relationships between different aspects of coping styles have not been fully clarified. A full information item bifactor model will be beneficial to future research. Objective One goal of this study is identification of the best fit statistical model of coping styles. A second goal is entails extended analyses of latent relationships among different coping styles. In general, such research should offer greater understanding of the mechanisms of coping styles and provide insights into coping with stress. Methods Coping Styles Questionnaire (CSQ) and Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) were administrated to officers suffering from military stress. Confirmatory Factor Analyses was performed to indentify the best fit model. A hierarchical item response model (bifactor model) was adopted to analyze the data. Additionally, correlations among coping styles and self-efficacy were compared using both original and bifactor models. Results Results showed a bifactor model best fit the data. Item loadings on general and specific factors varied among different coping styles. All items loaded significantly on the general factor, and most items also had moderate to large loadings on specific factors. The correlation between coping styles and self-efficacy and the correlation among different coping styles changed significantly after extracting the general factor of coping stress using bifactor analysis. This was seen in changes from positive (r?=?0.714, p<0.01) correlation to negative (r?=??0.335, p<0.01) and also from negative (r?=??0.296, p<0.01) to positive (r?=?0.331, p<0.01). Conclusion Our results reveal that coping styles have a bifactor structure. They also provide direct evidence of coexisting coping resources and styles. This further clarifies that dimensions of coping styles should include coping resources and specific coping styles. This finding has implications for measurement of coping mechanisms, health maintenance, and stress reduction. PMID:24787952

Cui, Meng; Wu, Qing; Zhu, Xia; Miao, Danmin; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Xi; Xiao, Wei

2014-01-01

139

Enhancing the Emotional and Social Skills of the Youth to Promote their Wellbeing and Positive Development: A Systematic Review of Universal School-based Randomized Controlled Trials  

PubMed Central

Background: The acquisition of social and emotional skills is associated with positive youth development, character education, healthy lifestyle behaviours, reduction in depression and anxiety, conduct disorders, violence, bullying, conflict, and anger. School-based interventions aimed to enhance these skills go beyond a problem-focused approach to embrace a more positive view of health; they could also improve the youth’s wellbeing. Aim: To describe the main features and to establish the effectiveness of universal school-based RCTs for children and the youth, aimed to promote their psychosocial wellbeing, positive development, healthy lifestyle behaviours and/or academic performance by improving their emotional and social skills. Methods: Systematic review by searching for relevant papers in PubMed/Medline with the following key words: “mental health” OR “wellbeing” OR “health promotion” OR “emotional learning” OR “social learning” OR “emotional and social learning” OR “positive youth development” OR “life skills” OR “life skills training” AND “school”. Interval was set from January 2000 to April 2014. Results: 1,984 papers were identified through the search. Out of them 22 RCTs were included. While most interventions were characterized by a whole-school approach and SAFE practices, few studies only used standardized measures to assess outcomes, or had collected follow-up data after ? 6 months. The results of all these trials were examined and discussed. Conclusion: Universal school-based RCTs to enhance emotional and social skills showed controversial findings, due to some methodological issues mainly. Nevertheless they show promising outcomes that are relatively far-reaching for children and youth wellbeing and therefore are important in the real world. PMID:25834626

Sancassiani, Federica; Pintus, Elisa; Holte, Arne; Paulus, Peter; Moro, Maria Francesca; Cossu, Giulia; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Lindert, Jutta

2015-01-01

140

Coping with Traumatic Events  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Resource Page Violence and Mental Illness Fact Sheet Coping with Violence and Traumatic Events ... Blog About Coping with Traumatic Events Understanding Severe Mental Illness January 11, 2011 Tragedy at Fort Hood November ...

141

Position Revision Form Please describe in writing the changes in responsibilities and skill requirements that have occurred and the impact on the  

E-print Network

Position Revision Form Please describe in writing the changes in responsibilities and skill): _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Essential Duties & Responsibilities List the essential duties performed as a regular part of the job the percentage of time required to perform each duty, the total equaling 100%. Essential Functions

Hutcheon, James M.

142

Coping with Cancer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the incidence of cancer in this country is high and the cancer survival rates are increasing, it is important to study coping strategies in cancer patients. As survival time lengthens, coping strategies that might affect the quality of a patient's life become increasingly important. A study was conducted to examine coping strategies in newly…

Manuel, Gerdenio M.; And Others

143

Foresight Group Roundtable: Fresh Thinking for Learning and Skills. Centre for Innovation in Learning--Positioning Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creating a fertile space for debate and ideas in order to drive innovation in learning and skills is integral to LSN's (Learning and Skills Network's) mission. To achieve this LSN has pioneered a new approach to making learning work from classroom to boardroom--and created the Centre for Innovation in Learning. This new, independent think tank…

Learning and Skills Network (NJ3), 2010

2010-01-01

144

Indirect and direct associations between personality and psychological distress mediated by dispositional coping.  

PubMed

The present study examines the association between coping and personality, by testing the hypothesis that dispositional coping mediates the relationship between personality and psychological distress. Canonical correlations evaluated the degree of the association among personality and coping dimensions in a community sample (N = 489) from Cyprus. Results partially support the hypothesized mediation model with Agreeableness predicting distress through the full mediation of avoidant coping, expression of negative feelings and active-positive coping. Partial mediation was found for Neuroticism and Openness. Canonical correlations deciphered how coping relates to the Big Five dimensions. Neuroticism was mostly associated with maladaptive coping, whereas Conscientiousness and Extraversion with adaptive coping. PMID:25087318

Panayiotou, Georgia; Kokkinos, Constantinos M; Kapsou, Margarita

2014-01-01

145

Coping and Self-Efficacy in Marijuana Treatment: Results from the Marijuana Treatment Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether a coping-skills-based treatment for marijuana dependence operated by encouraging the use of coping skills or via other mechanisms. Participants were 450 men and women treated in the multisite Marijuana Treatment Project who were randomly assigned to motivational enhancement therapy plus cognitive-behavioral (MET-CB)…

Litt, Mark D.; Kadden, Ronald M.; Stephens, Robert S.

2005-01-01

146

Ways of coping with premenstrual change: development and validation of a premenstrual coping measure  

PubMed Central

Background Negative premenstrual change can result in distress for a significant proportion of women. Previous research has suggested that women employ a range of coping strategies and behaviours in order to manage and reduce premenstrual distress. However, as yet there has been no specific scale available to measure premenstrual coping. This research aimed to develop and validate a measure of premenstrual coping which can be used in future investigations of negative premenstrual experience. Methods A sample of 250 women living in Australia, reporting mild to severe premenstrual distress, completed an online survey containing 64 items related to premenstrual coping. The items were generated by reviewing past literature related to premenstrual experience, in particular recent qualitative research on premenstrual coping. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted to determine item clusters that would form a measure. Reliability and validity were tested using calculations of Cronbach alphas, correlational analysis with psychological coping scales and a content analysis of participant reports of coping strategies. Results The factor analysis, which involved two principal component analyses, resulted in five factors containing 32 premenstrual coping behaviours. Interpretation of the factor solution drew on empirical and theoretical accounts of premenstrual coping and the emergent factors were labelled Avoiding Harm, Awareness and Acceptance of Premenstrual Change, Adjusting Energy, Self-Care, and Communicating. These factors form the subscales of the Premenstrual Coping Measure (PMCM). The subscales demonstrated acceptable to very good reliability and tests of construct, concurrent and content validity were supportive of sound validity. Conclusions The PMCM provides a valid and reliable scale for quantifying ways of coping specific to negative premenstrual change. Conceptual similarity was found between some coping behaviours and behaviours positioned as symptoms of premenstrual change. Explanations for this overlap may be found in cultural discourses associated with idealised femininity and PMS (premenstrual syndrome). Further psychometric investigation of the PMCM will enhance knowledge of the role of coping with negative premenstrual experience. PMID:24383580

2014-01-01

147

Coping with Racism: What Works and Doesn't Work for Black Women?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Perceived racial discrimination (PRD) has deleterious effects on Black Americans. However, there is minimal empirical research on the influence of gender and coping on the relationship between PRD and mental health. This study posited that coping style (i.e., problem-focused coping and avoidant coping) would moderate the relationship between PRD…

West, Lindsey M.; Donovan, Roxanne A.; Roemer, Lizabeth

2010-01-01

148

The Relationship of Coping, Self-Worth, and Subjective Well-Being: A Structural Equation Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between various coping-related variables and the evaluation of self-worth and subjective well-being among persons with spinal cord injury. Positive coping variables included hope, proactive coping style, and sense of humor, whereas negative coping variables included perceptions of stress,…

Smedema, Susan Miller; Catalano, Denise; Ebener, Deborah J.

2010-01-01

149

Daily Coping Practice Predicts Treatment Effects in Children With Sickle Cell Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the 1-month effects of a pain coping skills intervention in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Methods: Forty-six African American children (8-17 years old) were randomly assigned to either a coping skills condition or a standard care control condition. Children were asked to practice daily with audiotaped instructions of skills (e.g., relaxation, imagery). Results: Multivariate analyses of

Karen M. Gil; Kelly K. Anthony; James W. Carson; Rupa Redding-Lallinger; Charles W. Daeschner; Russell E. Ware

2001-01-01

150

Spiritual coping predicts CD4-cell preservation and undetectable viral load over four years.  

PubMed

In this study of 177 people living with HIV, we examined if spiritual coping leads to slower HIV disease progression (CD4 cells, viral load [VL]), and more positive health behaviors (adherence, safer sex, less substance use). Prior research suggests that physicians' assessment of spiritual coping can be an interventional aid in promoting positive spiritual coping. Longitudinal spiritual coping was rated using qualitative content analysis of six-monthly interviews/essays. Positive spiritual coping (65%) was predominant over negative (7%), whereas 28% did not make significant use of spirituality as a means to cope. Spiritual coping was associated with less substance use disorder but not with less sexual risk behavior. Hierarchical linear modeling demonstrated that spiritual coping predicted sustained undetectable VL and CD4-cell preservation over four years, independent of sociodemographics, baseline disease status, and substance use disorder. Achieving undetectable VL significantly increased over time in participants with positive spiritual coping but decreased among those with negative spiritual coping. For every participant with positive spiritual coping achieving undetectable VL, four with negative spiritual coping reported with detectable/transmittable HIV. Notably, even when controlling for the effect of VL suppression, CD4-cell decline was 2.25 times faster among those engaged in negative versus positive spiritual coping. In conclusion, spiritual coping is associated with positive health behaviors, such as maintaining long-term VL suppression and less onset/relapse of substance use disorder over time. Among those who are sexually active, positive spiritual coping reduces the risk of HIV transmission via VL suppression but may not prevent the transmission of other STDs because spiritual coping is not related to safer sexual behavior. Notably, the association between spiritual coping and immune preservation was direct (i.e., not explained by VL suppression), suggesting potential psychoneuroimmunological pathways. Thus, assessment of spiritual coping may be an important area of intervention to achieve undetectable VL, reduce HIV disease progression, and prevent substance use onset/relapse. PMID:25297848

Kremer, Heidemarie; Ironson, Gail; Kaplan, Lauren; Stuetzele, Rick; Baker, Neil; Fletcher, Mary Ann

2015-01-01

151

Re-Positioning Australia's International Education in Global Knowledge Economies: Implications of Shifts in Skilled Migration Policies for Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent times, many key host nations have made it easier for foreign graduates to migrate after graduation. These students are often considered ideal migrants, possessing local qualifications along with a degree of acculturation, language skills and, in many cases, relevant local work experience. For the student, the opportunity to obtain…

Gribble, Cate; Blackmore, Jill

2012-01-01

152

What Qualifications and Skills are Important for Digital Librarian Positions in Academic Libraries? A Job Advertisement Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

As academic library functions and activities continue to evolve, libraries have broadened the traditional library model, which focuses on management of physical resources and activities, to include a digital library model, transforming resources and services into digital formats to support teaching, learning, and research. This transition has affected professionals' roles and activities due to new required skills. This study examines

Youngok Choi; Edie Rasmussen

2009-01-01

153

Coping with condom embarrassment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assesses the embarrassment associated with purchasing, carrying, storing, using and disposing of condoms. It incorporates coping theory into the investigation of embarrassment by analysing the strategies individuals use to cope with embarrassment during condom purchase. The results of a survey show that individuals are embarrassed at various stages related to condom use. Purchasing condoms elicits the most embarrassment,

Sarah G. Moore; Darren W. Dahl; Gerald J. Gorn; Charles B. Weinberg

2006-01-01

154

The Depression Coping Questionnaire.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College students (N=396), chronic pain patients (N=319), and schizophrenic veterans (N=43) completed the Depression Coping Questionnaire (DCQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Factor analysis of the DCQ identified eleven coping responses: social support, problem solving, self-blame/escape, aggression, indulgence, activities, medication,…

Kleinke, Chris L.

155

Coping with Street Gangs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to coping with street gangs is aimed at the young person who may be considering gang membership or who is afraid of gang violence. Understanding gangs leads to the ability to cope with the problems they pose. Part I explores "What Gangs Are," explaining characteristics of gangs and why young people join them. It is essential that…

Webb, Margot

156

Transitions: Preparing Families of Preschoolers for "Marathon Skills".  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Skills that families gain in coping with transitions at the early ages of their child with visual impairments provide skills necessary for all the life-stage transitions that follow and, thus, are termed marathon skills. The transition programing of the Lighthouse Child Development Center in New York City is designed to develop those skills. (JDD)

Deitz, Sally J.; Warkala, Catherine Sonen

1993-01-01

157

Coping during pregnancy: a systematic review and recommendations  

PubMed Central

Extensive evidence documents that prenatal maternal stress predicts a variety of adverse physical and psychological health outcomes for the mother and baby. However, the importance of the ways that women cope with stress during pregnancy is less clear. We conducted a systematic review of the English-language literature on coping behaviors and coping styles in pregnancy using PsycInfo and PubMed to identify 45 cross-sectional and longitudinal studies involving 16,060 participants published between January 1990 and June 2012. Although results were often inconsistent across studies, the literature provides some evidence that avoidant coping behaviors or styles and poor coping skills in general are associated with postpartum depression, preterm birth, and infant development. Variability in study methods including differences in sample characteristics, timing of assessments, outcome variables, and measures of coping styles or behaviors may explain the lack of consistent associations. In order to advance the scientific study of coping in pregnancy, we call attention to the need for a priori hypotheses and greater use of pregnancy-specific, daily process, and skills-based approaches. There is promise in continuing this area of research, particularly in the possible translation of consistent findings to effective interventions, but only if the conceptual basis and methodological quality of research improve. PMID:24489596

Guardino, Christine M.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel

2013-01-01

158

Cross-cultural differences in coping with sadness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study investigated cross-cultural differences in ways of coping with sadness in a multicultural sample (N=140).\\u000a Anova analyses revealed that Asians and Caucasians are less likely to use confrontive and positive reappraisal coping strategies\\u000a in dealing with sadness than multicultural individuals. Asians are also less likely to use distancing coping strategies than\\u000a multicultural individuals. Clinical implications of the results

Debra J. Vandervoort

2001-01-01

159

Coping Self-Talk and Cognitive Interference in Anxious Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study addressed the as-yet-unresolved issue of whether coping self-talk facilitates or interferes with effective task performance. Tests of the relationship between coping cognition and task performance are reported when potentially confounding relationships of negative cognition and task performance are controlled. The results indicate that coping self-talk of high-anxious children was positively correlated with negative thoughts but did not

Pier J. M. Prins; Gerrit J. F. P. Hanewald

1999-01-01

160

Offered: Offered: Position(s): Position(s)  

E-print Network

decision-making skills -Assertiveness and initiative -Team-oriented thinking -Ability to communicateCompany: Industry: Website: Majors: Offered: Offered: Position(s): Position(s): Description Target Bachelors, Masters Use your business, leadership and people skills to inspire exceptional

New Hampshire, University of

161

Interrelatedness of Proactive Coping, Reactive Coping, and Learned Resourcefulness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research has identified that coping strategies used by individuals depend on temporal locations of stressors. Dispositional attributes are also identified as predictors of coping. The current study identified commonalities of proactive coping, reactive coping, and learned resourcefulness measures. The analysis yielded three factors reflective of…

Moring, John; Fuhrman, Robert; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A.

2011-01-01

162

Postdoctoral Position: Primary Healthcare and Mental Health A postdoctoral position is available for a highly motivated and qualified individual with excellent skills in  

E-print Network

Postdoctoral Position: Primary Healthcare and Mental Health A postdoctoral position of research on developing and examining the effectiveness and uptake of interactive, webbased eHealth tools in the area of mental health, primary healthcare and diverse communities including immigrants, refugees

163

Having Trouble Coping?  

MedlinePLUS

Having Trouble Coping? The Lifeline is FREE, confidential, and always available. HELP a loved one, a friend, or yourself deal with trauma. Community crisis centers answer Lifeline calls. Printed 2007? Reprinted ...

164

Terrorism, post-traumatic stress, coping strategies, and spiritual outcomes.  

PubMed

This mail survey measured post-traumatic stress symptoms, spiritual and non-spiritual coping strategies, and positive spiritual outcomes following the tragedies of 9/11/01 in a national, random sample of 1,056 Presbyterians. Respondents reported mild to moderate degrees of re-experiencing and hyper-arousal symptoms of post-traumatic stress, unrelated to location or knowing someone involved. People experiencing high stress used greater frequency and variety of both spiritual and non-spiritual types of coping strategies. Positive spiritual outcomes were remarkably related to positive spiritual coping strategies, in contrast to no association with negative coping. This study illustrates the significant degree of post-traumatic stress experienced with vicarious exposure and a wide spectrum of coping strategies used following the major terrorist attacks. PMID:19229625

Meisenhelder, Janice Bell; Marcum, John P

2009-03-01

165

Denial as a Strategy for Coping with Cancer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asserts that, in some situations, one of the most useful strategies for helping cancer patients to cope can be denial. Presents definitions of coping in general and denial in particular. Discusses potential positive functions of denial for cancer patients and provides an overview of potential negative consequences. Concludes with brief summary and…

Matt, Denise A.; And Others

1988-01-01

166

[Coping for paranoid ideation in college students].  

PubMed

Research has shown that individual with a high level of paranoia use more avoidant coping strategies (Ellett, Lopes, & Chadwick, 2003). The present study examines coping strategies in 141 college students with lower or higher levels of paranoid ideation using the Paranoia Scale (Fenigstein & Vanable, 1992) and the Interpersonal Stress Coping Inventory (ISI; Kato, 2000). Participants were first required to complete the ISI for paranoid ideation (ISI-pre). They were then asked to complete ISI again (ISI-post) on the assumption that the previous coping strategies (ISI-pre) did not work well. The results showed that people with a higher level of paranoid ideation reported more negative relationship-oriented strategies on both the ISI-pre and ISI-post. The ISI-pre was higher than ISI post for positive relationship-oriented strategies among the participants with a higher level of paranoid ideation. These results suggested that people with paranoid ideation keep using the negative relationship-oriented strategies and reduce positive relationship-oriented strategies, if the primary coping strategies do not work well. PMID:18402063

Morimoto, Sachiko

2008-02-01

167

Learning Styles and Their Relationship to Stress and Coping in College Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the relationship between specific learning styles and stress and coping in a sample of female college students (N = 246). Participants in the study were assessed on the three variables by completing several self-report instruments measuring learning styles, life stress level, and coping skills. There were significant…

Vaughn, L. M.; Hensley, B.; Baker, R. C.; Dearman, L.

2010-01-01

168

Stress, Coping and Burnout in Mental Health Nurses: Findings From Three Research Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present data from three research studies on stress, coping and burnout in mental health nurses. All three studies used a range of self report questionnaires. Measures included a demographic checklist, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the DCL Stress Scale and the Cooper Coping Skills Scale. In all, 648 ward based mental health

Leonard Fagin; Jerome Carson; John Leary; Nicolette De Villiers; Heather Bartlett; Patty OMalley; Maria West; Stephen Mcelfatrick; Daniel Brown

1996-01-01

169

Coping Strategies Title I Teachers Use to Manage Burnout and Stress: A Multisite Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teacher burnout contributes to poor psychological and physical health, absenteeism, early retirement, and leads to inadequate teacher performance with adverse outcomes in student learning and achievement. Effective coping skills have been proposed as possible protectors from the effects of burnout; therefore, examining teachers' coping

Jeter, Lisa

2013-01-01

170

Cognitive Behavioral and Behavioral Interventions Help Young Children Cope During a Voiding Cystourethrogram  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To reduce young children's distress and increase coping behavior among children undergoing a voiding cystourethrogram (VCU). Methods: Three- to seven-year-old children were stratified based on prior VCU experience and randomly as- signed to an intervention (n 20) or a standard care (n 20) condition. The intervention included provi- sion of information, coping skills training, and parent coaching. We hypothesized

Nataliya Zelikovsky; James R. Rodrigue; Christine A. Gidycz

2000-01-01

171

Personal and situational factors that predict coping strategies for acute stress among basketball referees  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to establish the ways in which coping style and situational appraisals are related to the consistency of using approach and avoidance coping strategies for skilled Australian basketball referees (n = 133) after three game-related stressful events. The events, ‘making a mistake’, ‘aggressive reactions by coaches or players’ and ‘presence of important others’, were determined

Angelos Kaissidis-Rodafinos; Mark H. Anshel; Anne Porter

1997-01-01

172

Perceived Changes in Self-Image and Coping Strategies of Mothers of Children with Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focus groups were conducted to determine changes in self- esteem and coping strategies of 10 mothers of children with special needs. Participants in a short-term occupational therapy intervention gained coping skills, improved self-image, and increased self-care. (Contains 37 references.) (JOW)

Helitzer, Deborah L.; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie D.; VanLeit, Betsy; Crowe, Terry K.

2002-01-01

173

Attributions and Coping Styles in Reducing Victimization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To examine the role of attributions and coping on children's victimization over time, 220 children completed questionnaires twice over a 6-month period. Direct and mediational models were tested using regressions, cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Characterological self-blame was positively related to victimization within and across time for…

Shelley, Danielle; Craig, Wendy M.

2010-01-01

174

Youth Development Program Participation and Intentional Self-Regulation Skills: Contextual and Individual Bases of Pathways to Positive Youth Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present research used data from Grades 8, 9, and 10 of the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development, a longitudinal study involving U.S. adolescents, in order to better elucidate the process through which the strengths of youth and the ecological resources promoting healthy development (such as out-of-school-time programs) may contribute to…

Mueller, Megan Kiely; Phelps, Erin; Bowers, Edmond P.; Agans, Jennifer P.; Urban, Jennifer Brown; Lerner, Richard M.

2011-01-01

175

Young carers as social actors: coping strategies of children caring for ailing or ageing guardians in Western Kenya.  

PubMed

There is a vast body of research on the impact of HIV/AIDS on children, but little which acknowledges the role of children in providing care and support for ailing parents or ageing guardians. There has been a tendency to downplay the active role and agency of young carers, with young carers often represented as victims of damaging circumstances that compromise their psychosocial well-being. To counter-balance this tendency, and to develop the critical trend that views children as social actors, we explore how young carers cope with challenging circumstances, often with skill and ingenuity, drawing on data collected in Western Kenya in 2007. Forty-eight young carers (aged 11-17) used photography and drawing to provide accounts of their coping strategies. They described 240 of the resulting photographs and drawings in writing. In addition, 34 individual interviews and 2 group discussions were conducted with children to explore the findings further and 10 individual interviews with local adults were conducted to elucidate the dynamics between adults and children. Our data revealed that young carers cope by mobilising social support, engaging in income generating activities and constructing positive social identities around their caring roles. We conclude that children's ability to cope is determined by the extent to which they are able to participate in their community and negotiate support from it. PMID:19570600

Skovdal, Morten; Ogutu, Vincent O; Aoro, Cellestine; Campbell, Catherine

2009-08-01

176

Effects of Coping on Health Outcome Among Women With Gastrointestinal Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Studies have shown that the nature and quality of coping may positively or negatively affect health outcome; however, this relationship has not been well studied among patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Objectives: The primary objective was to study the effect of different coping strategies on the health outcome of women with GI disorders and how these coping strategies may

DOUGLAS A. DROSSMAN; JANE LESERMAN; ZHIMING LI; FRANCIS KEEFE; YUMING J. B. HU; TIMOTHY C. TOOMEY

177

Psychological and Religious Coping Strategies of Mothers Bereaved by the Sudden Death of a Child  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the associations of 3 types of psychological coping (task-based, emotion-based, avoidance), 2 types of religious coping (positive, negative), and their interactions with grief of 57 mothers bereaved by the sudden death of a child. Results indicated that mothers who use emotion-based coping report significantly higher levels of…

Anderson, Miriam J.; Marwit, Samuel J.; Vandenberg, Brian; Chibnall, John T.

2005-01-01

178

Spirituality and Well-Being: The Relationship between Religious Coping and Recovery from Sexual Assault  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite a growing body of literature documenting beneficial outcomes of religious coping, there are virtually no studies examining sexual assault survivors' use of religious coping. To fill this gap in the literature, the current study examines predictors and outcomes of positive and negative religious coping among 100 sexual assault survivors who…

Ahrens, Courtney E.; Abeling, Samantha; Ahmad, Sarah; Hinman, Jessica

2010-01-01

179

Project COPE, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In its final year of funding, Project COPE provided instruction in basic skills and career development to 388 students of limited English proficiency (LEP) in grades 9 through 12 at three sites in Brooklyn and the Bronx: 150 Hispanics at John F. Kennedy High School, 150 Haitians at Prospect Heights High School, and 88 Italians at Christopher…

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Educational Evaluation.

180

A cross-sectional study of stressors and coping mechanisms used by radiation therapists and oncology nurses: Resilience in Cancer Care Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Occupational stress and burnout are well-recognised experiences reported by cancer care workers. The aim was to describe the frequency and severity of potential stressors as well as the effectiveness of coping skills of radiation therapists (RTs) and oncology nurses (ONs), which make up the two largest occupational groups in cancer care. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to RTs and ONs in two large tertiary hospitals in Queensland. Descriptive data regarding severity of potential stressors at home and work as well as the perceived effectiveness of preferred coping styles for each stressor was compared for each professional group. Respondents were asked questions about their personal circumstances and to also complete five standardised questionnaires measuring resilience, mental well-being, depression, anxiety and burnout. Results There were 71 respondents representing a response rate of 26%. The types of stressors differed between the two groups but both reported that heavy workload was the most severe workplace stressor. RTs reported higher stressor and coping strategy frequency than ONs. There were no identifiable differences between RTs and ONs in the types or effectiveness of coping strategies employed at home or work. Mental well-being for both groups was inversely correlated with depression, anxiety and burnout and positively correlated with resilience. Conclusions RTs experienced higher mean scores for stressors and coping than ONs. There were no significant between-group differences for anxiety, depression, burnout, mental well-being or resilience. PMID:25598975

Poulsen, Michael G; Poulsen, Anne A; Baumann, Kathryn C; McQuitty, Simon; Sharpley, Christopher F

2014-01-01

181

Learning Leadership Skills in a Simulated Business Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In today's unstable market economy, individuals have to be skilled to work efficiently in constantly changing and complex situations. Thus, graduate students have to be trained to cope with unpredictable situations before they enter the workforce. They need to exercise occupational skills, such as leadership skills, during higher education.…

Siewiorek, Anna; Saarinen, Eeli; Lainema, Timo; Lehtinen, Erno

2012-01-01

182

Prospective study of religious coping among patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considerable attention has focused on relationships between religious or spiritual coping and health outcomes among cancer\\u000a patients. However, few studies have differentiated among discrete dimensions of religious coping, and there have been surprisingly\\u000a few prospective investigations. Negative or conflicted aspects of religious coping, in particular, represent a compelling\\u000a area for investigation. This prospective study examined negative religious coping, positive religious

Allen C. Sherman; Thomas G. Plante; Stephanie Simonton; Umaira Latif; Elias J. Anaissie

2009-01-01

183

Impact of Age, and Cognitive and Coping Resources on Coping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To explore the predictive value of cognitive and coping resources for problem- and emotion-focused coping with age, we collected data from community-dwelling adults between 20 and 90 years old. We hypothesized that age, perceived stress, self-efficacy, working-memory capacity, and mental flexibility were predictors of coping. We collected data…

Trouillet, Raphael; Doan-Van-Hay, Loane-Martine; Launay, Michel; Martin, Sophie

2011-01-01

184

Awareness and Coping with Emotion in Schizophrenia: Acceptability, Feasibility and Case Illustrations  

PubMed Central

Although current treatments help to alleviate some of the symptoms of schizophrenia, people with schizophrenia often continue to experience residual symptoms. An emotion-focused treatment approach may help to improve well-being in this population by increasing positive experiences and resources. In this article, we discuss the feasibility and acceptability of a skills-based group treatment for people schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. As part of the Awareness and Coping with Emotion in Schizophrenia (ACES) intervention, group members learned eight empirically supported cognitive and behavioural skills covering emotional awareness and coping. Group member feedback and three case illustrations illuminate participants’ experiences with the group, as well as the potential benefits and challenges of this treatment approach. These data suggest that ACES is a feasible and acceptable group intervention. Future research is needed to examine whether ACES has a selective impact on well-being, but these initial findings point to the promise of this intervention to improve quality of life for individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, thus filling a void in existing treatments options. PMID:23553953

Caponigro, Janelle M.; Moran, Erin K.; Kring, Ann M.; Moskowitz, Judith T.

2014-01-01

185

Map Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Map Skill Activities Map Skills Follow the directions below and write your answers on the worksheet provided. 1. Continents Quiz: Continents Quiz 2. Latitude/Longitude Reviews latitude and longitude quiz latitude/longitude map game lat/long multiple choice quiz 3. Map Scale Map Scale Activity 4.Map Skills map skills game map skills quiz ...

Mrs. Ali

2010-02-23

186

Impact of subject related factors and position of flight control stick on acquisition of simulated flying skills using a flight simulator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increasing demand on aviation industry calls for more pilots. Thus, pilot training systems and pilot-candidate screening systems are essential for civil and military flying training institutes. Before actual flight training, it is not easy to determine whether a flight trainee will be successful in the training. Due to the high cost of actual flight training, it would be better if there were low cost methods for screening and training candidates prior to the actual flight training. This study intended to determine if subject related factors and flight control stick position have an impact on acquisition of simulated flying skills using a PC-based flight simulator. The experimental model was a factorial design with repeated measures. Sixty-four subjects participated in the experiment and were divided into 8 groups. Experiment consisted of 8 sessions in which performance data, such as heading, altitude and airspeed were collected every 15 seconds. Collected data were analyzed using SAS statistical program. Result of multivariate analysis of variance indicated that the three independent variables: nationality, computer game experience, and flight stick position have significant impact on acquiring simulated flying skill. For nationality, Americans recorded higher scores in general (mean: 81.7) than Koreans (mean: 78.9). The difference in mean scores between Americans and Koreans was 2.8 percent. Regarding computer game experience, the difference between high experience group (82.3) and low experience group (78.3) is significant. For high experience group, American side-stick group recorded the highest (mean: 85.6), and Korean side-stick group (mean: 77.2) scored the lowest. For the low experience group, American center-stick group scored the highest (80.6), and the Korean side-stick group (74.2) scored the lowest points. Therefore, there is a significant difference between high experience group and low experience group. The results also reveal that the center-stick position is easier to learn than side-stick position. The difference in performance score between group of center-stick (mean: 82.1) and side-stick (mean: 76.8) is considerable.

Cho, Bo-Keun

187

Children Coping with Chronic Illness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children who live with chronic illness are confronted with challenges that frequently force them to cope in myriad ways. The ways in which children face chronic illness are summarized in this literature review. Also covered, are how the effects of family can influence coping strategies and how family members, especially parents, cope with their…

Perez, Lissette M.

188

Spirituality and well-being: the relationship between religious coping and recovery from sexual assault.  

PubMed

Despite a growing body of literature documenting beneficial outcomes of religious coping, there are virtually no studies examining sexual assault survivors' use of religious coping. To fill this gap in the literature, the current study examines predictors and outcomes of positive and negative religious coping among 100 sexual assault survivors who believed in God. Results suggested that African American survivors were more likely to use both forms of religious coping than survivors from other ethnicities. Yet, results also suggest that positive religious coping is related to higher levels of psychological well-being and lower levels of depression, whereas negative religious coping is related to higher levels of depression, regardless of ethnicity. The only outcome where ethnicity makes a difference is posttraumatic growth with a stronger relationship between positive religious coping and posttraumatic growth among Caucasian survivors space. The implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed. PMID:19729675

Ahrens, Courtney E; Abeling, Samantha; Ahmad, Sarah; Hinman, Jessica

2010-07-01

189

Respiratory sinus arrhythmia: a marker for positive social functioning and receptive language skills in children with autism spectrum disorders.  

PubMed

The current study builds on the emerging autism spectrum disorder (ASD) literature that associates autonomic nervous system activity with social function, and examines the link between respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and both social behavior and cognitive function. The RSA response pattern was assessed in 23 4- to 7-year-old children diagnosed with an ASD. Higher baseline RSA amplitudes were associated with better social behavior (i.e., more conventional gestures, more instances of joint attention) and receptive language abilities. Similar to reports of typically developing children, ASD children with higher RSA amplitude at baseline showed greater RSA and HP reactivity during an attention-demanding task. These results highlight the importance of studying RSA as a marker of positive function in children with ASD. PMID:22212893

Patriquin, Michelle A; Scarpa, Angela; Friedman, Bruce H; Porges, Stephen W

2013-03-01

190

Medication and Skilled Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is increasing interest in the way in which drugs impair performance. This has arisen because some may impair day-to-day skills of those whose occupations demand vigilance and motor skill, and of those who are involved in decision making or where interpersonal relations are crucial. For many years the position was adopted, at least in certain occupations where impaired performance

A. N. Nicholson

1990-01-01

191

Coping with Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective The primary aim of this study was to examine the associations between different types of coping and psychological well-being and physical health among women with breast cancer. A second aim was to explore the potential moderating influences of situational and measurement factors on the associations between coping and psychological well-being and physical health. Methods On 14 February 2011, a literature search was made for articles published in the PubMed and PsycINFO databases before January 2010. On 5 September 2013, a repeated literature search was made for articles published before May 2013. In the final analyses, 78 studies with 11 948 participants were included. Results Efforts to facilitate adaptation to stress, such as Acceptance and Positive Reappraisal, were related to higher well-being and health. Disengagement and avoidance types of coping were associated with lower well-being and health. The analyses indicated that, in several circumstances, coping effectiveness was dependent on cancer stage, treatment, disease duration, and type of coping measure. Conclusions Use of coping targeting adjustment and avoiding use of disengagement forms of coping were related to better psychological well-being and physical health. Adaptive strategies and avoiding disengagement forms of coping seemed particularly beneficial for women undergoing treatment. PMID:25423095

Kvillemo, Pia; Bränström, Richard

2014-01-01

192

Coping behaviour after shipwreck.  

PubMed

A description is given of the coping behaviour of seven men who survived a shipwreck and were not rescued until 13 days later. The principal behaviours shown by the men were attachment ideation, drive to survive, modelling, prayer and hope. Particular attention is paid to the first of these, and consideration given to its likely origins in behavioural evolution. It is proposed as a hitherto inadequately recognized coping behaviour. A follow-up examination 12 to 24 months later showed that five of the seven men available had developed substantial psychiatric disorder, while by contrast one was not only well but claimed to have been enriched by the experience. Exposure to extreme adversity or disaster may have long-term effects on mental health. Further longitudinal studies of disaster victims are necessary for the design of informed after-care. PMID:884411

Henderson, S; Bostock, T

1977-07-01

193

From Fistfights to Gunfights: Preparing Teachers and Administrators To Cope with Violence in School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Issues facing educators today include drug traffic and abuse, crime and delinquency, gangs, weapons, violence, vandalism, schoolyard bullying, and crisis management. Teachers and administrators require special skills to cope with potentially explosive situations and violent students, yet training in those skills is not being received in university…

Hughes, H. Woodrow

194

Psychological skill model of collegiate athletes in Taiwan.  

PubMed

The importance of psychological skills to an athlete is widely recognized. The Athletic Psychological Skills Inventory (APSI) was developed to evaluate psychological skills in the Taiwanese sports environment. This study employed the APSI model to refine the psychological skill factor structure. The model was supported as a reliable and valid form of measurement. A second-order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) confirmed the factor structure of the APSI in Taiwanese collegiate athletes. Peaking under pressure and coping with adversity were combined into a simplified factor, coping with adversity. PMID:25310230

Lin, Kai; Chou, Tzu-Chin Rejoice

2014-10-01

195

Intervention for Positive Use of Leisure Time Among College Students.  

PubMed

College student excessive alcohol use is a pressing public health concern, and many of the negative events associated with heavy drinking occur during leisure or free time. Positive use of leisure can lead to coping skills, stress reduction, and healthy development. Negative use of leisure, including heavy alcohol use, is associated with physical inactivity, stress, and short and long-term health concerns. We contend that using the classroom context to help college students understand why it is beneficial to engage in positive leisure pursuits and how that engagement will promote personal growth is of critical importance to healthy development. PMID:24198896

Yarnal, Careen; Qian, Xinyi; Hustad, John; Sims, Damon

2013-05-01

196

Critical Skills Master's Program The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP)  

E-print Network

Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP): The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP) provides exceptional bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Master's of Science in an appropriate technical staff position at Sandia with competitive pay. Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP

197

Can a Self-Regulation Skills and Cultural Arts Program Promote Positive Outcomes in Mental Health Symptoms and Academic Achievement for At-Risk Youth?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-regulation skills programs focusing on emotional regulation and executive functioning and arts programs have separately demonstrated reductions in internalizing and externalizing disorders and academic difficulties and have shown improvement in self-regulation skills. This study sought to evaluate participants in Prodigy (a program synthesizing arts and self-regulation skills) regarding changes in mental health symptoms and academic performance. A quasi-experimental pretest–posttest was

Lisa Rapp-Paglicci; Chris Stewart; William Rowe

2011-01-01

198

Prevention of depression and anxiety symptoms in adolescents: 42 and 54 months follow-up of the Aussie Optimism Program-Positive Thinking Skills  

PubMed Central

Anxiety and depression are the most commonly reported mental health problems amongst Australian children and adolescents. The Aussie Optimism: Program-Positive Thinking Skills (AOP-PTS) is a universal intervention program based on cognitive and behavioral strategies and aimed to prevent anxiety and depression in the middle primary school children aged 9–10 years old. 370 students randomly assigned to the intervention and control condition participated in the 42 and 54 months follow-up study. The intervention group received the AOP-PTS 10-week program and the control group received the regular health education curriculum. Students were assessed on anxiety, depression and attribution style at school whilst parents reported on their child’s externalizing and internalizing problems at home. Results showed there were no significant reductions across groups in the depressive and anxiety symptoms, and attribution style at either 42 or 54 months follow-up. These findings suggest that AOP-PTS has short and medium term effects but were not sustained in longer term period. Future strategies to achieve the desirable outcomes in a longitudinal study are discussed. PMID:24904446

Johnstone, Julie; Rooney, Rosanna M.; Hassan, Shari; Kane, Robert T.

2014-01-01

199

Prevention of depression and anxiety symptoms in adolescents: 42 and 54 months follow-up of the Aussie Optimism Program-Positive Thinking Skills.  

PubMed

Anxiety and depression are the most commonly reported mental health problems amongst Australian children and adolescents. The Aussie Optimism: Program-Positive Thinking Skills (AOP-PTS) is a universal intervention program based on cognitive and behavioral strategies and aimed to prevent anxiety and depression in the middle primary school children aged 9-10 years old. 370 students randomly assigned to the intervention and control condition participated in the 42 and 54 months follow-up study. The intervention group received the AOP-PTS 10-week program and the control group received the regular health education curriculum. Students were assessed on anxiety, depression and attribution style at school whilst parents reported on their child's externalizing and internalizing problems at home. Results showed there were no significant reductions across groups in the depressive and anxiety symptoms, and attribution style at either 42 or 54 months follow-up. These findings suggest that AOP-PTS has short and medium term effects but were not sustained in longer term period. Future strategies to achieve the desirable outcomes in a longitudinal study are discussed. PMID:24904446

Johnstone, Julie; Rooney, Rosanna M; Hassan, Shari; Kane, Robert T

2014-01-01

200

Prevention of internalizing disorders in 9–10 year old children: efficacy of the Aussie Optimism Positive Thinking Skills Program at 30-month follow-up  

PubMed Central

The Aussie Optimism: Positive Thinking Skills Program (AOPTP) is a school-based prevention program aimed at addressing anxious and depressive symptoms in children aged 9–10 years. Nine-hundred and ten students from 22 Australian primary schools situated in low socio-economic areas were randomly assigned to either an intervention or control group, and assessed at a 30-month follow up. Those in the intervention group received the AOPTP program, where the control group continued to receive the regular health education course. Students completed self-report measures regarding their levels of depression, anxiety, and attribution style. Parents also reported on their children's externalizing and internalizing problems outside of school. There were no significant differences between groups in regard to anxiety or depression, as well as no significant differences in attributional styles. Parents reported significantly less hyperactive behaviors from children in the intervention group. This finding suggests that AOP-PTS has the capacity to treat externalizing problems at a medium term effect. The decrease in the externalizing problems provides evidence of a partial medium term intervention effect. Future studies should continue to evaluate the program at a long term follow up. PMID:24421776

Rooney, Rosanna M.; Morrison, David; Hassan, Sharinaz; Kane, Robert; Roberts, Clare; Mancini, Vincent

2013-01-01

201

Alexithymia, Coping Styles and Traumatic Stress Symptoms in a Sample of Veterans Who Experienced Military Sexual Trauma.  

PubMed

The current study examined the association between alexithymia and coping styles (planning, positive reinterpretation and growth, social-emotion coping, and denial), and trauma symptoms in a clinical sample of 170 male and female veterans who experienced sexual trauma during military service. Denial was the only coping style positively associated with trauma symptoms, and it mediated the relationship between alexithymia and trauma symptoms. Alexithymia was negatively associated with planning. Likewise, alexithymia was negatively associated with social-emotional coping and with positive reinterpretation and growth. The results speak to the significant role that alexithymia has in predicting individual coping styles. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25393043

Gaher, Raluca M; O'Brien, Carol; Smiley, Paul; Hahn, Austin M

2014-11-13

202

Religious Coping in College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three religious-coping profiles (Self-directing, Deferring\\/Collaborative, and Eclectic) have been identified in previous research with cardiac-transplantation candidates. This study examines the existence of religious-coping styles in college students and tests the role of religious coping as a stress moderator of psychological and physical symptoms. Additional potential stress buffers were included to help explain the relationship between stress and symptomatology more completely.

Misty R. Kolchakian; Samuel F. Sears

1999-01-01

203

Active and Avoidant Coping and Coping Efficacy as Mediators of the Relation of Maternal Involvement to Depressive Symptoms among Urban Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our study tested an extension of the social resource model in an urban sample of 129 African American and 114 European American\\u000a adolescents. Maternal involvement was positively related to the use of active and avoidant coping strategies among youth of\\u000a both ethnicities. Additionally, use of active coping strategies was related to greater coping efficacy, which, in turn, was\\u000a associated with

Catherine E. Mosher; Hazel M. Prelow

2007-01-01

204

Psychosocial Predictors of Sexual HIV Transmission Risk Behavior among HIV-Positive Adults with a Sexual Abuse History in Childhood  

PubMed Central

Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with HIV sexual risk behavior. Although many psychosocial correlates of sexual risk among HIV-positive persons have been identified, studies predicting continued risk among HIV-positive adults with histories of CSA are limited. This cross-sectional study identified variables predictive of sexual transmission risk behavior among an ethnically diverse sample of 256 HIV-positive adults (women and men who have sex with men; MSM) with CSA histories. Participants were assessed for trauma symptoms, shame related to HIV and sexual trauma, substance use, coping style, and sexual risk behavior. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify variables predictive of unprotected sexual behavior in the past 4 months. Unprotected sex was significantly associated with substance use and trauma-related behavioral difficulties among women and men, and less spiritual coping among men. Unprotected sex with HIV negative or serostatus unknown partners was significantly associated with greater trauma-related behavioral difficulties, more HIV-related shame, and fewer active coping strategies. Thus, trauma symptoms, shame, coping style, and substance use were significantly associated with sexual risk behavior among HIV-positive adults with histories of CSA, with models of prediction differing by gender and partner serostatus. HIV prevention intervention for persons with HIV and CSA histories should address trauma-related behavioral difficulties and enhance coping skills to reduce sexual transmission risk behavior. PMID:17999171

Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Meade, Christina S.; Kochman, Arlene; Fox, Ashley M.

2015-01-01

205

Evaluating Child Coping Competence: Theory and Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much of the research on children's coping styles is based on a downward extension of adult coping theories. In a departure from this approach, coping competence theory seeks to account for children's ability to cope with daily challenges on the basis of developmental research. The theory, which states that challenges call for distinct coping

Moreland, Angela D.; Dumas, Jean E.

2008-01-01

206

Assessing coping strategies: A theoretically based approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a muRidimensional coping inventory to assess the different ways in which people respond to stress. Five scales (of four items each) measure conceptually distinct aspects of problem- focused coping (active coping, planning, suppression of competing activities, restraint coping, seek- ing of instrumental social support); five scales measure aspects of what might be viewed as emotion- focused coping (seeking

Charles S. Carver; Michael F. Scheier; Jagdish K. Weintraub

1989-01-01

207

Predicting Occupational Strain and Job Satisfaction: The Role of Stress, Coping, Personality, and Affectivity Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four studies employed path analysis to examine how measures of occupational stressors, coping resources, and negative affectivity (NA) and positive affectivity (PA) interact to predict occupational strain. The Occupational Stress Inventory (Osipow & Spokane, 1987) was used to measure stress, strain, and coping. The Positive and Negative Affectivity Schedule (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988) was used for the affectivity variables.

Gerard J. Fogarty; M. Anthony Machin; Majella J. Albion; Lynette F. Sutherland; Gabrielle I. Lalor; Susan Revitt

1999-01-01

208

Coping styles among families of children with HIV infection.  

PubMed

The primary aim of this study was to examine coping strategies among families of HIV-infected children and how they relate to medical, central nervous system (CNS) and family environment factors. Caregivers of HIV-positive children (N=52) completed a family coping measure (F-COPES) and provided information regarding family environment. Data regarding medical and CNS status were obtained from patient records. Results indicated that families' passive coping and spiritual support were among the coping techniques used most often, and social support was used least often. Medical variables were unrelated to any coping styles. Families of children with CNS impairment endorsed more passive coping techniques than families of children with no apparent deficits. A trend was found for non-biological caregivers to seek out more community resources and support than biological caregivers. Findings suggest the need to target families least likely to utilize resources, and to teach them to effectively seek out and benefit from social and community supports. PMID:15203422

Martin, S C; Wolters, P L; Klaas, P A; Perez, L; Wood, L V

2004-04-01

209

Coping Strategies in Egyptian Ladies with Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION A diagnosis of breast cancer regardless of the stage can be stressful, impact multiple spheres of life, and disrupt physical status, emotional and spiritual well-being, and personal relationships for the patient and family. In order to adapt, the patient ought to employ certain coping mechanisms. Individuals with terminal illness who utilize coping strategies have better quality of life compared to those who do not. PATIENTS AND METHODS This study aimed to determine the strategies used by females with breast cancer to cope with such stress by using Brief COPE scale and the hospital anxiety and depression scale. The study included 56 female patients diagnosed with operable breast cancer at Mansoura Oncology Center before surgery. RESULTS Large proportion of patients used acceptance, religion, and emotional support in coping with the stress of having breast cancer. Patients with depressive symptoms scored significantly higher venting while those with anxiety scored higher positive reframing, planning, and venting. CONCLUSION Efforts should be made to encourage women with breast cancer to use coping strategies that have been found to be helpful (eg, acceptance, emotional support, distraction, and active coping strategies). PMID:24940070

Elsheshtawy, Eman A.; Abo-Elez, Warda F.; Ashour, Hala S.; Farouk, Omar; El zaafarany, Maha I. Esmael

2014-01-01

210

Coping with negative emotions: connections with adolescents' academic performance and stress.  

PubMed

The authors assessed connections among adolescents' emotional dispositions, negative academic affect, coping strategies, academic stress, and overall grade point average (GPA). A total of 119 ninth through 12th-grade students completed assessments for (a) overall positive and negative moods, (b) GPA, and (c) academically related variables involving stress, negative emotions, and engaged and disengaged coping strategies. Greater negative academic affect and disengaged coping were related to lower GPAs, and disengaged coping mediated the connection between negative academic affect and GPA. By contrast, higher academic stress was related to students' overall moods, negative academic affect, and disengaged coping; disengaged coping mediated the connection between academic stress and negative overall moods. Discussion focused on the especially problematic nature of disengaged academic coping. PMID:24796156

Arsenio, William F; Loria, Samantha

2014-01-01

211

Coping among military veterans with PTSD in substance use disorder treatment.  

PubMed

We longitudinally investigated coping among male military veterans (n = 98) with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology and a co-occurring substance use disorder (SUD) who participated in a randomized controlled trial of seeking safety (SS). Participants were randomized to SS or intensive treatment-as-usual (TAU) for SUD. Coping (active, avoidant, emotional discharge), and PTSD and SUD symptomatology were measured prior to and at the end of treatment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Among the total sample, we found that: (a) avoidant and emotional discharge, but not active, coping tended to be positively associated with PTSD and SUD symptomatology at baseline; (b) active coping increased and avoidant and emotional discharge coping decreased during the 12-month time-period; and (c) avoidant and emotional discharge, but not active, coping longitudinally covaried with PTSD and SUD symptomatology. Results suggest the utility of targeting maladaptive coping in treatments for individuals with co-occurring PTSD and SUD. PMID:24854218

Tyler Boden, Matthew; Kimerling, Rachel; Kulkarni, Madhur; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O; Weaver, Christopher; Trafton, Jodie

2014-08-01

212

Development of the Coping Flexibility Scale: Evidence for the Coping Flexibility Hypothesis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Coping flexibility" was defined as the ability to discontinue an ineffective coping strategy (i.e., evaluation coping) and produce and implement an alternative coping strategy (i.e., adaptive coping). The Coping Flexibility Scale (CFS) was developed on the basis of this definition. Five studies involving approximately 4,400 Japanese college…

Kato, Tsukasa

2012-01-01

213

Presentation skills.  

PubMed

This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Nurses with such skills can share knowledge and expertise, and communicate clearly, in a range of workplace scenarios. PMID:25746884

2015-03-01

214

Coping Experiences: A Pathway towards Different Coping Orientations Four and Twelve Months after Myocardial Infarction—A Grounded Theory Approach  

PubMed Central

Background. Patients recovering from a myocardial infarction (MI) are faced with a number of serious challenges. Aim. To create a substantive theory on myocardial infarction patients' coping as a continuum. Methods. Grounded theory method was used. Data were collected by using individual interviews. The informants were 28 MI patients. Results. The core category “coping experiences—a pathway towards different coping orientations” includes 2 main categories: “positive and negative coping experiences” (4 months after MI) and “different coping orientations” (12 months after MI). Conclusion. Coping with a myocardial infarction is a long-term dynamic process of dealing with varied emotions and adjustment needs. Coping is threatened, if the patient denies the seriousness of the situation, suffers from depression and emotional exhaustion, or if there are serious problems in the interaction with family members. This study stresses the importance of recognizing the patient's depressive state of mind and the psychological aspects which affect family dynamics. A more family-centered approach involving a posthospital counseling intervention is recommended. Relevance to Clinical Practice. The results of this study can be used in nursing care practice when organizing support interventions for myocardial infarction patients. PMID:23304483

Salminen-Tuomaala, Mari; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi; Rekiaro, Matti; Paavilainen, Eija

2012-01-01

215

Coping with Continual Motion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the face of seismic shifts in technology and social organization, librarians and library staff face changing roles. A focus on competencies--the skills, knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes that are involved in a job--can help the library profession keep its footing as well as help librarians stick to values. When well done, they can define a…

Gutsche, Betha

2010-01-01

216

Intergenerational Child Abuse and Coping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many studies have investigated the consequences of child sexual abuse (CSA) but few have examined the intergenerational effects of poly-victimization and maladaptive coping. The purpose of this investigation was to examine patterns of maltreatment and maladaptive coping among second-generation CSA survivors. It is hypothesized that: (a) maternal…

Robboy, Juliet; Anderson, Kristen G.

2011-01-01

217

Coping with a Cancer Diagnosis  

MedlinePLUS

... FACTS FOR LIFE Coping With a Breast Cancer Diagnosis Coping with breast cancer A breast cancer diagnosis can cause a wide range of feelings. Denial, ... They are there to help: • Lend support from diagnosis through treatment and ... • Gather information about breast cancer. A social worker or counselor can also help ...

218

Stress Coping Preferences of Principals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents results of a 1985 survey to identify the occupational stressors and stress-coping preferences of 212 secondary school principals from excellent schools. Primary stressors are task-based; preferred coping strategies are discussing concerns with colleagues, delegating tasks to others, and taking work home. Principals must improve planning…

Cooper, Larry W.

1988-01-01

219

[Coping strategies in adaptation of higher education students].  

PubMed

The adjustment to higher education can be understood as a multidimensional process, which requires by the student a development of adaptive skills to a new and dynamic context in itself. To meet these challenges students have to develop effective coping strategies, enabling them to be adapted to the context. The school has a key role in the help it can give to these young people, in order to adapt effectively. PMID:18372532

das Neves Mira Freitas, Helena Cristina

2007-01-01

220

Coping with Job Transitions over the Work Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A job transition is a process involving a number of steps, including thinking about goals and skills, evaluating the potential\\u000a job market, conducting the job search, managing personal reactions, and negotiating entry into the new organization. As both\\u000a a common and impactful transition of modern life, it is important to examine the factors associated with coping with job transitions.\\u000a Specifically,

John R. Rudisill; Jean M. Edwards; Paul J. Hershberger; Joyce E. Jadwin; John M. McKee

221

Examining Behavioural Coping Strategies as Mediators between Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress  

PubMed Central

We examined the mediating role of behavioral coping strategies in the association between work-family conflict and psychological distress. In particular, we examined the two directions of work-family conflict, namely, work interference into family and family interference into work. Furthermore, two coping styles in this study were adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 429 Malaysian working women using self-reported data. The results of mediational analysis in the present study showed that adaptive coping strategy does not significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. However, maladaptive coping strategies significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. These results show that adaptive coping strategies, which aimed to improve the stressful situation, are not effective in managing stressor such as work-family conflict. We found that experiencing interrole conflict steers employees toward frequent use of maladaptive coping strategies which in turn lead to psychological distress. Interventions targeted at improvement of coping skills which are according to individual's needs and expectation may help working women to balance work and family demands. The important issue is to keep in mind that effective coping strategies are to control the situations not to eliminate work-family conflict. PMID:25695097

Shamsuddin, Khadijah

2015-01-01

222

Basic Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These four articles focus on developing basic reading, science, and job search skills: "Reading Program for Vocational Classes" by Augustus Luparelli; "Why Teach Employability Skills?" by Larry Siefferman; "Improving Vocabulary and Reading Skills" by Edythe Conway; and "Science in Everyday Life" by Virginia Eleazer and George Carney. (SK)

Luparelli, Augustus N.; And Others

1981-01-01

223

Incorporating coping into an expectancy framework for explaining drinking behaviour.  

PubMed

Expectancy Theory has offered much in the way of understanding alcohol use and abuse, and has contributed greatly to prevention and treatment initiatives. However although many cognitive-behavioural treatment approaches are based on expectancy constructs, such as outcome expectancies and self-efficacy, high relapse rates imply that expectancy theory may be too narrow in scope, and that additional variables need to be examined if a comprehensive understanding of drinking behaviour, and better treatment outcomes, are to be achieved. We suggest that the coping strategies an individual employs present one such set of variables that have largely been neglected from an expectancy framework. Although coping skills training is routinely used in prevention and treatment of alcohol problems, coping research has suffered from a poor theoretical framework. In this paper we review the existing research relating expectancies, self-efficacy and coping to drinking behaviour and propose a model which explains both social and dependent drinking, by incorporating coping into an expectancy theory framework. We also outline research and clinical implications of the proposed model. PMID:19630702

Hasking, Penelope A; Oei, Tian P S

2008-01-01

224

Examining the Coping Response to Peer Relational Aggression Victimization  

PubMed Central

Purpose. Relational aggression, rumor spreading, backstabbing, and social isolation, is psychologically damaging for adolescent girls. The purpose of this study was to provide an explanation of victimization response after experiencing peer relational aggression victimization. Methods. Grounded theory techniques were used to gain an understanding of the victimization experience and the coping responses used. Findings. A theory of coping after experiencing peer relational aggression victimization was generated. Girls voiced feelings of hurt and anger after the experience and expressed the following ways of coping as a result: distancing from others, retaliation against the aggressor, discussing their feelings with friends and family, writing their feelings down, and/or confronting the aggressor. Clinical Implications. Nurses should be aware of the phenomenon and asses, for incidences of relational aggression victimization so that they may provide strategies to assist the adolescent and her family with positive coping mechanisms in order to prevent maladaptive responses. PMID:21994828

Gomes, Melissa M.

2011-01-01

225

An Analysis of Mental Training Programs' Influences on Intercollegiate Female Athletes' Selected Psychological Skills: A Single-Subject \\/ Qualitative Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A single-subject\\/qualitative design was employed to determine if psychological skills training (PST) programs influenced athletes' levels and interpretations of anxiety, concentration, motiva- tion, and coping resources. Two female collegiate swimmers high in anxiety and low in motiva- tion and coping skills were selected from a participant pool of 53 swimmers, divers, volleyball, and soccer players. Both athletes completed an inventory

Michelle S. Hamstra; Kevin L. Burke; A. Barry Joyner; Charles H. Hardy

2004-01-01

226

Tracheal intubation of patients in non-standard positions requires training.  

PubMed

In extreme emergency situations, patients may need to undergo endotracheal intubation, while in a non-supine position. This manuscript offers several options to the anesthesiologist to cope with tracheal intubations in non-standard positions. The authors stress that there is a need for adequate training in an anaesthesia skills lab, whereby classic direct laryngoscopy and indirect videolaryngoscopy should be practiced on manikins, before our trainees actually practice anesthesia on patients in operating theatres. This manuscript is also a plea for developing an algorithm for emergency airway management in the non-supine position. PMID:23370120

Van Zundert, T C R V; Van Zundert, A A J

2013-06-01

227

Coping with Changes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this Science NetLinks lesson is to understand how the nervous system allows us to learn, remember, and cope with changes in the environment. In grades 3-5, students start viewing the body as one whole system, as one whole organism. In the 6th grade and up, students should start to understand how organs and organ systems work together. For instance, the brain is part of the nervous system and works in conjunction with neurons (cells). The nervous system works with all other body systems, such as the musculoskeletal system. The activities in this lesson introduce the nervous system, both in parts and as a whole. By learning about the whole system, students will understand that the brain, spinal cord, and nerve cells are at the root of all other body functions.

Science Netlinks

2001-10-20

228

Coping profiles characterize individual flourishing, languishing, and depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, negative emotions narrow one's thought–action repertoire. In contrast, positive emotions have a broadening effect, expanding cognitive capacity, increasing potential coping strategies that come to mind, and enhancing decision-making, reaction, and adaptation to adversity. Fredrickson and Losada determined that a positivity ratio – the ratio of experienced positive to negative emotions – at

Kathryn E. Faulk; Christian T. Gloria; Mary A. Steinhardt

2012-01-01

229

Integration and Reuse in Cognitive Skill Acquisition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous accounts of cognitive skill acquisition have demonstrated how procedural knowledge can be obtained and transformed over time into skilled task performance. This article focuses on a complementary aspect of skill acquisition, namely the integration and reuse of previously known component skills. The article posits that, in addition to…

Salvucci, Dario D.

2013-01-01

230

Religious coping, posttraumatic stress, psychological distress, and posttraumatic growth among female survivors four years after Hurricane Katrina.  

PubMed

Positive and negative religious coping strategies and their relation with posttraumatic stress (PTS), psychological distress, and posttraumatic growth (PTG) were examined in the context of Hurricane Katrina. Positive religious coping was hypothesized to be associated with PTG, whereas negative religious coping was hypothesized to be associated with PTS and psychological distress. Low-income mothers (N = 386, mean age = 25.4 years, SD = 4.43) were surveyed before, and 1 and 4 years after the storm. Results from structural regression modeling indicated that negative religious coping was associated with psychological distress, but not PTS. Positive religious coping was associated with PTG. Further analysis indicated significant indirect effects of pre- and postdisaster religiousness on postdisaster PTG through positive religious coping. Findings underscore the positive and negative effect of religious variables in the context of a natural disaster. PMID:23529889

Chan, Christian S; Rhodes, Jean E

2013-04-01

231

The moderating effect of avoidant coping on restrained eaters' risk for disinhibited eating: implications for dietary relapse prevention.  

PubMed

Avoidant coping style was tested as a moderating variable for the effect of ego threat on chronic dieters' (restrained eaters) risk for disinhibited eating. Young women (n=146) were randomly assigned to a speech threat or to a no threat condition and then participated in a bogus ice cream taste test. Analyses of covariance revealed that restrained eaters who scored higher on a standardized measure of avoidant coping consumed significantly more ice cream than restrained eaters who scored lower on avoidant coping regardless of the threat condition to which they were assigned. The findings suggest that dieters prone to using avoidant coping strategies may be particularly vulnerable to overeating and, therefore, could be at risk for lapses in dietary restraint. Hence, dietary relapse prevention programs might target dieters who tend to use avoidant coping strategies for cognitive-behavioral therapy to teach them adaptive coping skills. PMID:17466939

Lee, Joycelyn M; Greening, Leilani; Stoppelbein, Laura

2007-10-01

232

Job Satisfaction and Stress Coping Skills of Primary School Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Job satisfaction expresses the extent of match between teachers' expectation of the job, job requirements and the satisfaction derived from their jobs. There seems to be a growing discontentment towards teaching as a result of which standards of education are falling. Teachers are dissatisfied in spite of different plans and programmes which have…

Bindhu, C. M.; Sudheeshkumar, P. K.

2006-01-01

233

Shop Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Shop Skills is a lesson plan which provides instruction in the safety procedures and work processes for hand and machine tools used in a metal machine shop. Specific skills include sawing, drilling, boring, grinding, lathing, and milling. After completing this module, students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in these skills through a variety of shop projects and in a final exercise that uses a combination of these skills. Note: This module is part of a modularized manufacturing technology curriculum created by the PSCME, found at www.pscme.org/educators.html.

234

Spiritual Coping with Chronic Pain   

E-print Network

Intro The object of this study was to investigate the relationship between an individual’s spiritual beliefs and how that affected their pain in those with arthritis. It focused mainly on the coping strategies they chose ...

Henderson, Kevin

2008-06-26

235

Coping with Aging and Amputation  

MedlinePLUS

Coping With Aging and Amputation: How Changing the Way You Think Could Change Your Health by Omal Bani Saberi, LCSW, CCHT “ ... Though we don’t have much control over aging, we do have some power over the way ...

236

Psychosocial Stressors and Patterns of Coping in Adolescent Suicide Attempters  

PubMed Central

Context: Different risk factors associated with adolescent suicide attempts have been identified including those of socio-demographic and clinical variables. Relatively, little research has been done in the area of their stressors and coping patterns. Aims: To study the recent psychosocial stressors and patterns of coping associated with adolescent suicide attempts. Settings and Design: Tertiary care hospital, case-control study. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive cases of adolescent attempted suicide admitted to the hospital and an equal number of controls, matched individually for age and sex, from the relatives and friends of other patients in the ward, were studied. Assessment included details regarding socio-demographic data, psychiatric and physical morbidity, their recent stressors, and patterns of coping. Stressors were assessed using Presumptive Stressful Life Event Scale and coping strategies by Ways of Coping Questionnaire (revised). Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: The number of stressful life events and mean stress scores in the preceding 1 month and certain coping strategies such as confronting, distancing, and escape-avoidance were found to be significant risk factors associated with adolescent suicide attempts. Strategies such as self-control, seeking social support, accepting responsibilities, problem solving, and positive appraisal act as protective factors. Conclusions: Recent stressors and strategies such as confronting, distancing, and escape-avoidance are significant risk factors associated with adolescent suicide attempts, whereas certain coping strategies act as protective factors. Teaching adolescents these protective coping patterns may be a promising strategy for prevention of adolescent suicide attempts. PMID:23833341

Mathew, Anju; Nanoo, Subha

2013-01-01

237

The Finance MBA at Rutgers Business School provides broad professional competence and skills to prepare students for careers in executive positions at banks, financial  

E-print Network

Investment Analysis Mutual Fund Management Mergers and Acquisitions Long Term Corporate Finance QuantitativeThe Finance MBA at Rutgers Business School provides broad professional competence and skills.C., an MBA in finance from Rutgers connects students with excellent job opportunities with the best

Lin, Xiaodong

238

Facilitating Positive Psychosocial Adaptation in Children with Cystic Fibrosis by Increasing Family Communication and Problem-Solving Skills. A Research Report to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested the effects of two group-oriented supportive and educational approaches on the parents of children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Thirteen families were randomly assigned either to a group which received information on medical and technical aspects of CF or to a group which received instruction in communication skills in addition to…

Stabler, Brian; And Others

239

Coping as a caregiver for an elderly family member.  

PubMed

With nearly 30% of the adult U.S. population acting as caregivers for sick, disabled, or elderly family members, it is imperative that caregivers become better equipped to cope with this challenging role. Although caregiving is regarded as an arduous endeavor, caring for an older family member may actually produce positive experiences. This study examines how caregivers use communication as a tool to cope with caring for an older family member. Over a span of 15 months, more than 150 caregiver stories were gathered from AgingCare.com, analyzed thematically, and categorized. The results show that stories utilize emotion-based techniques, including humor (20%), positive framing (16%), and acceptance (11%), to reveal that lasting, meaningful bonds can develop between caregivers and caregivers' relatives. These techniques allow caregivers to redefine their familial role and to find comfort in disheartening situations. Thus, coping is a truly communicative event since emotions can facilitate behaviors directed at ailing family members. PMID:25062386

Alpert, Jordan M; Womble, Frances E

2015-07-01

240

School Attendance Revisited: A Study of Urban African American Students' Grade Point Averages and Coping Strategies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Urban African American first-year high school students' absenteeism was found to be negatively related to grade point average (GPA) and avoidance as a means of coping (use of substances as a way to escape--food, alcohol, smoking, caffeine, etc.) and positively related to use of social support as a means of coping (efforts to stay emotionally…

Steward, Robbie J.; Steward, Astin Devine; Blair, Jonathan; Jo, Hanik; Hill, Martin F.

2008-01-01

241

Relationships Among Locus of Control, Coping Behaviors, and Levels of Worry Following Exposure to Hurricanes  

Microsoft Academic Search

To explore the relationships among locus of control, coping behaviors, and levels of worry following exposure to hurricanes, the current study examines the responses of college students who were exposed to one or more hurricanes affecting central Florida in 2004. The results show that an external locus of control is related significantly and positively to avoidant coping behaviors. External locus

Samantha L. Scott; Teresa Marino Carper; Melissa Middleton; Rachel White; Kimberly Renk; Amie Grills-Taquechel

2010-01-01

242

Biblio-Therapeutic Book Creations by Pre-Service Student Teachers: Helping Elementary School Children Cope  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many elementary school children may cope with difficult life struggles such as disabilities, abuse, loss, and identity issues. This article details original, student generated, biblio-therapeutic book creations and how this genre teaches positive ways for children at-risk to cope with tough life circumstances. Pre-service, elementary college…

Haeseler, Lisa Ann

2009-01-01

243

Perfectionism in school teachers: Relations with stress appraisals, coping styles, and burnout  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many school teachers suffer from stress and burnout, and perfectionism is a personality characteristic that has been associated with increased stress, maladaptive coping, and burnout. Recent findings, however, show that perfectionism has both positive and negative facets. To investigate how these facets are related to stress, coping, and burnout in teachers, a sample of 118 secondary school teachers completed multidimensional

Joachim Stoeber; Dirk Rennert

2008-01-01

244

Effects of an intervention promoting proactive coping competencies in middle and late adulthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: We tested the effectiveness of a brief educational program that is based on proactive coping theory. The program entails a four-session group intervention for people aged between 50 and 75 years and was intended to improve proactive coping competencies. Furthermore, we investigated the positive as well as negative side effects and differential effectiveness of the program. DESIGN AND METHODS:

Christina Bode; D. T. D. de Ridder; R. G. Kuijer; J. M. Bensing

2007-01-01

245

Depressive Symptoms, Religious Coping, and Cigarette Smoking Among Post-secondary Vocational Students  

PubMed Central

Depressive symptoms are associated with increased levels of cigarette smoking, yet not every individual experiencing depressive symptoms smokes. This study examined whether religious coping moderated the impact of depressive symptoms on past 30-day cigarette use among a racially/ethnically diverse sample of 963 post-secondary vocational students (46.8% women; mean age = 25 years). Results from negative binomial regression analyses indicated that depressive symptoms increased the likelihood of cigarette smoking (quantity-frequency measure of cigarette use) for female students, whereas positive religious coping decreased the likelihood of smoking for female students. Consistent with religious coping theory and as expected, negative religious coping moderated the depressive symptoms-smoking relationship such that negative religious coping exacerbated the impact of depressive symptoms on cigarette smoking among females. Positive religious coping also moderated the depressive symptoms-cigarette smoking relationship for females. However, contrary to expectations, high levels of positive religious coping exacerbated the likelihood of cigarette smoking among females with high levels of depressive symptoms. Surprisingly, neither depressive symptoms nor positive or negative religious coping contributed to the likelihood of males’ smoking. Study limitations and suggestions for directions in future research are discussed. PMID:23276324

Horton, Karissa D.; Loukas, Alexandra

2014-01-01

246

The Relationship between Supervisee Stress, Coping Resources, the Working Alliance, and the Supervisory Working Alliance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the relationship of perceived stress, specific types of coping resources, the working alliance, and the supervisory working alliance among 232 counselor supervisees. The working alliance and the supervisory working alliance were negatively related to perceived stress and positively related to multiple coping resources. Two…

Gnilka, Philip B.; Chang, Catherine Y.; Dew, Brian J.

2012-01-01

247

Process of coping with intracavity radiation treatment for gynecologic cancer  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to describe the process of coping with the experience of receiving intracavity radiation treatment (ICR) for gynecologic cancer. Data were collected on the outcomes of coping, emotion (Profile of Mood States) and level of function (Sickness Impact Profile), and symptom severity and upset the evening before, during, the day after, and 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The subjects (N = 28) had a mean age of 52 years, 39% were employed full-time, 56% had occupations as manual workers, 57% had completed 12 or more years of education, and 68% were married or widowed. The treatment required the subjects to be hospitalized on complete bedrest with radiation precautions for an average of 48 hours. Intrauterine devices were used to treat 18 subjects and vaginal applications were used to treat 10 subjects. Negative mood and level of disruption in function were generally low. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in negative mood over time while the change in function was attributable to the increase in disruption during treatment. Utilization of affective coping strategies and problem-oriented coping strategies was positively correlated with negative mood and disruption in function over the points of measurement. The results indicate that subjects tolerated ICR well and rapidly resumed usual function following discharge from the hospital, despite the persistence of some symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The positive association between the utilization of coping strategies and negative outcomes of coping suggests a need to examine the measurement of coping strategies and consider the possibility that these actions represent a response to a stressful situation rather than a method of dealing with the situation.

Nail, L.M.D.

1985-01-01

248

Accommodative coping in early adolescence: an investigation of possible developmental components.  

PubMed

Despite fruitful research on some aspects of adolescent coping, the development of specific coping mechanisms still remains a neglected topic. The present empirical study with 535 early adolescents (M = 12.60 years) and their parents examines possible developmental components of accommodative coping competences. Using latent path modelling, we investigated how specific components of four sets of variables (cognitive abilities, experiences in life, goal disengagement, and parental influences) contributed to accommodative coping capacities in the adolescents. Direct effects (e.g., specific cognitive abilities, parental influences) and indirect effects (e.g., positive experiences in life) on accommodative coping were identified for the components investigated. Future research should focus on the relevance of these components for the development of accommodative coping capacities. PMID:24011113

Thomsen, Tamara; Greve, Werner

2013-10-01

249

Exploring the experiences and coping strategies of international medical students  

PubMed Central

Background Few studies have addressed the challenges that international medical students face and there is a dearth of information on the behavioural strategies these students adopt to successfully progress through their academic program in the face of substantial difficulties of language barrier, curriculum overload, financial constraints and assessment tasks that require high proficiency in communication skills. Methods This study was designed primarily with the aim of enhancing understanding of the coping strategies, skill perceptions and knowledge of assessment expectations of international students as they progress through the third and fourth years of their medical degree at the School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Australia. Results Survey, focus group discussion and individual interviews revealed that language barriers, communication skills, cultural differences, financial burdens, heavy workloads and discriminatory bottlenecks were key factors that hindered their adaptation to the Australian culture. Quantitative analyses of their examination results showed that there were highly significant (p < 0.001) variations between student performances in multiple choice questions, short answer questions and objective structured clinical examinations (70.3%, 49.7% & 61.7% respectively), indicating existence of communication issues. Conclusions Despite the challenges, these students have adopted commendable coping strategies and progressed through the course largely due to their high sense of responsibility towards their family, their focus on the goal of graduating as medical doctors and their support networks. It was concluded that faculty needs to provide both academic and moral support to their international medical students at three major intervention points, namely point of entry, mid way through the course and at the end of the course to enhance their coping skills and academic progression. Finally, appropriate recommendations were made. PMID:21702988

2011-01-01

250

Parental Coping in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit  

PubMed Central

Fifty-six mothers of premature infants who participated in a study to reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) completed the Brief COPE, a self-report inventory of coping mechanisms, the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire to assess acute stress (ASD) disorder and the Davidson Trauma Scale (DTS) to assess PTSD. 18% of mothers had baseline ASD while 30% of mothers met the criteria for PTSD at the one-month follow-up. Dysfunctional coping as measured by the Brief COPE was positively associated with elevated risk of PTSD in these mothers (RR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.15; p=.008). Maternal education was positively associated with PTSD; each year increase in education was associated with a 17% increase in the relative risk of PTSD at one month follow-up (RR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.35; p = .03). Results suggest that dysfunctional coping is an important issue to consider in the development of PTSD in parents of premature infants. PMID:22990746

Shaw, Richard J; Bernard, Rebecca S.; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Rhine, William; Horwitz, Sarah M.

2012-01-01

251

Ways of coping as predictors of satisfaction with curriculum and academic success in medical school  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of the present study was to determine the coping strategies of medical students and to investigate the effects of coping strategies on student satisfaction and academic achievement with different instruction methods. A total of 152 medical students was followed throughout the first 2 yr of medical education between 2008 and 2010. Students completed a sociodemographic questionnaire and revised form of the Ways of Coping questionnaire both at the beginning of the first year and at the end of the second year. These forms provided data about the characteristics and main coping strategies (problem focused or emotion focused) of the students and revealed the change over time. At the end of the second year, participants also completed a satisfaction questionnaire asking their satisfaction with lectures, problem-based learning, and practicals. The authors used block, problem-based learning, and practical exam scores of the students attained in the past 2 yr as academic achievement indicators. No sociodemographic variable was related to coping strategy. The majority of students (80.9%) adopted problem-focused coping. A shift occurred in the main coping strategies of some students in both sides. Problem-focused coping scores decreased over time. Problem-focused coping positively correlated with satisfaction with practicals and practical exam scores, whereas emotion-focused coping showed the same correlation negatively. The main coping strategy also predicted satisfaction and exam success in practicals. In conclusion, a main coping strategy may be helpful to predict student satisfaction and academic achievement with some student-centered instruction methods. Determining undesired coping strategies may provide an opportunity for intervention to prevent relevant dissatisfaction and failure.

2011-03-01

252

The Effectiveness of a Universal School-Based Programme on Coping and Mental Health: A Randomised, Controlled Study of Zippy' Friends  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to evaluate Zippy's Friends, a universal school programme that aims at strengthening children's coping skills. The sample consisted of 1483 children (aged 7-8 years) from 91 second-grade classes in 35 schools. The schools were matched and randomly assigned to intervention or control conditions. Coping was assessed by…

Holen, Solveig; Waaktaar, Trine; Lervag, Arne; Ystgaard, Mette

2012-01-01

253

A Problem in Online Interpersonal Skills Training: Do Learners Practice Skills?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One problem found when teaching interpersonal skills online is learners' lack of opportunity for skill practice. The online learning environment is deficient in face-to-face interaction, and opportunities for self-regulation make it difficult to ensure learners practice skills despite the positive effects of such practice on skill improvement. The…

Doo, Min Young

2006-01-01

254

Measuring coping in pregnant minority women.  

PubMed

Coping strategies may help explain why some minority women experience more stress and poorer birth outcomes, so a psychometrically sound instrument to assess coping is needed. We examined the psychometric properties, readability, and correlates of coping in pregnant Black (n = 186) and Hispanic (n = 220) women using the Brief COPE. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis tested psychometric properties. The Flesch-Kincaid Reading Level test assessed readability. Linear regression models tested correlates of coping. Findings suggested two factors for the questionnaire: active and disengaged coping, as well as adequate reliability, validity, and readability level. For disengaged coping, Cronbach's ? was .78 (English) and .70 (Spanish), and for active coping .86 (English) and .92 (Spanish). A two group confirmatory factor analysis revealed both minority groups had equivalent factor loadings. The reading level was at the sixth grade. Age, education, and gravidity were all found to be significant correlates with active coping. PMID:24658289

Ruiz, Roberta Jeanne; Gennaro, Susan; O'Connor, Caitlin; Marti, C Nathan; Lulloff, Amanda; Keshinover, Tayra; Gibeau, Anne; Melnyk, Bernadette

2015-02-01

255

Terrorism, Posttraumatic Stress, Spiritual Coping, and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines stress and coping in relation to mental health and spiritual outcomes following the 9\\/11 terrorist attacks. In November 2001, a survey was mailed to a stratified, randomized sample of registered voters from six communities in Massachusetts (n  =  231) and New York City (n  =  58). The Short PTSD Rating Interview (SPRINT) posttraumatic stress scale, positive and

Janice Bell Meisenhelder; Edwin H. Cassem

2009-01-01

256

Drinking Patterns, Drinking Expectancies, and Coping after Spinal Cord Injury.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drinking patterns, alcohol expectancies, and coping strategies were assessed for 121 persons with recent spinal cord injuries during hospitalization, 3 months after surgery, and 12 months after surgery. Although the rate of heavy drinking decreased, preinjury problem drinkers still had the lowest rate of positive reappraisal, problem solving, and…

Heinemann, Allen W.; And Others

1994-01-01

257

Religious Coping is Associated with the Quality of Life of Patients with Advanced Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background For patients confronting a life-threatening illness such as advanced cancer, religious coping can be an important factor influencing their quality of life (QOL). Objective The study's main purpose was to examine the association between religious coping and QOL among 170 patients with advanced cancer. Both positive religious coping (e.g., benevolent religious appraisals) and negative religious coping (e.g., anger at God) and multiple dimensions of QOL (physical, physical symptom, psychological, existential, and support) were studied. Design Structured interviews were conducted with 170 patients recruited as part of an ongoing multi-institutional longitudinal evaluation of the prevalence of mental illness and patterns of mental health service utilization in advanced cancer patients and their primary informal caregivers. Measurements Patients completed measures of QOL (McGill QOL questionnaire), religious coping (Brief Measure of Religious Coping [RCOPE] and Multidimensional Measure of Religion/Spirituality), self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy Scale), and sociodemographic variables. Results Linear regression analyses revealed that after controlling for sociodemographic variables, lifetime history of depression and self-efficacy, greater use of positive religious coping was associated with better overall QOL as well as higher scores on the existential and support QOL dimensions. Greater use of positive religious coping was also related to more physical symptoms. In contrast, greater use of negative religious coping was related to poorer overall QOL and lower scores on the existential and psychological QOL dimensions. Conclusions Findings show that religious coping plays an important role for the QOL of patients and the types of religious coping strategies used are related to better or poorer QOL. PMID:16752970

Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Vanderwerker, Lauren C.; Paulk, Elizabeth; Pearce, Michelle J.; Kasl, Stanislav V.; Prigerson, Holly G.

2008-01-01

258

Careers Service Skills acquired by Mathematics and Statistics Graduates  

E-print Network

A positive `can do' attitude Basic oral communication skills Punctuality Reliability Ability to meet important Quite important Basic literacy skills 96% 4% Basic oral communication skills 91% 9% Numeracy% 34% Problem solving skills 59% 37% Advanced oral communication skills (eg presentations) 42% 46

259

Osteology and relationships of Captorhinus aguti (Cope) (Reptilia: Captorhinomorpha)  

E-print Network

of Skull Roof 7 Captorhinomorpha 53 Occiput 11 Position of Tympanum in Captorhinus 54 Dermal Bones of Palate 12 Primitive Captorhinomorphs, Synapsids Ossifications of Palatoquadrate Cartilage 16 and Middle Ear 54 Braincase 18 Microsaurs... and Re- cent; the length of the sides of the skull is roughly 1.3 of the width of the skull at the occiput (Figs. 1-5). FIGURE 1. Captorhinus aguti (COPE). Lateral view of skull ( KU 9978), X1.25. FIGURE 2. Captorhinus aguti (COPE). Lateral view of skull...

Fox, R. C.; Bowman, M. C.

1966-01-31

260

Cognitive Coping Tool Kit for Psychosis: Development of a Group-Based Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article outlines an 8-week curriculum that was created to help outpatients develop cognitive and behavioral skills for coping with delusions and hallucinations as well as to reduce patients' comorbid subjective levels of distress (e.g., depression, anxiety). The manualized protocol consisted of psychoeducation and training in a variety of CBT…

Goldberg, Joel O.; Wheeler, Heather; Lubinsky, Tobi; Van Exan, Jessica

2007-01-01

261

Helping Schoolchildren Cope with Anger: A Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention. Second Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide presents information and clinical tools to implement the Anger Coping Program, an empirically supported intervention for students in grades 3-6. Practitioners are taken step by step through setting up treatment groups, teaching vital skills for reducing aggression and disruptive behavior, and building strong partnerships with teachers…

Larson, Jim; Lochman, John E.

2010-01-01

262

Problem-Solving Treatment and Coping Styles in Primary Care for Minor Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research was undertaken to compare problem-solving treatment for primary care (PST-PC) with usual care for minor depression and to examine whether treatment effectiveness was moderated by coping style. PST-PC is a 6-session, manual-based, psychosocial skills intervention. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2 academic, primary care…

Oxman, Thomas E.; Hegel, Mark T.; Hull, Jay G.; Dietrich, Allen J.

2008-01-01

263

Improving Children’s Coping With Everyday Stress: Transporting Treatment Interventions to the School Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children are continuously confronted with everyday stressors in their daily routine, and their ability to deal with these stressors has been found to be significantly related to their psychological adjustment. In fact, numerous studies have indicated that having a repertoire of coping skills at a young age can be a buffer or moderator of the effects of negative life stress

Donna B. Pincus; Alice G. Friedman

2004-01-01

264

Coping with Classroom Homophobia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, a version of which first appeared in the February 2007 number of Gay Times, gay rapper Marcos Brito describes his experiences of dealing with a general climate of homophobia at his secondary school in Essex. He argues that positive affirmations of lesbian, gay and bisexual people should be promoted as part of the school curriculum.

Brito, Marcos "Qboy"

2007-01-01

265

Coping Processes Among Bereaved Spouses  

PubMed Central

We investigated if an intervention based on the dual process model (vs. traditional bereavement support) enhanced oscillation between loss- and restoration-oriented (LO/RO) coping of recently bereaved (2–6 months) spouses/partners. Participants were followed over 12 months. We found an increased emphasis over time on RO coping, particularly for women and those who were younger; however, no treatment effect was detected. Although patterns in the data are consistent with the model, we conclude that it is difficult for interventions to modify LO, RO and oscillation unless there is sufficient intervention dosage and tailored to those exclusively engaged in one process. PMID:24524542

Caserta, Michael; Utz, Rebecca; Lund, Dale; Bearnson, Kristin Lee; de Vries, Brian

2012-01-01

266

Positive Education: Positive Psychology and Classroom Interventions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Positive education is defined as education for both traditional skills and for happiness. The high prevalence worldwide of depression among young people, the small rise in life satisfaction, and the synergy between learning and positive emotion all argue that the skills for happiness should be taught in school. There is substantial evidence from…

Seligman, Martin E. P.; Ernst, Randal M.; Gillham, Jane; Reivich, Karen; Linkins, Mark

2009-01-01

267

Rural hospital nurse's stressors and coping strategies: a survey.  

PubMed

A survey was undertaken to identify stressful situations of rural hospital nurses and to examine their stress level in relation to coping strategies, particularly social support. Eighty-seven nurses, aged 25-65 years, from rural hospitals completed the survey. Results indicated that while the stressors were similar to those identified in the literature for urban nurses and urban nursing students the frequency and importance differed. These findings are discussed in light of the unique stressors experienced by rural nurses. Results indicated a positive relationship between nursing stress and emotion-focused coping and between stress and social support. These findings are discussed in relation to Lazarus and Folkman's (1984) stress and coping model. PMID:15708018

LeSergent, Cheryl Marie; Haney, Colleen J

2005-03-01

268

Dyadic Coping in Metastatic Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Couples facing metastatic breast cancer (MBC) must learn to cope with stressors that can affect both partners’ quality of life as well as the quality of their relationship. Common dyadic coping involves taking a \\

Hoda Badr; Cindy L. Carmack; Deborah A. Kashy; Massimo Cristofanilli; Tracey A. Revenson

2010-01-01

269

Grief, Bereavement, and Coping with Loss (PDQ)  

MedlinePLUS

... Dictionary Search for Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss (PDQ®) Overview People ... one in different ways. Most people who experience grief will cope well. Others will have severe grief ...

270

Development and psychometric validation of a Domestic Violence Coping Self-efficacy Measure (DV-CSE).  

PubMed

Psychometric properties of a Domestic Violence Coping Self-Efficacy Measure were examined. Two-hundred eighty three women assaulted within the past 6 months were recruited. Internal reliability of the measure was very good (alpha = .97). Principle components factor analysis indicated one primary factor accounting for 56% of the variance. The measure was positively associated with optimism, adaptive coping, and healthy psychological functioning, and negatively associated with trauma-related distress, negative mood, and maladaptive coping. A small positive association with social desirability was found. This measure may have significant clinical utility in helping survivors by indicating areas where individuals feel especially vulnerable or empowered. PMID:15730069

Benight, Charles C; Harding-Taylor, Alexandra S; Midboe, Amanda M; Durham, Robert L

2004-12-01

271

Grief: Helping Young Children Cope  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In their role as caregivers supporting the children they teach, it is important for teachers to understand the grieving process and recognize symptoms of grief. The author explains Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's five stages of grief and offers 10 classroom strategies to help young children cope with their feelings.

Wood, Frances B.

2008-01-01

272

Eating Disorders as Coping Mechanisms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on the complex nature of eating disorders, specifically highlighting their use as coping mechanisms for underlying emotional and psychological concerns. Case examples of college counseling center clients are discussed in order to illustrate common ways in which eating disorders are utilized by clients with varying…

Wagener, Amy M.; Much, Kari

2010-01-01

273

Coping within couples: adjustment two years after forced geographic relocation.  

PubMed

Is our understanding of how individuals adjust to stressful life events increased when we analyze their adjustment in ways that recognize that these individuals are also married couples? The data used to answer this question came from a unique "natural experiment" occasioned by the forced evacuation of the Israeli settlement of Ophira under the terms of the Camp David Accords. We found that the adjustment of individuals within couples became more similar across the relocation, that is, couples adapted as a "family system." This occurred because the coping skills of one member of the couple "drove" the adjustment of both partners. PMID:1955021

Wamboldt, F S; Steinglass, P; Kaplan De-Nour, A

1991-09-01

274

Coping with Schizophrenia: Patterns in Later Adulthood.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated whether the coping framework developed with younger adults with schizophrenia could be applied to people over 50 with schizophrenia. Results indicated that coping strategies used by older people were similar to those of younger populations. However, it was reported that efficacy of coping strategies had increased as participants had…

Solano, Nancy H.; Whitbourne, Susan Krauss

2001-01-01

275

Coping Strategies in Young Male Prisoners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The general aim of this study is to analyze diverse aspects relating to the use of coping strategies among prison inmates. The specific objectives are (a) to analyze which type of coping strategies predominate among prisoners, considering both the focus and the method; (b) to relate the use of coping strategies with variables related to the prison…

Mohino, Susana; Kirchner, Teresa; Forns, Maria

2004-01-01

276

Mothers' Coping and Hope in Early Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goals of the study were to examine the relations between maternal coping and hope among mothers who participated in early intervention program for their infants. Earlier studies focused attention on mothers' experiences of stress and their coping. Within the salutogenic construct, we aim at examining relations between mothers' coping and hope…

Einav, Michal; Levi, Uzi; Margalit, Malka

2012-01-01

277

Structural relationships between social support and coping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relationships between social support and coping were examined over a one-year period in a sample (n = 120) exposed to a specific stressor (i.e. a spinal cord injury). Two issues were evaluated: (1) patterns of social support and coping over time; and (2) the direction of the effects of coping on social support or vice versa. Subjects had incurred a

Mary Ann Mccoll; Hau Lei; Harvey Skinner

1995-01-01

278

Coping Processes of Couples Experiencing Infertility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the coping processes of couples experiencing infertility. Participants included 420 couples referred for advanced reproductive treatments. Couples were divided into groups based on the frequency of their use of eight coping strategies. Findings suggest that coping processes, which are beneficial to individuals, may be…

Peterson, Brennan D.; Newton, Christopher R.; Rosen, Karen H.; Schulman, Robert S.

2006-01-01

279

Age Differences in Coping with Chronic Illness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While most lifespan developmental theories of personality predict age-related changes in coping, little direct evidence exists for determining whether age differences in coping style are due to intrinsic developmental processes or to age differences in the kinds of stresses encountered. To evaluate age differences in coping strategies and whether…

Felton, Barbara J.; Revenson, Tracey A.

280

Relationships between group skills, temperament, and argumentativeness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationships between students’ self?perceived group skills, personality temperament, and trait argumentativeness are reported. Temperaments based on Keirsey's FourTypes Sorter are not substantially related to group skills, and tend to give oppositely?signed correlations by gender. Argumentativeness is broadly related to group skills, generally but not always in a positive manner.

Nancy M. Schullery; Stephen E. Schullery

2002-01-01

281

Determining the Study Skills of Student Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: It is known that success of a student is affected by the skills of motivation, time management. Studies have showed that there is positive relationship between academic achievement and study skills of a student. Purpose: It is thought that study skills of learners should be defined to be more successful on teaching-learning process.…

Tural Dincer, Guner; Akdeniz, Ali Riza

2008-01-01

282

Activities to Enhance Social, Emotional, and Problem-Solving Skills: Seventy-Six Activities that Teach Children, Adolescents, and Adults Skills Crucial to Success in Life. Second Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book provides descriptions of 76 engaging activities that can be used to teach children, adolescents, and adults valuable social, emotional, and problem-solving skills. Some of the skills taught include identifying and expressing one's own emotions, identifying emotions in others, coping with stressors, making and keeping friends, setting…

Malouff, John M.; Schutte, Nicola S.

2007-01-01

283

Enhancement of couples' communication and dyadic coping by a self-directed approach: a randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

Although prevention of relationship distress and dissolution has potential to strengthen the well-being of partners and any children they are raising, dissemination of prevention programs can be limited because couples face many barriers to in-person participation. An alternative strategy, providing couples with an instructional DVD, is tested in the present study, in which 330 Caucasian couples (N = 660 participants; mean age: men 41.4 years, women 40.0 years) were randomly assigned to a DVD group without any further support, a DVD group with technical telephone coaching, or a wait-list control group. Couples completed questionnaires at pretest, posttest, and 3 and 6 months after completion of the intervention. Self-report measures of dyadic coping, communication quality, ineffective arguing, and relationship satisfaction were used to test whether the intervention groups improved in comparison with the control group. Women in both intervention groups increased in dyadic coping, reduced conflict behavior, and were more satisfied with their relationship 6 months after the intervention. Effects for men were mixed. Participants with poorer skills reported stronger improvement. Intimate relationships can, within limits, be positively influenced by a self-directed approach. Effective dissemination of principles underlying successful relationships can be facilitated through the use of emerging low-cost tools and technologies. PMID:24660673

Bodenmann, Guy; Hilpert, Peter; Nussbeck, Fridtjof W; Bradbury, Thomas N

2014-08-01

284

Seattle University Recreation Position Description  

E-print Network

skills · Crisis management skills · Written and verbal skills · Money management skills · Experience event supervision to money management. He/she must also have the ability to effectively dealSeattle University Recreation Position Description Title: University Recreation Office Manager Date

Carter, John

285

[Translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and content validation of the Portuguese version of the Coping Behaviours Inventory (CBI) for the Brazilian population].  

PubMed

Coping skills correlate directly with the success of alcohol abstinence. Brazil previously lacked an instrument to identify alcohol users' specific coping skills. The current study therefore aimed to perform the translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and content validation of the Coping Behaviours Inventory (CBI). Procedures included translation and back-translation, cross-cultural adaptation, content evaluation, and a pilot study. The final Portuguese version was administered by telephone to 40 alcohol users seeking help through a telephone hotline called VIVAVOZ. The retranslated version was close to the original. As for content validation, most of the items proved satisfactory and acceptable. The theoretical dimension showed a mean kappa index of 0.666 between evaluators, which was considered a substantial level of agreement. The results were satisfactory and acceptable, demonstrating that the inventory is appropriate for investigating coping skills in Brazilian alcohol users. PMID:25388308

Constant, Hilda Maria Rodrigues Moleda; Figueiró, Luciana Rizzieri; Signor, Luciana; Bisch, Nadia Krubskaya; Barros, Helena Maria Tanhauser; Ferigolo, Maristela

2014-10-01

286

A model linking sources of stress to approach and avoidance coping styles of Turkish basketball referees.  

PubMed

Purpose of this study was to externally validate and test a conceptual transient model involving six paths that linked sources of acute stress to avoidance and approach coping styles among Turkish basketball referees. The sample consisted of 125 Turkish basketball referees ranging in age from 18 to 36 years (mean = 25.58. ? = 3.69). The path analysis tested the relationships simultaneously from stressors, in consecutive order, distractions, subpar performance and verbal abuse, to coping styles, first both avoidance-cognitive and approach-cognitive, and then approach-behaviour. Results indicated that the model achieved a good fit and that all paths tested simultaneously were significant. The distractions stressor was positively related to subpar performance, which, in turn, was positively related to verbal abuse. Verbal abuse was negatively associated with an avoidance-cognitive coping style and positively related to the approach-cognitive coping style. The results also supported a crossover effect of both avoidance-cognitive and approach-cognitive on approach-behaviour. One implication of this study is that coping should be studied in naturally occurring stages, a process-oriented approach. Another implication is that approach and avoidance coping styles, each sub-divided into cognitive and behavioural categories, provide a meaningful framework which provides sports officials a coherent structure for learning and improving ways to cope with acute stress experienced during the contest. PMID:24015999

Anshel, Mark Howard; Sutarso, Toto; Ekmekci, Ridvan; Saraswati, Intan W

2014-01-01

287

Skills Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

Canter, Patricia; And Others

288

Study Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study strategies used to assist mildly handicapped students become more actively engaged and successful in gaining and responding to information in content area classes are described. They include using advance organizers, summarizing/paraphrasing what is read, enhancing listening skills, and improving the organization, appearance, and accuracy of…

Gleason, Mary M.; And Others

1988-01-01

289

Leadership Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While this may not be a "complete list" of what leadership skills one needs to effectively lead in any/every situation, it should provide a great overview of many of the things s/he needs to do, at least initially.

Parish, Thomas S.

2006-01-01

290

Employability Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module from the Florida Advanced Technological Education (FL-ATE) Center will help students understand and develop their own set of personal employability skills, such as communication and teamwork. The activity aims to help students understand the importance of communication and teamwork in a business setting. The lesson should require one class period to complete.

291

Religious coping moderates the relation between racism and psychological well-being among Christian Asian American college students.  

PubMed

The authors examined the moderating role of positive and negative religious coping in the relation between racism and psychological well-being in a sample of Catholic and Protestant Asian American college students (N = 107). On the basis of prior theorizing on the 2 types of religious coping, combined with some limited empirical evidence, they predicted that positive religious coping would have a buffering effect (Hypothesis 1) on the racism-mental health relation and that negative religious coping would have an exacerbating effect (Hypothesis 2). Participants completed an online survey containing measures corresponding to the study variables. Results indicated that the interaction between positive religious coping and racism was nonsignificant, so Hypothesis 1 was not supported. For Hypothesis 2, the negative religious coping and racism interaction term was statistically significant, but the moderating effect was in an unexpected direction, such that negative religious coping actually protected against the deleterious impact of racism on mental health. The findings suggest that the theorized deleterious influence of negative religious coping may need to be reconsidered in an Asian American setting. The findings have the potential to inform practitioners who work with Asian American college students to better cope with the detrimental consequences of racism. PMID:25602609

Kim, Paul Youngbin; Kendall, Dana L; Webb, Marcia

2015-01-01

292

Spiritual Coping and Psychosocial Adjustment of Adolescents with Chronic Illness: The Role of Cognitive Attributions, Age, and Disease Group  

PubMed Central

Purpose Spiritual coping is an important determinant of adjustment in youth with chronic illness, but the mechanisms through which it affects outcomes have not been elucidated. It is also unknown whether the role of spiritual coping varies by age or disease group. This study evaluated whether general cognitive attributions explain the effects of spiritual coping on internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents with cystic fibrosis and diabetes and whether these relationships vary by age or disease group. Methods In this cross-sectional study, adolescents (N=128; M=14.7 yrs) diagnosed with cystic fibrosis or diabetes completed measures of spiritual coping and attributional style. Adolescents and their caregivers reported on adolescents’ internalizing and externalizing problems. Results Overall, positive spiritual coping was associated with fewer internalizing and externalizing problems. Negative spiritual coping was related to more externalizing problems, and for adolescents with cystic fibrosis only, also internalizing problems. Optimistic attributions mediated the effects of positive spiritual coping among adolescents with diabetes. The results did not vary by age. Conclusions An optimistic attribution style may help explain the effects of positive, but not negative, spiritual coping on adjustment of youth with diabetes. Youth with progressive, life-threatening illnesses, such as cystic fibrosis, may be more vulnerable to the harmful effects of negative spiritual coping. Future research should examine if addressing spiritual concerns and promoting optimistic attributions improves adolescents’ emotional and behavioral functioning. PMID:23298988

Reynolds, Nina; Mrug, Sylvie; Guion, Kimberly

2012-01-01

293

Coping with arthritis. Current status and critique.  

PubMed

Our understanding of the complex role of coping in the psychological adjustment to arthritis has improved over the past decade. Studies have consistently demonstrated a relationship between certain coping strategies and psychological outcomes. However, unresolved problems in the methodology and theory concerning these studies cloud the picture, limiting the conclusions that can be drawn. There are general problems with the ways in which coping has been conceptualized and measured by researchers evaluating stress and coping, and there are problems more specific to the ways coping concepts and measures have been used to study patients with arthritis. A complete understanding of the relationship between coping and mental health in this population would have important theoretical and clinical implications. Such studies would serve as a model for investigations of stress and coping in patients with other illnesses, and would point to effective psychosocial interventions for improving the quality of life for this population. PMID:1445442

Manne, S L; Zautra, A J

1992-11-01

294

Coping with a community stressor: a proposed hazardous waste disposal facility  

SciTech Connect

This study examined a number of factors believed to influence community involvement. Residents of a rural community near Phoenix, Arizona, where a hazardous waste facility had been proposed to built, were interviewed at home in August 1982. Most residents were chosen at random (n = 70) while a smaller number (n = 29) were selected because of known involvement in activities regarding the hazardous waste facility. Residents who perceived the facility as a threat to their health, safety, and general well-being employed a number of coping strategies. Strategies to change or alter the source of stress, problem-focused coping, were associated with greater community involvement. Strategies to regulate one's emotional response to stress, emotion-focused coping, were associated with less community involvement. Increased self-efficacy and sense of community led to increased community involvement. Both measures indirectly influenced community involvement through different modes of coping. Self-efficacy was negatively related to emotion-focused coping while sense of community was positively related to problem-focused coping. Increased demoralization was associated with decreased self-efficacy, increased emotion-focused coping, and decreased community involvement. The results suggest that the psychologically most fragile residents are underrepresented in community activities, and that the use of high levels of emotion-focused coping may have been maladaptive.

Bachrach, K.M.

1983-01-01

295

Coping Strategies Associated With Suicidal Behaviour in Adolescent Inpatients With Borderline Personality Disorder  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To compare the coping strategies of adolescents with borderline personality disorder (BPD) to the coping strategies of adolescents without BPD, and to explore the association of coping with suicidal ideation and attempts among adolescents with BPD. Method: Adolescent inpatients (n = 167) aged 13 to 17 years were admitted after suicide attempts and evaluated within 10 days, using the abbreviated version of the Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines–Revised, the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children–Present and Lifetime Version supported by a team consensus best estimate method for the primary diagnosis, the Adolescent Coping Scale, and the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Results: Firstly, compared with adolescents without BPD, adolescents with BPD relied more on nonproductive coping strategies, mostly avoidant strategies, and less on productive coping strategies. Secondly, coping appeared as a factor associated with suicidal ideation in adolescents with BPD. While while controlling for age, sex, and depression, multivariate analyses showed a significant positive association between the coping strategy to focusing on solving the problem and suicidal ideation. Conclusion: The use of avoidant strategies by adolescents with BPD could be viewed as attempts to increase emotional regulation. Problem-solving strategies in the immediate aftermath of a suicide attempt may prevent adolescents with BPD from overcoming a crisis and may increase suicidal ideation.

Knafo, Alexandra; Guilé, Jean-Marc; Breton, Jean-Jacques; Labelle, Réal; Belloncle, Vincent; Bodeau, Nicolas; Boudailliez, Bernard; de la Rivière, Sébastien Garny; Kharij, Brahim; Mille, Christian; Mirkovic, Bojan; Pripis, Cornelia; Renaud, Johanne; Vervel, Christine; Cohen, David; Gérardin, Priscille

2015-01-01

296

Intrinsic religiousness and well-being among cancer patients: the mediating role of control-related religious coping and self-efficacy for coping with cancer.  

PubMed

We examined the relationship between intrinsic religiousness and well-being, with control-related religious coping and self-efficacy for coping with cancer as potential mediators of this relationship among cancer patients. In a cross-sectional design, 179 ambulatory cancer patients completed measures of intrinsic religiousness, religious coping, self-efficacy for coping with cancer, well-being, and demographic variables. Type of cancer, stage of cancer, and time since diagnosis were collected from electronic medical charts. In a path model, the positive association between intrinsic religiousness and three types of well-being-physical, functional, and social-was fully mediated by active religious surrender and self-efficacy for coping with cancer. In addition, the negative association between passive religious deferral and all four types of well-being-physical, functional, social, and emotional-was fully mediated by self-efficacy for coping with cancer. Finally, there was a negative direct association between pleading for God's direct intercession and emotional well-being. These findings suggest pathways by which intrinsic religiousness and control-related religious coping are linked to various dimensions of well-being among cancer patients. PMID:25169026

Pérez, John E; Rex Smith, Amy

2015-04-01

297

Effects on Problem Behavior and Social Skills Associated with the Implementation of School Wide Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports Approach in an Alternative School Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In spite of research documenting the negative effects of punishment, most high schools and correctional facilities rely on punishment to establish order and compliance with rules and routines (Nelson, Sprague, Jolivette, Smith, & Tobin, 2009). One alternative to punitive consequences is School Wide Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports…

Evans, Erica

2013-01-01

298

A learning skills course for the 1st year medical students: an experience at a Saudi medical school  

PubMed Central

Background Every year nearly 1,500 students enter into medical program after passing high school and national aptitude exams. However, many students experience frustration, failure, and psychological morbidities like stress, depression, and anxiety because they are not aware of their learning styles or do not have effective learning skills and strategies. The College of Medicine of Al-Imam Muhammad ibn Saud Islamic University has adopted the outcome based, community oriented, Spiral Curriculum. Although the curriculum is innovative, on the other hand, it is very demanding. Objective The purpose of this paper is to share educational structure and evaluation results of the course on effective learning and study skills for the 1st year medical students. Methods To prepare our students in order to cope with this demanding but promising curriculum, we conducted an effective and comprehensive learning skills course for 16 weeks in the first semester of year 1 in the medical program. Performance of each student was assessed and the course evaluation was done by students at the end of the course. Results The attendance of the students throughout the course was over 90%. The average performance of students in the summative assessment was 78% and the course was generally liked by the students. Discussion Students overall had a positive attitude toward the learning skills course. Majority of the students showed interest in attending the sessions regularly and realized the significance of this course to improve their learning skills. PMID:25848332

Siddiqui, Imran A; Bin Abdulrahman, Khalid A; Alsultan, Mohammed A

2015-01-01

299

Sexual assault related distress and drinking: the influence of daily reports of social support and coping control.  

PubMed

Introduction. A history of sexual assault (SA) is often associated with increased distress and heavy drinking. One's ability to cope with the distress and seek social support has been associated with drinking more generally. However, SA-related distress, drinking, and the extent to which a woman engages in adaptive coping or seeks social support is known to vary day-to-day. The goal of the present investigation was to examine the moderating influence of perceived coping control and social support on the event-level association between SA-related distress and drinking. Methods. This study included 133 college women with a history of SA who reported recent heavy drinking. Participants provided daily reports of their SA-related distress, perceived coping control, perceived social support, and alcohol consumption every day for 30days. Results. Results of generalized estimating equation models suggest that coping control moderated the association between distress and drinking such that those with less perceived coping control drank more as their SA-related distress increased from their average. Although social support did not moderate between distress and drinking, decreases in perceived social support were associated with more drinking on that day. Conclusions. The results suggest that daily deviations in SA-related distress may influence alcohol consumption more than average levels of distress, especially among women with low coping control. Interventions for women with SA histories should help them build coping skills as well as adequate social support in order to reduce drinking. PMID:25437266

Stappenbeck, Cynthia A; Hassija, Christina M; Zimmerman, Lindsey; Kaysen, Debra

2015-03-01

300

Coping style of substance-abuse patients: effects of anxiety and mood disorders on coping change.  

PubMed

The authors studied the coping style of substance-abuse patients during clinical cognitive-behavioral group therapy, and the effects of mood and anxiety disorders on changes in coping style. Change in coping style was studied prospectively in a cohort of 132 residential-drug-abuse patients. In addition to pretreatment assessments, which included diagnosis of mood and anxiety disorders and addiction severity, repeated measurements of coping style were performed at predetoxification, pretreatment, and after three and six months of treatment. Considerable change in coping style between predetoxification and pretreatment was found, suggesting that coping assessment in a predetoxification phase is confounded by state factors surrounding treatment entry. Coping style of detoxified substance abusers is related to the presence of mood and anxiety disorders. Coping style was not found to be related to the severity of drug abuse. Furthermore, maladaptive coping styles decreased after three months of inpatient-substance-abuse treatment, and more-adaptive coping styles remained stable for another three months of inpatient treatment. Patients with an anxiety disorder improved less on coping style when compared to non-anxiety patients. Presence of a mood disorder had no impact on coping-style improvement. The results indicate that more attention should be focused on anxiety disorders during substance-abuse treatment in order to improve coping style. Furthermore, more studies are needed on the relation between substance abuse, coping style, and psychopathology. PMID:11241361

Franken, I H; Hendriks, V M; Haffmans, P M; van der Meer, C W

2001-03-01

301

Burden and well-being of caregivers for the severely mentally ill: the role of coping style and social support.  

PubMed

Caregivers of persons with severe mental illness often experience a significant burden in coping with patients' symptoms. Several factors have been hypothesized to mediate the impact of caring for a mentally ill relative, including cognitive appraisal, coping strategies, and social support. The present study examined the relationships between these factors, and subjective burden and well-being in caregivers of persons with a severe mental illness. Higher levels of subjective burden were related to (1) greater perceived frequency of positive and negative symptom behaviors, (2) a tendency to use problem-focused oriented coping for dealing with negative symptom behaviors, and (3) a tendency not to use problem-solving oriented coping for dealing with positive symptom behaviors. Well-being was also related to lower perceived frequency of positive symptom behaviors and social support, but not to coping style. The implications of the findings for interventions designed to reduce caregiver subjective burden are discussed. PMID:9850983

Webb, C; Pfeiffer, M; Mueser, K T; Gladis, M; Mensch, E; DeGirolamo, J; Levinson, D F

1998-11-30

302

Environmental Emergency Preparedness. Outdoor Living Skills Series. Instructor Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This instructor's manual contains 21 lesson plans to teach advanced skills to cope with emergency outdoor living situations and emphasizes being prepared, rather than survival. Written for the classroom teacher, but adaptable for other youth groups, the module contains subject information, lesson plans with activities, student handouts, a written…

Deaton, Don

303

Three Authentic Curriculum-Integration Approaches to Bird Adaptations That Incorporate Technology and Thinking Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Integration of subject areas with technology and thinking skills is a way to help teachers cope with today's overloaded curriculum and to help students see the connectedness of different curriculum areas. This study compares three authentic approaches to teaching a science unit on bird adaptations for habitat that integrate thinking skills and…

Rule, Audrey C.; Barrera, Manuel T., III

2008-01-01

304

How Coping Mediates the Effect of Optimism on Distress: A Study of Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

At diagnosis, 59 breast cancer patients reported on their overall optimism about life; 1 day presurgery, 10 days postsurgery, and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups, they reported their recent coping responses and distress levels. Optimism related inversely to distress at each point, even controlling for prior distress. Acceptance, positive reframing, and use of religion were the most common coping

Charles S. Carver; Christina Pozo; Suzanne D. Harris; Victoria Noriega; Michael F. Scheier; David S. Robinson; Alfred S. Ketcham; Frederick L. Moffat; Kimberley C. Clark

1993-01-01

305

Forgiveness and mental health variables: Interpreting the relationship using an adaptational-continuum model of personality and coping  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper uses an adaptational-continuum model of personality, based on Ferguson’s (2001) health psychology model integrating Eysenck personality factors and coping style, to provide a context for examining the relationship between forgiveness and mental health. Three hundred and twenty respondents completed measures of personality, coping style, forgiveness (forgiveness of self, others, likelihood, presence of positive forgiveness, absence of negative

John Maltby; Liza Day; Louise Barber

2004-01-01

306

Longitudinal Spiritual Coping with Trauma in People with HIV: Implications for Health Care  

PubMed Central

Abstract This 10-year study (N=177) examines how people with HIV use spirituality to cope with life's trauma on top of HIV-related stress (e.g., facing death, stigma, poverty, limited healthcare) usual events. Spirituality, defined as a connection to a higher presence, is independent from religion (institutionalized spirituality). As a dynamic adaptive process, coping requires longitudinal studying. Qualitative content-analysis of interviews/essays yielded a coding of specific aspects and a longitudinal rating of overall spiritual coping. Most participants were rated as spiritual, using spiritual practices, about half experienced comfort, empowerment, growth/transformation, gratitude, less than one-third meaning, community, and positive reframing. Up to one-fifth perceived spiritual conflict, struggle, or anger, triggering post-traumatic stress, which sometimes converted into positive growth/transformation later. Over time, 65% used spiritual coping positively, 7% negatively, and 28% had no significant use. Spirituality was mainly beneficial for women, heterosexuals, and African Americans (p<0.05). Results suggest that spirituality is a major source of positive and occasionally negative coping (e.g., viewing HIV as sin). We discuss how clinicians can recognize and prevent when spirituality is creating distress and barriers to HIV treatment, adding a literature review on ways of effective spiritual assessment. Spirituality may be a beneficial component of coping with trauma, considering socio-cultural contexts. PMID:24601735

Ironson, Gail

2014-01-01

307

Coping with contraception: cognitive and behavioral methods with adolescents.  

PubMed

Teenagers' sporadic use or nonuse of contraception is 1 explanation for the high rates of unwanted pregnancies in the US. Past efforts have had limited impact as they focused on simply providing adolescents with information and increased access to birth control. The argument here points to specific cognitive and behavioral skills, which adolescents lack, and which are required for effective contraception. Previous research documents an increase in teenagers' use of contraception following a skills-training program presented in intensive small-group format. The present study evaluates cognitive and behavioral skills training methods implemented with large groups (n=120), in the natural environment. The subjects are male and female students of a middle class suburban public high school. Training in this preventive approach stresses verbal and nonverbal components of effective interpersonal communication--approach, refusal and request responses--as important behavioral skills. Cognitive skills training emphasizes the application of facts about reproduction and contraception to make optimal decisions in situations involving sexual activity. Leaders help the subjects relate abstract facts and observable risks to their own life circumstances and choices. Additional skills practice involves the completion of written assignments outside the group setting. At the end of the 2-week training period, the students are evaluated along 4 measures: a knowledge inventory, a contraceptive attitudes and intentions inventory, and a videotaped performance test. Analyses of findings support the feasibility of large-group procedures for helping adolescents cope with sexuality and contraception. Future investigations are needed to replicate the present research as are longitudinal follow-up data to assess the long-term effects of this treatment approach. PMID:12265688

Gilchrist, L D; Schinke, S P

1983-01-01

308

Assessing Students' Metacognitive Skills  

PubMed Central

Objective To develop a diagnostic test for assessing cognitive skills related to metacognition in a physiology course. Methods Cognitive skills believed to be related to metacognition (visualizing lecture information and interpreting diagrams) were identified in a first-professional year (P1) physiology course and test items were constructed for each. Analyses included overall reliability, item discrimination, and variance comparisons of 4 groups to assess the effect of prior physiology coursework and diagnostic test score level on the first examination in physiology. Results Overall reliability was 0.83 (N = 78). Eighty percent of the test items discriminated positively. The average diagnostic test scores of students with or without a prior physiology course did not differ significantly. Students who scored above the class mean on the diagnostic test and who had taken a prior physiology course also had the highest average scores on the physiology examination. Conclusion The diagnostic test provided a measure of a limited number of skills related to metacognition, and preliminary data suggest that such skills are especially important in retaining information. PMID:17429514

Alman, Martha; Gardner, Stephanie; Born, Charles

2007-01-01

309

Cognitive Skills, Student Achievement Tests, and Schools  

PubMed Central

Cognitive skills predict academic performance, so schools that improve academic performance might also improve cognitive skills. To investigate the impact schools have on both academic performance and cognitive skills, we related standardized achievement test scores to measures of cognitive skills in a large sample (N=1,367) of 8th-grade students attending traditional, exam, and charter public schools. Test scores and gains in test scores over time correlated with measures of cognitive skills. Despite wide variation in test scores across schools, differences in cognitive skills across schools were negligible after controlling for 4th-grade test scores. Random offers of enrollment to over-subscribed charter schools resulted in positive impacts of such school attendance on math achievement, but had no impact on cognitive skills. These findings suggest that schools that improve standardized achievement tests do so primarily through channels other than cognitive skills. PMID:24434238

Finn, Amy S.; Kraft, Matthew A.; West, Martin R.; Leonard, Julia A.; Bish, Crystal E.; Martin, Rebecca E.; Sheridan, Margaret A.; Gabrieli, Christopher F. O.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

2014-01-01

310

Cognitive skills, student achievement tests, and schools.  

PubMed

Cognitive skills predict academic performance, so schools that improve academic performance might also improve cognitive skills. To investigate the impact schools have on both academic performance and cognitive skills, we related standardized achievement-test scores to measures of cognitive skills in a large sample (N = 1,367) of eighth-grade students attending traditional, exam, and charter public schools. Test scores and gains in test scores over time correlated with measures of cognitive skills. Despite wide variation in test scores across schools, differences in cognitive skills across schools were negligible after we controlled for fourth-grade test scores. Random offers of enrollment to oversubscribed charter schools resulted in positive impacts of such school attendance on math achievement but had no impact on cognitive skills. These findings suggest that schools that improve standardized achievement-test scores do so primarily through channels other than improving cognitive skills. PMID:24434238

Finn, Amy S; Kraft, Matthew A; West, Martin R; Leonard, Julia A; Bish, Crystal E; Martin, Rebecca E; Sheridan, Margaret A; Gabrieli, Christopher F O; Gabrieli, John D E

2014-03-01

311

Assessments of "Learning-Related Skills" and "Interpersonal Skills" Constructs within Early Childhood Environments in Singapore"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social skills are necessary for developing successful relationships and promoting learning. "Interpersonal skills" (IPS) are needed for maintaining friendships while "learning-related skills" (LRS) are required for positive classroom behaviours. In this study, we investigated the construct validity of LRS and IPS within two existing assessments:…

Lim, Sok Mui; Rodger, Sylvia; Brown, Ted

2010-01-01

312

Mother-daughter coping and disordered eating.  

PubMed

This study explores whether the coping style of teenage girls with and without an eating disorder is similar to that of their mothers' (biological and adoptive), and whether teens with disordered eating utilize more maladaptive coping compared with those without. Eating disorder was diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria, and the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations was administered to distinguish the coping style of the participants. Our findings suggest that daughters coped very similarly to their mothers in either group. Contrary to previous studies, our sample of teenage girls with eating disorders as well as their mothers utilized less frequently the avoidance-distraction coping compared with the girls without eating disorders and their mothers. These findings reinforce the importance for family involvement and for simultaneous focus on intrapersonal and interpersonal maintenance factors during eating disorder treatment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. PMID:25645347

Lantzouni, Eleni; Cox, Molly Havnen; Salvator, Ann; Crosby, Ross D

2015-03-01

313

Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Machining Skills Cluster.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document of skill standards for the machining skills cluster serves as a guide to workforce preparation program providers in defining content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. These 67 occupational skill standards describe what people should know and be able to do in an…

Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

314

Coping and adjustment to breast cancer.  

PubMed

This study examined possible predictors of adjustment to breast cancer. Sixty-one women participated soon after they were diagnosed with Stage I or Stage II breast cancer. Measures were gathered at diagnosis and again 4 months later. Predictor variables included aspects of the disease and treatment process and reported coping behavior. The most consistent predictor of distress and, to a lesser extent, quality of life, was avoidant coping: women who reported more avoidant coping were more distressed. These data fit well with most previous research and suggest one way of identifying women who may be more at risk for special difficulties coping with the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:10390735

McCaul, K D; Sandgren, A K; King, B; O'Donnell, S; Branstetter, A; Foreman, G

1999-01-01

315

Hong Kong baccalaureate nursing students' stress and their coping strategies in clinical practice.  

PubMed

This study examined Hong Kong baccalaureate nursing students' stress and their coping strategies in clinical practice. Two hundred five nursing students completed a self-administrative survey including demographics, Perceived Stress Scale, and Coping Behavior Inventory. Results showed that students perceived a moderate level of stress (M = 2.10, SD =0.44). The most common stressor was lack of professional knowledge and skills. Among the four types of coping strategies (transference, stay optimistic, problem solving, and avoidance), transference was the most frequently used. Furthermore, senior students who perceived a higher level of stress from taking care of patients were more likely to choose problem-solving strategies. Senior students who had no religious belief and perceived a higher level of stress from teachers and nursing staff were more likely to use avoidance strategies. The results provided valuable information for clinical educators in identifying students' needs, facilitating their learning in the clinical setting, and developing effective interventions to reduce stress. PMID:19751936

Chan, Christine K L; So, Winnie K W; Fong, Daniel Y T

2009-01-01

316

The role of coping in depression treatment utilization for VA primary care patients  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the impact of Veterans’ coping strategies on mental health treatment engagement following a positive screen for depression. Methods A mixed methods observational study using a mailed survey and semi structured interviews. Sample included 271 Veterans who screened positive for depression during a primary care visit at one of three VA medical centers and had not received a diagnosis of depression or prescribed antidepressants 12 months prior to screening. A subsample of 23 Veterans was interviewed. Results Logistic regression models showed that Veterans who reported more instrumental support and active coping were more likely to receive depression or other mental health treatment within three months of their positive depression screen. Those who reported emotional support or self distraction as coping strategies were less likely to receive any treatment in the same time frame. Qualitative analyses revealed that how Veterans use these and other coping strategies can impact treatment engagement in a variety of ways. Conclusions The relationship between Veterans’ use of coping strategies and treatment engagement for depression may not be readily apparent without in depth exploration. Practice implications In VA primary care clinics, nurse care managers and behavioral health providers should explore how Veterans’ methods of coping may impact treatment engagement. PMID:24315160

Osei-Bonsu, Princess E.; Bokhour, Barbara G.; Glickman, Mark E.; Rodrigues, Stephanie; Mueller, Nora M.; Dell, Natalie S.; Zhao, Shibei; Eisen, Susan V.; Elwy, A. Rani

2014-01-01

317

Stigma, disclosure, coping, and medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS in Northern Tanzania.  

PubMed

This study examines a proposed theoretical model examining the interrelationships between stigma, disclosure, coping, and medication adherence among 158 HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in northern Tanzania. Perceived and self-stigma, voluntary and involuntary disclosure, positive and negative coping, and demographics were assessed by trained interviewers, and self-reported adherence was collected during 5 months follow-up. Data were examined using correlation and regression analyses. The analyses showed that perceived stigma is primarily related to involuntary disclosure, whereas self-stigma is related to voluntary disclosure. Religious coping positively relates to acceptance, whereas perceived stigma explains higher levels of denial of HIV status. Lastly, adherence was negatively affected by alcohol use, self-stigma, and denial. We conclude that adherence is predominantly predicted by negative rather than positive coping mechanisms. Therefore, substituting maladaptive coping mechanisms like denial and alcohol use with a more adaptive coping style may be an important strategy to improve long-term ART adherence and well-being of patients. Moreover, this study showed that it is useful to examine both involuntary and voluntary disclosure when studying its relation with stigma. PMID:24517541

Lyimo, Ramsey A; Stutterheim, Sarah E; Hospers, Harm J; de Glee, Teuntje; van der Ven, Andre; de Bruin, Marijn

2014-02-01

318

Stability and Change in Patterns of Coping with Parkinson's Disease  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined how Parkinson's disease patients cope with disease-related stressors over time. Of interest was whether patterns of coping would support a dispositional model of coping (i.e., stability) or a contextual model of coping (i.e., change). The influence of stability and change in coping on mental and physical health outcomes was…

Frazier, Leslie D.

2002-01-01

319

Coping strategies predict disability in patients with primary fibromyalgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

We administered the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) to 80 patients with fibromyalgia (FM) to determine the relationship between coping strategies and functional disability. A principal components factor analysis revealed two dimensions of patients' CSQ responses: Coping Attempts and Catastrophizing. Coping Attempts consists of five scales: Reinterpreting Pain, Ignoring Pain Sensations, Diverting Attention, Coping Self-Statements and Increasing Activity Level. Catastrophizing is

Michelle Y Martin; Laurence A Bradley; Ronald W Alexander; Graciela S Alarcón; Mireya Triana-Alexander; Leslie A Aaron; Kristin R Alberts

1996-01-01

320

Maladaptive coping, adaptive coping, and depressive symptoms: Variations across age and depressive state  

E-print Network

adolescent girls, 41 never-depressed women, and 39 depressed women, we examined whether generally adaptiveMaladaptive coping, adaptive coping, and depressive symptoms: Variations across age and depressive Keywords: Depression Rumination Involuntary responses to stress Coping a b s t r a c t Rumination has

Jonides, John

321

Does Coping Help?: A Reexamination of the Relation Between Coping and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a longitudinal community survey of 291 adults, we explored the relation between coping strategies and psychological symptoms. Respondents completed the revised Ways of Coping Scale (Folkman & Lazarus, 1985) for a self-named stressful episode. Factor analysis produced eight coping factors: three problem focused, four emotion focused, and one (support mobilization) that contained elements of both. Multiple regression analyses indicated

Carolyn M. Aldwin; Tracey A. Revenson

1987-01-01

322

The possibility of nuclear war: Appraisal, coping and emotional response  

SciTech Connect

This study used Lazarus and Folkman's (1984) model of appraisal and coping to explore people's emotional response to the possibility of nuclear war. Sixty-seven women and 49 men participated in a questionnaire study. The sample represented a cross-section of Americans by age and ethnic group but had more education and higher occupational status scores than is typical for the greater population. Sampling limitations and the political climate at the time of questionnaire administration suggested that the present findings be interpreted cautiously. Nevertheless, results suggested the importance of appraisal, defined in this study as the estimated probability of nuclear war and beliefs that citizen efforts to reduce the likelihood of nuclear war can be effective, and coping as factors in people's nuclear threat related emotional response. Six of the study's 11 hypotheses received at least partial confirmation. One or more measures of nuclear threat-related emotional distress were positively correlated with probability estimates of nuclear war, individual and collective response efficacy beliefs, and seeking social support in regard to the nuclear threat. Negative correlations were found between measures of threat-related distress and both trust in political leaders and distancing. Statistically significant relationships contrary to the other five hypotheses were also obtained. Measures of threat-related distress were positively, rather than negatively, correlated with escape avoidance and positive reappraisal coping efforts. Appraisal, coping, and emotion variables, acting together, predicted the extent of political activism regarding the nuclear arms race. It is useful to consider attitudes toward the nuclear arms race, distinguishing between intensity and frequency of emotional distress, and between measures of trait, state, and concept-specific emotionality in understanding emotional responses.

Kanofsky, S.

1989-01-01

323

Developing Compassionate Self-care Skills in Persons Living with HIV: a Pilot Study to Examine Mindful Awareness in Body-oriented Therapy Feasibility and Acceptability  

PubMed Central

Background Self-care skills for persons living with HIV (PLWH) are needed to better cope with the common symptoms and emotional challenges of living with this chronic illness. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and acceptability of Mindful Awareness in Body-oriented Therapy (MABT) for individuals receiving medical management for HIV at an outpatient program. Setting A nonprofit outpatient day program that provided medical management to low-income individuals with HIV. Research Design A one group pre–post study design, nine participants were recruited to receive eight weekly MABT sessions of 1.25 hours each. Intervention MABT is designed to facilitate emotion regulation through teaching somatically-based self-care skills to respond to daily stressors. Main Outcome Measures To assess participant characteristics and study feasibility, a battery of health questionnaires and one week of wrist actigraphy was administered pre- and postintervention. A satisfaction survey and written questionnaire was administered postintervention to assess MABT acceptability. Results The results demonstrated recruitment and retention feasibility. The sample had psychological and physical health symptoms that are characteristic of PLWH. MABT acceptability was high, and participants perceived that they learned new mind-body self-care skills that improved HIV symptoms and their ability to manage symptoms. Conclusion The positive findings support a larger future study to examine MABT efficacy to improve coping with HIV symptoms among PLWH. PMID:23730396

Price, Cynthia J.; Diana, Taibi M.; Smith-DiJulio, Kathleen L.; Voss, Joachim G.

2013-01-01

324

The relationships of character strengths with coping, work-related stress, and job satisfaction.  

PubMed

Personality traits have often been highlighted to relate to how people cope with stressful events. The present paper focuses on character strengths as positive personality traits and examines two basic assumptions that were derived from a core characteristic of character strengths (i.e., to determine how individuals deal with adversities): (1) character strengths correlate with coping and (2) buffer the effects of work-related stress on job satisfaction. Two different samples (i.e., a mixed sample representing various occupations [N = 214] and a nurses sample [N = 175]) filled in measures for character strengths, coping, work-related stress, and job satisfaction. As expected, intellectual, emotional, and interpersonal strengths were related to coping. Interpersonal strengths played a greater role for coping among nurses, as interactions with others are an essential part of their workday. Furthermore, intellectual strengths partially mediated the negative effect of work-related stress on job satisfaction. These findings open a new field for research on the role of personality in coping with work-related stress. Character strengths are trainable personal characteristics, and therefore valuable resources to improve coping with work-related stress and to decrease the negative effects of stress. Further research is needed to investigate this assumed causality. PMID:25767452

Harzer, Claudia; Ruch, Willibald

2015-01-01

325

Religiousness and Religious Coping in a Secular Society: The Gender Perspective  

PubMed Central

Women are found to be more religious than men and more likely to use religious coping. Only few studies have explored religious gender differences in more secular societies. This population-based study comprised 3,000 Danish men and women (response rate 45 %) between 20 and 40 years of age. Information about demographics, religiousness and religious coping was obtained through a web-based questionnaire. We organized religiousness in the three dimensions: Cognition, Practice and Importance, and we assessed religious coping using the brief RCOPE questionnaire. We found substantial gender differences in both religiousness and religious coping. Nearly, 60 % of the women believed in some sort of spirit or in God compared to 40 % of the men. Generally, both men and women scored low on the RCOPE scale. However, for respondents reporting high levels of religiousness, the proportion of men who scored high in the RCOPE exceeded the proportion of women in using positive and especially negative coping strategies. Also, in a secular society, women are found to be more religious than men, but in a subset of the most religious respondents, men were more inclined to use religious coping. Further studies on religious coping in secular societies are required. PMID:23625173

Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Skytthe, Axel; Christensen, Kaare; Hvidt, Niels Christian

2014-01-01

326

The relationships of character strengths with coping, work-related stress, and job satisfaction  

PubMed Central

Personality traits have often been highlighted to relate to how people cope with stressful events. The present paper focuses on character strengths as positive personality traits and examines two basic assumptions that were derived from a core characteristic of character strengths (i.e., to determine how individuals deal with adversities): (1) character strengths correlate with coping and (2) buffer the effects of work-related stress on job satisfaction. Two different samples (i.e., a mixed sample representing various occupations [N = 214] and a nurses sample [N = 175]) filled in measures for character strengths, coping, work-related stress, and job satisfaction. As expected, intellectual, emotional, and interpersonal strengths were related to coping. Interpersonal strengths played a greater role for coping among nurses, as interactions with others are an essential part of their workday. Furthermore, intellectual strengths partially mediated the negative effect of work-related stress on job satisfaction. These findings open a new field for research on the role of personality in coping with work-related stress. Character strengths are trainable personal characteristics, and therefore valuable resources to improve coping with work-related stress and to decrease the negative effects of stress. Further research is needed to investigate this assumed causality. PMID:25767452

Harzer, Claudia; Ruch, Willibald

2015-01-01

327

Electrical stimulation during skill training with a therapeutic glove enhances the induction of cortical plasticity and has a positive effect on motor memory.  

PubMed

To examine whether afferent stimulation of hand muscles has a facilitating effect on motor performance, learning and cortical excitability, healthy subjects were trained on the grooved pegboard test (GTP) while wearing a mesh glove (MG) with incorporated electrical stimulation. Three study groups (n=12) were compared in a between subjects design, the bare handed (BH), gloved (MG) and gloved with electrical stimulation (MGS) groups. Motor performance was assessed by the GPT completion time across 4 training blocks, and further one block was retested 7 days later to determine the off-line effects. On-line learning was obtained by normalizing the completion time values to the first training block, and off-line learning was obtained by normalizing the retest values to the last training block. Cortical excitability was assessed via single and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at pre-training, post-training and 30 min post-training. Motor evoked potential recruitment curve, short-latency intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation were estimated from the TMS assessments. Motor performance across all 4 training blocks was poor in the MG and MGS groups, while on-line learning was not affected by wearing the glove or by afferent stimulation. However, off-line learning, tested 7 days after training, was improved in the MGS group compared to the MG group. In addition, post-training corticospinal excitability was increased in the MGS group. It can be concluded that afferent stimulation improves off-line learning and thus has a positive effect on motor memory, likely due to LTP-like cortical plasticity in the consolidation phase. PMID:24844752

Christova, Monica; Rafolt, Dietmar; Golaszewski, Stefan; Nardone, Raffaele; Gallasch, Eugen

2014-08-15

328

Coping behavior of international late adolescent students in selected Australian educational institutions.  

PubMed

Using the Adolescent Coping Scale, ACS (Frydenberg & Lewis, 1993) we surveyed 45 randomly selected foreign adolescents in Australian schools. The coping strategies used most by the participants were: focus on solving the problem; seeking relaxing diversions; focusing on the positive; seeking social support; worry; seeking to belong; investing in close friends; wishful thinking; and keep to self (Table 4). With regard to coping styles, the most widely used was the productive coping followed by non-productive coping while the least used style was reference to others (Table 4). In terms of both genders the four coping strategies used most often were:  work hard to achieve; seeking relaxing diversions; focus on solving the problem; and focus on the positive (Table 5). The most noticeable gender difference was the use of the physical recreation coping strategy in which male students engaged more (Fig 1). The usage of four coping strategies (solving problem; work hard; focus on positive; and social support) was higher for students who have been away from family more than once as compared to those who have been away once only while the usage of seeking relaxing diversions was higher for the first timers (Table 6). No significant differences were obtained on the sample's performance on the ACS subscales by gender (Table 7), frequency of leaving own country (Table 8), country of origin (Table 9), and length of stay in Australia (Table 11). However, foundation students scored significantly higher on the reference to others variable than their secondary school peers (Table 10). We recommended counseling for students with high support needs and further large-scale mixed-methods research to gain additional insights. PMID:24373267

Shahrill, Masitah; Mundia, Lawrence

2014-01-01

329

Measurement and predictors of young adults' perceived ability to cope with dental life events.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to assess coping skills and predictors of the ability to cope with dental life events employing a 10-item rather than a 48-item rating questionnaire. A representative random sample of 1490 subjects aged 25 years from 3 Norwegian counties received a mail questionnaire in March 1997. The response rate was 62% after 1 reminder. Eight selected items from the Social Readjustment Rating Questionnaire (SRRQ) plus 2 dental items were presented as graphic rating scales with the endpoints 'not difficult at all' and 'more difficult than anything'. Mean values were used to rank the life events and for comparison with findings from a previous study. Information was also collected for 16 predictor variables (Table 2). The informants found it moderately difficult to cope with losing one or more teeth and with getting dentures. A 10- and a 48-item rating scale seemed to give comparable results. In multiple logistic regression analysis, controlling for having experienced extraction during the previous 5 years, gender, and dental anxiety were significant predictors of both dental life events; education, many cavities, and belief in keeping teeth for life influenced coping with getting dentures. The identified predictors of dental life events explained <11% of the variance. In addition to extending the list of predictors of perceived need for skills to adjust to dental life events, the study also provided evidence to suggest that it may be acceptable to rely on a shorter rating questionnaire. PMID:12166904

Klock, Kristin S; Haugejorden, Ola

2002-06-01

330

Mixed Emotions and Coping: The Benefits of Secondary Emotions  

PubMed Central

The existing empirical literature suggests that during difficult situations, the concurrent experience of positive and negative affects may be ideal for ensuring successful adaptation and well-being. However, different patterns of mixed emotions may have different adaptive consequences. The present research tested the proposition that experiencing a pattern of secondary mixed emotion (i.e., secondary emotion that embrace both positive and negative affects) more greatly promotes adaptive coping than experiencing two other patterns of mixed emotional experiences: simultaneous (i.e., two emotions of opposing affects taking place at the same time) and sequential (i.e., two emotions of opposing affects switching back and forth). Support for this hypothesis was obtained from two experiments (Studies 1 and 2) and a longitudinal survey (Study 3). The results revealed that secondary mixed emotions predominate over sequential and simultaneous mixed emotional experiences in promoting adaptive coping through fostering the motivational and informative functions of emotions; this is done by providing solution-oriented actions rather than avoidance, faster decisions regarding coping strategies (Study 1), easier access to self-knowledge, and better narrative organization (Study 2). Furthermore, individuals characterized as being prone to feeling secondary mixed emotions were more resilient to stress caused by transitions than those who were characterized as being prone to feeling opposing emotions separately (Study 3). Taken together, the preliminary results indicate that the pattern of secondary mixed emotion provides individuals with a higher capacity to handle adversity than the other two patterns of mixed emotional experience. PMID:25084461

Braniecka, Anna; Trzebi?ska, Ewa; Dowgiert, Aneta; Wytykowska, Agata

2014-01-01

331

Helping Students Cope with Fears and Crises.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of two modules extracted from a six-module larger work. Module 1 presents six articles on the topic of "helping students to cope with fears and crises." Module 2 contains 17 articles on "programs and practices for helping students cope with fears and crises." Article titles and authors are as follows: (1) "Worries of…

Walz, Garry R., Ed.; Bleuer, Jeanne C., Ed.

332

Pain Coping Strategies in Osteoarthritis Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the relation of pain coping strategies to pain, health status, and psychological distress in a group of osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain. Patients completed various questionnaires. Medical status variables were also used. The Pain Control and Rational Thinking factor derived from the Coping Strategies Questionnaire proved to…

Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

1987-01-01

333

Patterns of Coping, Patterns of Response.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Both behavioral and cognitive coping strategies are determined by an individual's perception of the stressful stimuli. To investigate the relationship of an individual's usual coping style to differential responses to a behavioral or cognitive stressor in four response systems (heart rate, muscle tension, galvanic skin response, and subjective…

Franzen, Michael D.; Heffernan, William

334

Effects of student teachers' coping behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. When teachers employ ineffective ways of coping with stressful encounters with pupils, this may result in feelings of distress and diminished learning opportunities for pupils. In the case of beginning teachers, in partic- ular, problematic classroom interactions cause feelings of distress and may result in dysfunctional teaching. Aim. This study examined the functional relationship between student teach- ers' coping

Wilfried F. Admiraal; Fred A. J. Korthagen; Theo Wubbels

2000-01-01

335

Macroevolutionary trends in the Dinosauria: Cope's rule  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cope's rule is the tendency for body size to increase over time along a lineage. A set of 65 phylogenetically independent comparisons, between earlier and later genera, show that Cope's rule applied in dinosaurs: later genera were on average about 25% longer than the related earlier genera to which they were compared. The tendency for size to increase was not

D. W. E. HONE; T. M. KEESEY; D. PISANI; A. PURVIS

2005-01-01

336

Coping with Relationship Stressors: A Decade Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review identifies key issues in research on adolescent coping with stress with parents, friends, and romantic partners during the past decade. An analysis of 78 studies revealed findings on relationship stressors and the potential links between the use of different coping styles for different relationship types. Research has confirmed…

Seiffge-Krenke, Inge

2011-01-01

337

Active and passive coping strategies in chronic pain patients  

E-print Network

This study assessed the validity of an active/passive conceptualization of coping in a sample of chronic pain patients (N = 84). The validity of active and passive coping dimensions was supported. The Coping Strategies Questionnaire...

Snow-Turek, Andrea Lynn

1994-01-01

338

Religious and Spiritual Issues: Family Therapy Approaches with Military Families Coping with Deployment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploring religious and spiritual issues in family therapy has become more commonplace over the past decade (Walsh, Spiritual\\u000a resources in family therapy, 2009), but understanding how religion and spirituality evolve within military families is unclear. Further, the stressors that\\u000a family members face in the midst of a deployment are paramount, for which many individuals use a variety of coping skills.

Gina M. Brelsford; Robert D. Friedberg

339

The reported pain coping strategies of pediatric burn survivors-does a correlation exist between coping style and development of anxiety disorder?  

PubMed

Unresolved pediatric pain, both acute and chronic, has been associated with negative short- and long-term physical and mental health outcomes. This study sought to determine whether an association existed between self-reported pain coping skills and anxiety levels in a cohort of pediatric burn patients, and whether gender would influence their responses. The sample comprised burn-injured children in attendance at one of three mature burn camp sites. The self-report measures utilized included the 41-item Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders Child Version and the 39-item Pain Coping Questionnaire. Parental consent was obtained. A psychologist administered the measures. Participants included 187 youth, mean age 12.4 ± 2.4 years, girls (n = 89) boys (n = 98) with 67% reporting visible burn scars. Among boys, the use of Internalizing Coping Strategies was moderately correlated with elevated scores on Panic Disorder symptoms (r = .42, P < .001). Among girls, the use of Internalizing Coping Strategies was associated with elevated Generalized Anxiety (r = .51, P < .001), Panic Disorder (r = .46, P < .001), and Total Anxiety Symptom Scores (r = .49, P < .001). Those children who reported using Behavioral Distraction Strategies did not have any elevated anxiety scores. These findings suggest that burn-injured children, who employ Internalization as their pain coping strategy, may be more vulnerable to the development of long-term anxiety disorder, which, if left untreated may result in a negative psycho/social outcome. Applicability to Practice: Assessment of in-patient pediatric patients with the Pain Coping Questionnaire may help to identify children who are more likely to experience long-term anxiety. Future studies should seek to confirm these findings and determine whether improved pain management and early treatment of anxiety can help to diminish the long-term implications of unhelpful pain strategies and increased anxiety in burn-injured children. PMID:25094014

Rimmer, Ruth Brubaker; Alam, Now Bahar; Bay, R Curt; Sadler, Ian J; Foster, Kevin N; Caruso, Daniel M

2015-01-01

340

Coping and coping assistance among children with sickle cell disease and their parents.  

PubMed

The ways in which a family copes with the physical and psychosocial burdens of sickle cell disease (SCD) can influence the child and family functioning. However, few studies have examined SCD-related stressors beyond pain or how children and parents cope with these stressors. This study aimed to describe child coping and parent attempts to help their children cope (ie, coping assistance) with a range of SCD stressors by using a triangulated mixed methods design. We also explored convergence between findings from qualitative interviews and quantitative coping inventories. Fifteen children (aged 6 to 14 years) with SCD and their parents (N=15) completed semistructured interviews and self-report measures to assess SCD-related stressors, coping, and coping assistance strategies. Findings indicate that children experience numerous stressors related to SCD and its treatment, including, but not limited to, pain. To manage these stressors, families employ a range of approach and avoidance-oriented coping strategies. Quantitative and qualitative assessments provided complementary and unique contributions to understanding coping processes among children with SCD and their parents. Examining a broad range of stressors and integrating multiple assessment methods helps improve our understanding of coping with pediatric SCD, which may inform clinical practice and family-focused intervention development. PMID:24327131

Hildenbrand, Aimee K; Barakat, Lamia P; Alderfer, Melissa A; Marsac, Meghan L

2015-01-01

341

Test-Taking Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are two types of skills needed to perform well on a standardized achievement test: (1) the cognitive ability or basic skill that the test is designed to measure, and (2) the ability to demonstrate that cognitive ability or basic skill within the test situation. Test-taking skills (sometimes referred to as test wiseness) are the skills needed…

Sabers, Darrell

342

Alpha suppression following performance errors is correlated with depression, affect, and coping behaviors.  

PubMed

This study tested the hypothesis that enhanced neural arousal in response to performance errors would predict poor affect and coping behaviors in everyday life. Participants were preselected as either low-depressed (LD) or high-depressed (HD) based on a screening questionnaire, and they then completed a laboratory Stroop task while EEG was recorded, followed by a 2-week period of daily reports of affect and coping behaviors. The EEG measure of arousal response to errors was the degree of error-related alpha suppression (ERAS) in the intertrial interval, that is the reduction in alpha power following errors compared with correct responses. ERAS was relatively heightened at frontal sites for the HD versus the LD group, and frontal ERAS predicted lower positive affect, higher negative affect, and less adaptive coping behaviors in the daily reports. Together, the results imply that heightened arousal following mistakes is associated with suboptimal emotion and coping with stressors. PMID:23731439

Compton, Rebecca J; Hofheimer, Julia; Kazinka, Rebecca; Levinson, Amanda; Zheutlin, Amanda

2013-10-01

343

Religion and Health in African Americans: The Role of Religious Coping  

PubMed Central

Objectives To test a model of the religion-health connection to determine whether religious coping plays a mediating role in health behaviors in a national sample of African Americans. Methods Participants completed a telephone survey (N = 2370) assessing religious involvement, religious coping, health behaviors, and demographics. Results Religious beliefs were associated with greater vegetable consumption, which may be due to the role of positive and negative religious coping. Negative religious coping played a role in the relationship between religious beliefs and alcohol consumption. There was no evidence of mediation for fruit consumption, alcohol use in the past 30 days, or smoking. Conclusions Findings have implications for theory and health promotion activities for African Americans. PMID:24629548

Holt, Cheryl L.; Clark, Eddie M.; Debnam, Katrina J.; Roth, David L.

2014-01-01

344

[Influence of job-hunting anxiety on job-hunting: from the viewpoint of coping].  

PubMed

The present study developed a job-hunting anxiety scale and investigated the influence of job-hunting anxiety on coping, number of job-hunting applications, and satisfaction with job-hunting. Questionnaires were completed by 306 college students who had started job-hunting. Explorative factor analysis extracted five factors such as "appeal anxiety", "support anxiety", "activity persistence anxiety", "test anxiety", and "a lack of readiness anxiety". Analysis of covariance structures indicated that (a) job-hunting anxiety was negatively related to problem-focused coping, the number of job-hunting applications, and the satisfaction with job-hunting, and (b) problem-focused coping was positively related to the number of job-hunting applications and the satisfaction with job-hunting. These results suggest that reduction of job-hunting anxiety and the use of problem-focused coping facilitated job-hunting. PMID:20235476

Matsuda, Yuko; Nagasaku, Minoru; Arai, Kunijiro

2010-02-01

345

Evaluating the Demand for Soft Skills in Software Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis of 500 advertisements for IT positions focuses on the soft skills mentioned in the ads, revealing which soft skills are in high demand for software development and which ones are neglected despite their importance.

Faheem Ahmed; Luiz Fernando Capretz; Piers Campbell

2012-01-01

346

Existential relatedness in light of eudemonic well-being and religious coping among middle-aged and older cardiac patients.  

PubMed

This study examined the prediction of preoperative faith factors for perceived spiritual support, indicating existential relationship as a dimension of eudemonic well-being (EWB), at 30 months after cardiac surgery (N=226). The study capitalized on data from preoperative surveys and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons' National Database. Controlling for demographics, cardiac indices, and mental health, hierarchical regression showed that preoperative prayer coping, subjective religiousness, and internal control were positive predictors of spiritual support. Negative religious coping was a negative predictor. Internal control mediated the role of positive religious coping. Certain faith-based experiences may enhance aspects of EWB, but future research should investigate mechanisms. PMID:22544157

Ai, Amy Lee; Hopp, Faith; Tice, Terrence N; Koenig, Harold

2013-03-01

347

Pretend Play, Coping, and Subjective Well-Being in Children: A Follow-Up Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers, the authors state, link play to cognitive and affective processes important for a child's development and overall well-being. In this article, the authors examine the relationships involving pretend play, coping, and subjective well-being (the last of which they conceptualize as positive affect--positive mood--and life satisfaction)…

Fiorelli, Julie A.; Russ, Sandra W.

2012-01-01

348

Individual differences in coping with criticism of one's physical appearance among Taiwanese students.  

PubMed

When someone is criticized for some failure or deficiency, he or she is faced with a dilemma about whether or how to respond. To date, most research on responses to criticism has adopted a communication approach and has focused on general social complaints. The present study instead adopted the perspective of stress and coping and aimed to delineate possible responses to criticism pertaining to one's physical appearance. We investigated the efficacy of three coping styles, namely acceptance, avoidance, and retaliation in explaining emotional reactions towards such criticism, and we additionally controlled for personality characteristics, in particular assertion and harmony beliefs. A sample of Taiwanese university students (N = 300) was surveyed for their coping styles and psychological outcomes, and personality traits were examined as possible predictors of response options. We found that (1) acceptance, retaliation, and avoidance were three broad coping styles in this problematic social situation; (2) the individual trait of assertion was negatively related to the use of avoidance, while harmony beliefs were positively related to acceptance and avoidance, but negatively related to retaliation; and (3) the use of acceptance and avoidance were positively related to positive emotions, whereas retaliation was positively related to negative emotions. Males tended to use more acceptance. Implications of these findings were discussed in relation to existing studies of communication, stress and coping. Possible influences of the Chinese collectivist culture on people's responses to criticism were also delineated, such as valuing interpersonal harmony and face-work in social situations. PMID:22029556

Lu, Luo; Kao, Shu-Fang; Chang, Ting-Ting; Lee, Ya-Wen

2009-08-01

349

The Mediating Role of Secular Coping Strategies in the Relationship between Religious Beliefs and Adjustment to Chronic Pain: The Middle Road to Damascus  

E-print Network

self-statements. Benevolent religious appraisals were also related to positive affect. Coping self-statements did not mediate this relationship. A significant positive relationship was found between punishing God appraisals and depression...

Parenteau, Stacy Candace

2008-08-06

350

Positivity Coping Style and Tobacco and Alcohol Use in Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Adolescence is a period when at-risk health behaviors often begin, such as tobacco and alcohol use; thus, it is a critical period for implementing preventive strategies. Method: In this context, 106 adolescents took part in this research (54 females and 52 males; mean age for both groups = 14.10). The main objectives were to first…

Lara, M. Dolores; Bermudez, Jose; Perez-Garcia, Ana M.

2013-01-01

351

Communication skills.  

PubMed

The front-line nurse is responsible for providing direct patient care, patient satisfaction, care coordination, policy, safety, and communication during a 12-hour shift. Every nurse has the opportunity to make a positive impact on patient outcomes through day-to-day advocacy for patients, nurses, and the nursing profession. Communication is a means of advocacy that provides the avenue to which a positive impact can be made. There are multiple barriers to effective communication in the day-to-day communication of the front-line nurse. Interprofessional communication and shared governance models offer ways to improve communication within nursing and within a systems approach. PMID:25680486

Ellison, Deborah

2015-03-01

352

Biotechnology Skills Standards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Here users will find an assortment of Bioscience/Agricultural Biotechnology Skills Standards. These should be useful for development of new programs as well as for comparisons with existing programs. The sections discussed are: Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing Skill Standards, Combined Bioscience/Agricultural Biotechnology Skill Standards, Agricultural Biotechnology Skill Standards, Bioscience Industry Skill Standards, National Association of Scientific Materials Managers, ACAP Austin Competency Analysis Profile - Biotechnology, Making Skill Standards Work, and Window on the Workplace.

353

Children and Adolescents Coping With Cancer: Self- and Parent Reports of Coping and Anxiety/Depression  

PubMed Central

Objective The diagnosis and treatment of cancer present children and adolescents with significant stress. However, research on the ways that children and adolescents cope with cancer-related stress has not yielded clear findings on the efficacy of different coping strategies, and has been limited by reliance primarily on self-reports of both coping and distress. To address this gap, the current study used a control-based model of coping to examine self- and parent reports of child/adolescent coping and symptoms of anxiety and depression in a sample of children with cancer. Method Children and adolescents (5 to 17 years old) and their parents were recruited near the time of a child’s diagnosis or relapse of cancer (M = 1.30 months postdiagnosis). Child self-reports (n = 153), mother reports (n = 297), and father reports (n = 161) of children’s coping and symptoms of anxiety/depression were obtained. Results Bivariate correlations revealed significant associations for secondary control coping (efforts to adapt to source of stress; e.g., acceptance, cognitive reappraisal) and disengagement coping (e.g., avoidance, denial) with anxiety/depression within and across informants. Linear multiple regression analyses indicated that secondary control coping accounted for unique variance in symptoms of anxiety/ depression both within and across informants. Conclusions Secondary control coping appears important for children and adolescents during early phases of treatment for cancer, and it may serve as an important target for future interventions to enhance adjustment in these children. PMID:25068455

Compas, Bruce E.; Desjardins, Leandra; Vannatta, Kathryn; Young-Saleme, Tammi; Rodriguez, Erin M.; Dunn, Madeleine; Bemis, Heather; Snyder, Sarah; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

2014-01-01

354

Coping and adaptation process during puerperium  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The puerperium is a stage that produces changes and adaptations in women, couples and family. Effective coping, during this stage, depends on the relationship between the demands of stressful or difficult situations and the recourses that the puerperal individual has. Roy (2004), in her Middle Range Theory about the Coping and Adaptation Processing, defines Coping as the ''behavioral and cognitive efforts that a person makes to meet the environment demands''. For the puerperal individual, the correct coping is necessary to maintain her physical and mental well being, especially against situations that can be stressful like breastfeeding and return to work. According to Lazarus and Folkman (1986), a resource for coping is to have someone who receives emotional support, informative and / or tangible. Objective: To review the issue of women coping and adaptation during the puerperium stage and the strategies that enhance this adaptation. Methods: search and selection of database articles: Cochrane, Medline, Ovid, ProQuest, Scielo, and Blackwell Synergy. Other sources: unpublished documents by Roy, published books on Roy´s Model, Websites from of international health organizations. Results: the need to recognize the puerperium as a stage that requires comprehensive care is evident, where nurses must be protagonist with the care offered to women and their families, considering the specific demands of this situation and recourses that promote effective coping and the family, education and health services. PMID:24893059

Muñoz de Rodríguez, Lucy; Ruiz de Cárdenas, Carmen Helena

2012-01-01

355

Work stressors, Chinese coping strategies, and job performance in Greater China.  

PubMed

The aim of this research was to jointly test effects of work stressors and coping strategies on job performance among employees in the Greater China region. A self-administered survey was conducted to collect data from three major cities in the region, namely Beijing, Hong Kong, and Taipei (N = 380). Four important work stressors were assessed: heavy workload, organizational constraints, lack of work autonomy, and interpersonal conflict. We used a four-factor model of Chinese coping strategies composed of hobbies/relaxation, active action, seeking social support, and passive adaptation. Job performance was indicated by both task performance (quantity of work, quality of work, job knowledge) and contextual performance (attendance, getting along with others). We found that: (1) work stressors were related to job performance. Specifically, workload had a positive relation with quantity of work, whereas organizational constraints had negative relations with quantity of work and attendance. In addition, interpersonal conflict had a negative relation with getting along with others. (2) Chinese positive coping strategies were positively related to job performance. Specifically, seeking social support had positive relations with quantity of work and getting along with others, whereas active action had positive relations with attendance and job knowledge. (3) Chinese passive adaptation coping behaviors were negatively related to job performance. Specifically, passive adaptation had negative relations with quantity of work, quality of work, and getting along with others. The present study thus found joint effects of work stressors and coping behaviors among Chinese employees in the Greater China region, encompassing three sub-societies of mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Differential effects of Chinese positive and passive coping strategies were also noted. Most importantly, all these effects were demonstrated on multiple indicators of job performance, a rarely studied but important strain variable from the organizational point of view. PMID:22044015

Lu, Luo; Kao, Shu-Fang; Siu, Oi-Ling; Lu, Chang-Qin

2010-08-01

356

Coping responses in the midst of terror: the July 22 terror attack at Utøya Island in Norway.  

PubMed

This study examined the peri-trauma coping responses of 325 survivors, mostly youth, after the July 22, 2011 terror attack on Utøya Island in Norway. The aim was to understand peri-trauma coping responses and their relation to subsequent post-traumatic stress (PTS) reactions. Respondents were interviewed face-to-face 4-5 months after the shooting, and most were interviewed at their homes. Peri-trauma coping was assessed using ten selected items from the "How I Cope Under Pressure Scale" (HICUPS), covering the dimensions of problem solving, positive cognitive restructuring, avoidance, support seeking, seeking understanding, and religious coping. PTS reactions were assessed with the UCLA PTSD Reaction Index. The participants reported using a wide variety of coping strategies. Problem solving, positive cognitive restructuring, and seeking understanding strategies were reported most often. Men reported using more problem-solving strategies, whereas women reported more emotion-focused strategies. There were no significant associations between age and the use of coping strategies. Problem solving and positive cognitive restructuring were significantly associated with fewer PTS reactions. The results are discussed in light of previous research and may help to inform early intervention efforts for survivors of traumatic events. PMID:25431029

Jensen, Tine K; Thoresen, Siri; Dyb, Grete

2015-02-01

357

Meaningful Maths: Teaching Map Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the author's experience, lessons that are clearly meaningful for students beyond the classroom can foster positive attitudes, increase enjoyment, and enhance learning. In this paper she offers suggestions on how to plan for meaningful mathematics lessons using the topic of map skills as an example. She also presents some specific ideas for…

Whittle, Miranda Pacaya

2007-01-01

358

Intervention LSCI Skills for Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI) is a set of skills that helps adults turn problem situations into learning opportunities for kids. LSCI views conflicts or stressful incidents as opportunities for learning, growth, insight, and change. This training provides parents with tools for building positive relationships with their children and…

Whitson, Signe; Chambers, J. C.

2014-01-01

359

An Interprofessional Approach to Teaching Communication Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Recent research suggests that effective interprofessional communication and collaboration can positively influence patient satisfaction and outcomes. Health professional communication skills do not necessarily improve over time but can improve with formal communication skills training (CST). This article describes the development,…

Sargeant, Joan; MacLeod, Tanya; Murray, Anne

2011-01-01

360

EDUCATION AND SKILLS CASE FOR SPACE  

E-print Network

THE EDUCATION AND SKILLS CASE FOR SPACE PAUL SPENCER AND GRAHAM HULBERT JUNE 2006 #12;#12;Contents: IMechE Survey 40 References 42 #12;The Education and Skills Case for Space Executive Summary Our survey found that space has a direct, positive effect on educational and career decisions and on participation

361

Embedding Transferable Skills and Enhancing Student Learning in a Political Science Research Methods Module: Evidence from the United Kingdom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

U.K. government policy is placing a heavy emphasis on "essential" and "employability" skills in an effort to help individuals cope with changing social and economic circumstances. Delivery of these skills falls to a range of education providers. This is a particular difficulty for university lecturers who teach non-vocational students who are…

Clark, Alistair

2011-01-01

362

3 Ways to Increase Positive Emotions  

MedlinePLUS

... Topics Stress & Coping Center Writing a Paper Abusive Relationships Dynamic Stretching A Guy's Guide to Body Image 3 Ways to Increase Positive Emotions KidsHealth > Teens > Mind > Feelings & Emotions > 3 Ways to ...

363

Aging and skilled problem solving.  

PubMed

Information-processing models of problem solving too often are based on restrictive age ranges. On the other hand, gerontologists have investigated few problem-solving tasks and have rarely generated explicit models. As this article demonstrates, both fields can benefit by closer collaboration. One major issue in gerontology is whether aging is associated with irreversible decrement or developmental plasticity. If both processes occur, then an appropriate strategy for investigating aging is to equate age groups for molar problem-solving performance and search for differences in the underlying components. This strategy was adopted to examine the relation of age and skill to problem solving in chess. Chess players were selected to vary widely in age and skill such that these variables were uncorrelated. Problem-solving and memory tasks were administered. Skill level was the only significant predictor for accuracy in both a choose-a-move task and a speeded end-game evaluation task. Age (negatively) and skill (positively) jointly determined performance in an unexpected recall task. Efficient chunking in recall was positively related to skill, though negatively related to age. Recognition confidence, though not accuracy, was negatively related to age. Thus despite age-related declines in encoding and retrieval of information, older players match the problem-solving performance of equivalently skilled younger players. Apparently, they can search the problem space more efficiently, as evidenced by taking less time to select an equally good move. Models of chess skill that stress that role of encoding efficiency, as indexed by chunking in recall, need to be modified to account for performance over the life span. PMID:6453184

Charness, N

1981-03-01

364

Understanding recovery in children following traffic-related injuries: exploring acute traumatic stress reactions, child coping, and coping assistance.  

PubMed

Millions of children incur potentially traumatic physical injuries every year. Most children recover well from their injury but many go on to develop persistent traumatic stress reactions. This study aimed to describe children's coping and coping assistance (i.e., the ways in which parents and peers help children cope) strategies and to explore the association between coping and acute stress reactions following an injury. Children (N = 243) rated their acute traumatic stress reactions within one month of injury and reported on coping and coping assistance six months later. Parents completed a measure of coping assistance at the six-month assessment. Children used an average of five to six coping strategies (out of 10), with wishful thinking, social support, and distraction endorsed most frequently. Child coping was associated with parent and peer coping assistance strategies. Significant acute stress reactions were related to subsequent child use of coping strategies (distraction, social withdrawal, problem-solving, blaming others) and to child report of parent use of distraction (as a coping assistance strategy). Findings suggest that children's acute stress reactions may influence their selection of coping and coping assistance strategies. To best inform interventions, research is needed to examine change in coping behaviors and coping assistance over time, including potential bidirectional relationships between trauma reactions and coping. PMID:23677925

Marsac, Meghan L; Donlon, Katharine A; Hildenbrand, Aimee K; Winston, Flaura K; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

2014-04-01

365

A qualitative assessment of psychosocial impact, coping and adjustment in high-risk melanoma patients and caregivers.  

PubMed

The present study qualitatively assessed the psychosocial impacts experienced by stage III melanoma patients and caregivers throughout the course of the disease, and the coping responses they utilized in an attempt to promote psychosocial adjustment. The purpose of the study was to inform the development of a supportive care strategy for this population. Nineteen stage III melanoma patients and 14 of their caregivers were recruited from the clinical research database of the Melanoma Institute Australia. Data were collected using semistructured telephone interviews and analysed using thematic analysis. Participants reported psychosocial impacts related to diagnosis (shock, panic and devastation), treatment (challenges and unsatisfactory care, pain and limitation, practical impacts, new roles and responsibilities for the caregiver, caregiver inadequacy) and survivorship (ongoing physical problems, watchful waiting, feeling abandoned). They also reported global themes relevant to multiple phases of the disease (emotional distress, disfigurement, injustice, caregiver devaluation). Coping responses were identified related to diagnosis (avoidance), treatment (confidence in the treatment team, taking action) and survivorship (finding a positive meaning, acceptance and moving on) as well as global themes pertaining to multiple disease phases (receiving support, helpful thinking, putting on a brave face, redirecting attention, religion). The current findings support routine screening for the presence of symptoms and psychological distress and appropriate referral when necessary, and for provision of psychosocial interventions to provide information and support to stage III melanoma patients and caregivers. In addition, provision of communication skills training to all health professionals treating melanoma, use of evidence-based strategies for improving patient/caregiver understanding and recall, and routine assessment of patient-reported outcomes to inform clinical practice would be helpful. PMID:24584097

Tan, Jason D; Butow, Phyllis N; Boyle, Frances M; Saw, Robyn P M; O'Reilly, Amanda J

2014-06-01

366

Does spirituality as a coping mechanism help or hinder coping with chronic pain?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic pain is a complex experience stemming from the interrelationship among biological, psychological, social, and spiritual\\u000a factors. Many chronic pain patients use religious\\/spiritual forms of coping, such as prayer and spiritual support, to cope\\u000a with their pain. This article explores empirical research that illustrates how religion\\/spirituality may impact the experience\\u000a of pain and may help or hinder the coping process.

Amy B. Wachholtz; Michelle J. Pearce

2009-01-01

367

Want Positive Behavior? Use Positive Language  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Positive adult language is the professional use of words and tone of voice to enable students to learn in an engaged, active way. This includes learning social skills. To guide children toward choosing and maintaining positive behaviors, adults need to carefully choose the words and tone of voice used when speaking to them. Learning to use…

Wood, Chip; Freeman-Loftis, Babs

2012-01-01

368

Coping with Cancer in Everyday Life  

MedlinePLUS

... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Coping With Cancer in Everyday Life Download Printable Version [ ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

369

Coping Checklists for Patients and Caregivers  

MedlinePLUS

... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Coping Checklists for Patients and Caregivers These checklists can ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

370

Coping with Test Pain, Discomfort, and Anxiety  

MedlinePLUS

... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities PLEASE NOTE: Your web browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Unless you enable Javascript , your ... Coping with Test Pain, Discomfort, and Anxiety Share this page: Was ...

371

Recovery After Stroke: Coping with Emotions  

MedlinePLUS

Recovery After Stroke: Coping with Emotions Dealing with a flood of emotions can be hard for stroke ... your doctor, “Where am I on my stroke recovery journey? Note: This fact sheet is compiled from ...

372

The Importance of Nature in Coping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Ottosson, J. 2007. The importance of Nature in Coping. Acta Universitatis Agriculurae Sueciae. Doctoral Thesis No. 2007: 115 The aim of the present dissertation is to create a greater understanding of the importance of

Johan Ottosson

2007-01-01

373

Stress and Coping with Discrimination and Stigmatization  

PubMed Central

The aim of this article is to briefly review the literature on stigmatization and more generally identity threats, to focus more specifically of the way people appraise and cope with those threatening situations. Based on the transactional model of stress and coping of Lazarus and Folkman (1984), we propose a model of coping with identity threats that takes into accounts the principle characteristic of stigma, its devaluing aspect. We present a model with specific antecedents, a refined appraisal phase and a new classification of coping strategies based on the motives that may be elicited by the threatening situation, those of protecting and/or enhancing the personal and/or social identity. PMID:21713247

Berjot, Sophie; Gillet, Nicolas

2011-01-01

374

Locus of control, cognitive appraisal, and coping in stressful episodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigated locus of control and coping processes in relation to specific stressful episodes reported by 171 female student nurses. Scores of each of 3 measures (General Coping, Direct Coping, and Suppression) that were derived from the Ways of Coping Questionnaire were analyzed to examine the role of appraisal (in terms of the extent to which the situation was perceived as

Katharine R. Parkes

1984-01-01

375

Proactive and Preventive Coping in Adjustment to College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study compared the relative importance of proactive coping and preventive coping in the adjustment to university life among 403 freshmen at a Chinese university and evaluated the function of proactive coping in the stress process. Participants completed the Future-Oriented Coping Inventory (Gan, Yang, Zhou, & Zhang, 2007), the…

Gan, Yiqun; Hu, Yueqin; Zhang, Yiwen

2010-01-01

376

ATHLETICS & RECREATION Job Posting for WORK STUDY position  

E-print Network

. Skills: Communication, interpersonal, creative thinking skills are necessary. OtherATHLETICS & RECREATION Job Posting for WORK STUDY position Title exceptional interpersonal skills and have experience in presenting in front of large

Boonstra, Rudy

377

Psychological Distress and Coping amongst Higher Education Students: A Mixed Method Enquiry  

PubMed Central

Background Psychological distress among higher education students is of global concern. Students on programmes with practicum components such as nursing and teacher education are exposed to additional stressors which may further increase their risk for psychological distress. The ways in which these students cope with distress has potential consequences for their health and academic performance. An in-depth understanding of how nursing/midwifery and teacher education students experience psychological distress and coping is necessary to enable higher education providers to adequately support these students. Methods This mixed method study was employed to establish self-reported psychological distress (General Health Questionnaire), coping processes (Ways of Coping Questionnaire) and lifestyle behaviour (Lifestyle Behaviour Questionnaire) of a total sample (n?=?1557) of undergraduate nursing/midwifery and teacher education students in one university in Ireland. Individual interviews (n?=?59) provided an in-depth understanding of students experiences of psychological distress and coping. Results A significant percentage (41.9%) of respondents was psychologically distressed. The factors which contributed to their distress, included study, financial, living and social pressures. Students used varied coping strategies including seeking social support, problem solving and escape avoidance. The positive relationship between elevated psychological distress and escape avoidance behaviours including substance use (alcohol, tobacco and cannabis) and unhealthy diet is of particular concern. Statistically significant relationships were identified between “escape-avoidance” and gender, age, marital status, place of residence, programme/year of study and lifestyle behaviours such as diet, substance use and physical inactivity. Conclusion The paper adds to existing research by illuminating the psychological distress experienced by undergraduate nursing/midwifery and teacher education students. It also identifies their distress, maladaptive coping and the relationship to their lifestyle behaviours. The findings can inform strategies to minimise student distress and maladaptive coping during college and in future professional years. PMID:25506825

Deasy, Christine; Coughlan, Barry; Pironom, Julie; Jourdan, Didier; Mannix-McNamara, Patricia

2014-01-01

378

Non-technical skills in histopathology: definition and discussion.  

PubMed

Health care is a high-risk industry, with most documented adverse incidents being associated with 'human factors' including cognitive and social skills termed 'non-technical skills'. Non-technical skills complement the diagnostic and specialist skills and professional attributes required by medical practitioners, including histopathologists, and can enhance the quality of practice and delivery of health-care services and thus contribute to patient safety. This review aims to introduce histopathologists to non-technical skills and how these pertain to everyday histopathological practice. Drawing from other domains in medicine, specifically anaesthesia and surgery, a variety of non-technical skills are identified and described in the context of histopathology to illustrate the role each plays, often collectively, in daily practice. The generic non-technical skills are defined as situation awareness, decision-making, communication, teamwork, leadership, managing stress and coping with fatigue. Example scenarios from histopathology are presented and the contributions to outcomes made by non-technical skills are explained. Consideration of these specific non-technical skills as a component in histopathology training may benefit practitioners as well as assuring patient safety. PMID:21692830

Johnston, Peter W; Fioratou, Evie; Flin, Rhona

2011-09-01

379

Acquisition of cognitive skill  

Microsoft Academic Search

A framework for skill acquisition is proposed that includes two major stages in the development of a cognitive skill: a declarative stage in which facts about the skill domain are interpreted and a procedural stage in which the domain knowl- edge is directly embodied in procedures for performing the skill. This general framework has been instantiated in the ACT system

John R. Anderson

1982-01-01

380

Cooperative Group Performance in Graduate Research Methodology Courses: The Role of Study Coping and Examination-Taking Coping Strategies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study seeks to examine the extent to which cooperative group members' levels of coping strategies (study and examination-taking coping strategies) and the degree that heterogeneity (variability of study coping strategies and examination-taking coping strategies) predict cooperative groups' levels of achievement in research…

Jiao, Qun G.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

2013-01-01

381

Work factors and behavioural coping in relation to withdrawal from the labour force in patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To assess separate and combined effects of work factors and behavioural coping in relation to withdrawal from the labour force among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).?METHODS—A cross sectional study was conducted in a Dutch nationwide random sample of 720 patients with RA. Information about work factors and behavioural coping was collected by a self-administered postal questionnaire. A broad variety of work factors and coping styles were evaluated separately and in combination using multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for sociodemographic and disease related variables. Attributable and preventable fractions were calculated from the combined analyses to assess the relative importance of the contributing factors.?RESULTS—Additional job training, equal career opportunities, letting the disease influence the choice of the current job position, and informing colleagues about having the disease were negatively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. The most relevant factor in terms of decreasing the risk was adjusting job demands which accounted for 63% of the patients still in the labour force. Decreasing activities and diverting attention in order to cope with pain, and pacing in order to cope with limitations were the coping styles which were positively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. The most relevant factor in terms of increasing the risk of withdrawal was pacing which accounted for 67% of the withdrawals.?CONCLUSION—Work factors are potentially important modifiable risk factors for withdrawal from the labour force in patients with RA. Behavioural coping is also relevant.?? PMID:11602473

Chorus, A; Miedema, H; Wevers, C; van der Linden, S

2001-01-01

382

Acculturation and religious coping as moderators of the association between discrimination and depressive symptoms among Mexican-American vocational students.  

PubMed

Although perceived discrimination has been associated with depressive symptoms among Hispanic adults, not all individuals who report discrimination will report elevated levels of depression. This study examined whether acculturation and religious coping would moderate the association between past-year perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms in a sample of 247 Mexican-American post-secondary vocational students (59.6 % males; mean age = 26.81). Results from hierarchical regression analyses indicated that perceived discrimination, positive religious coping, and negative religious coping were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Further analyses indicated that positive religious coping moderated the perceived discrimination-depressive symptoms association. Students reporting using positive religious coping were protected from experiencing heightened levels of depressive symptoms when faced with discrimination. Acculturation was not directly associated with depressive symptoms nor did it function as a moderator. The salutary influences of positive religious coping for Mexican-American students are discussed. Study limitations and future directions for research are also discussed. PMID:24271112

Fernandez, Alejandra; Loukas, Alexandra

2014-12-01

383

HIV, wages, and the skill premium.  

PubMed

The HIV epidemic has dramatically decreased labor supply among prime-age adults in Sub-Saharan Africa. Using within-country variation in regional HIV prevalence and a synthetic panel, I find that HIV significantly increases the capital-labor ratio in urban manufacturing firms. The impact of HIV on average wages is positive but imprecisely estimated. In contrast, HIV has a large positive impact on the skill premium. The impact of HIV on the wages of low skilled workers is insignificantly different from 0, and is strongly dampened by competition from rural migrants. The HIV epidemic disproportionately increases the incomes of high-skilled survivors, thus increasing inequality. PMID:25019957

Marinescu, Ioana

2014-09-01

384

Parents' Skills and Children's Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research has suggested a positive intergenerational relationship between a parent's childhood cognitive skill level and their own children's skill levels. Yet we also know that individuals' skill levels change during childhood and into adulthood, not least as a result of their education, training and work experience. Thus parents' adult…

de Coulon, Augustin; Meschi, Elena; Vignoles, Anna

2011-01-01

385

Skills for Action. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Skills for Action," a program to build positive character values and life and citizenship skills for students in grades 9-12, includes classroom lessons and service learning. The program, with more than 100 lessons focused around 26 personal, social, and thinking skills, ranges from one semester to four years in length. Students explore personal…

What Works Clearinghouse, 2006

2006-01-01

386

Coping with war trauma and psychological distress among school-age Palestinian children.  

PubMed

This study investigated the long-term effects of the 2012 war on children's psychological distress in Gaza Strip. It was hypothesized that a) greater levels of exposure to war trauma would be associated with greater behavioral and emotional disorders, neuroticism, and PTSD symptoms; b) children who rely more on problem-focused coping will manifest less behavioral and emotional disorders, neuroticism, and PTSD symptoms whereas children who rely more on emotion-focused coping will manifest higher levels of behavioral and emotional disorders, neuroticism, and PTSD symptoms; and c) certain children's characteristics (i.e., age, gender, and family income) would be predictive of children's behavioral and emotional disorders, neuroticism, and PTSD. Participants were 205 males and females aged 9 to 16 years. Questionnaires were administered in an interview format with participants at schools. Results indicated that approximately 30 percent of the Palestinian children who were exposed to higher levels of war traumas have developed PTSD with excess risk for co-morbidity with other disorders such as emotional symptoms and neuroticism. The findings revealed that children with lower family income reported higher levels of emotion and behavioral disorders and neuroticism. While emotion-focused coping was positively associated with emotional and behavioral problems, neuroticism, and PTSD, problem-focused coping was negatively associated with neuroticism and PTSD. The clinical implications of these conclusions were discussed to formulate cognitive-behavioral coping interventions that can lead to positive outcomes in the posttrauma environment. PMID:25642655

Khamis, Vivian

2015-01-01

387

Combat health care providers and resiliency: adaptive coping mechanisms during and after deployment.  

PubMed

The purpose of this investigation was to understand the varied health care provider responses to traumas by identifying perceptions of control and self-efficacy, appraisal styles, and postevent coping strategies in active duty military nurses and physicians deployed to combat/terrorist regions. Twenty purposively sampled military health care providers completed a descriptive questionnaire, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a recorded semistructured interview that was later transcribed and content analyzed. Cognitive-behavioral determinants of healthy response to trauma were used to frame this descriptive interpretive study and to assist with developing a model for healthy adaptation in trauma-exposed health care providers. Participants felt they had the greatest control over their health care provider role in theater, and most expressed a belief that a sense of control and a sense of purpose were important to their coping. All used some form of social support to cope and many found calming activities that allowed for self-reflection to be helpful. Results from this analysis can be used to inform interventions and promote postevent coping behaviors that increase social support, strengthen important bonds, and enhance involvement in activities that elicit positive emotions. Health care providers experienced positive outcomes despite considerable traumatic exposure by using coping strategies that map closely to several principles of psychological first aid. This suggests a need to train all medical personnel in these concepts as they appear helpful in mitigating responses to the stress of combat-related exposures. PMID:23855421

Gibbons, Susanne W; Shafer, Michaela; Aramanda, Larry; Hickling, Edward J; Benedek, David M

2014-05-01

388

Managing Stress and Maintaining Well-Being: Social Support, Problem-Focused Coping, and Avoidant Coping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested a model that links stress, social support, problem-focused coping, and well-being. First, it looks at how high support significantly moderated the association between stress and well-being. Next, the students' problem-focused coping was seen as mediating this moderated association. Finally, a 3-way interaction of stress, social…

Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

2011-01-01

389

Development of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire 24, a Clinically Utilitarian Version of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To use principal-components analysis to obtain a shorter and therefore more clinically useful version of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ). Subjects: A British sample of 214 chronic back pain patients attending outpatient spinal assessment. Results: A 4-factor solution was discovered that incorporates Catastrophizing, Diversion, Cognitive Coping, and Reinterpreting factors. Apart from the absence of a Praying and Hoping factor,

Nicholas J. Harland; Karen Georgieff

2003-01-01

390

Position Announcement Weather Decision Technologies, Inc.  

E-print Network

systems Strong organizational skills and able to use critical thinking to identify objectivesPosition Announcement Weather Decision Technologies, Inc. Norman, OK Senior Meteorological Software data Basic web programming (HTML, CGI, etc.) Salary will be commensurate with the knowledge, skills

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

391

Transfer of motor and perceptual skills from basketball to darts  

PubMed Central

The quiet eye is a perceptual skill associated with expertise and superior performance; however, little is known about the transfer of quiet eye across domains. We attempted to replicate previous skill-based differences in quiet eye and investigated whether transfer of motor and perceptual skills occurs between similar tasks. Throwing accuracy and quiet eye duration for skilled and less-skilled basketball players were examined in basketball free throw shooting and the transfer task of dart throwing. Skilled basketball players showed significantly higher throwing accuracy and longer quiet eye duration in the basketball free throw task compared to their less-skilled counterparts. Further, skilled basketball players showed positive transfer from basketball to dart throwing in accuracy but not in quiet eye duration. Our results raise interesting questions regarding the measurement of transfer between skills. PMID:24062703

Rienhoff, Rebecca; Hopwood, Melissa J.; Fischer, Lennart; Strauss, Bernd; Baker, Joseph; Schorer, Jörg

2013-01-01

392

Skill training versus 12-step facilitation for parents of substance-abusing teens.  

PubMed

Distressed parents (N=85) with a substance-abusing adolescent not receiving treatment were randomized to 12 weeks of coping skill training (CST), 12-step facilitation (TSF), or delayed treatment control (DTC). At the end of treatment/delay, CST showed greater coping skillfulness than TSF, and both CST and TSF were more skillful than DTC. The percentage of parent problem days (PPD)-days when the adolescent's substance use caused a problem-also was reduced in CST and TSF, relative to DTC. Both CST and TSF reported significantly reduced monthly PPD by the end of a 12-month follow-up. Skill training and TSF interventions appear equally effective for this underserved parent population. PMID:25306932

McGillicuddy, Neil B; Rychtarik, Robert G; Papandonatos, George D

2015-03-01

393

Cognitive Therapy Skills Predict Cognitive Reactivity to Sad Mood Following Cognitive Therapy for Depression  

PubMed Central

Both patients’ competence in the coping skills taught in Cognitive Therapy (CT) and patients’ endorsement of dysfunctional cognitions following a sad mood induction (i.e., their cognitive reactivity) have been found to predict risk of relapse following a successful course of CT for depression. We examined the relationship between these constructs, specifically whether CT skills would be related to less cognitive reactivity following a mood induction among patients who responded to a course of CT. In a sample of 28 depressed patients, post-treatment CT skills were significantly related to less cognitive reactivity in response to a sad mood induction procedure (? = ?.29). This relation was not accounted for by individual differences in mood reactivity. We discuss these findings as a key step in developing a more complete understanding of the role of CT coping skills and cognitive reactivity as markers of patients’ vulnerability to relapse. PMID:24363473

Strunk, Daniel R.; Adler, Abby D.; Hollars, Shannon N.

2013-01-01

394

Coping with Workplace Interpersonal Stress among Japanese Employees.  

PubMed

The current study examined the relationship between coping with workplace interpersonal stress (WIS) and psychological dysfunction (i.e. depressive symptoms, burnout, general distress and daytime sleepiness). Three hundred twenty-four Japanese full-time workers completed measures assessing coping strategies with WIS and psychological dysfunction. Three strategies of coping with WIS were measured: distancing coping, reassessing coping and constructive coping. Multiple regression analyses revealed that distancing coping, which reflects strategies to actively damage, disrupt and dissolve a stressful relationship, was related to high levels of depressive symptoms, burnout, general distress and daytime sleepiness. Reassessing coping, which incorporates efforts to patiently wait for an appropriate opportunity to act, such as a change or improvement in the situation, was related to low levels of depressive symptoms, burnout, general distress and daytime sleepiness. Constructive coping was not significantly associated with psychological dysfunction. Implications for workplace stress are discussed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24639236

Kato, Tsukasa

2014-03-18

395

Do Religious Coping Styles Moderate or Mediate the External and Internalized Racism-Distress Links?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the potential moderating and mediating roles of positive and negative religious coping styles in the relationship between external and internalized racism and African American persons' psychological distress. Participants included 269 African Americans who completed a web-based Internet survey. Results…

Szymanski, Dawn M.; Obiri, Oluwafunmilayo

2011-01-01

396

A Longitudinal Examination of Latino Adolescents' Ethnic Identity, Coping with Discrimination, and Self-Esteem  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current longitudinal study tested the premise that Latino adolescents' (N = 323) proactive coping with discrimination would mediate the relationship between ethnic identity and self-esteem. Each component of ethnic identity (i.e., exploration, resolution, and affirmation) was positively associated with concurrent assessments of adolescents'…

Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino; Garcia, Cristal D.; Gonzales-Backen, Melinda

2008-01-01

397

Predicting Occupational Strain and Job Satisfaction: The Role of Stress, Coping, Personality, and Affectivity Variables.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two studies showed that positive and negative affectivity influenced occupational stress, role strain, and coping. Study 3 added job satisfaction to the model, strengthening its predictive validity. Study 4's addition of personality measures did not improve prediction of job satisfaction and strain. (SK)

Fogarty, Gerard J.; Machin, M. Anthony; Albion, Majella J.; Sutherland, Lynette F.; Lalor, Gabrielle I.; Revitt, Susan

1999-01-01

398

Coping with negative media content: The experiences of professional football goalkeepers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study explored the experiences of three football goalkeepers coping with negative media coverage. Goalkeeping is a hard position to play as you become scrutinized from all angles, and keepers are often blamed for losses by the media. The study of the media as a stressor is a relatively unexplored field. In this investigation, we chose qualitative semi-structured interviews

E. Kristiansen; G. C. Roberts; M. K. Sisjord

2011-01-01

399

Survival Skills: A Basic Skills Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide describes an approach designed to promote the basic skills of hearing impaired students Basic or survival skills are identified which cover the student's daily functioning at home, school, and in the community. The guide is aimed at the 10-15 year old hearing impaired student, but techniques are expected to be applicable to both…

Mahoney, Don

400

Teaching communication skills: beyond wishful thinking.  

PubMed

Communication skills tend to decline with time unless they are regularly recalled and practiced. However, most medical schools still deliver clinical communication training only during pre-clinical years although the clinical environment is considered to be ideal for acquiring and teaching clinical communication. The aim of this article is to review the barriers that prevent communication skills teaching and training from occurring in clinical practice and describe strategies that may help enhance such activities. Barriers occur at several levels: students, junior doctors and clinical supervisors sometimes have negative attitudes towards communication training; structured training in communication skills is often insufficient; clinical supervisors behave as poor role models and lack effective communication and teaching skills; finally, there are organisational constraints such as lack of time, competing priorities, weak hierarchy support and lack of positive incentives for using, training or teaching good communication skills in clinical practice. Given the difficulty of assessing transfer of communication skills in practice, only few studies describe successful educational interventions. In order to optimise communication skills learning in practice, there is need to: (1.) modify the climate and structure of the working environment so that that use, training and teaching of good communication skills in clinical practice becomes valued, supported and rewarded; (2.) extend communication skills training to any field of medicine; (3.) provide regular structured trainings and tailor them to trainees' needs. Practical implications of such findings are discussed at the end of this review. PMID:25664624

Junod Perron, Noelle; Sommer, Johanna; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Nendaz, Mathieu

2015-01-01

401

Distinct coping strategies differentially predict urge levels and lapses in a smoking cessation attempt.  

PubMed

This study analysed mechanisms through which stress-coping and temptation-coping strategies were associated with lapses. Furthermore, we explored whether distinct coping strategies differentially predicted reduced lapse risk, lower urge levels, or a weaker association between urge levels and lapses during the first week of an unassisted smoking cessation attempt. Participants were recruited via the internet and mass media in Switzerland. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) with mobile devices was used to assess urge levels and lapses. Online questionnaires were used to measure smoking behaviours and coping variables at baseline, as well as smoking behaviour at the three-month follow-up. The sample consisted of 243 individuals, aged 20 to 40, who reported 4199 observations. Findings of multilevel regression analyses show that coping was mainly associated with a reduced lapse risk and not with lower urge levels or a weaker association between urge levels and lapses. 'Calming down' and 'commitment to change' predicted a lower lapse risk and also a weaker relation between urge levels and lapses. 'Stimulus control' predicted a lower lapse risk and lower urge levels. Conversely, 'task-orientation' and 'risk assessment' were related to higher lapse risk and 'risk assessment' also to higher urge levels. Disengagement coping i.e. 'eating or shopping', 'distraction', and 'mobilising social support' did not affect lapse risk. Promising coping strategies during the initial stage of smoking cessation attempt are targeted directly at reducing the lapse risk and are characterised by engagement with the stressor or one's reactions towards the stressor and a focus on positive consequences instead of health risks. PMID:23501139

Brodbeck, Jeannette; Bachmann, Monica S; Znoj, Hansjörg

2013-06-01

402

A mixed methods assessment of coping with pediatric cancer  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to describe child coping and parent coping assistance with cancer-related stressors during treatment. Fifteen children (aged 6-12) with cancer and their parents (N = 17) completed semi-structured interviews and self-report measures to assess coping and coping assistance. Results suggest families utilized a broad array of approach and avoidance strategies to manage cancer and its treatment. Quantitative and qualitative assessments provided complementary and unique contributions to understanding coping among children with cancer and their parents. Using a mixed methods approach to assess coping provides a richer understanding of families’ experiences, which can better inform clinical practice. PMID:24428250

Alderfer, Melissa A.; Deatrick, Janet A.; Marsac, Meghan L.

2014-01-01

403

Coping strategies, quality of life and pain in women with breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among Iranian women and is a significant stressor in women's life that may affect their coping strategies and quality of life. This study aimed to investigate coping strategies, quality of life and pain of women with breast cancer. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study which held in Seyed-AL shohada hospital and two private offices in Isfahan, Iran. Target population was women with confirmed diagnosis of breast cancer in a recent year and between 18 and 60 years old. Data were collected via3 questionnaires (Brief cope, EORTC QLQ-C30 and Brief pain Inventory). The reliability and validity of these questionnaires were confirmed in different studies. Sixty-two patients completed the questionnaires. Analysis included descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient and t-test where necessary. All analysis were conducted using the SPSS version 16.0 and P-value of less than 0.05 considered as statistically significant. Results: Sixty-two women with breast cancer completed questionnaires. The mean age of respondents was 45/81±6/78 years; most married (93/5%), high school-educated (41/97%), house wife (82/3%) and stage II (46/8%). The most common coping strategies were religion, acceptance, self-distraction, planning, active coping, positive reframing and denial. Mean score for the worst pain during the past 24 hours was 6/24 ± 2/55 and for the least pain was 3/19 ± 2/17. The global health scale was 60.34 ± 21.10. Emotion-focused coping strategies were positively and significantly related to symptom aspect of quality of life (r = 0/43 P ? 0/01) and affective interference of pain (r = 0/36 P = 0/004) and also was inversely correlated to functional health status (r = ?0/38 P = 0/002). There was no significant correlation between problem-focused coping strategies and dimensions of quality of life and also different aspects of pain. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicated that the care of breast cancer should address physical, psychological and social wellbeing and the findings point to the importance of taking individual coping strategies into account when evaluating the impact of breast cancer on psychosocial wellbeing. Description of coping strategies might be useful for identifying patients in need to particular counseling and support. PMID:23983738

Khalili, Narjes; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Mokarian, Fariborz; Bahrami, Fatemeh

2013-01-01

404

Nonreligious coping and religious coping as predictors of expressed emotion in relatives of patients with schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Expressed emotion (EE) is a measure of the amount of criticism and emotional over involvement expressed by a key relative towards a relative with a disorder or illness (Hooley, 2007). Research has established that living in a high EE environment, which is characterized by increased levels of critical and emotionally exaggerated communication, leads to a poorer prognosis for patients with a mental illness when compared to low EE environments. Despite evidence that EE is a strong predictor of course of illness, there continue to be questions concerning why some family members express excessive levels of high EE attitudes about their mentally ill relatives while others do not. Based on indirect evidence from previous research, the current study tested whether religious and nonreligious coping serve as predictors of EE. A sample of 72 family members of patients with schizophrenia completed an EE interview, along with questionnaires assessing situational nonreligious coping and religious coping. In line with hypotheses, results indicated that nonreligious coping predicted EE. Specifically, less use of adaptive emotion-focused coping predicted high EE. Also consistent with predictions, maladaptive religious coping predicted high EE above and beyond nonreligious coping. PMID:23393424

Wasserman, Stephanie; Weisman, Amy; Suro, Giulia

2012-01-01

405

Customer service skills for survival.  

PubMed

As APICS practitioners, we all must share a common goal. How can we contribute to our company's success? Success can be measured in positive terms of market share, growth, profitability, return on investment, or some combination thereof. Each company must establish its own definition of success. For the purposes of this article, success will be equated to one word that we can all readily identify with: survival. What skills do we need to survive in the marketplace of the next millennium? PMID:10623133

McAtee, L F

1999-11-01

406

Can the NHS cope in future?  

PubMed Central

Four potential pressures are likely to determine whether the NHS will be able to cope in future: the change in population structure, changes in level of morbidity, introduction of new technologies, and increasing expectations of patients and NHS providers. New technology and changes in expectations are likely to have the biggest effect and are also the most difficult to quantify. Nevertheless, these pressures are to some extent amenable to control. If the growth in funding continues as it has in the past there is no convincing evidence that the NHS will not continue to cope. PMID:9006479

Harrison, A.; Dixon, J.; New, B.; Judge, K.

1997-01-01

407

A structural model of the relationships among stress, coping, benefit-finding and quality of life in persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer.  

PubMed

This study has used the structural equation modelling to examine the role of benefit-finding (BF) in the context of the stress and coping model. In the study, 1276 individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer completed a written questionnaire and telephone interview at around 4.5 months (on average) and 12 months post-diagnosis. Analyses revealed that the final model fit the data, where stress, coping and BF accounted for 63% of the variance in Time 1 quality of life (QOL). Threat appraisal, coping resources, avoidant coping and BF directly impacted on Time 1 QOL, while threat appraisal, social support and approach coping directly impacted on BF. Approach coping and BF had differential relationships with stress, coping resources and outcomes, indicating that BF may not be a meaning-based coping strategy, as proposed by Folkman [Folkman, S. (1997). Positive psychological states and coping with severe stress. Social Science and Medicine, 45, 1207–1221]. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:21391134

Rinaldis, Machelle; Pakenham, Kenneth I; Lynch, Brigid M

2012-01-01

408

Global Skill Shortages.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book discusses the causes and impact of global skill shortages, focusing on data from skill shortages measured in the period 1995-1998 in 19 developed and emerging economies. Chapter one contains a brief introduction. Chapter two is a review of theoretical literature on skill shortages, including static and dynamic shortages, efficiency wage…

Cohen, Malcolm S.; Zaidi, Mahmood A.

409

The Michigan Essential Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication lists skill expectations in ten curriculum areas for grades 1-9. Although intended to be used by educators in Michigan, the skill list can be used or adapted by educators in other states. The ten curriculum areas are: communication skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening); health education; mathematics; music; physical…

Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

410

Entry Skills for BSNs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Continuing Education for Consensus on Entry Skills project, designed to bring the expectations of nursing service and nursing education closer on entry-level competencies of new baccalaureate graduates. Discusses teaching and collaboration skills, planning and evaluation of patient care skills, interpersonal relations/communication…

Stull, Mary K.

1986-01-01

411

Enhancing Employee Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains four symposium papers on enhancing employee skills. "The Effect of Study Skills Training Intervention on United States Air Force Aeromedical Apprentices" (John C. Griffith) demonstrates how study skills intervention resulted in a significant increase in the end-of-course scores of a sample of 90 randomly selected Air Force…

1999

412

Teaching Organizational Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Kerr and Zigmond (1986) found that 67 percent of all high school teachers surveyed viewed organizational skills as crucial for student success in school. How can teachers get their students to agree? One way is to teach organizational skills just as they would teach writing or computation skills. Explain and demonstrate what students are to do,…

Bakunas, Boris; Holley, William

2004-01-01

413

School Leadership Skill Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between what is currently understood about skills for school leadership and the need for a greater understanding of those skills. The importance of developing leadership skills to improve school performance and effectiveness is great. In the field of school leadership, most leaders…

Weigel, Richard A.

2013-01-01

414

A systematic review of genetic influences on coping.  

PubMed

Coping refers to the way that an individual manages stress. Coping strategies vary; for example, problem-focused coping is directed at reducing or removing a stressor, while emotion-focused coping is directed more at managing reactions that accompany the stressor. How individuals cope with stress can impact their health, but the physiological effects of coping are not well understood. The field of genetics provides tools that could help illuminate the physiology of coping. This review of the literature was conducted to determine what is currently known about the phenotype of coping from a genetic perspective. PubMed, HubMed, PsychInfo, Medline, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases were used to conduct the search, and reference lists were reviewed to identify additional publications. Only studies that measured coping style or a coping domain specifically, were written in English language, and were human-subject focused were included in the review. We identified 19 studies that met these criteria, and 2 types of genetic studies emerged for the review: heritability (n = 9) and candidate gene association (n = 10) studies. Heritability estimates of .68-.76 support a nonadditive genetic component to coping. Replication of association was found for the serotonin transporter and adrenergic receptor beta 2 genes. In addition to finding evidence supporting a role for genetic variability with coping phenotype, it is worth noting that the review revealed a lack of consistency in instruments used to phenotype coping across studies. PMID:25504954

Dunn, Sandra H; Conley, Yvette P

2015-01-01

415

Social skills training and negative symptoms.  

PubMed

Schizophrenic patients with severe negative symptoms may have an impaired capacity to benefit from social skills training (SST), and their negative symptoms may show little change as a result of SST. The present study, employing a multiple-baseline design across-behaviors with three patients who had prominent negative schizophrenic symptoms, combined nonverbal skills training with the Stacking the Deck social skills game. Further, the study examined changes in both social skills (assessed using role-play and conversation tests) and negative symptoms. Depression, extrapyramidal side effects, and positive symptoms were also monitored. Modest improvements in social skills and negative symptoms were achieved. There was little evidence of a training effect. The unstable baselines may have contributed to this finding. It is important for further research to employ comprehensive patient-assessment procedures. PMID:1540123

Matousek, N; Edwards, J; Jackson, H J; Rudd, R P; McMurray, N E

1992-01-01

416

Depression and Interpersonal Problems in Adolescents: Their Relationship With Alexithymia and Coping Styles  

PubMed Central

Objective: The aim of the present research was to determine whether depression and interpersonal problems had relationships with alexithymia and coping styles in adolescents. Methods: The study population was randomly selected from all of the adolescent students in the schools of Sari in Iran; 441 adolescents (228 boys and 213 girls) were included in the study. The participants completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics and was expressed in means, standard deviations, and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Alexithymia was related to depression and interpersonal problems; the adolescents who defined themselves as more alexithymic obtained higher scores in depression and interpersonal problems than the adolescents who classified themselves as less- and non-alexithymic. Furthermore, coping styles were related to depression and interpersonal problems. Regression analyses showed that both alexithymia and coping styles accounted for a unique and significant proportion of the variance in depression and interpersonal problems in adolescents. Conclusion: These findings support the positive correlation of alexithymia and maladaptive coping styles with depression and interpersonal problems. PMID:25798172

Talebi Joybari, Masoud

2014-01-01

417

Healthcare Provider and Parent Behavior and Children’s Coping and Distress at Anesthesia Induction  

PubMed Central

Background To date, no study has evaluated the impact of specific healthcare provider and parent behaviors on children’s distress during anesthesia induction. Method Extensive digital video data were collected on 293, 2 to 10 year old children undergoing anesthesia induction with a parent present. Anesthesiologist, nurse, and parent behavior and children’s distress and coping were coded using the Revised Preoperative Child-Adult Medical Procedure Interaction Scale administered using specialized coding software. Results Anesthesiologists and parents engaged in higher rates of most behaviors than nurses. Overall, adult emotion-focused behavior such as Empathy and Reassurance was significantly positively related to children’s distress and negatively related to children’s coping behaviors. Adult distracting behavior such as humor and distracting talk showed the opposite pattern. Medical reinterpretation by anesthesiologists was significantly positively related to children’s coping behaviors, but the same behavior by parents was significantly positively related to children’s distress. Conclusions The data presented here provide evidence for a relation between adult behaviors and children’s distress and coping at anesthesia induction. These behaviors are trainable and hence it is possible to test if modifying physician behavior can influence child behavior in future studies. PMID:19934874

Chorney, Jill MacLaren; Torrey, Carrie; Blount, Ronald; McLaren, Christine; Chen, Wen-Pin; Kain, Zeev

2009-01-01

418

Assessment of Perceptual Motor Skills Contribution to Psycho-Evaluation: Unit 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to (Koppitz, 1975) manual suggests, "the use of the BVMGT is a rough test of intelligence. The BVMGT is not an intelligence test but a measure of a child's skill in coping geometric designs. It provides a very limited sample of behavior. Although perceptual motor development has emerged as a very important instrument for the development…

Peabody, Albert D. Jr.

2005-01-01

419

Students' Argumentative Writing Skills in Science and First-Language Education: Commonalities and Differences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability to build arguments is a crucial skill and a central educational goal in all school subjects including science as it enables students to formulate reasoned opinions and thus to cope with the increasing complexity of knowledge. In the present cross-sectional study, we examined the domain-specificity of argumentative writing in science by…

Heitmann, Patricia; Hecht, Martin; Schwanewedel, Julia; Schipolowski, Stefan

2014-01-01

420

Teaching Thinking Skills in Context-Based Learning: Teachers' Challenges and Assessment Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For an educational reform to succeed, teachers need to adjust their perceptions to the reform's new curricula and strategies and cope with new content, as well as new teaching and assessment strategies. Developing students' scientific literacy through context-based chemistry and higher order thinking skills was the framework for establishing a new…

Avargil, Shirly; Herscovitz, Orit; Dori, Yehudit Judy

2012-01-01

421

School Power: Study Skill Strategies for Succeeding in School. Revised and Updated Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This self-help book is aimed at middle school students who are learning to cope with different teachers' styles and rules, as well as learning how to follow a schedule. It provides tips, techniques, and strategies on how to read faster; take better notes in class; become a better writer; improve study skills; and ways to ask for help when needed.…

Schumm, Jeanne Shay

422

The Development of a Sport-Based Life Skills Scale for Youth to Young Adults, 11-23 Years of Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to develop a sport-based life skills scale that assesses 20 life skills: goal setting, time management, communication, coping, problem solving, leadership, critical thinking, teamwork, self-discipline, decision making, planning, organizing, resiliency, motivation, emotional control, patience, assertiveness, empathy,…

Cauthen, Hillary Ayn

2013-01-01

423

Anxiety about Violence Tips on Coping Events can occur at home or at work which disrupt your usual feelings of safety and security.  

E-print Network

Anxiety about Violence ­ Tips on Coping Events can occur at home or at work which disrupt your management activities: exercise, play or watch sports, engage in your hobbies. 9) Use positive images to form

Subramanian, Venkat

424

Coping with Continued Stress: The Gulf Oil Spill Disaster  

MedlinePLUS

... problems increases, including anger, shame, depression, substance abuse, domestic violence and even suicide. Example of the oil stranded ... Health: Information on Coping with Traumatic Events Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Violence and Disasters: What Parents Can Do Helping Children ...

425

Adolescent Involvement in Extracurricular Activities: Influences on Leadership Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study examined adolescents' participation in sports, school, and community extracurricular activities to assess the influence of different involvement roles and adult support on leadership skills. The study found that males and females who perceived their adult support more positively had more positive perceptions of their leadership skills.…

Hancock, Donna; Dyk, Patricia Hyjer; Jones, Kenneth

2012-01-01

426

From goal motivation to goal progress: the mediating role of coping in the Self-Concordance Model.  

PubMed

The present studies examined the mediating role of self-regulatory mechanisms in the relationship between goal motivation and goal progress in the Self-Concordance Model. First, a systematic review, using meta-analytical path analysis, supported the mediating role of effort and action planning in the positive association between autonomous goal motivation and goal progress. Second, results from two additional empirical studies, using structural equation modeling, lent credence to the mediating role of coping in the relationship between goal motivation and goal progress of university students. Autonomous goal motivation was positively associated with task-oriented coping, which predicted greater goal progress during midterm exams (Study 1, N=702) and at the end of the semester in a different sample (Study 2, N=167). Controlled goal motivation was associated with greater disengagement-oriented coping (Study 1 and Study 2) and lesser use of task-oriented coping (Study 2), which reduced goal progress. These results held up after controlling for perceived stress (Study 2). Our findings highlight the importance of coping in the "inception-to-attainment" goal process because autonomous goal motivation indirectly rather than directly predicts goal progress of university students through their usage of task-oriented coping. PMID:22092003

Gaudreau, Patrick; Carraro, Natasha; Miranda, Dave

2012-01-01

427

Marital adjustment in families of young children with disabilities: associations with daily hassles and problem-focused coping.  

PubMed

A family systems framework was used to examine associations between stressors/hassles, problem-focused coping, and marital adjustment in 67 families of young children with disabilities. Most of the couples were experiencing average to above average marital adjustment. When daily stressors/hassles were higher, husbands and wives viewed their marriages more negatively. After variance contributed by stressors/hassles was statistically controlled, fathers who employed more problem-focused coping strategies were more positive about their marriages. For wives (but not husbands), a cross-spousal partner effect was found; women reported higher marital adjustment when their husbands employed more problem-focused coping strategies. We reaffirmed the systemic nature of family processes and highlighted the role of parent gender in understanding the relationships among stressors, coping, and marital well-being. PMID:16332152

Gavidia-Payne, Susana; Stoneman, Zolinda

2006-01-01

428

Coping with the Experience of Rape  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The coping strategies that a victim of a rape engages in can have a strong impact on the development and persistence of psychological symptoms. Research provides evidence that victims who rely heavily on avoidance strategies, such as suppression, are less likely to recover successfully than those who rely less heavily on these strategies. The…

Littleton, Heather; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki

2006-01-01

429

Stress in College Athletics: Causes, Consequences, Coping.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book addresses the causes and consequences of stress in college sports and offers effective coping mechanisms to help individuals understand and control stressors and emotions in their environment. The chapters are: (1) "Understanding Stress"; (2) "Perceptions of Stress in College Athletics"; (3) "Stress among College Athletes"; (4) "Stress…

Humphrey, James H.; Yow, Deborah A.; Bowden, William W.

430

Abortion work: strains, coping strategies, policy implications.  

PubMed

As a result of the moral and social conflicts surrounding abortion, workers involved in counseling potential abortion recipients are subject to certain strains. The author uses observations made at one abortion clinic to support her conclusion that these strains, as well as the methods of coping developed by staff and administration, must be considered in formulating any policy on abortion. PMID:10244755

Joffe, C

1979-11-01

431

Process of Coping with Radiation Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluated ability of self-regulation and emotional-drive theories to explain effects of informational intervention entailing objective descriptions of experience on outcomes of coping with radiation therapy among 84 men with prostate cancer. Consistent with self-regulation theory, similarity between expectations and experience and degree of…

Johnson, Jean E.; And Others

1989-01-01

432

The myths of coping with loss  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing from theory and clinical lore, we consider how individuals are assumed to cope following irrevocable loss. Several assumptions are reviewed reflecting beliefs concerning the grieving process. Specifically, we examine the expectation that depression is inevitable following loss; that distress is necessary, and failure to experience it is indicative of pathology; that it is necessary to \\

Camille B. Wortman; Roxane Cohen Silver

1989-01-01

433

Strengths for Coping with Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maltreatment in the family occurs through a variety of forms of abuse and neglect. These risks are particularly prevalent in families with parents who abuse substances. The author describes connections between parental addiction and coping behaviors used by the children in these high-risk families. Strength-based strategies enable these youth to…

Chambers, Jamie C.

2005-01-01

434

Relapse Crises and Coping among Dieters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined situational antecedents of dieting relapse crises and dieters'attempts to cope with temptations to overeat among obese type II diabetics (N=57). Found three categories of relapse crises: mealtime, low-arousal, and emotional upset situations. Found upset situations most frequently produced negative outcome while strong cognitive and…

Grilo, Carlos M.; And Others

1989-01-01

435

Personality, coping patterns, and aggression in piglets  

Microsoft Academic Search

To search for a pattern of behaviour similar to the one found for active and passive coping strategies in rodents, we tested piglets in a series of different tests. One of the tests was a restraint test previously used by Hessing et al. (1993a,b). In this test the piglet was turned on its back and held there for 1 min

B. Forkman; I. L. Furuhaug; P. Jensen

1995-01-01

436

Coping with Loneliness among the Terminally Ill  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Loneliness is a universal phenomenon, and its pain is intensified by a diagnosis of a terminal illness. The present study is an investigation of the strategies used by patients with Multiple sclerosis (MS), by individuals diagnosed with cancer, and by the general population to cope with loneliness. Three hundred and twenty nine MS patients, 315…

Rokach, Ami

2007-01-01

437

Coping Attitudes toward Personal Suffering among Retirees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although some researchers have distinguished the concepts of pain and suffering and despite the recent rise of many centers for pain management in the United States, medical educators and practitioners have given little attention to the topic of suffering. In the studies which have been conducted, patients differed in styles of coping with and…

Foley, Daniel P.

438

Coping with Chronic Pain: Assessing Narrative Approaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a project developed to gain understanding of the experiences of people suffering from a chronic pain condition with no visible symptoms. Results suggest that narrative approaches helped participants find their own strengths and means of coping and helped them find identities other than as patients. (RJM)

Kelley, Patricia; Clifford, Patrick

1997-01-01

439

Early Childhood Teachers Coping with Educational Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a study of early childhood teachers' (educators of children aged four - eight years in school settings) perceptions of key factors which impact on their ability to cope with the implementation of mandated educational change in the workplace. Using qualitative methodology including surveys, focus groups and in-depth interviews,…

Kilgallon, Pam; Maloney, Carmel; Lock, Graeme

2008-01-01

440

A Theoretical Perspective on Coping with Stigma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses existing theory and research on general stress and coping responses to describe responses to stigma-related stressors and discuss the adaptiveness of these responses. Research suggests that different stressors evoke different responses from different individuals. Stigmatized people have different life experiences than nonstigmatized people,…

Miller, Carol T.; Kaiser, Cheryl R.

2001-01-01

441

Suppressor Effects of Coping Strategies on Resilience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the current study is to demonstrate a significant suppressor effect among coping strategies on resilience. Two different samples were used to replicate the suppressor effect. Participants in the first example were 391 adolescents (middle school students) in Korea, and participants in the second example were 282 young adults…

Yoon, Jae ho; Lee, Ji hae; Lee, Chae Yeon; Cho, Minhee; Lee, Sang Min

2014-01-01

442

Empowering Children to Cope with Teasing  

MedlinePLUS

... child cope with name-calling, ridicule, and verbal bullying by Judy S. Freedman • Bullies are a Pain in the Brain by Trevor ... vol. 1 by Erin McCoy • How to Handle Bullies, Teasers and other Meanies: A book that takes ...

443

Working Together: Coping with College Politics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggestions are made for creating healthy working relationships within a college administration and for improving the administrator's ability to cope with college politics. After introductory material examining the difficulty some educators, especially women, experience in utilizing power and politics to achieve desired goals, the report discusses…

Reisser, Linda

444

Coping with uncertainties of mercury regulation  

SciTech Connect

The thermometer is rising as coal-fired plants cope with the uncertainties of mercury regulation. The paper deals with a diagnosis and a suggested cure. It describes the state of mercury emission rules in the different US states, many of which had laws or rules in place before the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) was promulgated.

Reich, K. [Wolf-Block, Boston, MA (United States)

2006-09-15

445

Coping with Childhood Asthma: Caretakers' Views.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pilot study of 23 caretakers of African American and Hispanic school-aged children with asthma explored effects of asthma on families and coping strategies of caretakers. Found large and significant correlations between perceived impact in areas of financial burden, social and familial isolation, and personal strain. Caretakers reported using…

Mailick, Mildred D.; And Others

1994-01-01

446

Healing Art: Young Children Coping With Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Helping young children to cope with stress plays a vital role in today's classroom. It is normal for children to experience stress, which comes from pressures such as family, friends, and school. Some of the indicators of stress in young children are behavioral changes (e.g., mood swings, changes in sleep patterns, and incontinence) and physical…

Hale, Judy Ann

447

Stress and Coping Activity: Reframing Negative Thoughts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stress management and coping techniques are not only relevant in many psychology courses but also personally relevant for undergraduate students. In this article, the authors describe an activity designed to provide students with practice evaluating and challenging negative self-talk. Students responded to scenarios individually, were paired with…

Hughes, Jamie S.; Gourley, Mary K.; Madson, Laura; Le Blanc, Katya

2011-01-01

448

A developmental approach to coping with divorce  

Microsoft Academic Search

The engagement?disengagement process is a common developmental phenomena in life events. In divorce adults and children must disengage from one life style and engage again, with a new direction and focus. In coping with the life change precipitated by a divorce a three step process of re?engagement is proposed, and the clinician's role in facilitating this process is discussed. In

Eric Dlugokinski

1977-01-01

449

Drug Withdrawal and Coping with Loneliness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Loneliness is a prevailing experience which is particularly familiar to adolescents and young adults. It is a subjective experience which is influenced by one's personality, life experiences, and situational variables. The present study examined the influence of drug cessation on coping with loneliness. Drug abusers, during their stay in detox…

Rokach, Ami

2005-01-01

450

Maternal coping styles and adjustment in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive examination of children's social-emotional adjustment as related to maternal coping styles was performed. Subjects were 186 black mothers from lower-income families, and their children who were enrolled in the Detroit Public Schools Area F, Title I Preschool Program. Maternal nurturant and restrictive child rearing practices, life stress, locus of control and marital status were evaluated with respect to

Jana G. Atlas; Annette U. Rickel

1988-01-01

451

Coping with Drought on Rangelands: Concluding Remarks  

E-print Network

Coping with Drought on Rangelands: Concluding Remarks & Needed Directions K.M. Havstad #12;Summary Point #1 · "YIKES!" From Gary McManus regarding the current drought in Oklahoma · Expand on 2 key points regarding the past and the future #12;Palmer Drought Severity Index % of months in severe and extreme

452

Coping with Stress during Infectious Disease Outbreaks  

MedlinePLUS

· 1 Coping With Stress During Infectious Disease Outbreaks What You Should Know When you hear, read, or watch news about an outbreak of ... you may feel anxious and show signs of stress—even when the outbreak affects people far from ...

453

Coping with Unexpected Events: Depression and Trauma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Witnessing or experiencing a traumatic event affects everyone mentally and emotionally. Each person has a different way of responding emotionally, and this is a normal part of the healing process. This document discusses some of the ways people respond to trauma and how to deal with it. It lists ways to cope with depression, how to help others…

National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association, Chicago, IL.

454

Adolescent Coping Styles and Perceptions of Parental Child Rearing  

Microsoft Academic Search

To relate adolescent coping styles to parental rearing practices, 107 15-and 17-year-olds were classified into one of four groups (authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, or neglectful) based on perceptions of theirparents' rearing practices. Subjects completed the Adolescent Coping Orientation for Problem Experiences, a measure of adolescents' general coping styles. Those in the indulgent and authoritative groups used more problem-focused coping; those in

Jerome B. Dusek; Maribeth Danko

1994-01-01

455

Relations Between Personality and Coping: A Meta-Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personality may directly facilitate or constrain coping, but relations of personality to coping have been inconsistent across studies, suggesting a need for greater attention to methods and samples. This meta-analysis tested moderators of relations between Big Five personality traits and coping using 2,653 effect sizes drawn from 165 samples and 33,094 participants. Personality was weakly related to broad coping (e.g.,

Jennifer K. Connor-Smith; Celeste Flachsbart

2007-01-01

456

Stress, Sex Differences, and Coping Strategies Among College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sources of stress (academics, financial, family, social, and daily hassles) and coping strategies (self-help, approach,\\u000a accommodation, avoidance, and self-punishment) of 166 college students were examined. The relationship between sex, specific\\u000a sources of stress, and coping strategies was also investigated. Students completed a stress assessment inventory and a stress\\u000a coping inventory based on a 5-factor revised COPE model (Zuckerman and

Ruby R. Brougham; Christy M. Zail; Celeste M. Mendoza; Janine R. Miller

2009-01-01

457

Effective communication skills in nursing practice.  

PubMed

This article highlights the importance of effective communication skills for nurses. It focuses on core communication skills, their definitions and the positive outcomes that result when applied to practice. Effective communication is central to the provision of compassionate, high-quality nursing care. The article aims to refresh and develop existing knowledge and understanding of effective communication skills. Nurses reading this article will be encouraged to develop a more conscious style of communicating with patients and carers, with the aim of improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction. PMID:25467362

Bramhall, Elaine

2014-12-01

458

Skill of hindcasts initialized through surface nudging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an evaluation of the IPSL decadal prediction system. The hindcasts are initialized through nudging towards observed SSTs, using a relatively weak damping coefficient (-40 W/m2/K). It is shown that such strategy has a positive impact on the predictive skill of thermal characteristics of the ocean down to 300m for about 4 years both in the North Pacific and Atlantic. Regional origin for this skill is investigated. The effects of climate sensitivity bias, start date frequency as well as the ensemble size on the detection of skill are discussed.

Mignot, Juliette; Nguyen, Sébastien; Garcia-Serrano, Javier; Ray, Sulagna; Swingedouw, Didier; Guilyardi, Eric

2014-05-01

459

Relationships between study skills and academic performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Study skills play an important role in influencing academic performance of university students. These skills, which can be modified, can be used as an indicator on how a student would perform academically in his course of study. The purpose of the study is to determine the study skills profile among Universiti Selangor's (Unisel) students and to find the relationships of these skills with student's academic performance. A sample of seventy-eight (78) foundation studies and diploma students of Unisel were selected to participate in this study. Using Study Skills Inventory instrument, eight skills were measured. They are note taking; test taking; textbook study; concentration and memory; time management; analytical thinking and problem solving; nutrition; and vocabulary. Meanwhile, student's academic performance was measured through their current Grade Point Average (GPA). The result showed that vocabulary skill scored the highest mean with 3.01/4.00, followed by test taking (2.88), analytical thinking and problem solving (2.80), note taking (2.79), textbook study (2.58), concentration and memory (2.54), time management (2.25) and nutrition (2.21). Correlation analysis showed that test taking (r=0.286, p=0.011), note taking (r=0.224, p=0.048), and analytical thinking and problem solving (r=0.362, p=0.001) skills were positively correlated with GPA achievement.

Md Rahim, Nasrudin; Meon, Hasni

2013-04-01

460

From Substitution to Coping: Developing and Testing a Leisure Constraints-Based Coping Model  

E-print Network

that the leisure constraints should not be necessarily viewed as insurmountable obstacles. Individuals can negotiate constraints by applying an array of coping mechanisms. Recently, Iwasaki and Schneider (2003) and Schneider and Stanis (2007) proposed...

Tseng, Yung-Ping

2010-01-14

461

The Disposition Toward Critical Thinking: Its Character, Measurement, and Relationship to Critical Thinking Skill  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theorists have hypothesized that skill in critical thinking is positively correlated with the consistent internal motivation to think; and, moreover, that specific critical thinking skills are matched with specific critical thinking dispositions. If true, these assumptions suggest that a skill-focused curriculum would lead persons to be both willing and able to think. New instruments to measure critical thinking skills and

Peter A. Facione; Noreen C. Facione; Carol A. Giancarlo

2000-01-01

462

Developing Leadership Skills in "Introduction to Engineering Courses" through Multi-Media Case Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A literature review identifies a partial list of leadership skills to include developing higher-order cognitive skills, team working skills, positive attitude, and ability to transfer these skills to future environment. This paper discusses the results of research conducted on the use of multiple instructional methodologies in two different…

Sankar, Chetan S.; Kawulich, Barbara; Clayton, Howard; Raju, P. K.

2010-01-01

463

Perceived parental rearing practices and styles of coping  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to study the relation between parental rearing practices and coping dispositions, 75 females and 65 males completed the Children's Report of Parental Behavior Inventory and the COPE, a measure of general coping dispositions. Those who reported their parents had an authoritative rearing style (warmth and nurturance coupled with close monitoring and age-appropriate demandingness) used more social support and

Julie Guay McIntyre; Jerome B. Dusek

1995-01-01

464

Perceived Parental Rearing Practices and Styles of Coping.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To study the relationship between parental rearing practices and coping dispositions, 75 female and 65 male college freshmen completed the Children's Report of Parental Behavior Inventory and the COPE instrument. Findings support the indirect influence of rearing style on coping dispositions through their impact on feelings of competence and…

McIntyre, Julie Guay; Dusek, Jerome B.

1995-01-01

465

Developmental and Cross-Situational Differences in Adolescents' Coping Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we investigated developmental and cross-situational differences in strategies adolescents use to cope with family, school, and peer stressors. We also examined the relation between adolescents' use of coping strategies and two indices of adjustment (self perceptions of their adjustment as a result of coping with the specific stressor and state anxiety). The sample included 148 seventh graders,

Michael A. Griffith; Eric F. Dubow; Maria F. Ippolito

2000-01-01

466

Developing Coping Typologies of Minority Adolescents: A Latent Profile Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Latent profile analysis (LPA) was used to develop a coping typology of minority adolescents (M = 15.5 years). A multiethnic sample (n = 354) was recruited from a program aimed at serving low-income students. LPA revealed three distinct coping profiles. The first comprised adolescents who used a number of specific coping strategies at a low level…

Aldridge, Arianna A.; Roesch, Scott C.

2008-01-01

467

Coping with Boredom in School: An Experience Sampling Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study explored students' use of boredom-related coping strategies at trait and state levels. Two trait-based dimensions of coping relevant to boredom were considered, namely approach--versus avoidance-oriented and cognitively--versus behaviorally-oriented coping strategies. The two dimensions were assessed in a self-report…

Nett, Ulrike E.; Goetz, Thomas; Hall, Nathan C.

2011-01-01

468

Situational differences in the coping processes of student-athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the role of the situation in the appraisal and coping processes of a sample of 84 college football players. The athletes' appraisals and coping behavior were assessed in both an academically and athletically stressful situation using a modified version of the Ways of Coping scale. The athletes appraised the academic situation as being more relevant to the

Robert M. Sellers

1995-01-01

469

Validation of the English Version of the Dyadic Coping Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to validate the English version of the original German Dyadic Coping Inventory. Results indicated that the English version of the Dyadic Coping Inventory is a valid and reliable measure of dyadic coping in a sample of 709 heterosexual university students.

Levesque, Christine; Lafontaine, Marie-France; Caron, Angela; Fitzpatrick, Josée

2014-01-01

470

Coping Styles in Youths with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluated relationships between two coping styles and two health outcomes in 135 youth with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Found that poor adherence to treatment, older adolescent age, and long duration of IDDM correlated with ventilation and avoidance coping. High ventilation and avoidance coping was predicted by high stress, low…

Hanson, Cindy L.; And Others

1989-01-01

471

Coping Strategies for Living in Student Residential Facilities in Nigeria  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines coping strategies used by students in high-density living. It uses the questionnaire survey method in 20 university halls-of-residence in southwestern Nigeria. The study focused on students' cognitive responses to the bedroom, the coping strategies that they used, gender differences in coping styles, and the influence of…

Amole, Dolapo

2005-01-01

472

Dyadic Coping and Interpersonal Trust in Student-Teacher Interactions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A longitudinal study was undertaken to determine whether interpersonal competence of teachers and students was related to coping strategies of students during an oral examination. The main research question was to find out whether expected supportive dyadic coping, the wish to delegate coping and interpersonal trust, assessed 8 weeks before an…

Schwarzer, Christine; Buchwald, Petra

473

Stress, Depression and Coping among Latino Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers  

PubMed Central

Research shows that one in four migrant farmworkers experienced an episode of one or more mental health disorders such as stress, depression, or anxiety in their lifetime. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore experiences and perceptions related to stress and depression among Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFWs), and to identify their coping behaviors for dealing with these mental health conditions. Using a mixed methods research approach, three focus group interviews of a sample of Latino MSFWs (N = 29) were conducted and a quantitative survey was implemented (N = 57) at community sites in eastern North Carolina. Four major themes emerged from the focus group data: (1) physical stress related to working conditions; (2) mental stress related to family situations, work environment, documentation status, and lack of resources; (3) depression related to separation from family and the lack of resources; and (4) use of positive and negative mechanisms for coping with stress and depression. A discussion of these themes, results from the survey findings, implications for intervention and outreach programs, along with recommendations for further research, are provided. PMID:23644829

Burke Winkelman, Sloane; Chaney, Elizabeth H.; Bethel, Jeffrey W.

2013-01-01

474

Does Leisure Time as a Stress Coping Resource Increase Affective Complexity? Applying the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA).  

PubMed

Affective complexity, a manifestation of psychological well-being, refers to the relative independence between positive and negative affect (PA, NA). According to the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA), stressful situations lead to highly inverse PA-NA relationship, reducing affective complexity. Meanwhile, positive events can sustain affective complexity by restoring PA-NA independence. Leisure, a type of positive events, has been identified as a coping resource. This study used the DMA to assess whether leisure time helps restore affective complexity on stressful days. We found that on days with more leisure time than usual, an individual experienced less negative PA-NA relationship after daily stressful events. The finding demonstrates the value of leisure time as a coping resource and the DMA's contribution to coping research. PMID:24659826

Qian, Xinyi Lisa; Yarnal, Careen M; Almeida, David M

2013-01-01

475

Predictors of employer satisfaction: technical and non-technical skills.  

PubMed

Employers of 2007-2009 graduates from Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine were asked to respond to a survey regarding their overall satisfaction with their new employees as well as their new employees' preparation in several technical and non-technical skill areas. Seventy-five responses contained complete data and were used in the analysis. Four technical skill areas (data collection, data interpretation, planning, and taking action) and five non-technical skill areas (interpersonal skills, ability to deal with legal issues, business skills, making referrals, and problem solving) were identified. All of the skill area subscales listed above had appropriate reliability (Cronbach's alpha>0.70) and were positively and significantly correlated with overall employer satisfaction. Results of two simultaneous regression analyses indicated that of the four technical skill areas, taking action is the most salient predictor of employer satisfaction. Of the five non-technical skill areas, interpersonal skills, business skills, making referrals, and problem solving were the most important skills in predicting employer satisfaction. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that all technical skills explained 25% of the variation in employer satisfaction; non-technical skills explained an additional 42% of the variation in employer satisfaction. PMID:22433741

Danielson, Jared A; Wu, Tsui-Feng; Fales-Williams, Amanda J; Kirk, Ryan A; Preast, Vanessa A

2012-01-01

476

Why skill matters.  

PubMed

Maximizing rewards per unit time is ideal for success and survival in humans and animals. This goal can be approached by speeding up behavior aiming at rewards and this is done most efficiently by acquiring skills. Importantly, reward-directed skills consist of two components: finding a good object (i.e., object skill) and acting on the object (i.e., action skill), which occur sequentially. Recent studies suggest that object skill is based on high-capacity memory for object-value associations. When a learned object is encountered the corresponding memory is quickly expressed as a value-based gaze bias, leading to the automatic acquisition or avoidance of the object. Object skill thus plays a crucial role in increasing rewards per unit time. PMID:23911579

Hikosaka, Okihide; Yamamoto, Shinya; Yasuda, Masaharu; Kim, Hyoung F

2013-09-01

477

Enhancing Treatment Gains in a School-Based Intervention for Children of Divorce Through Skill Training, Parental Involvement, and Transfer Procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The school-based Children’s Support Group procedure teaches skills to cope with divorce-related events and provides strategies for mastering disrupted developmental tasks. Ss were 103 3rd- through 5th-grade children of separated or divorced parents who were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: support; support and skill building; support, skill building, transfer, and parent training procedures; or no-treatment control. Twenty-six children

Arnold L. Stolberg; Jeffrey Mahler

1994-01-01

478

Relations between personality and coping: a meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Personality may directly facilitate or constrain coping, but relations of personality to coping have been inconsistent across studies, suggesting a need for greater attention to methods and samples. This meta-analysis tested moderators of relations between Big Five personality traits and coping using 2,653 effect sizes drawn from 165 samples and 33,094 participants. Personality was weakly related to broad coping (e.g., Engagement or Disengagement), but all 5 traits predicted specific strategies. Extraversion and Conscientiousness predicted more problem-solving and cognitive restructuring, Neuroticism less. Neuroticism predicted problematic strategies like wishful thinking, withdrawal, and emotion-focused coping but, like Extraversion, also predicted support seeking. Personality more strongly predicted coping in young samples, stressed samples, and samples reporting dispositional rather than situation-specific coping. Daily versus retrospective coping reports and self-selected versus researcher-selected stressors also moderated relations between personality and coping. Cross-cultural differences were present, and ethnically diverse samples showed more protective effects of personality. Richer understanding of the role of personality in the coping process requires assessment of personality facets and specific coping strategies, use of laboratory and daily report studies, and multivariate analyses. PMID:18072856

Connor-Smith, Jennifer K; Flachsbart, Celeste

2007-12-01

479

Position: IT pre-sales engineer. Job Description  

E-print Network

Position: IT pre-sales engineer. Job Description: Develop sales proposals Provide technical sales presentation and communication skills (both verbal and written). Position requires traveling outside Jordan

480

Investigation of the benefits of HIV/AIDS caregiving and relations among caregiving adjustment, benefit finding, and stress and coping variables.  

PubMed

The present study explored the nature of benefit finding in HIV/AIDS caregiving, and examined relations among caregiver adjustment, benefit finding, and stress and coping variables. A total of 64 HIV/AIDS caregivers and 46 care recipients completed interviews and questionnaires. First, the study aimed to explore the types of benefits associated with HIV/AIDS caregiving. Content analyses of caregiver responses to an interview question inquiring about gains from caregiving revealed eight benefit themes. Second, the study aimed to examine relations between caregiver adjustment and both benefit finding and stress and coping variables. We hypothesized that number of caregiver reported benefits, social support, challenge and control appraisals, and problem focused coping would be inversely related to poorer adjustment, whereas care recipient reported global distress and illness, caregiver threat appraisal and passive-avoidant emotion-focused coping would be positively associated with poorer adjustment. Correlations indicated that poorer adjustment (measured by global distress, depression, caregiving impact, social adjustment and health status) was positively correlated with care-recipient distress, threat appraisals and passive avoidant coping and inversely correlated with social support, and number of reported benefits. Unexpectedly, problem-focused coping, controllability and challenge appraisals, and care recipient illness were unrelated to adjustment. Third, the study aimed to examine relations between benefit finding and stress and coping variables. Correlations indicated that benefit finding was related to social support use, seeking social support coping and problem-solving coping. Findings indicate that the benefit finding and stress/coping frameworks have utility in guiding research into adaptation to HIV/AIDS caregiving. Results also indicate targets for intervention in the provision of services for HIV/AIDS caregivers. PMID:14617506

McCausland, J; Pakenham, K I

2003-12-01