Science.gov

Sample records for positive feedback mechanisms

  1. Amplification of ABA biosynthesis and signaling through a positive feedback mechanism in seeds.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Mariko; Sall, Khadidiatou; Nambara, Eiji; Nonogaki, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-01

    Abscisic acid is an essential hormone for seed dormancy. Our previous study using the plant gene switch system, a chemically induced gene expression system, demonstrated that induction of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a rate-limiting ABA biosynthesis gene, was sufficient to suppress germination in imbibed Arabidopsis seeds. Here, we report development of an efficient experimental system that causes amplification of NCED expression during seed maturation. The system was created with a Triticum aestivum promoter containing ABA responsive elements (ABREs) and a Sorghum bicolor NCED to cause ABA-stimulated ABA biosynthesis and signaling, through a positive feedback mechanism. The chimeric gene pABRE:NCED enhanced NCED and ABF (ABRE-binding factor) expression in Arabidopsis Columbia-0 seeds, which caused 9- to 73-fold increases in ABA levels. The pABRE:NCED seeds exhibited unusually deep dormancy which lasted for more than 3 months. Interestingly, the amplified ABA pathways also caused enhanced expression of Arabidopsis NCED5, revealing the presence of positive feedback in the native system. These results demonstrated the robustness of positive feedback mechanisms and the significance of NCED expression, or single metabolic change, during seed maturation. The pABRE:NCED system provides an excellent experimental system producing dormant and non-dormant seeds of the same maternal origin, which differ only in zygotic ABA. The pABRE:NCED seeds contain a GFP marker which enables seed sorting between transgenic and null segregants and are ideal for comparative analysis. In addition to its utility in basic research, the system can also be applied to prevention of pre-harvest sprouting during crop production, and therefore contributes to translational biology. PMID:24520869

  2. Collective irrationality and positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Nicolis, Stamatios C; Zabzina, Natalia; Latty, Tanya; Sumpter, David J T

    2011-01-01

    Recent experiments on ants and slime moulds have assessed the degree to which they make rational decisions when presented with a number of alternative food sources or shelter. Ants and slime moulds are just two examples of a wide range of species and biological processes that use positive feedback mechanisms to reach decisions. Here we use a generic, experimentally validated model of positive feedback between group members to show that the probability of taking the best of options depends crucially on the strength of feedback. We show how the probability of choosing the best option can be maximized by applying an optimal feedback strength. Importantly, this optimal value depends on the number of options, so that when we change the number of options the preference of the group changes, producing apparent "irrationalities". We thus reinterpret the idea that collectives show "rational" or "irrational" preferences as being a necessary consequence of the use of positive feedback. We argue that positive feedback is a heuristic which often produces fast and accurate group decision-making, but is always susceptible to apparent irrationality when studied under particular experimental conditions. PMID:21541321

  3. Position feedback control system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard (Albuquerque, NM); Ensz, Mark T. (Albuquerque, NM); Watson, Robert D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2003-01-01

    Disclosed is a system and method for independently evaluating the spatial positional performance of a machine having a movable member, comprising an articulated coordinate measuring machine comprising: a first revolute joint; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the first joint, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto, wherein the probe tip is pivotally mounted to the movable machine member; a second revolute joint; a first support arm serially connecting the first joint to the second joint; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the first and second revolute joints, for calculating the spatial coordinates of the probe tip; means for kinematically constraining the articulated coordinate measuring machine to a working surface; and comparator means, in operative association with the coordinate processing means and with the movable machine, for comparing the true position of the movable machine member, as measured by the true position of the probe tip, with the desired position of the movable machine member.

  4. Histone demethylase KDM5A is regulated by its reader domain through a positive-feedback mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Idelisse Ortiz; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Nnadi, Chimno I.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Kelly, Mark J. S.; Fujimori, Danica Galoni?

    2015-02-01

    The retinoblastoma binding protein KDM5A removes methyl marks from lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). Misregulation of KDM5A contributes to the pathogenesis of lung and gastric cancers. In addition to its catalytic jumonji C domain, KDM5A contains three PHD reader domains, commonly recognized as chromatin recruitment modules. It is unknown whether any of these domains in KDM5A have functions beyond recruitment and whether they regulate the catalytic activity of the demethylase. Here using biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structural studies, we show that the PHD1 preferentially recognizes unmethylated H3K4 histone tail, product of KDM5A-mediated demethylation of tri-methylated H3K4 (H3K4me3). Binding of unmodified H3 peptide to the PHD1 stimulates catalytic domain-mediated removal of methyl marks from H3K4me3 peptide and nucleosome substrates. This positive-feedback mechanism—enabled by the functional coupling between a reader and a catalytic domain in KDM5A—suggests a model for the spread of demethylation on chromatin.

  5. Positive feedback regulation of prothoracicotropic hormone secretion by ecdysteroid--a mechanism that determines the timing of metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Akira; Kamimura, Manabu; Kiuchi, Makoto; Kataoka, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    When insect larvae have fully grown, prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) is released from the brain, triggering the initiation of metamorphic development through stimulation of ecdysteroid secretion by the prothoracic glands. The present study analyzes the mechanism that regulates the occurrence of this PTTH surge. In the silkworm Bombyx mori, the PTTH surge occurs on day 6 of the fifth instar and is preceded by a small rise in hemolymph ecdysteroid titer, which occurs late on day 5. We therefore hypothesized that this rise of ecdysteroid titer is involved in the induction of the PTTH surge. To test this hypothesis, two experiments were conducted. First, a small amount of 20-hydroxyecdysone was injected on day 4, two days before the expected day of the PTTH surge, to simulate the small rise in hemolymph ecdysteroid titer on day 5. This injection led to a precocious surge of PTTH the next day. Next, the hemolymph ecdysteroid titer on day 5 was artificially lowered by injecting ecdysteroid-22-oxidase, which inactivates 20-hydroxyecdysone. After this treatment, the PTTH surge did not occur on day 6 in 80% of the animals. These results indicate that a small rise of the hemolymph ecdysteroid titer plays a critical role in the induction of the PTTH surge. Since basal ecdysteroidogenic activity of the prothoracic glands increases with larval growth, a circulating level of ecdysteroids may convey information about larval maturity to the brain, to coordinate larval growth and metamorphosis. This is the first report in invertebrates to demonstrate positive feedback regulation of the surge of a tropic hormone by a downstream steroid hormone. PMID:25596092

  6. Positive feedback of interacting ductile faults from coupling of equation of state, rheology and thermal-mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Yuen, Dave

    2004-05-01

    We present a fully coupled energy approach to investigate the important problem of ductile faulting within the lithosphere. Our starting setup consists of a 70 km×106 km segment of a model lithosphere containing a random set of thermal perturbations. This allows the development of multiple sets of interacting ductile faults. The perturbations diffuse through conduction while the model is subject to constant velocity pure shear boundary conditions. The entire lithosphere has two domains, one governed chiefly by the Peierls mechanism (cold top part) and another by power law creep (hot lower part). In the calculations, the primary creep mechanisms are not assigned but activated by their dominance through adding power and Peierls creep strain-rates. The water content is always below solubility, hence brittle fracture is not considered in this model. Extreme localization through thermal-mechanical feedback is observed in interacting ductile faults inverse cascading from short- to long-length scales. Another outstanding effect of interacting faults is the remarkable ability to reduce the time scale leading to finite amplitude-instability. Both Peierls- and power law-domains are affected, but the Peierls-domain exhibits true, ductile, faults while the power law domain develops unstable slipping events akin to brittle shear faults. This affinity to a seismic response is due to the exponential temperature dependence of power law creep leading to short creep-bursts with time scales less than a day. The addition of water can stabilize the brittle like response into a more ductile one through its effect on the activation energy. The main storage of elastic energy lies in the Peierls domain so that shear zones are attracted to an isotherm 875-1100 K, thus marking the transition between both creep regimes in the p- T-strain-rate space. Criteria for stability and accuracy in the presence of thermal feedback are developed. These show that extremely high mesh resolution (˜100-500 m local resolution) is required for accurately assessing the potential for shear localization. The potential for upscaling schemes based on critical Peclet and dissipation numbers is discussed and the critical energy quantity (dissipation number) for spontaneous symmetry breaking is introduced.

  7. Positive feedback, memory, and the predictability of earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Sammis, C. G.; Sornette, D.

    2002-01-01

    We review the “critical point” concept for large earthquakes and enlarge it in the framework of so-called “finite-time singularities.” The singular behavior associated with accelerated seismic release is shown to result from a positive feedback of the seismic activity on its release rate. The most important mechanisms for such positive feedback are presented. We solve analytically a simple model of geometrical positive feedback in which the stress shadow cast by the last large earthquake is progressively fragmented by the increasing tectonic stress. PMID:11875202

  8. AGN Feedback Mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Mitchell C. Begelman

    2003-03-03

    Accreting black holes can release enormous amounts of energy to their surroundings, in various forms. Such feedback may profoundly influence a black hole's environment. After briefly reviewing the possible types of feedback, I focus on the injection of kinetic energy through jets and powerful winds. The effects of these outflows may be especially apparent in the heating of the X-ray--emitting atmospheres that pervade clusters of galaxies. Analogous heating effects, during the epoch of galaxy formation, could regulate the growth of supermassive black holes.

  9. Feedback about gaze position improves saccade efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ghahghaei, Saeideh; Verghese, Preeti

    2015-09-01

    When searching for an unknown number of noisy targets in a limited time, looking at uncertain locations is more efficient than looking at locations with a high probability of the target. Previously, we showed that immediate saccadic feedback that revealed the true identity of a noisy stimulus was effective in improving saccade efficiency (Verghese, Ghahghaei, 2013). However, the stimuli in that task were not limited by visibility, and the feedback artificially removed any ambiguity about the identity of the stimulus as soon as a saccade landed at that location. Here we examine if the increase in visibility upon naturally foveating a target combined with simple knowledge about eye position will encourage a strategy to fixate informative locations. Observers actively searched a brief display (900 ms) with six Gabor patches in noise, located 3 degrees from fixation to locate an unknown number of horizontal targets, among vertical distractors. The contrast of the Gabors was high or low such that the orientation of the high-contrast Gabor was perfectly discriminable at 3 degrees, but that of the low-contrast Gabor only upon foveation. Thus, saccades to low-contrast rather than high-contrast locations were more informative. In separate blocks participants received either (i) no gaze feedback, (ii) delayed gaze feedback at the end of the trial, or (iii) immediate gaze feedback after each saccade in the trial. Feedback was provided by changing the color of the ring that surrounded each location. In the absence of feedback, participants differed in the proportion of saccades to informative locations, with a greater proportion for more experienced participants. Both immediate and delayed feedback increased the proportion of informative saccades for four out of five participants. Furthermore, gaze feedback increased the latency of the first saccade and reduced the number of reflexive saccades to salient locations, making saccades more informative. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26325741

  10. Hepatitis B virus replication and sex-determining region Y box 4 production are tightly controlled by a novel positive feedback mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jian; Zheng, Yuan; Guo, Xiaohong; Mo, Jiayin; Xie, Xueping; Xiong, Ying; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Kailang; Wu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of liver diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying HBV infection and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. The sex-determining region Y box 4 (Sox4) is a transcriptional factor, which preferentially regulates the development of various organs, tissues, and cancers. But, the role of Sox4 in viral infection and pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrated that Sox4 is up-regulated by HBV, and revealed the mechanism by which HBV regulates Sox4 expression. First, HBV stimulates Sox4 expression through transcriptional factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1), which binds to Sox4 promoter to activate Sox4 transcriptional activity. Second, miR-335, miR-129-2 and miR-203 inhibit Sox4 expression by targeting its mRNA 3’UTR, while HBV suppresses the microRNAs expression, resulting in up-regulating Sox4 post-transcriptionally. Third, Sox4 protein is degraded by proteasome, while HBV surface protein (HBsAg) prevents Sox4 from degradation by directly interacting with the protein, thereby enhancing Sox4 production post-translationlly. More interestingly, HBV-activated Sox4 in turn facilitates HBV replication by direct binding to the viral genome via its HMG box. Thus, this study revealed a novel positive feedback mechanism by which Sox4 production and HBV replication are tightly correlated. PMID:25970172

  11. Modeling Circadian Oscillations with Interlocking Positive and Negative Feedback Loops

    E-print Network

    Byrne, John H.

    for the gener- ation of circadian rhythms. To test the sufficiency of the pro- posed mechanisms, two Circadian rhythms reflect oscillating expression of genes, one or a few of which act as clock componentsModeling Circadian Oscillations with Interlocking Positive and Negative Feedback Loops Paul Smolen

  12. Positive position feedback control for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Caughey, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique for vibration suppression in large space structures is investigated in laboratory experiments on a thin cantilever beam. This technique, called Positive Position Feedback, makes use of generalized displacement measurements to accomplish vibration suppression. Several features of Positive Position Feedback make it attractive for the large space structure control environment: The realization of the controller is simple and straightforward. Global stability conditions can be derived which are independent of the dynamical characteristics of the structure being controlled, i.e., all spillover is stabilizing. The method cannot be destabilized by finite actuator dynamics, and the technique is amenable to a strain-based sensing approach. The experiments control the first six bending modes of a cantilever beam, and make use of piezoelectric materials for actuators and sensors, simulating a piezoelectric active-member. The modal damping ratios are increased by factors ranging from 2 to 130.

  13. Ribosome flow model with positive feedback

    PubMed Central

    Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs usually form a circular structure; thus, ribosomes that terminatae translation at the 3? end can diffuse with increased probability to the 5? end of the transcript, initiating another cycle of translation. This phenomenon describes ribosomal flow with positive feedback—an increase in the flow of ribosomes terminating translating the open reading frame increases the ribosomal initiation rate. The aim of this paper is to model and rigorously analyse translation with feedback. We suggest a modified version of the ribosome flow model, called the ribosome flow model with input and output. In this model, the input is the initiation rate and the output is the translation rate. We analyse this model after closing the loop with a positive linear feedback. We show that the closed-loop system admits a unique globally asymptotically stable equilibrium point. From a biophysical point of view, this means that there exists a unique steady state of ribosome distributions along the mRNA, and thus a unique steady-state translation rate. The solution from any initial distribution will converge to this steady state. The steady-state distribution demonstrates a decrease in ribosome density along the coding sequence. For the case of constant elongation rates, we obtain expressions relating the model parameters to the equilibrium point. These results may perhaps be used to re-engineer the biological system in order to obtain a desired translation rate. PMID:23720534

  14. Positioning Mechanism For Hoisting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlin, John D., III; Moore, Barry J.; Myers, Robert I.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanism positions large, heavy objects in container for lifting out by hoist, crane, or winch. Handles objects gently and ensures they are lifted cleanly away in vertical direction without bumping container. Developed for lifting offset pieces of solid-propellant core out of rocket motor through its propellant port. Similar specialized mechanisms can be developed to lift other specially shaped, specially contained heavy objects. Track in base of mechanism guides each trunnion and piece to which attached to middle as hydraulic rods extend. When mechanism lifted, tilted pieces swing inward and come to rest on energy-absorbing paddle.

  15. Integrin activation - the importance of a positive feedback

    E-print Network

    Dagmar Iber; Iain D Campbell

    2006-03-31

    Integrins mediate cell adhesion and are essential receptors for the development and functioning of multicellular organisms. Integrin activation is known to require both ligand and talin binding and to correlate with cluster formation but the activation mechanism and precise roles of these processes are not yet resolved. Here mathematical modeling, with known experimental parameters, is used to show that the binding of a stabilizing factor, such as talin, is alone insufficient to enable ligand-dependent integrin activation for all observed conditions; an additional positive feedback is required.

  16. Stable hopping of a muscle-actuated leg system using positive force feedback

    E-print Network

    Wongviriyawong, Chanikarn Mint

    2007-01-01

    In control of movement, two key components, which are pure mechanical response of the system and response due to sensory feedback, must be thoroughly understood. Recent studies suggest not only the existence of positive ...

  17. Adaptive positive position feedback for energy absorption in acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, M. Austin; Leo, Donald J.; Farinholt, Kevin M.

    2007-04-01

    A method for adaptive energy absorption in the low frequency region of acoustic cavities is presented. The method is based on an adaptive scheme consisting of a self-tuning regulator (STR) that has the ability to target multiple modes with a single actuator. The inner control loop of the STR uses positive position feedback (PPF) in series with a high- and low-pass Butterworth filters for each controlled mode. The outer loop consists of an algorithm that locates the zero frequencies of the collocated signal and uses these values to update the resonance frequency of the PPF filter and the cut-off and cut-on frequencies of the Butterworth filters. Experimental results of a duct are provided that show how less than a 10 percent change in the frequencies of the acoustic modes of the duct will cause a non-adaptive controller to go unstable, but the STR will maintain stability and continue absorbing energy through a 20 percent change in the frequencies of the acoustic modes of the duct. Additional experimental results of a fairing replica are provided that show internal temperature variations can change the frequencies of the acoustic modes of this larger cavity and that the STR can adapt to these changes and absorb acoustic energy.

  18. Regulatory Dynamics of Synthetic Gene Networks with Positive Feedback

    E-print Network

    Sano, Masaki

    Regulatory Dynamics of Synthetic Gene Networks with Positive Feedback Yusuke T. Maeda* and Masaki is slowed down if the gene regulatory system includes positive feedback. We also report that the transition the interactions between genes and proteins. These interactions are incorporated into complex regulatory networks

  19. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals with ASD remained emotionally unaffected. Thus, individuals with ASD do not experience feedback from activated facial expressions as controls do. This facial feedback-impairment enhances our understanding of the social and emotional lives of individuals with ASD. PMID:18293075

  20. Wi-Fi-Based Indoor Positioning Using Human-Centric Collaborative Feedback

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yuanzhu Peter

    characteristic of such systems. For indoor positioning mechanisms, we argue that it is also possible-centric collaborative feedback within a baseline Wi-Fi fingerprinting-based indoor positioning system. Experimental]. In this article, we propose a Wi-Fi based indoor positioning system that includes an

  1. Position feedback system for volume holographic storage media

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Nathan J. (San Francisco, CA); Henson, James A. (Morgan Hill, CA); Carpenter, Christopher M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Akin, Jr.. William R. (Morgan Hill, CA); Ehrlich, Richard M. (Saratoga, CA); Beazley, Lance D. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-07-07

    A method of holographic recording in a photorefractive medium wherein stored holograms may be retrieved with maximum signal-to noise ratio (SNR) is disclosed. A plurality of servo blocks containing position feedback information is recorded in the crystal and made non-erasable by heating the crystal. The servo blocks are recorded at specific increments, either angular or frequency, depending whether wavelength or angular multiplexing is applied, and each servo block is defined by one of five patterns. Data pages are then recorded at positions or wavelengths enabling each data page to be subsequently reconstructed with servo patterns which provide position feedback information. The method of recording data pages and servo blocks is consistent with conventional practices. In addition, the recording system also includes components (e.g. voice coil motor) which respond to position feedback information and adjust the angular position of the reference angle of a reference beam to maximize SNR by reducing crosstalk, thereby improving storage capacity.

  2. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stel, Marielle; van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals…

  3. Position Sensor Performance in Nanometer Resolution Feedback Systems

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    Position Sensor Performance in Nanometer Resolution Feedback Systems Andrew J. Fleming School and resolution of position sensors. Unfortunately, these parameters may not be available in a form that allows direct comparison between sensors or the prediction of closed- loop performance. This article presents

  4. Feedback in Action--The Mechanism of the Iris.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pingnet, B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstration experiments. Outlines a demonstration of the general principle of positive and negative feedback and the influence of time delays in feedback circuits. Elucidates the principle of negative feedback with a model of the iris of the eye. Emphasizes the importance of feedback in biological systems. (CW)

  5. Integrated packaging of 2D MOEMS mirrors with optical position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, M.; Lenzhofer, M.; Kremer, M. P.; Tortschanoff, A.

    2015-02-01

    Many applications of MOEMS microscanners rely on accurate position feedback. For MOEMS devices which do not have intrinsic on-chip feedback, position information can be provided with optical methods, most simply by using a reflection from the backside of a MOEMS scanner. By measuring the intensity distribution of the reflected beam across a quadrant diode, one can precisely detect the mirror's deflection angles. Previously, we have presented a position sensing device, applicable to arbitrary trajectories, which is based on the measurement of the position of the reflected laser beam with a quadrant diode. In this work, we present a novel setup, which comprises the optical position feedback functionality integrated into the device package itself. The new device's System-in-Package (SiP) design is based on a flip-folded 2.5D PCB layout and fully assembled as small as 9.2×7×4 mm³ in total. The device consists of four layers, which supply the MOEMS mirror, a spacer to provide the required optical path length, the quadrant photo-diode and a laser diode to serve as the light source. In addition to describing the mechanical setup of the novel device, we will present first experimental results and optical simulation studies. Accurate position feedback is the basis for closed-loop control of the MOEMS devices, which is crucial for some applications as image projection for example. Position feedback and the possibility of closed-loop control will significantly improve the performance of these devices.

  6. Positive Feedback Between PU.1 and the Cell Cycle Controls

    E-print Network

    Elowitz, Michael

    Positive Feedback Between PU.1 and the Cell Cycle Controls Myeloid Differentiation Hao Yuan Kueh,1 increase PU.1 levels by lengthening their cell cycles, which causes stable PU.1 accumulation. Exogenous PU.1 expression in progenitors increases endogenous PU.1 levels by inducing cell cycle lengthening

  7. Cognitive Evaluation Theory, Locus of Control and Positive Verbal Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonky, Edward; Reihman, Jacqueline

    This study tests the hypothesis that individual differences in locus of control orientation may mediate elementary school students' responses to positive verbal feedback. A total of 30 kindergarten through fourth grade subjects were assessed for locus of control orientation using the Bialer Children's Locus of Control Questionnaire. To establish a…

  8. Positive feedback regulation results in spatial clustering and fast spreading of active signaling molecules on a cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2009-06-01

    Positive feedback regulation is ubiquitous in cell signaling networks, often leading to binary outcomes in response to graded stimuli. However, the role of such feedbacks in clustering, and in spatial spreading of activated molecules, has come to be appreciated only recently. We focus on the latter, using a simple model developed in the context of Ras activation with competing negative and positive feedback mechanisms. We find that positive feedback, in the presence of slow diffusion, results in clustering of activated molecules on the plasma membrane, and rapid spatial spreading as the front of the cluster propagates with a constant velocity (dependent on the feedback strength). The advancing fronts of the clusters of the activated species are rough, with scaling consistent with the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation in one dimension. Our minimal model is general enough to describe signal transduction in a wide variety of biological networks where activity in the membrane-proximal region is subject to feedback regulation.

  9. Improved Position Sensor for Feedback Control of Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert; Savage, Larry; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    An improved optoelectronic apparatus has been developed to provide the position feedback needed for controlling the levitation subsystem of a containerless-processing system. As explained, the advantage of this apparatus over prior optoelectronic apparatuses that have served this purpose stems from the use of an incandescent lamp, instead of a laser, to illuminate the levitated object. In containerless processing, a small object to be processed is levitated (e.g., by use of a microwave, low-frequency electromagnetic, electrostatic, or acoustic field) so that it is not in contact with the wall of the processing chamber or with any other solid object during processing. In the case of electrostatic or low-frequency electromagnetic levitation, real-time measurement of the displacement of the levitated object from its nominal levitation position along the vertical axis (and, in some cases, along one or two horizontal axes) is needed for feedback control of the levitating field.

  10. Stochastic gene expression with bursting and positive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platini, Thierry; Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    Stochasticity (or noise) in the process of gene expression can play a critical role in cellular circuits that control switching between probabilistic cell-fate decisions in diverse organisms. Such circuits often include positive feedback loops as critical elements. In some cases (e.g. HIV-1 viral infections), switching between different cell fates occurs even in the absence of bistability in the underlying deterministic model. To characterize the role of noise in such systems, we analyze a simple gene expression circuit that includes contributions from both transcriptional and translational bursting and positive feedback effects. Using a combination of analytical approaches and stochastic simulations, we explore how the underlying parameters control the corresponding mean and variance in protein distributions.

  11. Feedback Mechanism for Microtubule Length Regulation by Stathmin Gradients

    E-print Network

    Maria Zeitz; Jan Kierfeld

    2014-12-09

    We formulate and analyze a theoretical model for the regulation of microtubule (MT) polymerization dynamics by the signaling proteins Rac1 and stathmin. In cells, the MT growth rate is inhibited by cytosolic stathmin, which, in turn, is inactivated by Rac1. Growing MTs activate Rac1 at the cell edge, which closes a positive feedback loop. We investigate both tubulin sequestering and catastrophe promotion as mechanisms for MT growth inhibition by stathmin. For a homogeneous stathmin concentration in the absence of Rac1, we find a switch-like regulation of the MT mean length by stathmin. For constitutively active Rac1 at the cell edge, stathmin is deactivated locally, which establishes a spatial gradient of active stathmin. In this gradient, we find a stationary bimodal MT length distributions for both mechanisms of MT growth inhibition by stathmin. One subpopulation of the bimodal length distribution can be identified with fast growing and long pioneering MTs in the region near the cell edge, which have been observed experimentally. The feedback loop is closed through Rac1 activation by MTs. For tubulin sequestering by stathmin, this establishes a bistable switch with two stable states: one stable state corresponds to upregulated MT mean length and bimodal MT length distributions, i.e., pioneering MTs; the other stable state corresponds to an interrupted feedback with short MTs. Stochastic effects as well as external perturbations can trigger switching events. For catastrophe promoting stathmin we do not find bistability.

  12. Robust, tunable genetic memory from protein sequestration combined with positive feedback

    PubMed Central

    Shopera, Tatenda; Henson, William R.; Ng, Andrew; Lee, Young Je; Ng, Kenneth; Moon, Tae Seok

    2015-01-01

    Natural regulatory networks contain many interacting components that allow for fine-tuning of switching and memory properties. Building simple bistable switches, synthetic biologists have learned the design principles of complex natural regulatory networks. However, most switches constructed so far are so simple (e.g. comprising two regulators) that they are functional only within a limited parameter range. Here, we report the construction of robust, tunable bistable switches in Escherichia coli using three heterologous protein regulators (ExsADC) that are sequestered into an inactive complex through a partner swapping mechanism. On the basis of mathematical modeling, we accurately predict and experimentally verify that the hysteretic region can be fine-tuned by controlling the interactions of the ExsADC regulatory cascade using the third member ExsC as a tuning knob. Additionally, we confirm that a dual-positive feedback switch can markedly increase the hysteretic region, compared to its single-positive feedback counterpart. The dual-positive feedback switch displays bistability over a 106-fold range of inducer concentrations, to our knowledge, the largest range reported so far. This work demonstrates the successful interlocking of sequestration-based ultrasensitivity and positive feedback, a design principle that can be applied to the construction of robust, tunable, and predictable genetic programs to achieve increasingly sophisticated biological behaviors. PMID:26384562

  13. [Feedback control mechanisms of plant cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    We have generated considerable evidence for the significance of wall stress relaxation in the control of plant growth and found that several agents (gibberellin, light, genetic loci for dwarf stature) influence growth rate via alteration of wall relaxation. We have refined our methods for measuring wall relaxation and, moreover, have found that wall relaxation properties bear only a distance relationship to wall mechanical properties. We have garnered novel insights into the nature of cell expansion mechanisms by analyzing spontaneous fluctuations of plant growth rate in seedlings. These experiments involved the application of mathematical techniques for analyzing growth rate fluctuations and the development of new instrumentation for measuring and forcing plant growth in a controlled fashion. These studies conclude that growth rate fluctuations generated by the plant as consequence of a feedback control system. This conclusion has important implications for the nature of wall loosening processes and demands a different framework for thinking about growth control. It also implies the existence of a growth rate sensor.

  14. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  15. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz, respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  16. Adaptive positive position feedback for actively absorbing energy in acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, M. A.; Leo, D. J.; Farinholt, K. M.

    2008-03-01

    A method for adaptive energy absorption in acoustic cavities is presented. The method is based on an adaptive scheme consisting of a self-tuning regulator that has the ability to target multiple modes with a single actuator. The inner control loop of the self-tuning regulator uses positive position feedback in series with a high- and low-pass Butterworth filters for each controlled mode. The outer loop consists of an algorithm that locates the zero frequencies of the collocated signal and uses these values to update the resonance frequency of the positive position feedback filter and the cut-off and cut-on frequencies of the Butterworth filters. Experimental results are provided that show how less than a 10 percent change in the frequencies of the acoustic modes of the experimental setup will cause a non-adaptive controller (using positive position feedback and Butterworth filters) to go unstable, but the self-tuning regulator will maintain stability and continue absorbing energy through a 20 percent change in the frequencies of the acoustic modes.

  17. A positive feedback synapse from retinal horizontal cells to cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Skyler L; Babai, Norbert; Chambers, James J; Thoreson, Wallace B; Kramer, Richard H

    2011-05-01

    Cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells (HCs) have a reciprocal synapse that underlies lateral inhibition and establishes the antagonistic center-surround organization of the visual system. Cones transmit to HCs through an excitatory synapse and HCs feed back to cones through an inhibitory synapse. Here we report that HCs also transmit to cone terminals a positive feedback signal that elevates intracellular Ca(2+) and accelerates neurotransmitter release. Positive and negative feedback are both initiated by AMPA receptors on HCs, but positive feedback appears to be mediated by a change in HC Ca(2+), whereas negative feedback is mediated by a change in HC membrane potential. Local uncaging of AMPA receptor agonists suggests that positive feedback is spatially constrained to active HC-cone synapses, whereas the negative feedback signal spreads through HCs to affect release from surrounding cones. By locally offsetting the effects of negative feedback, positive feedback may amplify photoreceptor synaptic release without sacrificing HC-mediated contrast enhancement. PMID:21559323

  18. Blowin' in the Wind: Both "Negative" and "Positive" Feedback in an Obscured High-z Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresci, G.; Mainieri, V.; Brusa, M.; Marconi, A.; Perna, M.; Mannucci, F.; Piconcelli, E.; Maiolino, R.; Feruglio, C.; Fiore, F.; Bongiorno, A.; Lanzuisi, G.; Merloni, A.; Schramm, M.; Silverman, J. D.; Civano, F.

    2015-01-01

    Quasar feedback in the form of powerful outflows is invoked as a key mechanism to quench star formation in galaxies, preventing massive galaxies to overgrow and producing the red colors of ellipticals. On the other hand, some models are also requiring "positive" active galactic nucleus feedback, inducing star formation in the host galaxy through enhanced gas pressure in the interstellar medium. However, finding observational evidence of the effects of both types of feedback is still one of the main challenges of extragalactic astronomy, as few observations of energetic and extended radiatively driven winds are available. Here we present SINFONI near infrared integral field spectroscopy of XID2028, an obscured, radio-quiet z = 1.59 QSO detected in the XMM-COSMOS survey, in which we clearly resolve a fast (1500 km s-1) and extended (up to 13 kpc from the black hole) outflow in the [O III] lines emitting gas, whose large velocity and outflow rate are not sustainable by star formation only. The narrow component of H? emission and the rest frame U-band flux from Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging enable to map the current star formation in the host galaxy: both tracers independently show that the outflow position lies in the center of an empty cavity surrounded by star forming regions on its edge. The outflow is therefore removing the gas from the host galaxy ("negative feedback"), but also triggering star formation by outflow induced pressure at the edges ("positive feedback"). XID2028 represents the first example of a host galaxy showing both types of feedback simultaneously at work.

  19. BLOWIN' IN THE WIND: BOTH ''NEGATIVE'' AND ''POSITIVE'' FEEDBACK IN AN OBSCURED HIGH-z QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Cresci, G.; Mannucci, F.; Mainieri, V.; Brusa, M.; Perna, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Piconcelli, E.; Feruglio, C.; Fiore, F.; Bongiorno, A.; Maiolino, R.; Merloni, A; Schramm, M.; Silverman, J. D.; Civano, F.

    2015-01-20

    Quasar feedback in the form of powerful outflows is invoked as a key mechanism to quench star formation in galaxies, preventing massive galaxies to overgrow and producing the red colors of ellipticals. On the other hand, some models are also requiring ''positive'' active galactic nucleus feedback, inducing star formation in the host galaxy through enhanced gas pressure in the interstellar medium. However, finding observational evidence of the effects of both types of feedback is still one of the main challenges of extragalactic astronomy, as few observations of energetic and extended radiatively driven winds are available. Here we present SINFONI near infrared integral field spectroscopy of XID2028, an obscured, radio-quiet z = 1.59 QSO detected in the XMM-COSMOS survey, in which we clearly resolve a fast (1500 km s{sup –1}) and extended (up to 13 kpc from the black hole) outflow in the [O III] lines emitting gas, whose large velocity and outflow rate are not sustainable by star formation only. The narrow component of H? emission and the rest frame U-band flux from Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging enable to map the current star formation in the host galaxy: both tracers independently show that the outflow position lies in the center of an empty cavity surrounded by star forming regions on its edge. The outflow is therefore removing the gas from the host galaxy (''negative feedback''), but also triggering star formation by outflow induced pressure at the edges (''positive feedback''). XID2028 represents the first example of a host galaxy showing both types of feedback simultaneously at work.

  20. The Effect of Positive Feedback in a Constraint-Based Intelligent Tutoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrovic, Antonija; Ohlsson, Stellan; Barrow, Devon K.

    2013-01-01

    Tutoring technologies for supporting learning from errors via negative feedback are highly developed and have proven their worth in empirical evaluations. However, observations of empirical tutoring dialogs highlight the importance of positive feedback in the practice of expert tutoring. We hypothesize that positive feedback works by reducing…

  1. Output feedback control of a mechanical system using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Carbajal, F; Valderrabano-Gonzalez, A; Rosas-Caro, J C; Favela-Contreras, A

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an application of a nonlinear magnetic levitation system to the problem of efficient active control of mass-spring-damper mechanical systems. An output feedback control scheme is proposed for reference position trajectory tracking tasks on the flexible mechanical system. The electromagnetically actuated system is shown to be a differentially flat nonlinear system. An extended state estimation approach is also proposed to obtain estimates of velocity, acceleration and disturbance signals. The differential flatness structural property of the system is then employed for the synthesis of the controller and the signal estimation approach presented in this work. Some experimental and simulation results are included to show the efficient performance of the control approach and the effective estimation of the unknown signals. PMID:25707718

  2. 78 FR 36190 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ...Activities; Submission for OMB Review; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism AGENCY: Office of...information collection requirement regarding IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism. A notice was published...Information Collection 3090- 0285, IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism, by any of the...

  3. 78 FR 13057 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ...Activities; Information Collection; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism AGENCY: Office of...information collection requirement regarding IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism. DATES: Submit comments...Information Collection 3090- 0285, IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism, by any of the...

  4. Truthful Feedback for Sanctioning Reputation Mechanisms Jens Witkowski

    E-print Network

    Nebel, Bernhard

    . Almost every e- commerce site employs a so-called reputation mecha- nism which collects and publishes of almost all reputation mecha- nisms is the dependency on honest feedback. Most mechanisms, is retaliatory feedback. Empirical data of eBay's pre-2008 reputation mecha- nism suggests that sellers wait

  5. Active vibration control using genetic algorithm-based system identification and positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszulik, Ryan R.; Shan, Jinjun

    2012-05-01

    A system identification and vibration control strategy for a flexible manipulator with a collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair is presented in this paper. An iteratively implemented genetic algorithm is applied to the system identification problem of the flexible manipulator. A control law based upon positive position feedback is developed for vibration suppression. A minimization criterion based on the H?-norm of the closed loop system is solved by a genetic algorithm to derive optimal controller parameters. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the effectiveness of the system identification and vibration controller.

  6. Sensory feedback mechanism underlying entrainment of central pattern generator to mechanical resonance.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Zheng, M

    2006-04-01

    Rhythmic body motions observed in animal locomotion are known to be controlled by neuronal circuits called central pattern generators (CPGs). It appears that CPGs are energy efficient controllers that cooperate with biomechanical and environmental constraints through sensory feedback. In particular, the CPGs tend to induce rhythmic motion of the body at a natural frequency, i.e., the CPGs are entrained to a mechanical resonance by sensory feedback. The objective of this paper is to uncover the mechanism of entrainment resulting from the dynamic interaction of the CPG and mechanical system. We first develop multiple CPG models for the reciprocal inhibition oscillator (RIO) and examine through numerical experiments whether they can be entrained to a simple pendulum. This comparative study identifies the neuronal properties essential for the entrainment. We then analyze the simplest model that captures the essential dynamics via the method of harmonic balance. It is shown that robust entrainment results from a strong, positive-feedback coupling of a lightly damped mechanical system and the RIO consisting of neurons with the complete adaptation property. PMID:16404611

  7. Supporting Material: Feedback mechanism for microtubule length

    E-print Network

    Kierfeld, Jan

    with closed feedback, we present details of the theoretical bifurcation analysis. Finally, we present additional results on the robustness of our results with respect to changes in the catastrophe model), a growing MT experiences an immediate catastrophe event. For simplicity, we assume that at xMT = 0

  8. Positive Proprioceptive Feedback Elicited By Isometric Contractions of Ankle Flexors on Pretibial Motoneurons in Cats

    E-print Network

    Positive Proprioceptive Feedback Elicited By Isometric Contractions of Ankle Flexors on Pretibial proprioceptive feedback elicited by isometric contractions of ankle flexors on pretibial motoneurons in cats. J inhibition. This contraction-induced Ia excitatory feedback in ankle flexors might either reinforce Ia

  9. Positive feedback and momentum growth during debris-flow entrainment of wet bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Reid, M.E.; Logan, M.; LaHusen, R.G.; Godt, J.W.; Griswold, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Debris flows typically occur when intense rainfall or snowmelt triggers landslides or extensive erosion on steep, debris-mantled slopes. The flows can then grow dramatically in size and speed as they entrain material from their beds and banks, but the mechanism of this growth is unclear. Indeed, momentum conservation implies that entrainment of static material should retard the motion of the flows if friction remains unchanged. Here we use data from large-scale experiments to assess the entrainment of bed material by debris flows. We find that entrainment is accompanied by increased flow momentum and speed only if large positive pore pressures develop in wet bed sediments as the sediments are overridden by debris flows. The increased pore pressure facilitates progressive scour of the bed, reduces basal friction and instigates positive feedback that causes flow speed, mass and momentum to increase. If dryer bed sediment is entrained, however, the feedback becomes negative and flow momentum declines. We infer that analogous feedbacks could operate in other types of gravity-driven mass flow that interact with erodible beds. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Ribosome Flow Model with Positive Feedback Michael Margaliot and Tamir Tuller

    E-print Network

    Margaliot, Michael

    1 Ribosome Flow Model with Positive Feedback Michael Margaliot and Tamir Tuller Abstract--Eukaryotic mRNAs usually form a circular structure; thus, ribosomes that terminate translation at the 3' end of translation. This phenomenon describes ribosomal flow with positive feedback­an increase in the flow

  11. Positive feedbacks of fire, climate, and vegetation and the conversion of tropical savanna

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Positive feedbacks of fire, climate, and vegetation and the conversion of tropical savanna William a positive feedback loop in which clearing of tropical savannas results in warmer and drier climate of tropical savannas increases temperatures and wind speeds and decreases precipitation and relative humidity

  12. Is Positive Feedback a Forgotten Classroom Practice? Findings and Implications for At-Risk Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprouls, Katie; Mathur, Sarup R.; Upreti, Gita

    2015-01-01

    Although using higher rates of positive to negative feedback is one best practice often recommended to teachers, particularly when it comes to students experiencing behavioral problems in classroom settings, research on the use of positive feedback in classroom teaching practice has revealed inconsistent results. Research has documented…

  13. Triggering star formation by both radiative and mechanical AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Gan, Zhao-Ming; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2013-08-01

    We perform two dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations to study the positive active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback which triggers, rather than suppresses, star formation. Recently, it was shown by Nayakshin et al. and Ishibashi et al. that star formation occurs when the cold interstellar medium (ISM) is squeezed by the impact of mass outflow or radiation pressure, respectively. Mass outflow is ubiquitous in this astrophysical context, and radiation pressure is also important if the AGN is luminous. For the first time in this subject, we incorporate both mass outflow feedback and radiative feedback into our model. Consequently, the ISM is shocked into shells by the AGN feedback, and these shells soon fragment into clumps and filaments because of Rayleigh-Taylor and thermal instabilities. We have two major findings: (1) the star formation rate can indeed be very large in the clumps and filaments. However, the resultant star formation rate density is too large compared with previous works, which is mainly because we ignore the fact that most of the stars that are formed would be disrupted when they move away from the galactic center. (2) Although radiation pressure feedback has a limited effect, when mass outflow feedback is also included, they reinforce each other. Specifically, in the gas-poor case, mass outflow is always the dominant contributor to feedback.

  14. Feedback mechanism for smart nozzles and nebulizers

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar [Potomac, MD; Jorabchi, Kaveh [Arlington, VA; Kahen, Kaveh [Kleinburg, CA

    2009-01-27

    Nozzles and nebulizers able to produce aerosol with optimum and reproducible quality based on feedback information obtained using laser imaging techniques. Two laser-based imaging techniques based on particle image velocimetry (PTV) and optical patternation map and contrast size and velocity distributions for indirect and direct pneumatic nebulizations in plasma spectrometry. Two pulses from thin laser sheet with known time difference illuminate droplets flow field. Charge coupled device (CCL)) captures scattering of laser light from droplets, providing two instantaneous particle images. Pointwise cross-correlation of corresponding images yields two-dimensional velocity map of aerosol velocity field. For droplet size distribution studies, solution is doped with fluorescent dye and both laser induced florescence (LIF) and Mie scattering images are captured simultaneously by two CCDs with the same field of view. Ratio of LIF/Mie images provides relative droplet size information, then scaled by point calibration method via phase Doppler particle analyzer.

  15. Positive feedback can lead to dynamic nanometer-scale clustering on cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrens, Martijn; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Mugler, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Clustering of molecules on biological membranes is a widely observed phenomenon. A key example is the clustering of the oncoprotein Ras, which is known to be important for signal transduction in mammalian cells. Yet, the mechanism by which Ras clusters form and are maintained remains unclear. Recently, it has been discovered that activated Ras promotes further Ras activation. Here we show using particle-based simulation that this positive feedback is sufficient to produce persistent clusters of active Ras molecules at the nanometer scale via a dynamic nucleation mechanism. Furthermore, we find that our cluster statistics are consistent with experimental observations of the Ras system. Interestingly, we show that our model does not support a Turing regime of macroscopic reaction-diffusion patterning, and therefore that the clustering we observe is a purely stochastic effect, arising from the coupling of positive feedback with the discrete nature of individual molecules. These results underscore the importance of stochastic and dynamic properties of reaction diffusion systems for biological behavior.

  16. Positive Feedback between Shrub Encroachment and Nocturnal Air Temperature over the Northern Chihuahuan Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; D'Odorico, P.; de Wekker, S.; Fuentes, J. D.; Litvak, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Many arid grasslands around the world are affected by the encroachment of woody plants. A number of drivers have been invoked to explain these changes in plant community composition, including climate change, increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, nitrogen deposition, or internal feedbacks involving soil erosion or fire dynamics. An overlooked aspect of this shift in vegetation cover is its possible feedback on microclimate conditions. In this study we investigate how in the northern Chihuahuan Desert these changes in vegetation composition and structure influence near surface climate conditions and what feedbacks these conditions have on vegetation dynamics. To this end, the impact of shrub encroachment on the thermal structure of the near surface boundary layer and on the surface energy budget was analyzed using concurrent micrometeorological observations at two adjacent sites dominated respectively by Larrea tridentata shrubs and native grass species at the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge (northern Chihuahuan Desert, NM). The nighttime air temperature was found to be substantially higher (> 2 degrees Celsius) in the shrubland than in the grassland, especially during calm winter nights. Low temperatures are considered to be the limiting factor of the northward migration of Larrea tridentata. Thus, a positive feedback mechanism seems to exist, where shrub encroachment leads to warmer near-ground nighttime conditions, particularly during winter, which in turn favor woody species encroachment. Our analysis shows that these differences in surface air temperature are accompanied by differences in longwave radiation, and surface sensible and ground heat fluxes. These differences in surface fluxes are interpreted as an effect of the larger fraction of bare soil that typically exists in the shrubland sites. Therefore, the ground surface remains less insulated and more energy flows into the ground at the shrubland site than in the grassland during daytime. This energy is then released at night mainly as longwave radiation, which causes the differences in the nocturnal air temperatures between the two land covers.

  17. Positive feedback between microclimate and shrub encroachment in the northern Chihuahuan desert

    E-print Network

    Pockman, William T.

    Positive feedback between microclimate and shrub encroachment in the northern Chihuahuan desert ecosystem dynamics. In the case of the Chihuahuan Desert, we show that one such feedback could emerge from in the northern Chihuahuan Desert, Larrea tridentata, presently occurs where minimum temperatures are sufficiently

  18. Understanding Informal Feedback Seeking in the Workplace: The Impact of the Position in the Organizational Hierarchy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Rijt, Janine; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the position of employees in the organizational hierarchy is important in explaining their feedback seeking behaviour. Design/methodology/approach: This study takes a social network perspective by using an ego-centric network survey to investigate employees' feedback seeking behaviour…

  19. Linkages of plant–soil feedbacks and underlying invasion mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Inderjit; Cahill, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities and processes have repeatedly been shown to impact plant community assembly and population growth. Soil-driven effects may be particularly pronounced with the introduction of plants to non-native ranges, as introduced plants are not typically accompanied by transference of local soil communities. Here we describe how the mechanisms by which soil community processes influence plant growth overlap with several known and well-described mechanisms of plant invasion. Critically, a given soil community process may either facilitate or limit invasion, depending upon local conditions and the specific mechanisms of soil processes involved. Additionally, as soil communities typically consist of species with short generation times, the net consequences of plant–soil feedbacks for invasion trajectories are likely to change over time, as ecological and evolutionary adjustments occur. Here we provide an overview of the ecological linkages of plant–soil feedbacks and underlying mechanisms of invasion. PMID:25784668

  20. Eco-hydrological feedback mechanisms control ecological services in wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, J.; Hinz, C.; Vogwill, R.; Tareque, H.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems contain various feedback mechanisms between their abiotc and biotic components. The feedbacks are triggered by climate and propagate into patterns of environment partitioning based on distinct zones of hydrological function that vary in time and space. This partitioning co-evolves with vegetation, defines carbon metabolism and creates niches that govern patterns of flora and fauna abundance and distribution. Using a minimalistic model for wetland eco-hydrology, we explore vegetation adaptation to climate variability and the net metabolism of a wetland ecosystem given a range of climate conditions. We then apply the model to characterize the changes in niche habitat availability for a tortoise population endangered by a drying climate.

  1. Dual optical mechanical position tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, S. L., Jr.

    1985-06-01

    This patent application describes an apparatus for retaining control of moving carriage impact dot matrix print heads when subjected to strong external forces such as shock and/or vibration. Position and direction of carriage movement is provided by a photo emitter-sensor assembly and a slotted timing wheel or disc having a plurality of equally spaced slots whose slot width is equal to the slot separation. The slot width is sufficient to frame a pair of side-by-side emitters which operate in conjunction with a pair of side-by-side sensors on the other side of the timing wheel. The order or sequence in which the sensors receive photo energy from their respective emitters indicates the direction of rotation of the timing wheel while simultaneous reception of photo energy by the side-by-side sensors provides an indication of valid rest position of the carriage drive motor.

  2. Positive and Negative Feedbacks and Free-Scale Pattern Distribution in Rural-Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Alados, Concepción L.; Errea, Paz; Gartzia, Maite; Saiz, Hugo; Escós, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Depopulation of rural areas is a widespread phenomenon that has occurred in most industrialized countries, and has contributed significantly to a reduction in the productivity of agro-ecological resources. In this study, we identified the main trends in the dynamics of rural populations in the Central Pyrenees in the 20th C and early 21st C, and used density independent and density dependent models and identified the main factors that have influenced the dynamics. In addition, we investigated the change in the power law distribution of population size in those periods. Populations exhibited density-dependent positive feedback between 1960 and 2010, and a long-term positive correlation between agricultural activity and population size, which has resulted in a free-scale population distribution that has been disrupted by the collapse of the traditional agricultural society and by emigration to the industrialized cities. We concluded that complex socio-ecological systems that have strong feedback mechanisms can contribute to disruptive population collapses, which can be identified by changes in the pattern of population distribution. PMID:25474704

  3. The MAGNUM survey: positive feedback in the nuclear region of NGC 5643 suggested by MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresci, G.; Marconi, A.; Zibetti, S.; Risaliti, G.; Carniani, S.; Mannucci, F.; Gallazzi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Capetti, A.; Cicone, C.; Feruglio, C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Nagao, T.; Oliva, E.; Salvato, M.; Sani, E.; Tozzi, P.; Urrutia, T.; Venturi, G.

    2015-10-01

    We study the ionization and kinematics of the ionized gas in the nuclear region of the barred Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 5643 using MUSE integral field observations in the framework of the Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope (MAGNUM) survey. The data were used to identify regions with different ionization conditions and to map the gas density and the dust extinction. We find evidence for a double-sided ionization cone, possibly collimated by a dusty structure surrounding the nucleus. At the center of the ionization cone, outflowing ionized gas is revealed as a blueshifted, asymmetric wing of the [OIII] emission line, up to projected velocity v10 ~ -450 km s-1. The outflow is also seen as a diffuse, low-luminosity radio and X-ray jet, with similar extension. The outflowing material points in the direction of two clumps characterized by prominent line emission with spectra typical of HII regions, located at the edge of the dust lane of the bar. We propose that the star formation in the clumps is due to positive feedback induced by gas compression by the nuclear outflow, providing the first candidate for outflow-induced star formation in a Seyfert-like, radio-quiet AGN. This suggests that positive feedback may be a relevant mechanism in shaping the black hole-host galaxy coevolution. This work is based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO program 60.A-9339).

  4. PKC? maintains phenotypes of tumor initiating cells through cytokine-mediated autocrine loop with positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Kim, R-K; Suh, Y; Hwang, E; Yoo, K-C; Choi, K-S; An, S; Hwang, S-G; Kim, I-G; Kim, M-J; Lee, H-J; Lee, S-J

    2015-11-12

    The existence of tumor initiating cells (TICs) has been emerged as a good therapeutic target for treatment of glioblastoma that is the most aggressive brain tumor with poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the phenotypes of TICs still remain obscure. In this study, we found that PKC?, among PKC isoforms, is preferentially activated in TICs and acts as a critical regulator for the maintenance of TICs in glioblastoma. By modulating the expression levels or activity of PKC?, we demonstrated that PKC? promotes self-renewal and tumorigenic potentials of TICs. Importantly, we found that the activation of PKC? persists in TICs through an autocrine loop with positive feedback that was driven by PKC?/STAT3/IL-23/JAK signaling axis. Moreover, for phenotypes of TICs, we showed that PKC? activates AKT signaling component by phosphorylation specifically on Ser473. Taken together, we proposed that TICs regulate their own population in glioblastoma through an autocrine loop with positive feedback that is driven by PKC?-dependent secretion of cytokines. PMID:25746003

  5. Consensus positive position feedback control for vibration attenuation of smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Ehsan; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new network-based approach for active vibration control in smart structures. In this approach, a network with known topology connects collocated actuator/sensor elements of the smart structure to one another. Each of these actuators/sensors, i.e., agent or node, is enhanced by a separate multi-mode positive position feedback (PPF) controller. The decentralized PPF controlled agents collaborate with each other in the designed network, under a certain consensus dynamics. The consensus constraint forces neighboring agents to cooperate with each other such that the disagreement between the time-domain actuation of the agents is driven to zero. The controller output of each agent is calculated using state-space variables; hence, optimal state estimators are designed first for the proposed observer-based consensus PPF control. The consensus controller is numerically investigated for a flexible smart structure, i.e., a thin aluminum beam that is clamped at its both ends. Results demonstrate that the consensus law successfully imposes synchronization between the independently controlled agents, as the disagreements between the decentralized PPF controller variables converge to zero in a short time. The new consensus PPF controller brings extra robustness to vibration suppression in smart structures, where malfunctions of an agent can be compensated for by referencing the neighboring agents’ performance. This is demonstrated in the results by comparing the new controller with former centralized PPF approach.

  6. Visual feedback and lip-positioning skills of children with and without impaired hearing.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, S G

    1986-06-01

    Interplay between visual feedback and lip-positioning skill was studied in 10 5- to 14-year-old children with normal hearing and 10 with severe to profound hearing impairment. With visual feedback, the subjects in both groups had similar response times and accuracy in matching six visually specified lip separation "targets." Special skill in processing visual information by the hearing-impaired subjects was suggested by higher velocities of lip movement toward the targets and shorter latencies in reaching the goal positions. In the responses of the hearing children, lip-closing movements were executed more accurately than opening movements both with and without visual feedback. In general, the findings showed that, given visually displayed lip-position targets and feedback from positioning actions, children can achieve the targets with high accuracy regardless of hearing status or prior speaking experience. PMID:3724116

  7. 78 FR 13057 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism... to review and approve a previously approved information collection requirement regarding IT Dashboard... identified by Information Collection 3090- 0285, IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism, by any of the...

  8. The role of noise and positive feedback in the onset of autosomal dominant diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant (AD) diseases result when a single mutant or non-functioning gene is present on an autosomal chromosome. These diseases often do not emerge at birth. There are presently two prevailing theories explaining the expression of AD diseases. One explanation originates from the Knudson two-hit theory of hereditary cancers, where loss of heterozygosity or occurrence of somatic mutations impairs the function of the wild-type copy. While these somatic second hits may be sufficient for stable disease states, it is often difficult to determine if their occurrence necessarily marks the initiation of disease progression. A more direct consequence of a heterozygous genetic background is haploinsufficiency, referring to a lack of sufficient gene function due to reduced wild-type gene copy number; however, haploinsufficiency can involve a variety of additional mechanisms, such as noise in gene expression or protein levels, injury and second hit mutations in other genes. In this study, we explore the possible contribution to the onset of autosomal dominant diseases from intrinsic factors, such as those determined by the structure of the molecular networks governing normal cellular physiology. Results First, simple models of single gene insufficiency using the positive feedback loops that may be derived from a three-component network were studied by computer simulation using Bionet software. The network structure is shown to affect the dynamics considerably; some networks are relatively stable even when large stochastic variations in are present, while others exhibit switch-like dynamics. In the latter cases, once the network switches over to the disease state it remains in that state permanently. Model pathways for two autosomal dominant diseases, AD polycystic kidney disease and mature onset diabetes of youth (MODY) were simulated and the results are compared to known disease characteristics. Conclusions By identifying the intrinsic mechanisms involved in the onset of AD diseases, it may be possible to better assess risk factors as well as lead to potential new drug targets. To illustrate the applicability of this study of pathway dynamics, we simulated the primary pathways involved in two autosomal dominant diseases, Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) and mature onset diabetes of youth (MODY). Simulations demonstrate that some of the primary disease characteristics are consistent with the positive feedback - stochastic variation theory presented here. This has implications for new drug targets to control these diseases by blocking the positive feedback loop in the relevant pathways. PMID:20587063

  9. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing

    E-print Network

    Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing University of Kansas of additive manufacturing. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of

  10. Positive and negative feedback learning and associated dopamine and serotonin transporter binding after methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Stolyarova, Alexandra; O’Dell, Steve J.; Marshall, John F.; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Learning from mistakes and prospectively adjusting behavior in response to reward feedback is an important facet of performance monitoring. Dopamine (DA) pathways play an important role in feedback learning and a growing literature has also emerged on the importance of serotonin (5HT) in reward learning, particularly during punishment or reward omission (negative feedback). Cognitive impairments resulting from psychostimulant exposure may arise from altered patterns in feedback learning, which in turn may be modulated by DA and 5HT transmission. We analyzed long-term, off-drug changes in learning from positive and negative feedback and associated striatal DA transporter (DAT) and frontocortical 5HT transporter (SERT) binding in rats pretreated with methamphetamine (mAMPH). Specifically, we assessed the reversal phase of pairwise visual discrimination learning in rats receiving single dose- (mAMPHsingle) vs. escalating-dose exposure (mAMPHescal). Using fine-grained trial-by-trial analyses, we found increased sensitivity to and reliance on positive feedback in mAMPH-pretreated animals, with the mAMPHsingle group showing more pronounced use of this type of feedback. In contrast, overall negative feedback sensitivity was not altered following any mAMPH treatment. In addition to validating the enduring effects of mAMPH on early reversal learning, we found more consecutive error commissions before the first correct response in mAMPH-pretreated rats. This behavioral rigidity was negatively correlated with subregional frontocortical SERT whereas positive feedback sensitivity negatively correlated with striatal DAT binding. These results provide new evidence for the overlapping, yet dissociable roles of DA and 5HT systems in overcoming perseveration and in learning new reward rules. PMID:24959862

  11. Positive and negative feedback learning and associated dopamine and serotonin transporter binding after methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Stolyarova, Alexandra; O'Dell, Steve J; Marshall, John F; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2014-09-01

    Learning from mistakes and prospectively adjusting behavior in response to reward feedback is an important facet of performance monitoring. Dopamine (DA) pathways play an important role in feedback learning and a growing literature has also emerged on the importance of serotonin (5HT) in reward learning, particularly during punishment or reward omission (negative feedback). Cognitive impairments resulting from psychostimulant exposure may arise from altered patterns in feedback learning, which in turn may be modulated by DA and 5HT transmission. We analyzed long-term, off-drug changes in learning from positive and negative feedback and associated striatal DA transporter (DAT) and frontocortical 5HT transporter (SERT) binding in rats pretreated with methamphetamine (mAMPH). Specifically, we assessed the reversal phase of pairwise visual discrimination learning in rats receiving single dose- (mAMPHsingle) vs. escalating-dose exposure (mAMPHescal). Using fine-grained trial-by-trial analyses, we found increased sensitivity to and reliance on positive feedback in mAMPH-pretreated animals, with the mAMPHsingle group showing more pronounced use of this type of feedback. In contrast, overall negative feedback sensitivity was not altered following any mAMPH treatment. In addition to validating the enduring effects of mAMPH on early reversal learning, we found more consecutive error commissions before the first correct response in mAMPH-pretreated rats. This behavioral rigidity was negatively correlated with subregional frontocortical SERT whereas positive feedback sensitivity negatively correlated with striatal DAT binding. These results provide new evidence for the overlapping, yet dissociable roles of DA and 5HT systems in overcoming perseveration and in learning new reward rules. PMID:24959862

  12. On the magnitude of positive feedback between future climate change and the carbon cycle

    E-print Network

    Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    On the magnitude of positive feedback between future climate change and the carbon cycle J CO 2 will be 18% higher due to the climate change impact on the carbon cycle. Such a positive. They found a very large negative im- pact of climate change on land carbon cycle with a de- cline of tropical

  13. Positive feedbacks between fire and non-native grass invasion in temperate deciduous forests

    E-print Network

    Fraterrigo, Jennifer

    Positive feedbacks between fire and non-native grass invasion in temperate deciduous forests in eastern deciduous forests man- aged with prescribed fire and how this response varied across the landscape than drier sites. These findings indicate that deciduous forests are vulnerable to positive invasion

  14. Feedback loop design and experimental testing for integrated optics with micro-mechanical tuning

    E-print Network

    Waller, Laura A. (Laura Ann)

    2005-01-01

    I designed a capacitive sensor with feedback control for precision tuning of a MEMS controlled wavelength-selective switch. The implementation is based upon a customized feedback loop with a PID controller. The positional ...

  15. Experimental study on active vibration control using genetic algorithm-based system identification and optimized positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszulik, Ryan R.; Shan, Jinjun

    2012-12-01

    A genetic algorithm is implemented to identify the transfer function of an experimental system consisting of a flexible manipulator with a collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair. A multi-mode positive position feedback controller is then designed based upon the identified transfer function. To this end, the same iteratively implemented genetic algorithm is used to optimize all controller parameters by minimization of the closed loop H?-norm. The designed controller is then applied for vibration suppression on the experimental system.

  16. The role of positive facial feedback in the stress response

    E-print Network

    Kraft, Tara L.

    2011-04-01

    ). State affect changes were assessed at baseline and after each stress task using a short form of the Profile of Mood States, and change scores for positive and negative affect (average PA and NA during each task minus average baseline PA and NA) were used...

  17. Optically actuated two position mechanical mover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.; Murphy, A. J. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    An optically actuated mechanical mover adapted to be moved from an ambient position to an active position, is disclosed. The mechanical mover essentially comprises a piston/cylinder arrangement including a piston that is contained within an internal cylindrical chamber of a housing. The cylindrical chamber is configured to permit the piston to be moved for the length of the chamber as a work stroke. A lock pin extending through the piston, and diametrically opposed walls of the chamber housing, retain the piston in the ambient position at one end of the chamber. An actuator for producing a pressure or shock wave that drives the piston is positioned at the end of the chamber corresponding to the piston ambient position.

  18. 78 FR 36190 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... Dashboard Feedback Mechanism. A notice was published in the Federal Register at 78 FR 13057, on February 26... ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; IT Dashboard Feedback... comments identified by Information Collection 3090- 0285, IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism, by any of...

  19. Design principles of stripe-forming motifs: the role of positive feedback

    PubMed Central

    Munteanu, Andreea; Cotterell, James; Solé, Ricard V.; Sharpe, James

    2014-01-01

    Interpreting a morphogen gradient into a single stripe of gene-expression is a fundamental unit of patterning in early embryogenesis. From both experimental data and computational studies the feed-forward motifs stand out as minimal networks capable of this patterning function. Positive feedback within gene networks has been hypothesised to enhance the sharpness and precision of gene-expression borders, however a systematic analysis has not yet been reported. Here we set out to assess this hypothesis, and find an unexpected result. The addition of positive-feedback can have different effects on two different designs of feed-forward motif– it increases the parametric robustness of one design, while being neutral or detrimental to the other. These results shed light on the abundance of the former motif and especially of mutual-inhibition positive feedback in developmental networks. PMID:24830352

  20. Effect of Positive Feedback with Threshold Control on Stochastic Resonance of Bi-Stable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Renhuan; Song, Aiguo

    It is important to magnify natural stochastic resonance of nonlinear systems. In this paper, positive feedback is proposed to enhance stochastic resonance of those nonlinear systems whose internal parameters are difficult or impossible to be adjusted. The method can be used to improve the response of these nonlinear systems to external stimulus or strengthen the effect of target manipulation. At first, theoretical analysis based on adiabatic approximation method is presented, and then numerical simulations for both hard potential system and soft potential system are conducted to demonstrate the proposed method. Both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation indicate that stochastic resonance of these systems can be magnified by positive feedback.

  1. Positive tropical marine low-cloud cover feedback inferred from cloud-controlling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xin; Hall, Alex; Klein, Stephen A.; DeAngelis, Anthony M.

    2015-09-01

    Differences in simulations of tropical marine low-cloud cover (LCC) feedback are sources of significant spread in temperature responses of climate models to anthropogenic forcing. Here we show that in models the feedback is mainly driven by three large-scale changes—a strengthening tropical inversion, increasing surface latent heat flux, and an increasing vertical moisture gradient. Variations in the LCC response to these changes alone account for most of the spread in model-projected 21st century LCC changes. A methodology is devised to constrain the LCC response observationally using sea surface temperature (SST) as a surrogate for the latent heat flux and moisture gradient. In models where the current climate's LCC sensitivities to inversion strength and SST variations are consistent with observed, LCC decreases systematically, which would increase absorption of solar radiation. These results support a positive LCC feedback. Correcting biases in the sensitivities will be an important step toward more credible simulation of cloud feedbacks.

  2. Activation of TGF-?1-CD147 positive feedback loop in hepatic stellate cells promotes liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yan; Ju, Di; Zhang, Da-Wei; Li, Hao; Kong, Ling-Min; Guo, Yanhai; Li, Can; Wang, Xi-Long; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Bian, Huijie

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) by transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) initiates HBV-associated fibrogenesis. The mechanism of TGF-?1 modulating HSC activation is not fully uncovered. We hypothesized a positive feedback signaling loop of TGF-?1-CD147 promoting liver fibrogenesis by activation of HSCs. Human HSC cell line LX-2 and spontaneous liver fibrosis model derived from HBV transgenic mice were used to evaluate the activation of molecules in the signaling loop. Wound healing and cell contraction assay were performed to detect the CD147-overexpressed HSC migration and contraction. The transcriptional regulation of CD147 by TGF-?1/Smad4 was determined using dual-luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. We found that a positive reciprocal regulation between TGF-?1 and CD147 mediated HSC activation. CD147 over-expression promoted HSC migration and accelerated TGF-?1-induced cell contraction. Phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 in cooperation with Smad4 mediated the TGF-?1-regulated CD147 expression. Smad4 activated the transcription by direct interaction with CD147 promoter. Meanwhile, CD147 modulated the activated phenotype of HSCs through the ERK1/2 and Sp1 which up-regulated ?-SMA, collagen I, and TGF-?1 synthesis. These findings indicate that TGF-?1-CD147 loop plays a key role in regulating the HSC activation and combination of TGF-? receptor inhibitor and anti-CD147 antibody might be promised to reverse fibrogenesis. PMID:26559755

  3. Activation of TGF-?1-CD147 positive feedback loop in hepatic stellate cells promotes liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Yan; Ju, Di; Zhang, Da-Wei; Li, Hao; Kong, Ling-Min; Guo, Yanhai; Li, Can; Wang, Xi-Long; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Bian, Huijie

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) by transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) initiates HBV-associated fibrogenesis. The mechanism of TGF-?1 modulating HSC activation is not fully uncovered. We hypothesized a positive feedback signaling loop of TGF-?1-CD147 promoting liver fibrogenesis by activation of HSCs. Human HSC cell line LX-2 and spontaneous liver fibrosis model derived from HBV transgenic mice were used to evaluate the activation of molecules in the signaling loop. Wound healing and cell contraction assay were performed to detect the CD147-overexpressed HSC migration and contraction. The transcriptional regulation of CD147 by TGF-?1/Smad4 was determined using dual-luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. We found that a positive reciprocal regulation between TGF-?1 and CD147 mediated HSC activation. CD147 over-expression promoted HSC migration and accelerated TGF-?1-induced cell contraction. Phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 in cooperation with Smad4 mediated the TGF-?1-regulated CD147 expression. Smad4 activated the transcription by direct interaction with CD147 promoter. Meanwhile, CD147 modulated the activated phenotype of HSCs through the ERK1/2 and Sp1 which up-regulated ?-SMA, collagen I, and TGF-?1 synthesis. These findings indicate that TGF-?1-CD147 loop plays a key role in regulating the HSC activation and combination of TGF-? receptor inhibitor and anti-CD147 antibody might be promised to reverse fibrogenesis. PMID:26559755

  4. Precise computer controlled positioning of robot end effectors using sensory feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C.; Tsai, J. S. H.; Mcinnis, B. C.; Shieh, L. S.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary study of the combined position/force control using sensory feedback for a one-dimensional manipulator model, which may count for the spacecraft docking problem or to be extended to the multijoint robot manipulator problem, has been performed. The additional degrees of freedom introduced by the compliant force sensor is included in the system dynamics in the design of precise position control. State feedback based on pole placement method and with integral control is used to design the position controller. A simple constant gain force controller is used as an example to illustrate the dependence of the stability and steady-state accuracy of the overall position/force control on the design of the inner position controller. Supportive simulation results are also provided.

  5. A Positive Autoregulatory BDNF Feedback Loop via C/EBP? Mediates Hippocampal Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Bambah-Mukku, Dhananjay; Travaglia, Alessio; Chen, Dillon Y.; Pollonini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the temporal progression and regulation of the mechanisms underlying memory consolidation. Brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor (BDNF) has been shown to mediate the maintenance of memory consolidation, but the mechanisms of this regulation remain unclear. Using inhibitory avoidance (IA) in rats, here we show that a hippocampal BDNF-positive autoregulatory feedback loop via CCAAT-enhancer binding protein ? (C/EBP?) is necessary to mediate memory consolidation. At training, a very rapid, learning-induced requirement of BDNF accompanied by rapid de novo translation controls the induction of a persistent activation of cAMP-response element binding-protein (CREB) and C/EBP? expression. The latter, in turn, controls an increase in expression of bdnf exon IV transcripts and BDNF protein, both of which are necessary and, together with the initial BDNF requirement, mediate memory consolidation. The autoregulatory loop terminates by 48 h after training with decreased C/EBP? and pCREB and increased methyl-CpG binding protein-2, histone-deacetylase-2, and switch-independent-3a binding at the bdnf exon IV promoter. PMID:25209292

  6. Sensitivity analysis of the Nonlinear Integral Positive Position Feedback and Integral Resonant controllers on vibration suppression of nonlinear oscillatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Ehsan; Mahmoodi, S. Nima

    2015-05-01

    A new Nonlinear Integral Positive Position Feedback (NIPPF) approach and the Integral Resonant Control (IRC) method are implemented and analyzed for nonlinear vibration control. The performances of both controllers are compared to the Positive Position Feedback (PPF) method. A comprehensive form of the nonlinear feedback controller that includes all three approaches is considered for the closed-loop system; this form is then solved innovatively using the Method of Multiple Scales. The particular form of the modulation equations for each controller is obtained via the calculated comprehensive solution. Sensitivity analysis is performed on the controller parameters of each approach, and the influence of the parameters on the system response is studied. Results demonstrate that controller structure has the most salient role in the suppression performance. Even by selecting the optimal control parameters for each approach, improvements in the control performances are limited. The NIPPF controller delivers superior results compared to the other two approaches in the frequency and time domains. Using this approach, not only is the vibration amplitude at the exact resonant frequency sufficiently suppressed, but the subsequent peaks in the frequency domain are also reduced significantly compared to the PPF method.

  7. Positive And Negative Feedback Loops Coupled By Common Transcription Activator And Repressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; ?opaciuk, Agata

    2015-03-01

    Dynamical systems consisting of two interlocked loops with negative and positive feedback have been studied using the linear analysis of stability and numerical solutions. Conditions for saddle-node bifurcation were formulated in a general form. Conditions for Hopf bifurcations were found in a few symmetrical cases. Auto-oscillations, when they exist, are generated by the negative feedback repressive loop. This loop determines the frequency and amplitude of oscillations. The positive feedback loop of activation slightly modifies the oscillations. Oscillations are possible when the difference between Hilll's coefficients of the repression and activation is sufficiently high. The highly cooperative activation loop with a fast turnover slows down or even makes the oscillations impossible. The system under consideration can constitute a component of epigenetic or enzymatic regulation network.

  8. Asymmetry of the Bjerknes positive feedback between the two types of El Niño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fei; Fang, Xiang-Hui; Yu, Jin-Yi; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-11-01

    Corresponding to the pronounced amplitude asymmetry for the central Pacific (CP) and eastern Pacific (EP) types of El Niño, an asymmetry in the strength of the Bjerknes positive feedback is found between these two types of El Niño, which is manifested as a weaker relationship between the zonal wind anomaly and the zonal gradient of sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly in the CP El Niño. The strength asymmetry mainly comes from a weaker sensitivity of the zonal gradient of sea level pressure (SLP) anomaly to that of diabatic heating anomaly during CP El Niño. This weaker sensitivity is caused by (1) a large cancelation induced by the negative SST-cloud thermodynamic feedback to the positive dynamical feedback for CP El Niño, (2) an off-equator shift of the maximum SLP anomalies during CP El Niño, and (3) a suppression of the mean low-level convergence when CP El Niño events occur more often.

  9. Morphogenesis can be driven by properly parametrised mechanical feedback.

    PubMed

    Beloussov, L V

    2013-11-01

    A fundamental problem of morphogenesis is whether it presents itself as a succession of links that are each driven by its own specific cause-effect relationship, or whether all of the links can be embraced by a common law that is possible to formulate in physical terms. We suggest that a common biophysical background for most, if not all, morphogenetic processes is based upon feedback between mechanical stresses (MS) that are imposed to a given part of a developing embryo by its other parts and MS that are actively generated within that part. The latter are directed toward hyper-restoration (restoration with an overshoot) of the initial MS values. We show that under mechanical constraints imposed by other parts, these tendencies drive forth development. To provide specificity for morphogenetic reactions, this feedback should be modulated by long-term parameters and/or initial conditions that are set up by genetic factors. The experimental and model data related to this concept are reviewed. PMID:24264054

  10. Control of cardiac alternans by mechanical and electrical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapari, Felicia; Deshpande, Dipen; Belhamadia, Youssef; Dubljevic, Stevan

    2014-07-01

    A persistent alternation in the cardiac action potential duration has been linked to the onset of ventricular arrhythmia, which may lead to sudden cardiac death. A coupling between these cardiac alternans and the intracellular calcium dynamics has also been identified in previous studies. In this paper, the system of PDEs describing the small amplitude of alternans and the alternation of peak intracellular Ca2+ are stabilized by optimal boundary and spatially distributed actuation. A simulation study demonstrating the successful annihilation of both alternans on a one-dimensional cable of cardiac cells by utilizing the full-state feedback controller is presented. Complimentary to these studies, a three variable Nash-Panfilov model is used to investigate alternans annihilation via mechanical (or stretch) perturbations. The coupled model includes the active stress which defines the mechanical properties of the tissue and is utilized in the feedback algorithm as an independent input from the pacing based controller realization in alternans annihilation. Simulation studies of both control methods demonstrate that the proposed methods can successfully annihilate alternans in cables that are significantly longer than 1 cm, thus overcoming the limitations of earlier control efforts.

  11. Mechanical feedback as a possible regulator of tissue growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shraiman, Boris I.

    2005-03-01

    Regulation of cell growth and proliferation has a fundamental role in animal and plant development and in the progression of cancer. In the context of development, it is important to understand the mechanisms that coordinate growth and patterning of tissues. Imaginal discs, which are larval precursors of fly limbs and organs, have provided much of what we currently know about these processes. Here, we consider the mechanism that is responsible for the observed uniformity of growth in wing imaginal discs, which persists in the presence of gradients in growth inducing morphogens in spite of the stochastic nature of cell division. The phenomenon of "cell competition," which manifests in apoptosis of slower-growing cells in the vicinity of faster growing tissue, suggests that uniform growth is not a default state but a result of active regulation. How can a patch of tissue compare its growth rate with that of its surroundings? A possible way is furnished by mechanical interactions. To demonstrate this mechanism, we formulate a mathematical model of nonuniform growth in a layer of tissue and examine its mechanical implications. We show that a clone growing faster or slower than the surrounding tissue is subject to mechanical stress, and we propose that dependence of the rate of cell division on local stress could provide an "integral-feedback" mechanism stabilizing uniform growth. The proposed mechanism of growth control is not specific to imaginal disc growth and could be of general relevance. Several experimental tests of the proposed mechanism are suggested. Drosophila melanogaster | imaginal disc | mechanics | stress

  12. quantum mechanics position and momentum Pigment Molecules

    E-print Network

    quantum mechanics position and momentum Pigment Molecules A typical pigment molecule has a photon of wavelength at the pigment molecule. What is the largest value of such that the photon can be absorbed by an electron in the pigment molecule? When the photon is absorbed, the electron must be able

  13. The effect of experimental warming and precipitation change on proteolytic enzyme activity: positive feedbacks

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    are a principal driver of the within-system cycle of soil nitrogen, yet there is little to no understanding of the nitrogen cycle. Keywords: global change, organic nitrogen, proteolytic enzymes, soil nitrogen cycle, soil: positive feedbacks to nitrogen availability are not universal E D W A R D R . B R Z O S T E K * 1 , J O H N

  14. PH-315 A. La Rosa POSITIVE FEEDBACK and OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS (Schmitt trigger comparator)

    E-print Network

    PH-315 A. La Rosa POSITIVE FEEDBACK and OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS (Schmitt trigger comparator) 1 to amplify dc or ac signals. In this lab session, we will use LM358AP whose terminal connections are shown "Operational Amplifier" posted in the website of this course. APPLICATIONS: COMPARATORS and SCHMITT TRIGGER

  15. Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenstrom, Anna-Brita

    A study of feedback in conversational question-response exchanges focused on the questioner's feedback to the respondent. It examined three types of "followup" moves: the ordinary type revealing the questioner's attitude to the response and closing the exchange; the type signaling the questioner's reaction to the response and inviting further…

  16. Cellular mechanisms for integral feedback in visually guided behavior

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Bettina; Weir, Peter T.; Roth, Eatai; Fairhall, Adrienne L.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory feedback is a ubiquitous feature of guidance systems in both animals and engineered vehicles. For example, a common strategy for moving along a straight path is to turn such that the measured rate of rotation is zero. This task can be accomplished by using a feedback signal that is proportional to the instantaneous value of the measured sensory signal. In such a system, the addition of an integral term depending on past values of the sensory input is needed to eliminate steady-state error [proportional-integral (PI) control]. However, the means by which nervous systems implement such a computation are poorly understood. Here, we show that the optomotor responses of flying Drosophila follow a time course consistent with temporal integration of horizontal motion input. To investigate the cellular basis of this effect, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from the set of identified visual interneurons [horizontal system (HS) cells] thought to control this reflex during tethered flight. At high stimulus speeds, HS cells exhibit steady-state responses during flight that are absent during quiescence, a state-dependent difference in physiology that is explained by changes in their presynaptic inputs. However, even during flight, the membrane potential of the large-field interneurons exhibits no evidence for integration that could explain the behavioral responses. However, using a genetically encoded indicator, we found that calcium accumulates in the terminals of the interneurons along a time course consistent with the behavior and propose that this accumulation provides a mechanism for temporal integration of sensory feedback consistent with PI control. PMID:24706794

  17. ON THE EXTREME POSITIVE STAR FORMATION FEEDBACK CONDITION IN SCUBA SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, Filiberto; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Wuensch, Richard; Palous, Jan

    2010-03-01

    We present a detailed study of the hydrodynamics of the matter reinserted by massive stars via stellar winds and supernovae explosions in young assembling galaxies. We show that the interplay between the thermalization of the kinetic energy provided by massive stars, radiative cooling of the thermalized plasma, and the gravitational pull of the host galaxy lead to three different hydrodynamic regimes. These are: (1) the quasi-adiabatic supergalactic winds; (2) the bimodal flows, with mass accumulation in the central zones and gas expulsion from the outer zones of the assembling galaxy; and (3) the gravitationally bound regime, for which all of the gas returned by massive stars remains bound to the host galaxy and is likely to be reprocessed into further generations of stars. Which of the three possible solutions takes place depends on the mass of the star-forming region, its mechanical luminosity (or star formation rate), and its size. The model predicts that massive assembling galaxies with large star formation rates similar to those detected in Submillimeter Common-User Bolometric Array sources ({approx}1000 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) are likely to evolve in a positive star formation feedback condition, either in the bimodal or in the gravitationally bound regime. This implies that star formation in these sources may have little impact on the intergalactic medium and result instead into a fast interstellar matter enrichment, as observed in high redshift quasars.

  18. CGILS: Results from the First Phase of an International Project to Understand the Physical Mechanisms of Low Cloud Feedbacks in Single Column Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter N.; Austin, Phillip H.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; DelGenio, Anthony; DeRoode, Stephan R.; Endo, Satoshi; Franklin, Charmaine N.; Oolaz, Jean-Christophe; Hannay, Cecile; Heus, Thijs; Isotta, Francesco Alessandro; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Kang, In-Sik; Kawai, Hideaki; Kiehler, Martin; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Yangang; Lock, Adrian P.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Molod, Andrea M.; Suarez, Max J.

    2013-01-01

    1] CGILS-the CFMIP-GASS Intercomparison of Large Eddy Models (LESs) and single column models (SCMs)-investigates the mechanisms of cloud feedback in SCMs and LESs under idealized climate change perturbation. This paper describes the CGILS results from 15 SCMs and 8 LES models. Three cloud regimes over the subtropical oceans are studied: shallow cumulus, cumulus under stratocumulus, and well-mixed coastal stratus/stratocumulus. In the stratocumulus and coastal stratus regimes, SCMs without activated shallow convection generally simulated negative cloud feedbacks, while models with active shallow convection generally simulated positive cloud feedbacks. In the shallow cumulus alone regime, this relationship is less clear, likely due to the changes in cloud depth, lateral mixing, and precipitation or a combination of them. The majority of LES models simulated negative cloud feedback in the well-mixed coastal stratus/stratocumulus regime, and positive feedback in the shallow cumulus and stratocumulus regime. A general framework is provided to interpret SCM results: in a warmer climate, the moistening rate of the cloudy layer associated with the surface-based turbulence parameterization is enhanced; together with weaker large-scale subsidence, it causes negative cloud feedback. In contrast, in the warmer climate, the drying rate associated with the shallow convection scheme is enhanced. This causes positive cloud feedback. These mechanisms are summarized as the "NESTS" negative cloud feedback and the "SCOPE" positive cloud feedback (Negative feedback from Surface Turbulence under weaker Subsidence-Shallow Convection PositivE feedback) with the net cloud feedback depending on how the two opposing effects counteract each other. The LES results are consistent with these interpretations

  19. CGILS: Results from the first phase of an international project to understand the physical mechanisms of low cloud feedbacks in single column models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter N.; Austin, Phillip H.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; Genio, Anthony D.; Roode, Stephan R.; Endo, Satoshi; Franklin, Charmaine N.; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hannay, Cecile; Heus, Thijs; Isotta, Francesco Alessandro; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Kang, In-Sik; Kawai, Hideaki; Köhler, Martin; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Yangang; Lock, Adrian P.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Molod, Andrea M.; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Rasch, Philip; Sandu, Irina; Senkbeil, Ryan; Siebesma, A. Pier; Siegenthaler-Le Drian, Colombe; Stevens, Bjorn; Suarez, Max J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Salzen, Knut; Webb, Mark J.; Wolf, Audrey; Zhao, Ming

    2013-12-01

    CGILS—the CFMIP-GASS Intercomparison of Large Eddy Models (LESs) and single column models (SCMs)—investigates the mechanisms of cloud feedback in SCMs and LESs under idealized climate change perturbation. This paper describes the CGILS results from 15 SCMs and 8 LES models. Three cloud regimes over the subtropical oceans are studied: shallow cumulus, cumulus under stratocumulus, and well-mixed coastal stratus/stratocumulus. In the stratocumulus and coastal stratus regimes, SCMs without activated shallow convection generally simulated negative cloud feedbacks, while models with active shallow convection generally simulated positive cloud feedbacks. In the shallow cumulus alone regime, this relationship is less clear, likely due to the changes in cloud depth, lateral mixing, and precipitation or a combination of them. The majority of LES models simulated negative cloud feedback in the well-mixed coastal stratus/stratocumulus regime, and positive feedback in the shallow cumulus and stratocumulus regime. A general framework is provided to interpret SCM results: in a warmer climate, the moistening rate of the cloudy layer associated with the surface-based turbulence parameterization is enhanced; together with weaker large-scale subsidence, it causes negative cloud feedback. In contrast, in the warmer climate, the drying rate associated with the shallow convection scheme is enhanced. This causes positive cloud feedback. These mechanisms are summarized as the "NESTS" negative cloud feedback and the "SCOPE" positive cloud feedback (Negative feedback from Surface Turbulence under weaker Subsidence—Shallow Convection PositivE feedback) with the net cloud feedback depending on how the two opposing effects counteract each other. The LES results are consistent with these interpretations.

  20. Single screw interrupted thread positive displacement mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boblitt, Wayne W.

    1992-07-01

    A single screw positive displacement compressor mechanism employing shallow gate rotor tooth penetration of the main rotor for purposes of reducing internal leakage and consequent compressor inefficiencies is presented. The invention is provided with an interrupted main rotor thread for purposes of insuring multiple gate rotor teeth meshing with the drive portion of the main rotor thread, thereby reducing gate rotor tooth flank loads in the compressor section of the device. Provision is also made for main rotor thread baffling between the main rotor chamber section and the mechanism inlet.

  1. The regulation of positive and negative social feedback: A psychophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne; Remue, Jonathan; Ng, Kwun Kei; Mueller, Sven C; De Raedt, Rudi

    2015-09-01

    Everyday social evaluations are psychologically potent and trigger self-reflective thoughts and feelings. The present study sought to examine the psychophysiological impact of such evaluations using eye tracking, pupillometry, and heart-rate variability. Fifty-nine healthy adult volunteers received rigged social feedback (criticism and praise) based on their photograph. Gaze data were collected to investigate processes of attentional deployment/allocation toward the self or the evaluator expressing criticism or praise. Whereas voluntary attention was directed to evaluators who expressed praise, attention was drawn to one's own picture after criticism. Pupil dilation and heart-rate variability were larger in response to criticism as compared to praise, suggesting a flexible and adaptive emotion regulatory effort in response to social information that triggers an affective response. Altogether, healthy individuals recruited more regulatory resources to cope with negative (as compared to positive) social feedback, and this processing of social feedback was associated with adjustments in self-focused attention. PMID:25810280

  2. Positive Feedback in the AKT/mTOR pathway and its implications for growth signal progression in skeletal

    E-print Network

    Duffy, Ken

    proposed as mediator of skeletal muscle growth and a positive feedback between Akt and mTOR was suggested to be a regulator of muscle cell growth. Indeed, studies that over- expressed active AKT by genetic mutationsPositive Feedback in the AKT/mTOR pathway and its implications for growth signal progression

  3. Eliminating the possibility at Chernobyl 4 of recriticality with positive feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.

    1996-04-29

    We have recently published an article in which we discuss means by which plutonium and other fissile material stored underground could reach criticality with positive feedback and therefore explosive potential. The Chernobyl rubble involving hundreds of tons of material is similar in some respects to the systems analyzed in the paper, and the practices there to control criticality may well increase the probability of a second event at Chernobyl 4. This paper explores the Chernobyl situation and remedial actions are recommended.

  4. Implementation of modified positive velocity feedback controller for active vibration control in smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Ehsan; McCarty, Rachael; Mahmoodi, S. Nima

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces the Modified Positive Velocity Feedback (MPVF) controller as an alternative to the conventional Positive Position Feedback (PPF) controller, with the goal of suppressing unwanted resonant vibrations in smart structures. The MPVF controller uses two parallel feedback compensators working on the fundamental modes of the structure. The vibration velocity is measured by a sensor or state estimator and is fed back to the controller as the input. To control n-modes, n sets of parallel compensators are required. MPVF controller gain selection in multimode cases highly affects the control results. This problem is resolved using the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and the M-norm optimization method, which are selected to form the desired performance of the MPVF controller. First, the controller is simulated for the two optimization approaches, and then, experimental investigation of the vibration suppression is performed. The LQR-optimized MPVF provides a better suppression in terms of vibration displacement. The M-normoptimized MPVF controller focuses on modes with higher magnitudes of velocity and provides a higher level of vibration velocity suppression than LQR-optimized method. Vibration velocity attenuation can be very important in preventing fatigue failures due to the fact that velocity can be directly related to stress.

  5. An FPGA-based Bunch-by-Bunch Position and Angle Feedback System at ATF2

    E-print Network

    Christian, G B; Bett, D R; Burrows, P N; Constance, B; Davis, M R; Gerbershagen, A; Perry, C; Resta Lopez, J

    2011-01-01

    The FONT5 intra-train feedback system serves as a prototype for an interaction point beam-based feedback system for future electron-positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider. The system has been tested on the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and is deployed to stabilise the beam orbit at the ATF2. The goal of this system is to correct both position and angle jitter in the vertical plane, providing stability of ~1 micron at the entrance to the ATF2 final-focus system. The system comprises three stripline beam position monitors (BPMs) and two stripline kickers, custom low-latency analogue front-end BPM processors, a custom FPGA-based digital processing board with fast ADCs, and custom kicker-drive amplifiers. An overview of the hardware, and the latest results from beam tests at ATF2, will be presented. The total latency of the system with coupled position and angle feedback loops operating simultaneously was measured to be approximately 140 ns. The greatest degree of correction observed ...

  6. The Use of Feedback Mechanisms in Interpreting the Robustness of a Neoliberal Educational Assemblage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerath, Peter; Mattheis, Allison

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates how using feedback mechanisms or "loops" as heuristic devices can help ethnographers explain the interior logic, robustness and contradictions within complex educational assemblages. After reviewing the use of feedback mechanisms in the natural and social sciences, particularly practice theory, the article…

  7. A Novel TGF? Modulator that Uncouples R-Smad/I-Smad-Mediated Negative Feedback from R-Smad/Ligand-Driven Positive Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wenchao; Monteiro, Rui; Zuo, Jie; Simões, Filipa Costa; Martella, Andrea; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Grosveld, Frank; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Patient, Roger

    2015-01-01

    As some of the most widely utilised intercellular signalling molecules, transforming growth factor ? (TGF?) superfamily members play critical roles in normal development and become disrupted in human disease. Establishing appropriate levels of TGF? signalling involves positive and negative feedback, which are coupled and driven by the same signal transduction components (R-Smad transcription factor complexes), but whether and how the regulation of the two can be distinguished are unknown. Genome-wide comparison of published ChIP-seq datasets suggests that LIM domain binding proteins (Ldbs) co-localise with R-Smads at a substantial subset of R-Smad target genes including the locus of inhibitory Smad7 (I-Smad7), which mediates negative feedback for TGF? signalling. We present evidence suggesting that zebrafish Ldb2a binds and directly activates the I-Smad7 gene, whereas it binds and represses the ligand gene, Squint (Sqt), which drives positive feedback. Thus, the fine tuning of TGF? signalling derives from positive and negative control by Ldb2a. Expression of ldb2a is itself activated by TGF? signals, suggesting potential feed-forward loops that might delay the negative input of Ldb2a to the positive feedback, as well as the positive input of Ldb2a to the negative feedback. In this way, precise gene expression control by Ldb2a enables an initial build-up of signalling via a fully active positive feedback in the absence of buffering by the negative feedback. In Ldb2a-deficient zebrafish embryos, homeostasis of TGF? signalling is perturbed and signalling is stably enhanced, giving rise to excess mesoderm and endoderm, an effect that can be rescued by reducing signalling by the TGF? family members, Nodal and BMP. Thus, Ldb2a is critical to the homeostatic control of TGF? signalling and thereby embryonic patterning. PMID:25665164

  8. Vacuum ultraviolet light source utilizing rare gas scintillation amplification sustained by photon positive feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena (Inventor); Chen, Danli (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A source of light in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region includes a reflective UV-sensitive photocathode supported in spaced parallel relationship with a mesh electrode within a rare gas at low pressure. A high positive potential applied to the mesh electrode creates an electric field which causes drifting of free electrons occurring between the electrodes and producing continuous VUV light output by electric field-driven scintillation amplification sustained by positive photon feedback mediated by photoemission from the photocathode. In one embodiment the lamp emits a narrow-band continuum peaked at 175 nm.

  9. Soil moisture-precipitation feedback: reconciling negative spatial coupling with a positive temporal feedback via moisture recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillod, Benoît; Orlowsky, Boris; Miralles, Diego G.; Teuling, Adriaan J.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture-precipitation coupling, i.e., the impact of soil moisture on precipitation, conveys some of the largest uncertainties in land-atmosphere interactions. In addition to a direct positive effect via moisture recycling, a number of indirect effects have been identified, where surface turbulent fluxes impact temperature and humidity in the boundary layer, its growth and thereby indirectly many variables that can support or inhibit convection triggering, such as atmospheric stability, entrainment, or mesoscale circulations. Due to the complexity of the involved interactions, the sign and strength of this feedback remains heavily debated in the literature, despite important advances in recent years. Traditional "temporal" perspectives often highlight positive relationships, i.e. rain falling more often over wet soils [e.g., 1], albeit with difficulties in attributing these relationships to a coupling due to atmospheric persistence [e.g., 2]. On the other hand, recent studies focusing on the impacts of spatial differences in soil moisture have highlighted that rain falls preferentially over soils that are drier than their surrounding [3]. This is likely due to negative indirect effects, such as mesoscale circulations that are induced by the underlying spatial soil moisture patterns [4]. These results from "temporal" and "spatial" perspectives may first appear contradictory and dependent on the underlying datasets. However, they could also refer to different processes that determine when and where it rains. In other words, the presence of negative spatial coupling may not necessarily be incompatible with the concept of positive temporal coupling. Using global satellite-based data, we compare spatial and temporal perspectives using metrics that relate precipitation events to prior spatial and temporal soil moisture patterns. We find that relationships between soil moisture and subsequent precipitation can be spatially negative while temporally positive, with implications on the interpretation of both perspectives. While the causality of temporal relationships remains difficult to assess, these findings suggest that a positive coupling could induce persistence in precipitation and soil moisture, while a negative spatial coupling could act to redistribute soil moisture spatially. Our results show that it rains preferentially over patches that are drier than the surrounding but at times in which they are wetter than their own climatology. [1] K. L. Findell et al., 2011, Nat. Geosci., 4, 434-439. [2] B. P. Guillod et al., 2014, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 8343-8367. [3] C. M. Taylor et al., 2012, Nature, 489, 423-426. [4] C. M. Taylor et al., 2011, Nat. Geosci., 4, 1-4.

  10. Sp1-CD147 positive feedback loop promotes the invasion ability of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Ye, Wei; Wu, Juan; Liu, Lijuan; Yang, Lina; Gao, Lu; Chen, Biliang; Zhang, Fanglin; Yang, Hong; Li, Yu

    2015-07-01

    CD147 is a novel cancer biomarker that has been confirmed to be overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, which is significantly associated with poor prognosis. Although the Sp1 protein regulates the expression level of CD147, it remains unclear whether Sp1 phosphorylation plays a role in this regulation. A dual-luciferase assay revealed that T453 and T739 mutations decreased the activity of Sp1 binding to the promoter of CD147, followed by a decrease in CD147 mRNA and protein expression. Western blot analysis showed that CD147 promoted Sp1 phosphorylation at T453 and T739 through the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK pathways. In addition, blocking the Sp1-CD147 positive feedback loop reduced the invasion ability of HO-8910pm cells. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the components of the feedback loop were overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissues. The correlation analysis revealed a significant correlation between phospho-Sp1 (T453), phospho-Sp1 (T739) and CD147 expression levels, with correlation coefficients of r=0.477 and r=0.461, respectively. Collectively, our results suggest that a Sp1-CD147 positive feedback loop plays a critical role in the invasion ability of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:25998266

  11. An optimal feedback control framework for grasping objects with position uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Vassilios N; Schrater, Paul R

    2011-10-01

    As we move, the relative location between our hands and objects changes in uncertain ways due to noisy motor commands and imprecise and ambiguous sensory information. The impressive capabilities humans display for interacting and manipulating objects with position uncertainty suggest that our brain maintains representations of location uncertainty and builds compensation for uncertainty into its motor control strategies. Our previous work demonstrated that specific control strategies are used to compensate for location uncertainty. However, it is an open question whether compensation for position uncertainty in grasping is consistent with the stochastic optimal feedback control, mainly due to the difficulty of modeling natural tasks within this framework. In this study, we develop a stochastic optimal feedback control model to evaluate the optimality of human grasping strategies. We investigate the properties of the model through a series of simulation experiments and show that it explains key aspects of previously observed compensation strategies. It also provides a basis for individual differences in terms of differential control costs-the controller compensates only to the extent that performance benefits in terms of making stable grasps outweigh the additional control costs of compensation. These results suggest that stochastic optimal feedback control can be used to understand uncertainty compensation in complex natural tasks like grasping. PMID:21732861

  12. Neural mechanisms underlying auditory feedback control of speech

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Kevin J.; Guenther, Frank H.

    2013-01-01

    The neural substrates underlying auditory feedback control of speech were investigated using a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and computational modeling. Neural responses were measured while subjects spoke monosyllabic words under two conditions: (i) normal auditory feedback of their speech, and (ii) auditory feedback in which the first formant frequency of their speech was unexpectedly shifted in real time. Acoustic measurements showed compensation to the shift within approximately 135 ms of onset. Neuroimaging revealed increased activity in bilateral superior temporal cortex during shifted feedback, indicative of neurons coding mismatches between expected and actual auditory signals, as well as right prefrontal and Rolandic cortical activity. Structural equation modeling revealed increased influence of bilateral auditory cortical areas on right frontal areas during shifted speech, indicating that projections from auditory error cells in posterior superior temporal cortex to motor correction cells in right frontal cortex mediate auditory feedback control of speech. PMID:18035557

  13. The importance of outflow quasars in the AGN feedback mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Lujón, Florencia

    2011-11-01

    Outflows from Active Galactic Nuclei(AGNs) are an important diagnostic of the physical conditions in their inner regions. The kinetic luminosity (L_k) as a fraction of the total bolometric luminosity of the AGN, is a key parameter that let us describe the role that outflows may play in various AGN feedback mechanisms such as the enrichment of the intergalactic medium, the formation of the supermassive black holes and their host galaxies and their coevolution. To derive L_k, it is necessary to estimate the distance of theoutflow from the quasar nucleus. We presenta detailed analysis of several high-redshift (2.5<=z<=4.0) quasars presenting resolved absorption doublets (such as CIV, SiIV and NV) in their spectra, based on high-resolution WHT+ISIS observations. Covering factors and column densities of several atomic species in the absorbing gas have been measured by comparison of the residual intensities in the two components of the doublets. From these, the ionisation parameters have been estimated providing constraints on the distance of the gas from the nucleus (for plausible assumed values of electron densities), and therefore the kinetic luminosity of the outflow.

  14. MICROBE SENSING, POSITIVE FEEDBACK LOOPS, AND THE PATHOGENESIS OF INFLAMMATORY DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Summary The molecular apparatus that protects us against infection can also injure us by causing autoimmune or autoinflammatory disease. It now seems that at times, defects within the sensing arm of innate immunity contribute to diseases of this type. The initiation of an immune response is often microbe dependent and, in many cases, Toll-like receptor (TLR) dependent. Positive feedback loops triggering immune activation may occur when TLR signaling pathways stimulate host cells in an unchecked manner. Or, immune activation may persist because of failure to eradicate an inciting infection. Or on occasion, endogenous DNA may trigger specific immune responses that beget further responses in a TLR-dependent autoamplification loop. Specific biochemical defects that cause loop-related autoimmunity have been revealed by random germline mutagenesis and by gene targeting. We have also developed some insight into critical points at which feedback loops can be interrupted. PMID:19120489

  15. Enhanced Positive Water Vapor Feedback Associated with Tropical Deep Convection: New Evidence from Aura MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Hui; Read, William G.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Waters, Joe W.; Wu, Dong L.; Fetzer, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent simultaneous observations of upper tropospheric (UT) water vapor and cloud ice from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite provide new evidence for tropical convective influence on UT water vapor and its associated greenhouse effect. The observations show that UT water vapor increases as cloud ice water content increases. They also show that, when sea surface temperature (SST) exceeds approx.300 K, UT cloud ice associated with tropical deep convection increases sharply with increasing SST. The moistening of the upper troposphere by deep convection leads to an enhanced positive water vapor feedback, about 3 times that implied solely by thermodynamics. Over tropical oceans when SST greater than approx.300 K, the 'convective UT water vapor feedback' inferred from the MLS observations contributes approximately 65% of the sensitivity of the clear-sky greenhouse parameter to SST.

  16. Response to "The Iris Hypothesis: A Negative or Positive Cloud Feedback?"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lindzen, Richard S.; Hou, Arthur Y.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Based on radiance measurements of Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite, Lindzen et al. found that the high-level cloud cover averaged over the tropical western Pacific decreases with increasing sea surface temperature. They further found that the response of high-level clouds to the sea surface temperature had an effect of reducing the magnitude of climate change, which is referred as a negative climate feedback. Lin et al. reassessed the results found by Lindzen et al. by analyzing the radiation and clouds derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System measurements. They found a weak positive feedback between high-level clouds and the surface temperature. We have found that the approach taken by Lin et al. to estimating the albedo and the outgoing longwave radiation is incorrect and that the inferred climate sensitivity is unreliable.

  17. A dynamic model of the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism.

    PubMed

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1990-05-01

    We have reported oscillations in proximal tubular pressure and flow and in distal tubular pressure and chloride concentration in halothane-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. These variables oscillated at the same frequency in each animal, approximately 35 mHz, but were out of phase with each other. We suggested that the oscillation arises within the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) system. As a test of this hypothesis, we have now developed a dynamic model to determine whether it can simulate the measured frequency and phase relationships with a realistic set of parameters. The model includes a detailed representation of pressure and flow in the tubules based on a reduced version of the Navier-Stokes equations. The NaCl concentration at the macula densa was used as the signal to the TGF mechanism. The tubular NaCl concentration was modeled by a partial differential equation based on conservation of mass. For a realistic set of parameter values the model accurately predicted oscillations with the same frequency and phase relationships among the oscillating variables as was found experimentally. Moreover, tubular NaCl handling significantly influenced the dynamic properties of the TGF system. Thus the model predicted a substantial phase shift of the NaCl concentration relative to the flow oscillation at the macula densa. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the oscillations are caused by the TGF mechanism. The results further support the notion that the delays and damping caused by the tubule are responsible for the limited high-frequency response of renal autoregulation. PMID:2337158

  18. A positive feedback loop between Gli1 and tyrosine kinase Hck amplifies shh signaling activities in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, X; Zhan, X; Wu, J

    2015-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is critical during normal development, and the abnormal activation of the Shh pathway is involved in many human cancers. As a target gene of the Shh pathway and as a transcription activator downstream of Shh signaling, Gli1 autoregulates and increases Shh signaling output. Gli1 is one of the key oncogenic factors in Shh-induced tumors such as medulloblastoma. Gli1 is posttranslationally modified, but the nature of the active form of Gli1 was unclear. Here we identified a Src family kinase Hck as a novel activator of Gli1. In Shh-responsive NIH3T3 cells, Hck interacts with Gli1 and phosphorylates multiple tyrosine residues in Gli1. Gli1-mediated target gene activation was significantly enhanced by Hck with both kinase activity-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We provide evidence showing that Hck disrupts the interaction between Gli1 and its inhibitor Sufu. In both NIH3T3 cells and cerebellum granule neuron precursors, the Hck gene is also a direct target of Gli1. Therefore, Gli1 and Hck form a positive feedback loop that amplifies Shh signaling transcription outcomes. In Shh-induced medulloblastoma, Hck is highly expressed and Gli1 is tyrosine phosphorylated, which may enhance the tumorigenic effects of the Gli1 oncogene. RNAi-mediated inhibition of Hck expression significantly repressed medulloblastoma cell growth. In summary, a novel positive feedback loop contributes to maximal Gli1 oncogenic activities in Shh-induced tumors such as medulloblastoma. PMID:26619401

  19. The Y-located gonadoblastoma gene TSPY amplifies its own expression through a positive feedback loop in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kido, Tatsuo; Lau, Yun-Fai Chris

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Y-encoded proto-oncoprotein TSPY amplifies its expression level via a positive feedback loop. • TSPY binds to the chromatin/DNA at exon 1 of TSPY gene. • TSPY enhances the gene expression in a TSPY exon 1 sequence dependent manner. • The conserved SET/NAP-domain is essential for TSPY transactivation. • Insights on probable mechanisms on TSPY exacerbation on cancer development in men. - Abstract: The testis-specific protein Y-encoded (TSPY) is a repetitive gene located on the gonadoblastoma region of the Y chromosome, and has been considered to be the putative gene for this oncogenic locus on the male-only chromosome. It is expressed in spermatogonial cells and spermatocytes in normal human testis, but abundantly in gonadoblastoma, testicular germ cell tumors and a variety of somatic cancers, including melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and prostate cancer. Various studies suggest that TSPY accelerates cell proliferation and growth, and promotes tumorigenesis. In this report, we show that TSPY could bind directly to the chromatin/DNA at exon 1 of its own gene, and greatly enhance the transcriptional activities of the endogenous gene in the LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Domain mapping analyses of TSPY have localized the critical and sufficient domain to the SET/NAP-domain. These results suggest that TSPY could efficiently amplify its expression and oncogenic functions through a positive feedback loop, and contribute to the overall tumorigenic processes when it is expressed in various human cancers.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A FAST MICRON-RESOLUTION BEAM POSITION MONITOR SIGNAL PROCESSOR FOR LINEAR COLLIDER BEAMBASED FEEDBACK SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Apsimon, R; Clarke, C; Constance, B; Dabiri Khah, H; Hartin, T; Perry, C; Resta Lopez, J; Swinson, C; Christian, G B; Kalinin, A

    2009-01-01

    We present the design of a prototype fast beam position monitor (BPM) signal processor for use in inter-bunch beam-based feedbacks for linear colliders and electron linacs. We describe the FONT4 intra-train beam-based digital position feedback system prototype deployed at the Accelerator test facility (ATF) extraction line at KEK, Japan. The system incorporates a fast analogue beam position monitor front-end signal processor, a digital feedback board, and a fast kicker-driver amplifier. The total feedback system latency is less than 150ns, of which less than 10ns is used for the BPM processor. We report preliminary results of beam tests using electron bunches separated by c. 150ns. Position resolution of order 1 micron was obtained.

  1. Control of a double impacting mechanical oscillator displacement feedback

    E-print Network

    Arrowsmith, David

    for this study was to understand the nature of non-linear resonances associated with the interaction of servo-hydraulic may be applicable to problems where physical objects must be manipulated by feedback assisted

  2. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junwei; Zhou, Tianshou

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per and clk mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  3. Shifts in a single muscle's control potential of body dynamics are determined by mechanical feedback.

    PubMed

    Sponberg, Simon; Libby, Thomas; Mullens, Chris H; Full, Robert J

    2011-05-27

    Muscles are multi-functional structures that interface neural and mechanical systems. Muscle work depends on a large multi-dimensional space of stimulus (neural) and strain (mechanical) parameters. In our companion paper, we rewrote activation to individual muscles in intact, behaving cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis L.), revealing a specific muscle's potential to control body dynamics in different behaviours. Here, we use those results to provide the biologically relevant parameters for in situ work measurements. We test four hypotheses about how muscle function changes to provide mechanisms for the observed control responses. Under isometric conditions, a graded increase in muscle stress underlies its linear actuation during standing behaviours. Despite typically absorbing energy, this muscle can recruit two separate periods of positive work when controlling running. This functional change arises from mechanical feedback filtering a linear increase in neural activation into nonlinear work output. Changing activation phase again led to positive work recruitment, but at different times, consistent with the muscle's ability to also produce a turn. Changes in muscle work required considering the natural sequence of strides and separating swing and stance contributions of work. Both in vivo control potentials and in situ work loops were necessary to discover the neuromechanical coupling enabling control. PMID:21502130

  4. Technology Enhanced Feedback Tools as a Knowledge Management Mechanism for Supporting Professional Growth and School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Alan; Swan, Gerry

    2011-01-01

    Attempts at school reform and improvement have experienced difficulty creating and implementing feedback systems that energize and sustain change efforts. If the call for reform at all levels of education is to be met, attention must be given to establishing effective feedback mechanisms in educational institutions as they embark on improvement…

  5. Spatial pattern formation of coastal vegetation in response to external gradients and positive feedbacks affecting soil porewater salinity: A model study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, J.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Smith, T. J., III; Teh, S.Y.; Koh, H.-L.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal vegetation of South Florida typically comprises salinity-tolerant mangroves bordering salinity-intolerant hardwood hammocks and fresh water marshes. Two primary ecological factors appear to influence the maintenance of mangrove/hammock ecotones against changes that might occur due to disturbances. One of these is a gradient in one or more environmental factors. The other is the action of positive feedback mechanisms, in which each vegetation community influences its local environment to favor itself, reinforcing the boundary between communities. The relative contributions of these two factors, however, can be hard to discern. A spatially explicit individual-based model of vegetation, coupled with a model of soil hydrology and salinity dynamics is presented here to simulate mangrove/hammock ecotones in the coastal margin habitats of South Florida. The model simulation results indicate that an environmental gradient of salinity, caused by tidal flux, is the key factor separating vegetation communities, while positive feedback involving the different interaction of each vegetation type with the vadose zone salinity increases the sharpness of boundaries, and maintains the ecological resilience of mangrove/hammock ecotones against small disturbances. Investigation of effects of precipitation on positive feedback indicates that the dry season, with its low precipitation, is the period of strongest positive feedback. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. (outside the USA).

  6. Movement goals and feedback and feedforward control mechanisms in speech production

    PubMed Central

    Perkell, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of speech motor control are described that support a theoretical framework in which fundamental control variables for phonemic movements are multi-dimensional regions in auditory and somatosensory spaces. Auditory feedback is used to acquire and maintain auditory goals and in the development and function of feedback and feedforward control mechanisms. Several lines of evidence support the idea that speakers with more acute sensory discrimination acquire more distinct goal regions and therefore produce speech sounds with greater contrast. Feedback modification findings indicate that fluently produced sound sequences are encoded as feedforward commands, and feedback control serves to correct mismatches between expected and produced sensory consequences. PMID:22661828

  7. MECHANISMS OF CARBON MONOXIDE ATTENUATION OF TUBULOGLOMERULAR FEEDBACK (TGF)

    PubMed Central

    Ren, YiLin; D’Ambrosio, Martin A.; Wang, Hong; Falck, John R.; Peterson, Edward L.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a physiological messenger with diverse functions in the kidney, including controlling afferent arteriole (Af-Art) tone both directly and via tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF). We have reported that CO attenuates TGF, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unknown. We hypothesized that CO, acting via cGMP, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), and cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterase-2 (PDE2), reduces cAMP in the macula densa, leading to TGF attenuation. In vitro, microdissected rabbit Af-Arts and their attached macula densa were simultaneously perfused. TGF was measured as the decrease in Af-Art diameter elicited by switching macula densa NaCl from 10 to 80 mM. Adding a CO-releasing molecule (CORM-3, 5×10?5mol/L) to the macula densa blunted TGF from 3.3±0.3 to 2.0±0.3 µm (P<0.001). The guanylate cyclase inhibitor LY-83583 (10?6mol/L) enhanced TGF (5.8±0.6 µm; P<0.001 vs. control) and prevented the effect of CORM-3 on TGF (LY-83583 + CORM-3, 5.5±0.3 µm). Similarly, the PKG inhibitor KT-5823 (2×10?6mol/L) enhanced TGF and prevented the effect of CORM-3 on TGF (KT-5823, 6.0±0.7 µm; KT-5823 + CORM-3, 5.9±0.8 µm). However, the PDE2 inhibitor BAY-60-7550 (10?6mol/L) did not prevent the effect of CORM-3 on TGF (BAY-60-7550, 4.07±0.31 µm; BAY-60-7550 + CORM-3, 1.84±0.31 µm, P<0.001). Finally, the degradation-resistant cAMP analog dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP, 10?3mol/L) prevented the attenuation of TGF by CORM-3 (db-cAMP, 4.6±0.5 µm; db-cAMP + CORM-3, 5.0±0.6 µm). We conclude that CO attenuates TGF by reducing cAMP via a cGMP-dependent pathway mediated by PKG, rather than PDE2. Our results will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that control the renal microcirculation. PMID:22508834

  8. Phasic dopamine release induced by positive feedback predicts individual differences in reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Klanker, Marianne; Sandberg, Tessa; Joosten, Ruud; Willuhn, Ingo; Feenstra, Matthijs; Denys, Damiaan

    2015-11-01

    Striatal dopamine (DA) is central to reward-based learning. Less is known about the contribution of DA to the ability to adapt previously learned behavior in response to changes in the environment, such as a reversal of response-reward contingencies. We hypothesized that DA is involved in the rapid updating of response-reward information essential for successful reversal learning. We trained rats to discriminate between two levers, where lever availability was signaled by a non-discriminative cue. Pressing one lever was always rewarded, whereas the other lever was never rewarded. After reaching stable discrimination performance, a reversal was presented, so that the previously non-rewarded lever was now rewarded and vice versa. We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to monitor DA release in the ventromedial striatum. During discrimination performance (pre-reversal), cue presentation induced phasic DA release, whereas reward delivery did not. The opposite pattern was observed post-reversal: Striatal DA release emerged after reward delivery, while cue-induced release diminished. Trial-by-trial analysis showed rapid reinstatement of cue-induced DA release on trials immediately following initial correct responses. This effect of positive feedback was observed in animals that learned the reversal, but not in 'non-learners'. In contrast, neither pre-reversal responding and DA signaling, nor post-reversal DA signaling in response to negative feedback differed between learners and non-learners. Together, we show that phasic DA dynamics in the ventromedial striatum encoding reward-predicting cues are associated with positive feedback during reversal learning. Furthermore, these signals predict individual differences in learning that are not present prior to reversal, suggesting a distinct role for dopamine in the adaptation of previously learned behavior. PMID:26343836

  9. Positive Feedback between Transcriptional and Kinase Suppression in Nematodes with Extraordinary Longevity and Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bharill, Puneet; Shmookler Reis, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) regulates development and metabolism, and modulates aging, of Caenorhabditis elegans. In nematodes, as in mammals, IIS is understood to operate through a kinase-phosphorylation cascade that inactivates the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor. Situated at the center of this pathway, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylates PIP2 to form PIP3, a phospholipid required for membrane tethering and activation of many signaling molecules. Nonsense mutants of age-1, the nematode gene encoding the class-I catalytic subunit of PI3K, produce only a truncated protein lacking the kinase domain, and yet confer 10-fold greater longevity on second-generation (F2) homozygotes, and comparable gains in stress resistance. Their F1 parents, like weaker age-1 mutants, are far less robust—implying that maternally contributed trace amounts of PI3K activity or of PIP3 block the extreme age-1 phenotypes. We find that F2-mutant adults have <10% of wild-type kinase activity in vitro and <60% of normal phosphoprotein levels in vivo. Inactivation of PI3K not only disrupts PIP3-dependent kinase signaling, but surprisingly also attenuates transcripts of numerous IIS components, even upstream of PI3K, and those of signaling molecules that cross-talk with IIS. The age-1(mg44) nonsense mutation results, in F2 adults, in changes to kinase profiles and to expression levels of multiple transcripts that distinguish this mutant from F1 age-1 homozygotes, a weaker age-1 mutant, or wild-type adults. Most but not all of those changes are reversed by a second mutation to daf-16, implicating both DAF-16/ FOXO–dependent and –independent mechanisms. RNAi, silencing genes that are downregulated in long-lived worms, improves oxidative-stress resistance of wild-type adults. It is therefore plausible that attenuation of those genes in age-1(mg44)-F2 adults contributes to their exceptional survival. IIS in nematodes (and presumably in other species) thus involves transcriptional as well as kinase regulation in a positive-feedback circuit, favoring either survival or reproduction. Hyperlongevity of strong age-1(mg44) mutants may result from their inability to reset this molecular switch to the reproductive mode. PMID:19360094

  10. The Effect of Positive and Negative Feedback on Risk-Taking across Different Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Losecaat Vermeer, Annabel B.; Sanfey, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    Preferences for risky choices have often been shown to be unstable and context-dependent. Though people generally avoid gambles with mixed outcomes, a phenomenon often attributed to loss aversion, contextual factors can impact this dramatically. For example, people typically prefer risky options after a financial loss, while generally choosing safer options after a monetary gain. However, it is unclear what exactly contributes to these preference shifts as a function of prior outcomes, as these gain/loss outcomes are usually confounded with participant performance, and therefore it is unclear whether these effects are driven purely by the monetary gains or losses, or rather by success or failure at the actual task. Here, we experimentally separated the effects of monetary gains/losses from performance success/failure prior to a standard risky choice. Participants performed a task in which they experienced contextual effects: 1) monetary gain or loss based directly on performance, 2) monetary gain or loss that was randomly awarded and was, crucially, independent from performance, and 3) success or failure feedback based on performance, but without any monetary incentive. Immediately following these positive/negative contexts, participants were presented with a gain-loss gamble that they had to decide to either play or pass. We found that risk preferences for identical sets of gambles were biased by positive and negative contexts containing monetary gains and losses, but not by contexts containing performance feedback. This data suggests that the observed framing effects are driven by aversion for monetary losses and not simply by the positive or negative valence of the context, or by potential moods resulting from positive or negative contexts. These results highlight the specific context dependence of risk preferences. PMID:26407298

  11. MiR-192-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop Controls the Robustness of Stress-Induced p53 Oscillations in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Moore, Richard; Ooi, Hsu Kiang; Kang, Taek; Bleris, Leonidas; Ma, Lan

    2015-12-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a critical role in cellular stress and cancer prevention. A number of post-transcriptional regulators, termed microRNAs, are closely connected with the p53-mediated cellular networks. While the molecular interactions among p53 and microRNAs have emerged, a systems-level understanding of the regulatory mechanism and the role of microRNAs-forming feedback loops with the p53 core remains elusive. Here we have identified from literature that there exist three classes of microRNA-mediated feedback loops revolving around p53, all with the nature of positive feedback coincidentally. To explore the relationship between the cellular performance of p53 with the microRNA feedback pathways, we developed a mathematical model of the core p53-MDM2 module coupled with three microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops involving miR-192, miR-34a, and miR-29a. Simulations and bifurcation analysis in relationship to extrinsic noise reproduce the oscillatory behavior of p53 under DNA damage in single cells, and notably show that specific microRNA abrogation can disrupt the wild-type cellular phenotype when the ubiquitous cell-to-cell variability is taken into account. To assess these in silico results we conducted microRNA-perturbation experiments in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Time-lapse microscopy of cell-population behavior in response to DNA double-strand breaks, together with image classification of single-cell phenotypes across a population, confirmed that the cellular p53 oscillations are compromised after miR-192 perturbations, matching well with the model predictions. Our study via modeling in combination with quantitative experiments provides new evidence on the role of microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops in conferring robustness to the system performance of stress-induced response of p53. PMID:26642352

  12. MiR-192-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop Controls the Robustness of Stress-Induced p53 Oscillations in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bleris, Leonidas; Ma, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a critical role in cellular stress and cancer prevention. A number of post-transcriptional regulators, termed microRNAs, are closely connected with the p53-mediated cellular networks. While the molecular interactions among p53 and microRNAs have emerged, a systems-level understanding of the regulatory mechanism and the role of microRNAs-forming feedback loops with the p53 core remains elusive. Here we have identified from literature that there exist three classes of microRNA-mediated feedback loops revolving around p53, all with the nature of positive feedback coincidentally. To explore the relationship between the cellular performance of p53 with the microRNA feedback pathways, we developed a mathematical model of the core p53-MDM2 module coupled with three microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops involving miR-192, miR-34a, and miR-29a. Simulations and bifurcation analysis in relationship to extrinsic noise reproduce the oscillatory behavior of p53 under DNA damage in single cells, and notably show that specific microRNA abrogation can disrupt the wild-type cellular phenotype when the ubiquitous cell-to-cell variability is taken into account. To assess these in silico results we conducted microRNA-perturbation experiments in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Time-lapse microscopy of cell-population behavior in response to DNA double-strand breaks, together with image classification of single-cell phenotypes across a population, confirmed that the cellular p53 oscillations are compromised after miR-192 perturbations, matching well with the model predictions. Our study via modeling in combination with quantitative experiments provides new evidence on the role of microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops in conferring robustness to the system performance of stress-induced response of p53. PMID:26642352

  13. Sahara Heat Low Perturbations and Water Vapor in the Sahel: A Positive Feedback System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, L.; Evan, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    It is necessary to understand the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification, motivated by the increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Climate change and land dynamics are the perturbations that are major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a ';';desertified'' state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. This research focuses on changes in precipitation resulting from land-atmosphere interactions and changes in vegetation cover. We concentrate on the Sahel region of Africa (a strip of land that is a transitional area between the Sahara desert to the North and the rain forest to the South). It is a dry land, semi arid environment and is a bistable ecosystem that can either be in the state of 'dry' or 'wet'. After an abnormally wet/high precipitation period in the 1950s the Sahel experienced terrible droughts and desertification which peaked in the 1980s. Since then, precipitation has gradually increased and a sinusoidal model has been shown run on a multi decadal cycle. Discrepancies in the data exist, however, and although the overall cycle has been modeled well, the large inter-annual fluctuations in precipitation have yet to be sufficiently modeled or explained. This research offers new evidence as to why such a phenomenon exists and attempts to attribute this behavior to a coupled land-atmosphere feedback system, linking together changes in vegetation cover and precipitation in the Sahel. Using the model output data from a high resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to look at Africa and compare the difference between perturbations and the mean, this research asserts that when the surface of the Saharan Heat Low (SHL) becomes extremely hot the pressure drops substantially. Subsequently, due to the West African Monsoon system, air rushes in from high-pressure areas, and pulls monsoon precipitation/humidity over the Sahel, causing abnormally wet seasons. The more rainfall the area receives, the more vegetation cover increases. Additionally, this increased water vapor coming from evapotranspiration from plants then blankets the SHL, further warming it and continuing the cycle of positive feedback. The reverse effect could also take place, causing an abnormally dry season. This is theorized to be the reason for the inter-annual variation in rainfall within the Sahel and preliminary results support this conclusion.

  14. A simple negative interaction in the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is sufficient to produce reliable oscillations.

    PubMed

    Miró-Bueno, Jesús M; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Negative and positive transcriptional feedback loops are present in natural and synthetic genetic oscillators. A single gene with negative transcriptional feedback needs a time delay and sufficiently strong nonlinearity in the transmission of the feedback signal in order to produce biochemical rhythms. A single gene with only positive transcriptional feedback does not produce oscillations. Here, we demonstrate that this single-gene network in conjunction with a simple negative interaction can also easily produce rhythms. We examine a model comprised of two well-differentiated parts. The first is a positive feedback created by a protein that binds to the promoter of its own gene and activates the transcription. The second is a negative interaction in which a repressor molecule prevents this protein from binding to its promoter. A stochastic study shows that the system is robust to noise. A deterministic study identifies that the dynamics of the oscillator are mainly driven by two types of biomolecules: the protein, and the complex formed by the repressor and this protein. The main conclusion of this paper is that a simple and usual negative interaction, such as degradation, sequestration or inhibition, acting on the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is a sufficient condition to produce reliable oscillations. One gene is enough and the positive transcriptional feedback signal does not need to activate a second repressor gene. This means that at the genetic level an explicit negative feedback loop is not necessary. The model needs neither cooperative binding reactions nor the formation of protein multimers. Therefore, our findings could help to clarify the design principles of cellular clocks and constitute a new efficient tool for engineering synthetic genetic oscillators. PMID:22205920

  15. A Simple Negative Interaction in the Positive Transcriptional Feedback of a Single Gene Is Sufficient to Produce Reliable Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Miró-Bueno, Jesús M.; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Negative and positive transcriptional feedback loops are present in natural and synthetic genetic oscillators. A single gene with negative transcriptional feedback needs a time delay and sufficiently strong nonlinearity in the transmission of the feedback signal in order to produce biochemical rhythms. A single gene with only positive transcriptional feedback does not produce oscillations. Here, we demonstrate that this single-gene network in conjunction with a simple negative interaction can also easily produce rhythms. We examine a model comprised of two well-differentiated parts. The first is a positive feedback created by a protein that binds to the promoter of its own gene and activates the transcription. The second is a negative interaction in which a repressor molecule prevents this protein from binding to its promoter. A stochastic study shows that the system is robust to noise. A deterministic study identifies that the dynamics of the oscillator are mainly driven by two types of biomolecules: the protein, and the complex formed by the repressor and this protein. The main conclusion of this paper is that a simple and usual negative interaction, such as degradation, sequestration or inhibition, acting on the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is a sufficient condition to produce reliable oscillations. One gene is enough and the positive transcriptional feedback signal does not need to activate a second repressor gene. This means that at the genetic level an explicit negative feedback loop is not necessary. The model needs neither cooperative binding reactions nor the formation of protein multimers. Therefore, our findings could help to clarify the design principles of cellular clocks and constitute a new efficient tool for engineering synthetic genetic oscillators. PMID:22205920

  16. A Haptic Feedback Scheme to Accurately Position a Virtual Wrist Prosthesis Using a Three-Node Tactor Array

    PubMed Central

    Erwin, Andrew; Sup, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel haptic feedback scheme, used for accurately positioning a 1DOF virtual wrist prosthesis through sensory substitution, is presented. The scheme employs a three-node tactor array and discretely and selectively modulates the stimulation frequency of each tactor to relay 11 discrete haptic stimuli to the user. Able-bodied participants were able to move the virtual wrist prosthesis via a surface electromyography based controller. The participants evaluated the feedback scheme without visual or audio feedback and relied solely on the haptic feedback alone to correctly position the hand. The scheme was evaluated through both normal (perpendicular) and shear (lateral) stimulations applied on the forearm. Normal stimulations were applied through a prototype device previously developed by the authors while shear stimulations were generated using an ubiquitous coin motor vibrotactor. Trials with no feedback served as a baseline to compare results within the study and to the literature. The results indicated that using normal and shear stimulations resulted in accurately positioning the virtual wrist, but were not significantly different. Using haptic feedback was substantially better than no feedback. The results found in this study are significant since the feedback scheme allows for using relatively few tactors to relay rich haptic information to the user and can be learned easily despite a relatively short amount of training. Additionally, the results are important for the haptic community since they contradict the common conception in the literature that normal stimulation is inferior to shear. From an ergonomic perspective normal stimulation has the potential to benefit upper limb amputees since it can operate at lower frequencies than shear-based vibrotactors while also generating less noise. Through further tuning of the novel haptic feedback scheme and normal stimulation device, a compact and comfortable sensory substitution device for upper limb amputees might be created. PMID:26263015

  17. Development of digital feedback systems for beam position and energy at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Karn, J.; Chowdhary, M.; Hutton, A.

    1997-06-01

    The development of beam-based digital feedback systems for the CEBAF accelerator has gone through several stages. As the accelerator moved from commissioning to operation for the nuclear physics program, the top priority was to stabilize the beam against slow energy and position drifts (<1 Hz). These slow drifts were corrected using the existing accelerator monitors and actuators driven by software running on top of the EPICS control system. With slow drifts corrected, attention turned to quantifying the higher frequency disturbances on the beam and to designing the required feedback systems needed to achieve the CEBAF design stability requirements. Results from measurements showed the major components in position and energy to be at harmonics of the power line frequencies of 60, 120, and 180 Hz. Hardware and software was installed in two locations of the accelerator as prototypes for the faster feedback systems needed. This paper gives an overview of the measured beam disturbances and the feedback systems developed.

  18. Functional characteristics of a double positive feedback loop coupled with autorepression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Subhasis; Bose, Indrani

    2008-12-01

    We study the functional characteristics of a two-gene motif consisting of a double positive feedback loop and an autoregulatory negative feedback loop. The motif appears in the gene regulatory network controlling the functional activity of pancreatic ?-cells. The model exhibits bistability and hysteresis in appropriate parameter regions. The two stable steady states correspond to low (OFF state) and high (ON state) protein levels, respectively. Using a deterministic approach, we show that the region of bistability increases in extent when the copy number of one of the genes is reduced from 2 to 1. The negative feedback loop has the effect of reducing the size of the bistable region. Loss of a gene copy, brought about by mutations, hampers the normal functioning of the ?-cells giving rise to the genetic disorder, maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The diabetic phenotype makes its appearance when a sizable fraction of the ?-cells is in the OFF state. Using stochastic simulation techniques we show that, on reduction of the gene copy number, there is a transition from the monostable ON to the ON state in the bistable region of the parameter space. Fluctuations in the protein levels, arising due to the stochastic nature of gene expression, can give rise to transitions between the ON and OFF states. We show that as the strength of autorepression increases, the ON ? OFF state transitions become less probable whereas the reverse transitions are more probable. The implications of the results in the context of the occurrence of MODY are pointed out.

  19. Implications of Positive Feedback in the Control of Movement ARTHUR PROCHAZKA, DEBORAH GILLARD, AND DAVID J. BENNETT

    E-print Network

    Prochazka, Arthur

    the b- attributed to instability in the stretch reflex arc (Dimitrijevicfusimotor system, which mediates theories regarding the reflexive role Within the CNS, the oscillators generating the limit cyclesof sensory for positive feedback els of the neuromuscular control system. It is shown that positive connections in reflex

  20. Self-Management of Patient Body Position, Pose, and Motion Using Wide-Field, Real-Time Optical Measurement Feedback: Results of a Volunteer Study

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, James M.; Price, Gareth J.; Sharrock, Phil J.; Jackson, Andrew S.N.; Stratford, Julie; Moore, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We present the results of a clinical feasibility study, performed in 10 healthy volunteers undergoing a simulated treatment over 3 sessions, to investigate the use of a wide-field visual feedback technique intended to help patients control their pose while reducing motion during radiation therapy treatment. Methods and Materials: An optical surface sensor is used to capture wide-area measurements of a subject's body surface with visualizations of these data displayed back to them in real time. In this study we hypothesize that this active feedback mechanism will enable patients to control their motion and help them maintain their setup pose and position. A capability hierarchy of 3 different level-of-detail abstractions of the measured surface data is systematically compared. Results: Use of the device enabled volunteers to increase their conformance to a reference surface, as measured by decreased variability across their body surfaces. The use of visual feedback also enabled volunteers to reduce their respiratory motion amplitude to 1.7 ± 0.6 mm compared with 2.7 ± 1.4 mm without visual feedback. Conclusions: The use of live feedback of their optically measured body surfaces enabled a set of volunteers to better manage their pose and motion when compared with free breathing. The method is suitable to be taken forward to patient studies.

  1. Theory and calculations of synchrotron instabilities and feedback-mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meijssen, T.E.M.

    1981-08-12

    The properties of the phenomenon synchrotron radiation are given with general theory on the basic processes and betatron and synchrotron oscillations. A more extended theoretical view at transverse instabilities and the influence of a damping feedback system are discussed. The longitudinal case is covered. For the calculations on the longitudinal case with M equally spaced pointbunches, with N electrons each, in the storage ring, the parasitic modes of the radio-frequency cavity were measured. A description of this is given. The values of damping rates of the longitudinal feedback system found, are as expected, but too low to damp the longitudinal instabilities calculated. This might be caused by the input data. The calculated growth rates are very sensitive to changes in frequency and width of the parasitic modes, which were measured under conditions differing slightly from the operating conditions.

  2. Scattering and reflection positivity in relativistic Euclidean quantum mechanics

    E-print Network

    Polyzou, Wayne

    Scattering and reflection positivity in relativistic Euclidean quantum mechanics W. N. Polyzou The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 Abstract In this paper I exhibit a class of reflection positive mechanics where the dynamics is introduced through a collection of reflection positive Euclidean "Green

  3. Scattering and reflection positivity in relativistic Euclidean quantum mechanics

    E-print Network

    Polyzou, Wayne

    Scattering and reflection positivity in relativistic Euclidean quantum mechanics W. N. Polyzou The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 Abstract In this paper I exhibit a class of reflection positive mechanics where the dynamics is introduced through a collection of reflection positive Euclidean ``Green

  4. The impact of mechanical AGN feedback on the formation of massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ena; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Moster, Benjamin P.

    2015-06-01

    We employ cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the effects of AGN feedback on the formation of massive galaxies with present-day stellar masses of M_stel= 8.8 × 10^{10}-6.0 × 10^{11} M_{?}. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations with a pressure-entropy formulation that allows an improved treatment of contact discontinuities and fluid mixing, we run three sets of simulations of 20 haloes with different AGN feedback models: (1) no feedback, (2) thermal feedback, and (3) mechanical and radiation feedback. We assume that seed black holes are present at early cosmic epochs at the centre of emerging dark matter haloes and trace their mass growth via gas accretion and mergers with other black holes. Both feedback models successfully recover the observed MBH-? relation and black hole-to-stellar mass ratio for simulated central early-type galaxies. The baryonic conversion efficiencies are reduced by a factor of 2 compared to models without any AGN feedback at all halo masses. However, massive galaxies simulated with thermal AGN feedback show a factor of ˜10-100 higher X-ray luminosities than observed. The mechanical/radiation feedback model reproduces the observed correlation between X-ray luminosities and velocity dispersion, e.g. for galaxies with ? = 200 km s- 1, the X-ray luminosity is reduced from 1042 erg s- 1 to 1040 erg s- 1. It also efficiently suppresses late-time star formation, reducing the specific star formation rate from 10-10.5 yr- 1 to 10-14 yr- 1 on average and resulting in quiescent galaxies since z = 2, whereas the thermal feedback model shows higher late-time in situ star formation rates than observed.

  5. Optical boundary reconstruction of tokamak plasmas for feedback control of plasma position and shape

    SciTech Connect

    Hommen, G.; Baar, M. de; Nuij, P.; Steinbuch, M.; McArdle, G.; Akers, R.

    2010-11-15

    A new diagnostic is developed to reconstruct the plasma boundary using visible wavelength images. Exploiting the plasma's edge localized and toroidally symmetric emission profile, a new coordinate transform is presented to reconstruct the plasma boundary from a poloidal view image. The plasma boundary reconstruction is implemented in MATLAB and applied to camera images of Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak discharges. The optically reconstructed plasma boundaries are compared to magnetic reconstructions from the offline reconstruction code EFIT, showing very good qualitative and quantitative agreement. Average errors are within 2 cm and correlation is high. In the current software implementation, plasma boundary reconstruction from a single image takes 3 ms. The applicability and system requirements of the new optical boundary reconstruction, called OFIT, for use in both feedback control of plasma position and shape and in offline reconstruction tools are discussed.

  6. Output feedback integral control for nano-positioning using piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jinjun; Yang, Liu; Li, Zhan

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a robust output feedback controller for a piezoelectrically actuated system with only position sensor. This considered piezoelectric actuator (PEA) system is subjected to model imperfection, creep nonlinearity, hysteresis nonlinearity and other external effects. The designed controller employs a second-order auxiliary system and a discontinuous uncertainty and disturbance estimation term to generate filtered error signals and to compensate for the model uncertainties and system disturbance, respectively. The global stability of the proposed controller is proved through Lyapunov-based stability analysis. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed control approach are verified experimentally using a PEA stage. Results demonstrate that both set-point and tracking control without/with external loads are realized with good performance and the PEA system with high-accuracy can be achieved. Moreover, the robustness of the controller is verified and analyzed through the sinusoidal tracking with external disturbance.

  7. Calculating the spontaneous magnetization and defining the Curie temperature using a positive-feedback model

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, R. G.

    2014-01-21

    A positive-feedback mean-field modification of the classical Brillouin magnetization theory provides an explanation of the apparent persistence of the spontaneous magnetization beyond the conventional Curie temperature—the little understood “tail” phenomenon that occurs in many ferromagnetic materials. The classical theory is unable to resolve this apparent anomaly. The modified theory incorporates the temperature-dependent quantum-scale hysteretic and mesoscopic domain-scale anhysteretic magnetization processes and includes the effects of demagnetizing and exchange fields. It is found that the thermal behavior of the reversible and irreversible segments of the hysteresis loops, as predicted by the theory, is a key to the presence or absence of the “tails.” The theory, which permits arbitrary values of the quantum spin number J, generally provides a quantitative agreement with the thermal variations of both the spontaneous magnetization and the shape of the hysteresis loop.

  8. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Water Conservation in Industrial Processes

    E-print Network

    Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Water Conservation in Industrial Processes University of Kansas The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Kansas is seeking applications in industrial processes. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered

  9. Positive feedback between RNA-binding protein HuD and transcription factor SATB1 promotes neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifei; Tidei, Joseph J; Polich, Eric D; Gao, Yu; Zhao, Huashan; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I; Guo, Weixiang; Zhao, Xinyu

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian embryonic lethal abnormal vision (ELAV)-like protein HuD is a neuronal RNA-binding protein implicated in neuronal development, plasticity, and diseases. Although HuD has long been associated with neuronal development, the functions of HuD in neural stem cell differentiation and the underlying mechanisms have gone largely unexplored. Here we show that HuD promotes neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) in the adult subventricular zone by stabilizing the mRNA of special adenine-thymine (AT)-rich DNA-binding protein 1 (SATB1), a critical transcriptional regulator in neurodevelopment. We find that SATB1 deficiency impairs the neuronal differentiation of NSCs, whereas SATB1 overexpression rescues the neuronal differentiation phenotypes resulting from HuD deficiency. Interestingly, we also discover that SATB1 is a transcriptional activator of HuD during NSC neuronal differentiation. In addition, we demonstrate that NeuroD1, a neuronal master regulator, is a direct downstream target of SATB1. Therefore, HuD and SATB1 form a positive regulatory loop that enhances NeuroD1 transcription and subsequent neuronal differentiation. Our results here reveal a novel positive feedback network between an RNA-binding protein and a transcription factor that plays critical regulatory roles in neurogenesis. PMID:26305964

  10. Interpretation of the positive low-cloud feedback predicted by a climate model under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brient, Florent; Bony, Sandrine

    2013-05-01

    The response of low-level clouds to climate change has been identified as a major contributor to the uncertainty in climate sensitivity estimates among climate models. By analyzing the behaviour of low-level clouds in a hierarchy of models (coupled ocean-atmosphere model, atmospheric general circulation model, aqua-planet model, single-column model) using the same physical parameterizations, this study proposes an interpretation of the strong positive low-cloud feedback predicted by the IPSL-CM5A climate model under climate change. In a warmer climate, the model predicts an enhanced clear-sky radiative cooling, stronger surface turbulent fluxes, a deepening and a drying of the planetary boundary layer, and a decrease of tropical low-clouds in regimes of weak subsidence. We show that the decrease of low-level clouds critically depends on the change in the vertical advection of moist static energy from the free troposphere to the boundary-layer. This change is dominated by variations in the vertical gradient of moist static energy between the surface and the free troposphere just above the boundary-layer. In a warmer climate, the thermodynamical relationship of Clausius-Clapeyron increases this vertical gradient, and then the import by large-scale subsidence of low moist static energy and dry air into the boundary layer. This results in a decrease of the low-level cloudiness and in a weakening of the radiative cooling of the boundary layer by low-level clouds. The energetic framework proposed in this study might help to interpret inter-model differences in low-cloud feedbacks under climate change.

  11. Visual Feedback of the Non-Moving Limb Improves Active Joint-Position Sense of the Impaired Limb in Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smorenburg, Ana R. P.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the active joint-position sense in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) and the effect of static visual feedback and static mirror visual feedback, of the non-moving limb, on the joint-position sense. Participants were asked to match the position of one upper limb with that of the contralateral limb. The task…

  12. Method to quantify accuracy of position feedback signals of a three-dimensional two-photon laser-scanning microscope.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Witte, Otto W; Haueisen, Jens; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy enables to record neuronal network activity in three-dimensional space while maintaining single-cellular resolution. One of the proposed approaches combines galvanometric x-y scanning with piezo-driven objective movements and employs hardware feedback signals for position monitoring. However, readily applicable methods to quantify the accuracy of those feedback signals are currently lacking. Here we provide techniques based on contact-free laser reflection and laser triangulation for the quantification of positioning accuracy of each spatial axis. We found that the lateral feedback signals are sufficiently accurate (defined as <2.5 µm) for a wide range of scan trajectories and frequencies. We further show that axial positioning accuracy does not only depend on objective acceleration and mass but also its geometry. We conclude that the introduced methods allow a reliable quantification of position feedback signals in a cost-efficient, easy-to-install manner and should be applicable for a wide range of two-photon laser scanning microscopes. PMID:26504620

  13. Method to quantify accuracy of position feedback signals of a three-dimensional two-photon laser-scanning microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Witte, Otto W.; Haueisen, Jens; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy enables to record neuronal network activity in three-dimensional space while maintaining single-cellular resolution. One of the proposed approaches combines galvanometric x-y scanning with piezo-driven objective movements and employs hardware feedback signals for position monitoring. However, readily applicable methods to quantify the accuracy of those feedback signals are currently lacking. Here we provide techniques based on contact-free laser reflection and laser triangulation for the quantification of positioning accuracy of each spatial axis. We found that the lateral feedback signals are sufficiently accurate (defined as <2.5 µm) for a wide range of scan trajectories and frequencies. We further show that axial positioning accuracy does not only depend on objective acceleration and mass but also its geometry. We conclude that the introduced methods allow a reliable quantification of position feedback signals in a cost-efficient, easy-to-install manner and should be applicable for a wide range of two-photon laser scanning microscopes. PMID:26504620

  14. Does Gender Influence Emotions Resulting from Positive Applause Feedback in Self-Assessment Testing? Evidence from Neuroscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chia-Ju; Huang, Chin-Fei; Liu, Ming-Chi; Chien, Yu-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hung; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2015-01-01

    Computerized self-assessment testing can help learners reflect on learning content and can also promote their motivation toward learning. However, a positive affective state is the key to achieving these learning goals. This study aims to examine learning gains and emotional reactions resulting from receiving emotional feedback in the form of…

  15. MoietyProperties.doc 21 Arthur, Brian W. 1990. Positive feedback in the economy. Scientific American 262:92-99.

    E-print Network

    White, Douglas R.

    MoietyProperties.doc 21 References Arthur, Brian W. 1990. Positive feedback in the economy):305-359. Boston: Blackwell Publishers. #12;MoietyProperties.doc 20 shown in Figure 6.4 It has at most two node and collective discovery of geodesics. #12;MoietyProperties.doc 19 Theorem C. Every s-t graph G that satisfies g+

  16. Video-Feedback Intervention to Promote Positive Parenting Adapted to Autism (VIPP-AUTI): A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poslawsky, Irina E; Naber, Fabiënne BA; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van Daalen, Emma; van Engeland, Herman; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2015-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, we evaluated the early intervention program Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting adapted to Autism (VIPP-AUTI) with 78 primary caregivers and their child (16-61 months) with Autism Spectrum Disorder. VIPP-AUTI is a brief attachment-based intervention program, focusing on improving parent-child…

  17. Effects of Supervisor Performance Feedback on Increasing Preservice Teachers' Positive Communication Behaviors with Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathel, Jeanna Marie; Drasgow, Erik; Christle, Christine C.

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of supervisor performance feedback on preservice teachers' rates of positive and negative communication behaviors with students with emotional and behavioral disorders and the effects of the intervention on the preservice teachers' perceptions of classroom management and climate. The authors…

  18. AP-1 regulates sphingosine kinase 1 expression in a positive feedback manner in glomerular mesangial cells exposed to high glucose.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kaipeng; Huang, Juan; Chen, Cheng; Hao, Jie; Wang, Shaogui; Huang, Junying; Liu, Peiqing; Huang, Heqing

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies have confirmed that the sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1)-sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling pathway in the kidney under diabetic conditions is closely correlated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). The activation of SphK1-S1P pathway by high glucose (HG) can increase the expression of fibronectin (FN), an important fibrotic component, in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) by promoting the DNA-binding activity of transcription factor AP-1. However, the mechanism responsible for the sustained activation of SphK1-S1P pathway remains unclear. Given the binding motifs for AP-1 within the first intron of the SphK1 gene, we speculated that the activated AP-1 in the kidney under HG condition possibly regulates SphK1 expression in a positive feedback manner, thereby promoting the sustained activation of SphK1-S1P pathway and mediating the pathological progression of DN. Here, we observed the effect of AP-1 on SphK1 expression in GMCs and explored the molecular mechanism involved in the sustained activation of SphK1-S1P pathway. We found two consensus binding motifs for AP-1 in the promoter sequences and non-coding region downstream of the transcriptional initiation of the rat SphK1 gene by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The treatment of GMCs with both HG and S1P significantly increased the protein expression of c-Jun and c-Fos, and obviously enhanced the phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser63 and Ser73, and c-Fos at Ser32. Knockdown of c-Jun and c-Fos with siRNAs substantially inhibited the expression of SphK1 and FN, whereas overexpression of c-Jun and c-Fos significantly increased the expression of SphK1 and FN. Curcumin treatment greatly decreased the levels of c-Jun, c-Fos, SphK1, and FN in the kidney tissues of diabetic rats. SiRNAs targeting SphK1 and S1P2 receptor respectively inhibited the phosphorylation of c-Jun (ser63 and ser73) and c-Fos (ser32), as well as FN expression under both normal and HG conditions. Our data demonstrated that the activated SphK1-S1P signaling pathway in GMCs under diabetic conditions is closely associated with AP-1 to form a positive feedback loop. This positive feedback loop functions as an important molecular basis for the sustained activation of SphK1-S1P pathway and increased FN expression that lead to the initiation and progression of DN. PMID:24342046

  19. Vacuum cryogenic wheel-driving mechanism with high positioning repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churilov, Vladimir; Smith, Greg; Hingley, Brian E.

    2002-11-01

    The repeatability of positioning of wheels carrying optical components can be critical for the performance of optical instruments. We present the cryogenic worm driven wheel positioning mechanism designed for Anglo-Australian Observatory's Infrared Imager and Spectrograph IRIS2. The mechanism, which was designed for a high vacuum environment and working temperature of 70-90K, utilized an aluminum worm and gearwheel, stepper motor and an encoding system based on infrared sensors. The mechanism has demonstrated repeatability of 1 arcmin.

  20. Mechanism of Feedback Allosteric Inhibition of ATP Phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the first and committed step in l-histidine biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is therefore subjected to allosteric feedback regulation. Because of its essentiality, this enzyme is being studied as a potential target for novel anti-infectives. To understand the basis for its regulation, we characterized the allosteric inhibition using gel filtration, steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics, and the pH dependence of inhibition and binding. Gel filtration experiments indicate that MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase is a hexamer in solution, in the presence or absence of l-histidine. Steady-state kinetic studies demonstrate that l-histidine inhibition is uncompetitive versus ATP and noncompetitive versus PRPP. At pH values close to neutrality, a Kii value of 4 ?M was obtained for l-histidine. Pre-steady-state kinetic experiments indicate that chemistry is not rate-limiting for the overall reaction and that l-histidine inhibition is caused by trapping the enzyme in an inactive conformation. The pH dependence of binding, obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance, indicates that l-histidine binds better as the neutral ?-amino group. The pH dependence of inhibition (Kii), on the contrary, indicates that l-histidine better inhibits MtATP-phosphoribosytransferase with a neutral imidazole and an ionized ?-amino group. These results are combined into a model that accounts for the allosteric inhibition of MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:22989207

  1. Methane bubbling from Siberian thaw lakes as a positive feedback to climate warming.

    PubMed

    Walter, K M; Zimov, S A; Chanton, J P; Verbyla, D; Chapin, F S

    2006-09-01

    Large uncertainties in the budget of atmospheric methane, an important greenhouse gas, limit the accuracy of climate change projections. Thaw lakes in North Siberia are known to emit methane, but the magnitude of these emissions remains uncertain because most methane is released through ebullition (bubbling), which is spatially and temporally variable. Here we report a new method of measuring ebullition and use it to quantify methane emissions from two thaw lakes in North Siberia. We show that ebullition accounts for 95 per cent of methane emissions from these lakes, and that methane flux from thaw lakes in our study region may be five times higher than previously estimated. Extrapolation of these fluxes indicates that thaw lakes in North Siberia emit 3.8 teragrams of methane per year, which increases present estimates of methane emissions from northern wetlands (< 6-40 teragrams per year; refs 1, 2, 4-6) by between 10 and 63 per cent. We find that thawing permafrost along lake margins accounts for most of the methane released from the lakes, and estimate that an expansion of thaw lakes between 1974 and 2000, which was concurrent with regional warming, increased methane emissions in our study region by 58 per cent. Furthermore, the Pleistocene age (35,260-42,900 years) of methane emitted from hotspots along thawing lake margins indicates that this positive feedback to climate warming has led to the release of old carbon stocks previously stored in permafrost. PMID:16957728

  2. Benefit of educational feedback for the use of positive expiratory pressure device

    PubMed Central

    Reychler, Gregory; Jacquemart, Manon; Poncin, William; Aubriot, Anne-Sophie; Liistro, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) is regularly used as a self-administered airway clearance technique. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the need to teach the correct use of the PEP device and to measure the progress of the success rate of the maneuver after training. METHOD: A PEP system (PariPEP-S Sytem) was used to generate PEP in 30 healthy volunteers. They were instructed by a qualified physical therapist to breathe correctly through the PEP device. Then they were evaluated during a set of ten expirations. Two other evaluations were performed at day 2 and day 8 (before and after feedback). The mean PEP and the success rate were calculated for each set of expirations. The number of maneuvers needed to obtain a correct use was calculated on the first session. RESULTS: An optimal PEP was reached after 7.5 SD 2.7 attempts by all subjects. Success rates and mean pressures were similar between the different sets of expirations (p=0.720 and p=0.326, respectively). Pressure variability was around 10%. After one week, 30% of subjects generated more than two non-optimal pressures in the set of ten expirations. No difference in success rate was observed depending on the evaluations. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that good initial training on the use of the PEP device and regular follow-up are required for the subject to reach optimal expiratory pressure. PMID:26647746

  3. Far-Infrared Surface Emissivity Impacts on Climate and the Potential for a Positive Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Collins, W.; Huang, X.; Chen, X.; Walden, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    There are few observational constraints on surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, a spectral region commonly referred to as the far-infrared. Nevertheless, where the precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm, which is common at high latitudes and high altitudes, the infrared energy budget is directly impacted by this emissivity. Calculations based on published indices of refraction of ice, water, and common surficial minerals, and observations based on a limited set of spectroscopic measurements, find that non-frozen ocean and desert scenes will exhibit lower far-infrared surface emissivity than frozen scenes by between 0.1 and 0.2. The representation of surface emissivity in climate models is highly simplified, based on ideal black-body emission, and systematically higher than emissivity of real surfaces. Therefore, we performed sensitivity studies using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and found that Arctic surface temperatures warm by 2 °K and frozen surface extent decreases by 5-10% when the model is subjected to realistic values of far-infrared surface emissivity. This finding may help explain the cold-pole bias, and also suggests the potential for a positive feedback whereby the loss of snow or ice leads to the exposure of surfaces that reduce surface infrared cooling, thus warming the surface further.

  4. A computerized tablet with visual feedback of hand position for functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Karimpoor, Mahta; Tam, Fred; Strother, Stephen C.; Fischer, Corinne E.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Graham, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological tests behavioral tasks that very commonly involve handwriting and drawing are widely used in the clinic to detect abnormal brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be useful in increasing the specificity of such tests. However, performing complex pen-and-paper tests during fMRI involves engineering challenges. Previously, we developed an fMRI-compatible, computerized tablet system to address this issue. However, the tablet did not include visual feedback of hand position (VFHP), a human factors component that may be important for fMRI of certain patient populations. A real-time system was thus developed to provide VFHP and integrated with the tablet in an augmented reality display. The effectiveness of the system was initially tested in young healthy adults who performed various handwriting tasks in front of a computer display with and without VFHP. Pilot fMRI of writing tasks were performed by two representative individuals with and without VFHP. Quantitative analysis of the behavioral results indicated improved writing performance with VFHP. The pilot fMRI results suggest that writing with VFHP requires less neural resources compared to the without VFHP condition, to maintain similar behavior. Thus, the tablet system with VFHP is recommended for future fMRI studies involving patients with impaired brain function and where ecologically valid behavior is important. PMID:25859201

  5. Multiscale modeling of tissue-engineered fat: is there a deformation-driven positive feedback loop in adipogenesis?

    PubMed

    Shoham, Naama; Mor-Yossef Moldovan, Lisa; Benayahu, Dafna; Gefen, Amit

    2015-04-01

    Mechanotransduction plays a role in adipose tissues by transducing the environmental mechanical signals. It is recognized that dynamic or cyclic mechanical strains suppress adipogenesis, but static strains activate the adipogenic signaling pathways. This phenomenon needs to be investigated further, given its potential use in tissue engineering of fat. We used in vitro cultures as model systems for studying differentiation and function of adipocytes. Additionally, using the finite element method, we developed here sets of multiscale models (MSM), which represent single or multiple adipocytes embedded in scaffolds, stimulated mechanically in a static regime. Based on in vitro adipocyte culture work, these models were employed to study the hypothesis that the loading state of the plasma membrane (PM) in adipocytes is influenced by neighboring cells, which could reflect positive feedback loops of en mass adipose cell differentiation. We demonstrate that under static loading, tensile strains at the PM increase with the stage of cell maturation. Furthermore, when the cell density was sufficient (above 19 cells per 100??m(3)), progressive differentiation in some of the cells caused higher magnitudes of tensile strains in the PMs of other nearby cells. MSM are currently the only feasible means to correlate continuum (macrolevel) construct deformations to subcellular-level PM stretches in distorted cells. These macro-to-micro mechanobiology relationships, revealed through MSM, point to stimulations that promote the formation of lipid droplet accumulations and the increase of adipogenesis. Such models are a cost-effective useful platform for achieving better understanding of these deformation-driven cell processes toward optimized design of tissue-engineered fat constructs. PMID:25517541

  6. Presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors in guinea pig papillary muscle: evidence for adrenaline-mediated positive feedback on noradrenergic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, B.; Singer, E.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Guinea pig papillary muscles were preincubated in the presence of 5 x 10{sup {minus} 9} mol/L unlabeled noradrenaline or adrenaline then incubated with ({sup 3}H)-noradrenaline and superfused. Electrical field stimulation with 180 pulses delivered at 1 or 3 Hz was used to induce overflow of radioactivity. Comparison of the effects of preexposure of the tissue to adrenaline or noradrenaline revealed that adrenaline incubation caused an enhancement of stimulation-evoked overflow of ({sup 3}H)noradrenaline and a reduction of the effect of exogenously added isoprenaline. Furthermore, the selective beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551 (10{sup {minus} 7} mol/L), but not the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 89,406 (10{sup {minus} 7} mol/L), reduced electrically evoked overflow of ({sup 3}H)noradrenaline in tissue preincubated with adrenaline but not in tissue preincubated with noradrenaline. The overflow-reducing effect of ICI 118.551 occurred at stimulation with 3 Hz but not at stimulation with 1 Hz. The present results support the hypothesis that noradrenergic transmission in guinea pig papillary muscle is facilitated via beta 2-adrenoceptors, and that adrenaline may serve as transmitter in this positive feedback mechanism after its incorporation into sympathetic nerves.

  7. Robustness of system-filter separation for the feedback control of a quantum harmonic oscillator undergoing continuous position measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szigeti, S. S.; Adlong, S. J.; Hush, M. R.; Carvalho, A. R. R.; Hope, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the effects of experimental imperfections on the problem of estimation-based feedback control of a trapped particle undergoing continuous position measurement. These limitations violate the assumption that the estimator (i.e., filter) accurately models the underlying system, thus requiring a separate analysis of the system and filter dynamics. We quantify the parameter regimes for stable cooling and show that the control scheme is robust to detector inefficiency, time delay, technical noise, and miscalibrated parameters. We apply these results to the specific context of a weakly-interacting Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Given that this system has previously been shown to be less stable than a feedback-cooled BEC with strong interatomic interactions, this result shows that reasonable experimental imperfections do not limit the feasibility of cooling a BEC by continuous measurement and feedback.

  8. Noise suppression of on-chip mechanical resonators by chaotic coherent feedback

    E-print Network

    Nan Yang; Jing Zhang; Hui Wang; Yu-xi Liu; Re-Bing Wu; Lian-qing Liu; Chun-Wen Li; Franco Nori

    2015-04-19

    We propose a method to decouple the nanomechanical resonator in optomechanical systems from the environmental noise by introducing a chaotic coherent feedback loop. We find that the chaotic controller in the feedback loop can modulate the dynamics of the controlled optomechanical system and induce a broadband response of the mechanical mode. This broadband response of the mechanical mode will cut off the coupling between the mechanical mode and the environment and thus suppress the environmental noise of the mechanical modes. As an application, we use the protected optomechanical system to act as a quantum memory. It's shown that the noise-decoupled optomechanical quantum memory is efficient for storing information transferred from coherent or squeezed light.

  9. Noise suppression of on-chip mechanical resonators by chaotic coherent feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yu-xi; Wu, Re-Bing; Liu, Lian-qing; Li, Chun-Wen; Nori, Franco

    2015-09-01

    We propose a method to decouple the nanomechanical resonator in optomechanical systems from the environmental noise by introducing a chaotic coherent feedback loop. We find that the chaotic controller in the feedback loop can modulate the dynamics of the controlled optomechanical system and induce a broadband response of the mechanical mode. This broadband response of the mechanical mode will cut off the coupling between the mechanical mode and the environment and thus suppress the environmental noise of the mechanical modes. As an application, we use the protected optomechanical system to act as a quantum memory. It is shown that the noise-decoupled optomechanical quantum memory is efficient for storing information transferred from coherent or squeezed light.

  10. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Dust-Collector Requirements § 33.23 Mechanical positioning of parts. All parts of a...

  11. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Dust-Collector Requirements § 33.23 Mechanical positioning of parts. All parts of a...

  12. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Dust-Collector Requirements § 33.23 Mechanical positioning of parts. All parts of a...

  13. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Dust-Collector Requirements § 33.23 Mechanical positioning of parts. All parts of a...

  14. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Dust-Collector Requirements § 33.23 Mechanical positioning of parts. All parts of a...

  15. quantum mechanics position and momentum The BTK Model

    E-print Network

    quantum mechanics position and momentum The BTK Model Suppose we have an electron of mass m and Klapwijk in 1982, and is named BTK theory after their work. Let the wave function for our system be given

  16. Positive-Operator-Valued Time Observable in Quantum Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Riccardo Giannitrapani

    1998-02-22

    We examine the longstanding problem of introducing a time observable in Quantum Mechanics; using the formalism of positive-operator-valued measures we show how to define such an observable in a natural way and we discuss some consequences.

  17. On the dynamic forcing of short-term climate fluctuations by feedback mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    Various internal feedback mechanisms in the ocean atmosphere system were studied. A variability pattern of sea surface temperature with a quasibiennial oscillation (QBO) was detected off the coast of Senegal, in the Gulf of Guinea and even in the Gulf Stream as it leaves the North American continental shelf. Possible physical connections between some of these QBO's were pointed out by a hypothetical feedback model. Interaction of a QBO with the annual cycle may lead to beating frequencies resembling climatic trends of a duration of several years.

  18. Landscape urbanization and economic growth in China: positive feedbacks and sustainability dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xuemei; Chen, Jing; Shi, Peijun

    2012-01-01

    Accelerating urbanization has been viewed as an important instrument for economic development and reducing regional income disparity in some developing countries, including China. Recent studies (Bloom et al. 2008) indicate that demographic urbanization level has no causal effect on economic growth. However, due to the varying and changing definition of urban population, the use of demographic indicators as a sole representing indicator for urbanization might be misleading. Here, we re-examine the causal relationship between urbanization and economic growth in Chinese cities and provinces in recent decades, using built-up areas as a landscape urbanization indicator. Our analysis shows that (1) larger cities, both in terms of population size and built-up area, and richer cities tend to gain more income, have larger built-up area expansion, and attract more population, than poorer cities or smaller cities; and (2) that there is a long-term bidirectional causality between urban built-up area expansion and GDP per capita at both city and provincial level, and a short-term bidirectional causality at provincial level, revealing a positive feedback between landscape urbanization and urban and regional economic growth in China. Our results suggest that urbanization, if measured by a landscape indicator, does have causal effect on economic growth in China, both within the city and with spillover effect to the region, and that urban land expansion is not only the consequences of economic growth in cities, but also drivers of such growth. The results also suggest that under its current economic growth model, it might be difficult for China to control urban expansion without sacrificing economic growth, and China's policy to stop the loss of agricultural land, for food security, might be challenged by its policy to promote economic growth through urbanization. PMID:22103244

  19. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  20. Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Mechanisms of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Shonna M.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides, or AMPs, play a significant role in many environments as a tool to remove competing organisms. In response, many bacteria have evolved mechanisms to resist these peptides and prevent AMP-mediated killing. The development of AMP resistance mechanisms is driven by direct competition between bacterial species, as well as host and pathogen interactions. Akin to the number of different AMPs found in nature, resistance mechanisms that have evolved are just as varied and may confer broad-range resistance or specific resistance to AMPs. Specific mechanisms of AMP resistance prevent AMP-mediated killing against a single type of AMP, while broad resistance mechanisms often lead to a global change in the bacterial cell surface and protect the bacterium from a large group of AMPs that have similar characteristics. AMP resistance mechanisms can be found in many species of bacteria and can provide a competitive edge against other bacterial species or a host immune response. Gram-positive bacteria are one of the largest AMP producing groups, but characterization of Gram-positive AMP resistance mechanisms lags behind that of Gram-negative species. In this review we present a summary of the AMP resistance mechanisms that have been identified and characterized in Gram-positive bacteria. Understanding the mechanisms of AMP resistance in Gram-positive species can provide guidelines in developing and applying AMPs as therapeutics, and offer insight into the role of resistance in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:25419466

  1. Noise effect on persistence of memory in a positive-feedback gene regulatory circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jun; Yang, Xianqing; Ma, Jun; Jia, Ya

    2009-07-01

    Feedback circuits are important building blocks of gene regulatory network. Recent studies with simplified models found the advantage of coupled fast and slow feedback loops in creating bistable switch, and interlinked dual-time feedback loops can enhance robustness to stochasticity and persistence of memory. Based on the same feedback structure and mathematical model, the effect of noise on persistence of memory is investigated. It is found that (1) an intermediate amount of single-parameter noise plays a constructive role in persisting memory through noise-induced changing from monostable to bistable region, while larger single-parameter noise destroys the memory ability of the system through noise-induced transition between two stable states. (2) Different from the single-parameter noise, arbitrary amount of the internal noise destroys the memory ability of the system. (3) For the same feedback structure with less nonlinear feedback which is not enough to render the system bistability, the single-parameter noise can play similar constructive role through rendering the system bistability.

  2. Failure of feedback as a putative common mechanism of spreading depolarizations in migraine and stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlem, Markus A.; Schneider, Felix M.; Schöll, Eckehard

    2008-06-01

    The stability of cortical function depends critically on proper regulation. Under conditions of migraine and stroke a breakdown of transmembrane chemical gradients can spread through cortical tissue. A concomitant component of this emergent spatio-temporal pattern is a depolarization of cells detected as slow voltage variations. The propagation velocity of ˜3mm/min indicates a contribution of diffusion. We propose a mechanism for spreading depolarizations (SD) that rests upon a nonlocal or noninstantaneous feedback in a reaction-diffusion system. Depending upon the characteristic space and time scales of the feedback, the propagation of cortical SD can be suppressed by shifting the bifurcation line, which separates the parameter regime of pulse propagation from the regime where a local disturbance dies out. The optimization of this feedback is elaborated for different control schemes and ranges of control parameters.

  3. Version pressure feedback mechanisms for speculative versioning caches

    DOEpatents

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E.; Gara, Alan; O'Brien, Kathryn M.; Ohmacht, Martin; Zhuang, Xiaotong

    2013-03-12

    Mechanisms are provided for controlling version pressure on a speculative versioning cache. Raw version pressure data is collected based on one or more threads accessing cache lines of the speculative versioning cache. One or more statistical measures of version pressure are generated based on the collected raw version pressure data. A determination is made as to whether one or more modifications to an operation of a data processing system are to be performed based on the one or more statistical measures of version pressure, the one or more modifications affecting version pressure exerted on the speculative versioning cache. An operation of the data processing system is modified based on the one or more determined modifications, in response to a determination that one or more modifications to the operation of the data processing system are to be performed, to affect the version pressure exerted on the speculative versioning cache.

  4. Faculty Positions in Mechanical Engineering University of Utah

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    Faculty Positions in Mechanical Engineering University of Utah The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Utah (http://www.mech.utah.edu/) invites applications for five tenure track of Utah is a tier 1 research institution that has ranked in the top 5 nationally for start-up companies

  5. Postdoctoral Researcher Positions: Cancer Cell Biology, Cell Mechanics,

    E-print Network

    Rowat, Amy C.

    such as cancer and is critical in how physical forces initiate changes in gene expression. Now that we culture, cancer biology, genetic manipulations), and understand the molecular mechanisms underlyingPostdoctoral Researcher Positions: Cancer Cell Biology, Cell Mechanics, & High Throughput Screening

  6. Latest Performance Results from the FONT5 Intra-train Beam Position and Angle Feedback System at ATF2

    E-print Network

    Christian, G B; Bett, D R; Blaskovic Kraljevic, N; Burrows, P N; Davis, M R; Gerbershagen, A; Perry, C; Constance, B; Resta-Lopez, J

    2012-01-01

    A prototype Interaction Point beam-based feedback system for future electron-positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider, has been designed and tested on the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The FONT5 intra-train feedback system aims to stabilize the beam orbit by correcting both the position and angle jitter in the vertical plane on bunch-tobunch time scales, providing micron-level stability at the entrance to the ATF2 final-focus system. The system comprises three stripline beam position monitors (BPMs) and two stripline kickers, custom low-latency analogue front-end BPM processors, a custom FPGA-based digital processing board with fast ADCs, and custom kickerdrive amplifiers. The latest results from beam tests at ATF2 will be presented, including the system latency and correction performance.

  7. The oncogenic transcription factor IRF4 is regulated by a novel CD30/NF-?B positive feedback loop in peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Boddicker, Rebecca L; Kip, N Sertac; Xing, Xiaoming; Zeng, Yu; Yang, Zhi-Zhang; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Almada, Luciana L; Elsawa, Sherine F; Knudson, Ryan A; Law, Mark E; Ketterling, Rhett P; Cunningham, Julie M; Wu, Yanhong; Maurer, Matthew J; O'Byrne, Megan M; Cerhan, James R; Slager, Susan L; Link, Brian K; Porcher, Julie C; Grote, Deanna M; Jelinek, Diane F; Dogan, Ahmet; Ansell, Stephen M; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Feldman, Andrew L

    2015-05-14

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are generally aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas with poor overall survival rates following standard therapy. One-third of PTCLs express interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4), a tightly regulated transcription factor involved in lymphocyte growth and differentiation. IRF4 drives tumor growth in several lymphoid malignancies and has been proposed as a candidate therapeutic target. Because direct IRF4 inhibitors are not clinically available, we sought to characterize the mechanism by which IRF4 expression is regulated in PTCLs. We demonstrated that IRF4 is constitutively expressed in PTCL cells and drives Myc expression and proliferation. Using an inhibitor screen, we identified nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) as a candidate regulator of IRF4 expression and cell proliferation. We then demonstrated that the NF-?B subunits p52 and RelB were transcriptional activators of IRF4. Further analysis showed that activation of CD30 promotes p52 and RelB activity and subsequent IRF4 expression. Finally, we showed that IRF4 transcriptionally regulates CD30 expression. Taken together, these data demonstrate a novel positive feedback loop involving CD30, NF-?B, and IRF4; further evidence for this mechanism was demonstrated in human PTCL tissue samples. Accordingly, NF-?B inhibitors may represent a clinical means to disrupt this feedback loop in IRF4-positive PTCLs. PMID:25833963

  8. The positive feedback action of vasopressin on its own release from rat septal tissue in vitro is receptor-mediated.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, R; Ramirez, A D; Ramirez, V D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on its own septal release was evaluated using an in vitro superfusion procedure. As compared to basal release from septal fragments, pulses of synthetic AVP (15 pg/5 min) resulted in a 25-fold augmented release of endogenous AVP, indicating a positive feedback action. Both the basal and stimulated AVP release were significantly increased by 60 mM potassium and markedly reduced by omission of calcium. Preincubation of the septal fragments with the V2/V1 AVP receptor antagonist d(CH2)5 [D-Tyr (Et)2,Val4]AVP resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of the positive feedback action of AVP which was nearly completely blocked at doses between 1.25 and 5 ng per 100 microliters incubation medium. As compared to this effect, the V1 antagonist d(CH2)5 Tyr (Me)2 AVP as well as oxytocin were significantly less potent. The results suggest that the positive feedback action of AVP on its own release from septal fragments is potassium-stimulated, calcium-dependent and mainly V2 receptor-mediated. The physiological significance of this phenomenon remains to be shown. PMID:1830507

  9. Photon position eigenvectors lead to complete photon wave mechanics

    E-print Network

    Margaret Hawton

    2007-11-01

    We have recently constructed a photon position operator with commuting components. This was long thought to be impossible, but our position eigenvectors have a vortex structure like twisted light. Thus they are not spherically symmetric and the position operator does not transform as a vector, so that previous non-existence arguments do not apply. We find two classes of position eigenvectors and obtain photon wave functions by projection onto the bases of position eigenkets that they define, following the usual rules of quantum mechanics. The hermitian position operator, r0, leads to a Landau-Peierls wave function, while field-like eigenvectors of the nonhermitian position operator and its adjoint lead to a biorthonormal basis. These two bases are equivalent in the sense that they are related by a similarity transformation. The eigenvectors of the nonhermitian position operators lead to a field-potential wave function pair. These field-like positive frequency wave functions satisfy Maxwell's equations, and thus justify the supposition that MEs describe single photon wave mechanics. The expectation value of the number operator is photon density with undetected photons integrated over, consistent with Feynman's conclusion that the density of non-interacting particles can be interpreted as probability density.

  10. Analysis of Links Positions in Landing Gear Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewczy?ski, D.; Tora, G.

    2014-08-01

    This article contains a kinematic analysis of an aircraft chassis mechanism in a range of positions. The mechanism of the chassis is made up of several smaller subsystems with different functions. The first mechanism is used to eject the chassis before landing (touchdown) and fold it to hatchway after the lift off. The second mechanism is designed to perform rotation of the crossover with the wheel, in order to adjust the position of the wheel to fit it in the limited space in the hold. The third mechanism allows movement of the chassis resulting from the change in length of the damper. To determine the position of the following links of the mechanism calculus of vectors was applied in which unit vectors were used to represent the angular position of the links. The aim of the analysis is to determine the angle of convergence and the angle of heel wheels as a function of the variable length of hydraulic cylinder, length of the shock absorber, length of the regulations rods

  11. Adaptive Robust Output Feedback Control for a Marine Dynamic Positioning System Based on a High-Gain Observer.

    PubMed

    Du, Jialu; Hu, Xin; Liu, Hongbo; Chen, C L Philip

    2015-11-01

    This paper develops an adaptive robust output feedback control scheme for dynamically positioned ships with unavailable velocities and unknown dynamic parameters in an unknown time-variant disturbance environment. The controller is designed by incorporating the high-gain observer and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks in vectorial backstepping method. The high-gain observer provides the estimations of the ship position and heading as well as velocities. The RBF neural networks are employed to compensate for the uncertainties of ship dynamics. The adaptive laws incorporating a leakage term are designed to estimate the weights of RBF neural networks and the bounds of unknown time-variant environmental disturbances. In contrast to the existing results of dynamic positioning (DP) controllers, the proposed control scheme relies only on the ship position and heading measurements and does not require a priori knowledge of the ship dynamics and external disturbances. By means of Lyapunov functions, it is theoretically proved that our output feedback controller can control a ship's position and heading to the arbitrarily small neighborhood of the desired target values while guaranteeing that all signals in the closed-loop DP control system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, simulations involving two ships are carried out, and simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. PMID:25769172

  12. Design of a High Resolution Hexapod Positioning Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Jamie; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high resolution, six-degree of freedom positioning mechanism. This mechanism, based on the Stewart platform concept, was designed for use with the Developmental Comparative Active Optics Telescope Testbed (DCATT), a ground-based technology testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). The mechanism provides active control to the DCATT telescope's segmented primary mirror. Emphasis is on design decisions and technical challenges. Significant issues include undesirable motion properties of PZT-inchworm actuators, testing difficulties, dimensional stability and use of advanced composite materials. Supporting test data from prototype mechanisms is presented.

  13. Feedback as a mechanism for the resurrection of oscillations from death state

    E-print Network

    V. K. Chandrasekar; S. Karthiga; M. Lakshmanan

    2015-07-11

    The quenching of oscillations in interacting systems leads to several unwanted situations, which necessitate a suitable remedy to overcome the quenching. In this connection, this work addresses a mechanism that can resurrect oscillations in a typical situation. Through both numerical and analytical studies, we show the candidate which is capable of resurrecting oscillations is nothing but the feedback, the one which is profoundly used in dynamical control and in bio-therapies. Even in the case of a rather general system, we demonstrate analytically the applicability of the technique over one of the oscillation quenched states called amplitude death state. We also discuss some of the features of this mechanism such as adaptability of the technique with the feedback of only a few of the oscillators.

  14. 2D tilting MEMS micro mirror integrating a piezoresistive sensor position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lani, S.; Bayat, D.; Despont, M.

    2015-02-01

    An integrated position sensor for a dual-axis electromagnetic tilting mirror is presented. This tilting mirror is composed of a silicon based mirror directly assembled on a silicon membrane supported by flexible beams. The position sensors are constituted by 4 Wheatstone bridges of piezoresistors which are fabricated by doping locally the flexible beams. A permanent magnet is attached to the membrane and the scanner is mounted above planar coils deposited on a ceramic substrate to achieve electromagnetic actuation. The performances of the piezoresistive sensors are evaluated by measuring the output signal of the piezoresistors as a function of the tilt of the mirror and the temperature. White light interferometry was performed for all measurement to measure the exact tilt angle. The minimum detectable angle with such sensors was 30µrad (around 13bits) in the range of the minimum resolution of the interferometer. The tilt reproducibility was 0.0186%, obtained by measuring the tilt after repeated actuations with a coil current of 50mA during 30 min and the stability over time was 0.05% in 1h without actuation. The maximum measured tilt angle was 6° (mechanical) limited by nonlinearity of the MEMS system.

  15. Early Detection of Online Auction Opportunistic Sellers through the Use of Negative-Positive Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinert, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Apparently fraud is a growth industry. The monetary losses from Internet fraud have increased every year since first officially reported by the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) in 2000. Prior research studies and third-party reports of fraud show rates substantially higher than eBay's reported negative feedback rate of less than 1%. The…

  16. Mechanisms of rapid glucocorticoid feedback inhibition of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis

    PubMed Central

    TASKER, JEFFREY G.; HERMAN, JAMES P.

    2015-01-01

    Stress activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis culminates in increased circulating corticosteroid concentrations. Stress-induced corticosteroids exert diverse actions in multiple target tissues over a broad range of timescales, ranging from rapid actions, which are induced within seconds to minutes and gene transcription independent, to slow actions, which are delayed, long lasting, and transcription dependent. Rapid corticosteroid actions in the brain include, among others, a fast negative feedback mechanism responsible for shutting down the activated HPA axis centrally. We provide a brief review of the cellular mechanisms responsible for rapid corticosteroid actions in different brain structures of the rat, including the hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, and in the anterior pituitary. We propose a model for the direct feedback inhibition of the HPA axis by glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus. According to this model, glucocorticoids activate membrane glucocorticoid receptors to induce endocannabinoid synthesis in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and retrograde cannabinoid type I receptor-mediated suppression of the excitatory synaptic drive to PVN neuroendocrine cells. Rapid corticosteroid actions in the hippocampus, amygdala, and pituitary are mediated by diverse cellular mechanisms and may also contribute to the rapid negative feedback regulation of the HPA neuroendocrine axis as well as to the stress regulation of emotional and spatial memory formation. PMID:21663538

  17. A negative feedback mechanism for the long-term stabilization of the earth's surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C. G.; Hays, P. B.; Kasting, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    It is suggested that the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is buffered, over geological time scales, by a negative feedback mechanism, in which the rate of weathering of silicate minerals (followed by deposition of carbonate minerals) depends on surface temperature, which in turn depends on the carbon dioxide partial pressure through the greenhouse effect. Although the quantitative details of this mechanism are speculative, it appears able to partially stabilize the earth's surface temperature against the steady increase of solar luminosity, believed to have occurred since the origin of the solar system.

  18. Visual feedback of the non-moving limb improves active joint-position sense of the impaired limb in Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Smorenburg, Ana R P; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J A; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the active joint-position sense in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) and the effect of static visual feedback and static mirror visual feedback, of the non-moving limb, on the joint-position sense. Participants were asked to match the position of one upper limb with that of the contralateral limb. The task was performed in three visual conditions: without visual feedback (no vision); with visual feedback of the non-moving limb (screen); and with visual feedback of the non-moving limb and its mirror reflection (mirror). In addition to the proprioceptive measure, a functional test [Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST)] was performed and the amount of spasticity was determined in order to examine their relation with proprioceptive ability. The accuracy of matching was significantly influenced by the distance that had to be covered by the matching limb; a larger distance resulted in a lower matching accuracy. Moreover it was demonstrated that static (mirror) visual feedback improved the matching accuracy. A clear relation between functionality, as measured by the QUEST, and active joint-position sense was not found. This might be explained by the availability of visual information during the performance of the QUEST. It is concluded that static visual feedback improves matching accuracy in children with SHCP and that the initial distance between the limbs is an influential factor which has to be taken into account when measuring joint-position sense. PMID:21306868

  19. Mechanism Design Based on Beliefs about Responsive Play (Position Paper)

    E-print Network

    Vorobeychik, Eugene

    Mechanism Design Based on Beliefs about Responsive Play (Position Paper) Yevgeniy Vorobeychik of solutions is likely to be played, as well as the possibility that actual play will not correspond to any so- lution. Given that actual play is the ultimate determiner of a mech- anism's success, we advocate

  20. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mechanical positioning of parts. 33.23 Section 33.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN...

  1. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mechanical positioning of parts. 33.23 Section 33.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN...

  2. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mechanical positioning of parts. 33.23 Section 33.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN...

  3. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mechanical positioning of parts. 33.23 Section 33.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN...

  4. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mechanical positioning of parts. 33.23 Section 33.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN...

  5. Positive Results for Mechanism Design without Money (Extended Abstract)

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    Positive Results for Mechanism Design without Money (Extended Abstract) Richard Cole Courant concept for money-free settings, is highly competitive with respect to social welfare. We then show how a collection of resources to a set of strategic agents without using money? This is a fundamen- tal problem

  6. A Mechanism for Land-Atmosphere Feedback Involving Planetary Wave Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Chang, Yehui; Schubert, Siegfried D.

    2014-01-01

    While the ability of land surface conditions to influence the atmosphere has been demonstrated in various modeling and observational studies, the precise mechanisms by which land-atmosphere feedback occurs are still largely unknown particularly the mechanisms that allow land moisture state in one region to affect atmospheric conditions in another. Such remote impacts are examined here in the context of atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations, leading to the identification of one potential mechanism: the phase-locking and amplification of a planetary wave through the imposition of a spatial pattern of soil moisture at the land surface. This mechanism, shown here to be relevant in the AGCM, apparently also operates in nature, as suggested by supporting evidence found in reanalysis data.

  7. A satellite digital controller or 'play that PID tune again, Sam'. [Position, Integral, Derivative feedback control algorithm for design strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem discussed is to design a digital controller for a typical satellite. The controlled plant is considered to be a rigid body acting in a plane. The controller is assumed to be a digital computer which, when combined with the proposed control algorithm, can be represented as a sampled-data system. The objective is to present a design strategy and technique for selecting numerical values for the control gains (assuming position, integral, and derivative feedback) and the sample rate. The technique is based on the parameter plane method and requires that the system be amenable to z-transform analysis.

  8. Positive future climate feedback due to changes in oceanic DMS emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjiputra, Jerry; Six, Katharina; Seland, Øyvind; Heinze, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The global ocean is the largest natural source of dimethylsulphide (DMS) gas to the atmosphere. DMS is produced by phytoplankton and is released to the surface ocean if cells are degraded. Once it enters the atmosphere, it might contribute to the nucleation particles important for cloud formation, which then effect the Earth's radiation budget and climate. Future global warming and ocean acidification is projected to alter marine DMS production and emission. However the none of the models assessed in the last IPCC report includes the DMS-climate feedback. Recent study indicated that under high CO2 emissions future, the oceanic DMS emission is projected to decrease by 12 to 24% by the end of this century, potentially leading to an equilibrium temperature response of 0.1K to 0.76K. Here, for the first time using a fully interactive Earth system model including a microphysical aerosol module with sulfur chemistry, we perform simulations on future climate projection with coupled DMS feedback. Under the highest pH sensitivity, our simulation shows that projected DMS production and emission decrease relative to the preindustrial state by 50% and 36%, respectively toward the end of the 21st century under the RCP8.5 emissions scenario. The largest emission reduction is simulated in the Southern Ocean. On contrast, emissions at polar latitudes increase owing to the sea ice retreat. This large change in marine sulfur emisson leads to an additional global warming of 0.3K relative to the reference simulation without DMS-climate feedback at the end of the 21st century. Both simulations also produce similar trajectories in atmospheric CO2 concentration, consistent with little change in the cumulative oceanic and terrestrial carbon sinks.

  9. Nearly time-optimal feedback control of a magnetically levitated photolithography positioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.

    1993-12-31

    This paper focuses on the development of an approximate time-optimal feedback strategy for conducting rest-to-rest maneuvers of a magnetically levitated table. Classical switching curves are modified to account for the complexities of magnetic actuation as well as the coupling of the rigid body modes through the control. A smooth blend of time-optimal and proportional-derivative controls is realized near the destination point to correct for inaccuracies produced by the approximate time-optimal strategy. Detailed computer simulations of the system indicate that this hybrid control strategy provides a significant reduction in settling time as compared to proportional-derivative control alone.

  10. Stochastic Gene Expression in a Lentiviral Positive Feedback Loop: HIV-1 Tat Fluctuations Drive Phenotypic Diversity

    E-print Network

    Leor S. Weinberger; John C. Burnett; Jared E. Toettcher; Adam P. Arkin; David V. Schaffer

    2006-08-01

    Stochastic gene expression has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes, including cell differentiation and disease. In this issue of Cell, Weinberger et al. (2005) take an integrated computational-experimental approach to study the Tat transactivation feedback loop in HIV-1 and show that fluctuations in a key regulator, Tat, can result in a phenotypic bifurcation. This phenomenon is observed in an isogenic population where individual cells display two distinct expression states corresponding to latent and productive infection by HIV-1. These findings demonstrate the importance of stochastic gene expression in molecular "decision-making."

  11. Effects of positive feedback on the social interactions of boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a test of the self-protective hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Diener, M B; Milich, R

    1997-09-01

    Tested the hypothesis that inflated self-assessments offered by children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) serve a self-protective function. This was accomplished by examining the effects of positive feedback on self-perceptions and social interactions of boys with ADHD and comparison boys. Boys with ADHD and comparison boys, 8 to 11 years old, were paired in 60 dyads and interacted in two unstructured cooperative tasks. Following the first interaction, 1 boy in half of the dyads received positive feedback, supposedly from his partner, concerning his performance. Results indicated that following the first interaction, but prior to feedback, boys with ADHD had an overly positive view of how much their partner liked them. However, following the second interaction, boys with ADHD who received positive feedback actually showed a significant decrease in their self-perceptions, whereas comparison boys who received feedback showed an increase. These results are seen as supportive of the self-protective hypothesis that children with ADHD offer inflated self-perceptions to counter feelings of inadequacy. When presented with positive feedback, they are able to relax this defensive posture and offer more realistic self-assessments. PMID:9292383

  12. Role of positive urethrovesical feedback in vesical evacuation. The concept of a second micturition reflex: the urethrovesical reflex.

    PubMed

    Shafik, Ahmed; Shafik, Ali A; El-Sibai, Olfat; Ahmed, Ismail

    2003-08-01

    Upon feeling the urge to urinate, the urinary bladder contracts, the urethral sphincters relax and urine flows through the urethra. These actions are mediated by the micturition reflex. We investigated the hypothesis that vesical contraction is maintained by positive feedback through continuous flow of urine through the urethra, and that the cessation of urine flow aborts detrusor contraction. Normal saline was infused into the urinary bladders of 17 healthy volunteers (age 35.2 years+/-4.2(SD); ten women and seven men) at a rate of 100 ml/min. On urge, which occurred at a mean volume of 408.6 ml+/-28.7 of saline, the subject micturated while the vesical and urethral pressures during voiding were being recorded; residual urine was measured. The test was repeated after anesthetizing the urethra with xylocaine gel or, on another occasion, after applying a bland gel. On micturition, the urine was evacuated as a continuous stream without straining; no residual fluid was collected. After urethral anesthetization, the fluid came out of the urethra in multiple intermittent spurts and only with excessive straining. There was a large amount of residual fluid (184.6 ml+/-28.4). The results of bland gel application showed no significant difference ( P>0.05) from those without gel. Detrusor contraction during micturition is suggested to be maintained by positive urethrovesical feedback elicited by the continued passage of urine through the urethra. This feedback seems to be effected through the urethrovesical reflex, which produces vesical contraction on stimulation of the urethral stretch receptors. Abortion of this reflex by urethral anesthetization resulted in failure of detrusor contraction and excessive straining was needed to achieve bladder evacuation in multiple spurts. The urethrovesical reflex is thus assumed to constitute a second micturition reflex responsible for the continuation of detrusor contraction and urination. The role of this reflex in the pathogenesis of micturition disorders needs to be studied. PMID:12898170

  13. The effects of palmar feedback in 200mm Reticle Standard Mechanical Interface (SMIF) Pod handles with respect to hand pressure distribution and user preference 

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Pisces Shenique

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the preferred 200mm Reticle Standard Mechanical Interface (SMIF) Pod handle when comparing a handle with palmar feedback and a handle without palmar feedback. Objectively, load cells were used...

  14. Positive feedback produces broad distributions in maximum activation attained within a narrow time window in stochastic biochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit

    2013-03-01

    Stochastic fluctuations in biochemical reactions can regulate single cell decision processes. Using exact solutions and semi-analytical methods we calculate distributions of the maximum value (N) of species concentrations (Pmax (N)) and the time (t) taken to reach the maximum value (Pmax (t)) in minimal models of stochastic chemical reactions commonly found in cell signaling systems. We find, the presence of positive feedback interactions make Pmax (N) more spread out with a higher ``peakedness'' in Pmax (t) . Thus positive feedback interactions may help single cells to respond sensitively to a stimulus when cell decision processes require upregulation of activated forms of key proteins to a threshold number within a time window. Moreover, unlike other models of strongly correlated random variables such as Brownian walks or fluctuating interfaces, the extreme value distributions for the chemical reactions display multiscaling behavior emphasizing the presence of many time scales in cell signaling kinetics. This work was funded by the Research Institute at the Nationwide Children's Hospital and a grant (1R56AI090115-01A1) from the NIH.

  15. Hyperosmotic Shock Engages Two Positive Feedback Loops through Caspase-3-dependent Proteolysis of JNK1-2 and Bid.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jicheng; Ben Messaoud, Nabil; López, José M

    2015-12-18

    Hyperosmotic shock induces early calpain activation, Smac/DIABLO release from the mitochondria, and p38/JNK activation in Xenopus oocytes. These pathways regulate late cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Here, we show that JNK1-1 and JNK1-2 are activated early by osmostress, and sustained activation of both isoforms accelerates the apoptotic program. When caspase-3 is activated, JNK1-2 is proteolyzed at Asp-385 increasing the release of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activity, thereby creating a positive feedback loop. Expression of Bcl-xL markedly reduces hyperosmotic shock-induced apoptosis. In contrast, expression of Bid induces rapid caspase-3 activation, even in the absence of osmostress, which is blocked by Bcl-xL co-expression. In these conditions a significant amount of Bid in the cytosol is mono- and bi-ubiquitinated. Caspase-3 activation by hyperosmotic shock induces proteolysis of Bid and mono-ubiquitinated Bid at Asp-52 increasing the release of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation, and thus creating a second positive feedback loop. Revealing the JNK isoforms and the loops activated by osmostress could help to design better treatments for human diseases caused by perturbations in fluid osmolarity. PMID:26511318

  16. Characterizing Feedback Control Mechanisms in Nonlinear Microbial Models of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition by Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, K.; Tang, J.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is regulated by biotic and abiotic processes. Feedback interactions between such processes may act to dampen oscillatory responses to perturbations from equilibrium. Indeed, although biological oscillations have been observed in small-scale laboratory incubations, the overlying behavior at the plot-scale exhibits a relatively stable response to disturbances in input rates and temperature. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of microbial models to capture nonlinear feedbacks in SOM decomposition that linear Century-type models are unable to reproduce, such as soil priming in response to increased carbon input. However, these microbial models often exhibit strong oscillatory behavior that is deemed unrealistic. The inherently nonlinear dynamics of SOM decomposition have important implications for global climate-carbon and carbon-concentration feedbacks. It is therefore imperative to represent these dynamics in Earth System Models (ESMs) by introducing sub-models that accurately represent microbial and abiotic processes. In the present study we explore, both analytically and numerically, four microbe-enabled model structures of varying levels of complexity. The most complex model combines microbial physiology, a non-linear mineral sorption isotherm, and enzyme dynamics. Based on detailed stability analysis of the nonlinear dynamics, we calculate the system modes as functions of model parameters. This dependence provides insight into the source of state oscillations. We find that feedback mechanisms that emerge from careful representation of enzyme and mineral interactions, with parameter values in a prescribed range, are critical for both maintaining system stability and capturing realistic responses to disturbances. Corroborating and expanding upon the results of recent studies, we explain the emergence of oscillatory responses and discuss the appropriate microbe-enabled model structure for inclusion in ESMs.

  17. Modeling the relativistic runaway electron avalanche and the feedback mechanism with GEANT4

    PubMed Central

    Skeltved, Alexander Broberg; Østgaard, Nikolai; Carlson, Brant; Gjesteland, Thomas; Celestin, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first study that uses the GEometry ANd Tracking 4 (GEANT4) toolkit to do quantitative comparisons with other modeling results related to the production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes and high-energy particle emission from thunderstorms. We will study the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) and the relativistic feedback process, as well as the production of bremsstrahlung photons from runaway electrons. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the effects of electron ionization, electron by electron (Møller), and electron by positron (Bhabha) scattering as well as the bremsstrahlung process and pair production, in the 250 eV to 100 GeV energy range. Our results indicate that the multiplication of electrons during the development of RREAs and under the influence of feedback are consistent with previous estimates. This is important to validate GEANT4 as a tool to model RREAs and feedback in homogeneous electric fields. We also determine the ratio of bremsstrahlung photons to energetic electrons N?/Ne. We then show that the ratio has a dependence on the electric field, which can be expressed by the avalanche time ?(E) and the bremsstrahlung coefficient ?(?). In addition, we present comparisons of GEANT4 simulations performed with a “standard” and a “low-energy” physics list both validated in the 1 keV to 100 GeV energy range. This comparison shows that the choice of physics list used in GEANT4 simulations has a significant effect on the results. Key Points Testing the feedback mechanism with GEANT4 Validating the GEANT4 programming toolkit Study the ratio of bremsstrahlung photons to electrons at TGF source altitude PMID:26167437

  18. Role of the Qinghai-Xizang plateau in feedback mechanisms affecting the planetary circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, E.R.; Yi-Hui, D.

    1980-01-01

    It has been recognized for some time that the Qinghai-Xizang plateau is of great importance in generating planetary long-waves which, in resonance with similar waves induced by the Rocky Mountains, lead to the familiar pattern of quasi-stationary Rossby waves observed on monthly-mean upper level pressure charts. Seasonal forcing of flow patterns also appears to be particularly strong in the Qinghai-Xizang plateau region. Recent investigations suggest that the Qinghai-Xizang plateau may also be involved in feedback mechanisms which control in an important way the interannual variability of the general circulation of the atmosphere. It appears that the effects of the Qinghai-Xizang plateau on the interannual variability of the atmospheric circulation over Asia are but one important manifestation of a network of feedback mechanisms, ranging from the El Nino problems along the Peruvian coast to droughts in the Sahel region. A better understanding of each of the mechanisms involved will lead us closer to successful long-range forecasting of some of the weather phenomena which have a considerable effect on local and regional economics.

  19. Negative Feedback of Glycolysis and Oxidative Phosphorylation: Mechanisms of and Reasons for It.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, S S; Balakireva, A V; Markova, O V; Severin, F F

    2015-05-01

    There are two main pathways of ATP biosynthesis: glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. As a rule, the two pathways are not fully active in a single cell. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of glycolytic inhibition of respiration (Warburg and Crabtree effects). What are the reasons for the existence of this negative feedback? It is known that maximal activation of both processes can cause generation of reactive oxygen species. Oxidative phosphorylation is more efficient from the energy point of view, while glycolysis is safer and favors biomass synthesis. This might be the reason why quiescent cells are mainly using oxidative phosphorylation, while the quickly proliferating ones - glycolysis. PMID:26071773

  20. Mechanisms of spindle positioning: cortical force generators in the limelight.

    PubMed

    Kotak, Sachin; Gönczy, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Correct positioning of the spindle governs placement of the cytokinesis furrow and thus plays a crucial role in the partitioning of fate determinants and the disposition of daughter cells in a tissue. Converging evidence indicates that spindle positioning is often dictated by interactions between the plus-end of astral microtubules that emanate from the spindle poles and an evolutionary conserved cortical machinery that serves to pull on them. At the heart of this machinery lies a ternary complex (LIN-5/GPR-1/2/G? in Caenorhabditis elegans and NuMA/LGN/G?i in Homo sapiens) that promotes the presence of the motor protein dynein at the cell cortex. In this review, we discuss how the above components contribute to spindle positioning and how the underlying mechanisms are precisely regulated to ensure the proper execution of this crucial process in metazoan organisms. PMID:23958212

  1. Creating a Positive Classroom Atmosphere: Teachers' Use of Effective Praise and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Snyder, Angela; Al-Hendawi, Maha; Vo, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    Creating a positive and engaging classroom atmosphere is one of the most powerful tools teachers can use to encourage children's learning and prevent problem behaviors from occurring. Teachers' responses to children's appropriate and problem behavior can help set the tone of the classroom environment. Creating positive interactions between a…

  2. Positive water vapour feedback in climate models confirmed by satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Lerner, J.; Chiou, E.-W.; Chu, W.; Larsen, J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1991-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that GCMs used to evaluate climate change overestimate the greenhouse effect due to increased concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere. Here, new satellite-generated water vapor data are used to compare summer and winter moisture values in regions of the middle and upper troposphere that have previously been difficult to observe with confidence. It is found that, as the hemispheres warm, increased convection leads to increased water vapor above 500 mbar in approximate quantitative agreement with results from current climate models. The same conclusion is reached by comparing the tropical western and eastern Pacific regions. Thus, water vapor feedback is not overestimated in models and should amplify the climate response to increased trace-gas concentrations.

  3. Adaptation of cardiac structure by mechanical feedback in the environment of the cell: a model study.

    PubMed Central

    Arts, T; Prinzen, F W; Snoeckx, L H; Rijcken, J M; Reneman, R S

    1994-01-01

    In the cardiac left ventricle during systole mechanical load of the myocardial fibers is distributed uniformly. A mechanism is proposed by which control of mechanical load is distributed over many individual control units acting in the environment of the cell. The mechanics of the equatorial region of the left ventricle was modeled by a thick-walled cylinder composed of 6-1500 shells of myocardial fiber material. In each shell a separate control unit was simulated. The direction of the cells was varied so that systolic fiber shortening approached a given optimum of 15%. End-diastolic sarcomere length was maintained at 2.1 microns. Regional early-systolic stretch and global contractility stimulated growth of cellular mass. If systolic shortening was more than normal the passive extracellular matrix stretched. The design of the load-controlling mechanism was derived from biological experiments showing that cellular processes are sensitive to mechanical deformation. After simulating a few hundred adaptation cycles, the macroscopic anatomical arrangement of helical pathways of the myocardial fibers formed automatically. If pump load of the ventricle was changed, wall thickness and cavity volume adapted physiologically. We propose that the cardiac anatomy may be defined and maintained by a multitude of control units for mechanical load, each acting in the cellular environment. Interestingly, feedback through fiber stress is not a compelling condition for such control. PMID:8038399

  4. Positional Reproducibility of Pancreatic Tumors Under End-Exhalation Breath-Hold Conditions Using a Visual Feedback Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Nakata, Manabu; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To assess positional reproducibility of pancreatic tumors under end-exhalation (EE) breath-hold (BH) conditions with a visual feedback technique based on computed tomography (CT) images. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved trial. All patients were placed in a supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. At the time of CT scan, they held their breath at EE with the aid of video goggles displaying their abdominal displacement. Each three-consecutive helical CT data set was acquired four times (sessions 1-4; session 1 corresponded to the time of CT simulation). The point of interest within or in proximity to a gross tumor volume was defined based on certain structural features. The positional variations in point of interest and margin size required to cover positional variations were assessed. Results: The means {+-} standard deviations (SDs) of intrafraction positional variations were 0.0 {+-} 1.1, 0.1 {+-} 1.2, and 0.1 {+-} 1.0 mm in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions, respectively (p = 0.726). The means {+-} SDs of interfraction positional variations were 0.3 {+-} 2.0, 0.8 {+-} 1.8, and 0.3 {+-} 1.8 mm in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively (p = 0.533). Population-based margin sizes required to cover 95th percentiles of the overall positional variations were 4.7, 5.3, and 4.9 mm in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. Conclusions: A margin size of 5 mm was needed to cover the 95th percentiles of the overall positional variations under EE-BH conditions, using this noninvasive approach to motion management for pancreatic tumors.

  5. A Circuit Mechanism for Differentiating Positive and Negative Associations

    PubMed Central

    Namburi, Praneeth; Beyeler, Anna; Yorozu, Suzuko; Calhoon, Gwendolyn G.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Wichmann, Romy; Holden, Stephanie S.; Mertens, Kim L.; Anahtar, Melodi; Felix-Ortiz, Ada C.; Wickersham, Ian R.; Gray, Jesse M.; Tye, Kay M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentiate stimuli predicting positive or negative outcomes is critical for survival, and perturbations of emotional processing underlie many psychiatric disease states. Synaptic plasticity in the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) mediates the acquisition of associative memories, both positive1,2 and negative3–7. Different populations of BLA neurons may encode fearful or rewarding associations8–10, but the identifying features of these populations and the synaptic mechanisms of differentiating positive and negative emotional valence have remained an enigma. Here, we show that BLA neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens (NAc projectors) or the centromedial amygdala (CeM projectors) underwent opposing synaptic changes following fear or reward conditioning. We found that photostimulation of NAc projectors supports positive reinforcement while photostimulation of CeM projectors mediates negative reinforcement. Photoinhibition of CeM projectors impaired fear conditioning and enhanced reward conditioning. We then characterized these functionally-distinct neuronal populations by comparing their electrophysiological, morphological and genetic features. We provide a mechanistic explanation for the representation of positive and negative associations within the amygdala. PMID:25925480

  6. RADIATIVE AND MOMENTUM-BASED MECHANICAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL GALAXY EVOLUTION CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ena; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.

    2012-08-01

    We study the growth of black holes (BHs) in galaxies using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with new implementations of the momentum mechanical feedback, and restriction of accreted elements to those that are gravitationally bound to the BH. We also include the feedback from the X-ray radiation emitted by the BH, which heats the surrounding gas in the host galaxies, and adds radial momentum to the fluid. We perform simulations of isolated galaxies and merging galaxies and test various feedback models with the new treatment of the Bondi radius criterion. We find that overall the BH growth is similar to what has been obtained by earlier works using the Springel, Di Matteo, and Hernquist algorithms. However, the outflowing wind velocities and mechanical energy emitted by winds are considerably higher (v{sub w} {approx} 1000-3000 km s{sup -1}) compared to the standard thermal feedback model (v{sub w} {approx} 50-100 km s{sup -1}). While the thermal feedback model emits only 0.1% of BH released energy in winds, the momentum feedback model emits more than 30% of the total energy released by the BH in winds. In the momentum feedback model, the degree of fluctuation in both radiant and wind output is considerably larger than in standard treatments. We check that the new model of BH mass accretion agrees with analytic results for the standard Bondi problem.

  7. A Cell-Regulatory Mechanism Involving Feedback between Contraction and Tissue Formation Guides Wound Healing Progression

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Javierre, Etelvina; García-Aznar, José Manuel; Gómez-Benito, María José

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a process driven by cells. The ability of cells to sense mechanical stimuli from the extracellular matrix that surrounds them is used to regulate the forces that cells exert on the tissue. Stresses exerted by cells play a central role in wound contraction and have been broadly modelled. Traditionally, these stresses are assumed to be dependent on variables such as the extracellular matrix and cell or collagen densities. However, we postulate that cells are able to regulate the healing process through a mechanosensing mechanism regulated by the contraction that they exert. We propose that cells adjust the contraction level to determine the tissue functions regulating all main activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and matrix production. Hence, a closed-regulatory feedback loop is proposed between contraction and tissue formation. The model consists of a system of partial differential equations that simulates the evolution of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor, as well as the deformation of the extracellular matrix. This model is able to predict the wound healing outcome without requiring the addition of phenomenological laws to describe the time-dependent contraction evolution. We have reproduced two in vivo experiments to evaluate the predictive capacity of the model, and we conclude that there is feedback between the level of cell contraction and the tissue regenerated in the wound. PMID:24681636

  8. Perception of electrical and mechanical stimulation of the skin: implications for electrotactile feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Patrick L.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2009-12-01

    Spinal cord injury is often accompanied by impaired tactile and proprioceptive sensations. Normally, somatosensensory information derived from such sensations is important in the formation of voluntary motor commands. Therefore, as a preliminary step toward the development of an electrotactile feedback system to restore somatosensation, psychophysical methods were used to characterize perceptual attributes associated with electrical stimulation of the skin on the back of the neck in human subjects. These data were compared to mechanical stimulation of the skin on the back of neck and on the distal pad of the index finger. Spatial acuity of the neck, evaluated using two-point thresholds, was not significantly different for electrical (37 ± 14 mm) or mechanical stimulation (39 ± 10 mm). The exponent (?) of the best fitting power function relating perceived intensity to applied stimulus strength was used to characterize perceptual sensitivity to mechanical and electrical stimuli. For electrical stimuli, both current amplitude-modulated and frequency-modulated trains of pulses were tested. Perceptual sensitivity was significantly greater for current amplitude modulation (? = 1.14 ± 0.37) compared to frequency modulation (? = 0.57 ± 0.24) and mechanical stimulation (0.51 ± 0.12). Finally, based on the data gathered here, we derive a transfer function that could be used in the future to convert mechanical stimuli detected with artificial sensors placed on the fingers into electrotactile signals that evoke perceptions similar to those arising from normal mechanical stimulation of the skin.

  9. Role of the Qinghai-Xizang plateau in feedback mechanisms affecting the planetary circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, E. R.; Yi-Hui, D.

    The Qinghai-Xizang plateau is of great importance in generating planetary long waves which, in resonance with similar waves induced by the Rocky Mountains, lead to the familiar pattern of quasi-stationary Rossby waves observed on monthly mean upper level pressure charts. Seasonal forcing of flow patterns also appears to be particularly strong in the Qinghai-Xizang plateau region. The effects of the Qinghai-Xizang plateau on the interannual variability of the atmospheric circulation over Asia are but one important manifestation of a network of feedback mechanisms, ranging from the El Nino problems along the Peruvian coast to droughts in the Sahel region. The mechanisms involved were investigated. Results will lead to successful long range forecasting of weather phenomena.

  10. Chk1 Activation Protects Rad9A from Degradation as Part of a Positive Feedback Loop during Checkpoint Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Osorio-Zambrano, William F.; Davey, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of Rad9A at S387 is critical for establishing a physical interaction with TopBP1, and to downstream activation of Chk1 for checkpoint activation. We have previously demonstrated a phosphorylation of Rad9A that occurs at late time points in cells exposed to genotoxic agents, which is eliminated by either Rad9A overexpression, or conversion of S387 to a non-phosphorylatable analogue. Based on this, we hypothesized that this late Rad9A phosphorylation is part of a feedback loop regulating the checkpoint. Here, we show that Rad9A is hyperphosphorylated and accumulates in cells exposed to bleomycin. Following the removal of bleomycin, Rad9A is polyubiquitinated, and Rad9A protein levels drop, indicating an active degradation process for Rad9A. Chk1 inhibition by UCN-01 or siRNA reduces Rad9A levels in cells synchronized in S-phase or exposed to DNA damage, indicating that Chk1 activation is required for Rad9A stabilization in S-phase and during checkpoint activation. Together, these results demonstrate a positive feedback loop involving Rad9A-dependend activation of Chk1, coupled with Chk1-dependent stabilization of Rad9A that is critical for checkpoint regulation. PMID:26658951

  11. Multidimensional subwavelength position sensing using a semiconductor laser with optical feedback

    E-print Network

    Baranger, Harold U.

    or sense complex objects in 2D or 3D, such laser-based systems require scanning and sequential 1D with the object position [6]; this method does not require sequential scanning to deduce 2D information. An open that the 2D posi- tion of an object inside the cavity could be determined with subwavelength precision using

  12. Mathematical model for positive feedback and temperature induced signal transduction and differential gene regulation in {\\it Bordetella pertussis}}

    E-print Network

    Bandyopadhyay, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    Based on the phosphorelay kinetics operative within BvgAS two component system we propose a mathematical model for signal transduction and differential gene regulation in {\\it Bordetella pertussis}. To understand the system behavior under elevated temperature, the developed model has been studied in two different ways. First, a quasi-steady state analysis has been carried out for the two component system, comprising of sensor BvgS and response regulator BvgA. The quasi-steady state analysis reveals a positive feedback and temperature induced molecular switch, leading to graded response and amplification in the output of BvgA. Accumulation of large pool of BvgA thus results into differential regulation of the downstream genes, including the gene encoding toxin. Furthermore, numerical integration of the full network kinetics has been carried out to explore time dependent behavior of different system components, that qualitatively capture the essential features of experimental results performed {\\it in vivo}.

  13. Reciprocal Markov Modeling of Feedback Mechanisms Between Emotion and Dietary Choice Using Experience-Sampling Data.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ji; Pan, Junhao; Zhang, Qiang; Dubé, Laurette; Ip, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    With intensively collected longitudinal data, recent advances in the experience-sampling method (ESM) benefit social science empirical research, but also pose important methodological challenges. As traditional statistical models are not generally well equipped to analyze a system of variables that contain feedback loops, this paper proposes the utility of an extended hidden Markov model to model reciprocal the relationship between momentary emotion and eating behavior. This paper revisited an ESM data set (Lu, Huet, & Dube, 2011 ) that observed 160 participants' food consumption and momentary emotions 6 times per day in 10 days. Focusing on the analyses on feedback loop between mood and meal-healthiness decision, the proposed reciprocal Markov model (RMM) can accommodate both hidden ("general" emotional states: positive vs. negative state) and observed states (meal: healthier, same or less healthy than usual) without presuming independence between observations and smooth trajectories of mood or behavior changes. The results of RMM analyses illustrated the reciprocal chains of meal consumption and mood as well as the effect of contextual factors that moderate the interrelationship between eating and emotion. A simulation experiment that generated data consistent with the empirical study further demonstrated that the procedure is promising in terms of recovering the parameters. PMID:26717120

  14. Reciprocal Markov modeling of feedback mechanisms between emotion and dietary choice using experience sampling data

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ji; Pan, Junhao; Zhang, Qiang; Dubé, Laurette; Ip, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    With intensively collected longitudinal data, recent advances in Experience Sampling Method (ESM) benefit social science empirical research, but also pose important methodological challenges. As traditional statistical models are not generally well-equipped to analyze a system of variables that contain feedback loops, this paper proposes the utility of an extended hidden Markov model to model reciprocal relationship between momentary emotion and eating behavior. This paper revisited an ESM data set (Lu, Huet & Dube, 2011) that observed 160 participants’ food consumption and momentary emotions six times per day in 10 days. Focusing on the analyses on feedback loop between mood and meal healthiness decision, the proposed Reciprocal Markov Model (RMM) can accommodate both hidden (“general” emotional states: positive vs. negative state) and observed states (meal: healthier, same or less healthy than usual) without presuming independence between observations and smooth trajectories of mood or behavior changes. The results of RMM analyses illustrated the reciprocal chains of meal consumption and mood as well as the effect of contextual factors that moderate the interrelationship between eating and emotion. A simulation experiment that generated data consistent to the empirical study further demonstrated that the procedure is promising in terms of recovering the parameters. PMID:26717120

  15. Inhibition of Receptor Dimerization as a Novel Negative Feedback Mechanism of EGFR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kluba, Malgorzata; Engelborghs, Yves; Hofkens, Johan; Mizuno, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is crucial for initiating signal transduction. We employed raster image correlation spectroscopy to continuously monitor the EGFR monomer-dimer equilibrium in living cells. EGFR dimer formation upon addition of EGF showed oscillatory behavior with a periodicity of about 2.5 min, suggesting the presence of a negative feedback loop to monomerize the receptor. We demonstrated that monomerization of EGFR relies on phospholipase C?, protein kinase C, and protein kinase D (PKD), while being independent of Ca2+ signaling and endocytosis. Phosphorylation of the juxtamembrane threonine residues of EGFR (T654/T669) by PKD was identified as the factor that shifts the monomer-dimer equilibrium of ligand bound EGFR towards the monomeric state. The dimerization state of the receptor correlated with the activity of an extracellular signal-regulated kinase, downstream of the EGFR. Based on these observations, we propose a novel, negative feedback mechanism that regulates EGFR signaling via receptor monomerization. PMID:26465157

  16. Indirect adaptive output feedback control of a biorobotic AUV using pectoral-like mechanical fins.

    PubMed

    Naik, Mugdha S; Singh, Sahjendra N; Mittal, Rajat

    2009-06-01

    This paper treats the question of servoregulation of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) in the yaw plane using pectoral-like mechanical fins. The fins attached to the vehicle have oscillatory swaying and yawing motion. The bias angle of the angular motion of the fin is used for the purpose of control. Of course, the design approach considered here is applicable to AUVs for other choices of oscillation patterns of the fins, which produce periodic forces and moments. It is assumed that the vehicle parameters, hydrodynamic coefficients, as well the fin forces and moments are unknown. For the trajectory control of the yaw angle, a sampled-data indirect adaptive control system using output (yaw angle) feedback is derived. The control system has a modular structure, which includes a parameter identifier and a stabilizer. For the control law derivation, an internal model of the exosignals (reference signal (constant or ramp) and constant disturbance) is included. Unlike the direct adaptive control scheme, the derived control law is applicable to minimum as well as nonminimum phase biorobotic AUVs (BAUVs). This is important, because for most of the fin locations on the vehicle, the model is a nonminimum phase. In the closed-loop system, the yaw angle trajectory tracking error converges to zero and the remaining state variables remain bounded. Simulation results are presented which show that the derived modular control system accomplishes precise set point yaw angle control and turning maneuvers in spite of the uncertainties in the system parameters using only yaw angle feedback. PMID:19276512

  17. Positive regulation of the Egr-1/osteopontin positive feedback loop in rat vascular smooth muscle cells by TGF-{beta}, ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hong-Wei; Liu, Qi-Feng; Liu, Gui-Nan

    2010-05-28

    Previous studies identified a positive feedback loop in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in which early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) binds to the osteopontin (OPN) promoter and upregulates OPN expression, and OPN upregulates Egr-1 expression via the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. The current study examined whether transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) activity contributes to Egr-1 binding to the OPN promoter, and whether other signaling pathways act downstream of OPN to regulate Egr-1 expression. ChIP assays using an anti-Egr-1 antibody showed that amplification of the OPN promoter sequence decreased in TGF-{beta} DNA enzyme-transfected VSMCs relative to control VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), or SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited OPN-induced Egr-1 expression, and PD98059 treatment was associated with the most significant decrease in Egr-1 expression. OPN-stimulated VSMC cell migration was inhibited by SP600125 or SB203580, but not by PD98059. Furthermore, MTT assays showed that OPN-mediated cell proliferation was inhibited by PD98059, but not by SP600125 or SB203580. Taken together, the results of the current study show that Egr-1 binding to the OPN promoter is positively regulated by TGF-{beta}, and that the p38 MAPK, JNK, and ERK pathways are involved in OPN-mediated Egr-1 upregulation.

  18. Mechanisms for Generating False Positives for Extrasolar Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Meadows, Victoria; Schwieterman, Edward; Luger, Rodrigo; Wordsworth, Robin; Barnes, Rory; Segura, Antigona; Claire, Mark; Virtual Planetary Laboratory

    2015-01-01

    Future mission concepts designed to look for life generally plan to search for oxygen (O2), ozone (O3), and/or methane (CH4). However, mechanisms exist for generating each of these species abiotically. In this presentation, we will review these processes, and discuss the atmospheres that result from them. In general, false positives can form in atmospheres with severe redox imbalance. This redox imbalance can also be thought of as extreme elemental composition, skewed towards very high or very low O/H ratios. Specific examples of this include: 1) loss of H through the top of a planetary atmosphere that leads to high O/H and an atmosphere rich in O2 and O3 2) atmospheres whose volcanism is O-rich and H-poor (i.e., highly oxidized), which leads to an atmosphere that with high O/H that can accumulate O3 and potentially O2 3) atmospheres in which H escape is slow, leading to low O/H and accumulation of CH4 and 4) atmospheres in which volcanic outgassing is H-rich (highly reduced), leading to low O/H and potential accumulation of CH4. Each of these cases would constitute a 'false positive' for life if O2, O3, or CH4 were detected without obtaining the chemical atmospheric context that could indicate a severe redox imbalance exists.Methods exist for discriminating between these 'false positives' where the gases arise from abiotic sources, and 'true positives' where the gases arise by biological sources. The best means of doing this is to obtain measurements of both O-rich (O2/O3) and H-rich (CH4) species, allowing identification of non-extreme O/H ratios in the atmosphere, and eliminating this abiotic source of O2, O3, and CH4. Because this is the most likely cause of abiotic production of these species, the elimination of this explanation would indicate that these gases were instead likely produced by biology.More specific methods to identify each of these false positives mechanisms also exist, but will not be discussed in detail in this presentation.

  19. The January 2010 Haiti mainshock-aftershock sequence: Positive feedback between faults in strain-partitioned transpression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeber, L.; Waldhauser, F.; Diehl, T.; Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Nettles, M.

    2010-12-01

    The Caribbean and North American plates converge ENE across the broad plate boundary in western Hispaniola. This motion is partitioned between a pair of parallel sinistral ~E-W striking transform faults and a set of NW-SE striking thrust-folds. The January 2010 M7.0 earthquake sequence in Haiti activated both these structural elements, shifting from mostly sinistral during the mainshock to pure thrusting in the aftershocks. Teleseismic waveforms of the mainshock point to a rupture on a WSW-striking segment of the Enriquillo-Plaintain Garden Fault (EPGF), dipping steeply north and mostly sinistral with a reverse component. Structural and coseismic surface deformation and lack of surface rupture, have lead to different interpretations. Which faults were activated in the sequence remains controversial. We greatly improved hypocenter resolution for the mainshock and 56 aftershocks (Mw 4.2-5.9) that occurred within two months by applying a teleseismic double-difference algorithm to the NEIC phase arrival times. Relative location uncertainties at the 90% confidence level are, on average, 1.9 km laterally and 1.3 km vertically. Aftershocks form two clusters, the smaller one near and east of the mainshock epicenter and the larger one about 30 km to the west and beyond. The gap between them is approximately the inferred main-rupture length. Focal mechanisms in both clusters exhibit nearly pure thrusting with planes striking from W to NW, except for one similar to and near the mainshock. Absolute location uncertainties, however, remain large so that the correlation between hypocenters and faults is interpretative. We place the relocated epicentres so that the two clusters correlate with restraining portions of the EPGF and the mainshock epicenter is on the fault trace, near the NEIC epicenter and well within the range of possible absolute locations. In agreement with more recent earthquake locations from local seismic stations and with the expected placement of thrust aftershocks, hypocenters in the western cluster are below the trace of the EPGF and northward, in the compressive quadrant of the sinistral main rupture. Most importantly, the prominent compressional bend and at the western terminus of the rupture accounts for a rise in fault-normal stress that stops the rupture and triggers thrusting on neighboring faults. The data suggest two sub-parallel thrust faults dipping SSW. The one to the north matches the Trois Bayes fault along the southern flank of the Canal du Sud. The one to the south is activated only below the trace of the EPGF, along a narrow west-dipping band. We interpret this activity to be on the Jacmel fault (our name), a regional thrust fault across the southern peninsula of Haiti, but only where this fault intersects the EPGF. Thrust motion on the Jacmel fault warps the EPGF in a constricting bend; slip on the EPGF at this bend raises horizontal compression that drives the thrusting. This positive feedback may account for partitioning along transpression boundaries and is likely to have a critical role in fault segmentation and stress transfer.

  20. The positive effect of mirror visual feedback on arm control in children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy is dependent on which arm is viewed.

    PubMed

    Smorenburg, Ana R P; Ledebt, Annick; Feltham, Max G; Deconinck, Frederik J A; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2011-09-01

    Mirror visual feedback has previously been found to reduce disproportionate interlimb variability and neuromuscular activity in the arm muscles in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP). The aim of the current study was to determine whether these positive effects are generated by the mirror per se (i.e. the illusory perception of two symmetrically moving limbs, irrespective of which arm generates the mirror visual feedback) or by the visual illusion that the impaired arm has been substituted and appears to move with less jerk and in synchrony with the less-impaired arm (i.e. by mirror visual feedback of the less-impaired arm only). Therefore, we compared the effect of mirror visual feedback from the impaired and the less-impaired upper limb on the bimanual coupling and neuromuscular activity during a bimanual coordination task. Children with SHCP were asked to perform a bimanual symmetrical circular movement in three different visual feedback conditions (i.e. viewing the two arms, viewing only one arm, and viewing one arm and its mirror image), combined with two head orientation conditions (i.e. looking from the impaired and looking from the less-impaired body side). It was found that mirror visual feedback resulted in a reduction in the eccentric activity of the Biceps Brachii Brevis in the impaired limb compared to the condition with actual visual feedback from the two arms. More specifically, this effect was exclusive to mirror visual feedback from the less-impaired arm and absent when mirror visual feedback from the impaired arm was provided. Across conditions, the less-impaired arm was the leading limb, and the nature of this coupling was independent from visual condition or head orientation. Also, mirror visual feedback did not affect the intensity of the mean neuromuscular activity or the muscle activity of the Triceps Brachii Longus. It was concluded that the positive effects of mirror visual feedback in children with SHCP are not just the result of the perception of two symmetrically moving limbs. Instead, in order to induce a decrease in eccentric neuromuscular activity in the impaired limb, mirror visual feedback from the 'unaffected' less-impaired limb is required. PMID:21766223

  1. Modelling ecogeomorphic feedbacks: investigating mechanisms of land degradation in semi-arid grassland and shrubland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Laura; Mueller, Eva; Tietjen, Britta; Wainwright, John

    2014-05-01

    Across vast areas of the world's drylands, land degradation is exacerbated by ecohydrological processes, which alter the structure, function and connectivity of dryland hillslopes. These processes are often interlinked through feedback mechanisms in such a way that a trigger may result in a re-organization of the affected landscape. Here, we present a spatially explicit process-based ecogeomorphic model, MAHLERAN-EcoHyD to enhance our understanding of complex linkages between abiotic and biotic drivers and processes of degradation in drylands. This ecogeomorphic modelling approach is innovative in two main ways: it couples biotic and abiotic processes, and simulates intra and inter-event dynamics, thus overcoming a key limitation of previous modelling approaches in terms of their temporal scaling, by simulating key ecogeomorphic processes at process-relevant time steps. Redistribution of water, sediment and nutrients during high-intensity rainstorms is simulated at 1-sec time steps, soil moisture and transpiration dynamics at daily time steps, and vegetation dynamics (establishment, growth, mortality) at 14-day time steps, over a high-resolution 1x1 m grid. We use this innovative modelling approach to investigate soil-vegetation feedback mechanisms within a grassland-shrubland transition zone at the Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research site in the south-western United States. Results from three modelling experiments are presented: the first modelling experiment investigates the impact of annual variations in individual high-intensity storms to assess long-term variations in runoff, soil-moisture conditions and sediment and nutrient fluxes over two decades; the second modelling experiment assesses the impact of vegetation composition on spatial changes in surface soil texture due to soil erosion by water; and the third modelling experiment investigates how long-term changes in vegetation alter feedbacks between biotic and abiotic processes using scenarios for static vegetation, dynamic vegetation and two stress scenarios (drought and overgrazing). Results of the first modelling experiment show that total runoff and sediment fluxes are reproduced reasonably well for larger storm events, yet fluxes are generally underestimated for smaller storm events due to the greater sensitivity of simulated runoff to discrepancies in simulated surface soil-moisture content. Results from the second modelling experiment reveal that although the spatial average of fine sediment fractions does not change, the spatial distribution of fine sediment fractions does change, especially over the shrub-dominated plot. This difference is particularly significant since the fine sediment fraction has the highest concentration of plant-essential nutrients. Results from the third modelling experiment show that if grass cover is low (~20%), then sensitivity to stress scenarios is high, whereas if grass cover is high (~40%), then grass and shrubs may co-exist under stress conditions. Results also show that in dry years when soil-moisture content remains high in the lower soil layer, the system is more resilient to meteorological drought. This ecogeomorphic model thus closes the gap of current modelling approaches that either investigate only individual extreme events or model the long-term dynamics of a landscape without including feedbacks between abiotic and biotic processes. This ecogeomorphic model therefore allows novel insight into the interactions and feedbacks between biotic and abiotic processes that govern ecosystem state in drylands.

  2. Cytoplasmic flows as signatures for the mechanics of mitotic positioning

    E-print Network

    Ehssan Nazockdast; Abtin Rahimian; Daniel Needleman; Michael Shelley

    2015-11-08

    The proper positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for asymmetric cell division and generating cell diversity during development. Proper position in the single-cell embryo of Caenorhabditis elegans is achieved initially by the migration and rotation of the pronuclear complex (PNC) and its two associated centrosomal arrays of microtubules (MTs). We present here the first systematic theoretical study of how these $O(1000)$ centrosomal microtubules (MTs) interact through the immersing cytoplasm, the cell periphery and PNC, and with each other, to achieve proper position. This study is made possible through our development of a highly efficient and parallelized computational framework that accounts explicitly for long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) between the MTs, while also capturing their flexibility, dynamic instability, and interactions with molecular motors and boundaries. First, we show through direct simulation that previous estimates of the PNC drag coefficient, based on either ignoring or partially including HIs, lead to misprediction of the active forces and time-scales of migration. We then directly study the dynamics of PNC migration under various force-transduction models, including the pushing or pulling of MTs at the cortex, and the pulling of MTs by cytoplasmically-bound force generators. While achieving proper position and orientation on physiologically reasonable time-scales does not uniquely choose a model, we find that each model produces a different signature in its induced cytoplasmic flow and MT conformations. We suggest then that cytoplasmic flows and MT conformations can be used to differentiate between mechanisms and to determine their contribution to the migration process.

  3. PYK2 integrates growth factor and cytokine receptors signaling and potentiates breast cancer invasion via a positive feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Selitrennik, Michael; Lev, Sima

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of ErbB family members in breast cancer progression and metastasis has been demonstrated by many studies. However, the downstream effectors that mediate their migratory and invasive responses have not been fully explored. In this study, we show that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase PYK2 is a key effector of EGFR and HER2 signaling in human breast carcinoma. We found that PYK2 is activated by both EGF and heregulin (HRG) in breast cancer cells, and positively regulates EGF/HRG-induced cell spreading, migration and invasion. PYK2 depletion markedly affects ERK1/2 and STAT3 phosphorylation in response to EGF/HRG as well as to IL8 treatment. Importantly, PYK2 depletion also reduced EGF/HRG-induced MMP9 and IL8 transcription, while IL8 inhibition abrogated EGF-induced MMP9 transcription and attenuated cell invasion. IL8, which is transcriptionally regulated by STAT3 and induces PYK2 activation, prolonged EGF-induced PYK2, STAT3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that IL8 acts through an autocrine loop to reinforce EGF-induced signals. Collectively our studies suggest that PYK2 is a common downstream effector of ErbB and IL8 receptors, and that PYK2 integrates their signaling pathways through a positive feedback loop to potentiate breast cancer invasion. Hence, PYK2 could be a potential therapeutic target for a subset of breast cancer patients. PMID:26084289

  4. Computational and Experimental Insights into the Mechanism of Substrate Recognition and Feedback Inhibition of Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheng-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Xi, Zhen; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2013-01-01

    Protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase (PPO; EC 1.3.3.4) is an essential enzyme catalyzing the last common step in the pathway leading to heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Great interest in PPO inhibitors arises from both its significance to agriculture and medicine. However, the discovery of PPO inhibitors with ultrahigh potency and selectivity is hampered due to lack of structural and mechanistic understanding about the substrate recognition, which remains a longstanding question central in porphyrin biology. To understand the mechanism, a novel binding model of protogen (protoporphyrinogen IX, the substrate) was developed through extensive computational simulations. Subsequently, amino acid residues that are critical for protogen binding identified by computational simulations were substituted by mutagenesis. Kinetic analyses of these mutants indicated that these residues were critical for protogen binding. In addition, the calculated free energies of protogen binding with these mutants correlated well with the experimental data, indicating the reasonability of the binding model. On the basis of this novel model, the fundamental mechanism of substrate recognition was investigated by performing potential of mean force (PMF) calculations, which provided an atomic level description of conformational changes and pathway intermediates. The free energy profile revealed a feedback inhibition mechanism of proto (protoporphyrin IX, the product), which was also in agreement with experimental evidence. The novel mechanistic insights obtained from this study present a new starting point for future rational design of more efficient PPO inhibitors based on the product-bound PPO structure. PMID:23935953

  5. A positive feedback loop of p53/miR-19/TP53INP1 modulates pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofang; Wang, Lei; Mo, Qingjiang; Jia, Ankui; Dong, Yuqian; Wang, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a common malignancy whose prognosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer is extremely poor, with only 20% of patients reaching two years of survival. Previous findings have shown that the tumor suppressor p53 is involved in the development of various types of cancer, including pancreatic cancer. Additionally, p53 is able to activate TP53INP1 transcription by regulating several phenotypes of cancer cells. Using gain and loss-of-function assays, the aim of the present study was to examine the relationships between miR-19a/b and cancer development as well as potential underlying mechanisms. The results showed that miR-19a/b identified a positive feedback regulation of p53/TP53INP1 axis. Additionally, p53 upregulated the TP53INP1 level in pancreatic cancer cells. However, overexpressed miR-19a/b partially restored the TP53 function in the pancreatic cancer cells while miR-19a/b downregulated TP53INP1 protein by directly targeting 3'UTR of its mRNA at the post-transcriptional level. In addition, the patient tissues identified that the miR-19a/b level in pancreatic cancer tissues was conversely correlated with TP53 and TP53INP1 expression. The results provide evidence for revealing the molecular mechanism involved in the development of pancreatic cancer and may be useful in the identification of new therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26531836

  6. LIM Homeobox 8 (Lhx8) Is a Key Regulator of the Cholinergic Neuronal Function via a Tropomyosin Receptor Kinase A (TrkA)-mediated Positive Feedback Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Takeyasu; Shimazaki, Takuya; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Oki, Toru; Ohgoh, Makoto; Okano, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons play an important role in cognitive functions such as learning and memory, and they are affected in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. Despite their functional importance, the molecular mechanisms of functional maturation and maintenance of these cholinergic neurons after the differentiation stage have not been fully elucidated. This study demonstrates that the LIM homeobox 8 (Lhx8) transcription factor regulates cholinergic function in rat septal cholinergic neurons in primary cultures from E18.5 embryos and in the adult brain. Lhx8 expression modulated tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) expression in septal cholinergic neurons in vitro and in vivo, resulting in regulated acetylcholine release as an index of cholinergic function. In addition, Lhx8 expression and function were regulated by nerve growth factor (NGF), and the effect of NGF was potentiated by Lhx8-induced TrkA expression. Together, our findings suggest that positive feedback regulation between Lhx8, TrkA, and NGF is an important regulatory mechanism for cholinergic functions of the septum. PMID:24265310

  7. miR-221 Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition through Targeting PTEN and Forms a Positive Feedback Loop with ?-catenin/c-Jun Signaling Pathway in Extra-Hepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lei; Li, Guodong; Ma, Donglai; Sun, Chen; Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC) is a refractory malignancy with poor prognosis due to its early invasion, metastasis and recurrence after operation. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of invasion and metastasis is the key to the development of new and effective therapeutic strategies for EHCC. In the present study we demonstrated that miR-221 promoted EHCC invasion and metastasis through targeting PTEN and formed a positive feedback loop with ?-catenin/c-Jun signaling pathway. We found miR-221 was upregulated in EHCC specimens and CC cell lines. Moreover, miR-221 was found strongly associated with the metastasis and prognosis of EHCC patients. The expression of PTEN was downregulated in EHCC patients and CC cell lines, and was further demonstrated as one of the downstream targets of miR-221. In addition, our data indicated that ?-catenin activated miR-221 through c-jun, while miR-221 enhanced ?-catenin signaling induced-epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by targeting PTEN, hence forming a positive feedback loop in EHCC cell lines. In conclusion, our results suggested that miR-221 promotes EMT through targeting PTEN and forms a positive feedback loop with ?-catenin/c-Jun signaling pathway in EHCC. PMID:26501139

  8. The unsteady nature of sea cliff retreat due to mechanical abrasion, failure and comminution feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Shaun W.; Adams, Peter N.; Limber, Patrick W.

    2014-08-01

    Sea cliff retreat is often linked to large waves, heavy precipitation and seismic events, but the specific operative mechanics have not been well constrained. In particular, what is the role of mechanical abrasion by beach sediments in cliff/platform evolution and how does it relate to the episodic nature of cliff retreat observed at certain locations? Here we present a simple, numerical model of sea cliff retreat that incorporates mechanical abrasion of a basal notch, threshold-controlled failure of the cantilevered block, and a feedback mechanism wherein retreat is dependent on the rate of sediment comminution within the surf zone. Using shore platform and cliff characteristics found in two coastal settings (the central California coast and the English North Sea coast), the model produces retreat rates comparable to those observed via field measurements. The highest retreat rates coincide with the steepest shore platforms and increasing wave height. Steeper platforms promote wave access to the cliff toe and, correspondingly, the receding cliff face produces additional accommodation space for the platform beach, preserving the erosive efficacy of the beach sediments. When exposed to energetic wave forcing, the slope of the inner platform segment controls retreat rates for concave platforms, whereas the slope of the outer platform segment exerts greater control for convex platforms. Platform beaches approached a long-term dynamic equilibrium on the concave profiles, leading to more consistent and steady retreat. Platform beaches were ephemeral on convex profiles, mirroring observed sand wave (Ord) migration on the Holderness coast, UK. These findings agree with previous field observations and support mechanical abrasion as a viable cause of temporal heterogeneity in cliff retreat rate for both coastlines.

  9. Transglutaminase II/MicroRNA-218/-181a Loop Regulates Positive Feedback Relationship between Allergic Inflammation and Tumor Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Sangkyung; Kim, Youngmi; Kim, Misun; Park, Deokbum; Lee, Hansoo; Lee, Yun Sil; Choe, Jongseon; Kim, Young Myeong; Jeoung, Dooil

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of transglutaminase II (TGaseII)-mediated allergic inflammation remains largely unknown. TGaseII, induced by antigen stimulation, showed an interaction and co-localization with Fc?RI. TGaseII was necessary for in vivo allergic inflammation, such as triphasic cutaneous reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, and passive systemic anaphylaxis. TGaseII was necessary for the enhanced metastatic potential of B16F1 melanoma cells by passive systemic anaphylaxis. TGaseII was shown to be a secreted protein. Recombinant TGaseII protein increased the histamine release and ?-hexosaminidase activity, and enhanced the metastatic potential of B16F1 mouse melanoma cells. Recombinant TGaseII protein induced the activation of EGF receptor and an interaction between EGF receptor and Fc?RI. Recombinant TGaseII protein displayed angiogenic potential accompanied by allergic inflammation. R2 peptide, an inhibitor of TGaseII, exerted negative effects on in vitro and in vivo allergic inflammation by regulating the expression of TGaseII and Fc?RI signaling. MicroRNA (miR)-218 and miR-181a, decreased during allergic inflammation, were predicted as negative regulators of TGaseII by microRNA array and TargetScan analysis. miR-218 and miR-181a formed a negative feedback loop with TGaseII and regulated the in vitro and in vivo allergic inflammation. TGaseII was necessary for the interaction between mast cells and macrophages during allergic inflammation. Mast cells and macrophages, activated during allergic inflammation, were responsible for the enhanced metastatic potential of tumor cells that are accompanied by allergic inflammation. In conclusion, the TGaseII/miR-218/-181a feedback loop can be employed for the development of anti-allergy therapeutics. PMID:25202021

  10. Positive feedback and temperature mediated molecular switch controls differential gene regulation in Bordetella pertussis

    E-print Network

    Arnab Bandyopadhyay; Suman K. Banik

    2012-08-17

    Based on the phosphorelay kinetics operative within BvgAS two component system we propose a mathematical framework for signal transduction and gene regulation of phenotypic phases in Bordetella pertussis. The proposed model identifies a novel mechanism of transcriptional interference between two promoters present in the bvg locus. To understand the system behavior under elevated temperature, the developed model has been studied in two different ways. First, a quasi-steady state analysis has been carried out for the two component system, comprising of sensor BvgS and response regulator BvgA. The quasi-steady state analysis reveals temperature induced sharp molecular switch, leading to amplification in the output of BvgA. Accumulation of a large pool of BvgA thus results into differential regulation of the downstream genes, including the gene encoding toxin. Numerical integration of the full network kinetics is then carried out to explore time dependent behavior of different system components, that qualitatively capture the essential features of experimental results performed in vivo. Furthermore, the developed model has been utilized to study mutants that are impaired in their ability to phosphorylate the transcription factor, BvgA, of the signaling network.

  11. Water Vapor Feedback and Links to Mechanisms of Recent Tropical Climate Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.; Miller, Tim L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent variations of tropical climate on interannual to near-decadal scales have provided a useful target for studying feedback processes. A strong warm/cold ENSO couplet (e.g. 1997-2000) along with several subsequent weaker events are prominent interannual signals that are part of an apparent longer term strengthening of the Walker circulation during the mid to late1990 s with some weakening thereafter. Decadal scale changes in tropical SST structure during the 1990s are accompanied by focusing of precipitation over the Indo-Pacific warm pool and an increase in tropical ocean evaporation of order 1.0 %/decade. Here we use a number of diverse satellite measurements to explore connections between upper-tropospheric humidity (UTH) variations on these time scales and changes in other water and energy fluxes. Precipitation (GPCP, TRMM), turbulent fluxes (OAFlux), and radiative fluxes (ERBE / CERES, SRB) are use to analyze vertically-integrated divergence of moist static energy, divMSE, and its dry and moist components. Strong signatures of MSE flux transport linking ascending and descending regions of tropical circulations are found. Relative strengths of these transports compared to radiative flux changes are interpreted as a measure of efficiency in the overall process of heat rejection during episodes of warm or cold SST forcing. In conjunction with the diagnosed energy transports we explore frequency distributions of upper-tropospheric humidity as inferred from SSM/T-2 and AMSU-B passive microwave measurements. Relating these variations to SST changes suggests positive water vapor feedback, but at a level reduced from constant relative humidity.

  12. Revised Submission (R3) to `IEEE TNSRE' November 2009 Neural-Mechanical Feedback Control Scheme Generates Physiological

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Milos R.

    Generates Physiological Ankle Torque Fluctuation during Quiet Stance Running Title: Neural and derivative (PD) feedback controller can regulate the active ankle torque during quiet stance and stabilize the active and passive ankle torque mechanisms and identify their contributions to the total ankle torque

  13. Reward and Visual Feedback Relative to the Performance and Mechanical Efficiency of High School Girls in the Standing Broad Jump.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebas, Carole J.

    This study focuses on changes occurring in selected mechanical components of high school girls performing the standing broad jump, and collects data pertaining to the effects of monetary reward and videotape feedback upon the following components: (a) distance jumped, (b) maximum angle of knee flexion, (c) maximum angle of hip flexion, (d) hip…

  14. [Feedback control mechanisms of plant cell expansion]. Progress report, [June 1989--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1992-12-31

    We have generated considerable evidence for the significance of wall stress relaxation in the control of plant growth and found that several agents (gibberellin, light, genetic loci for dwarf stature) influence growth rate via alteration of wall relaxation. We have refined our methods for measuring wall relaxation and, moreover, have found that wall relaxation properties bear only a distance relationship to wall mechanical properties. We have garnered novel insights into the nature of cell expansion mechanisms by analyzing spontaneous fluctuations of plant growth rate in seedlings. These experiments involved the application of mathematical techniques for analyzing growth rate fluctuations and the development of new instrumentation for measuring and forcing plant growth in a controlled fashion. These studies conclude that growth rate fluctuations generated by the plant as consequence of a feedback control system. This conclusion has important implications for the nature of wall loosening processes and demands a different framework for thinking about growth control. It also implies the existence of a growth rate sensor.

  15. Mechanisms and Feedbacks Causing Changes in Upper Stratospheric Ozone in the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Luke; Waugh, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Douglass, A. R.; Newman, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone is expected to increase during the 21st century as the abundance of halogenated ozone-depleting substances decrease to 1960 values. However, climate change will likely alter this "recovery" of stratospheric ozone by changing stratospheric temperatures, circulation, and abundance of reactive chemical species. Here we quantity the contribution of different mechanisms to changes in upper stratospheric ozone from 1960 to 2100 in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOS CCM), using multiple linear regression analysis applied to simulations using either Alb or A2 greenhouse gas (GHG) scenarios. In both these scenarios upper stratospheric ozone has a secular increase over the 21st century. For the simulation using the Alb GHG scenario, this increase is determined by the decrease in halogen amounts and the greenhouse gas induced cooling, with roughly equal contributions from each mechanism. There is a larger cooling in the simulation using the A2 GHG scenario, but also enhanced loss from higher NOy and HOx concentrations, which nearly offsets the increase due to cooler temperatures. The resulting ozone evolutions are similar in the A2 and Alb simulations. The response of ozone due to feedbacks from temperature and HOx changes, related to changing halogen concentrations, are also quantified using simulations with fixed halogen concentrations.

  16. INSM1 increases N-myc stability and oncogenesis via a positive-feedback loop in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Insulinoma associated-1 (IA-1/INSM1) gene is exclusively expressed during early embryonic development, but has been found to be re-expressed at high levels in neuroendocrine tumors including neuroblastoma. Using over-expression and knockdown experiments in neuroblastoma cells, we showed that INSM1 is critical for cell proliferation, BME-coated invasion, and soft agar colony formation. Here, we identified INSM1 as a novel target gene activated by N-myc in N-myc amplified neuroblastoma cells. The Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway induced INSM1 by increasing N-myc expression. INSM1 activated PI3K/AKT/GSK3? pathways to suppress N-myc phosphorylation (Thr-58) and inhibited degradation of N-myc. Inversely, N-myc protein bound to the E2-box region of the INSM1 promoter and activated INSM1 expression. The invasion assay and the xenograft nude mouse tumor model revealed that the INSM1 factor facilitated growth and oncogenesis of neuroblastoma. The current data supports our hypothesis that a positive-feedback loop of sonic hedgehog signaling induced INSM1 through N-myc and INSM1 enhanced N-myc stability contributing to the transformation of human neuroblastoma. PMID:26456864

  17. Elastin-derived peptides stimulate trophoblast migration and invasion: a positive feedback loop to enhance spiral artery remodelling.

    PubMed

    Desforges, Michelle; Harris, Lynda K; Aplin, John D

    2015-01-01

    Elastin breakdown in the walls of uterine spiral arteries during early pregnancy facilitates their transformation into dilated, high-flow, low-resistance channels. Elastin-derived peptides (EDP) can influence cell migration, invasion and protease activity, and so we hypothesized that EDP released during elastolysis promote extravillous trophoblast (EVT) invasion and further elastin breakdown. Treatment of the trophoblast cell line SGHPL4 with the elastin-derived matrikine VGVAPG (1 ?g/ml) significantly increased total elastase activity, promoted migration in a wound healing assay and increased invasion through Matrigel-coated transwells compared with vehicle control (0.1% DMSO) or the scrambled sequence VVGPGA. Furthermore, treatment of first-trimester placental villous explants with this EDP significantly increased both the area of trophoblast outgrowth and distance of migration away from the villous tips. Primary first-trimester cytotrophoblast exposed to VGVAPG (1 ?g/ml) for 30 min showed increased phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway, events also associated with tumour cell migration and invasion. These in vitro observations suggest liberation of bioactive EDP during induction of elastolysis in the uterine spiral arteries may orchestrate a positive feedback loop that promotes EVT invasion and further elastin breakdown, contributing to the process of vascular remodelling. PMID:25245255

  18. RTVP-1 promotes mesenchymal transformation of glioma via a STAT-3/IL-6-dependent positive feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Nis David; Ziv-Av, Amotz; Lee, Hae Kyung; Finniss, Susan; Cazacu, Simona; Xiang, Cunli; Ben-Asher, Hiba Waldman; deCarvalho, Ana; Mikkelsen, Tom; Poisson, Laila; Brodie, Chaya

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs), the most aggressive primary brain tumors, exhibit increased invasiveness and resistance to anti-tumor treatments. We explored the role of RTVP-1, a glioma-associated protein that promotes glioma cell migration, in the mesenchymal transformation of GBM. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) demonstrated that RTVP-1 expression was higher in mesenchymal GBM and predicted tumor recurrence and poor clinical outcome. ChiP analysis revealed that the RTVP-1 promoter binds STAT3 and C/EBP?, two master transcription factors that regulate mesenchymal transformation of GBM. In addition, IL-6 induced RTVP-1 expression in a STAT3-dependent manner. RTVP-1 increased the migration and mesenchymal transformation of glioma cells. Similarly, overexpression of RTVP-1 in human neural stem cells induced mesenchymal differentiation, whereas silencing of RTVP-1 in glioma stem cells (GSCs) decreased the mesenchymal transformation and stemness of these cells. Silencing of RTVP-1 also increased the survival of mice bearing GSC-derived xenografts. Using gene array analysis of RTVP-1 silenced glioma cells we identified IL-6 as a mediator of RTVP-1 effects on the mesenchymal transformation and migration of GSCs, therefore acting in a positive feedback loop by upregulating RTVP-1 expression via the STAT3 pathway. Collectively, these results implicate RTVP-1 as a novel prognostic marker and therapeutic target in GBM. PMID:26267319

  19. Neural mechanism of oculomotor horizontal velocity-to- position temporal integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksay, Emre R. F.

    Storage of briefly presented information in ``working'' memory correlates with persistent firing in the brain. Persistent activity in response to transient stimulation is a form of neural temporal integration. Here, the mechanism of temporal integration was explored in the oculomotor velocity-to-position neural integrator (VPNI), where persistent activity is used to maintain eye position and fixation. Extracellular and intracellular electrophysiology, single-cell dye- labeling, and pharmacological inactivation were performed in awake behaving goldfish while monitoring eye motion with the scleral search-coil method. Neurons identified within a compact subnucleus in the medulla designated as Area I are part of the VPNI for horizontal eye movements. Neurons fired tonically during fixations, with tonic rate higher for lateral eye positions and no discharge below a threshold position value. Dye-labeled somata were localized in a 350 micron extent of the inferior reticular formation. Axons either projected ipsilaterally to abducens motoneurons, or crossed the midline and projected toward the contralateral Area I and abducens. Bilateral inactivation of Area I induced inability to maintain eccentric gaze. During intracellular recording, step changes in eye position and firing rate were accompanied by steps in underlying membrane potential. Steps remained when neurons were hyperpolarized below action potential threshold. Perturbation with brief intracellular current pulses only induced transient changes in firing rate and potential. Membrane potential fluctuations were greater during more depolarized steps. These results suggest that steps are generated by synaptic input changes rather than intrinsic properties like membrane multistability. Spiking of unilateral pairs was positively correlated with 0-10 ms lag. Bilateral pairs were negatively correlated with 0-10 ms lag. These results are consistent with excitatory connections between unilateral pairs and inhibitory connections between bilateral pairs. The precise role of synaptic interaction was tested by pharmacological inactivation of part of the VPNI. Inactivation of ipsilateral Area I neurons disrupted persistent firing of non-inactivated cells, with effects most pronounced at high rates. Inactivation of contralateral Area I neurons also disrupted persistent firing, with effects most pronounced at low rates. These results suggest that both recurrent ipsilateral excitatory and contralateral inhibitory connections contribute to integration, apparently by mediating positive feedback.

  20. REDBACK: an Open-Source Highly Scalable Simulation Tool for Rock Mechanics with Dissipative Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, T.; Veveakis, M.; Paesold, M.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    Multiphysics modelling has become an indispensable tool for geoscientists to simulate the complex behaviours observed in their various fields of study where multiple processes are involved, including thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical (THMC) laws. This modelling activity involves simulations that are computationally expensive and its soaring uptake is tightly linked to the increasing availability of supercomputing power and easy access to powerful nonlinear solvers such as PETSc (http://www.mcs.anl.gov/petsc/). The Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) is a finite-element, multiphysics framework (http://mooseframework.org) that can harness such computational power and allow scientists to develop easily some tightly-coupled fully implicit multiphysics simulations that run automatically in parallel on large clusters. This open-source framework provides a powerful tool to collaborate on numerical modelling activities and we are contributing to its development with REDBACK (https://github.com/pou036/redback), a module for Rock mEchanics with Dissipative feedBACKs. REDBACK builds on the tensor mechanics finite strain implementation available in MOOSE to provide a THMC simulator where the energetic formulation highlights the importance of all dissipative terms in the coupled system of equations. We show first applications of fully coupled dehydration reactions triggering episodic fluid transfer through shear zones (Alevizos et al, 2014). The dimensionless approach used allows focusing on the critical underlying variables which are driving the resulting behaviours observed and this tool is specifically designed to study material instabilities underpinning geological features like faulting, folding, boudinage, shearing, fracturing, etc. REDBACK provides a collaborative and educational tool which captures the physical and mathematical understanding of such material instabilities and provides an easy way to apply this knowledge to realistic scenarios, where the size and complexity of the geometries considered, along with the material parameters distributions, add as many sources of different instabilities. References: Alevizos, S., T. Poulet, and E. Veveakis (2014), J. Geophys. Res., 119, 4558-4582, doi:10.1002/2013JB010070.

  1. A novel Ca2+-feedback mechanism extends the operating range of mammalian rods to brighter light.

    PubMed

    Vinberg, Frans; Turunen, Teemu T; Heikkinen, Hanna; Pitkänen, Marja; Koskelainen, Ari

    2015-10-01

    Sensory cells adjust their sensitivity to incoming signals, such as odor or light, in response to changes in background stimulation, thereby extending the range over which they operate. For instance, rod photoreceptors are extremely sensitive in darkness, so that they are able to detect individual photons, but remain responsive to visual stimuli under conditions of bright ambient light, which would be expected to saturate their response given the high gain of the rod transduction cascade in darkness. These photoreceptors regulate their sensitivity to light rapidly and reversibly in response to changes in ambient illumination, thereby avoiding saturation. Calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play a major role in mediating the rapid, subsecond adaptation to light, and the Ca(2+)-binding proteins GCAP1 and GCAP2 (or guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins [GCAPs]) have been identified as important mediators of the photoreceptor response to changes in intracellular Ca(2+). However, mouse rods lacking both GCAP1 and GCAP2 (GCAP(-/-)) still show substantial light adaptation. Here, we determined the Ca(2+) dependency of this residual light adaptation and, by combining pharmacological, genetic, and electrophysiological tools, showed that an unknown Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism contributes to light adaptation in GCAP(-/-) mouse rods. We found that mimicking the light-induced decrease in intracellular [Ca(2+)] accelerated recovery of the response to visual stimuli and caused a fourfold decrease of sensitivity in GCAP(-/-) rods. About half of this Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of sensitivity could be attributed to the recoverin-mediated pathway, whereas half of it was caused by the unknown mechanism. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that the feedback mechanisms regulating the sensitivity of mammalian rods on the second and subsecond time scales are all Ca(2+) dependent and that, unlike salamander rods, Ca(2+)-independent background-induced acceleration of flash response kinetics is rather weak in mouse rods. PMID:26415569

  2. The synaptonemal complex is assembled by a polySUMOylation-driven feedback mechanism in yeast.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wing-Kit; Humphryes, Neil; Afshar, Negar; Argunhan, Bilge; Terentyev, Yaroslav; Tsubouchi, Tomomi; Tsubouchi, Hideo

    2015-11-23

    During meiotic prophase I, proteinaceous structures called synaptonemal complexes (SCs) connect homologous chromosomes along their lengths via polymeric arrays of transverse filaments (TFs). Thus, control of TF polymerization is central to SC formation. Using budding yeast, we show that efficiency of TF polymerization closely correlates with the extent of SUMO conjugation to Ecm11, a component of SCs. HyperSUMOylation of Ecm11 leads to highly aggregative TFs, causing frequent assembly of extrachromosomal structures. In contrast, hypoSUMOylation leads to discontinuous, fragmented SCs, indicative of defective TF polymerization. We further show that the N terminus of the yeast TF, Zip1, serves as an activator for Ecm11 SUMOylation. Coexpression of the Zip1 N terminus and Gmc2, a binding partner of Ecm11, is sufficient to induce robust polySUMOylation of Ecm11 in nonmeiotic cells. Because TF assembly is mediated through N-terminal head-to-head associations, our results suggest that mutual activation between TF assembly and Ecm11 polySUMOylation acts as a positive feedback loop that underpins SC assembly. PMID:26598615

  3. A three-component signalling system fine-tunes expression kinetics of HPPK responsible for folate synthesis by positive feedback loop during stress response of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Fang; Deng, Chao-Ying; Cai, Zhen; Wang, Ting; Wang, Li; Wang, Xiao-Zheng; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Qian, Wei

    2014-07-01

    During adaptation to environments, bacteria employ two-component signal transduction systems, which contain histidine kinases and response regulators, to sense and respond to exogenous and cellular stimuli in an accurate spatio-temporal manner. Although the protein phosphorylation process between histidine kinase and response regulator has been well documented, the molecular mechanism fine-tuning phosphorylation levels of response regulators is comparatively less studied. Here we combined genetic and biochemical approaches to reveal that a hybrid histidine kinase, SreS, is involved in the SreK-SreR phosphotransfer process to control salt stress response in the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris. The N-terminal receiver domain of SreS acts as a phosphate sink by competing with the response regulator SreR to accept the phosphoryl group from the latter's cognate histidine kinase SreK. This regulatory process is critical for bacterial survival because the dephosphorylated SreR protein participates in activating one of the tandem promoters (P2) at the 5' end of the sreK-sreR-sreS-hppK operon, and then modulates a transcriptional surge of the stress-responsive gene hppK, which is required for folic acid synthesis. Therefore, our study dissects the biochemical process of a positive feedback loop in which a 'three-component' signalling system fine-tunes expression kinetics of downstream genes. PMID:24119200

  4. Separable Neural Mechanisms Contribute to Feedback Processing in a Rule-Learning Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanolie, K.; Van Leijenhorst, L.; Rombouts, S. A. R. B.; Crone, E. A.

    2008-01-01

    To adjust performance appropriately to environmental demands, it is important to monitor ongoing action and process performance feedback for possible errors. In this study, we used fMRI to test whether medial prefrontal cortex (PFC)/anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsolateral (DL) PFC have different roles in feedback processing. Twenty adults…

  5. The mediating role of trees - transfer and feedback mechanisms of wind-driven seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Michael; Burtin, Arnaud; Simard, Sonia; Hovius, Niels

    2015-04-01

    There are multiple pathways to deliver energy, necessary to drive geomorphic processes, to the Earth surface. However, the role of vegetation - especially trees - in a wind field has received only limited attention. While tree mechanics above the surface are well investigated, there appears to be a fundamental lack of information on the amount of energy transferred to the subsurface. With modern broadband seismometers it is possible to quantify this energy. In a forest close to natural conditions (Serrahn area of the Müritz National Park, northern Germany) two three-component seismometers were deployed over several winter storm periods to record the patterns of seismic activity with respect to meteorological drivers. Trees emit considerable seismic energy over a broad frequency band (< 0.5 - 50 Hz), in close relation to wind speed (R² = 0.6 to 0.8), which must be compensated within shallow depth. However, lateral attenuation is significant: less than 50 m beyond the forest margin the signal virtually vanished. The relationship of wind speed and seismic activity shows a clockwise hysteresis pattern, which appears to be related to stem water content (as indicated by tree diameter measurements). This results in a time lag of tree response to increasing wind speed as well as a recovery time of several hours until the hysteresis is closed again. These findings show the vital role of vegetation in coupling energy systems (atmosphere and subsurface) and the coupled feedback loops and time-variant properties of wind, trees and ground properties.

  6. Model of myosin recruitment to the cell equator for cytokinesis: feedback mechanisms and dynamical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Alexander; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2011-03-01

    The formation and constriction of the contractile ring during cytokinesis, the final step of cell division, depends on the recruitment of motor protein myosin to the cell's equatorial region. During animal cell cytokinesis, cortical myosin filaments (MF) disassemble at the flanking regions and concentrate in the equator. This recruitment depends on myosin motor activity and the Rho proteins that regulate MF assembly and disassembly. Central spindle and astral microtubules help establish a spatial pattern of differential Rho activity. We propose a reaction-diffusion model for the dynamics of MF recruitment to the equatorial region. In the model, the central spindle and mechanical stress promote self-reinforcing MF assembly. Negative feedback is introduced by MF-induced recruitment of inhibitor myosin phosphatase. Our model yields various dynamical regimes and explains both the recruitment of MF to the cleavage furrow and the observed damped MF oscillations in the flanking regions, as well as steady MF assembly. Space and time parameters of MF oscillations are calculated. We predict oscillatory relaxation of cortical MF upon removal of locally-applied external stress.

  7. Real-time feedback on knee abduction moment does not improve frontal-plane knee mechanics during jump landings.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, M L; Palmieri-Smith, R M

    2014-08-01

    Excessive knee abduction loading is a contributing factor to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a double-leg landing training program with real-time visual feedback improves frontal-plane mechanics during double- and single-leg landings. Knee abduction angles and moments and vertical ground reaction forces (GRF) of 21 recreationally active women were quantified for double- and single-leg landings before and after the training program. This program consisted of two sessions of double-leg jump landings with real-time visual feedback on knee abduction moments for the experimental group and without real-time feedback for the control group. No significant differences were found between training groups. In comparison with pre-training data, peak knee abduction moments decreased 12% post-training for both double- and single-leg landings; whereas peak vertical GRF decreased 8% post-training for double-leg landings only, irrespective of training group. Real-time feedback on knee abduction moments, therefore, did not significantly improve frontal-plane knee mechanics during landings. The effect of the training program on knee abduction moments, however, transferred from the double-leg landings (simple task) to single-leg landings (more complex task). Consequently, ACL injury prevention efforts may not need to focus on complex tasks during which injury occurs. PMID:23347094

  8. Fire, microclimate, wind- and water-erosion create positive feedback for microsite soil resources: meta-analysis in sagebrush steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, J. B.; Germino, M. J.; Sankey, T.; Hoover, A. N.; Glenn, N. F.

    2010-12-01

    Undershrub and interspace microsites are the fundamental scale at which wind and water erosion, and soil surface resources vary, yet we are not aware of a meta-analysis that quantitatively summarizes the literature on this subject. We recently completed such a meta-analysis in sagebrush steppe of the western USA, with particular emphasis on landscapes disturbed by fire. This research is especially relevant because the extent to which rehabilitation efforts in sagebrush steppe, such as post-fire reseeding, might be affected by soil heterogeneity at the microsite scale is currently not well understood. The meta-analysis incorporated results of our recent study of microsite effects using the Portable In-situ Wind Erosion Laboratory (PI-SWERL) instrument, as we identified wind erosion to be previously unstudied for microsites of the sagebrush steppe. Results of the meta-analysis indicated that regardless of whether surfaces had or had not recently burned (i.e., within a year), undershrub microsites were significantly higher in nutrient concentrations, organic matter, and water repellency, lower in bulk density, and did not differ from interspaces in texture. In unburned conditions, interspaces had significantly lower soil water content, greater temperature maximums, and were more erodible by water, yet equally erodible by wind in comparison to undershrub microsites. Conversely, in burned conditions, interspaces were significantly wetter and cooler than undershrubs, and less erodible by wind, but equally erodible by water. We present these patterns in a conceptual framework and propose that fire, soil water, and soil temperature in conjunction with wind- and water-transport can produce a positive feedback on microsites in sagebrush steppe. We recommend future efforts to develop studies on understudied soil surface factors at the microsite scale, especially wind erosion and microclimate, and expand the meta-analysis to a quantitative comparison between shrublands of cold and warm deserts.

  9. Caging Mechanism for a drag-free satellite position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, R.; Mathiesen, J.; Debra, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A disturbance compensation system for satellites based on the drag-free concept was mechanized and flown, using a spherical proof mass and a cam-guided caging mechanism. The caging mechanism controls the location of the proof mass for testing and constrains it during launch. Design requirements, design details, and hardware are described.

  10. Three-Dimensional MHD Magnetic Reconnection Simulations with Finite Guide Field: Proposal of the Shock-Evoking Positive-Feedback Model

    E-print Network

    Wang, Shuoyang; Isobe, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model, we simulate the magnetic reconnection in a single current sheet. We assume a finite guide field, a random perturbation on the velocity field and uniform resistivity. Our model enhances the reconnection rate relative to the classical Sweet-Parker model in the same configuration. The efficiency of magnetic energy conversion is increased by interactions between the multiple tearing layers coexisting in the global current sheet. This interaction, which forms a positive-feedback system, arises from coupling of the inflow and outflow regions in different layers across the current sheet. The coupling accelerates the elementary reconnection events, thereby enhancing the global reconnection rate. The reconnection establishes flux tubes along each tearing layer. Slow-mode shocks gradually form along the outer boundaries of these tubes, further accelerating the magnetic energy conversion.Such positive-feedback system is absent in two-dimensional simulation, three-dime...

  11. Three-dimensional MHD Magnetic Reconnection Simulations with a Finite Guide Field: Proposal of the Shock-evoking Positive-feedback Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuoyang; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Isobe, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    Using a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic model, we simulate the magnetic reconnection in a single current sheet. We assume a finite guide field, a random perturbation on the velocity field, and uniform resistivity. Our model enhances the reconnection rate relative to the classical Sweet-Parker model in the same configuration. The efficiency of magnetic energy conversion is increased by interactions between the multiple tearing layers coexisting in the global current sheet. This interaction, which forms a positive-feedback system, arises from coupling of the inflow and outflow regions in different layers across the current sheet. The coupling accelerates the elementary reconnection events, thereby enhancing the global reconnection rate. The reconnection establishes flux tubes along each tearing layer. Slow-mode shocks gradually form along the outer boundaries of these tubes, further accelerating the magnetic energy conversion. Such a positive-feedback system is absent in two-dimensional simulations, 3D reconnection without a guide field, and reconnection under a single perturbation mode. We refer to our model as the “shock-evoking positive-feedback” model.

  12. Towards simulating star formation in turbulent high-z galaxies with mechanical supernova feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Cen, Renyue; Devriendt, Julien; Dubois, Yohan; Slyz, Adrianne

    2015-08-01

    To better understand the impact of supernova (SN) explosions on the evolution of galaxies, we perform a suite of high-resolution (12 pc), zoom-in cosmological simulations of a Milky Way-like galaxy at z = 3 with adaptive mesh refinement. We find that SN explosions can efficiently regulate star formation, leading to the stellar mass and metallicity consistent with the observed mass-metallicity relation and stellar mass-halo mass relation at z ˜ 3. This is achieved by making three important changes to the classical feedback scheme: (i) the different phases of SN blast waves are modelled directly by injecting radial momentum expected at each stage, (ii) the realistic time delay of SNe is required to disperse very dense gas before a runaway collapse sets in, and (iii) a non-uniform density distribution of the interstellar medium (ISM) is taken into account below the computational grid scale for the cell in which an SN explodes. The simulated galaxy with the SN feedback model shows strong outflows, which carry approximately 10 times larger mass than star formation rate, as well as smoothly rising circular velocity. Although the metallicity of the outflow depends sensitively on the feedback model used, we find that the accretion rate and metallicity of the cold flow around the virial radius is impervious to SN feedback. Our results suggest that understanding the structure of the turbulent ISM may be crucial to assess the role of SN and other feedback processes in galaxy formation theory.

  13. Cytoplasmic flows as signatures for the mechanics of mitotic positioning

    E-print Network

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The proper positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for asymmetric cell division and generating cell diversity during development. Proper position in the single-cell embryo of Caenorhabditis elegans is achieved initially by the migration and rotation of the pronuclear complex (PNC) and its two associated centrosomal arrays of microtubules (MTs). We present here the first systematic theoretical study of how these $O(1000)$ centrosomal microtubules (MTs) interact through the immersing cytoplasm, the cell periphery and PNC, and with each other, to achieve proper position. This study is made possible through our development of a highly efficient and parallelized computational framework that accounts explicitly for long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) between the MTs, while also capturing their flexibility, dynamic instability, and interactions with molecular motors and boundaries. First, we show through direct simulation that previous estimates of the PNC drag coefficient, based on either ignoring or ...

  14. Positive feedback of DDX6/c-Myc/PTB1 regulated by miR-124 contributes to maintenance of the Warburg effect in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kohei; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Kumazaki, Minami; Shinohara, Haruka; Yamada, Nami; Matsuhashi, Nobuhisa; Futamura, Manabu; Ito, Yuko; Otsuki, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa; Akao, Yukihiro

    2015-09-01

    The human DEAD/H-box RNA helicase gene DDX6 is a target of the t(11;14)(q23;q32) chromosomal translocation observed in human B-cell lymphoma, and the overexpression of its protein has been shown to cause malignant transformation. DDX6 has a variety of functions such as translation initiation, pre-mRNA splicing, ribosome assembly, and more. However, details of the regulatory mechanism of DDX6 and functions of DDX6 in cancer cells are largely unknown. On the other hand, the Warburg effect is a well-known feature of cancer cells. Pyruvate kinase in muscle (PKM), which is a rate-limiting glycolytic enzyme, has 2 isoforms, PKM1 and PKM2. It has been frequently reported that PKM2 is a tumor-specific isoform and promotes the Warburg effect. However, the functions of the PKM1 gene have been hardly mentioned. Here, we showed that DDX6 was overexpressed in colorectal cancer specimens and regulated by microRNA (miR)-124 in colon cancer cells. Also, a DDX6/c-Myc/PTB1 positive feedback circuit regulated by miR-124 was shown to be established and to contribute to maintenance of the Warburg effect. Moreover, we showed that knockdown of DDX6 induced mainly apoptosis through an imbalance of PKM gene expression, especially causing down-regulation of PKM1 in colon cancer cells. These results suggest that miR-124 is a fine tuner of the Warburg effect and that DDX6 is one of the key molecules in Warburg effect-related miR-124 targeting various genes. PMID:26144048

  15. Mechanisms of Product Feedback Regulation and Drug Resistance in Cytidine Triphosphate Synthetases from the Structure of a CTP-Inhibited Complex,

    E-print Network

    Baldwin, Enoch

    Mechanisms of Product Feedback Regulation and Drug Resistance in Cytidine Triphosphate Synthetases ABSTRACT: Cytidine triphosphate synthetases (CTPSs) synthesize CTP and regulate its intracellular from uridine triphosphate (UTP), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and glutamine by cytidine triphosphate

  16. Abstract The Arctic contains extensive soil carbon re-serves that could provide a substantial positive feedback

    E-print Network

    Grogan, Paul

    - centrations/changing climate. Keywords Carbon · Climate · Feedback · Nutrients · Respiration Introduction warming (Lashof 1989). In addition, general circulation models of CO2-induced global climate changeAbstract The Arctic contains extensive soil carbon re- serves that could provide a substantial

  17. An Adapting Auditory-motor Feedback Loop Can Contribute to Generating Vocal Repetition

    PubMed Central

    Brainard, Michael S.; Jin, Dezhe Z.

    2015-01-01

    Consecutive repetition of actions is common in behavioral sequences. Although integration of sensory feedback with internal motor programs is important for sequence generation, if and how feedback contributes to repetitive actions is poorly understood. Here we study how auditory feedback contributes to generating repetitive syllable sequences in songbirds. We propose that auditory signals provide positive feedback to ongoing motor commands, but this influence decays as feedback weakens from response adaptation during syllable repetitions. Computational models show that this mechanism explains repeat distributions observed in Bengalese finch song. We experimentally confirmed two predictions of this mechanism in Bengalese finches: removal of auditory feedback by deafening reduces syllable repetitions; and neural responses to auditory playback of repeated syllable sequences gradually adapt in sensory-motor nucleus HVC. Together, our results implicate a positive auditory-feedback loop with adaptation in generating repetitive vocalizations, and suggest sensory adaptation is important for feedback control of motor sequences. PMID:26448054

  18. Developing an Undergraduate Assessment Test: A Mechanism for Faculty Feedback about Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Thomas J.; Strandholm, Karen; Dziekan, Julie

    2010-01-01

    A regional business school chose to self develop an assessment test of the fundamental concepts of the undergraduate business core. Above and beyond the demands of AACSB accreditation, faculty identified feedback from such a test as an essential precursor to changing both overall curriculum and individual class content. The authors describe the…

  19. In Silico Modeling of Itk Activation Kinetics in Thymocytes Suggests Competing Positive and Negative IP4 Mediated Feedbacks Increase Robustness

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Rigaud, Stephanie; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Fu, Guo; Prochenka, Agnieszka; Dworkin, Michael; Gascoigne, Nicholas R. J.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Sauer, Karsten; Das, Jayajit

    2013-01-01

    The inositol-phosphate messenger inositol(1,3,4,5)tetrakisphosphate (IP4) is essential for thymocyte positive selection by regulating plasma-membrane association of the protein tyrosine kinase Itk downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR). IP4 can act as a soluble analog of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) membrane lipid product phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)trisphosphate (PIP3). PIP3 recruits signaling proteins such as Itk to cellular membranes by binding to PH and other domains. In thymocytes, low-dose IP4 binding to the Itk PH domain surprisingly promoted and high-dose IP4 inhibited PIP3 binding of Itk PH domains. However, the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of membrane recruitment of Itk by IP4 and PIP3 remain unclear. The distinct Itk PH domain ability to oligomerize is consistent with a cooperative-allosteric mode of IP4 action. However, other possibilities cannot be ruled out due to difficulties in quantitatively measuring the interactions between Itk, IP4 and PIP3, and in generating non-oligomerizing Itk PH domain mutants. This has hindered a full mechanistic understanding of how IP4 controls Itk function. By combining experimentally measured kinetics of PLC?1 phosphorylation by Itk with in silico modeling of multiple Itk signaling circuits and a maximum entropy (MaxEnt) based computational approach, we show that those in silico models which are most robust against variations of protein and lipid expression levels and kinetic rates at the single cell level share a cooperative-allosteric mode of Itk regulation by IP4 involving oligomeric Itk PH domains at the plasma membrane. This identifies MaxEnt as an excellent tool for quantifying robustness for complex TCR signaling circuits and provides testable predictions to further elucidate a controversial mechanism of PIP3 signaling. PMID:24066087

  20. Modeling the relativistic runaway electron avalanche and the feedback mechanism with GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeltved, Alexander Broberg; Østgaard, Nikolai; Carlson, Brant; Gjesteland, Thomas; Celestin, Sebastien

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the first study that uses the GEometry ANd Tracking 4 (GEANT4) toolkit to do quantitative comparisons with other modeling results related to the production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes and high-energy particle emission from thunderstorms. We will study the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) and the relativistic feedback process, as well as the production of bremsstrahlung photons from runaway electrons. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the effects of electron ionization, electron by electron (Møller), and electron by positron (Bhabha) scattering as well as the bremsstrahlung process and pair production, in the 250 eV to 100 GeV energy range. Our results indicate that the multiplication of electrons during the development of RREAs and under the influence of feedback are consistent with previous estimates. This is important to validate GEANT4 as a tool to model RREAs and feedback in homogeneous electric fields. We also determine the ratio of bremsstrahlung photons to energetic electrons N?/Ne. We then show that the ratio has a dependence on the electric field, which can be expressed by the avalanche time ?(E) and the bremsstrahlung coefficient ?(?). In addition, we present comparisons of GEANT4 simulations performed with a "standard" and a "low-energy" physics list both validated in the 1 keV to 100 GeV energy range. This comparison shows that the choice of physics list used in GEANT4 simulations has a significant effect on the results.

  1. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes. PMID:26365394

  2. Cloud CCN feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Cloud microphysics affects cloud albedo precipitation efficiency and the extent of cloud feedback in response to global warming. Compared to other cloud parameters, microphysics is unique in its large range of variability and the fact that much of the variability is anthropogenic. Probably the most important determinant of cloud microphysics is the spectra of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) which display considerable variability and have a large anthropogenic component. When analyzed in combination three field observation projects display the interrelationship between CCN and cloud microphysics. CCN were measured with the Desert Research Institute (DRI) instantaneous CCN spectrometer. Cloud microphysical measurements were obtained with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Lockheed Electra. Since CCN and cloud microphysics each affect the other a positive feedback mechanism can result.

  3. Mechanism of positive allosteric modulators acting on AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongsheng; Clark, Suzanne; Weeks, Autumn M; Dudman, Joshua T; Gouaux, Eric; Partin, Kathryn M

    2005-09-28

    Ligand-gated ion channels involved in the modulation of synaptic strength are the AMPA, kainate, and NMDA glutamate receptors. Small molecules that potentiate AMPA receptor currents relieve cognitive deficits caused by neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and show promise in the treatment of depression. Previously, there has been limited understanding of the molecular mechanism of action for AMPA receptor potentiators. Here we present cocrystal structures of the glutamate receptor GluR2 S1S2 ligand-binding domain in complex with aniracetam [1-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-2-pyrrolidinone] or CX614 (pyrrolidino-1,3-oxazino benzo-1,4-dioxan-10-one), two AMPA receptor potentiators that preferentially slow AMPA receptor deactivation. Both potentiators bind within the dimer interface of the nondesensitized receptor at a common site located on the twofold axis of molecular symmetry. Importantly, the potentiator binding site is adjacent to the "hinge" in the ligand-binding core "clamshell" that undergoes conformational rearrangement after glutamate binding. Using rapid solution exchange, patch-clamp electrophysiology experiments, we show that point mutations of residues that interact with potentiators in the cocrystal disrupt potentiator function. We suggest that the potentiators slow deactivation by stabilizing the clamshell in its closed-cleft, glutamate-bound conformation. PMID:16192394

  4. Mechanism of Positive Allosteric Modulators Acting on AMPA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jin,R.; Clark, S.; Weeks, A.; Dudman, J.; Gouaux, E.; Partin, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels involved in the modulation of synaptic strength are the AMPA, kainate, and NMDA glutamate receptors. Small molecules that potentiate AMPA receptor currents relieve cognitive deficits caused by neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and show promise in the treatment of depression. Previously, there has been limited understanding of the molecular mechanism of action for AMPA receptor potentiators. Here we present cocrystal structures of the glutamate receptor GluR2 S1S2 ligand-binding domain in complex with aniracetam [1-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-2-pyrrolidinone] or CX614 (pyrrolidino-1, 3-oxazino benzo-1, 4-dioxan-10-one), two AMPA receptor potentiators that preferentially slow AMPA receptor deactivation. Both potentiators bind within the dimer interface of the nondesensitized receptor at a common site located on the twofold axis of molecular symmetry. Importantly, the potentiator binding site is adjacent to the 'hinge' in the ligand-binding core 'clamshell' that undergoes conformational rearrangement after glutamate binding. Using rapid solution exchange, patch-clamp electrophysiology experiments, we show that point mutations of residues that interact with potentiators in the cocrystal disrupt potentiator function. We suggest that the potentiators slow deactivation by stabilizing the clamshell in its closed-cleft, glutamate-bound conformation.

  5. CGILS: Results from the First Phase of an International Project to Understand the Physical Mechanisms of Low Cloud Feedbacks in Single Column Models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter; Austin, Phillip A.; Bacmeister, J.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; Del Genio, Anthony D.; De Roode, Stephan R.; Endo , Satoshi; Franklin, Charmaine N.; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hannay, Cecile; Heus, Thijs; Isotta, Francesco A.; Jean-Louis, Dufresne; Kang, In-Sik; Kawai, Hideaki; Koehler, M.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Yangang; Lock, Adrian; Lohmann, U.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Molod, Andrea M.; Neggers, Roel; Rasch, Philip J.; Sandu, Irina; Senkbeil, Ryan; Siebesma, A. P.; Siegenthaler-Le Drian, Colombe; Stevens, Bjorn; Suarez, Max; Xu, Kuan-Man; Von Salzen, Knut; Webb, Mark; Wolf, Audrey; Zhao, M.

    2013-12-26

    Large Eddy Models (LES) and Single Column Models (SCM) are used in a surrogate climate change 101 to investigate the physical mechanism of low cloud feedbacks in climate models. Enhanced surface-102 driven boundary layer turbulence and shallow convection in a warmer climate are found to be 103 dominant mechanisms in SCMs.

  6. The Role of Possible Feedback Mechanisms in the Effects of Altered Gravity on Formation and Function of Gravireceptors of Mollusks and Fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondrachuk, Alexander V.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    The variety of the effects of altered gravity (AG) on development and function of gravireceptors cannot be explained by simple feedback mechanism that correlates gravity level and weight of test mass. The reaction of organisms to the change of gravity depends on the phase of their development. To predict this reaction we need to know the details of the mechanisms of gravireceptor formation

  7. Towards simulating star formation in turbulent high-z galaxies with mechanical supernova feedback

    E-print Network

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Dubois, Yohan; Slyz, Adrianne

    2015-01-01

    Feedback from supernovae is essential to understanding the self-regulation of star formation in galaxies. However, the efficacy of the process in a cosmological context remains unclear due to excessive radiative losses during the shock propagation. To better understand the impact of SN explosions on the evolution of galaxies, we perform a suite of high-resolution (12 pc), zoom-in cosmological simulations of a Milky Way-like galaxy at z=3 with adaptive mesh refinement. We find that SN explosions can efficiently regulate star formation, leading to the stellar mass and metallicity consistent with the observed mass-metallicity relation and stellar mass-halo mass relation at z~3. This is achieved by making three important changes to the classical feedback scheme: i) the different phases of SN blast waves are modelled directly by injecting radial momentum expected at each stage, ii) the realistic time delay of SNe, commencing at as early as 3 Myr, is required to disperse very dense gas before a runaway collapse set...

  8. RHIC 10 Hz global orbit feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff, R.; Arnold, L.; Carboni, L.; Cerniglia, P; Curcio, A.; DeSanto, L.; Folz, C.; Ho, C.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.; Karl, R.; Luo, Y.; Liu, C.; MacKay, W.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Popken, P.; Przybylinski, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Schoenfeld, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weston, A.; White, J.; Ziminski, P.; Zimmerman, P.

    2011-03-28

    Vibrations of the cryogenic triplet magnets at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are suspected to be causing the horizontal beam perturbations observed at frequencies around 10 Hz. Several solutions to counteract the effect have been considered in the past, including a local beam feedback system at each of the two experimental areas, reinforcing the magnet base support assembly, and a mechanical servo feedback system. However, the local feedback system was insufficient because perturbation amplitudes outside the experimental areas were still problematic, and the mechanical solutions are very expensive. A global 10 Hz orbit feedback system consisting of 36 beam position monitors (BPMs) and 12 small dedicated dipole corrector magnets in each of the two 3.8 km circumference counter-rotating rings has been developed and commissioned in February 2011. A description of the system architecture and results with beam will be discussed.

  9. Phytotoxicity of salt and plant salt uptake: Modeling ecohydrological feedback mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Rasmussen, Nikolaj F.; Feificova, Dagmar; Trapp, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    A new model of phytotoxicity of salt and plant salt uptake is presented and is coupled to an existing three-dimensional groundwater simulation model. The implementation of phytotoxicity and salt uptake relationships is based on experimental findings from willow trees grown in hydroponic solution. The data confirm an s-shaped phytotoxicity relationship as found in previous studies. Uptake data were explained assuming steady state salt concentration in plant roots, passive salt transport into the roots, and active enzymatic removal of salt from plant roots. On the one hand, transpiration strongly depends on groundwater salinity (phytotoxicity); on the other hand, transpiration significantly changes the groundwater salinity (uptake). This feedback loop generates interesting dynamic phenomena in hydrological systems that are dominated by transpiration and are influenced by significant salinity gradients. Generic simulations are performed for the Okavango island system and are shown to reproduce essential phenomena observed in nature.

  10. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  11. Glacier-surge mechanisms promoted by a hydro-thermodynamic feedback to summer melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunse, T.; Schellenberger, T.; Hagen, J. O.; Kääb, A.; Schuler, T. V.; Reijmer, C. H.

    2015-02-01

    Mass loss from glaciers and ice sheets currently accounts for two-thirds of the observed global sea-level rise and has accelerated since the 1990s, coincident with strong atmospheric warming in the polar regions. Here we present continuous GPS measurements and satellite synthetic-aperture-radar-based velocity maps from Basin-3, the largest drainage basin of the Austfonna ice cap, Svalbard. Our observations demonstrate strong links between surface-melt and multiannual ice-flow acceleration. We identify a hydro-thermodynamic feedback that successively mobilizes stagnant ice regions, initially frozen to their bed, thereby facilitating fast basal motion over an expanding area. By autumn 2012, successive destabilization of the marine terminus escalated in a surge of Basin-3. The resulting iceberg discharge of 4.2±1.6 Gt a-1 over the period April 2012 to May 2013 triples the calving loss from the entire ice cap. With the seawater displacement by the terminus advance accounted for, the related sea-level rise contribution amounts to 7.2±2.6 Gt a-1. This rate matches the annual ice-mass loss from the entire Svalbard archipelago over the period 2003-2008, highlighting the importance of dynamic mass loss for glacier mass balance and sea-level rise. The active role of surface melt, i.e. external forcing, contrasts with previous views of glacier surges as purely internal dynamic instabilities. Given sustained climatic warming and rising significance of surface melt, we propose a potential impact of the hydro-thermodynamic feedback on the future stability of ice-sheet regions, namely at the presence of a cold-based marginal ice plug that restricts fast drainage of inland ice. The possibility of large-scale dynamic instabilities such as the partial disintegration of ice sheets is acknowledged but not quantified in global projections of sea-level rise.

  12. Opposing and following vocal responses to pitch-shifted auditory feedback: Evidence for different mechanisms of voice pitch control

    PubMed Central

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Korzyukov, Oleg; Sattler, Lindsey; Larson, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes a technique for analysis of vocal responses to auditory feedback pitch perturbations in which individual trials are first sorted according to response direction and then separately averaged in groups of upward or downward responses. In experiment 1, the stimulus direction was predictable (all upward) but magnitude was randomized between +100, +200, or +500 cents (unpredictable). Results showed that pitch-shift stimuli (PSS) of +100 and +200 cents elicited significantly larger opposing (compensatory) responses than +500 cent stimuli, but no such effect was observed for “following” responses. In experiment 2, subjects were tested in three blocks of trials where for the first two, PSS magnitude and direction were predictable (block 1+100 and block 2–100 cents), and in block 3, the magnitude was predictable (±100 cents) but direction was randomized (upward or downward). Results showed there were slightly more opposing than following responses for predictable PSS direction, but randomized directions led to significantly more opposing than following responses. Results suggest that predictability of stimulus direction and magnitude can modulate vocal responses to feedback pitch perturbations. The function and causes of the opposing and following responses are unknown, but there may be two different neural mechanisms involved in their production. PMID:23039441

  13. Explanation, Evolution and Subjective Probability in Everett Quantum Mechanics with Positive Preclusion

    E-print Network

    Mark A. Rubin

    2010-03-28

    The usual interpretational rule of quantum mechanics which states that outcomes do not occur when their weights are zero is changed so as to preclude outcomes with weights less than a small but positive value. With this "positive preclusion" rule, and in the absence of any notion of objective probability, Everett quantum mechanics has the explanatory power to account for the evolution of organisms with subjective expectations of probability that are in accord with the Born rule. Positive preclusion also allows for the derivation of a connection between weight and relative frequency in situations involving a finite number of measurements.

  14. Strategies for providing upper extremity amputees with tactile and hand position feedback--moving closer to the bionic arm.

    PubMed

    Riso, R R

    1999-01-01

    A continuing challenge for prostheses developers is to replace the sensory function of the hand. This includes tactile sensitivity such as finger contact, grip force, object slippage, surface texture and temperature, as well as proprioceptive sense. One approach is sensory substitution whereby an intact sensory system such as vision, hearing or cutaneous sensation elsewhere on the body is used as an input channel for information related to the prosthesis. A second technique involves using electrical stimulation to deliver sensor derived information directly to the peripheral afferent nerves within the residual limb. Stimulation of the relevant afferent nerves can ultimately come closest to restoring the original sensory perceptions of the hand, and to this end, researchers have already demonstrated some degree of functionality of the transected sensory nerves in studies with amputee subjects. This paper provides an overview of different types of nerve interface components and the advantages and disadvantages of employing each of them in sensory feedback systems. Issues of sensory perception, neurophysiology and anatomy relevant to hand sensation and function are discussed with respect to the selection of the different types of nerve interfaces. The goal of this paper is to outline what can be accomplished for implementing sensation into artificial arms in the near term by applying what is present or presently attainable technology. PMID:10665673

  15. SIRTF/IRS cryogenic grating drive mechanism (ARC second positioning at 4 K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements, design, and test results of a grating drive mechanism for the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) science instrument on the proposed superfluid helium-cooled Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) are described. The IRS grating drive mechanism, tested in the fall of 1989, satisfied all performance requirements in vacuum at 4 K. Measured mechanism performance included: 1.4 arc sec root-mean-square (rms) error positioning resolution; 2.2 arc sec rms position repeatability error, less than 10 millijoules/deg dissipated power; and 170 deg angular range of travel. Mechanisms that precisely position optical elements at very low cryogenic temperatures (at/below 4 K) are vital to the operating success of a number of proposed infrared scientific instruments like those in SIRTF.

  16. Mitogenic signaling from the egf receptor is attenuated by a phospholipase C-gamma/protein kinase C feedback mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, P; Xie, H; Wells, A

    1996-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling of cell motility and mitogenesis diverge at the immediate post-receptor level. How these two mutually exclusive cell responses cross-communicate is not known. We investigated a possible role for a phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent feedback mechanism that attenuates EGF-induced mitogenesis. Inhibition of PLC gamma activation by U73122 (1 microM) augmented the EGF-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation by 23-55% in two transduced NR6 fibroblast lines expressing motility-responsive EGFR; increased cell division and mitosis was observed in parallel. The time dependence of this increase revealed that it was due to an increase in maximal incorporation and not a foreshortened cell cycle. Motility-responsive cell lines expressing a dominant-negative PLC gamma fragment (PLCz) also demonstrated augmented mitogenic responses by 25-68% when compared with control cells. PLCz- or U73122-augmented mitogenesis was not observed in three non-PLC gamma activating, nonmotility-responsive EGFR-expressing cell lines. Protein kinase C (PKC), which may be activated by PLC-generated second messengers, has been proposed as mediating feedback attenuation due to its capacity to phosphorylate EGFR and inhibit the receptor's tyrosine kinase activity. Inhibition of PKC by Calphostin C (0.05 microM) resulted in a 57% augmentation in the fold of EGF-induced thymidine incorporation. To further establish PKC's role in this feedback attenuation mechanism, an EGFR point mutation, in which the PKC target threonine654 was replaced by alanine, was expressed. Cells expressing these PKC-resistant EGFR constructs demonstrated EGF-induced motility comparable to cells expressing the threonine-containing EGFR. However, when these cells were treated with U73122 or Calphostin C, the mitogenic responses are not enhanced. These findings suggest a model in which PKC activation subsequent to triggering of motility-associated PLC gamma activity attenuates the EGFR mitogenic response. Images PMID:8816994

  17. Plant-soil feedbacks and soil sickness: from mechanisms to application in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Feng; Song, Liu-Xia; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Mao, Wei-Hua; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2013-02-01

    Negative plant-soil feedbacks play an important role in soil sickness, which is one of the factors limiting the sustainable development of intensive agriculture. Various factors, such as the buildup of pests in the soil, disorder in physico-chemical soil properties, autotoxicity, and other unknown factors may contribute to soil sickness. A range of autotoxins have been identified, and these exhibit their allelopathic potential by influencing cell division, water and ion uptake, dark respiration, ATP synthesis, redox homeostasis, gene expression, and defense responses. Meanwhile, there are great interspecific and intraspecific differences in the uptake and accumulation of autotoxins, which contribute to the specific differences in growth in response to different autotoxins. Importantly, the autotoxins also influence soil microbes and vice versa, leading to an increased or decreased degree of soil sickness. In many cases, autotoxins may enhance soilborne diseases by predisposing the roots to infection by soilborne pathogens through a direct biochemical and physiological effect. Some approaches, such as screening for low autotoxic potential and disease-resistant genotypes, proper rotation and intercropping, proper soil and plant residue management, adoption of resistant plant species as rootstocks, introduction of beneficial microbes, physical removal of phytotoxins, and soil sterilization, are proposed. We discuss the challenges that we are facing and possible approaches to these. PMID:23385367

  18. High-protein-induced glomerular hyperfiltration is independent of the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism and nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Sällström, Johan; Carlström, Mattias; Olerud, Johan; Fredholm, Bertil B; Kouzmine, Mattias; Sandler, Stellan; Persson, A Erik G

    2010-11-01

    A high protein intake is associated with increased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which has been suggested to be mediated by reduced signaling of the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism. Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to contribute to high protein-induced glomerular hyperfiltration, but the specific NO synthase (NOS) isoform responsible is not clear. In this study, a model for high-protein-induced hyperfiltration in conscious mice was developed. Using this model, we investigated the role of TGF using adenosine A(1)-receptor knockout mice lacking the TGF mechanism. Furthermore, the role of the different NOS isoforms was studied using neuronal-, inducible-, and endothelial-NOS knockout mice, and furthermore, wild-type mice acutely administered with the unspecific NOS inhibitor N(?)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (100 mg/kg). GFR was measured consecutively in mice given a low-protein diet (8% casein) for 10 days, followed by a high-protein diet (50% casein) for 10 days. All mice developed high protein-induced hyperfiltration to a similar degree. These results demonstrate that high protein-induced glomerular hyperfiltration is independent of the TGF mechanism and NOS isoforms. PMID:20739607

  19. Overall non-linear correction of phase shifting mechanism in white light interferometry system based on displacement feedback control combined with fuzzy PID control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ningfang; Luo, Xinkai; Li, Huipeng; Li, Jiao

    2015-10-01

    The non-linearity of the phase shifting mechanism in white light interferometry system can seriously affect the measuring accuracy of the system. In this paper, the correcting method is to combine the displacement feedback control technology with the fuzzy PID control technology. Displacement feedback control mechanism and fuzzy PID controller are designed and then try to figure it out through Matlab simulation and experiment.. The result shows that combining the displacement feedback control technology with the fuzzy PID control technology can fulfill decent overall non-linear correction in the white light interferometry measuring system. Meanwhile, the accuracy of the correction is high and the non-linearity drop from 2% to 0.1%.

  20. Dynamics of a Minimal Model of Interlocked Positive and Negative Feedback Loops of Transcriptional Regulation by cAMP-Response

    E-print Network

    Byrne, John H.

    and formation of long-term memory (LTM), in both invertebrates and vertebrates (2­5), circadian rhythm (6 for understanding many key biological functions. The involvement and regulation of CREBs in the induc- tion of LTM activator neces- sary for induction of long-term synaptic facilitation, a mechanism for LTM. Upon exposure

  1. Nonlinear feedback control of multiple robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Yun, X.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple coordinated robot arms are modeled by considering the arms: (1) as closed kinematic chains, and (2) as a force constrained mechanical system working on the same object simultaneously. In both formulations a new dynamic control method is discussed. It is based on a feedback linearization and simultaneous output decoupling technique. Applying a nonlinear feedback and a nonlinear coordinate transformation, the complicated model of the multiple robot arms in either formulation is converted into a linear and output decoupled system. The linear system control theory and optimal control theory are used to design robust controllers in the task space. The first formulation has the advantage of automatically handling the coordination and load distribution among the robot arms. In the second formulation, by choosing a general output equation, researchers can superimpose the position and velocity error feedback with the force-torque error feedback in the task space simultaneously.

  2. IL-15 dependent induction of IL-18 secretion as a feedback mechanism controlling human MAIT-cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Arne; Dang-Heine, Chantip; Reinke, Petra; Babel, Nina

    2015-08-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are characterized by an invariant TCRV?7.2 chain recognizing microbial vitamin B metabolites presented by the MHC-Ib molecule MR1. They are mainly detectable in the CD8(+) and CD8(-) CD4(-) "double negative" T-cell compartments of mammals and exhibit both Th1- and Th17-associated features. As MAIT cells show a tissue-homing phenotype and operate at mucosal surfaces with myriads of pathogenic encounters, we wondered how IL-15, a multifaceted cytokine being part of the intestinal mucosal barrier, impacts on their functions. We demonstrate that in the absence of TCR cross-linking, human MAIT cells secrete IFN-?, increase perforin expression and switch on granzyme B production in response to IL-15. As this mechanism was dependent on the presence of CD14(+) cells and sensitive to IL-18 blockade, we identified IL-15 induced IL-18 production by monocytes as an inflammatory, STAT5-dependent feedback mechanism predominantly activating the MAIT-cell population. IL-15 equally affects TCR-mediated MAIT-cell functions since it dramatically amplifies bacteria-induced IFN-? secretion, granzyme production, and cytolytic activity at early time points, an effect being most pronounced under suboptimal TCR stimulation conditions. Our data reveal a new quality of IL-15 as player in an inflammatory cytokine network impacting on multiple MAIT-cell functions. PMID:26046663

  3. Mechanisms of apical-basal axis orientation and epithelial lumen positioning.

    PubMed

    Overeem, Arend W; Bryant, David M; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D

    2015-08-01

    In epithelial cells, the polarized orientation of the apical-basal axis determines the position of the apical lumen and, thereby, the collective tubular tissue architecture. From recent studies employing 3D cell cultures, animal models, and patient material, a model is emerging in which the orientation and positioning of the apical surface and lumen is controlled by the relationships between the extracellular matrix (ECM), Rho family GTPase signaling, recycling endosome dynamics, and cell division. Different epithelial cells adjust these relationships to establish their specific cell polarity orientation and lumen positioning, according to physiologic need. We provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms required to construct and orient the apical lumen. PMID:25941134

  4. Accurate mean-field modeling of the Barkhausen noise power in ferromagnetic materials, using a positive-feedback theory of ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. G.

    2015-07-01

    A mean-field positive-feedback (PFB) theory of ferromagnetism is used to explain the origin of Barkhausen noise (BN) and to show why it is most pronounced in the irreversible regions of the hysteresis loop. By incorporating the ABBM-Sablik model of BN into the PFB theory, we obtain analytical solutions that simultaneously describe both the major hysteresis loop and, by calculating separate expressions for the differential susceptibility in the irreversible and reversible regions, the BN power response at all points of the loop. The PFB theory depends on summing components of the applied field, in particular, the non-monotonic field-magnetization relationship characterizing hysteresis, associated with physical processes occurring in the material. The resulting physical model is then validated by detailed comparisons with measured single-peak BN data in three different steels. It also agrees with the well-known influence of a demagnetizing field on the position and shape of these peaks. The results could form the basis of a physics-based method for modeling and understanding the significance of the observed single-peak (and in multi-constituent materials, multi-peak) BN envelope responses seen in contemporary applications of BN, such as quality control in manufacturing, non-destructive testing, and monitoring the microstructural state of ferromagnetic materials.

  5. APEX-CHAMP+ high-J CO observations of low-mass young stellar objects. IV. Mechanical and radiative feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y?ld?z, U. A.; Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Karska, A.; Belloche, A.; Endo, A.; Frieswijk, W.; Güsten, R.; van Kempen, T. A.; Leurini, S.; Nagy, Z.; Pérez-Beaupuits, J. P.; Risacher, C.; van der Marel, N.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wyrowski, F.

    2015-04-01

    Context. During the embedded stage of star formation, bipolar molecular outflows and UV radiation from the protostar are important feedback processes. Both processes reflect the accretion onto the forming star and affect subsequent collapse or fragmentation of the cloud. Aims: Our aim is to quantify the feedback, mechanical and radiative, for a large sample of low-mass sources in a consistent manner. The outflow activity is compared to radiative feedback in the form of UV heating by the accreting protostar to search for correlations and evolutionary trends. Methods: Large-scale maps of 26 young stellar objects, which are part of the Herschel WISH key program are obtained using the CHAMP+ instrument on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (12CO and 13CO 6-5; Eup ~ 100 K), and the HARP-B instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (12CO and 13CO 3-2; Eup ~ 30 K). The maps have high spatial resolution, particularly the CO 6-5 maps taken with a 9? beam, resolving the morphology of the outflows. The maps are used to determine outflow parameters and the results are compared with higher-J CO lines obtained with Herschel. Envelope models are used to quantify the amount of UV-heated gas and its temperature from 13CO 6-5 observations. Results: All sources in our sample show outflow activity, with the spatial extent decreasing from the Class 0 to the Class I stage. Consistent with previous studies, the outflow force, FCO, is larger for Class 0 sources than for Class I sources, even if their luminosities are comparable. The outflowing gas typically extends to much greater distances than the power-law envelope and therefore influences the surrounding cloud material directly. Comparison of the CO 6-5 results with HIFI H2O and PACS high-J CO lines, both tracing currently shocked gas, shows that the two components are linked, even though the transitions do not probe the same gas. The link does not extend down to CO 3-2. The conclusion is that CO 6-5 depends on the shock characteristics (density and velocity), whereas CO 3-2 is more sensitive to conditions in the surrounding environment (density). The radiative feedback is responsible for increasing the gas temperature by a factor of two, up to 30-50 K, on scales of a few thousand AU, particularly along the direction of the outflow. The mass of the UV heated gas exceeds the mass contained in the entrained outflow in the inner ~3000 AU and is therefore at least as important on small scales. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe CHAMP+ maps (data cubes) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/576/A109

  6. Adaptive wavelet neural network control with hysteresis estimation for piezo-positioning mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Faa-Jeng; Shieh, Hsin-Jang; Huang, Po-Kai

    2006-03-01

    An adaptive wavelet neural network (AWNN) control with hysteresis estimation is proposed in this study to improve the control performance of a piezo-positioning mechanism, which is always severely deteriorated due to hysteresis effect. First, the control system configuration of the piezo-positioning mechanism is introduced. Then, a new hysteretic model by integrating a modified hysteresis friction force function is proposed to represent the dynamics of the overall piezo-positioning mechanism. According to this developed dynamics, an AWNN controller with hysteresis estimation is proposed. In the proposed AWNN controller, a wavelet neural network (WNN) with accurate approximation capability is employed to approximate the part of the unknown function in the proposed dynamics of the piezo-positioning mechanism, and a robust compensator is proposed to confront the lumped uncertainty that comprises the inevitable approximation errors due to finite number of wavelet basis functions and disturbances, optimal parameter vectors, and higher order terms in Taylor series. Moreover, adaptive learning algorithms for the online learning of the parameters of the WNN are derived based on the Lyapunov stability theorem. Finally, the command tracking performance and the robustness to external load disturbance of the proposed AWNN control system are illustrated by some experimental results. PMID:16566470

  7. Mechanisms and Allocations with Positive Network Externalities ANAND BHALGAT, University of Pennsylvania

    E-print Network

    Fiat, Amos

    Mechanisms and Allocations with Positive Network Externalities ANAND BHALGAT, University With the advent of social networks such as Facebook and LinkedIn, and online offers/deals web sites, net- work externalties raise the possibility of marketing and advertising to users based on influence they derive from

  8. A Tradeoff Between Accuracy and Flexibility in a Working Memory Circuit Endowed with Slow Feedback Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jacinto; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that reverberation underlying mnemonic persistent activity must be slow, to ensure the stability of a working memory system and to give rise to long neural transients capable of accumulation of information over time. Is the slower the underlying process, the better? To address this question, we investigated 3 slow biophysical mechanisms that are activity-dependent and prominently present in the prefrontal cortex: Depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI), calcium-dependent nonspecific cationic current (ICAN), and short-term facilitation. Using a spiking network model for spatial working memory, we found that these processes enhance the memory accuracy by counteracting noise-induced drifts, heterogeneity-induced biases, and distractors. Furthermore, the incorporation of DSI and ICAN enlarges the range of network's parameter values required for working memory function. However, when a progressively slower process dominates the network, it becomes increasingly more difficult to erase a memory trace. We demonstrate this accuracy-flexibility tradeoff quantitatively and interpret it using a state-space analysis. Our results supports the scenario where N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent recurrent excitation is the workhorse for the maintenance of persistent activity, whereas slow synaptic or cellular processes contribute to the robustness of mnemonic function in a tradeoff that potentially can be adjusted according to behavioral demands. PMID:25253801

  9. An autonomous drug release system based on chemo-mechanical energy conversion "Organic Engine" for feedback control of blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ryodai; Munkhjargal, Munkhbayar; Takahashi, Daishi; Arakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2010-12-15

    A novel autonomous drug release system was fabricated and tested. The system consists of two integrated units: decompression unit and drug release unit. The decompression unit was fabricated by separating a cylindrical cell into a top cell (gas phase) and a bottom cell (liquid phase) by glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme immobilized membrane. The enzyme membrane recognizes glucose and converts chemical energy found in glucose to mechanical energy. The linear correlation between glucose concentration and de-pressure slope of the top cell was revealed as applying glucose solution to the bottom cell. Afterward, the drug release unit which utilizes the energy of the decompression unit as a power source was fabricated and evaluated by recording its release actions. The drug release unit was made to release at a constant quantity of drug in the liquid phase. The system was then fabricated by combining the decompression unit and the drug release unit. And it was evaluated in an open loop and in a closed loop by applying a mixture of glucose solution (100 mmol/l) and NADH(+) using glucose dehydrogenase enzyme (GDH) as a glucose reducer. Glucose concentration decreased gradually in the closed loop and, as a consequence, interval time of the GDH release became longer. In other words, an inverse correlation between actuation interval of the system and glucose concentration was shown. As a result, the possibility of feedback control of glucose concentration by the drug release system without external energy was confirmed. PMID:20728337

  10. Assessing the Importance of the Evaporation-Wind Feedback Mechanism in the Modulation of Simulated Madden-Julian Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colon, Edward; Lindesay, James; Suarez, Max J.

    1998-01-01

    An examination of simulated Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) response to active and suppressed air-sea interactions is made using an aquaplanet model employing a realistic representation of the hydrologic cyle. In general, the evaporation-wind feedback (EWF) results from a coupling between tropical zonal surface wind stresses and evaporation anomalies. Recent observational and theoretical studies have questioned the significance of EWF in sustaining the predominantly wavenumber 1 eastward propagating mode commonly attributed to the interaction between large scale convergence and cumulus-scale convection (conditional instability of the second kind, CISK). To ascertain the nature of the EWF dependence on lower boundary conditions and thus quantify its effect on MJO development, a series of numerical experiments were conducted employing various zonally symmetric sea surface temperature (SST) distributions with active and suppressed EWF mechanisms. Results suggest that a correlation exists between tropical SSTs and the efficacy of the EWF in vertically redistributing heat acquired through surface wind stresses. It has been determined that the removal of the EWF is not a crucial factor in the dampening of the simulated MJO at high equatorial SSTs. The additional energy fed into the developing convective mode by the EWF selectively amplifies higher order wave modes in all numerical experiments thus boosting overall variances in oscillatory responses.

  11. Increasing Induction-Level Teachers' Positive-to-Negative Communication Ratio and Use of Behavior-Specific Praise through E-Mailed Performance Feedback and Its Effect on Students' Task Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathel, Jeanna M.; Drasgow, Erik; Brown, William H.; Marshall, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of e-mailed specific performance feedback that included progress monitoring graphs on induction-level teachers' ratios of positive-to-negative communication behaviors and their use of behavior-specific praise in classrooms for students with emotional and behavioral disorders, mild…

  12. Current view of the mechanism of benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo: cupulolithiasis or canalolithiasis?

    PubMed

    Brandt, T; Steddin, S

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical evidence is presented that all the typical features of BPPV (benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo) cannot be explained by cupulolithiasis in that otoconial debris become settled on the cupula of the posterior semicircular canal. A free floating clot of inorganic particles (heavier than endolymph) in the ampullofugal branch of the posterior semicircular canal is more likely to cause the syndrome. The clot always gravitates to the most dependent part of the canal as soon as the patient's head is moved in a way that alters the angle between the canal's plane and the gravity vector. As compared to a plunger (depending on the direction it moves) the clot produces push or pull forces on the cupula, thereby eliciting the BPPV attack. This clot-induced endolymph flow mechanism is compatible with all features of BPPV such as latency, limited duration, fatigability, change in direction of the induced nystagmus, and the efficacy of physical therapy in both posterior and horizontal semicircular canal BPPV. The floating clot is only activated by changes in position of the head relative to the gravitational vector (positioning vertigo) but not by prolonged static positions of the head (positional vertigo), which fits clinical experience. Therefore, canalolithiasis rather than cupulolithiasis provides a better definition of the underlying mechanism in BPPV. PMID:8275271

  13. HD-Zip Proteins GL2 and HDG11 Have Redundant Functions in Arabidopsis Trichomes, and GL2 Activates a Positive Feedback Loop via MYB23[W

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Aashima; Paper, Janet M.; Boehler, Allison P.; Bradley, Amanda M.; Neumann, Titus R.; Schrick, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    The class IV homeodomain leucine zipper transcription factor GLABRA2 (GL2) acts in a complex regulatory circuit that regulates the differentiation of trichomes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We describe a genetic interaction with HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (HDG11), previously identified as a negative regulator of trichome branching. gl2 hdg11 double mutants display enhanced trichome cell-type differentiation defects. Transgenic expression of HDG11 using the GL2 promoter partially suppresses gl2 trichome phenotypes. Vice versa, expression of GL2 under the control of its native promoter partially complements hdg11 ectopic branching. Since gl2 hdg11 and gl2 myb23 double mutants and the triple mutant display similar trichome differentiation defects, we investigated a connection to the R2R3-MYB transcription factor MYB23. We show that MYB23 transcript levels are significantly reduced in shoots from gl2 mutants and that GL2 can drive the expression of a MYB23-promoter fusion to green fluorescent protein. Yeast one-hybrid, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and in planta reporter gene experiments indicate that an L1-box in the MYB23 promoter acts as a GL2 binding site. Taken together, our findings reveal a functional redundancy between GL2 and HDG11, two homeodomain leucine zipper transcription factors previously thought to mediate opposing functions in trichome morphogenesis. A model is proposed in which GL2 transcript levels are maintained through a positive feedback loop involving GL2 activation of MYB23. PMID:24824485

  14. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Anne

    2015-04-01

    As human interactions with Earth systems intensify in the "Anthropocene", understanding the complex relationships among human activity, landscape change, and societal responses to those changes is increasingly important. Interdisciplinary research centered on the theme of "feedbacks" in human-landscape systems serves as a promising focus for unraveling these interactions. Deciphering interacting human-landscape feedbacks extends our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Enormous challenges exist, however, in quantifying impact-feedback loops in landscapes with significant human alterations. This paper illustrates an example of human-landscape interactions following a wildfire in Colorado (USA) that elicited feedback responses. After the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire, concerns for heightened flood potential and debris flows associated with post-fire hydrologic changes prompted local landowners to construct tall fences at the base of a burned watershed. These actions changed the sediment transport regime and promoted further landscape change and human responses in a positive feedback cycle. The interactions ultimately increase flood and sediment hazards, rather than dampening the effects of fire. A simple agent-based model, capable of integrating social and hydro-geomorphological data, demonstrates how such interacting impacts and feedbacks could be simulated. Challenges for fully capturing human-landscape feedback interactions include the identification of diffuse and subtle feedbacks at a range of scales, the availability of data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, and the varied metrics and data needed to represent both the physical and human systems. By collaborating with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of landscape change, as well as the human responses to those changes, geoscientists could more fully recognize and anticipate the coupled human-landscape interactions that will drive the evolution of Earth systems into the future.

  15. Cloud-radiation interactions - Effects of cirrus optical thickness feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, Richard C. J.; Iacobellis, Sam

    1987-01-01

    The paper is concerned with a cloud-radiation feedback mechanism which may be an important component of the climate changes expected from increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other trace greenhouse gases. A major result of the study is that cirrus cloud optical thickness feedbacks may indeed tend to increase the surface warming due to trace gas increases. However, the positive feedback from cirrus appears to be generally weaker than the negative effects due to lower clouds. The results just confirm those of earlier research indicating that the net effect of cloud optical thickness feedbacks may be a negative feedback which may substantially (by a factor of about 2) reduce the surface warming due to the doubling of CO2, even in the presence of cirrus clouds.

  16. The positional isotope exchange technique as a probe of enzymatic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, L.S.H.

    1989-01-01

    The positional isotope exchange (PIX) technique has been used to investigate the mechanisms of five enzymes: uridine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase, galactose 1-phosphate uridyltransferase, sucrose synthetase, D-alanyl-D-alanine ligase and carbamyl phosphate synthetase. Applications of the technique have been expanded to include determination of kinetic mechanisms (ordered or random), partitioning ratios of binary and ternary enzyme complexes, and individual rate constants. Combination of the PIX technique and traditional steady state kinetics allowed the determination of the lower limit of release of substrates from the binary and ternary enzyme complexes in the reaction catalyzed by uridine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase. Because it was possible to follow a positional isotope exchange in both the forward and reverse direction, values for all of the individual rate constants were estimated. A positional isotope exchange method was developed for the analysis of enzyme catalyzed reactions which have ping-pong kinetic mechanisms. The application involves the recyclization of the modified enzyme form by inclusion of the unlabeled product. The methodology was applied to galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. The relative rate of product dissociation from the enzyme-product complex was determined. The timing of intermediate formation was probed in the reactions catalyzed by sucrose synthetase and D-alanyl-D-alanine ligase. For both enzymes, the formation of an intermediate prior to the binding of the last substrate was investigated. The reaction of sucrose synthetase has been proposed to proceed by a two step mechanism in which the scissile bond of UDP-glucose is cleaved to form an intermediate which would then react with fructose. No positional isotope exchange in the absence of fructose could be detected for sucrose synthetase.

  17. Mechanics of a magnet and a Meissner superconducting ring at arbitrary position and orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Diaz, J. L.; Garcia-Prada, J. C.; Diaz-Garcia, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    The force and torque exerted by a magnetic dipole on a superconducting ring (or hollow cylinder) in the Meissner state at arbitrary position and orientation are calculated using a Maxwell-London model previously proposed by the authors. The center of the ring is an unstable equilibrium point for the magnet. At this point the ring tends to align the magnet but tends to expel it for any small axial deviation from the center. There is also a non-monotonic and oscillatory dependence of the forces and torques on the position caused by the finiteness of the ring and a torque arises when the magnet is displaced both radially and axially from the center of the cylinder which corresponds to the experimental data. Therefore, the use of a magnet in a Meissner superconducting ring as a self aligning bearing requires a centered position and that the axial unstability to be compensated by additional mechanical means.

  18. Wide range force feedback for catheter insertion mechanism for use in minimally invasive mitral valve repair surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Roozbeh; Sokhanvar, Saeed; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Dargahi, Javad

    2009-02-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) is a condition in which heart's mitral valve does not close tightly, which allows blood to leak back into the left atrium. Restoring the dimension of the mitral-valve annulus by percutaneous intervention surgery is a common choice to treat MR. Currently, this kind of open heart annuloplasty surgery is being performed through sternotomy with cardiomyopathy bypass. In order to reduce trauma to the patient and also to eliminate bypass surgery, robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedure, which requires small keyhole incisions, has a great potential. To perform this surgery through MIS procedure, an accurate computer controlled catheter with wide-range force feedback capabilities is required. There are three types of tissues at the site of operation: mitral leaflet, mitral annulus and left atrium. The maximum allowable applied force to these three types of tissue is totally different. For instance, leaflet tissue is the most sensitive one with the lowest allowable force capacity. For this application, therefore, a wide-range force sensing is highly required. Most of the sensors that have been developed for use in MIS applications have a limited range of sensing. Therefore, they need to be calibrated for different types of tissue. The present work, reports on the design, modeling and simulation of a novel wide-range optical force sensor for measurement of contact pressure between catheter tip and heart tissue. The proposed sensor offers a wide input range with a high resolution and sensitivity over this range. Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technology, this sensor can be microfabricated and integrated with commercially available catheters.

  19. Feedback has a positive effect on cognitive function during total sleep deprivation if there is sufficient time for it to be effectively processed.

    PubMed

    Roach, Gregory D; Lamond, Nicole; Dawson, Drew

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether the provision of feedback and the interval between successive stimuli interact to affect performance on a serial simple reaction time test during sleep deprivation. Sixteen participants (9 female, 7 male, aged 18-27 yr) completed four versions of the 5-min psychomotor vigilance task for a handheld personal digital assistant (PalmPVT) every 2 h during 28 h of sustained wakefulness. The four versions differed in terms of whether or not they provided feedback immediately after each response, and whether the inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs) were long (2-10 s) or short (1-5 s). Cognitive function was assessed using reciprocal response time and percentage of responses that were lapses (i.e., had a response time ? 500 ms). Data were analysed using repeated measures ANOVA with three within-subjects factors: test session, feedback, and ISI. For both measures, the only significant interaction was between feedback and ISI. Cognitive function was enhanced by feedback when the ISIs were long because it provided motivation. Cognitive function was not affected by feedback when the ISIs were short because there was insufficient time to both attend to the feedback and prepare for the subsequent stimulus. PMID:26360220

  20. Global desertification: Drivers and feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Bhattachan, Abinash; Davis, Kyle F.; Ravi, Sujith; Runyan, Christiane W.

    2013-01-01

    Desertification is a change in soil properties, vegetation or climate, which results in a persistent loss of ecosystem services that are fundamental to sustaining life. Desertification affects large dryland areas around the world and is a major cause of stress in human societies. Here we review recent research on the drivers, feedbacks, and impacts of desertification. A multidisciplinary approach to understanding the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification is motivated by our increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Classic desertification theories look at this process as a transition between stable states in bistable ecosystem dynamics. Climate change (i.e., aridification) and land use dynamics are the major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a “desertified” (or “degraded”) state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. Desertification feedbacks may involve land degradation processes (e.g., nutrient loss or salinization), changes in rainfall regime resulting from land-atmosphere interactions (e.g., precipitation recycling, dust emissions), or changes in plant community composition (e.g., shrub encroachment, decrease in vegetation cover). We analyze each of these feedback mechanisms and discuss their possible enhancement by interactions with socio-economic drivers. Large scale effects of desertification include the emigration of “environmental refugees” displaced from degraded areas, climatic changes, and the alteration of global biogeochemical cycles resulting from the emission and long-range transport of fine mineral dust. Recent research has identified some possible early warning signs of desertification, which can be used as indicators of resilience loss and imminent shift to desert-like conditions. We conclude with a brief discussion on some desertification control strategies implemented in different regions around the world.

  1. Dynamics of one- and two-dimensional fronts in a bistable equation with time-delayed global feedback: Propagation failure and control mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Boubendir, Yassine; Mendez, Vicenc; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2010-09-15

    We study the evolution of fronts in a bistable equation with time-delayed global feedback in the fast reaction and slow diffusion regime. This equation generalizes the Hodgkin-Grafstein and Allen-Cahn equations. We derive a nonlinear equation governing the motion of fronts, which includes a term with delay. In the one-dimensional case this equation is linear. We study the motion of one- and two-dimensional fronts, finding a much richer dynamics than for the previously studied cases (without time-delayed global feedback). We explain the mechanism by which localized fronts created by inhibitory global coupling loose stability in a Hopf bifurcation as the delay time increases. We show that for certain delay times, the prevailing phase is different from that corresponding to the system in the absence of global coupling. Numerical simulations of the partial differential equation are in agreement with the analytical predictions.

  2. Position measurements in the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Naaman-Marom, Gillie; Erez, Noam; Vaidman, Lev

    2012-10-15

    The de Broglie-Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics assigns positions and trajectories to particles. We analyze the validity of a formula for the velocities of Bohmian particles which makes the analysis of these trajectories particularly simple. We apply it to particle detectors of four different types and show that the detectors of three of these types lead to 'surrealistic trajectories', i.e., leave a trace where the Bohmian particle was not present. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We perform computer simulation of Bohmian trajectories for position detectors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simplified velocity formula provides very precise (or exact) Bohmian trajectories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spin, phase, and Bohmian velocity type detectors exhibit surrealistic trajectories.

  3. Positive-operator-valued measures in the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenovi?, D.; Buri?, N.; Popovi?, D. B.; Radonji?, M.; Prvanovi?, S.

    2015-06-01

    In the Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics, ideal measurements of physical variables are discussed using the spectral theory of Hermitian operators and the corresponding projector-valued measures (PVMs). However, more general types of measurements require the treatment in terms of positive-operator-valued measures (POVMs). In the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum mechanics, canonical coordinates are related to PVM. In this paper the results of an analysis of various aspects of applications of POVMs in the Hamiltonian formulation are reported. Several properties of state parameters and quantum observables given by POVMs or represented in an overcomplete basis, including the general Hamiltonian treatment of the Neumark extension, are presented. An analysis of the phase operator, given by the corresponding POVMs, in the Hilbert space and the Hamiltonian frameworks is also given.

  4. Formation mechanism of great positive TEC disturbances prior to Wenchuan earthquake on May 12, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Zakharenkova, I. E.; Pulinets, S. A.; Zhao, B.; Tsidilina, M. N.

    2011-08-01

    The problems of physical explanation and possible mechanisms of the seismo-ionospheric effects formation are under discussion now. There are proposed different mechanisms of such effects, for example, large- and small-scale internal gravity waves (IGWs), atmospheric electric field, electromagnetic fields and emissions. However, the appearance of local large-scale seismo-ionospheric anomalies in Total Electron Content ( TEC) is possible to explain only by two mechanisms: an atmospheric electric field and/or small-scale IGWs. In this paper, the simulation results for reproduction of the observed seismo-ionospheric great positive effects in TEC prior to strong Wenchuan earthquake are presented. The obtained results confirm the proposed mechanism of seismo-ionospheric effects formation by the penetration of the seismogenic electric field from the atmosphere into the ionosphere. It is suggested that so great TEC enhancement observed 3 days prior to Wenchuan earthquake could be explained by combined action of seismogenic vertical electric field and IGWs generated by the solar terminator.

  5. Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Semantic mechanisms for dynamic and evolving processes based on experience feedback and

    E-print Network

    Bordenave, Charles

    on experience feedback and simulation for PLM systems Thesis supervisor: Hedi KARRAY & Bernard ARCHIMEDE E based Product Lifecycle Management system (e-PLM) becomes a popular #12;option for managing product information. E-PLM services facilitate product information exchanging between heterogeneous PDM (Product Data

  6. Feedback Sandwiches Affect Perceptions but Not Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Jay; Abercrombie, Sara; McCarty, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    The feedback sandwich technique-make positive comments; provide critique; end with positive comments-is commonly recommended to feedback givers despite scant evidence of its efficacy. These two studies (N = 20; N = 350) of written peer feedback with third-year medical students on clinical patient note-writing assignments indicate that students…

  7. The c-MYC oncoprotein, the NAMPT enzyme, the SIRT1-inhibitor DBC1, and the SIRT1 deacetylase form a positive feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Menssen, Antje; Hydbring, Per; Kapelle, Karsten; Vervoorts, Jörg; Diebold, Joachim; Lüscher, Bernhard; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar; Hermeking, Heiko

    2012-01-24

    Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) represents an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that inhibits proapoptotic factors including p53. Here we determined whether SIRT1 is downstream of the prototypic c-MYC oncogene, which is activated in the majority of tumors. Elevated expression of c-MYC in human colorectal cancer correlated with increased SIRT1 protein levels. Activation of a conditional c-MYC allele induced increased levels of SIRT1 protein, NAD(+), and nicotinamide-phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) mRNA in several cell types. This increase in SIRT1 required the induction of the NAMPT gene by c-MYC. NAMPT is the rate-limiting enzyme of the NAD(+) salvage pathway and enhances SIRT1 activity by increasing the amount of NAD(+). c-MYC also contributed to SIRT1 activation by sequestering the SIRT1 inhibitor deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) from the SIRT1 protein. In primary human fibroblasts previously immortalized by introduction of c-MYC, down-regulation of SIRT1 induced senescence and apoptosis. In various cell lines inactivation of SIRT1 by RNA interference, chemical inhibitors, or ectopic DBC1 enhanced c-MYC-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, SIRT1 directly bound to and deacetylated c-MYC. Enforced SIRT1 expression increased and depletion/inhibition of SIRT1 reduced c-MYC stability. Depletion/inhibition of SIRT1 correlated with reduced lysine 63-linked polyubiquitination of c-Myc, which presumably destabilizes c-MYC by supporting degradative lysine 48-linked polyubiquitination. Moreover, SIRT1 enhanced the transcriptional activity of c-MYC. Taken together, these results show that c-MYC activates SIRT1, which in turn promotes c-MYC function. Furthermore, SIRT1 suppressed cellular senescence in cells with deregulated c-MYC expression and also inhibited c-MYC-induced apoptosis. Constitutive activation of this positive feedback loop may contribute to the development and maintenance of tumors in the context of deregulated c-MYC. PMID:22190494

  8. The Mechanisms of Virulence Regulation by Small Noncoding RNAs in Low GC Gram-Positive Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Pitman, Stephanie; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of small noncoding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has grown tremendously recently, giving new insights into gene regulation. The implementation of computational analysis and RNA sequencing has provided new tools to discover and analyze potential sRNAs. Small regulatory RNAs that act by base-pairing to target mRNAs have been found to be ubiquitous and are the most abundant class of post-transcriptional regulators in bacteria. The majority of sRNA studies has been limited to E. coli and other gram-negative bacteria. However, examples of sRNAs in gram-positive bacteria are still plentiful although the detailed gene regulation mechanisms behind them are not as well understood. Strict virulence control is critical for a pathogen’s survival and many sRNAs have been found to be involved in that process. This review outlines the targets and currently known mechanisms of trans-acting sRNAs involved in virulence regulation in various gram-positive pathogens. In addition, their shared characteristics such as CU interaction motifs, the role of Hfq, and involvement in two-component regulators, riboswitches, quorum sensing, or toxin/antitoxin systems are described. PMID:26694351

  9. Thermal-chemical-mechanical feedback during fluid-rock interactions: Implications for chemical transport and scales of equilibria in the crust

    SciTech Connect

    Dutrow, Barbara

    2008-08-13

    Our research evaluates the hypothesis that feedback amongst thermal-chemical-mechanical processes operative in fluid-rock systems alters the fluid flow dynamics of the system which, in turn, affects chemical transport and temporal and spatial scales of equilibria, thus impacting the resultant mineral textural development of rocks. Our methods include computational experimentation and detailed analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks from well-characterized terranes. This work focuses on metamorphic rocks and hydrothermal systems where minerals and their textures are utilized to evaluate pressure (P), temperature (T), and time (t) paths in the evolution of mountain belts and ore deposits, and to interpret tectonic events and the timing of these events. Our work on coupled processes also extends to other areas where subsurface flow and transport in porous media have consequences such as oil and gas movement, geothermal system development, transport of contaminants, nuclear waste disposal, and other systems rich in fluid-rock reactions. Fluid-rock systems are widespread in the geologic record. Correctly deciphering the products resulting from such systems is important to interpreting a number of geologic phenomena. These systems are characterized by complex interactions involving time-dependent, non-linear processes in heterogeneous materials. While many of these interactions have been studied in isolation, they are more appropriately analyzed in the context of a system with feedback. When one process impacts another process, time and space scales as well as the overall outcome of the interaction can be dramatically altered. Our goals to test this hypothesis are: to develop and incorporate algorithms into our 3D heat and mass transport code to allow the effects of feedback to be investigated numerically, to analyze fluid infiltrated rocks from a variety of terranes at differing P-T conditions, to identify subtle features of the infiltration of fluids and/or feedback, and to quantify the importance of feedback in complex fluid-rock systems and its affects on time and space scales and rates of reaction. We have made significant contributions toward understanding feedback and its impacts by numerical experimentation using 3D computational modeling of fluid-rock systems and by chemical and textural analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks.

  10. MAS promoter regulation: A role of Sry and tyrosine nitration of the KRAB domain of ZNF274 as a feedback mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Prokop, Jeremy W.; Rauscher, Frank J.; Peng, Hongzhuang; Liu, Yuanjie; Araujo, Fabiano C.; Watanabe, Ingrid; Reis, Fernando M.; Milsted, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MAS axis of the renin-angiotensin system has emerged as a pathway of interest in treating both cardiovascular disorders and cancer. The MAS protein is known to bind to and be activated by Ang-(1-7); however mechanisms of this activation are just starting to be understood. Whereas there are strong biochemical data regarding regulation and activation of the AT1 and AT2 receptors, with models of how Ang II binds each receptor, fewer studies have characterized MAS. We characterize the MAS promoter and provide a potential feedback mechanism that would compensate for the MAS degradation following activation by Ang-(1-7). Analysis of ENCODE data for the MAS promoter revealed potential epigenetic control by KRAB/KAP1. A proximal promoter construct for the MAS gene was repressed by the SOX proteins SRY, SOX2, SOX3, and SOX14, of which SRY is known to interact with the KRAB domain. The proteins KRAB/KAP1 can both be tyrosine nitrated, causing the dissociation of the KAP-1 protein, and thus a potential loss of epigenetic control. Activation of MAS can lead to an increase in nitric oxide, suggesting feedback mechanisms of MAS on its own promoter. These results present a more complete view of MAS regulation and for the first time suggest biochemical outcomes for nitration to the KRAB domain. PMID:24128372

  11. Solutions to position-dependent mass quantum mechanics for a new class of hyperbolic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, H. R.; Grupo de Física Teórica, State University of Ceara , Av. Paranjana 1700, 60740-903 Fortaleza-CE ; Cunha, M. S.

    2013-12-15

    We analytically solve the position-dependent mass (PDM) 1D Schrödinger equation for a new class of hyperbolic potentials V{sub q}{sup p}(x)=?V{sub 0}(sinh{sup p}x/cosh{sup q}x),?p=?2,0,?q?[see C. A. Downing, J. Math. Phys. 54, 072101 (2013)] among several hyperbolic single- and double-wells. For a solitonic mass distribution, m(x)=m{sub 0}?sech{sup 2}(x), we obtain exact analytic solutions to the resulting differential equations. For several members of the class, the quantum mechanical problems map into confluent Heun differential equations. The PDM Poschl-Teller potential is considered and exactly solved as a particular case.

  12. Using RFID Positioning Technology to Construct an Automatic Rehabilitation Scheduling Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Sheng; Hung, Lun-Ping; Yen, Neil Y

    2016-01-01

    Accurately and efficiently identifying the location of patients during the course of rehabilitation is an important issue. Wireless transmission technology can reach this goal. Tracking technologies such as RFID (Radio frequency identification) can support process improvement and improve efficiencies of rehabilitation. There are few published models or methods to solve the problem of positioning and apply this technology in the rehabilitation center. We propose a mechanism to enhance the accuracy of positioning technology and provide information about turns and obstacles on the path; and user-centered services based on location-aware to enhanced quality care in rehabilitation environment. This paper outlines the requirements and the role of RFID in assisting rehabilitation environment. A prototype RFID hospital support tool is established. It is designed to provide assistance for monitoring rehabilitation patients. It can simultaneously calculate the rehabilitant's location and the duration of treatment, and automatically record the rehabilitation course of the rehabilitant, so as to improve the management efficiency of the rehabilitation program. PMID:26573641

  13. A 1-dimensional statistical mechanics model for nucleosome positioning on genomic DNA

    E-print Network

    Tesoro, S; Morozov, A N; Sulaiman, N; Marenduzzo, D

    2015-01-01

    The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so called '10nm chromatin fibre', where DNA wraps around histone proteins (approx. 10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig zagging 'bead on a string' structure. In this work we present a one dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We consider both the case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas, and that of genomic sheep DNA, where our modelling is informed by high-resolution nucleosome positioning data. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally, we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on ...

  14. A 1-dimensional statistical mechanics model for nucleosome positioning on genomic DNA

    E-print Network

    S. Tesoro; I. Ali; A. N. Morozov; N. Sulaiman; D. Marenduzzo

    2015-10-25

    The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so called '10nm chromatin fibre', where DNA wraps around histone proteins (approx. 10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig zagging 'bead on a string' structure. In this work we present a one dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We consider both the case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas, and that of genomic sheep DNA, where our modelling is informed by high-resolution nucleosome positioning data. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally, we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on experimentally observable quantities in, for instance, chromatin fibres reconstituted in vitro.

  15. [Non-invasive positive pressure mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Scala, R

    2000-10-01

    Known for two centuries, positive pressure non invasive mechanical ventilation (VMNPP) has been widely applied in acute respiratory failure (IRA) only in the last ten years. The fact that VMNPP is able to improve gas exchange by avoiding endotracheal intubation and its complications is the most attractive aspect in both general and respiratory intensive care units and in the respiratory ward. Characteristics of VMNPP (interface, ventilator and modality of ventilation), the side where it is performed as well as severity of IRA, underlying disease, and the team's experience are important factors which influence outcome. The addition of VMNPP to conventional medical therapy reduces the need for IE, mortality and hospitalisation in a selected population of BPCO patients in IRA. As there are no available data for comparison between invasive mechanical ventilation (VMI) and VMNPP, the latter has not to be considered as an alternative to VMI but able to prevent it and, even if VMNPP fails, it may be used as a weaning technique. In IRA due to other than BPCO diseases VMNPP seems not to be more effective than standard treatment in avoiding IE but it may give efficient support with fewer complications as compared to VMI. Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and "terminal" diseases represent some of the most interesting application fields of VMNPP in non-BPCO patients. According to the latest literature data, in this review history, technique, advantages, limits, indications, nursing and cost of VMNPP are examined. PMID:11194980

  16. Prediction of clathrate structure type and guest position by molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Everly B; Janda, Kenneth C

    2013-05-16

    The clathrate hydrates occur in various types in which the number, size, and shape of the various cages differ. Usually the clathrate type of a specific guest is predicted by the size and shape of the molecular guest. We have developed a methodology to determine the clathrate type employing molecular mechanics with the MMFF force field employing a strategy to calculate the energy of formation of the clathrate from the sum of the guest/cage energies. The clathrate type with the most negative (most stable) energy of formation would be the type predicted (we mainly focused on type I, type II, or bromine type). This strategy allows for a calculation to predict the clathrate type for any cage guest in a few minutes on a laptop computer. It proved successful in predicting the clathrate structure for 46 out of 47 guest molecules. The molecular mechanics calculations also provide a prediction of the guest position within the cage and clathrate structure. These predictions are generally consistent with the X-ray and neutron diffraction studies. By supplementing the diffraction study with molecular mechanics, we gain a more detailed insight regarding the details of the structure. We have also compared MM calculations to studies of the multiple occupancy of the cages. Finally, we present a density functional calculation that demonstrates that the inside of the clathrates cages have a relatively uniform and low electrostatic potential in comparison with the outside oxygen and hydrogen atoms. This implies that van der Waals forces will usually be dominant in the guest-cage interactions. PMID:23600658

  17. The organization of plant communities: negative plant-soil feedbacks and semiarid grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimates of species losses and evidence of positive plant diversity-productivity relationships have spurred interest in understanding the mechanism(s) regulating species coexistence and relative abundance. Plant-soil biota feedbacks appear to affect plant diversity and community structure by eithe...

  18. Positive Maladjustment as a Transition from Chaos to Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laycraft, Krystyna

    2009-01-01

    Dabrowski's theory of positive disintegration describes patterns and explains mechanisms of human development and has been successfully applied to understanding of gifted individuals. This article shows how the concepts of chaos theory and self-organization such as the sensitivity to initial conditions, positive and negative feedback, bifurcation…

  19. Fast Feedback in Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmett, Katrina; Klaassen, Kees; Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 "Aust. Sci. Teach. J." 28-34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to be successful, and the data that we obtained…

  20. The Art of Giving Online Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibold, Nancyruth; Schwarz, Laura Marie

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of providing online feedback that is positive, effective, and enhances the learning experience is a valuable educator skill. Acquisition of the art of providing feedback is through education, practice, and faculty development. This article provides information about the best practices for delivering online feedback to learners. An…

  1. An Active Feedback Program Can Spark Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walther, Fay; Taylor, Susan

    1983-01-01

    A model that emphasizes the effective use of feedback on performance can influence the job-related behaviors of subordinates. Feedback to employees requires specificity, consistency, credibility, accuracy, and a combination of positive with negative information. Feedback is essential for maintaining the job satisfaction of women in nontraditional…

  2. Iodothyronine deiodinase gene analysis of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas reveals possible conservation of thyroid hormone feedback regulation mechanism in mollusks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Xu, Fei; Qu, Tao; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-07-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinase catalyzes the initiation and termination of thyroid hormones (THs) effects, and plays a central role in the regulation of thyroid hormone level in vertebrates. In non-chordate invertebrates, only one deiodinase has been identified in the scallop Chlamys farreri. Here, two deiodinases were cloned in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas ( CgDx and CgDy). The characteristic in-frame TGA codons and selenocysteine insertion sequence elements in the oyster deiodinase cDNAs supported the activity of them. Furthermore, seven orthologs of deiodinases were found by a tblastn search in the mollusk Lottia gigantea and the annelid Capitella teleta. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the deiodinase gene originated from an common ancestor and a clade-specific gene duplication occurred independently during the differentiation of the mollusk, annelid, and vertebrate lineages. The distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns implied functional divergence of the two deiodinases. The expression of CgDx and CgDy was influenced by L-thyroxine T4, and putative thyroid hormone responsive elements were found in their promoters, which suggested that the oyster deiodinases were feedback regulated by TH. Epinephrine stimulated the expression level of CgDx and CgDy, suggesting an interaction effect between different hormones. This study provides the first evidence for the existence of a conserved TH feedback regulation mechanism in mollusks, providing insights into TH evolution.

  3. Insights into low-latitude cloud feedbacks from high-resolution models.

    PubMed

    Bretherton, Christopher S

    2015-11-13

    Cloud feedbacks are a leading source of uncertainty in the climate sensitivity simulated by global climate models (GCMs). Low-latitude boundary-layer and cumulus cloud regimes are particularly problematic, because they are sustained by tight interactions between clouds and unresolved turbulent circulations. Turbulence-resolving models better simulate such cloud regimes and support the GCM consensus that they contribute to positive global cloud feedbacks. Large-eddy simulations using sub-100?m grid spacings over small computational domains elucidate marine boundary-layer cloud response to greenhouse warming. Four observationally supported mechanisms contribute: 'thermodynamic' cloudiness reduction from warming of the atmosphere-ocean column, 'radiative' cloudiness reduction from CO2- and H2O-induced increase in atmospheric emissivity aloft, 'stability-induced' cloud increase from increased lower tropospheric stratification, and 'dynamical' cloudiness increase from reduced subsidence. The cloudiness reduction mechanisms typically dominate, giving positive shortwave cloud feedback. Cloud-resolving models with horizontal grid spacings of a few kilometres illuminate how cumulonimbus cloud systems affect climate feedbacks. Limited-area simulations and superparameterized GCMs show upward shift and slight reduction of cloud cover in a warmer climate, implying positive cloud feedbacks. A global cloud-resolving model suggests tropical cirrus increases in a warmer climate, producing positive longwave cloud feedback, but results are sensitive to subgrid turbulence and ice microphysics schemes. PMID:26438280

  4. Achieving the Quantum Ground State of a Mechanical Oscillator using a Bose-Einstein Condensate with Back-Action and Cold Damping feedback schemes

    E-print Network

    Sonam Mahajan; Neha Aggarwal; Aranya B Bhattacherjee; ManMohan

    2013-02-02

    We present a detailed study to show the possibility of approaching the quantum ground-state of a hybrid optomechanical quantum device formed by a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) confined inside a high-finesse optical cavity with an oscillatory end mirror. Cooling is achieved using two experimentally realizable schemes: back-action cooling and cold damping quantum feedback cooling. In both the schemes, we found that increasing the two body atom-atom interaction brings the mechanical oscillator to its quantum ground state. It has been observed that back-action cooling is more effective in the good cavity limit while the cold damping cooling scheme is more relevant in the bad cavity limit. It is also shown that in the cold damping scheme, the device is more efficient in the presence of BEC than in the absence of BEC.

  5. Achieving the quantum ground state of a mechanical oscillator using a Bose-Einstein condensate with back-action and cold damping feedback schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Sonam; Aggarwal, Neha; Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; ManMohan

    2013-04-01

    We present a detailed study to show the possibility of approaching the quantum ground state of a hybrid optomechanical quantum device formed by a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) confined inside a high-finesse optical cavity with an oscillatory end mirror. Cooling is achieved using two experimentally realizable schemes: back-action cooling and cold damping quantum feedback cooling. In both the schemes, we found that increasing the two-body atom-atom interaction brings the mechanical oscillator to its quantum ground state. It has been observed that back-action cooling is more effective in the good cavity limit, while the cold damping cooling scheme is more relevant in the bad cavity limit. It is also shown that in the cold damping scheme, the device is more efficient in the presence of a BEC than in the absence of a BEC.

  6. Genome-wide MicroRNA Downregulation as a Negative Feedback Mechanism in the Early Phases of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Jingmin; Kren, Betsy T.; Xia, Zhilian; Wong, Phillip Y.-P.; Li, Lihua; Hanse, Eric A.; Min, Michael Xinan; Li, Bingshan; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.; Zeng, Yan; Subramanian, Subbaya; Steer, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    Liver is one of the few organs that have the capacity to regenerate in response to injury. We carried out genome-wide miRNA microarray studies during liver regeneration in rats after 70% PH at early and mid-time points to more thoroughly understand their role. At 3, 12 and 18 hrs post-PH ~ 40% of the miRNAs tested were up-regulated. Conversely, at 24 hrs post-PH, ~ 70% of miRNAs were down-regulated. Further, we established that the genome-wide down-regulation of miRNA expression at 24 hrs was also correlated with decreased expression of genes such as Rnasen, Dgcr8, Dicer, Tarbp2 and Prkra that are associated with miRNA biogenesis. To determine if a potential negative feedback loop between miRNAs and their regulatory genes existed, 11 candidate miRNAs which were predicted to target the above genes were examined and found to be up-regulated at 3 hrs post-PH. Using reporter and functional assays, we determined that expression of these miRNA-processing genes could be regulated by a subset of miRNAs and some miRNAs could target multiple miRNA biogenesis genes simultaneously. We also demonstrated that over-expression of these miRNAs inhibited cell proliferation and modulated the cell cycle in both Huh-7 human hepatoma cells and primary rat hepatocytes. From these observations, we postulated that selective up-regulation of miRNAs in the early-phase after PH was involved in the priming and commitment to liver regeneration, while the subsequent genome-wide down-regulation of miRNAs was required for efficient recovery of liver cell mass. Conclusion Our data suggest that miRNA changes are regulated by negative feedback loops between miRNAs and their regulatory genes that may play an important role in the steady-state regulation of liver regeneration. PMID:21574170

  7. Mechanical characteristics of ultra-long horizontal nanocantilevers grown by real-time feedback control on focused-ion-beam chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dengji; Warisawa, Shin’ichi; Ishihara, Sunao; Kometani, Reo

    2015-12-01

    Focused-ion-beam chemical vapour deposition (FIB-CVD) has been repeatedly proved to be a useful tool for the growth of three-dimensional (3D) micro- and nano-structures. The strategy of real-time feedback control on FIB-CVD was previously proposed and experimentally demonstrated to be effective for growing ultra-long horizontal nanocantilevers. To fabricate various nanoelectromechanical systems that consist of such types of nanocantilever structures, the mechanical characteristics of ultra-long horizontal nanocantilevers should be investigated. In this study, nanocantilevers with an overhang length of up to 35 ?m were grown by using a 30?kV Ga+ FIB, a beam current of 0.50 pA and phenanthrene (C14H10) as the gas source to deposit a diamond-like carbon structure. The Young’s modulus of each nanocantilever was measured by bending the nanocantilever with a nanopillar whose Young’s modulus was known. The average density of each nanocantilever was calculated from the Young’s modulus and the measured resonant frequency. We found that the mechanical characteristics of each nanocantilever depended on the length of the nanocantilever if the strategy of real-time feedback control was applied in fabrication. The Young’s moduli and the averaged densities of the nanocantilevers with a length of 11 to 34 ?m were found to be 86 to 254?GPa and 1950 to 5750?kg m?3, respectively. With the increase of the overhang length, the Young’s modulus and the average density were found to gradually increase.

  8. Causal feedbacks in climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nes, Egbert H.; Scheffer, Marten; Brovkin, Victor; Lenton, Timothy M.; Ye, Hao; Deyle, Ethan; Sugihara, George

    2015-05-01

    The statistical association between temperature and greenhouse gases over glacial cycles is well documented, but causality behind this correlation remains difficult to extract directly from the data. A time lag of CO2 behind Antarctic temperature--originally thought to hint at a driving role for temperature--is absent at the last deglaciation, but recently confirmed at the last ice age inception and the end of the earlier termination II (ref. ). We show that such variable time lags are typical for complex nonlinear systems such as the climate, prohibiting straightforward use of correlation lags to infer causation. However, an insight from dynamical systems theory now allows us to circumvent the classical challenges of unravelling causation from multivariate time series. We build on this insight to demonstrate directly from ice-core data that, over glacial-interglacial timescales, climate dynamics are largely driven by internal Earth system mechanisms, including a marked positive feedback effect from temperature variability on greenhouse-gas concentrations.

  9. Clustering in Cell Cycle Dynamics with General Response/Signaling Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Young, Todd R.; Fernandez, Bastien; Buckalew, Richard; Moses, Gregory; Boczko, Erik M.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by experimental and theoretical work on autonomous oscillations in yeast, we analyze ordinary differential equations models of large populations of cells with cell-cycle dependent feedback. We assume a particular type of feedback that we call Responsive/Signaling (RS), but do not specify a functional form of the feedback. We study the dynamics and emergent behaviour of solutions, particularly temporal clustering and stability of clustered solutions. We establish the existence of certain periodic clustered solutions as well as “uniform” solutions and add to the evidence that cell-cycle dependent feedback robustly leads to cell-cycle clustering. We highlight the fundamental differences in dynamics between systems with negative and positive feedback. For positive feedback systems the most important mechanism seems to be the stability of individual isolated clusters. On the other hand we find that in negative feedback systems, clusters must interact with each other to reinforce coherence. We conclude from various details of the mathematical analysis that negative feedback is most consistent with observations in yeast experiments. PMID:22001733

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 9, NO. 2, MARCH 2001 381 Multivariable Feedback Relevant System Identification of a Wafer Stepper

    E-print Network

    Van den Hof, Paul

    Feedback Relevant System Identification of a Wafer Stepper System Raymond A. de Callafon and Paul M. J. Van of a positioning mechanism present in a wafer stepper. The positioning mechanism in a wafer stepper is used in chip manufacturing processes for accurate posi- tioning of the silicon wafer on which the chips are to be produced

  11. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption or an El Nino.

  12. The Power of Positional Competition and Market Mechanism: A Case Study of Recent Parental Choice Development in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xiaoxin

    2008-01-01

    The positional competition reflected in the current parental choice fever in China is highlighted by the introduction of market mechanisms: buying houses near preferred schools, paying choice fees or co-founding fees, giving donations and spending money on spare time training classes, etc. All of these work effectively together with the…

  13. The neural mechanisms underlying the aging-related enhancement of positive affects: electrophysiological evidences

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianxin; Yang, Jiemin; Cai, AYan; Ding, XinSheng; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Hong; Yuan, JiaJin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies reported that old adults, relative to young adults, showed improvement of emotional stability and increased experiences of positive affects. Methods: In order to better understand the neural underpinnings behind the aging-related enhancement of positive affects, it is necessary to investigate whether old and young adults differ in the threshold of eliciting positive or negative emotional reactions. However, no studies have examined emotional reaction differences between old and young adults by manipulating the intensity of emotional stimuli to date. To clarify this issue, the present study examined the impact of aging on the brain’s susceptibility to affective pictures of varying emotional intensities. We recorded event-related potentials (ERP) for highly negative (HN), mildly negative (MN) and neutral pictures in the negative experimental block; and for highly positive (HP), mildly positive (MP) and neutral pictures in the positive experimental block, when young and old adults were required to count the number of pictures, irrespective of the emotionality of the pictures. Results: Event-related potentials results showed that LPP (late positive potentials) amplitudes were larger for HN and MN stimuli compared to neutral stimuli in young adults, but not in old adults. By contrast, old adults displayed larger LPP amplitudes for HP and MP relative to neutral stimuli, while these effects were absent for young adults. In addition, old adults reported more frequent perception of positive stimuli and less frequent perception of negative stimuli than young adults. The post-experiment stimulus assessment showed more positive ratings of Neutral and MP stimuli, and reduced arousal ratings of HN stimuli in old compared to young adults. Conclusion: These results suggest that old adults are more resistant to the impact of negative stimuli, while they are equipped with enhanced attentional bias for positive stimuli. The implications of these results to the aging-related enhancement of positive affects were discussed. PMID:26300770

  14. A squeeze-like operator approach to position-dependent mass in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Moya-Cessa, Héctor M.; Soto-Eguibar, Francisco; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2014-08-15

    We provide a squeeze-like transformation that allows one to remove a position dependent mass from the Hamiltonian. Methods to solve the Schrödinger equation may then be applied to find the respective eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. As an example, we consider a position-dependent-mass that leads to the integrable Morse potential and therefore to well-known solutions.

  15. Subramaniam et al. 1 A brain mechanism for facilitation of insight by positive affect

    E-print Network

    Reber, Paul J.

    Subramaniam, John Kounios, Todd B. Parrish, and Mark Jung-Beeman Department of Psychology and Cognitive Brain shown that people solve insight or creative problems better when in a positive mood (assessed or induced to engage in processing conducive to insight solving. This result suggests that positive mood enhances

  16. An influence of the stepping motor control and friction models on precise positioning of the complex mechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konowrocki, Robert; Szolc, Tomasz; Pochanke, Andrzej; Pr?gowska, Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, the electromechanical dynamic interaction between a driving stepping motor and a driven laboratory belt-transporter system. A test-rig imitates the operation of a robotic device in the form of a working tool-carrier under translational motion. The object under consideration is equipped with measurement systems, which enable the registration of electrical and mechanical quantities. Analytical considerations are performed by means of a circuit model of the electric motor and a discrete, non-linear model of the mechanical system. Various scenarios of the working tool-carrier motion and positioning by the belt-transporter are measured and simulated; in all cases the electric current control of the driving motor has been applied. The main goal of this study is to investigate the influence of the stepping motor control parameters along with various mechanical friction models on the precise positioning of a laboratory robotic device.

  17. Molecular gas heating mechanisms, and star formation feedback in merger/starbursts: NGC 6240 and Arp 193 as case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Weiss, Axel; Van der Werf, Paul; Israel, F. P.; Greve, T. R.; Isaak, Kate G.; Gao, Y. E-mail: zyzhang@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: aweiss@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de E-mail: israel@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: kisaak@rssd.esa.int

    2014-06-20

    We used the SPIRE/FTS instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory to obtain the Spectral Line Energy Distributions (SLEDs) of CO from J = 4-3 to J = 13-12 of Arp 193 and NGC 6240, two classical merger/starbursts selected from our molecular line survey of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (L {sub IR} ? 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}). The high-J CO SLEDs are then combined with ground-based low-J CO, {sup 13}CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, CS line data and used to probe the thermal and dynamical states of their large molecular gas reservoirs. We find the two CO SLEDs strongly diverging from J = 4-3 onward, with NGC 6240 having a much higher CO line excitation than Arp 193, despite their similar low-J CO SLEDs and L {sub FIR}/L {sub CO,} {sub 1} {sub –0}, L {sub HCN}/L {sub CO} (J = 1-0) ratios (proxies of star formation efficiency and dense gas mass fraction). In Arp 193, one of the three most extreme starbursts in the local universe, the molecular SLEDs indicate a small amount (?5%-15%) of dense gas (n ? 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}) unlike NGC 6240 where most of the molecular gas (?60%-70%) is dense (n ? (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5}) cm{sup –3}). Strong star-formation feedback can drive this disparity in their dense gas mass fractions, and also induce extreme thermal and dynamical states for the molecular gas. In NGC 6240, and to a lesser degree in Arp 193, we find large molecular gas masses whose thermal states cannot be maintained by FUV photons from Photon-Dominated Regions. We argue that this may happen often in metal-rich merger/starbursts, strongly altering the initial conditions of star formation. ALMA can now directly probe these conditions across cosmic epoch, and even probe their deeply dust-enshrouded outcome, the stellar initial mass function averaged over galactic evolution.

  18. Design and manufacture of an electro-mechanical hand position tracker

    E-print Network

    Tan, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    This thesis discusses the conceptual design, manufacture, and assembly of a device that tracks the movements and position of a user's hand. This device will be used for stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation using robotic ...

  19. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Markov Quantum Feedback Control Based on Homodyne Measurement of a Two-Qubit System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Min; Wang, Shun-Jin

    2010-09-01

    We consider the system consisting of two qubits collectively damped, with the output being unit-efficiency measured and subsequently fed back to control the system state. Our primary goal in this paper is (i) to solve the feedback-modified master equation, (ii) to demonstrate the ability of feedback control based on the solutions, and (iii) to pick out different steady states by choosing different driving strengths and feedback strengths to counteract the effects of both damping and the measurement back-action on the system. We further investigate some properties of the equilibrium steady state, its distribution probability and entanglement vs. the driving and feedback amplitudes. We find that in our feedback model feedback plays a negative role in producing entanglement.

  20. Experimental Determination of Unknown Masses and Their Positions in a Mechanical Black Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakrabarti, Bhupati; Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura

    2013-01-01

    An experiment with a mechanical black box containing unknown masses is presented. The experiment involves the determination of these masses and their locations by performing some nondestructive tests. The set-ups are inexpensive and easy to fabricate. They are very useful to gain an understanding of some well-known principles of mechanics.

  1. Feedback loops in biological networks.

    PubMed

    Franco, Elisa; Galloway, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    We introduce fundamental concepts for the design of dynamics and feedback in molecular networks modeled with ordinary differential equations. We use several examples, focusing in particular on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, to illustrate the concept that feedback loops are fundamental in determining the overall dynamic behavior of a system. Often, these loops have a structural function and unequivocally define the system behavior. We conclude with numerical simulations highlighting the potential for bistability and oscillations of the MAPK pathway re-engineered through synthetic promoters and RNA transducers to include positive and negative feedback loops. PMID:25487099

  2. Galaxy-scale AGN Feedback - Theory

    E-print Network

    Wagner, A Y; Umemura, M; Sutherland, R S; Silk, J

    2015-01-01

    Powerful relativistic jets in radio galaxies are capable of driving strong outflows but also inducing star-formation by pressure-triggering collapse of dense clouds. We review theoretical work on negative and positive active galactic nuclei feedback, discussing insights gained from recent hydrodynamical simulations of jet-driven feedback on galaxy scales that are applicable to compact radio sources. The simulations show that the efficiency of feedback and the relative importance of negative and positive feedback depends strongly on interstellar medium properties, especially the column depth and spatial distribution of clouds. Negative feedback is most effective if clouds are distributed spherically and individual clouds have small column depths, while positive feedback is most effective if clouds are predominantly in a disc-like configuration.

  3. Learning from Feedback: Spacing and the Delay-Retention Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Troy A.; Kimball, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Most modern research on the effects of feedback during learning has assumed that feedback is an error correction mechanism. Recent studies of feedback-timing effects have suggested that feedback might also strengthen initially correct responses. In an experiment involving cued recall of trivia facts, we directly tested several theories of…

  4. Bactericidal Activity and Mechanism of Photoirradiated Polyphenols against Gram-Positive and -Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ishiyama, Kirika; Sheng, Hong; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2015-09-01

    The bactericidal effect of various types of photoirradiated polyphenols against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria was evaluated in relation to the mode of action. Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus mutans) and Gram-negative bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) suspended in a 1 mg/mL polyphenol aqueous solution (caffeic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate, and proanthocyanidin) were exposed to LED light (wavelength, 400 nm; irradiance, 260 mW/cm(2)) for 5 or 10 min. Caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid exerted the highest bactericidal activity followed by gallic acid and proanthocyanidin against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. It was also demonstrated that the disinfection treatment induced oxidative damage of bacterial DNA, which suggests that polyphenols are incorporated into bacterial cells. The present study suggests that blue light irradiation of polyphenols could be a novel disinfection treatment. PMID:25660393

  5. Liquid-induced damping of mechanical feedback effects in single electron tunneling through a suspended carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, D. R.; Stiller, P. L.; Strunk, Ch.; Hüttel, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    In single electron tunneling through clean, suspended carbon nanotube devices at low temperature, distinct switching phenomena have regularly been observed. These can be explained via strong interaction of single electron tunneling and vibrational motion of the nanotube. We present measurements on a highly stable nanotube device, subsequently recorded in the vacuum chamber of a dilution refrigerator and immersed in the 3He/ 4He mixture of a second dilution refrigerator. The switching phenomena are absent when the sample is kept in the viscous liquid, additionally supporting the interpretation of dc-driven vibration. Transport measurements in liquid helium can thus be used for finite bias spectroscopy where otherwise the mechanical effects would dominate the current.

  6. The Human Ventromedial Frontal Lobe Is Critical for Learning from Negative Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Elizabeth Z.; Fellows, Lesley K.

    2008-01-01

    Are positive and negative feedback weighed in a common balance in the brain, or do they influence behaviour through distinct neural mechanisms? Recent neuroeconomic studies in both human and non-human primates indicate that the ventromedial frontal lobe carries information about both losses and gains, suggesting that this region may encode value…

  7. Feedback between aeolian dust, climate, and atmospheric CO2 in glacial time

    E-print Network

    Archer, David

    , in turn, climate is responsive to the dust due to iron fertilization. This positive feedback may mean. The mechanism for this is ``iron fertil- ization'' of the biota in the Southern Ocean [Watson et al., 2000 October 2002. [1] Enhanced aeolian supply of iron to the biota of the Southern Ocean during glacial

  8. Asymmetric interjoint feedback contributes to postural control of redundant multi-link systems

    PubMed Central

    Bunderson, Nathan E.; Ting, Lena H.; Burkholder, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Maintaining the postural configuration of a limb such as an arm or leg is a fundamental neural control task that involves the coordination of multiple linked body segments. Biological systems are known to use a complex network of inter- and intra-joint feedback mechanisms arising from muscles, spinal reflexes, and higher neuronal structures to stabilize the limbs. While previous work has shown that a small amount of asymmetric heterogenic feedback contributes to the behavior of these systems, a satisfactory functional explanation for this nonconservative feedback structure has not been put forth. We hypothesized that an asymmetric multi-joint control strategy would confer both an energetic and stability advantage in maintaining endpoint position of a kinematically redundant system. We tested this hypothesis by using optimal control models incorporating symmetric versus asymmetric feedback with the goal of maintaining the endpoint location of a kinematically redundant, planar limb. Asymmetric feedback improved endpoint control performance of the limb by 16%, reduced energetic cost by 21% and increased interjoint coordination by 40% compared to the symmetric feedback system. The overall effect of the asymmetry was that proximal joint motion resulted in greater torque generation at distal joints than vice versa. The asymmetric organization is consistent with heterogenic stretch reflex gains measured experimentally. We conclude that asymmetric feedback has a functionally relevant role in coordinating redundant degrees of freedom to maintain the position of the hand or foot. PMID:17873426

  9. A laboratory study of particle ploughing and pore-pressure feedback: A velocity-weakening mechanism for soft glacier beds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomason, J.F.; Iverson, N.R.

    2008-01-01

    If basal-water discharge and pressure are sufficiently high, a soft-bedded glacier will slip over its bed by ploughing, the process in which particles that span the ice-bed interface are dragged across the bed surface. Results of laboratory experiments indicate that resistance to ploughing can decrease with increasing ploughing velocity (velocity weakening). During ploughing at various velocities (15-400 ma-1), till was compacted in front of idealized particles, causing pore pressures there that were orders of magnitude higher than the ambient value. This excess pore pressure locally weakened the till in shear, thereby decreasing ploughing resistance by a factor of 3.0-6.6 with a six-fold increase in ploughing velocity. Characteristic timescales of pore-pressure diffusion and compaction down-glacier from ploughing particles depend on till diffusivity, ploughing velocity and sizes of ploughing particles. These timescales accurately predict the ranges of these variables over which excess pore pressure and velocity weakening occurred. Existing ploughing models do not account for velocity weakening. A new ploughing model with no adjustable parameters predicts ploughing resistance to no worse than 38% but requires that excess pore pressures be measured. Velocity weakening by this mechanism may affect fast glacier flow, sediment transport by bed deformation and basal seismicity.

  10. Modelling the mid-Pliocene Warm Period with the IPSLGCM: contribution to PlioMIP and feedback mechanisms from the presence of mega-lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contoux, C.; Jost, A.; Sepulchre, P.; Ramstein, G.

    2012-04-01

    The mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP, ca. 3.3 -3 Ma) is the last geological period showing a warmer climate than the preindustrial during a sustained period of time, much longer than interglacial periods of the last million years. Moreover, mPWP position of the continents and atmospheric pCO2 are very close to present-day, both conditions making the mPWP a relevant analogue for future global warming. For these reasons, the mPWP has been the focus of Pliocene Modelling Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP), which associates data analysis and modelling. We use the IPSLCM5 Earth System model and its atmospheric component alone (LMDZ), to simulate the climate of the mPWP. Boundary conditions such as sea surface temperatures (SSTs), topography, ice sheet extent and vegetation are the ones used within the PlioMIP framework. On a global scale we show the impact of different boundary conditions with LMDZ, and of a global coupling on the simulated climate. Results from the Earth System model are also compared to SST reconstructions, particularly in the North Atlantic Ocean, where an important warming occurs, generally poorly reproduced by models. These results will then be part of the multi-model analysis for the Pliocene. The PlioMIP exercise is also about better understanding model/data mismatches. In the present-day desertic regions of Lake Chad (Africa) and Lake Eyre (Australia), vegetation data show the presence of tropical savanna at the expense of deserts during the mPWP. Vegetation models forced by mPWP climatic simulations fail to reproduce more humid vegetation in these locations. There might be a reason for this model/data discrepancy: geological data stand for the presence of mega-lakes in these two regions during the mPWP that are not accounted for in previous simulations. Such extended waterbodies could have important feedbacks on the hydrological cycle and regional climate. We use the LMDZ4 atmospheric model imbedding explicitly resolved lake surfaces to simulate the climate under mega-lake conditions, using a zoom on the regions of interest. This allows us to determine the viability of such waterbodies under mid-Pliocene climatic conditions as well as their feedbacks on the climate system.

  11. A Feedback Mechanism to Control Apoptosis Occurs in the Digestive Gland of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas Exposed to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxins Producer Alexandrium catenella

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Jean-Luc; Medhioub, Walid; Vergnes, Agnes; Abi-khalil, Celina; Savar, Véronique; Abadie, Eric; Masseret, Estelle; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the effect of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PSTs) accumulation in the digestive gland of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, we experimentally exposed individual oysters for 48 h to a PSTs producer, the dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella. In comparison to the effect of the non-toxic Alexandrium tamarense, on the eight apoptotic related genes tested, Bax and BI.1 were significantly upregulated in oysters exposed 48 h to A. catenella. Among the five detoxification related genes tested, the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP1A) was shown to be correlated with toxin concentration in the digestive gland of oysters exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate. Beside this, we observed a significant increase in ROS production, a decrease in caspase-3/7 activity and normal percentage of apoptotic cells in this tissue. Taken together, these results suggest a feedback mechanism, which may occur in the digestive gland where BI.1 could play a key role in preventing the induction of apoptosis by PSTs. Moreover, the expression of CYP1A, Bax and BI.1 were found to be significantly correlated to the occurrence of natural toxic events, suggesting that the expression of these genes together could be used as biomarker to assess the biological responses of oysters to stress caused by PSTs. PMID:25257788

  12. Glucose-driven chemo-mechanical autonomous drug-release system with multi-enzymatic amplification toward feedback control of blood glucose in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Munkhjargal, Munkhbayar; Hatayama, Kohdai; Matsuura, Yuki; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-05-15

    A second-generation novel chemo-mechanical autonomous drug release system, incorporating various improvements over our first-generation system, was fabricated and evaluated. Enhanced oxygen uptake by the enzyme membrane of the organic engine was facilitated by optimizing the quantity of enzyme immobilizer, PVA-SbQ, and by hydrophobizing the membrane surface. Various quantities of PVA-SbQ were evaluated in the organic engine by measuring the decompression rate, with 1.5 mg/cm(2) yielding optimum results. When fluororesin was used as a hydrophobizing coating, the time to reach the peak decompression rate was shortened 2.3-fold. The optimized elements of the system were evaluated as a unit, first in an open loop and then in a closed loop setting, using a mixture of glucose solution (25 mmol/L), ATP and MgCI2 with glucose hexokinase enzyme (HK) as a glucose reducer. In conclusion, feedback-control of physiologically relevant glucose concentration was demonstrated by the second-generation drug release system without any requirement for external energy. PMID:25223550

  13. New scenarios for classical and quantum mechanical systems with position dependent mass

    E-print Network

    J. R. Morris

    2015-07-18

    An inhomogeneous Kaluza-Klein compactification to four dimensions, followed by a conformal transformation, results in a system with position dependent mass (PDM). This origin of a PDM is quite different from the condensed matter one. A substantial generalization of a previously studied nonlinear oscillator with variable mass is obtained, wherein the position dependence of the mass of a nonrelativistic particle is due to a dilatonic coupling function emerging from the extra dimension. Previously obtained solutions for such systems can be extended and reinterpreted as nonrelativistic particles interacting with dilaton fields, which, themselves, can have interesting structures. An application is presented for the nonlinear oscillator, where within the new scenario the particle is coupled to a dilatonic string.

  14. POSITION: Masters Fellowship Program MFP Mechanical Engineers-Job ID: 61883

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    with electrical, optical, quality, manufacturing and system engineers to perform design tasks. JOB DESCRIPTION Intergration Center (2600). The Engineering and Design Integration Center (2600) is a multi-discipline, product consequence military programs. The Center is divided into three main competencies: Advanced Mechanical Systems

  15. Inverse Compton X-Ray Halos Around High-z Radio Galaxies: A Feedback Mechanism Powered by Far-Infrared Starbursts or the Cosmic Microwave Background?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Ian; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lehmer, B. D.; Alexander, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of extended X-ray emission around two powerful radio galaxies at z approx. 3.6 (4C 03.24 and 4C 19.71) and use these to investigate the origin of extended, inverse Compton (IC) powered X-ray halos at high redshifts. The halos have X-ray luminosities of L(sub X) approx. 3 x 10(exp 44) erg/s and sizes of approx.60 kpc. Their morphologies are broadly similar to the approx.60 kpc long radio lobes around these galaxies suggesting they are formed from IC scattering by relativistic electrons in the radio lobes, of either cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons or far-infrared photons from the dust-obscured starbursts in these galaxies. These observations double the number of z > 3 radio galaxies with X-ray-detected IC halos. We compare the IC X-ray-to-radio luminosity ratios for the two new detections to the two previously detected z approx. 3.8 radio galaxies. Given the similar redshifts, we would expect comparable X-ray IC luminosities if millimeter photons from the CMB are the dominant seed field for the IC emission (assuming all four galaxies have similar ages and jet powers). Instead we see that the two z approx. 3.6 radio galaxies, which are 4 fainter in the far-infrared than those at z 3.8, also have approx.4x fainter X-ray IC emission. Including data for a further six z > or approx. 2 radio sources with detected IC X-ray halos from the literature, we suggest that in the more compact, majority of radio sources, those with lobe sizes < or approx.100-200 kpc, the bulk of the IC emission may be driven by scattering of locally produced far-infrared photons from luminous, dust-obscured starbursts within these galaxies, rather than millimeter photons from the CMB. The resulting X-ray emission appears sufficient to ionize the gas on approx.100-200 kpc scales around these systems and thus helps form the extended, kinematically quiescent Ly(alpha) emission line halos found around some of these systems. The starburst and active galactic nucleus activity in these galaxies are thus combining to produce an even more effective and widespread "feedback" process, acting on the long-term gas reservoir for the galaxy, than either individually could achieve. If episodic radio activity and co-eval starbursts are common in massive, high-redshift galaxies, then this IC-feedback mechanism may play a role in affecting the star formation histories of the most massive galaxies at the present day.

  16. Frequency modulated cutaneous orientation feedback from artificial arms. [dynamic control model of human arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomonow, M.; Freedy, A.; Lyman, J.

    1975-01-01

    A model of the human arm, emphasizing the neuromuscular mechanisms of feedback control, has been constructed. The various parameters and functions of physiological receptors in the feedback section have been classified into an automated category that can be incorporated in the prosthesis servo loop, and into a sensory category that should be communicated to the operator if control and dynamic performance are to be optimized. A scheme for simultaneous display of two such sensory parameters, i.e., fingertip pressure and elbow position, has been developed, implemented and evaluated. The neurophysiological mechanism of such displays, and the feasibility of sensory transformation, is discussed in this paper.

  17. Types and Frequencies of Teachers' Written Instructional Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Robert B.; Bourdon, Linda

    1980-01-01

    Because many teachers demonstrate limited use and knowledge of feedback strategies positively associated with student achievement, providers of preservice and inservice teacher education should review feedback research and instruct teachers on its effective use. (CJ)

  18. The mechanism of the formation of positive battery plates from pure lead 1. cyclic voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarides, C.; Hampson, N. A.; Bulman, G. M.

    The electrochemical behaviour of a pure lead electrode in sulphuric acid—perchloric acid electrolyte mixtures has been examined by cyclic voltammetry In the lead/lead sulphate region, the perchlorate ion promotes surface attack on the lead by displacing the passivating sulphate ion. The effect increa The mechanism in the lead sulphate/lead dioxide region possibly involves a reduction in the thickness of the passivating layer by the perchlorate anion

  19. ESTIMATE OF THE TOTAL MECHANICAL FEEDBACK ENERGY FROM GALAXY CLUSTER-CENTERED BLACK HOLES: IMPLICATIONS FOR BLACK HOLE EVOLUTION, CLUSTER GAS FRACTION, AND ENTROPY

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, William G.; Guo Fulai

    2011-09-10

    The total feedback energy injected into hot gas in galaxy clusters by central black holes can be estimated by comparing the potential energy of observed cluster gas profiles with the potential energy of non-radiating, feedback-free hot gas atmospheres resulting from gravitational collapse in clusters of the same total mass. Feedback energy from cluster-centered black holes expands the cluster gas, lowering the gas-to-dark-matter mass ratio below the cosmic value. Feedback energy is unnecessarily delivered by radio-emitting jets to distant gas far beyond the cooling radius where the cooling time equals the cluster lifetime. For clusters of mass (4-11) x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}, estimates of the total feedback energy, (1-3) x 10{sup 63} erg, far exceed feedback energies estimated from observations of X-ray cavities and shocks in the cluster gas, energies gained from supernovae, and energies lost from cluster gas by radiation. The time-averaged mean feedback luminosity is comparable to those of powerful quasars, implying that some significant fraction of this energy may arise from the spin of the black hole. The universal entropy profile in feedback-free gaseous atmospheres in Navarro-Frenk-White cluster halos can be recovered by multiplying the observed gas entropy profile of any relaxed cluster by a factor involving the gas fraction profile. While the feedback energy and associated mass outflow in the clusters we consider far exceed that necessary to stop cooling inflow, the time-averaged mass outflow at the cooling radius almost exactly balances the mass that cools within this radius, an essential condition to shut down cluster cooling flows.

  20. Design of a high-resolution high-stability positioning mechanism for crystal optics

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Toellner, T. S.; Alp, E. E.

    1999-10-11

    The authors present a novel miniature multi-axis driving structure that will allow positioning of two crystals with better than 50-nrad angular resolution and nanometer linear driving sensitivity.The precision and stability of this structure allow the user to align or adjust an assembly of crystals to achieve the same performance as does a single channel-cut crystal, so they call it an artificial channel-cut crystal. In this paper, the particular designs and specifications, as well as the test results,for a two-axis driving structure for a high-energy-resolution artificial channel-cut crystal monochromator are presented

  1. Delayed feedback control of fractional-order chaotic systems

    E-print Network

    Aleksandar Gjurchinovski; Trifce Sandev; Viktor Urumov

    2011-07-06

    We study the possibility to stabilize unstable steady states and unstable periodic orbits in chaotic fractional-order dynamical systems by the time-delayed feedback method. By performing a linear stability analysis, we establish the parameter ranges for successful stabilization of unstable equilibria in the plane parametrizad by the feedback gain and the time delay. An insight into the control mechanism is gained by analyzing the characteristic equation of the controlled system, showing that the control scheme fails to control unstable equilibria having an odd number of positive real eigenvalues. We demonstrate that the method can also stabilize unstable periodic orbits for a suitable choice of the feedback gain, providing that the time delay is chosen to coincide with the period of the target orbit. In addition, it is shown numerically that delayed feedback control with a sinusoidally modulated time delay significantly enlarges the stability region of the steady states in comparison to the classical time-delayed feedback scheme with a constant delay.

  2. Shrub expansion and climate feedbacks in Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranty, Michael M.; Goetz, Scott J.

    2012-03-01

    Arctic tundra ecosystems stand to play a substantial role in both the magnitude and rate of global climate warming over the coming decades and centuries. The exact nature of this role will be determined by the combined effects of currently amplified rates of climate warming in the Arctic (Serreze et al 2000) and a series of related positive climate feedbacks that include mobilization of permafrost carbon (Schuur et al 2008), decreases in surface albedo (Chapin et al 2005) and evapotranspiration (ET) mediated increases in atmospheric water vapor (Swann et al 2010). Conceptually, these feedback mechanisms are intuitive and readily comprehensible: warming-induced permafrost thaw will make new soil carbon pools accessible for microbial respiration, and increased vegetation productivity, expansion of shrubs in particular, will lower surface reflectance and increase ET. However, our current understanding of these feedback mechanisms relies largely on limited and local field studies and, as such, the quantitative estimates of feedback effects on regional and global climate require spatial upscaling and uncertainty estimates derived from models. Moreover, the feedback mechanisms interact and their combined net effect on climate is highly variable and not well characterized. A recent study by Bonfils et al (2012) is among the first to explicitly examine how shrub expansion in tundra ecosystems will impact regional climate. Using an Earth system model, Bonfils et al find that an idealized 20% increase in shrub cover north of 60°N latitude will lead to annual temperature increases of 0.66?°C and 1.84?°C, respectively, when the shrubs are 0.5 m and 2 m tall. The modeled temperature increases arise from atmospheric heating as a combined consequence of decreased albedo and increased ET. The primary difference between the two cases is associated with the fact that tall shrubs protrude above the snow, thus reducing albedo year round, whereas short shrubs are completely covered by the snowpack for part of the year. These results support evidence that shrub expansion in Arctic tundra will feed back positively to ongoing climate warming but, perhaps more importantly, illustrate the significance of shrub height in dictating the feedback strength. While differences in albedo associated with vegetation stature have been previously documented in these ecosystems (Loranty et al 2011, Sturm et al 2005a), the magnitudes of the feedbacks on regional climate were unknown. These findings highlight a pressing need to understand the rate and spatial extent at which shrub expansion is occurring. While increases in vegetation productivity inferred from satellite data have been observed across the Arctic (Bunn and Goetz 2006, Goetz et al 2005, Walker et al 2009), recent analyses suggest that the observed trends are a result of general increases in productivity across all vegetation types (Beck and Goetz 2011). Another important finding reported by Bonfils et al (2012) is the positive correlation between shrub height and modeled active layer depth (i.e. permafrost thaw). Results from a field study (Blok et al 2010) showed that the shading effects of shrub canopies reduce ground heat flux, which in turn leads to a decrease in active layer depth. Bonfils et al's (2012) results indicate that regional warming as a consequence of albedo and ET feedbacks will offset the local cooling effects of increased shrub cover, thus the net climate feedback associated with shrub expansion could be greater than reported (owing to biogeochemical processes and related feedbacks). A similar study by Lawrence and Swenson (2011) found that snow redistribution to shrub covered areas (Sturm et al 2005b) simultaneously reduced the albedo feedback by covering shrubs with snow and introduced a soil warming feedback through insulation provided by additional snow cover, with a net result of increased active layer depth under shrubs. When shrub cover (1 m tall canopy) was increased by 20% and less snow was available for redistribution over a greater shrub covered area, the insul

  3. Minimal position-velocity uncertainty wave packets in relativistic and non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hashimi, M.H. Wiese, U.-J.

    2009-12-15

    We consider wave packets of free particles with a general energy-momentum dispersion relation E(p). The spreading of the wave packet is determined by the velocity v={partial_derivative}{sub p}E. The position-velocity uncertainty relation {delta}x{delta}v{>=}1/2 |<{partial_derivative}{sub p}{sup 2}E>| is saturated by minimal uncertainty wave packets {phi}(p)=Aexp(-{alpha}E(p)+{beta}p). In addition to the standard minimal Gaussian wave packets corresponding to the non-relativistic dispersion relation E(p)=p{sup 2}/2m, analytic calculations are presented for the spreading of wave packets with minimal position-velocity uncertainty product for the lattice dispersion relation E(p)=-cos(pa)/ma{sup 2} as well as for the relativistic dispersion relation E(p)={radical}(p{sup 2}+m{sup 2}). The boost properties of moving relativistic wave packets as well as the propagation of wave packets in an expanding Universe are also discussed.

  4. 3D computational mechanics elucidate the evolutionary implications of orbit position and size diversity of early amphibians.

    PubMed

    Marcé-Nogué, Jordi; Fortuny, Josep; De Esteban-Trivigno, Soledad; Sánchez, Montserrat; Gil, Lluís; Galobart, Àngel

    2015-01-01

    For the first time in vertebrate palaeontology, the potential of joining Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Parametrical Analysis (PA) is used to shed new light on two different cranial parameters from the orbits to evaluate their biomechanical role and evolutionary patterns. The early tetrapod group of Stereospondyls, one of the largest groups of Temnospondyls is used as a case study because its orbits position and size vary hugely within the members of this group. An adult skull of Edingerella madagascariensis was analysed using two different cases of boundary and loading conditions in order to quantify stress and deformation response under a bilateral bite and during skull raising. Firstly, the variation of the original geometry of its orbits was introduced in the models producing new FEA results, allowing the exploration of the ecomorphology, feeding strategy and evolutionary patterns of these top predators. Secondly, the quantitative results were analysed in order to check if the orbit size and position were correlated with different stress patterns. These results revealed that in most of the cases the stress distribution is not affected by changes in the size and position of the orbit. This finding supports the high mechanical plasticity of this group during the Triassic period. The absence of mechanical constraints regarding the orbit probably promoted the ecomorphological diversity acknowledged for this group, as well as its ecological niche differentiation in the terrestrial Triassic ecosystems in clades as lydekkerinids, trematosaurs, capitosaurs or metoposaurs. PMID:26107295

  5. 3D Computational Mechanics Elucidate the Evolutionary Implications of Orbit Position and Size Diversity of Early Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Marcé-Nogué, Jordi; Fortuny, Josep; De Esteban-Trivigno, Soledad; Sánchez, Montserrat; Gil, Lluís; Galobart, Àngel

    2015-01-01

    For the first time in vertebrate palaeontology, the potential of joining Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Parametrical Analysis (PA) is used to shed new light on two different cranial parameters from the orbits to evaluate their biomechanical role and evolutionary patterns. The early tetrapod group of Stereospondyls, one of the largest groups of Temnospondyls is used as a case study because its orbits position and size vary hugely within the members of this group. An adult skull of Edingerella madagascariensis was analysed using two different cases of boundary and loading conditions in order to quantify stress and deformation response under a bilateral bite and during skull raising. Firstly, the variation of the original geometry of its orbits was introduced in the models producing new FEA results, allowing the exploration of the ecomorphology, feeding strategy and evolutionary patterns of these top predators. Secondly, the quantitative results were analysed in order to check if the orbit size and position were correlated with different stress patterns. These results revealed that in most of the cases the stress distribution is not affected by changes in the size and position of the orbit. This finding supports the high mechanical plasticity of this group during the Triassic period. The absence of mechanical constraints regarding the orbit probably promoted the ecomorphological diversity acknowledged for this group, as well as its ecological niche differentiation in the terrestrial Triassic ecosystems in clades as lydekkerinids, trematosaurs, capitosaurs or metoposaurs. PMID:26107295

  6. Positive effect of biaxial stretching on the mechanical behavior of PLA-Talc nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchiar, Saadia; Stoclet, Grégory; Cabaret, Cyrille; Gloaguen, Vincent; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc; UMET-Engineering polymer science Team; UMET / Ecomeris Collaboration; UMET / LCSN Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Poly (Lactic acid) (PLA), a biodegradable polyester issued from renewable resources, appears as a good candidate for the replacement of petrochemical-based materials due to its good combination of physical properties. However main drawbacks of PLA are its brittle behavior and its low thermal stability. One way to outclass these lacks consists in adding nanofillers into PLA. It is also recognized that the mechanical and barrier properties can be improved by biaxial drawing process. Consequently, this study deals with the enhancing effect of biaxial stretching on mechanical properties of Talc based PLA nanocomposites. The Talc content was varied between 0 to 30 wt%. This high level of talc results in a decrease in material cost, in addition to the enhancement of various physical properties. A main result is that neat PLA, which initially exhibit a brittle behavior upon uniaxial stretching at room temperature, become ductile after being biaxially stretched under appropriate conditions. More surprising is that the same behavior is observed for the filled samples. The origin of these enhancing properties will be also discussed.

  7. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

    2008-03-31

    Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

  8. [Mediate mechanism of positive effect of estrogens on the level of corticosteroid-binding globulin in rats].

    PubMed

    Kurabekova, R M; Mataradze, G D; Rozen, V B

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of estrogen action on CBG level in blood serum was studied in the experiments on white rats. It was shown that estradiol injection at the dose 100 micrograms for 3 weeks induced the increasing of CBG serum level in intact males, but it was not changed in the gonadectomized males and females. The presence of the positive effect of exogenic estrogens only in the intact males was connected with the estrogen depression of testis function. It suggests the absence of direct positive estrogens action on the level of CBG in the rats. The estrogen effect is not mediated by adrenal corticosteroids, and has independent negative action on CBG level in the rat. Thus, estrogen does not participate in the endocrine regulation of CBG content in the mature rats. PMID:2334800

  9. Control of parallel manipulators using force feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanua, Prabjot

    1994-01-01

    Two control schemes are compared for parallel robotic mechanisms actuated by hydraulic cylinders. One scheme, the 'rate based scheme', uses the position and rate information only for feedback. The second scheme, the 'force based scheme' feeds back the force information also. The force control scheme is shown to improve the response over the rate control one. It is a simple constant gain control scheme better suited to parallel mechanisms. The force control scheme can be easily modified for the dynamic forces on the end effector. This paper presents the results of a computer simulation of both the rate and force control schemes. The gains in the force based scheme can be individually adjusted in all three directions, whereas the adjustment in just one direction of the rate based scheme directly affects the other two directions.

  10. Alterations in glucocorticoid negative feedback following maternal Pb, prenatal stress and the combination: A potential biological unifying mechanism for their corresponding disease profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi-George, A.; Virgolini, M.B.; Weston, D.; Cory-Slechta, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Combined exposures to maternal lead (Pb) and prenatal stress (PS) can act synergistically to enhance behavioral and neurochemical toxicity in offspring. Maternal Pb itself causes permanent dysfunction of the body's major stress system, the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. The current study sought to determine the potential involvement of altered negative glucocorticoid feedback as a mechanistic basis of the effects in rats of maternal Pb (0, 50 or 150 ppm in drinking water beginning 2 mo prior to breeding), prenatal stress (PS; restraint on gestational days 16-17) and combined maternal Pb + PS in 8 mo old male and female offspring. Corticosterone changes were measured over 24 h following an i.p. injection stress containing vehicle or 100 or 300 {mu}g/kg (females) or 100 or 150 {mu}g/kg (males) dexamethasone (DEX). Both Pb and PS prolonged the time course of corticosterone reduction following vehicle injection stress. Pb effects were non-monotonic, with a greater impact at 50 vs. 150 ppm, particularly in males, where further enhancement occurred with PS. In accord with these findings, the efficacy of DEX in suppressing corticosterone was reduced by Pb and Pb + PS in both genders, with Pb efficacy enhanced by PS in females, over the first 6 h post-administration. A marked prolongation of DEX effects was found in males. Thus, Pb, PS and Pb + PS, sometimes additively, produced hypercortisolism in both genders, followed by hypocortisolism in males, consistent with HPA axis dysfunction. These findings may provide a plausible unifying biological mechanism for the reported links between Pb exposure and stress-associated diseases and disorders mediated via the HPA axis, including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, anxiety, schizophrenia and depression. They also suggest broadening of Pb screening programs to pregnant women in high stress environments.

  11. Vacuum chamber translation/positioning mechanism and welding power supply controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E., Jr.; Cashon, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Welding in the vacuum of space represents an important and fundamental problem for space exploration. Repairs or connection of metal components on orbit or during travel to the moon or distant planets may be required. Cracks or holes in spacecraft skin or supporting structures external to the pressurized section will require some type of repair that must be permanently made to the skin or support by welding. The development of a translation/positioning system that will permit research into welding of metal samples in a small vacuum chamber located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is addressed. The system and associated software was tested to the extent possible without the availability of the welder power supply or control computer that must be supplied by MSFC. Software has been developed for straight line welding. More extensive and varied translations are possible with simple alterations to the operating software to use the full capabilities of this three axes system. The source code 'VW.BAS' has been provided to serve as an example for further development of the vacuum welder translation system.

  12. The positive relationship between alcohol and heart disease in eastern Europe: potential physiological mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    McKee, M; Britton, A

    1998-01-01

    Research into the effect of alcohol on cardiovascular disease has indicated protective effects from moderate consumption. These observations, made in industrialized countries, have influenced policies on alcohol in countries where the situation may be quite different--specifically, where consumption is substantially higher or patterns of drinking are different. In central and eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, a growing body of epidemiological research indicates a positive rather than negative association between alcohol consumption and cardiovascular deaths, especially sudden cardiac deaths. By means of a systematic review of published work, we examine whether there is a physiological basis for the observed association between alcohol and heart disease seen in eastern Europe, focusing on the effects of high levels of consumption and of irregular or binge drinking. In binge drinkers, cardioprotective changes in high-density lipoproteins are not seen, and adverse changes in low-density lipoproteins are acquired. Irregular drinking is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis, occurring after cessation of drinking. It predisposes both to histological changes in the myocardium and conducting system and to a reduction in the threshold for ventricular fibrillation. Measures of frequency as well as quantity of consumption should be included in epidemiological studies. Taken with the epidemiological evidence emerging from eastern Europe, these observations have important implications for estimates of the burden of disease attributable to alcohol. PMID:9816353

  13. Immediate Feedback to Students and Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A study reported by The National Center for Fair and Open Testing (Black & William, 2007) found that low achievers do particularly well when provided high quality feedback about their work. The type of feedback, as well as the information provided to students about their assignments, can positively impact student learning. Providing students with…

  14. Social feedback processing from early to late adolescence: influence of sex, age, and attachment style

    PubMed Central

    Vrti?ka, Pascal; Sander, David; Anderson, Brittany; Badoud, Deborah; Eliez, Stephan; Debbané, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective The establishment of an accurate understanding of one's social context is a central developmental task during adolescence. A critical component of such development is to learn how to integrate the objective evaluation of one's behavior with the social response to the latter—here referred to as social feedback processing. Case report We measured brain activity by means of fMRI in 33 healthy adolescents (12–19 years old, 14 females). Participants played a difficult perceptual game with integrated verbal and visual feedback. Verbal feedback provided the participants with objective performance evaluation (won vs. lost). Visual feedback consisted of either smiling or angry faces, representing positive or negative social evaluations. Together, the combination of verbal and visual feedback gave rise to congruent versus incongruent social feedback combinations. In addition to assessing sex differences, we further tested for the effects of age and attachment style on social feedback processing. Results revealed that brain activity during social feedback processing was significantly modulated by sex, age, and attachment style in prefrontal cortical areas, ventral anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, caudate, and amygdala/hippocampus. We found indication for heightened activity during incongruent social feedback processing in females, older participants, and individuals with an anxious attachment style. Conversely, we observed stronger activity during processing of congruent social feedback in males and participants with an avoidant attachment style. Conclusion Our findings not only extend knowledge on the typical development of socio-emotional brain function during adolescence, but also provide first clues on how attachment insecurities, and particularly attachment avoidance, could interfere with the latter mechanisms. PMID:25328847

  15. Positive allosteric modulation of TRPV1 as a novel analgesic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of long-term opiate use in treating chronic non-cancer pain is increasing, and prescription opioid abuse and dependence are a major public health concern. To explore alternatives to opioid-based analgesia, the present study investigates a novel allosteric pharmacological approach operating through the cation channel TRPV1. This channel is highly expressed in subpopulations of primary afferent unmyelinated C- and lightly-myelinated A?-fibers that detect low and high rates of noxious heating, respectively, and it is also activated by vanilloid agonists and low pH. Sufficient doses of exogenous vanilloid agonists, such as capsaicin or resiniferatoxin, can inactivate/deactivate primary afferent endings due to calcium overload, and we hypothesized that positive allosteric modulation of agonist-activated TRPV1 could produce a selective, temporary inactivation of nociceptive nerve terminals in vivo. We previously identified MRS1477, a 1,4-dihydropyridine that potentiates vanilloid and pH activation of TRPV1 in vitro, but displays no detectable intrinsic agonist activity of its own. To study the in vivo effects of MRS1477, we injected the hind paws of rats with a non-deactivating dose of capsaicin, MRS1477, or the combination. An infrared diode laser was used to stimulate TRPV1-expressing nerve terminals and the latency and intensity of paw withdrawal responses were recorded. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed on dorsal root ganglia to examine changes in gene expression and the cellular specificity of such changes following treatment. Results Withdrawal responses of the capsaicin-only or MRS1477-only treated paws were not significantly different from the untreated, contralateral paws. However, rats treated with the combination of capsaicin and MRS1477 exhibited increased withdrawal latency and decreased response intensity consistent with agonist potentiation and inactivation or lesion of TRPV1-containing nerve terminals. The loss of nerve endings was manifested by an increase in levels of axotomy markers assessed by qRT-PCR and colocalization of ATF3 in TRPV1+ cells visualized via immunohistochemistry. Conclusions The present observations suggest a novel, non-narcotic, selective, long-lasting TRPV1-based approach for analgesia that may be effective in acute, persistent, or chronic pain disorders. PMID:22998799

  16. Torque feedback transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, B.L.

    1987-01-20

    This patent describes an infinitely variable transmission of inline configuration for interconnecting a primer mover with a load for clutch free operation in a range of speed including hydraulic neutral comprising: a. planetary gear train means having a ring gear, planetary gears supported by a planetary gear carrier, and a sun gear, the sun gear being connected mechanically to the load, output shaft means for joining the sun gear to the load; b. variable torque feedback means comprising (i) a variable displacement hydraulic motor whose rotor shaft is in line with the output shaft means and drivingly connected to the prime mover and the planetary gear carrier during the full range of operation of the transmission, and (ii) a fixed displacement hydraulic pump connected hydraulically to the motor, the rotor shaft of the pump being connected mechanically to the ring gear and being axially displaced from the output shaft means; c. means for adjusting the displacement volume within the hydraulic motor for controlling the torque feedback in the transmission to provide infinitely variable coupling between the prime mover and the load over the full range of the transmission including hydraulic neutral; d. a speed reducer between the primer mover and the motor rotor shaft and a speed multiplier between the sun gear and the load; and e. mechanical transmission assembly means between the speed multiplier and the load in line with the motor rotor shaft and the output shaft means for providing selection of drive, reverse, park, and neutral.

  17. Characterization of Ring-Like F-Actin Structure as a Mechanical Partner for Spindle Positioning in Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Tongge; Xia, Peng; Seffens, William; Aikhionbare, Felix; Wang, Dongmei; Dou, Zhen; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-01-01

    Proper spindle positioning and orientation are essential for accurate mitosis which requires dynamic interactions between microtubule and actin filament (F-actin). Although mounting evidence demonstrates the role of F-actin in cortical cytoskeleton dynamics, it remains elusive as to the structure and function of F-actin-based networks in spindle geometry. Here we showed a ring-like F-actin structure surrounding the mitotic spindle which forms since metaphase and maintains in MG132-arrested metaphase HeLa cells. This cytoplasmic F-actin structure is relatively isotropic and less dynamic. Our computational modeling of spindle position process suggests a possible mechanism by which the ring-like F-actin structure can regulate astral microtubule dynamics and thus mitotic spindle orientation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting Plk1, Mps1 or Myosin, and disruption of microtubules or F-actin polymerization perturbs the formation of the ring-like F-actin structure and alters spindle position and symmetric division. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized but important link between mitotic spindle and ring-like F-actin network in accurate mitosis and enables the development of a method to theoretically illustrate the relationship between mitotic spindle and cytoplasmic F-actin. PMID:25299690

  18. Characterization of ring-like F-actin structure as a mechanical partner for spindle positioning in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huan; Zhao, Qun; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Tongge; Xia, Peng; Seffens, William; Aikhionbare, Felix; Wang, Dongmei; Dou, Zhen; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-01-01

    Proper spindle positioning and orientation are essential for accurate mitosis which requires dynamic interactions between microtubule and actin filament (F-actin). Although mounting evidence demonstrates the role of F-actin in cortical cytoskeleton dynamics, it remains elusive as to the structure and function of F-actin-based networks in spindle geometry. Here we showed a ring-like F-actin structure surrounding the mitotic spindle which forms since metaphase and maintains in MG132-arrested metaphase HeLa cells. This cytoplasmic F-actin structure is relatively isotropic and less dynamic. Our computational modeling of spindle position process suggests a possible mechanism by which the ring-like F-actin structure can regulate astral microtubule dynamics and thus mitotic spindle orientation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting Plk1, Mps1 or Myosin, and disruption of microtubules or F-actin polymerization perturbs the formation of the ring-like F-actin structure and alters spindle position and symmetric division. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized but important link between mitotic spindle and ring-like F-actin network in accurate mitosis and enables the development of a method to theoretically illustrate the relationship between mitotic spindle and cytoplasmic F-actin. PMID:25299690

  19. Surface Proteins of Gram-Positive Bacteria and Mechanisms of Their Targeting to the Cell Wall Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Navarre, William Wiley; Schneewind, Olaf

    1999-01-01

    The cell wall envelope of gram-positive bacteria is a macromolecular, exoskeletal organelle that is assembled and turned over at designated sites. The cell wall also functions as a surface organelle that allows gram-positive pathogens to interact with their environment, in particular the tissues of the infected host. All of these functions require that surface proteins and enzymes be properly targeted to the cell wall envelope. Two basic mechanisms, cell wall sorting and targeting, have been identified. Cell well sorting is the covalent attachment of surface proteins to the peptidoglycan via a C-terminal sorting signal that contains a consensus LPXTG sequence. More than 100 proteins that possess cell wall-sorting signals, including the M proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes, protein A of Staphylococcus aureus, and several internalins of Listeria monocytogenes, have been identified. Cell wall targeting involves the noncovalent attachment of proteins to the cell surface via specialized binding domains. Several of these wall-binding domains appear to interact with secondary wall polymers that are associated with the peptidoglycan, for example teichoic acids and polysaccharides. Proteins that are targeted to the cell surface include muralytic enzymes such as autolysins, lysostaphin, and phage lytic enzymes. Other examples for targeted proteins are the surface S-layer proteins of bacilli and clostridia, as well as virulence factors required for the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes (internalin B) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (PspA) infections. In this review we describe the mechanisms for both sorting and targeting of proteins to the envelope of gram-positive bacteria and review the functions of known surface proteins. PMID:10066836

  20. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  1. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  2. Computer-Generated Feedback on Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Paige

    2011-01-01

    A distinction must be made between "computer-generated scoring" and "computer-generated feedback". Computer-generated scoring refers to the provision of automated scores derived from mathematical models built on organizational, syntactic, and mechanical aspects of writing. In contrast, computer-generated feedback, the focus of this article, refers…

  3. Indirect human impacts turn off reciprocal feedbacks and decrease ecosystem resilience.

    PubMed

    Bertness, Mark D; Brisson, Caitlin P; Crotty, Sinead M

    2015-05-01

    Creek bank salt marsh die-off is a conservation problem in New England, driven by predator depletion, which releases herbivores from consumer control. Many marshes, however, have begun to recover from die-off. We examined the hypothesis that the loss of the foundation species Spartina alterniflora has decreased facilitator populations, weakening reciprocal positive plant/animal feedbacks, resilience, and slowing recovery. Field surveys and experiments revealed that loss of Spartina leads to decreased biodiversity, and increased mortality and decreased growth of the ribbed mussel Geukensia demissa, a key facilitator of Spartina. Experimental addition of Geukensia facilitators to creek banks accelerated Spartina recovery, showing that their loss limits recovery and the reciprocal feedbacks that drive community resilience. Reciprocal positive feedbacks involving foundation species, often lost to human impacts, may be a common, but generally overlooked mechanism of ecosystem resilience, making their reestablishment a valuable restoration tool. PMID:25432574

  4. Positive AGN feedback in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabala, Stanislav; Crockett, R. Mark; Kaviraj, Sugata

    2015-03-01

    We observed the inner filament of NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), using the F225W, F657N and F814W filters. We find a young stellar population near the south-west tip of the filament. We constrain the ages of these stars to 1-3 Myrs. No further recent star formation is found along the filament. We propose an updated explanation for the origin of the inner filament. It has been suggested Sutherland et al. 1993 that radio jets can shock the surrounding gas, giving rise to the observed optical line emission. We argue that such shocks can naturally arise due to a weak cocoon-driven bow shock (rather than from the radio jet directly) propagating through the diffuse interstellar medium. We suggest such a shock has overrun a molecular cloud, triggering star formation in the dense molecular core. The outer, more diffuse parts of the cloud are then ablated and shock heated, giving rise to the observed optical line and X-ray emission.

  5. Developing First-Year Engagement with Written Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramp, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Assessment feedback continues to be a relatively under-researched area in higher education despite its fundamental role in learning and teaching. This article positions assessment feedback as a complex meaning-making process requiring dialogue and interpretation.The article outlines an evaluative case study investigating a feedback review meeting…

  6. The BASL polarity protein controls a MAPK signaling feedback loop in asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Pengcheng; Shao, Wanchen; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Dong, Juan

    2015-04-20

    Cell polarization is linked to fate determination during asymmetric division of plant stem cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In Arabidopsis, BREAKING OF ASYMMETRY IN THE STOMATAL LINEAGE (BASL) is polarized to control stomatal asymmetric division. A mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade determines terminal stomatal fate by promoting the degradation of the lineage determinant SPEECHLESS (SPCH). Here, we demonstrate that a positive-feedback loop between BASL and the MAPK pathway constitutes a polarity module at the cortex. Cortical localization of BASL requires phosphorylation mediated by MPK3/6. Phosphorylated BASL functions as a scaffold and recruits the MAPKKK YODA and MPK3/6 to spatially concentrate signaling at the cortex. Activated MPK3/6 reinforces the feedback loop by phosphorylating BASL and inhibits stomatal fate by phosphorylating SPCH. Polarization of the BASL-MAPK signaling feedback module represents a mechanism connecting cell polarity to fate differentiation during asymmetric stem cell division in plants. PMID:25843888

  7. Student Engagement with Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jon; Shields, Cathy; Gardner, James; Hancock, Alysoun; Nutt, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This report considers Biological Sciences students' perceptions of feedback, compared with those of the University as a whole, this includes what forms of feedback were considered most useful and how feedback used. Compared with data from previous studies, Biological Sciences students gave much greater recognition to oral feedback, placing it on a…

  8. Preventing Feedback Fizzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Feedback is certainly about saying or writing helpful, learning-focused comments. But that is only part of it. What happens beforehand? What happens afterward? Feedback that is helpful and learning-focused fits into a context. Before a teacher gives feedback, students need to know the learning target so they have a purpose for using the feedback

  9. Feedback Cooling in Hybrid Atom-Optomechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, James; Madsen, Lars; Baker, Mark; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Bowen, Warwick

    2014-03-01

    Hybrid atom-optomechanical devices may be engineered such that a mesoscopic mechanical oscillator is sympathetically cooled by optically-mediated coupling to an atomic cloud, potentially to the motional ground state. Alternatively, one can cool the oscillator by measuring its position and applying a feedback force. Our modelling shows that an optimised classical derivative feedback scheme outperforms atomic sympathetic cooling over a wide range of experimental conditions. In the limit that all optical fields may be adiabatically eliminated from the description of the system we find an analytical power spectrum: integration of which indicates that both cooling strategies are capable of reaching temperatures near to the ground state, though in different parameter regimes. From this we obtain criteria which specify the optimum cooling strategy as a function of experimental specifications. Interestingly, it is never beneficial to combine the two cooling mechanisms. This finding implies that systems with sufficient optomechanical cooperativity are best cooled by feedback, with coupling to the atoms being reserved for later manipulations of the mechanical state. Conversely, sympathetic cooling is necessary if the optomechanical coupling rate is small.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of GABA(B) receptor activation: new insights from the mechanism of action of CGP7930, a positive allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Binet, V; Goudet, C; Brajon, C; Le Corre, L; Acher, F; Pin, J-P; Prézeau, L

    2004-11-01

    The GABA(B) (gamma-aminobutyric acid-B) receptor is composed of two subunits, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2). Both subunits share structural homology with other class-III G-protein-coupled receptors. They contain two main domains, a heptahelical domain typical of all G-protein-coupled receptors and a large ECD (extracellular domain). It has not been demonstrated whether the association of these two subunits is always required for function. However, GABA(B2) plays a major role in coupling with G-proteins, and GABA(B1) has been shown to bind GABA. To date, only ligands interacting with GABA(B1)-ECD have been identified. In the present study, we explored the mechanism of action of CGP7930, a compound described as a positive allosteric regulator of the GABA(B) receptor. We have shown that it can weakly activate the wild-type GABA(B) receptor, but also the GABA(B2) expressed alone, thus being the first described agonist of GABA(B2). CGP7930 retains its weak agonist activity on a GABA(B2) subunit deleted of its ECD. Thus the heptahelical domain of GABA(B2) behaves similar to a rhodopsin-like receptor. These results open new strategies for studying the mechanism of activation of GABA(B) receptor and examine any possible role of GABA(B2). PMID:15494037

  11. Feedback control of colloidal transport

    E-print Network

    R. Gernert; S. A. M. Loos; K. Lichtner; S. H. L. Klapp

    2015-11-02

    We review recent work on feedback control of one-dimensional colloidal systems, both with instantaneous feedback and with time delay. The feedback schemes are based on measurement of the average particle position, a natural control target for an ensemble of colloidal particles, and the systems are investigated via the Fokker-Planck equation for overdamped Brownian particles. Topics include the reversal of current and the emergence of current oscillations, transport in ratchet systems, and the enhancement of mobility by a co-moving trap. Beyond the commonly considered case of non-interacting systems, we also discuss the treatment of colloidal interactions via (dynamical) density functional theory and provide new results for systems with attractive interactions.

  12. Projected Regime Shift in Arctic Cloud and Water Vapor Feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yonghua; Miller, James R.; Francis, Jennifer; Russel, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic climate is changing faster than any other large-scale region on Earth. A variety of positive feedback mechanisms are responsible for the amplification, most of which are linked with changes in snow and ice cover, surface temperature (T(sub s)), atmospheric water vapor (WV), and cloud properties. As greenhouse gases continue to accumulate in the atmosphere, air temperature and water vapor content also increase, leading to a warmer surface and ice loss, which further enhance evaporation and WV. Many details of these interrelated feedbacks are poorly understood, yet are essential for understanding the pace and regional variations in future Arctic change. We use a global climate model (Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Atmosphere-Ocean Model) to examine several components of these feedbacks, how they vary by season, and how they are projected to change through the 21st century. One positive feedback begins with an increase in T(sub s) that produces an increase in WV, which in turn increases the downward longwave flux (DLF) and T(sub s), leading to further evaporation. Another associates the expected increases in cloud cover and optical thickness with increasing DLF and T(sub s). We examine the sensitivities between DLF and other climate variables in these feedbacks and find that they are strongest in the non-summer seasons, leading to the largest amplification in Ts during these months. Later in the 21st century, however, DLF becomes less sensitive to changes in WV and cloud optical thickness, as they cause the atmosphere to emit longwave radiation more nearly as a black body. This regime shift in sensitivity implies that the amplified pace of Arctic change relative to the northern hemisphere could relax in the future.

  13. Applications of Feedback Control in Quantum Systems

    E-print Network

    Kurt Jacobs

    2006-05-02

    We give an introduction to feedback control in quantum systems, as well as an overview of the variety of applications which have been explored to date. This introductory review is aimed primarily at control theorists unfamiliar with quantum mechanics, but should also be useful to quantum physicists interested in applications of feedback control. We explain how feedback in quantum systems differs from that in traditional classical systems, and how in certain cases the results from modern optimal control theory can be applied directly to quantum systems. In addition to noise reduction and stabilization, an important application of feedback in quantum systems is adaptive measurement, and we discuss the various applications of adaptive measurements. We finish by describing specific examples of the application of feedback control to cooling and state-preparation in nano-electro-mechanical systems and single trapped atoms.

  14. Influence of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Myocardial Strain Assessed by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Faltoni, Agnese; Cameli, Matteo; Muzzi, Luigi; Lisi, Matteo; Cubattoli, Lucia; Cecchini, Sofia; Mondillo, Sergio; Biagioli, Bonizella

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The effects of mechanical ventilation (MV) on speckle tracking echocardiography- (STE-)derived variables are not elucidated. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) ventilation on 4-chamber longitudinal strain (LS) analysis by STE. Methods. We studied 20 patients admitted to a mixed intensive care unit who required intubation for MV and PEEP titration due to hypoxia. STE was performed at three times: (T1) PEEP = 5?cmH2O; (T2) PEEP = 10?cmH2O; and (T3) PEEP = 15?cmH2O. STE analysis was performed offline using a dedicated software (XStrain MyLab 70 Xvision, Esaote). Results. Left peak atrial-longitudinal strain (LS) was significantly reduced from T1 to T2 and from T2 to T3 (P < 0.05). Right peak atrial-LS and right ventricular-LS showed a significant reduction only at T3 (P < 0.05). Left ventricular-LS did not change significantly during titration of PEEP. Cardiac chambers' volumes showed a significant reduction at higher levels of PEEP (P < 0.05). Conclusions. We demonstrated for the first time that incremental PEEP affects myocardial strain values obtained with STE in intubated critically ill patients. Whenever performing STE in mechanically ventilated patients, care must be taken when PEEP is higher than 10?cmH2O to avoid misinterpreting data and making erroneous decisions. PMID:24066303

  15. 360 Degree Feedback: An Integrative Framework for Learning and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tee, Ding Ding; Ahmed, Pervaiz K.

    2014-01-01

    Feedback is widely acknowledged as the crux of a learning process. Multiplicities of research studies have been advanced to address the common "cri de coeur" of teachers and students for a constructive and effective feedback mechanism in the current higher educational settings. Nevertheless, existing pedagogical approaches in feedback

  16. Tenure-Track Faculty Position in Dynamical Systems and Controls The Mechanical Engineering Department at Wayne State University invites candidates to apply

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    -Track Faculty Position Announcement in Internal Combustion Engines The Mechanical Engineering Department of internal combustion engines. We expect to make the appointment at the Assistant Professor level by August 2016 in mechanical engineering with a concentration in internal combustion engines and related

  17. Tactile feedback improves auditory spatial localization.

    PubMed

    Gori, Monica; Vercillo, Tiziana; Sandini, Giulio; Burr, David

    2014-01-01

    Our recent studies suggest that congenitally blind adults have severely impaired thresholds in an auditory spatial bisection task, pointing to the importance of vision in constructing complex auditory spatial maps (Gori et al., 2014). To explore strategies that may improve the auditory spatial sense in visually impaired people, we investigated the impact of tactile feedback on spatial auditory localization in 48 blindfolded sighted subjects. We measured auditory spatial bisection thresholds before and after training, either with tactile feedback, verbal feedback, or no feedback. Audio thresholds were first measured with a spatial bisection task: subjects judged whether the second sound of a three sound sequence was spatially closer to the first or the third sound. The tactile feedback group underwent two audio-tactile feedback sessions of 100 trials, where each auditory trial was followed by the same spatial sequence played on the subject's forearm; auditory spatial bisection thresholds were evaluated after each session. In the verbal feedback condition, the positions of the sounds were verbally reported to the subject after each feedback trial. The no feedback group did the same sequence of trials, with no feedback. Performance improved significantly only after audio-tactile feedback. The results suggest that direct tactile feedback interacts with the auditory spatial localization system, possibly by a process of cross-sensory recalibration. Control tests with the subject rotated suggested that this effect occurs only when the tactile and acoustic sequences are spatially congruent. Our results suggest that the tactile system can be used to recalibrate the auditory sense of space. These results encourage the possibility of designing rehabilitation programs to help blind persons establish a robust auditory sense of space, through training with the tactile modality. PMID:25368587

  18. MAPK Cascades as Feedback Amplifiers

    E-print Network

    Herbert M Sauro; Brian Ingalls

    2007-10-26

    Interconvertible enzyme cascades, exemplified by the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, are a frequent mechanism in signal transduction pathways. There has been much speculation as to the role of these pathways, and how their structure is related to their function. A common conclusion is that the cascades serve to amplify biochemical signals so that a single bound ligand molecule might produce a multitude of second messengers. Some recent work has focused on a particular feature present in some MAPK pathways -- a negative feedback loop which spans the length of the cascade. This is a feature that is shared by a man-made engineering device, the feedback amplifier. We propose a novel interpretation: that by wrapping a feedback loop around an amplifier, these cascades may be acting as biochemical feedback amplifiers which imparts i) increased robustness with respect to internal perturbations; ii) a linear graded response over an extended operating range; iii) insulation from external perturbation, resulting in functional modularization. We also report on the growing list of experimental evidence which supports a graded response of MAPK with respect to Epidermal Growth Factor. This evidence supports our hypothesis that in these circumstances MAPK cascade, may be acting as a feedback amplifier.

  19. A self-oscillation mode in a mechanical system with rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharenko, V. I.

    1985-07-01

    The feedback mechanism underlying the generation of self-oscillations during the braking of rolling wheels is determined. These self-oscillations appear to be wheel shimmy, but, in contrast to shimmy, the energy input to the vibrational system depends on changes in the braking moments at the wheels determined by lateral motion. The feedback is formed by an additional loop made up by the working fluid in the line of the wheel brake system and the elastic elements of the brakes. Under certain conditions, the feedback is positive; its efficiency noticeably increases in the case of resonance, contributing to a possible loss of stability. A mathematical model describing the feedback is presented.

  20. Clustering and Negative Feedback by Endocytosis in Planar Cell Polarity Signaling Is Modulated by Ubiquitinylation of Prickle

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Bomsoo; Pierre-Louis, Gandhy; Sagner, Andreas; Eaton, Suzanne; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The core components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling system, including both transmembrane and peripheral membrane associated proteins, form asymmetric complexes that bridge apical intercellular junctions. While these can assemble in either orientation, coordinated cell polarization requires the enrichment of complexes of a given orientation at specific junctions. This might occur by both positive and negative feedback between oppositely oriented complexes, and requires the peripheral membrane associated PCP components. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying feedback are not understood. We find that the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex Cullin1(Cul1)/SkpA/Supernumerary limbs(Slimb) regulates the stability of one of the peripheral membrane components, Prickle (Pk). Excess Pk disrupts PCP feedback and prevents asymmetry. We show that Pk participates in negative feedback by mediating internalization of PCP complexes containing the transmembrane components Van Gogh (Vang) and Flamingo (Fmi), and that internalization is activated by oppositely oriented complexes within clusters. Pk also participates in positive feedback through an unknown mechanism promoting clustering. Our results therefore identify a molecular mechanism underlying generation of asymmetry in PCP signaling. PMID:25996914

  1. Design and calibration of a 2-axis haptic force feedback joystick

    E-print Network

    Pritchett, Will (Will Grey)

    2015-01-01

    The development of multi-axis force feedback joysticks enables mechanically coupled systems to be recreated by electronically coupled systems. A study of haptic force feedback systems was performed. A four-arm joint mechanism ...

  2. Modelling human balance using switched systems with linear feedback control.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Glendinning, Paul; Brown, Martin; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo; Dallali, Houman; Shapiro, Jonathan

    2012-02-01

    We are interested in understanding the mechanisms behind and the character of the sway motion of healthy human subjects during quiet standing. We assume that a human body can be modelled as a single-link inverted pendulum, and the balance is achieved using linear feedback control. Using these assumptions, we derive a switched model which we then investigate. Stable periodic motions (limit cycles) about an upright position are found. The existence of these limit cycles is studied as a function of system parameters. The exploration of the parameter space leads to the detection of multi-stability and homoclinic bifurcations. PMID:21697168

  3. Give Better Feedback on Engineering Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Robert, Jr.; Graham, Tony; Kapur, Arjun; Rhodes, Craig; Blackwell, Ellinor

    2005-01-01

    Most, if not all, systems have a mechanism that collects information to facilitate monitoring performance. This information is primarily used to modify the system to make it more efficient in performing desired tasks and, thus, attaining desired results. Similar to electrical, mechanical, or hydraulic systems, the feedback mechanism in an…

  4. Adaptation of reflexive feedback during arm posture to different environments.

    PubMed

    de Vlugt, Erwin; Schouten, Alfred C; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2002-07-01

    In this study we have examined the ability of the central nervous system (CNS) to use spinal reflexes to minimize displacements during postural control while continuous force perturbations were applied at the hand. The subjects were instructed to minimize the displacements of the hand from a reference position that resulted from the force perturbations. The perturbations were imposed in one direction by means of a hydraulic manipulator of which the virtual mass and damping were varied. Resistance to the perturbations came from intrinsic and reflexive stiffness, and from the virtual environment. It is hypothesized that reflexive feedback during posture maintenance is optimally adjusted such that position deviations are minimal for a given virtual environment. Frequency response functions were estimated, capturing all mechanical properties of the arm at the end point (hand) level. Intrinsic and reflexive parameters were quantified by fitting a linear neuromuscular model to the frequency responses. The reflexive length feedback gain increased strongly with damping and little with the eigenfrequency of the total combined system (i.e. arm plus environment). The reflexive velocity feedback gain decreased slightly with relative damping at the largest eigenfrequency and more markedly at smaller eigenfrequencies. In the case of highest reflex gains, the total system remained stable and sufficiently damped while the responses of only the arm were severely underdamped and sometimes even unstable. To further analyse these results, a model optimization was performed. Intrinsic and reflexive parameters were optimized such that two criterion functions were minimized. The first concerns performance and penalized hand displacements from a reference point. The second one weights afferent control effort to avoid inefficient feedback. The simulations showed good similarities with the estimated values. Length feedback was adequately predicted by the model for all conditions. The predicted velocity feedback gains were larger in all cases, probably indicating a mutual gain limiting relation between length and velocity afferent signals. The results suggest that both reflex gains seem to be adjusted by the CNS, where in particular the length feedback gain was optimal so as to maximize performance at minimum control effort. PMID:12111265

  5. Native and non-native ruderals experience similar plant-soil feedbacks and neighbor effects in a system where they coexist.

    PubMed

    Chiuffo, Mariana C; MacDougall, Andrew S; Hierro, José L

    2015-11-01

    Recent applications of coexistence theory to plant invasions posit that non-natives establish in resident communities through either niche differences or traits conferring them with fitness advantages, the former being associated with coexistence and the latter with dominance and competitive exclusion. Plant-soil feedback is a mechanism that is known to explain both coexistence and dominance. In a system where natives and non-natives appear to coexist, we explored how plant-soil feedbacks affect the performance of nine native and nine non-native ruderal species-the prevalent life-history strategy among non-natives-when grown alone and with a phytometer. We also conducted field samplings to estimate the abundance of the 18 species, and related feedbacks to abundances. We found that groups of native and non-native ruderals displayed similar frequencies of negative, positive, and neutral feedbacks, resulting in no detectable differences between natives and non-natives. Likewise, the phytometer exerted comparable negative impacts on native and non-native plants, which were unchanged by plant-soil feedbacks. Finally, feedbacks explained plant abundances only after removing one influential species which exhibited strong positive feedbacks but low abundance. Importantly, however, four out of five species with negative feedbacks were rare in the field. These findings suggest that soil feedbacks and plant-plant interactions do not confer an advantage to non-native over native species, but do contribute to the observed coexistence of these groups in the system. By comparing natives and non-natives with overlapping abundances and strategies, our work broadens understanding of the consequences of plant-soil feedbacks in plant invasion and, more generally, coexistence within plant communities. PMID:26209047

  6. Effect of prone positioning during mechanical ventilation on mortality among patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Sachin; Friedrich, Jan O.; Adhikari, Neill K. J.; Taccone, Paolo; Mancebo, Jordi; Polli, Federico; Latini, Roberto; Pesenti, Antonio; Curley, Martha A.Q.; Fernandez, Rafael; Chan, Ming-Cheng; Beuret, Pascal; Voggenreiter, Gregor; Sud, Maneesh; Tognoni, Gianni; Gattinoni, Luciano; Guérin, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mechanical ventilation in the prone position is used to improve oxygenation and to mitigate the harmful effects of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We sought to determine the effect of prone positioning on mortality among patients with ARDS receiving protective lung ventilation. Methods: We searched electronic databases and conference proceedings to identify relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published through August 2013. We included RCTs that compared prone and supine positioning during mechanical ventilation in patients with ARDS. We assessed risk of bias and obtained data on all-cause mortality (determined at hospital discharge or, if unavailable, after longest follow-up period). We used random-effects models for the pooled analyses. Results: We identified 11 RCTs (n = 2341) that met our inclusion criteria. In the 6 trials (n = 1016) that used a protective ventilation strategy with reduced tidal volumes, prone positioning significantly reduced mortality (risk ratio 0.74, 95% confidence interval 0.59–0.95; I2 = 29%) compared with supine positioning. The mortality benefit remained in several sensitivity analyses. The overall quality of evidence was high. The risk of bias was low in all of the trials except one, which was small. Statistical heterogeneity was low (I2 < 50%) for most of the clinical and physiologic outcomes. Interpretation: Our analysis of high-quality evidence showed that use of the prone position during mechanical ventilation improved survival among patients with ARDS who received protective lung ventilation. PMID:24863923

  7. Potential mechanism of corpus-predominant gastritis after PPI therapy in Helicobacter pylori-positive patients with GERD.

    PubMed

    Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hagiwara, Tadashi; Nakayama, Takahisa; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-14

    The long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) exacerbates corpus atrophic gastritis in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. To identify a potential mechanism for this change, we discuss interactions between pH, bile acids, and H. pylori. Duodenogastric reflux, which includes bile, occurs in healthy individuals, and bile reflux is increased in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diluted human plasma and bile acids have been found to be significant chemoattractants and chemorepellents, respectively, for the bacillus H. pylori. Although only taurine conjugates, with a pKa of 1.8-1.9, are soluble in an acidic environment, glycine conjugates, with a pKa of 4.3-5.2, as well as taurine-conjugated bile acids are soluble in the presence of PPI therapy. Thus, the soluble bile acid concentrations in the gastric contents of patients with GERD after continuous PPI therapy are considerably higher than that in those with intact acid production. In the distal stomach, the high concentration of soluble bile acids is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori. In contrast, the mucous layer in the proximal stomach has an optimal bile concentration that forms chemotactic gradients with plasma components required to direct H. pylori to the epithelial surface. H. pylori may then colonize in the stomach body rather than in the pyloric antrum, which may explain the occurrence of corpus-predominant gastritis after PPI therapy in H. pylori-positive patients with GERD. PMID:25232231

  8. Potential mechanism of corpus-predominant gastritis after PPI therapy in Helicobacter pylori-positive patients with GERD

    PubMed Central

    Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hagiwara, Tadashi; Nakayama, Takahisa; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) exacerbates corpus atrophic gastritis in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. To identify a potential mechanism for this change, we discuss interactions between pH, bile acids, and H. pylori. Duodenogastric reflux, which includes bile, occurs in healthy individuals, and bile reflux is increased in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diluted human plasma and bile acids have been found to be significant chemoattractants and chemorepellents, respectively, for the bacillus H. pylori. Although only taurine conjugates, with a pKa of 1.8-1.9, are soluble in an acidic environment, glycine conjugates, with a pKa of 4.3-5.2, as well as taurine-conjugated bile acids are soluble in the presence of PPI therapy. Thus, the soluble bile acid concentrations in the gastric contents of patients with GERD after continuous PPI therapy are considerably higher than that in those with intact acid production. In the distal stomach, the high concentration of soluble bile acids is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori. In contrast, the mucous layer in the proximal stomach has an optimal bile concentration that forms chemotactic gradients with plasma components required to direct H. pylori to the epithelial surface. H. pylori may then colonize in the stomach body rather than in the pyloric antrum, which may explain the occurrence of corpus-predominant gastritis after PPI therapy in H. pylori-positive patients with GERD. PMID:25232231

  9. A Connection Model between the Positioning Mechanism and Ultrasonic Measurement System via a Web Browser to Assess Acoustic Target Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Ken; Imaizumi, Tomohito; Abe, Koki; Takao, Yoshimi; Tamura, Shuko

    This paper details a network-controlled measurement system for use in fisheries engineering. The target strength (TS) of fish is important in order to convert acoustic integration values obtained during acoustic surveys into estimates of fish abundance. The target strength pattern is measured with the combination of the rotation system for the aspect of the sample and the echo data acquisition system using the underwater supersonic wave. The user interface of the network architecture is designed for collaborative use with researchers in other organizations. The flexible network architecture is based on the web direct-access model for the rotation mechanism. The user interface is available for monitoring and controlling via a web browser that is installed in any terminal PC (personal computer). Previously the combination of two applications was performed not by a web browser but by the exclusive interface program. So a connection model is proposed between two applications by indirect communication via the DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model) server and added in the web direct-access model. A prompt report system in the TS measurement system and a positioning and measurement system using an electric flatcar via a web browser are developed. By a secure network architecture, DCOM communications via both Intranet and LAN are successfully certificated.

  10. Passage Feedback with IRIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Kiduk; Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Newby, Gregory B.

    2001-01-01

    Compares a user-defined passage feedback system to a document feedback system for information retrieval, based on TREC (Text Retrieval Conference) guidelines. Highlights include a description of IRIS, an interactive retrieval system; text processing; ranking; term weights; feedback models, including the adaptive linear model; and suggestions for…

  11. Cultivating Engagement and Enjoyment in Exergames Using Feedback, Challenge, and Rewards

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article reviews theoretical and empirical evidence related to three mechanisms for encouraging enjoyment during exergame play: Feedback, challenge, and rewards. Materials and Methods: A literature search and narrative review were conducted. Results: Feedback is found in nearly all exergames, and richer, more in-depth feedback is associated with increased activity. Challenge is a vital component of any videogame, and exergames include physical as well as cognitive challenges. Flow states have traditionally been conceptualized as occurring when an optimal match between player skills and game challenge occurs. However, failure and retrial are necessary for feelings of overall satisfaction and fun, despite not necessarily being ideally fun or satisfying themselves. Rewards are a more complicated issue, with significant theoretical and empirical evidence suggesting positive and negative effects of reward systems. How rewards are integrated into the mechanics and storyline of the game likely impacts how they are perceived and, thus, their effectiveness. Finally, integration of these mechanisms into exergames requires specific attention to both cognitive and physical implementations. Movements that are not themselves enjoyable or engaging may lead to cheating and lower energy expenditure. Conclusions: Feedback, challenge, and rewards are promising mechanisms by which exergames could become more enjoyable. How these concepts are operationalized can affect physical and psychological reactions to exergames. Attention to these concepts in future exergame development and implementation would benefit theory, research, and practice. PMID:26181675

  12. Audio Feedback to Physiotherapy Students for Viva Voce: How Effective Is "The Living Voice"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munro, Wendy; Hollingworth, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Assessment and feedback remains one of the categories that students are least satisfied with within the United Kingdom National Student Survey. The Student Charter promotes the use of various formats of feedback to enhance student learning. This study evaluates the use of audio MP3 as an alternative feedback mechanism to written feedback for…

  13. Spontaneous cell polarization: Feedback control of Cdc42 GTPase breaks cellular symmetry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sophie G

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous polarization without spatial cues, or symmetry breaking, is a fundamental problem of spatial organization in biological systems. This question has been extensively studied using yeast models, which revealed the central role of the small GTPase switch Cdc42. Active Cdc42-GTP forms a coherent patch at the cell cortex, thought to result from amplification of a small initial stochastic inhomogeneity through positive feedback mechanisms, which induces cell polarization. Here, I review and discuss the mechanisms of Cdc42 activity self-amplification and dynamic turnover. A robust Cdc42 patch is formed through the combined effects of Cdc42 activity promoting its own activation and active Cdc42-GTP displaying reduced membrane detachment and lateral diffusion compared to inactive Cdc42-GDP. I argue the role of the actin cytoskeleton in symmetry breaking is not primarily to transport Cdc42 to the active site. Finally, negative feedback and competition mechanisms serve to control the number of polarization sites. PMID:26338468

  14. Feedbacks and Acceleration of Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, William

    2014-05-01

    The burning of fossil fuels since the beginning of the Industrial revolution has increased the level of atmospheric CO2 by about 45 % over that of earlier times. The increasing greenhouse effect is augmented by a series of feedbacks; most have been positive, but a few are negative. The most important are 1) Slowing of the thermohaline circulation system; 2) Decreasing Atlantic to Pacific vapor transport; 3) Increasing Arctic river runoff; 4) Melting of Arctic sea ice; 5) Periodic replacement of the Arctic atmospheric high by a cyclonic low pressure system; 6) Increased exchange of waters between the Arctic and North Atlantic; 7) Lessening of the Northern Hemisphere ice-albedo feedback effect; 8) Addition of methane from melting permafrost; 9) Overall changes in the rate of ocean mixing; 10) Overall changes in vegetation cover of land; 11) Increase in the area covered by C4 vegetation; 12) Addition of nitrous oxide from agricultural practices; 13) Changes in insect populations and their effect on vegetation; 14) Wildfires; 15) Soot accumulation on snow and ice; 16) Accelerated melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet; 17) Changes in the East Antarctic Ice Sheet; 18) Closing of the ozone hole over Antarctica; 19) Decay of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet; 20) Expansion of Southern Ocean sea ice; 21) Slowing of the rate of organic matter sinking into the deep ocean; 22) Decrease in insolation reaching the surface of the Earth as a result of introduction of aerosols into the atmosphere; 23) Depletion of stratospheric ozone by nitrous oxide. The global and regional effects and relative importance of many of these feedbacks are uncertain, and they may change both in magnitude and sign with time. New and unexpected mechanisms are constantly being discovered. The uncertainties and complexity associated with climate system feedbacks are responsible for the acceleration of climate change beyond the rates predicted by numerical modeling. To add to the difficulties inherent in predictions of future climate change, the increasingly chaotic weather is an indication that the Earth's climate system is becoming unstable in response to the ongoing perturbations.

  15. Effects of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion, Solar UV Radiation, and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change modulates the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, particularly for carbon cycling, resulting in UV-mediated positive or negative feedbacks on climate. Possible positive feedbacks discussed in this assessment...

  16. In vitro detection of adrenocorticotropic hormone levels by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy immunoassay for mathematical modeling of glucocorticoid-mediated feedback mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Performing quantitative, highly sensitive measurements at a single molecule level is often necessary to address specific issues related to complex molecular and biochemical systems. For that purpose, we present a technique exploiting both the flexibility of immunoassays as well as the low operating costs and high throughput rates of the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) method. That way we have established a quantitative measurement technique providing accurate and flexibly time resolved data of single molecules. Nanomolar changes in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels have been detected in a short time-frame that are caused by fast feedback actions in AtT-20 anterior pituitary glands in vitro. Especially with respect to clinical diagnostic or mathematical modeling this improved FCS setup may be of high relevance in order to accurately quantify the amounts of peptide hormones—such as ACTH—as well as signaling molecules, transcription factors, etc., being involved in intra- and extracellular reaction networks. PMID:23102048

  17. The Power of Positional Competition and Market Mechanism: An Empirical Study of Parental Choice of Junior Middle School in Nanning, P. R. China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xiaoxin

    2011-01-01

    School choice has been actively exercised by mostly middle class parents and "key" schools in many places in China, each obtaining what they want: school places and funds, respectively. The aims of this study were to explore the impact of positional competition in school choice and explore the effect of market mechanisms in the resulting school…

  18. Randomised prior feedback modulates neural signals of outcome monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Faisal; Wilkie, Richard M; Mon-Williams, Mark A; Schaefer, Alexandre

    2016-01-15

    Substantial evidence indicates that decision outcomes are typically evaluated relative to expectations learned from relatively long sequences of previous outcomes. This mechanism is thought to play a key role in general learning and adaptation processes but relatively little is known about the determinants of outcome evaluation when the capacity to learn from series of prior events is difficult or impossible. To investigate this issue, we examined how the feedback-related negativity (FRN) is modulated by information briefly presented before outcome evaluation. The FRN is a brain potential time-locked to the delivery of decision feedback and it is widely thought to be sensitive to prior expectations. We conducted a multi-trial gambling task in which outcomes at each trial were fully randomised to minimise the capacity to learn from long sequences of prior outcomes. Event-related potentials for outcomes (Win/Loss) in the current trial (Outcomet) were separated according to the type of outcomes that occurred in the preceding two trials (Outcomet-1 and Outcomet-2). We found that FRN voltage was more positive during the processing of win feedback when it was preceded by wins at Outcomet-1 compared to win feedback preceded by losses at Outcomet-1. However, no influence of preceding outcomes was found on FRN activity relative to the processing of loss feedback. We also found no effects of Outcomet-2 on FRN amplitude relative to current feedback. Additional analyses indicated that this effect was largest for trials in which participants selected a decision different to the gamble chosen in the previous trial. These findings are inconsistent with models that solely relate the FRN to prediction error computation. Instead, our results suggest that if stable predictions about future events are weak or non-existent, then outcome processing can be determined by affective systems. More specifically, our results indicate that the FRN is likely to reflect the activity of positive affective systems in these contexts. Importantly, our findings indicate that a multifactorial explanation of the nature of the FRN is necessary and such an account must incorporate affective and motivational factors in outcome processing. PMID:26497268

  19. Mechanism based neurotoxicity of mGlu5 positive allosteric modulators--development challenges for a promising novel antipsychotic target.

    PubMed

    Parmentier-Batteur, Sophie; Hutson, Peter H; Menzel, Karsten; Uslaner, Jason M; Mattson, Britta A; O'Brien, Julie A; Magliaro, Brian C; Forest, Thomas; Stump, Craig A; Tynebor, Robert M; Anthony, Neville J; Tucker, Thomas J; Zhang, Xu-Fang; Gomez, Robert; Huszar, Sarah L; Lambeng, Nathalie; Fauré, H; Le Poul, Emannuel; Poli, Sonia; Rosahl, Thomas W; Rocher, Jean-Philippe; Hargreaves, Richard; Williams, Theresa M

    2014-07-01

    Previous work has suggested that activation of mGlu5 receptor augments NMDA receptor function and thereby may constitute a rational approach addressing glutamate hypofunction in schizophrenia and a target for novel antipsychotic drug development. Here, we report the in vitro activity, in vivo efficacy and safety profile of 5PAM523 (4-Fluorophenyl){(2R,5S)-5-[5-(5-fluoropyridin-2-yl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]-2-methylpiperidin-1-yl}methanone), a structurally novel positive allosteric modulator selective of mGlu5. In cells expressing human mGlu5 receptor, 5PAM523 potentiated threshold responses to glutamate in fluorometric calcium assays, but does not have any intrinsic agonist activity. 5PAM523 acts as an allosteric modulator as suggested by the binding studies showing that 5PAM523 did not displace the binding of the orthosteric ligand quisqualic acid, but did partially compete with the negative allosteric modulator, MPyEP. In vivo, 5PAM523 reversed amphetamine-induced locomotor activity in rats. Therefore, both the in vitro and in vivo data demonstrate that 5PAM523 acts as a selective mGlu5 PAM and exhibits anti-psychotic like activity. To study the potential for adverse effects and particularly neurotoxicity, brain histopathological exams were performed in rats treated for 4 days with 5PAM523 or vehicle. The brain exam revealed moderate to severe neuronal necrosis in the rats treated with the doses of 30 and 50 mg/kg, particularly in the auditory cortex and hippocampus. To investigate whether this neurotoxicity is mechanism specific to 5PAM523, similar safety studies were carried out with three other structurally distinct selective mGlu5 PAMs. Results revealed a comparable pattern of neuronal cell death. Finally, 5PAM523 was tested in mGlu5 knock-out (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. mGlu5 WT mice treated with 5PAM523 for 4 days at 100 mg/kg presented significant neuronal death in the auditory cortex and hippocampus. Conversely, mGlu5 KO mice did not show any neuronal loss by histopathology, suggesting that enhancement of mGlu5 function is responsible for the toxicity of 5PAM523. This study reveals for the first time that augmentation of mGlu5 function with selective allosteric modulators results in neurotoxicity. PMID:23291536

  20. Chromatin targeting signals, nucleosome positioning mechanism and non-coding RNA-mediated regulation of the chromatin remodeling complex NoRC.

    PubMed

    Manelyte, Laura; Strohner, Ralf; Gross, Thomas; Längst, Gernot

    2014-03-01

    Active and repressed ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are characterised by specific epigenetic marks and differentially positioned nucleosomes at their promoters. Repression of the rRNA genes requires a non-coding RNA (pRNA) and the presence of the nucleolar remodeling complex (NoRC). ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes are essential regulators of DNA-dependent processes, and this regulation occurs via the modulation of DNA accessibility in chromatin. We have studied the targeting of NoRC to the rRNA gene promoter; its mechanism of nucleosome positioning, in which a nucleosome is placed over the transcription initiation site; and the functional role of the pRNA. We demonstrate that NoRC is capable of recognising and binding to the nucleosomal rRNA gene promoter on its own and binds with higher affinity the nucleosomes positioned at non-repressive positions. NoRC recognises the promoter nucleosome within a chromatin array and positions the nucleosomes, as observed in vivo. NoRC uses the release mechanism of positioning, which is characterised by a reduced affinity for the remodeled substrate. The pRNA specifically binds to NoRC and regulates the enzyme by switching off its ATPase activity. Given the known role of pRNA in tethering NoRC to the rDNA, we propose that pRNA is a key factor that links the chromatin modification activity and scaffolding function of NoRC. PMID:24651573

  1. Chromatin Targeting Signals, Nucleosome Positioning Mechanism and Non-Coding RNA-Mediated Regulation of the Chromatin Remodeling Complex NoRC

    PubMed Central

    Manelyte, Laura; Strohner, Ralf; Gross, Thomas; Längst, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Active and repressed ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are characterised by specific epigenetic marks and differentially positioned nucleosomes at their promoters. Repression of the rRNA genes requires a non-coding RNA (pRNA) and the presence of the nucleolar remodeling complex (NoRC). ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes are essential regulators of DNA-dependent processes, and this regulation occurs via the modulation of DNA accessibility in chromatin. We have studied the targeting of NoRC to the rRNA gene promoter; its mechanism of nucleosome positioning, in which a nucleosome is placed over the transcription initiation site; and the functional role of the pRNA. We demonstrate that NoRC is capable of recognising and binding to the nucleosomal rRNA gene promoter on its own and binds with higher affinity the nucleosomes positioned at non-repressive positions. NoRC recognises the promoter nucleosome within a chromatin array and positions the nucleosomes, as observed in vivo. NoRC uses the release mechanism of positioning, which is characterised by a reduced affinity for the remodeled substrate. The pRNA specifically binds to NoRC and regulates the enzyme by switching off its ATPase activity. Given the known role of pRNA in tethering NoRC to the rDNA, we propose that pRNA is a key factor that links the chromatin modification activity and scaffolding function of NoRC. PMID:24651573

  2. Ionisation Feedback in Star and Cluster Formation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolano, Barbara; Gritschneder, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    Feedback from photoionisation may dominate on parsec scales in massive star-forming regions. Such feedback may inhibit or enhance the star formation efficiency and sustain or even drive turbulence in the parent molecular cloud. Photoionisation feedback may also provide a mechanism for the rapid expulsion of gas from young clusters' potentials, often invoked as the main cause of `infant mortality'. There is currently no agreement, however, with regards to the efficiency of this process and how environment may affect the direction (positive or negative) in which it proceeds. The study of the photoionisation process as part of hydrodynamical simulations is key to understanding these issues, however, due to the computational demand of the problem, crude approximations for the radiation transfer are often employed. We will briefly review some of the most commonly used approximations and discuss their major drawbacks. We will then present the results of detailed tests carried out using the detailed photoionisation code mocassin and the SPH+ionisation code iVINE code, aimed at understanding the error introduced by the simplified photoionisation algorithms. This is particularly relevant as a number of new codes have recently been developed along those lines. We will finally propose a new approach that should allow to efficiently and self-consistently treat the photoionisation problem for complex radiation and density fields.

  3. Feedback effect on flute dynamics in a mirror machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of active feedback on flute instability is experimentally studied in a table-top mirror machine. Changing the plasma conditions from mirror-loss dominated to flute-loss dominated, it is demonstrated that while the feedback has no effect on plasma density in the first case, it increases the plasma density by up to 50% in the second case. Measurements of the dependence of instability amplitude on feedback gain show that large gain stimulates high frequency perturbations. The period of these perturbations corresponds to the inherent delay of immersed electrode feedback. Variation of the spatial phase between the input and output of the phase reveals a large asymmetry between positive and negative phase shifts. A simplified model is introduced to explain how a negative phase shift causes positive feedback between the external feedback and the centrifugally driven rotation.

  4. Cirrus feedback on interannual climate fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.; Dessler, A. E.; Zelinka, M. D.; Yang, P.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-28

    Cirrus clouds are not only important in determining the current climate, but also play an important role in climate change and variability. Analysis of satellite observations shows that the amount and altitude of cirrus clouds (optical depth <3.6, cloud top pressure <440 hPa) increase in response to inter-annual surface warming. Thus, cirrus clouds are likely to act as a positive feedback on short-term climate fluctuations, by reducing the planet’s ability to radiate longwave radiation to space in response to planetary surface warming. Using cirrus cloud radiative kernels, the magnitude of cirrus feedback is estimated to be 0.20±0.21W/m2/°C, which is comparable to the surface albedo feedback. Most of the cirrus feedback comes from increasing cloud amount in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and subtropical upper troposphere.

  5. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  6. Thermocline Feedback Influence on Indian Ocean Dipole Skewness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, B.; Cai, W.; Walsh, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    A positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) tends to have stronger cold sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) over the eastern Indian Ocean with greater impacts than warm SSTAs that occur during its negative phase. These impacts from positive IODs range from drought over Australia and Indonesia, to flooding over East Africa and India. Two feedbacks have been suggested as the cause of positive IOD skewness, a positive Bjerknes feedback and a negative SST-cloud-radiation (SCR) feedback, but their relative importance is debated. Using models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and inter-model statistics, we show that the most important process for IOD skewness is an asymmetry in the thermocline feedback, whereby SSTAs respond to thermocline depth anomalies more strongly during the positive phase than negative phase. This asymmetric thermocline feedback drives IOD skewness despite positive IODs receiving greater damping from the SCR feedback. In response to global warming, although the thermocline feedback strengthens, its asymmetry between positive and negative IODs weakens. This behaviour change explains the reduction in IOD skewness that many models display under global warming.

  7. Positive mental training: efficacy, experience and underlying mechanisms of a health promotion intervention for resilience and wellbeing in the workplace 

    E-print Network

    Ross, Sheila

    2015-07-03

    There is a growing interest in brief, low-cost workplace health promotion interventions for wellbeing, which target increasing resilience, mindfulness and positive appraisal. One such health promotion intervention is ...

  8. Reminders of a positively stereotyped identity when facing stereotype threat: Identity consistency and identity accessibility as mediating mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Danaher, Kelly

    2011-12-31

    this relationship. Undergraduate women were reminded of negative math performance stereotypes associated with their gender, positive math performance stereotypes associated with their college student identity, both identities, or neither identity. In Study 1, math...

  9. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for bone and cartilage differentiation - ex vivo study as a prospect for a laser surgery feedback mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mehari, Fanuel; Rohde, Maximilian; Knipfer, Christian; Kanawade, Rajesh; Klämpfl, Florian; Adler, Werner; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Laser surgery enables for very accurate, fast and clean modeling of tissue. The specific and controlled cutting and ablation of tissue, however, remains a central challenge in the field of clinical laser applications. The lack of information on what kind of tissue is being ablated at the bottom of the cut may lead to iatrogenic damage of structures that were meant to be preserved. One such example is the shaping or removal of diseased cartilaginous and bone tissue in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Diseases of the TMJ can induce deformation and perforation of the cartilaginous discus articularis, as well as alterations to the cartilaginous surface of the condyle or even the bone itself. This may result in restrictions of movement and pain. The aim of a surgical intervention ranges from specific ablation and shaping of diseased cartilage, bone or synovial tissues to extensive removal of TMJ structures. One approach to differentiate between these tissues is to use Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The ultimate goal is a LIBS guided feedback control system for surgical laser systems that enables real-time tissue identification for tissue specific ablation. In the presented study, the authors focused on the LIBS based differentiation between cartilage tissue and cortical bone tissue using an ex-vivo pig model. PMID:25426327

  10. The inhibitory effects of AR/miR-190a/YB-1 negative feedback loop on prostate cancer and underlying mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaohua; Wang, Tao; Song, Wen; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Feng; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Wu, Kongming; Yu, Zuoren; Wang, Chenguang; Chen, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer at advanced stages including metastatic and castration-resistant cancer remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. MiR-190a belongs to the small noncoding RNA family and has an important role in breast cancer metastasis. However, it is still unknown whether miR-190a plays a role in prostate cancer development. Herein, we first observed AR/miR-190a/YB-1 forms an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop in prostate cancer: miR-190a expression was down-regulated by AR activation; YB-1 functions are as an AR activator; miR-190a inhibited AR expression and transactivation through direct binding to 3?UTR of YB-1 gene. MiR-190a contributes the human prostate cancer cell growth through AR-dependent signaling. Moreover, we examined the expression of miR-190a and observed a significant decrease in human prostate cancers. Reduced expression of miR-190a was inversely correlated to AR levels of prostate cancer patients, and patients with higher miR-190a expression in their tumor have improved tumor-free survival. Taken together, our findings identified a biochemical and functional link between miR-190a with reduced expression in advanced prostate cancer, YB-1 and AR signaling in prostate cancer. PMID:26314494

  11. PKM2 promotes glucose metabolism and cell growth in gliomas through a mechanism involving a let-7a/c-Myc/hnRNPA1 feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Junxia; Qian, Jin; Li, Ri; Tao, Tao; Wei, Wenjin; Hu, Qi; Liu, Ning; You, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells metabolize more glucose to lactate in aerobic or hypoxic conditions than non-tumor cells. Pyruvate kinase isoenzyme type M2 (PKM2) is crucial for tumor cell aerobic glycolysis. We established a role for let-7a/c-Myc/hnRNPA1/PKM2 signaling in glioma cell glucose metabolism. PKM2 depletion via siRNA inhibits cell proliferation and aerobic glycolysis in glioma cells. C-Myc promotes up-regulation of hnRNPA1 expression, hnRNPA1 binding to PKM pre-mRNA, and the subsequent formation of PKM2. This pathway is downregulated by the microRNA let-7a, which functionally targets c-Myc, whereas hnRNPA1 blocks the biogenesis of let-7a to counteract its ability to downregulate the c-Myc/hnRNPA1/PKM2 signaling pathway. The down-regulation of c-Myc/hnRNPA1/PKM2 by let-7a is verified using a glioma xenograft model. These results suggest that let-7a, c-Myc and hnRNPA1 from a feedback loop, thereby regulating PKM2 expression to modulate glucose metabolism of glioma cells. These findings elucidate a new pathway mediating aerobic glycolysis in gliomas and provide an attractive potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25948776

  12. Daisyworld inhabited with daisies incorporating a seed size/number trade-off: the mechanism of negative feedback on selection from a standpoint of the competition theory.

    PubMed

    Seto, Mayumi; Akagi, Tasuku

    2005-05-21

    We reexamined a Daisyworld model from the traditional view of competition theory. Unlike the original model, white and black daisies in our model incorporate a seeding/germination trade-off against bare ground area without assuming the local temperature reward. As a result, the planetary temperature is automatically regulated by two species if the following conditions are met: (i) the species react equally to an environmental condition, but one can alter the environmental condition in the opposite direction to the other. (ii) that one of the two cannot have both a higher maximal growth rate (mu(max)) and lower half-saturation constant (K) than those of the other. In other words, a pair of phenotypes incorporates a trade-off between quality and number of seeds. We found that the homeostatic regulation can also be reconciled with the adaptive evolution of optimal temperature. The results of simulation imply that biotic environmental feedback can also be maintained when the emergence of polymorphisms (black and white daisies) is closely linked to such a trade-off. PMID:15757676

  13. Phase Model with Feedback Control for Power Grids

    E-print Network

    Matsuo, Tatsuma

    2013-01-01

    A phase model with feedback control is studied as a dynamical model of power grids. As an example, we study a model network corresponding to the power grid in the Kyushu region. The standard frequency is maintained by the mutual synchronization and the feedback control. Electric failures are induced by an overload. We propose a local feedback method in which the strength of feedback control is proportional to the magnitude of generators. We find that the electric failures do not occur until the utilization ratio is close to 1 under this feedback control. We also find that the temporal response for the time-varying input power is suppressed under this feedback control. We explain the mechanisms using the corresponding global feedback method.

  14. Group Feedback for Continuous Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Manuel; Sessa, Valerie I.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores relationships between feedback, group learning, and performance. It considers how feedback to individuals and the group as a whole supports continuous group learning. Feedback source, purpose, clarity, and valence may affect perceptions, processing, and outcomes of feedback. How feedback is processed and used may be…

  15. 77 FR 59614 - Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies; Information Collection; Data.gov Feedback...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies; Information Collection; Data.gov Feedback... regarding Data.gov Feedback Mechanisms. Public comments are particularly invited on: Whether this collection... Collection 3090- 0284, Data.gov Feedback Mechanisms, by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  16. Feedback and Sentence Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, John T.

    The theoretical functions of external feedback in SR and closed loop models of verbal learning are presented. Contradictory predictions from the models are tested with a three by three factorial experiment including three types of feedback and three amounts of rehearsal. There were 90 adult students run individually and they were required to learn…

  17. Energy, water, plant interactions: green feedback as a mechanism for environmental management and control through the application of phytotechnology and ecohydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalewski, Maciej; Santiago-Fandino, Vicente; Neate, John

    2003-10-01

    One of the fundamental tenets of the sustainable development concept is the maintenance of a homeostatic equilibrium within the ecosystem. Overexploitation of the ecosystem or degradation of its biotic structure alters ecosystem processes to the point whereby the ability of the ecosystem to produce desired resources is seriously diminished. Water is the medium for all ecological processes, from molecular to global scale. The physical quantification of ecological processes in terms of energy and molecular dimension is fundamental for scientific investigation and sound ecosystem management. As a consequence, the water mesocycle within the basin and connected processes (i.e. those which can be measured) should be considered as the basic unit for the analysis of energy-water-biota interactions.The degradation of freshwater ecosystems can be characterized in terms of two dimensions: first, pollution, which can be reduced to a significant extent by technologies; and second, the degradation of established water and nutrient cycles within the ecosystem as a whole. This second dimension is much more complex. A new approach for solving both of these problems is the application of ecohydrology and phytotechnology. Our progressive understanding of the range of anthropogenic degradation of hydrological, biogeochemical and biological processes within water basins indicates the need to control and regulate nutrients and water dynamics by increasing plant biomass and diversity. Thus, phytotechnologies, applied within the context of ecohydrological principles, can provide an approach for increasing ecosystem carrying capacity and enhancing the resilience and functionality of ecosystems at the basin scale.The application of these interdisciplinary, holistic approaches, based on an understanding of the role of plant biomass in the control of water and biogeochemical cycles (i.e. green feedback), can lead to an improvement of water resources quality, as well as the enhancement of system biodiversity, agricultural production, and bioenergy generation, with the potential for increased employment opportunities. Copyright

  18. Greenland ice sheet albedo feedback: mass balance implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, J. E.; Tedesco, M.; Fettweis, X.; Hall, D. K.; Steffen, K.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Greenland ice sheet mass loss has accelerated responding to combined glacier discharge and surface melt water runoff increases. During summer, absorbed solar energy, modulated at the surface primarily by albedo, is the dominant factor governing surface melt variability in the ablation area. NASA MODIS data spanning 13 summers (2000 - 2012), indicate that mid-summer (July) ice sheet albedo declined by 0.064 from a value of 0.752 in the early 2000s. The ice sheet accordingly absorbed 100 EJ more solar energy for the month of July in 2012 than in the early 2000s. This additional energy flux during summer doubled melt rates in the ice sheet ablation area during the observation period. Abnormally strong anticyclonic circulation, associated with a persistent summer North Atlantic Oscillation extreme 2007-2012, enabled 3 amplifying mechanisms to maximize the albedo feedback: 1) increased warm (south) air advection along the western ice sheet increased surface sensible heating that in turn enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates, further reducing albedo; 2) increased surface downward shortwave flux, leading to more surface heating and further albedo reduction; and 3) reduced snowfall rates sustained low albedo, maximizing surface solar heating, progressively lowering albedo over multiple years. The summer net infrared and solar radiation for the high elevation accumulation area reached positive values during this period, contributing to an abrupt melt area increase in 2012. A number of factors make it reasonable to expect more melt episodes covering 100% of the ice sheet area in coming years: 1) the past 13 y of increasing surface air temperatures have eroded snowpack 'cold content', preconditioning the ice sheet for earlier melt onset. Less heat is required to bring the surface to melting; 2) Greenland temperatures, have lagged the N Hemisphere average in the 2000s, need to increase further for Greenland to be in phase with the N Hemisphere average. 3) Arctic amplification of enhanced greenhouse warming is driven by albedo feedback over sea ice, terrestrial environments, and through autumn-winter heat release from open water areas. Likely melt area increases is despite a second order negative feedback operating in the accumulation area identified statistically from more summer snowfall (brightening effect) in anomalously warm summers. Without this negative feedback, the accumulation area complete surface melting may have happened sooner than in 2012. While it has been shown that the ice sheet dynamics can adjust rapidly to ice flow perturbations, a negative feedback responsivity, the mass imbalance of the ice sheet in the coming decades is likely to be increasingly negative because of the positive feedback from surface albedo with air temperature. Surface melting may therefore increasingly dominate ice sheet mass loss, as glaciers retreat from a marine termini and the area of low albedo expands over the gradually sloping ice sheet. The albedo feedback ensures an increasing solar energy absorption. What could shut the positive feedback down would be a combination of an anomalously cold winter and anomalously thick snowpack. This scenario is possible given the cooling effect of a major N Hemisphere volcanic eruption or some other event to reduce surface heating.

  19. Sample-Clock Phase-Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    To demodulate a communication signal, a receiver must recover and synchronize to the symbol timing of a received waveform. In a system that utilizes digital sampling, the fidelity of synchronization is limited by the time between the symbol boundary and closest sample time location. To reduce this error, one typically uses a sample clock in excess of the symbol rate in order to provide multiple samples per symbol, thereby lowering the error limit to a fraction of a symbol time. For systems with a large modulation bandwidth, the required sample clock rate is prohibitive due to current technological barriers and processing complexity. With precise control of the phase of the sample clock, one can sample the received signal at times arbitrarily close to the symbol boundary, thus obviating the need, from a synchronization perspective, for multiple samples per symbol. Sample-clock phase-control feedback was developed for use in the demodulation of an optical communication signal, where multi-GHz modulation bandwidths would require prohibitively large sample clock frequencies for rates in excess of the symbol rate. A custom mixedsignal (RF/digital) offset phase-locked loop circuit was developed to control the phase of the 6.4-GHz clock that samples the photon-counting detector output. The offset phase-locked loop is driven by a feedback mechanism that continuously corrects for variation in the symbol time due to motion between the transmitter and receiver as well as oscillator instability. This innovation will allow significant improvements in receiver throughput; for example, the throughput of a pulse-position modulation (PPM) with 16 slots can increase from 188 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s.

  20. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOEpatents

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  1. Effects of Video Feedback on Early Coercive Parent-Child Interactions: The Intervening Role of Caregivers' Relational Schemas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Justin D.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Moore, Kevin J.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Wilson, Melvin N.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effect of adding a video feedback intervention component to the assessment feedback session of the Family Check-Up (FCU) intervention (Dishion & Stormshak, 2007). We hypothesized that the addition of video feedback procedures during the FCU feedback at child age 2 would have a positive effect on caregivers' negative…

  2. Improving the Evaluation and Feedback Process for Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Bobby

    2009-01-01

    The continually changing role of the principal has created a complex position of leadership requiring more data for more skills than traditional methods of evaluation or feedback can provide. The purpose of this article is to question the process of providing beneficial and meaningful feedback for educational leaders so that they can reach their…

  3. True-positive exercise electrocardiogram/false-negative thallium-201 scintigram: a proposal of a mechanism for the paradox.

    PubMed

    Madias, J E; Knez, P; Win, M T

    2000-08-01

    A 72-year-old man with exertional angina had a strongly positive exercise electrocardiogram (EECG) with a negative thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigram (Tl). Arteriography revealed triple-vessel coronary artery disease, for which he underwent aortocoronary bypass grafting. Repeat EECG was negative, and it was again associated with a negative Tl. The false-negative Tl on the first test was felt to be due to a rare phenomenon of homogeneously distributed reversible exercise-induced myocardial ischemia, leading to a uniform radiotracer count density. The even distribution of ischemia would also be expected to render a false-negative EECG, due to electrocardiographic cancellation, and this is frequently the case. However, in the patient presented herein, we propose that the ischemic cardiac apex rendered the EECG strongly positive because its position was not opposed by an ischemic muscular region, and thus an uncancelled ischemic ST-segment vector was generated. This hypothesis is supported by our recent work showing the unique role of the ischemic apex (among all the other myocardial territories) in rendering the EECG positive. PMID:10941551

  4. Vegetation-climate feedback causes reduced precipitation in CMIP5 regional Earth system model simulation over Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Minchao; Smith, Benjamin; Schurgers, Guy; Lindström, Joe; Rummukainen, Markku; Samuelsson, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems have been demonstrated to play a significant role within the climate system, amplifying or dampening climate change via biogeophysical and biogeochemical exchange with the atmosphere and vice versa (Cox et al. 2000; Betts et al. 2004). Africa is particularly vulnerable to climate change and studies of vegetation-climate feedback mechanisms on Africa are still limited. Our study is the first application of A coupled Earth system model at regional scale and resolution over Africa. We applied a coupled regional climate-vegetation model, RCA-GUESS (Smith et al. 2011), over the CORDEX Africa domain, forced by boundary conditions from a CanESM2 CMIP5 simulation under the RCP8.5 future climate scenario. The simulations were from 1961 to 2100 and covered the African continent at a horizontal grid spacing of 0.44°. RCA-GUESS simulates changes in the phenology, productivity, relative cover and population structure of up to eight plant function types (PFTs) in response to forcing from the climate part of the model. These vegetation changes feedback to simulated climate through dynamic adjustments in surface energy fluxes and surface properties. Changes in the net ecosystem-atmosphere carbon flux and its components net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration and emissions from biomass burning were also simulated but do not feedback to climate in our model. Constant land cover was assumed. We compared simulations with and without vegetation feedback switched "on" to assess the influence of vegetation-climate feedback on simulated climate, vegetation and ecosystem carbon cycling. Both positive and negative warming feedbacks were identified in different parts of Africa. In the Sahel savannah zone near 15°N, reduced vegetation cover and productivity, and mortality caused by a deterioration of soil water conditions led to a positive warming feedback mediated by decreased evapotranspiration and increased sensible heat flux between vegetation and the atmosphere. In the equatorial rainforest stronghold region of central Africa, a feedback syndrome characterised by reduced plant production and LAI, a dominance shift from tropical trees to grasses, reduced soil water and reduced rainfall was identified. The likely underlying mechanism was a decline in evaporative water recycling associated with sparser vegetation cover, reminiscent of Earth system model studies in which a similar feedback mechanism was simulated to force dieback of tropical rainforest and reduced precipitation over the Amazon Basin (Cox et al. 2000; Betts et al. 2004; Malhi et al. 2009). Opposite effects are seen in southern Senegal, southern Mali, northern Guinea and Guinea-Bissau, positive evapotranspiration feedback enhancing the cover of trees in forest and savannah, mitigating warming and promoting local moisture recycling as rainfall. We reveal that LAI-driven evapotranspiration feedback may reduced rainfall in parts of Africa, vegetation-climate feedbacks may significantly impact the magnitude and character of simulated changes in climate as well as vegetation and ecosystems in future scenario studies of this region. They should be accounted for in future studies of climate change and its impacts on Africa. Keywords: vegetation-climate feedback, regional climate model, evapotranspiration, CORDEX. References: Betts, R.A., Cox, P.M., Collins, M., Harris, P.P., Huntingford, C. & Jones, C.D. 2004. The role of ecosystem-atmosphere interactions in simulated Amazonian precipitation decrease and forest dieback under global climate warming. Theoretical and Applied Climatology 78: 157-175. Cox, P.M., Betts, R.A., Jones, C.D., Spall, S.A. & Totterdell, I.J. 2000. Acceleration of global warming due to carbon-cycle feedbacks in a coupled climate model. Nature 408: 184-187. Samuelsson, P., Jones, C., Wil?en, U., Gollvik, S., Hansson, U. and coauthors. 2011. The Rossby Centre Regional Climate Model RCA3:Model description and performance. Tellus 63A, 4-23. Smith, B., Prentice, I. C. and Sykes, M. T. 2001. Representation of vegeta

  5. Mechanical energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An energy absorbing system for controlling the force where a moving object engages a stationary stop and where the system utilized telescopic tubular members, energy absorbing diaphragm elements, force regulating disc springs, and a return spring to return the telescoping member to its start position after stroking is presented. The energy absorbing system has frusto-conical diaphragm elements frictionally engaging the shaft and are opposed by a force regulating set of disc springs. In principle, this force feedback mechanism serves to keep the stroking load at a reasonable level even if the friction coefficient increases greatly. This force feedback device also serves to desensitize the singular and combined effects of manufacturing tolerances, sliding surface wear, temperature changes, dynamic effects, and lubricity.

  6. Probabilistic models for feedback systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2011-02-01

    In previous work, we developed a Bayesian-based methodology to analyze the reliability of hierarchical systems. The output of the procedure is a statistical distribution of the reliability, thus allowing many questions to be answered. The principal advantage of the approach is that along with an estimate of the reliability, we also can provide statements of confidence in the results. The model is quite general in that it allows general representations of all of the distributions involved, it incorporates prior knowledge into the models, it allows errors in the 'engineered' nodes of a system to be determined by the data, and leads to the ability to determine optimal testing strategies. In this report, we provide the preliminary steps necessary to extend this approach to systems with feedback. Feedback is an essential component of 'complexity' and provides interesting challenges in modeling the time-dependent action of a feedback loop. We provide a mechanism for doing this and analyze a simple case. We then consider some extensions to more interesting examples with local control affecting the entire system. Finally, a discussion of the status of the research is also included.

  7. Relaxation of quasi-transverse phonons in the Herring mechanism and ultrasound absorption in cubic crystals with positive and negative anisotropies of the second-order elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleyev, I. G.; Kuleyev, I. I.

    2009-11-01

    The phonon relaxation and quasi-transverse ultrasound absorption in the course of Herring and Landau-Rumer anharmonic scattering processes in cubic crystals with positive (Ge, Si, diamond, InSb, LiF, MgO) and negative (KCl, NaCl, CaF2) anisotropies of the second-order elastic moduli have been investigated. A new mechanism of transverse phonon relaxation, according to which the fusion of a transverse (slow or fast) phonon with a slow phonon generates a fast transverse phonon, has been considered in the long-wave-length approximation. This mechanism is similar to the Herring relaxation mechanism for longitudinal phonons. It has been demonstrated that, for crystals of the first group with a considerable anisotropy of the elastic energy (Ge, Si, InSb, LiF, MgO), “anomalous” relaxation processes in which the fusion of a slow transverse phonon with a fast phonon generates a slow transverse phonon are possible in contrast to the Herring relaxation mechanism for longitudinal phonons. These relaxation processes appear to be impossible for all crystals of the second group (KCl, NaCl, CaF2), as well as for crystals of the first group with a small anisotropy of the elastic energy, such as diamond. The angular dependences of the ultrasound absorption coefficient for the Herring and Landau-Rumer mechanisms have been analyzed using the anisotropic-continuum model. It has been shown that, for the crystals of the first group under consideration, the contribution of the Herring mechanism to the long-wavelength ultrasound absorption is small compared to the contribution of the Landau-Rumer mechanism. However, for the KCl and NaCl crystals of the second group in directions of the [001] type, the contribution of the Herring mechanism can significantly exceed the contribution of the Landau-Rumer mechanism.

  8. Cell shape regulation through mechanosensory feedback control.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Krithika; Luo, Tianzhi; Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2015-08-01

    Cells undergo controlled changes in morphology in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. These changes require a means for sensing and interpreting the signalling cues, for generating the forces that act on the cell's physical material, and a control system to regulate this process. Experiments on Dictyostelium amoebae have shown that force-generating proteins can localize in response to external mechanical perturbations. This mechanosensing, and the ensuing mechanical feedback, plays an important role in minimizing the effect of mechanical disturbances in the course of changes in cell shape, especially during cell division, and likely in other contexts, such as during three-dimensional migration. Owing to the complexity of the feedback system, which couples mechanical and biochemical signals involved in shape regulation, theoretical approaches can guide further investigation by providing insights that are difficult to decipher experimentally. Here, we present a computational model that explains the different mechanosensory and mechanoresponsive behaviours observed in Dictyostelium cells. The model features a multiscale description of myosin II bipolar thick filament assembly that includes cooperative and force-dependent myosin-actin binding, and identifies the feedback mechanisms hidden in the observed mechanoresponsive behaviours of Dictyostelium cells during micropipette aspiration experiments. These feedbacks provide a mechanistic explanation of cellular retraction and hence cell shape regulation. PMID:26224568

  9. In vivo reference point indentation reveals positive effects of raloxifene on mechanical properties following 6 months of treatment in skeletally mature beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Aref, Mohammad; Gallant, Maxime A; Organ, Jason M; Wallace, Joseph M; Newman, Christopher L; Burr, David B; Brown, Drew M; Allen, Matthew R

    2013-10-01

    Raloxifene treatment has been shown previously to positively affect bone mechanical properties following 1 year of treatment in skeletally mature dogs. Reference point indentation (RPI) can be used for in vivo assessment of mechanical properties and has been shown to produce values that are highly correlated with properties derived from traditional mechanical testing. The goal of this study was to use RPI to determine if raloxifene-induced alterations in mechanical properties occurred after 6 months of treatment. Twelve skeletally mature female beagle dogs were treated for 6 months with oral doses of saline vehicle (VEH, 1 ml/kg/day) or a clinically relevant dose of raloxifene (RAL, 0.5 mg/kg/day). At 6 months, all animals underwent in vivo RPI (10N force, 10 cycles) of the anterior tibial midshaft. RPI data were analyzed using a custom MATLAB program, designed to provide cycle-by-cycle data from the RPI test and validated against the manufacturer-provided software. Indentation distance increase (IDI), a parameter that is inversely related to bone toughness, was significantly lower in RAL-treated animals compared to VEH (-16.5%), suggesting increased bone toughness. Energy absorption within the first cycle was significantly lower with RAL compared to VEH (-21%). These data build on previous work that has documented positive effects of raloxifene on material properties by showing that these changes exist after 6 months. PMID:23871851

  10. Mechanism of action of recombinant Acc-royalisin from royal jelly of Chinese honeybee against gram-positive bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antibacterial activity of royalisin, an antimicrobial peptide from the royal jelly produced by honeybees has been addressed extensively. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, a recombinant royalisin, RAcc-royalisin from the royal jelly of Chinese honeybee Apis cerana...

  11. Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback Works Both Ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Dettmar, R.-J.

    2013-09-01

    Simulations of galaxy growth need to invoke strong negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to suppress the formation of stars and thus prevent the over-production of very massive systems. While some observations provide evidence for such negative feedback, other studies find either no feedback or even positive feedback, with increased star formation associated with higher AGN luminosities. Here we report an analysis of several hundred AGNs and their host galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South using X-ray and radio data for sample selection. Combined with archival far-infrared data as a reliable tracer of star formation activity in the AGN host galaxies, we find that AGNs with pronounced radio jets exhibit a much higher star formation rate (SFR) than the purely X-ray-selected ones, even at the same X-ray luminosities. This difference implies that positive AGN feedback plays an important role, too, and therefore has to be accounted for in all future simulation work. We interpret this to indicate that the enhanced SFR of radio-selected AGNs arises because of jet-induced star formation, as is suggested by the different jet powers among our AGN samples, while the suppressed SFR of X-ray selected AGN is caused by heating and photo-dissociation of molecular gas by the hot AGN accretion disk.

  12. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK WORKS BOTH WAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Norris, R. P.

    2013-09-01

    Simulations of galaxy growth need to invoke strong negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to suppress the formation of stars and thus prevent the over-production of very massive systems. While some observations provide evidence for such negative feedback, other studies find either no feedback or even positive feedback, with increased star formation associated with higher AGN luminosities. Here we report an analysis of several hundred AGNs and their host galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South using X-ray and radio data for sample selection. Combined with archival far-infrared data as a reliable tracer of star formation activity in the AGN host galaxies, we find that AGNs with pronounced radio jets exhibit a much higher star formation rate (SFR) than the purely X-ray-selected ones, even at the same X-ray luminosities. This difference implies that positive AGN feedback plays an important role, too, and therefore has to be accounted for in all future simulation work. We interpret this to indicate that the enhanced SFR of radio-selected AGNs arises because of jet-induced star formation, as is suggested by the different jet powers among our AGN samples, while the suppressed SFR of X-ray selected AGN is caused by heating and photo-dissociation of molecular gas by the hot AGN accretion disk.

  13. Sensory-Feedback Exoskeletal Arm Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Bin; Massie, Thomas H.; Vayner, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    An electromechanical exoskeletal arm apparatus has been designed for use in controlling a remote robotic manipulator arm. The apparatus, called a force-feedback exoskeleton arm master (F-EAM) is comfortable to wear and easy to don and doff. It provides control signals from the wearer s arm to a robot arm or a computer simulator (e.g., a virtual-reality system); it also provides force and torque feedback from sensors on the robot arm or from the computer simulator to the wearer s arm. The F-EAM enables the wearer to make the robot arm gently touch objects and finely manipulate them without exerting excessive forces. The F-EAM features a lightweight design in which the motors and gear heads that generate force and torque feedback are made smaller than they ordinarily would be: this is achieved by driving the motors to power levels greater than would ordinarily be used in order to obtain higher torques, and by providing active liquid cooling of the motors to prevent overheating at the high drive levels. The F-EAM (see figure) includes an assembly that resembles a backpack and is worn like a backpack, plus an exoskeletal arm mechanism. The FEAM has five degrees of freedom (DOFs) that correspond to those of the human arm: 1. The first DOF is that of the side-to-side rotation of the upper arm about the shoulder (rotation about axis 1). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 1 via drum 1 and a planar four-bar linkage. 2. The second DOF is that of the up-and-down rotation of the arm about the shoulder. The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 2 via drum 2. 3. The third DOF is that of twisting of the upper arm about its longitudinal axis. This DOF is implemented in a cable remote-center mechanism (CRCM). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 3, which drives the upper-arm cuff and the mechanism below it. A bladder inflatable by gas or liquid is placed between the cuff and the wearer s upper arm to compensate for misalignment between the exoskeletal mechanism and the shoulder. 4. The fourth DOF is that of flexion and extension of the elbow. The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 4 and drum 4, which are mounted on a bracket that can slide longitudinally by a pin-and-slot engagement with the upper-arm cuff to compensate for slight variations in the position of the kinematic center of the elbow. Attached to drum 4 is an adapter plate to which is attached a CRCM for the lower arm. 5. The lower-arm CRCM implements the fifth DOF, which is the twist of the forearm about its longitudinal axis. Motor 5 provides the reflected torque for this DOF by driving the lower-arm cuff. A rod transmits twist and torsion between the lower-arm cuff and the hand cuff. With this system, the motion of the wearer s joints and the reflected torques applied to these joints can be measured and controlled in a relatively simple manner. This is because the anthropomorphic design of the mechanism imitates the kinematics of the human arm, eliminating the need for kinematic conversion of joint-torque and joint-angle data.

  14. Stratospheric water vapor feedback.

    PubMed

    Dessler, A E; Schoeberl, M R; Wang, T; Davis, S M; Rosenlof, K H

    2013-11-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry-climate model to be +0.3 W/(m(2)?K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  15. Global Feedback Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-29

    GFS is a simulation engine that is used for the characterization of Accelerator performance parameters based on the machine layout, configuration and noise sources. It combines extensively tested Feedback models with a longitudinal phase space tracking simulator along with the interaction between the two via beam-based feedback using a computationally efficient simulation engine. The models include beam instrumentation, considerations on loop delays for in both the R and beam-based feedback loops, as well as themore »ability to inject noise (both correlated and uncorrelated) at different points of the machine including a full characterization of the electron gun performance parameters.« less

  16. Global Feedback Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-29

    GFS is a simulation engine that is used for the characterization of Accelerator performance parameters based on the machine layout, configuration and noise sources. It combines extensively tested Feedback models with a longitudinal phase space tracking simulator along with the interaction between the two via beam-based feedback using a computationally efficient simulation engine. The models include beam instrumentation, considerations on loop delays for in both the R and beam-based feedback loops, as well as the ability to inject noise (both correlated and uncorrelated) at different points of the machine including a full characterization of the electron gun performance parameters.

  17. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry–climate model to be +0.3 W/(m2?K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  18. Bortezomib sensitises TRAIL-resistant HPV-positive head and neck cancer cells to TRAIL through a caspase-dependent, E6-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bullenkamp, J; Raulf, N; Ayaz, B; Walczak, H; Kulms, D; Odell, E; Thavaraj, S; Tavassoli, M

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causative for a new and increasing form of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Although localised HPV-positive cancers have a favourable response to radio-chemotherapy (RT/CT), the impact of HPV in advanced or metastatic HNSCC remains to be defined and targeted therapeutics need to be tested for cancers resistant to RT/CT. To this end, we investigated the sensitivity of HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC cell lines to TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), which induces tumour cell-specific apoptosis in various cancer types. A clear correlation was observed between HPV positivity and resistance to TRAIL compared with HPV-negative head and neck cancer cell lines. All TRAIL-resistant HPV-positive cell lines tested were sensitised to TRAIL-induced cell death by treatment with bortezomib, a clinically approved proteasome inhibitor. Bortezomib-mediated sensitisation to TRAIL was associated with enhanced activation of caspase-8, -9 and -3, elevated membrane expression levels of TRAIL-R2, cytochrome c release and G2/M arrest. Knockdown of caspase-8 significantly blocked cell death induced by the combination therapy, whereas the BH3-only protein Bid was not required for induction of apoptosis. XIAP depletion increased the sensitivity of both HPV-positive and -negative cells to TRAIL alone or in combination with bortezomib. In contrast, restoration of p53 following E6 knockdown in HPV-positive cells had no effect on their sensitivity to either single or combination therapy, suggesting a p53-independent pathway for the observed response. In summary, bortezomib-mediated proteasome inhibition sensitises previously resistant HPV-positive HNSCC cells to TRAIL-induced cell death through a mechanism involving both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. The cooperative effect of these two targeted anticancer agents therefore represents a promising treatment strategy for RT/CT-resistant HPV-associated head and neck cancers. PMID:25341043

  19. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Babin, Sergey A.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim; Podivilov, Evgenii V.

    2014-09-01

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors-random distributed feedback fibre laser-was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (˜0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the generation of a stationary near-Gaussian beam with a narrow spectrum. A random distributed feedback fibre laser has efficiency and performance that are comparable to and even exceed those of similar conventional fibre lasers. The key features of the generated radiation of random distributed feedback fibre lasers include: a stationary narrow-band continuous modeless spectrum that is free of mode competition, nonlinear power broadening, and an output beam with a Gaussian profile in the fundamental transverse mode (generated both in single mode and multi-mode fibres). This review presents the current status of research in the field of random fibre lasers and shows their potential and perspectives. We start with an introductory overview of conventional distributed feedback lasers and traditional random lasers to set the stage for discussion of random fibre lasers. We then present a theoretical analysis and experimental studies of various random fibre laser configurations, including widely tunable, multi-wavelength, narrow-band generation, and random fibre lasers operating in different spectral bands in the 1-1.6 ?m range. Then we discuss existing and future applications of random fibre lasers, including telecommunication and distributed long reach sensor systems. A theoretical description of random lasers is very challenging and is strongly linked with the theory of disordered systems and kinetic theory. We outline two key models governing the generation of random fibre lasers: the average power balance model and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation based model. Recently invented random distributed feedback fibre lasers represent a new and exciting field of research that brings together such diverse areas of science as laser physics, the theory of disordered systems, fibre optics and nonlinear science. Stable random generation in optical fibre opens up new possibilities for research on wave transport and localization in disordered media. We hope that this review will provide background information for research in various fields and will stimulate cross-disciplinary collaborat

  20. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems.

    PubMed

    Chin, Anne; Florsheim, Joan L; Wohl, Ellen; Collins, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies key questions and challenges for geomorphologists in investigating coupled feedbacks in human-landscape systems. While feedbacks occur in the absence of human influences, they are also altered by human activity. Feedbacks are a key element to understanding human-influenced geomorphic systems in ways that extend our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Feedbacks have been increasingly identified in Earth-environmental systems, with studies of coupled human-natural systems emphasizing ecological phenomena in producing emerging concepts for social-ecological systems. Enormous gaps or uncertainties in knowledge remain with respect to understanding impact-feedback loops within geomorphic systems with significant human alterations, where the impacted geomorphic systems in turn affect humans. Geomorphology should play an important role in public policy by identifying the many diffuse and subtle feedbacks of both local- and global-scale processes. This role is urgent, while time may still be available to mitigate the impacts that limit the sustainability of human societies. Challenges for geomorphology include identification of the often weak feedbacks that occur over varied time and space scales ranging from geologic time to single isolated events and very short time periods, the lack of available data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, the varied tools and metrics needed to represent both physical and human processes, and the need to collaborate with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of geomorphic change, as well as the human responses to such change. PMID:23592016

  1. Feedback control for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guy A

    2014-02-01

    Although feedback control and automation has revolutionized many fields of human activity, it has yet to have a significant impact on healthcare, particularly when a patient is in the loop. Although there have been a number of studies concerned with closed-loop control of anesthesia, they have yet to have an impact on clinical practice. For such systems to be successful, engineers and clinicians have to work hand in hand, for this they have to have a basic understanding of each other's fields. The goal of this paper is to introduce clinicians to basic concepts in control engineering, with an emphasis on the properties of feedback control. Concepts such as modelling for control, feedback and uncertainty, robustness, feedback controller such as proportional-integral-derivative control, predictive control and adaptive control are briefly reviewed. Finally we discuss the safety issues around closed-loop control and discuss ways by which safe control can be guaranteed. PMID:23579866

  2. Remote Robot Control With High Force-Feedback Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.

    1993-01-01

    Improved scheme for force-reflecting hand control of remote robotic manipulator provides unprecedently high force-reflection gain, even when dissimilar master and slave arms used. Three feedback loops contained in remote robot control system exerting position-error-based force feedback and compliance control. Outputs of force and torque sensors on robot not used directly for force reflection, but for compliance control, while errors in position used to generate reflected forces.

  3. Vietnamese Learners' Ability to Write English Argumentative Paragraphs: The Role of Peer Feedback Giving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lap, Trinh Quoc; Yen, Cao Hoang

    2013-01-01

    The nature of peer feedback and its impacts on writing in English has attracted much attention of researchers and educators. Recent studies have indicated various types of peer feedback and its positive effects on writing development. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the nature of peer feedback and its effects on learners'…

  4. Evaluating Corrective Feedback Self-Efficacy Changes among Counselor Educators and Site Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motley, Veronica; Reese, Mary Kate; Campos, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of pretest-posttest scores on the Corrective Feedback Self-Efficacy Instrument (Page & Hulse-Killacky, [Page, B. J., 1999]) following a supervision workshop indicated a significant positive relationship between workshop training and supervisors' feedback self-efficacy in giving corrective feedback. Furthermore, the association…

  5. Praise in Public, Criticize in Private? An Assessment of Performance Feedback Transparency in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seevers, Matthew T.; Rowe, William J.; Skinner, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional wisdom in sales management encourages public delivery of positive feedback, and private delivery of negative feedback. In stark contrast, U.S. educators typically provide all performance feedback in relative (if not strict) privacy to comply with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). To investigate this discrepancy,…

  6. Shortening the length of stay and mechanical ventilation time by using positive suggestions via MP3 players for ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Diószeghy, Csaba; Fritúz, Gábor; Gál, János; Varga, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Long stay in intensive care unit (ICU) and prolonged ventilation are deleterious for subsequent quality of life and surcharge financial capacity. We have already demonstrated the beneficial effects of using suggestive communication on recovery time during intensive care. The aim of our present study was to prove the same effects with standardized positive suggestive message delivered by an MP3 player. Patients ventilated in ICU were randomized into a control group receiving standard ICU treatment and two groups with a standardized pre-recorded material delivered via headphones: a suggestive message about safety, self-control, and recovery for the study group and a relaxing music for the music group. Groups were similar in terms of age, gender, and mortality, but the SAPS II scores were higher in the study group than that in the controls (57.8 ± 23.6 vs. 30.1 ± 15.5 and 33.7 ± 17.4). Our post-hoc analysis results showed that the length of ICU stay (134.2 ± 73.3 vs. 314.2 ± 178.4 h) and the time spent on ventilator (85.2 ± 34.9 vs. 232.0 ± 165.6 h) were significantly shorter in the study group compared to the unified control. The advantage of the structured positive suggestive message was proven against both music and control groups. PMID:24672669

  7. Modeling HLA associations with EBV-positive and -negative Hodgkin lymphoma suggests distinct mechanisms in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul C D; McAulay, Karen A; Montgomery, Dorothy; Lake, Annette; Shield, Lesley; Gallagher, Alice; Little, Ann-Margaret; Shah, Anila; Marsh, Steven G E; Taylor, G Malcolm; Jarrett, Ruth F

    2015-09-01

    HLA genotyping and genome wide association studies provide strong evidence for associations between Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) alleles and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Analysis of these associations is complicated by the extensive linkage disequilibrium within the major histocompatibility region and recent data suggesting that associations with EBV-positive and EBV-negative cHL are largely distinct. To distinguish independent and therefore potentially causal associations from associations confounded by linkage disequilibrium, we applied a variable selection regression modeling procedure to directly typed HLA class I and II genes and selected SNPs from EBV-stratified patient subgroups. In final models, HLA-A*01:01 and B*37:01 were associated with an increased risk of EBV-positive cHL whereas DRB1*15:01 and DPB1*01:01 were associated with decreased risk. Effects were independent of a prior history of infectious mononucleosis. For EBV-negative cHL the class II SNP rs6903608 remained the strongest predictor of disease risk after adjusting for the effects of common HLA alleles. Associations with "all cHL" and differences by case EBV status reflected the subgroup analysis. In conclusion, this study extends previous findings by identifying novel HLA associations with EBV-stratified subgroups of cHL, highlighting those alleles likely to be biologically relevant and strengthening evidence implicating genetic variation associated with the SNP rs6903608. PMID:25648508

  8. Making Time for Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Ask any teacher what he or she needs more of, and it is a good bet that time will top the list. Anything that promises to recoup a little bit of their workday time is sure to be a best seller. One overlooked time-saver is in how they use feedback. Teachers know that feedback is important for teaching and learning. Unfortunately, most secondary…

  9. Seven Keys to Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Grant

    2012-01-01

    The term "feedback" is often used to describe all kinds of comments made after the fact, including advice, praise, and evaluation. But none of these are feedback, strictly speaking. Basically, feedback is information about how one is doing in his or her efforts to reach a goal. Whether feedback is just there to be grasped or is provided by another…

  10. Learning from feedback: Spacing and the delay-retention effect.

    PubMed

    Smith, Troy A; Kimball, Daniel R

    2010-01-01

    Most modern research on the effects of feedback during learning has assumed that feedback is an error correction mechanism. Recent studies of feedback-timing effects have suggested that feedback might also strengthen initially correct responses. In an experiment involving cued recall of trivia facts, we directly tested several theories of feedback-timing effects and also examined the effects of restudy and retest trials following immediate and delayed feedback. Results were not consistent with theories assuming that the only function of feedback is to correct initial errors but instead supported a theoretical account assuming that delaying feedback strengthens initially correct responses due to the spacing of encoding opportunities: Delaying feedback increased the probability of correct response perseveration on the final retention test but had minimal effects on error correction or error perseveration probabilities. In a 2nd experiment, the effects of varying the lags between study, test, and feedback trials during learning provided further support for the spacing hypothesis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:20053046

  11. Internal and external feedback circuits for skilled forelimb movement

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Eiman; Fink, Andrew J.P.; Jessell, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Skilled motor behavior emerges from interactions between efferent neural pathways that induce muscle contraction and feedback systems that report and refine movement. Two broad classes of feedback projections modify motor output, one from the periphery and a second that originates within the central nervous system. The mechanisms through which these pathways influence movement remain poorly understood, however. Here we discuss recent studies that delineate spinal circuitry that binds external and internal feedback pathways to forelimb motor behavior. A spinal presynaptic inhibitory circuit regulates the strength of external feedback, promoting limb stability during goal-directed reaching. A distinct excitatory propriospinal circuit conveys copies of motor commands to the cerebellum, establishing an internal feedback loop that rapidly modulates forelimb motor output. The behavioral consequences of manipulating these two circuits reveal distinct controls on motor performance, and provide an initial insight into feedback strategies that underlie skilled forelimb movement. PMID:25699987

  12. Portable Dextrous Force Feedback Master for robot telemanipulation (PDMFF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdea, Grigore C.; Speeter, Thomas H.

    1989-01-01

    A major drawback of open loop masters is a lack of force feedback, limiting their ability to perform complex tasks such as assembly and repair. Researchers present a simple dextrous force feedback master for computer assisted telemanipulation. The device is compact, portable and can be held in the operator hand, without the need for a special joystick or console. The system is capable of both position feed forward and force feedback, using electronic position sensors and a pneumatic micro-actuator. The level of forces exercised by the pneumatic actuator is such that near rigidity may be attained. Experimental results showing good system linearity and small time lag are given.

  13. The mechanism of solvent effect on the positional selectivity of Candida antarctica lipase B during 1,3-diolein synthesis by esterification.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhang-Qun; Du, Wei; Liu, De-Hua

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the influence of solvent on the positional selectivity of Novozym 435 which was the immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) during the esterification of oleic acid with glycerol for 1,3-diolein preparation previously. Herein, molecular modeling was used to elucidate the underlying mechanism of the solvent effect on the positional selectivity of the enzyme. The results showed that the binding energy of sn-1 hydroxyl of glycerol molecular with CALB became higher, and the binding energy of sn-2 hydroxyl of glycerol molecular with CALB became lower along with the increase of the solvent log P. It was demonstrated that, increasing log P of the solvent, the enzyme selectivity to sn-1 hydroxyl of glycerol molecular grew weaker, and the selectivity to sn-2 hydroxyl of glycerol molecular grew stronger. PMID:21978621

  14. Efficacy and mechanism of action of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib, lapatinib and neratinib in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer: preclinical and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Segovia-Mendoza, Mariana; González-González, María E; Barrera, David; Díaz, Lorenza; García-Becerra, Rocío

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of tumors, including breast cancer, overexpress proteins of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. The interaction between family members activates signaling pathways that promote tumor progression and resistance to treatment. Human epidermal growth factor receptor type II (HER2) positive breast cancer represents a clinical challenge for current therapy. It has motivated the development of novel and more effective therapeutic EGFR family target drugs, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This review focuses on the effects of three TKIs mostly studied in HER2- positive breast cancer, lapatinib, gefitinib and neratinib. Herein, we discuss the mechanism of action, therapeutic advantages and clinical applications of these TKIs. To date, TKIs seem to be promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast tumors, either as monotherapy or combined with other pharmacological agents. PMID:26609467

  15. Droplet distributions from melt displacement and ejection mechanism during Al ns-laser ablation and deposition experiments: Influence of laser spot position

    SciTech Connect

    Cultrera, L.; Lorusso, A.; Maiolo, B.; Cangueiro, L.; Vilar, R.; Perrone, A.

    2014-03-07

    Experimental observations of the angular distribution of droplets during laser ablation and deposition of Al thin films are presented and discussed. The experimental results, obtained by simply moving the laser spot position with respect to the rotation axis of the target, allow clarification of the unexpected symmetric double peaked angular droplet distribution on the films. These results provide direct evidence that a laser fluence threshold exists, beyond which droplets are generated from a melt displacement and ejection mechanism rather than from a phase explosion. The main directions of particulate ejection are related to the particular geometry of the laser generated tracks, whose profiles depend on the relative position of the incident beam with respect to the rotation axis of the target.

  16. Climate studies with a multi-layer energy balance model. I - Model description and sensitivity to the solar constant. II - The role of feedback mechanisms in the CO2 problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, L.; Chou, M.-D.; Arking, A.

    1982-01-01

    A nine-layer zonally averaged, steady-state model, based upon thermal energy balance, is developed for use in climate sensitivity studies and includes an accurate treatment of radiative transfer, parameterized meridional and vertical energy transport, and thermodynamic interaction between the surface and the atmosphere. A high degree of nonlinearity is exhibited by the model in a study of sensitivity to changes in the solar constant. The change in the hemispheric mean surface temperature is +3.1 C in response to a 2% increase in the solar constant and -4.3 C in response to a 2% decrease in the solar constant. The sensitivity varies with latitude, and the response of atmospheric temperature varies with height. In addition, the model is used to study the sensitivity of climate to a doubling of the atmospheric CO2 content. It is found that the tropospheric temperature lapse rate decreases at low latitudes but increases at high latitudes in response to a doubled CO2 content. Averaged over the Northern Hemisphere, the change is +2.3 C in the surface temperature and +0.47 C in the earth's brightness temperature. The effects of some feedback mechanisms on the climate sensitivity to a doubled CO2 content show that the sensitivity of surface temperature approximately doubles at all latitudes due to the change in water vapor content.

  17. The vertical distribution of cloud feedback in coupled ocean-atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soden, Brian J.; Vecchi, Gabriel A.

    2011-06-01

    We assess the vertical distribution of cloud feedbacks in coupled climate models, taking care to distinguish between cloud feedbacks and a change in cloud forcing. We show that the effect of cloud changes on the longwave fluxes provides a strong positive feedback that is broadly consistent across models. In contrast, the effect of cloud changes on the shortwave fluxes ranges from a modest negative to a strong positive feedback, and is responsible for most of the intermodel spread in net cloud feedback. The feedback from high clouds is positive in all models, and is consistent with that anticipated by the Proportionately Higher Anvil Temperature hypothesis over the tropics. In contrast, low cloud cover is responsible for roughly three-quarters of the difference in global mean net cloud feedback among models, with the largest contributions from regions associated with low-level subtropical marine cloud systems.

  18. Enhancement of Field Squeezing Using Coherent Feedback

    E-print Network

    J. E. Gough; S. Wildfeuer

    2009-08-22

    The theory of quantum feedback networks has recently been developed with the aim of showing how quantum input-output components may be connected together so as to control, stabilize or enhance the performance of one of the subcomponents. In this paper we show how the degree to which an idealized component (a degenerate parametric amplifier in the strong-coupling regime) can squeeze input fields may be enhanced by placing the component in-loop in a simple feedback mechanism involving a beam splitter. We study the spectral properties of output fields, placing particular emphasis on the elastic and inelastic components of the power density.

  19. Negative Feedback Facilitates Temperature Robustness in Biomolecular Circuit Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Murray, Richard M.

    Negative Feedback Facilitates Temperature Robustness in Biomolecular Circuit Dynamics Shaunak Sen dynamics in many biomolecular circuits can change with temperature because of the temperature dependence of underlying reaction rate parameters. It is generally unclear what circuit mechanisms can inherently

  20. Visual Feedback in a Coordinated Hand-Eye System

    E-print Network

    Woodham, Robert J.

    A system is proposed for the development of new techniques for the control and monitoring of a mechanical arm-hand. The use of visual feedback is seen to provide new interactive capabilities in a machine hand-eye system. ...