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Sample records for positive feedback mechanisms

  1. Amplification of ABA biosynthesis and signaling through a positive feedback mechanism in seeds.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Mariko; Sall, Khadidiatou; Nambara, Eiji; Nonogaki, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-01

    Abscisic acid is an essential hormone for seed dormancy. Our previous study using the plant gene switch system, a chemically induced gene expression system, demonstrated that induction of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a rate-limiting ABA biosynthesis gene, was sufficient to suppress germination in imbibed Arabidopsis seeds. Here, we report development of an efficient experimental system that causes amplification of NCED expression during seed maturation. The system was created with a Triticum aestivum promoter containing ABA responsive elements (ABREs) and a Sorghum bicolor NCED to cause ABA-stimulated ABA biosynthesis and signaling, through a positive feedback mechanism. The chimeric gene pABRE:NCED enhanced NCED and ABF (ABRE-binding factor) expression in Arabidopsis Columbia-0 seeds, which caused 9- to 73-fold increases in ABA levels. The pABRE:NCED seeds exhibited unusually deep dormancy which lasted for more than 3 months. Interestingly, the amplified ABA pathways also caused enhanced expression of Arabidopsis NCED5, revealing the presence of positive feedback in the native system. These results demonstrated the robustness of positive feedback mechanisms and the significance of NCED expression, or single metabolic change, during seed maturation. The pABRE:NCED system provides an excellent experimental system producing dormant and non-dormant seeds of the same maternal origin, which differ only in zygotic ABA. The pABRE:NCED seeds contain a GFP marker which enables seed sorting between transgenic and null segregants and are ideal for comparative analysis. In addition to its utility in basic research, the system can also be applied to prevention of pre-harvest sprouting during crop production, and therefore contributes to translational biology. PMID:24520869

  2. Position feedback control system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    Disclosed is a system and method for independently evaluating the spatial positional performance of a machine having a movable member, comprising an articulated coordinate measuring machine comprising: a first revolute joint; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the first joint, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto, wherein the probe tip is pivotally mounted to the movable machine member; a second revolute joint; a first support arm serially connecting the first joint to the second joint; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the first and second revolute joints, for calculating the spatial coordinates of the probe tip; means for kinematically constraining the articulated coordinate measuring machine to a working surface; and comparator means, in operative association with the coordinate processing means and with the movable machine, for comparing the true position of the movable machine member, as measured by the true position of the probe tip, with the desired position of the movable machine member.

  3. Depletion of retinoic acid receptors initiates a novel positive feedback mechanism that promotes teratogenic increases in retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    D'Aniello, Enrico; Rydeen, Ariel B; Anderson, Jane L; Mandal, Amrita; Waxman, Joshua S

    2013-01-01

    Normal embryonic development and tissue homeostasis require precise levels of retinoic acid (RA) signaling. Despite the importance of appropriate embryonic RA signaling levels, the mechanisms underlying congenital defects due to perturbations of RA signaling are not completely understood. Here, we report that zebrafish embryos deficient for RA receptor αb1 (RARαb1), a conserved RAR splice variant, have enlarged hearts with increased cardiomyocyte (CM) specification, which are surprisingly the consequence of increased RA signaling. Importantly, depletion of RARαb2 or concurrent depletion of RARαb1 and RARαb2 also results in increased RA signaling, suggesting this effect is a broader consequence of RAR depletion. Concurrent depletion of RARαb1 and Cyp26a1, an enzyme that facilitates degradation of RA, and employment of a novel transgenic RA sensor line support the hypothesis that the increases in RA signaling in RAR deficient embryos are the result of increased embryonic RA coupled with compensatory RAR expression. Our results support an intriguing novel mechanism by which depletion of RARs elicits a previously unrecognized positive feedback loop that can result in developmental defects due to teratogenic increases in embryonic RA. PMID:23990796

  4. Histone demethylase KDM5A is regulated by its reader domain through a positive-feedback mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Idelisse Ortiz; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Nnadi, Chimno I.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Kelly, Mark J. S.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2015-02-01

    The retinoblastoma binding protein KDM5A removes methyl marks from lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). Misregulation of KDM5A contributes to the pathogenesis of lung and gastric cancers. In addition to its catalytic jumonji C domain, KDM5A contains three PHD reader domains, commonly recognized as chromatin recruitment modules. It is unknown whether any of these domains in KDM5A have functions beyond recruitment and whether they regulate the catalytic activity of the demethylase. Here using biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structural studies, we show that the PHD1 preferentially recognizes unmethylated H3K4 histone tail, product of KDM5A-mediated demethylation of tri-methylated H3K4 (H3K4me3). Binding of unmodified H3 peptide to the PHD1 stimulates catalytic domain-mediated removal of methyl marks from H3K4me3 peptide and nucleosome substrates. This positive-feedback mechanism—enabled by the functional coupling between a reader and a catalytic domain in KDM5A—suggests a model for the spread of demethylation on chromatin.

  5. Positive feedback, memory, and the predictability of earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Sammis, C. G.; Sornette, D.

    2002-01-01

    We review the “critical point” concept for large earthquakes and enlarge it in the framework of so-called “finite-time singularities.” The singular behavior associated with accelerated seismic release is shown to result from a positive feedback of the seismic activity on its release rate. The most important mechanisms for such positive feedback are presented. We solve analytically a simple model of geometrical positive feedback in which the stress shadow cast by the last large earthquake is progressively fragmented by the increasing tectonic stress. PMID:11875202

  6. Regulation of alkane degradation pathway by a TetR family repressor via an autoregulation positive feedback mechanism in a Gram-positive Dietzia bacterium.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie-Liang; Nie, Yong; Wang, Miaoxiao; Xiong, Guangming; Wang, Yi-Ping; Maser, Edmund; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2016-01-01

    n-Alkanes are ubiquitous in nature and serve as important carbon sources for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Hydroxylation of n-alkanes by alkane monooxygenases is the first and most critical step in n-alkane metabolism. However, regulation of alkane degradation genes in Gram-positive bacteria remains poorly characterized. We therefore explored the transcriptional regulation of an alkB-type alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion gene, alkW1, from Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b. The alkW1 promoter was characterized and so was the putative TetR family regulator, AlkX, located downstream of alkW1 gene. We further identified an unusually long 48 bp inverted repeat upstream of alkW1 and demonstrated the binding of AlkX to this operator. Analytical ultracentrifugation and microcalorimetric results indicated that AlkX formed stable dimers in solution and two dimers bound to one operator in a positive cooperative fashion characterized by a Hill coefficient of 1.64 (± 0.03) [k(D)  = 1.06 (± 0.16) μM, k(D) ' = 0.05 (± 0.01) μM]. However, the DNA-binding affinity was disrupted in the presence of long-chain fatty acids (C10-C24), suggesting that AlkX can sense the concentrations of n-alkane degradation metabolites. A model was therefore proposed where AlkX controls alkW1 expression in a metabolite-dependent manner. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the alkane hydroxylase gene regulation mechanism may be common among Actinobacteria. PMID:26418273

  7. Positive force feedback in bouncing gaits?

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Hartmut; Seyfarth, Andre; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    During bouncing gaits (running, hopping, trotting), passive compliant structures (e.g. tendons, ligaments) store and release part of the stride energy. Here, active muscles must provide the required force to withstand the developing tendon strain and to compensate for the inevitable energy losses. This requires an appropriate control of muscle activation. In this study, for hopping, the potential involvement of afferent information from muscle receptors (muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs) is investigated using a two-segment leg model with one extensor muscle. It is found that: (i) positive feedbacks of muscle-fibre length and muscle force can result in periodic bouncing; (ii) positive force feedback (F+) stabilizes bouncing patterns within a large range of stride energies (maximum hopping height of 16.3 cm, almost twofold higher than the length feedback); and (iii) when employing this reflex scheme, for moderate hopping heights (up to 8.8 cm), an overall elastic leg behaviour is predicted (hopping frequency of 1.4-3 Hz, leg stiffness of 9-27 kN m(-1)). Furthermore, F+ could stabilize running. It is suggested that, during the stance phase of bouncing tasks, the reflex-generated motor control based on feedbacks might be an efficient and reliable alternative to central motor commands. PMID:14561282

  8. Ribosome flow model with positive feedback

    PubMed Central

    Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs usually form a circular structure; thus, ribosomes that terminatae translation at the 3′ end can diffuse with increased probability to the 5′ end of the transcript, initiating another cycle of translation. This phenomenon describes ribosomal flow with positive feedback—an increase in the flow of ribosomes terminating translating the open reading frame increases the ribosomal initiation rate. The aim of this paper is to model and rigorously analyse translation with feedback. We suggest a modified version of the ribosome flow model, called the ribosome flow model with input and output. In this model, the input is the initiation rate and the output is the translation rate. We analyse this model after closing the loop with a positive linear feedback. We show that the closed-loop system admits a unique globally asymptotically stable equilibrium point. From a biophysical point of view, this means that there exists a unique steady state of ribosome distributions along the mRNA, and thus a unique steady-state translation rate. The solution from any initial distribution will converge to this steady state. The steady-state distribution demonstrates a decrease in ribosome density along the coding sequence. For the case of constant elongation rates, we obtain expressions relating the model parameters to the equilibrium point. These results may perhaps be used to re-engineer the biological system in order to obtain a desired translation rate. PMID:23720534

  9. Independent modal space control with positive position feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.; Fedor, J.

    1989-01-01

    An independent modal space control (IMSC) algorithm is presented, whose modal control forces are generated from a positive position feedback (PPF) strategy. The proposed algorithm combines the attributes of both the IMSC and the PPF, and maintains the simplicity of the IMSC as it designs the controller of a complex structure at the uncoupled modal level. The effectiveness of the algorithm in damping out the vibration of flexible structures is validated experimentally. A simple cantilevered beam is employed as an example of a flexible structure whose multimodes of vibration are controlled by a single actuator. Performance of the active control system is determined in the frequency and the time domains. The experimental results indicate the potential of the proposed methodology as a viable method for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures.

  10. Positive Radiative-Dynamic Feedback in Martian Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafkin, S. C.; Rothchild, A.; Pielke, R. A., Sr.

    2010-12-01

    This work follows from the work of Rafkin [2010] that identified a positive radiative-dynamic feedback mechanism for the growth and maintenance of Mars dust storms under idealized conditions. In this study, the feedback mechanism is explored under more realistic settings including complex background atmospheric structures, topography, thermal tidal forcing, and a variety of mesoscale circulations. As expected, the more complex situation tends to mute the evidence and the impact of the proposed feedback process. Nonetheless, telltale signatures of the feedback mechanism are present and are consistent with the findings from the idealized scenario. Mesoscale simulations at the proposed MSL landing site of Mawrth Valles serve as the foundation for feedback studies with the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. A background dust field is specified based on MGS-TES retrievals and a dynamically active perturbation dust field is superimposed. The perturbation field arises from dust lifting (both resolved and subgrid scale) and it is subject to transport, diffusion, and sedimentation; the perturbation field is allowed to evolve over time consistent with the dynamics. The dust is tracked via a bin model with 8 discrete mass bins. To test for radiative-dynamic feedback, the radiative activity of the perturbation dust can be toggled on or off. If lifted dust behaves as a passive tracer then the simulations with radiatively active perturbation dust should evolve similarly to those with radiatively inactive dust. In idealized cases, a large difference was noted between these two scenarios indicating that lifted dust was modifying the local circulation. In the realistic scenarios presented here, simulations with radiatively active dust produce a noticeable local drop in atmospheric pressure and an increase in wind speeds, particularly in dust lifting regions where atmospheric dust concentrations are maximized. Analysis of wind residuals show a tendency for rotational and

  11. The progesterone positive feedback effect in women after ovariectomy.

    PubMed

    Zavos, Apostolos; Dafopoulos, Konstantinos; Messini, Christina I; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Verikouki, Christina; Anifandis, George; Garas, Antonios; Messinis, Ioannis E

    2013-03-01

    Various ovarian substances regulate the secretion of gonadotrophins during the menstrual cycle, but there are still several unclarified issues. The aim of this study was to investigate the positive feedback effect of progesterone during the immediate period following ovariectomy. Experiments were performed in 12 normally cycling women (aged 39-49 years). Following abdominal hysterectomy plus bilateral ovariectomy performed on cycle day 3 (day 0), the women received either estradiol via skin patches (days 0-7, n = 6, group 1) or estradiol as above plus vaginal progesterone (days 1-7, n = 6, group 2). Serum estradiol values increased similarly in the two groups. After the operation, serum progesterone levels decreased significantly in group 1, while in group 2 they remained stable becoming higher than in group 1 (p < 0.05). An LH and an FSH surge occurred in group 2 with the values after the peak returning to the pre-surge baseline. In contrast, in group 1 LH and FSH levels following an initial decrease, increased gradually until the end of the experiment. These results demonstrate that, despite a variable response to estrogens, the positive feedback effect of progesterone remained intact immediately after ovariectomy in women. It is suggested that it is the combining action of estradiol and progesterone that can ensure the expression of a positive feedback mechanism in women. PMID:23153029

  12. Distinguishing Feedback Mechanisms in Clock Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Alexander; Lubensky, David

    Biological oscillators are very diverse but can be classified based on dynamical motifs such as type of feedback. The S. Elongatus circadian oscillator is a novel circadian oscillator that can operate at constant protein number by modifying covalent states. It can be reproduced in vitro with only 3 different purified proteins: KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. We use computational and analytic techniques to compare models of the S. Elongatus post-translational oscillator that rely on positive feedback with models that rely on negative feedback. We show that introducing a protein that binds competitively with KaiA to the KaiB-KaiC complex can distinguish between positive and negative feedback as the primary driver of the rhythm, which has so far been difficult to address experimentally. NSF Grant DMR-1056456.

  13. Positive Feedbacks Enhance Macroalgal Resilience on Degraded Coral Reefs.

    PubMed

    Dell, Claire L A; Longo, Guilherme O; Hay, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Many reefs have shifted from coral and fish dominated habitats to less productive macroalgal dominated habitats, and current research is investigating means of reversing this phase shift. In the tropical Pacific, overfished reefs with inadequate herbivory can become dominated by the brown alga Sargassum polycystum. This alga suppresses recruitment and survival of corals and fishes, thus limiting the potential for reef recovery. Here we investigate the mechanisms that reinforce S. polycystum dominance and show that in addition to negatively affecting other species, this species acts in a self-reinforcing manner, positively promoting survival and growth of conspecifics. We found that survival and growth of both recruit-sized and mature S. polycystum fronds were higher within Sargassum beds than outside the beds and these results were found in both protected and fished reefs. Much of this benefit resulted from reduced herbivory within the Sargassum beds, but adult fronds also grew ~50% more within the beds even when herbivory did not appear to be occurring, suggesting some physiological advantage despite the intraspecific crowding. Thus via positive feedbacks, S. polycystum enhances its own growth and resistance to herbivores, facilitating its dominance (perhaps also expansion) and thus its resilience on degraded reefs. This may be a key feedback mechanism suppressing the recovery of coral communities in reefs dominated by macroalgal beds. PMID:27186979

  14. Positive Feedbacks Enhance Macroalgal Resilience on Degraded Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Dell, Claire L. A.; Longo, Guilherme O.

    2016-01-01

    Many reefs have shifted from coral and fish dominated habitats to less productive macroalgal dominated habitats, and current research is investigating means of reversing this phase shift. In the tropical Pacific, overfished reefs with inadequate herbivory can become dominated by the brown alga Sargassum polycystum. This alga suppresses recruitment and survival of corals and fishes, thus limiting the potential for reef recovery. Here we investigate the mechanisms that reinforce S. polycystum dominance and show that in addition to negatively affecting other species, this species acts in a self-reinforcing manner, positively promoting survival and growth of conspecifics. We found that survival and growth of both recruit-sized and mature S. polycystum fronds were higher within Sargassum beds than outside the beds and these results were found in both protected and fished reefs. Much of this benefit resulted from reduced herbivory within the Sargassum beds, but adult fronds also grew ~50% more within the beds even when herbivory did not appear to be occurring, suggesting some physiological advantage despite the intraspecific crowding. Thus via positive feedbacks, S. polycystum enhances its own growth and resistance to herbivores, facilitating its dominance (perhaps also expansion) and thus its resilience on degraded reefs. This may be a key feedback mechanism suppressing the recovery of coral communities in reefs dominated by macroalgal beds. PMID:27186979

  15. Alignment positioning mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantasia, Peter M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An alignment positioning mechanism for correcting and compensating for misalignment of structures to be coupled is disclosed. The mechanism comprises a power screw with a base portion and a threaded shank portion. A mounting fixture is provided for rigidly coupling said base portion to the mounting interface of a supporting structure with the axis of the screw perpendicular thereto. A traveling ball nut threaded on the power screw is formed with an external annular arcuate surface configured in the form of a spherical segment and enclosed by a ball nut housing with a conforming arcuate surface for permitting gimballed motion thereon. The ball nut housing is provided with a mounting surface which is positionable in cooperable engagement with the mounting interface of a primary structure to be coupled to the supporting structure. Cooperative means are provided on the ball nut and ball nut housing, respectively, for positioning the ball nut and ball nut housing in relative gimballed position within a predetermined range of relative angular relationship whereby severe structural stresses due to unequal loadings and undesirable bending moments on the mechanism are avoided.

  16. Sea ice-albedo climate feedback mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, J.L.; Curry, J.A.; Ebert, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism over the Arctic Ocean multiyear sea ice is investigated by conducting a series of experiments using several one-dimensional models of the coupled sea ice-atmosphere system. In its simplest form, ice-albedo feedback is thought to be associated with a decrease in the areal cover of snow and ice and a corresponding increase in the surface temperature, further decreasing the area cover of snow and ice. It is shown that the sea ice-albedo feedback can operate even in multiyear pack ice, without the disappearance of this ice, associated with internal processes occurring within the multiyear ice pack (e.g., duration of the snow cover, ice thickness, ice distribution, lead fraction, and melt pond characteristics). The strength of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism is compared for several different thermodynamic sea ice models: a new model that includes ice thickness distribution., the Ebert and Curry model, the Mayjut and Untersteiner model, and the Semtner level-3 and level-0 models. The climate forcing is chosen to be a perturbation of the surface heat flux, and cloud and water vapor feedbacks are inoperative so that the effects of the sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism can be isolated. The inclusion of melt ponds significantly strengthens the ice-albedo feedback, while the ice thickness distribution decreases the strength of the modeled sea ice-albedo feedback. It is emphasized that accurately modeling present-day sea ice thickness is not adequate for a sea ice parameterization; the correct physical processes must be included so that the sea ice parameterization yields correct sensitivities to external forcing. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Mechanical feedback stabilizes budding yeast morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavar, Samhita; Trogdon, Michael; Petzold, Linda; Campas, Otger

    Walled cells have the ability to remodel their shape while sustaining an internal turgor pressure that can reach values up to 10 atmospheres. This requires a tight and simultaneous regulation of cell wall assembly and mechanochemistry, but the underlying mechanisms by which this is achieved remain unclear. Using the growth of mating projections in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) as a motivating example, we have developed a theoretical description that couples the mechanics of cell wall expansion and assembly via a mechanical feedback. In the absence of a mechanical feedback, cell morphogenesis is inherently unstable. The presence of a mechanical feedback stabilizes changes in cell shape and growth, and provides a mechanism to prevent cell lysis in a wide range of conditions. We solve for the dynamics of the system and obtain the different dynamical regimes. In particular, we show that several parameters affect the stability of growth, including the strength of mechanical feedback in the system. Finally, we compare our results to existing experimental data.

  18. A unified approach to global and local beam position feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.

    1994-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The global feedback system uses 40 BPMs and 40 correctors per plane. Singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix is used for closed orbit correction. The local feedback system uses two X-ray BPMS, two rf BPMS, and the four-magnet local bump to control the angle and displacement of the X-ray beam from a bending magnet or an insertion device. Both the global and local feedback systems are based on digital signal processing (DSP) running at 4-kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. In this paper, we will discuss resolution of the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error and decoupling of the global and local feedback systems to maximize correction efficiency. In this scheme, the global feedback system absorbs the local bump closure error and the local feedback systems compensate for the effect of global feedback on the local beamlines. The required data sharing between the global and local feedback systems is done through the fiber-optically networked reflective memory.

  19. Positive feedback effect of oestradiol in superovulated women.

    PubMed

    Messinis, I E; Mademtzis, I; Zikopoulos, K; Tsahalina, E; Seferiadis, K; Tsolas, O; Templeton, A A

    1992-04-01

    To investigate the mechanism of blockage of the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in superovulated women, six normally ovulating women were studied in three cycles: a spontaneous cycle treated with exogenous oestrogen (oestradiol benzoate cycle), a cycle treated with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH; 225 IU/day; FSH cycle) and a cycle treated with FSH plus exogenous oestrogen (FSH + oestradiol benzoate cycle). Oestradiol benzoate was injected i.m. on cycle days 4 (0800 and 2000 h), 5 (0800 h) and 6 (0800 h) at doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 2.5 mg respectively to achieve supraphysiological levels of serum oestradiol. Exogenous oestrogen (supraphysiological oestradiol levels) induced an LH surge in all six women in the oestradiol benzoate cycles, but failed to stimulate an LH surge in three of the six patients during treatment with FSH. In three patients treated with FSH, an LH surge was stimulated both by supraphysiological (FSH + oestradiol benzoate cycles) and 'high normal' oestradiol levels (FSH cycles), while in three patients treated with FSH only, the LH surge was blocked, although the threshold level for the positive feedback effect had been exceeded by cycle day 9. We conclude that in women, supraphysiological concentrations of oestradiol exert a positive feedback effect on LH secretion. It is suggested that the occurrence of an LH surge in cycles superovulated with FSH is not dependent on serum oestradiol concentrations, but mainly on the strength of ovarian inhibitory substances. PMID:1522187

  20. Linking Nutrients to Growth through a Positive Feedback Loop.

    PubMed

    Palu, Rebecca A S; Thummel, Carl S

    2015-11-01

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Okamoto and Nishimura (2015) identify a positive feedback loop between neuronal cells that maintains insulin signaling and growth under restricted nutritional conditions. PMID:26555046

  1. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stel, Marielle; van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals…

  2. Equilibria and stability of a class of positive feedback loops.

    PubMed

    López-Caamal, Fernando; Middleton, Richard H; Huber, Heinrich J

    2014-02-01

    Positive feedback loops are common regulatory elements in metabolic and protein signalling pathways. The length of such feedback loops determines stability and sensitivity to network perturbations. Here we provide a mathematical analysis of arbitrary length positive feedback loops with protein production and degradation. These loops serve as an abstraction of typical regulation patterns in protein signalling pathways. We first perform a steady state analysis and, independently of the chain length, identify exactly two steady states that represent either biological activity or inactivity. We thereby provide two formulas for the steady state protein concentrations as a function of feedback length, strength of feedback, as well as protein production and degradation rates. Using a control theory approach, analysing the frequency response of the linearisation of the system and exploiting the Small Gain Theorem, we provide conditions for local stability for both steady states. Our results demonstrate that, under some parameter relationships, once a biological meaningful on steady state arises, it is stable, while the off steady state, where all proteins are inactive, becomes unstable. We apply our results to a three-tier feedback of caspase activation in apoptosis and demonstrate how an intermediary protein in such a loop may be used as a signal amplifier within the cascade. Our results provide a rigorous mathematical analysis of positive feedback chains of arbitrary length, thereby relating pathway structure and stability. PMID:23358701

  3. Ultrasensitive gene regulation by positive feedback loops in nucleosome modification.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Micheelsen, Mille A; Dodd, Ian B

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription involves the synergistic interaction of many different proteins. However, the question remains how eukaryotic promoters achieve ultrasensitive or threshold responses to changes in the concentration or activity of a single transcription factor (TF). We show theoretically that by recruiting a histone-modifying enzyme, a TF binding non-cooperatively to a single site can change the balance between opposing positive feedback loops in histone modification to produce a large change in gene expression in response to a small change in concentration of the TF. This mechanism can also generate bistable promoter responses, allowing a gene to be on in some cells and off in others, despite the cells being in identical conditions. In addition, the system provides a simple means by which the activities of many TFs could be integrated at a promoter. PMID:18414483

  4. Position feedback system for volume holographic storage media

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Nathan J.; Henson, James A.; Carpenter, Christopher M.; Akin, Jr.. William R.; Ehrlich, Richard M.; Beazley, Lance D.

    1998-07-07

    A method of holographic recording in a photorefractive medium wherein stored holograms may be retrieved with maximum signal-to noise ratio (SNR) is disclosed. A plurality of servo blocks containing position feedback information is recorded in the crystal and made non-erasable by heating the crystal. The servo blocks are recorded at specific increments, either angular or frequency, depending whether wavelength or angular multiplexing is applied, and each servo block is defined by one of five patterns. Data pages are then recorded at positions or wavelengths enabling each data page to be subsequently reconstructed with servo patterns which provide position feedback information. The method of recording data pages and servo blocks is consistent with conventional practices. In addition, the recording system also includes components (e.g. voice coil motor) which respond to position feedback information and adjust the angular position of the reference angle of a reference beam to maximize SNR by reducing crosstalk, thereby improving storage capacity.

  5. Folding with thermal-mechanical feedback: Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Hudleston, Peter J.

    2009-07-01

    A recent paper in this Journal by Bruce Hobbs, Klaus Regenauer-Lieb and Alison Ord [Hobbs, B., Regenauer-Lieb, K., Ord, A., 2008. Folding with thermal-mechanical feedback. Journal of Structural Geology 30, 1572-1592] presents an alternative theory to the traditional Biot-Ramberg theory for folding of viscous rocks that involves non-equilibrium thermodynamics and thermal-mechanical feedback. The authors convey a strong message throughout their paper that the folds produced by this theoretical and numerical modelling are geologically realistic and provide a better explanation for many natural folds than the traditional theory. They promise the same approach for boudinage, and present this folding paper as part of a "unified framework for rock deformation processes". Readers of the Journal of Structural Geology might be led to conclude that this paper provides a good alternative model for folding of rocks. Our discussion will disagree, on four counts.

  6. Feedback in Action--The Mechanism of the Iris.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pingnet, B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstration experiments. Outlines a demonstration of the general principle of positive and negative feedback and the influence of time delays in feedback circuits. Elucidates the principle of negative feedback with a model of the iris of the eye. Emphasizes the importance of feedback in biological systems. (CW)

  7. Beam position feedback system for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.

    1993-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The systems consist of 20 VME crates distributed around the ring, each running multiple digital signal processors (DSP) running at 4kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. The particle and X-ray beam position data is shared by the distributed processors through networked reflective memory. A theory of closed orbit correction using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix and simulation of its application to the APS storage ring will be discussed. This technique combines the global and local feedback systems and resolves the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error. Maximum correction efficiency is achieved by feeding back the global orbit data to the local feedback systems. The effect of the vacuum chamber eddy current induced by the AC corrector magnet field for local feedback systems is compensated by digital filters. Results of experiments conducted on the X-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source and the SPEAR at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory will be presented.

  8. Stochastic gene expression with bursting and positive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platini, Thierry; Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    Stochasticity (or noise) in the process of gene expression can play a critical role in cellular circuits that control switching between probabilistic cell-fate decisions in diverse organisms. Such circuits often include positive feedback loops as critical elements. In some cases (e.g. HIV-1 viral infections), switching between different cell fates occurs even in the absence of bistability in the underlying deterministic model. To characterize the role of noise in such systems, we analyze a simple gene expression circuit that includes contributions from both transcriptional and translational bursting and positive feedback effects. Using a combination of analytical approaches and stochastic simulations, we explore how the underlying parameters control the corresponding mean and variance in protein distributions.

  9. Improved Position Sensor for Feedback Control of Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert; Savage, Larry; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    An improved optoelectronic apparatus has been developed to provide the position feedback needed for controlling the levitation subsystem of a containerless-processing system. As explained, the advantage of this apparatus over prior optoelectronic apparatuses that have served this purpose stems from the use of an incandescent lamp, instead of a laser, to illuminate the levitated object. In containerless processing, a small object to be processed is levitated (e.g., by use of a microwave, low-frequency electromagnetic, electrostatic, or acoustic field) so that it is not in contact with the wall of the processing chamber or with any other solid object during processing. In the case of electrostatic or low-frequency electromagnetic levitation, real-time measurement of the displacement of the levitated object from its nominal levitation position along the vertical axis (and, in some cases, along one or two horizontal axes) is needed for feedback control of the levitating field.

  10. Feedback Mechanisms in a Mechanical Model of Cell Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinxin; Carlsson, Anders E.

    2014-01-01

    Directed cell migration requires a spatially polarized distribution of polymerized actin. We develop and treat a mechanical model of cell polarization based on polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments at the two ends of a cell, modulated by forces at either end that are coupled by the cell membrane. We solve this model using both a simulation approach that treats filament nucleation, polymerization, and depolymerization stochastically, and a rate-equation approach based on key properties such as the number of filaments N and the number of polymerized subunits F at either end of the cell. The rate-equation approach agrees closely with the stochastic approach at steady state and, when appropriately generalized, also predicts the dynamic behavior accurately. The calculated transitions from symmetric to polarized states show that polarization is enhanced by a high free-actin concentration, a large pointed-end off-rate, a small barbed-end off-rate, and a small spontaneous nucleation rate. The rate-equation approach allows us to perform a linear-stability analysis to pin down the key interactions that drive the polarization. The polarization is driven by a positive-feedback loop having two interactions. First, an increase in F at one side of the cell lengthens the filaments and thus reduces the decay rate of N (increasing N); second, increasing N enhances F because the force per growing filament tip is reduced. We find that the transitions induced by changing system properties result from supercritical pitchfork bifurcations. The filament lifetime depends strongly on the average filament length, and this effect is crucial for obtaining polarization correctly. PMID:25313164

  11. Graded Positive Feedback in Elasmobranch Ampullae of Lorenzini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmijn, Ad. J.

    2003-05-01

    The acute electrical sensitivity of marine sharks and rays is the greatest known in the Animal Kingdom. I investigate the possibility that the underlying biophysical principles are the very same as those encountered in the central nervous system of animal and man. The elasmobranch ampullae of Lorenzini detect the weak electric fields originating from the oceanic environment, whereas the nerve cells of the brain detect the electric fields arising, well, from the central nervous system. In responding to electrical signals, the cell membranes of excitable cells behave in different regions of the cell as negative or positive conductors. The negative and positive conductances in series, loaded by the cell's electrolytic environment, constitute a positive feedback circuit. The result may be of an all-or-none nature, as in peripheral nerve conduction, or of a graded nature, as in central processing. In this respect, the operation of the elasmobranch ampullae of Lorenzini is more akin to the graded, integrative processes of higher brain centers than to the conduction of nerve action potentials. Hence, the positive-feedback ampullary circuit promises to help elucidate the functioning of the central nervous system as profoundly as the squid giant axon has served to reveal the process of nervous conduction.

  12. [Feedback control mechanisms of plant cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    We have generated considerable evidence for the significance of wall stress relaxation in the control of plant growth and found that several agents (gibberellin, light, genetic loci for dwarf stature) influence growth rate via alteration of wall relaxation. We have refined our methods for measuring wall relaxation and, moreover, have found that wall relaxation properties bear only a distance relationship to wall mechanical properties. We have garnered novel insights into the nature of cell expansion mechanisms by analyzing spontaneous fluctuations of plant growth rate in seedlings. These experiments involved the application of mathematical techniques for analyzing growth rate fluctuations and the development of new instrumentation for measuring and forcing plant growth in a controlled fashion. These studies conclude that growth rate fluctuations generated by the plant as consequence of a feedback control system. This conclusion has important implications for the nature of wall loosening processes and demands a different framework for thinking about growth control. It also implies the existence of a growth rate sensor.

  13. Optical position feedback for electrostatically driven MOEMS scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortschanoff, A.; Baumgart, M.; Frank, A.; Wildenhain, M.; Sandner, T.; Schenk, H.; Kenda, A.

    2012-03-01

    For MOEMS devices which do not have intrinsic on-chip feedback, position information can be provided with optical methods, most simply by using a reflection from the backside of a MOEMS scanner. Measurement of timing signals using fast differential photodiodes can be used for resonant scanner mirrors performing sinusoidal motion with large amplitude. While this approach provides excellent accuracy it cannot be directly extended to arbitrary trajectories or static deflection angles. Another approach is based on the measurement of the position of the reflected laser beam with a quadrant diode. In this work, we present position sensing devices based on either principle and compare both approaches showing first experimental results from the implemented devices

  14. Local beam position feedback experiments on the ESRF storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Kahana, E.; Kirchman, J.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes the results of local beam position feedback experiments conducted on the ESRF storage ring using digital signal processing (DSP) under the trilateral agreement of collaboration among ESRF, APS, and SPring-8. Two rf beam position monitors (BPMS) in the, upstream and downstream of the insertion device (ID) and two x-ray BPMs in the sixth cell were used to monitor the electron beam and the x-ray beam emitted from the ID, respectively. The local bump coefficients were obtained using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) on the global response matrix for the bump magnets and all the available BPMs outside the local bump. The local response matrix was then obtained between the two three-magnet bumps and the position monitors. The data sampling frequency was 4 kHz and a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controller was used. The result indicates the closed-loop feedback bandwidth close to 100 Hz and clear attenuation ({approx} {minus}40 dB) of the 7-Hz beam motion due to girder vibration resonance. Comparison of the results using the rf BPMs and x-ray BPMs will be also discussed.

  15. The better, the bigger: The effect of graded positive performance feedback on the reward positivity.

    PubMed

    Frömer, Romy; Stürmer, Birgit; Sommer, Werner

    2016-02-01

    In this study on skill acquisition in a computerized throwing task, we examined the effect of graded correct-related performance feedback on the reward positivity of the event-related brain potential (ERP). Theories of reinforcement learning predict effects of reward magnitude and expectancy on the reward prediction error. The later is supposed to be reflected in reward positivity, a fronto-central ERP component. A sample of 68 participants learned to throw at a beamer-projected target disk while performance accuracy, displayed as the place of impact of the projectile on the target, served as graded feedback. Effects of performance accuracy in successful trials, hit frequency, and preceding trial performance on reward positivity were analyzed simultaneously on a trial-by-trial basis by means of linear mixed models. In accord with previous findings, reward positivity increased with feedback about more accurate performance. This relationship was not linear, but cubic, with larger impact of feedback towards the end of the accuracy distribution. In line with being a measure of expectancy, the reward positivity decreased with increasing hit frequency and was larger after unsuccessful trials. The effect of hit frequency was more pronounced following successful trials. These results indicate a fast trial-by-trial adaptation of expectation. The results confirm predictions of reinforcement learning theory and extend previous findings on reward magnitude to the area of complex, goal directed skill acquisition. PMID:26756995

  16. Towards positive feedbacks between vegetation and tropospheric O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanLoocke, A. D.; Bernacchi, C. J.; Ainsworth, E. A.; Betzelberger, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The concentration of tropospheric ozone ([O3]) has approximately doubled since 1900 and is projected to continue increasing. The extent of this increase depends strongly on the emission of ozone precursors as well as changing temperature and humidity. The responses of vegetation to O3 may also have the potential to positively feedback on regional climate and on the cycle of O3 formation and destruction. Plant productivity is linked to feedbacks in the climate indirectly through the carbon cycle as well as directly through the partitioning of radiation into sensible and latent heat fluxes. In the troposphere, O3 reduces plant productivity, an effect that is pronounced in soybean, the 4th most important food crop in the world. The soybean-maize agro-ecosystem is the largest ecosystem in the contiguous U.S., therefore changes in productivity and water use by soybean under increasing [O3] could impact the regional climate and hydrologic cycle in Midwestern U.S. with feedback effects on tropospheric O3 production and cycling. To assess the response to increasing [O3], soybeans were grown under open-air agricultural conditions at the SoyFACE research facility. During the 2009 growing season, eight 20 m diameter plots were exposed to different [O3] ranging from 40 to 200 ppb. Measurements of leaf-level gas exchange were made on four dates throughout the growing season and non-destructive measurements of Leaf Area Index were made weekly. Canopy latent and sensible heat fluxes were measured continuously throughout the growing season (day of year 197-245) using a residual energy balance micrometeorological technique. Results show that as [O3] increased, rates of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance decreased. Productivity, (i.e. seed yield) decreased by over 60% from 40 to 200 ppb while canopy evapotranspiration decreased by 30%. Sensible heat flux increased by 30%, while the growing season average canopy temperatures increased by 1 °C and with peak increases of 2

  17. Brain Activity Elicited by Positive and Negative Feedback in Preschool-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Xiaoqin; Tardif, Twila; Doan, Stacey N.; Liu, Chao; Gehring, William J.; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the processing of positive vs. negative feedback in children aged 4–5 years, we devised a prize-guessing game that is analogous to gambling tasks used to measure feedback-related brain responses in adult studies. Unlike adult studies, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) elicited by positive feedback was as large as that elicited by negative feedback, suggesting that the neural system underlying the FRN may not process feedback valence in early childhood. In addition, positive feedback, compared with negative feedback, evoked a larger P1 over the occipital scalp area and a larger positive slow wave (PSW) over the right central-parietal scalp area. We believe that the PSW is related to emotional arousal and the intensive focus on positive feedback that is present in the preschool and early school years has adaptive significance for both cognitive and emotional development during this period. PMID:21526189

  18. Brain activity elicited by positive and negative feedback in preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Mai, Xiaoqin; Tardif, Twila; Doan, Stacey N; Liu, Chao; Gehring, William J; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the processing of positive vs. negative feedback in children aged 4-5 years, we devised a prize-guessing game that is analogous to gambling tasks used to measure feedback-related brain responses in adult studies. Unlike adult studies, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) elicited by positive feedback was as large as that elicited by negative feedback, suggesting that the neural system underlying the FRN may not process feedback valence in early childhood. In addition, positive feedback, compared with negative feedback, evoked a larger P1 over the occipital scalp area and a larger positive slow wave (PSW) over the right central-parietal scalp area. We believe that the PSW is related to emotional arousal and the intensive focus on positive feedback that is present in the preschool and early school years has adaptive significance for both cognitive and emotional development during this period. PMID:21526189

  19. Integrated packaging of 2D MOEMS mirrors with optical position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, M.; Lenzhofer, M.; Kremer, M. P.; Tortschanoff, A.

    2015-02-01

    Many applications of MOEMS microscanners rely on accurate position feedback. For MOEMS devices which do not have intrinsic on-chip feedback, position information can be provided with optical methods, most simply by using a reflection from the backside of a MOEMS scanner. By measuring the intensity distribution of the reflected beam across a quadrant diode, one can precisely detect the mirror's deflection angles. Previously, we have presented a position sensing device, applicable to arbitrary trajectories, which is based on the measurement of the position of the reflected laser beam with a quadrant diode. In this work, we present a novel setup, which comprises the optical position feedback functionality integrated into the device package itself. The new device's System-in-Package (SiP) design is based on a flip-folded 2.5D PCB layout and fully assembled as small as 9.2×7×4 mm³ in total. The device consists of four layers, which supply the MOEMS mirror, a spacer to provide the required optical path length, the quadrant photo-diode and a laser diode to serve as the light source. In addition to describing the mechanical setup of the novel device, we will present first experimental results and optical simulation studies. Accurate position feedback is the basis for closed-loop control of the MOEMS devices, which is crucial for some applications as image projection for example. Position feedback and the possibility of closed-loop control will significantly improve the performance of these devices.

  20. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  1. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz, respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  2. Understanding positive feedback between PNA and synoptic eddies by eddy structure decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fang; Ren, Hong-Li; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, You

    2016-08-01

    In the upper troposphere during winter, positive synoptic eddy (SE) feedback plays an indispensible role in maintaining the Pacific-North American (PNA) pattern that dominates climate variability on inter-annual timescales over the North Pacific and downstream regions. This study shows that the eddy forcing, induced by eddy-vorticity (EV) fluxes, is not only in-phase with, but also downstream to the PNA pattern in terms of its northeast Pacific lobe. We employ the eddy structure decomposition method to understand such an observed PNA-SEs feedback, and propose a kinematic mechanism that can depict dynamical processes associated with the eddy structure change and its induced positive eddy feedback relative to the PNA flow pattern. With this method, the winter-mean PNA-related SE structures are separated into climatological (basic) and anomalous SE structures, and these two parts can be used to represent the changes in SE structure in a statistical sense and then to calculate the EV fluxes in order to further elucidate the feedback mechanism. It is demonstrated that, on one hand, the winter-mean PNA flow tends to systematically deform the structures of SEs and induce anomalous EV fluxes, and these winter-mean EV fluxes primarily converge into the PNA cyclonic center, which, in return enhances the PNA flow. On the other hand, the PNA-related northeast Pacific flow is featured by a stronger zonal wind shear in the east than the west, which can induce larger zonal-slanting eddy structure change and then stronger meridional EV fluxes that converge to form downstream feedback. This kinematic mechanism may help to deeply understand the dynamical eddy feedback between the low-frequency PNA flow and high-frequency SEs.

  3. Robust, tunable genetic memory from protein sequestration combined with positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Shopera, Tatenda; Henson, William R; Ng, Andrew; Lee, Young Je; Ng, Kenneth; Moon, Tae Seok

    2015-10-15

    Natural regulatory networks contain many interacting components that allow for fine-tuning of switching and memory properties. Building simple bistable switches, synthetic biologists have learned the design principles of complex natural regulatory networks. However, most switches constructed so far are so simple (e.g. comprising two regulators) that they are functional only within a limited parameter range. Here, we report the construction of robust, tunable bistable switches in Escherichia coli using three heterologous protein regulators (ExsADC) that are sequestered into an inactive complex through a partner swapping mechanism. On the basis of mathematical modeling, we accurately predict and experimentally verify that the hysteretic region can be fine-tuned by controlling the interactions of the ExsADC regulatory cascade using the third member ExsC as a tuning knob. Additionally, we confirm that a dual-positive feedback switch can markedly increase the hysteretic region, compared to its single-positive feedback counterpart. The dual-positive feedback switch displays bistability over a 10(6)-fold range of inducer concentrations, to our knowledge, the largest range reported so far. This work demonstrates the successful interlocking of sequestration-based ultrasensitivity and positive feedback, a design principle that can be applied to the construction of robust, tunable, and predictable genetic programs to achieve increasingly sophisticated biological behaviors. PMID:26384562

  4. Positive feedback between increasing atmospheric CO2 and ecosystem productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Robertson, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 will likely affect both the hydrologic cycle and ecosystem productivity. Current assumptions that increasing CO2 will lead to increased ecosystem productivity and plant water use efficiency (WUE) are driving optimistic predictions of higher crop yields as well as greater availability of freshwater resources due to a decrease in evapotranspiration. The plant physiological response that drives these effects is believed to be an increase in carbon uptake either by (a) stronger CO2 gradient between the stomata and the atmosphere, or by (b) reduced CO2 limitation of enzymatic carboxylation within the leaf. The (a) scenario will lead to increased water use efficiency (WUE) in plants. However, evidence for increased WUE is mostly based on modeling studies, and experiments producing a short duration or step-wise increase in CO2 concentration (e.g. free-air CO2 enrichment). We hypothesize that the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration is having a positive effect on ecosystem productivity and WUE. To investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed meteorological, ANPP, and soil CO2 flux datasets together with carbon isotopic ratio (13C/12C) of archived plant samples from the long term ecological research (LTER) program at Kellogg Biological Station. The datasets were collected between 1989 and 2007 (corresponding to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration of ~33 ppmv at Mauna Loa). Wheat (Triticum aestivum) samples taken from 1989 and 2007 show a significant decrease in the C isotope discrimination factor (Δ) over time. Stomatal conductance is directly related to Δ, and thus Δ is inversely related to plant intrinsic WUE (iWUE). Historical changes in the 13C/12C ratio (δ13C) in samples of a perennial forb, Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), taken from adjacent successional fields, indicate changes in Δ upon uptake of CO2 as well. These temporal trends in Δ suggest a positive feedback between the increasing CO2 concentration in the

  5. Output feedback control of a mechanical system using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Carbajal, F; Valderrabano-Gonzalez, A; Rosas-Caro, J C; Favela-Contreras, A

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an application of a nonlinear magnetic levitation system to the problem of efficient active control of mass-spring-damper mechanical systems. An output feedback control scheme is proposed for reference position trajectory tracking tasks on the flexible mechanical system. The electromagnetically actuated system is shown to be a differentially flat nonlinear system. An extended state estimation approach is also proposed to obtain estimates of velocity, acceleration and disturbance signals. The differential flatness structural property of the system is then employed for the synthesis of the controller and the signal estimation approach presented in this work. Some experimental and simulation results are included to show the efficient performance of the control approach and the effective estimation of the unknown signals. PMID:25707718

  6. Periodic explosions by positive feedback in a rising foam column

    PubMed Central

    Zener, Clarence; Noriega, Jaime

    1982-01-01

    An aqueous foam rising adiabatically in a column suffers a drop in temperature. Under appropriate conditions, such a column periodically explodes. We here trace this explosion to the tight thermal coupling between the foam and its enclosing glass column. When the surface surfactant concentration is unbuffered by micelles, a positive feedback exists between the flow of heat from the walls into the foam and the thermal conductivity of the foam itself. In our highly expanded foam, heat is conducted through the foam cells' interior primarily by the heat-pipe effect. Such an effect is retarded by a dense layer of surfactant molecules. Heat absorption causes cell expansion, which, in a foam unbuffered by micelles, causes a reduction in surface concentration of surfactant molecules and, hence, in an increase in thermal conductivity. This interpretation of our observed periodic explosions is in agreement with all of our observations. PMID:16593192

  7. BLOWIN' IN THE WIND: BOTH ''NEGATIVE'' AND ''POSITIVE'' FEEDBACK IN AN OBSCURED HIGH-z QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Cresci, G.; Mannucci, F.; Mainieri, V.; Brusa, M.; Perna, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Piconcelli, E.; Feruglio, C.; Fiore, F.; Bongiorno, A.; Maiolino, R.; Merloni, A; Schramm, M.; Silverman, J. D.; Civano, F.

    2015-01-20

    Quasar feedback in the form of powerful outflows is invoked as a key mechanism to quench star formation in galaxies, preventing massive galaxies to overgrow and producing the red colors of ellipticals. On the other hand, some models are also requiring ''positive'' active galactic nucleus feedback, inducing star formation in the host galaxy through enhanced gas pressure in the interstellar medium. However, finding observational evidence of the effects of both types of feedback is still one of the main challenges of extragalactic astronomy, as few observations of energetic and extended radiatively driven winds are available. Here we present SINFONI near infrared integral field spectroscopy of XID2028, an obscured, radio-quiet z = 1.59 QSO detected in the XMM-COSMOS survey, in which we clearly resolve a fast (1500 km s{sup –1}) and extended (up to 13 kpc from the black hole) outflow in the [O III] lines emitting gas, whose large velocity and outflow rate are not sustainable by star formation only. The narrow component of Hα emission and the rest frame U-band flux from Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging enable to map the current star formation in the host galaxy: both tracers independently show that the outflow position lies in the center of an empty cavity surrounded by star forming regions on its edge. The outflow is therefore removing the gas from the host galaxy (''negative feedback''), but also triggering star formation by outflow induced pressure at the edges (''positive feedback''). XID2028 represents the first example of a host galaxy showing both types of feedback simultaneously at work.

  8. Blowin' in the Wind: Both "Negative" and "Positive" Feedback in an Obscured High-z Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresci, G.; Mainieri, V.; Brusa, M.; Marconi, A.; Perna, M.; Mannucci, F.; Piconcelli, E.; Maiolino, R.; Feruglio, C.; Fiore, F.; Bongiorno, A.; Lanzuisi, G.; Merloni, A.; Schramm, M.; Silverman, J. D.; Civano, F.

    2015-01-01

    Quasar feedback in the form of powerful outflows is invoked as a key mechanism to quench star formation in galaxies, preventing massive galaxies to overgrow and producing the red colors of ellipticals. On the other hand, some models are also requiring "positive" active galactic nucleus feedback, inducing star formation in the host galaxy through enhanced gas pressure in the interstellar medium. However, finding observational evidence of the effects of both types of feedback is still one of the main challenges of extragalactic astronomy, as few observations of energetic and extended radiatively driven winds are available. Here we present SINFONI near infrared integral field spectroscopy of XID2028, an obscured, radio-quiet z = 1.59 QSO detected in the XMM-COSMOS survey, in which we clearly resolve a fast (1500 km s-1) and extended (up to 13 kpc from the black hole) outflow in the [O III] lines emitting gas, whose large velocity and outflow rate are not sustainable by star formation only. The narrow component of Hα emission and the rest frame U-band flux from Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging enable to map the current star formation in the host galaxy: both tracers independently show that the outflow position lies in the center of an empty cavity surrounded by star forming regions on its edge. The outflow is therefore removing the gas from the host galaxy ("negative feedback"), but also triggering star formation by outflow induced pressure at the edges ("positive feedback"). XID2028 represents the first example of a host galaxy showing both types of feedback simultaneously at work.

  9. The Effect of Positive Feedback in a Constraint-Based Intelligent Tutoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrovic, Antonija; Ohlsson, Stellan; Barrow, Devon K.

    2013-01-01

    Tutoring technologies for supporting learning from errors via negative feedback are highly developed and have proven their worth in empirical evaluations. However, observations of empirical tutoring dialogs highlight the importance of positive feedback in the practice of expert tutoring. We hypothesize that positive feedback works by reducing…

  10. From Positivity to Negativity Bias: Ambiguity Affects the Neurophysiological Signatures of Feedback Processing.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Henning; Schnuerch, Robert; Stahl, Jutta

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies on the neurophysiological underpinnings of feedback processing almost exclusively used low-ambiguity feedback, which does not fully address the diversity of situations in everyday life. We therefore used a pseudo trial-and-error learning task to investigate ERPs of low- versus high-ambiguity feedback. Twenty-eight participants tried to deduce the rule governing visual feedback to their button presses in response to visual stimuli. In the blocked condition, the same two feedback words were presented across several consecutive trials, whereas in the random condition feedback was randomly drawn on each trial from sets of five positive and five negative words. The feedback-related negativity (FRN-D), a frontocentral ERP difference between negative and positive feedback, was significantly larger in the blocked condition, whereas the centroparietal late positive complex indicating controlled attention was enhanced for negative feedback irrespective of condition. Moreover, FRN-D in the blocked condition was due to increased reward positivity (Rew-P) for positive feedback, rather than increased (raw) FRN for negative feedback. Our findings strongly support recent lines of evidence that the FRN-D, one of the most widely studied signatures of reinforcement learning in the human brain, critically depends on feedback discriminability and is primarily driven by the Rew-P. A novel finding concerned larger frontocentral P2 for negative feedback in the random but not the blocked condition. Although Rew-P points to a positivity bias in feedback processing under conditions of low feedback ambiguity, P2 suggests a specific adaptation of information processing in case of highly ambiguous feedback, involving an early negativity bias. Generalizability of the P2 findings was demonstrated in a second experiment using explicit valence categorization of highly emotional positive and negative adjectives. PMID:26765948

  11. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  12. Treatment with a position feedback-controlled head stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Harris, F A

    1979-08-01

    A position feedback-controlled head stabilizer has been developed to provide cerebral palsied individuals with resistive exercise to strengthen the neck musculature. This apparatus detects "involuntary" head motion and stabilizes the head by applying opposing forces; it also can be used to facilitate muscular contraction by resisting the subject's voluntary movements. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether voluntary head control in cerebral palsied individuals can be improved through systematic exercise using the stabilizer to strengthen the muscles of the neck and improve their balance of action. The findings support the author's contention that this is possible. The apparatus consists of a helmet and shoulder pads, interconnected so that the head is supported in the helmet by a manipulator arm. At its lower end, the manipulator arm is attached to the shoulder pad mounting frame via a gimbal assembly which allows head movement in two planes of tilt (pitch, or forward-and back, and roll, or side-to-side). Feedback control circuitry is so arranged that any deviation of the head from the desired position leads to actuation of pneumatic cylinders, which apply torques to the manipulator gimbal axes so as to oppose or conteract the incipient head movement. It is particularly significant that none of these patients participating in these experiments were at all apprehensive about or resisted being placed in the apparatus. (Even the youngest subject to use the apparatus--five year old-- did not mind being restrained by the shoulder pads or having his head gripped by helment.) While JG utilized the safety release valve quite often during the first few head control training sessions, he soon became confident enough in the action of the stabilizer that he did not even bother to grip the handle of the release valve. While DA had the action of safety valve explained and demonstrated for her, she never bothered to use it even from the outset of her experience

  13. FEEDBACK FROM CENTRAL BLACK HOLES IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. CAN PURELY MECHANICAL ENERGY FEEDBACK MODELS WORK?

    SciTech Connect

    Shin Minsu; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ciotti, Luca

    2010-03-01

    By using high-resolution one-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, we investigate the effects of purely mechanical feedback from super massive black holes (SMBHs) in the evolution of elliptical galaxies for a broad range of feedback efficiencies and compare the results to four major observational constraints. In particular, we focus on (1) the central black hole to stellar mass ratio of the host galaxy, (2) the lifetime of the luminous quasar phase, (3) the mass of stars formed in the host galaxy within the last Gyr, and (4) the X-ray luminosity of the hot diffuse gas. As a result, we try to pin down the most successful range of mechanical feedback efficiencies. We find that while low feedback efficiencies result in too much growth of the SMBH, high efficiencies totally blow out the hot interstellar gas, and the models are characterized by very low thermal X-ray luminosity well below the observed range. The net lifetime of the quasar phase is strongly coupled to the mass ratio between SMBH and its host galaxy, while the X-ray luminosity is generally correlated to the recent star formation within the last Gyr. When considering the popularly adopted model of the constant feedback efficiency, the feedback energy deposited into the ambient medium should be more than 0.01% of the SMBH accretion energy to be consistent with the SMBH mass to stellar mass ratio in the local universe. Yet, the X-ray luminosity of the hot gas favors about 0.005% of the accretion energy as the mechanical active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback energy. We conclude that the purely mechanical feedback mode is unlikely to be simultaneously compatible with all four observable tests, even allowing a broad range of feedback efficiencies, and that including both radiative and mechanical feedback together may be a solution to comply with the observational constraints. In addition to the adopted observational constraints, our simulations also show that the ratio of SMBH growth rate over its current

  14. Feedback mechanism for smart nozzles and nebulizers

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar [Potomac, MD; Jorabchi, Kaveh [Arlington, VA; Kahen, Kaveh [Kleinburg, CA

    2009-01-27

    Nozzles and nebulizers able to produce aerosol with optimum and reproducible quality based on feedback information obtained using laser imaging techniques. Two laser-based imaging techniques based on particle image velocimetry (PTV) and optical patternation map and contrast size and velocity distributions for indirect and direct pneumatic nebulizations in plasma spectrometry. Two pulses from thin laser sheet with known time difference illuminate droplets flow field. Charge coupled device (CCL)) captures scattering of laser light from droplets, providing two instantaneous particle images. Pointwise cross-correlation of corresponding images yields two-dimensional velocity map of aerosol velocity field. For droplet size distribution studies, solution is doped with fluorescent dye and both laser induced florescence (LIF) and Mie scattering images are captured simultaneously by two CCDs with the same field of view. Ratio of LIF/Mie images provides relative droplet size information, then scaled by point calibration method via phase Doppler particle analyzer.

  15. A positive feedback at the cellular level promotes robustness and modulation at the circuit level.

    PubMed

    Dethier, Julie; Drion, Guillaume; Franci, Alessio; Sepulchre, Rodolphe

    2015-10-01

    This article highlights the role of a positive feedback gating mechanism at the cellular level in the robustness and modulation properties of rhythmic activities at the circuit level. The results are presented in the context of half-center oscillators, which are simple rhythmic circuits composed of two reciprocally connected inhibitory neuronal populations. Specifically, we focus on rhythms that rely on a particular excitability property, the postinhibitory rebound, an intrinsic cellular property that elicits transient membrane depolarization when released from hyperpolarization. Two distinct ionic currents can evoke this transient depolarization: a hyperpolarization-activated cation current and a low-threshold T-type calcium current. The presence of a slow activation is specific to the T-type calcium current and provides a slow positive feedback at the cellular level that is absent in the cation current. We show that this slow positive feedback is required to endow the network rhythm with physiological modulation and robustness properties. This study thereby identifies an essential cellular property to be retained at the network level in modeling network robustness and modulation. PMID:26311181

  16. Input overload: Contributions of retinoic acid signaling feedback mechanisms to heart development and teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    D'Aniello, Enrico; Waxman, Joshua S

    2015-03-01

    Appropriate levels of retinoic acid (RA) signaling are critical for normal heart development in vertebrates. A fascinating property of RA signaling is the thoroughness by which positive and negative feedback are employed to promote proper embryonic RA levels. In the present short review, we first cover the advancement of hypotheses regarding the impact of RA signaling on cardiac specification. We then discuss our current understanding of RA signaling feedback mechanisms and the implications of recent studies, which have indicated improperly maintained RA signaling feedback can be a contributing factor to developmental malformations. PMID:25418431

  17. Estrogen positive feedback on LH secretion in transsexuality.

    PubMed

    Gooren, L J; Rao, B R; van Kessel, H; Harmsen-Louman, W

    1984-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis whether there is variation in hormonal levels or response to hormonal manipulation that could permit a distinction between heterosexuals and transsexuals, we designed the following protocol: Six male-to-female (m-to-f) transsexuals, six heterosexual control females and six female-to-male (f-to-m) transsexuals were given estradiol benzoate (E2B) (4.5 micrograms/kg/12 hr) for five days. In the female population, E2B treatment was initiated on day 5 of the menstrual cycle. In all the subjects blood luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol-17 beta (E2) and testosterone (T) levels were measured twice daily. Additionally, LH and FSH responses to LHRH (100 micrograms iv) stimulation prior to and on day 5 of the E2B treatment were evaluated. In the m-to-f transsexuals, T levels decreased sharply and progressively during estrogen treatment, along with a fall in LH and FSH levels. The magnitude of the LH and FSH responses to LHRH stimulation also decreased following estrogen administration. In the heterosexual female controls and in the f-to-m transsexuals, estrogen administration increased LH levels to a minimum of 100% above initial values from day 3 onwards. Interestingly, the magnitude of the LH increase in the f-to-m transsexuals was greater than that of the heterosexual female controls. In both groups, LHRH stimulation resulted in a greater LH response compared to that prior to estrogen treatment. Our present observations, based on blood hormonal levels and responses to hormonal manipulations do not permit a distinction between heterosexual females and f-to-m transsexuals. There was no convincing evidence for the existence of a positive estrogen feedback on LH secretion in m-to-f transsexuals. These results contradict some of the reported hypotheses concerning hormonal alterations in these individuals. PMID:6436856

  18. Positive feedbacks to growth of an invasive grass through alteration of nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marissa R; Flory, S Luke; Phillips, Richard P

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which invasive plants maintain dominance is essential to achieving long-term restoration goals. While many reports have suggested invasive plants alter resource availability, experimental tests of feedbacks between invasive plants and soil resources are lacking. We used field observations and experimental manipulations to test if the invasive grass Microstegium vimineum both causes and benefits from altered soil nitrogen (N) cycling. To quantify M. vimineum effects on N dynamics, we compared inorganic N pools and nitrification rates in 20 naturally invaded and uninvaded plots across a range of mixed hardwood forests, and in experimentally invaded and uninvaded common garden plots. Potential nitrification rates were 142 and 63 % greater in invaded than uninvaded plots in forest and common garden soils, respectively. As a result, soil nitrate was the dominant form of inorganic N during peak M. vimineum productivity in both studies. To determine the response of M. vimineum to altered nitrogen availability, we manipulated the dominant N form (nitrate or ammonium) in greenhouse pots containing M. vimineum alone, M. vimineum with native species, and native species alone. M. vimineum productivity was highest in monocultures receiving nitrate; in contrast, uninvaded native communities showed no response to N form. Notably, the positive response of M. vimineum to nitrate was not apparent when grown in competition with natives, suggesting an invader density threshold is required before positive feedbacks occur. Collectively, our results demonstrate that persistence of invasive plants can be promoted by positive feedbacks with soil resources but that the magnitude of feedbacks may depend on interspecific interactions. PMID:22526935

  19. Competing Positive and Negative Feedbacks on Glacier Response to Climatic Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupper, S.; Todd, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    The adiabatic temperature lapse rate imparts a well-studied positive feedback on glacier changes in response to a given change in climate. For example, if temperature increases, the surface of the glacier thins into the warmer temperatures of the lower surface elevation, dependent upon the local lapse rate, which amplifies the glacier response to the original temperature. However, a less well-quantified negative feedback can also be at play. As the length and thickness of a valley glacier changes, the percentage of the glacier surface that is shaded changes as well, decreasing the incident shortwave radiation at the surface. Assuming turbulent heat fluxes are small, the balance between changing downward longwave radiation (adiabatic lapse rate effect) and shortwave radiation (shading effect) in response to a climatic change will determine the equilibrium glacier profile for the new climate state. Here we use an energy balance model to determine the sensitivity of glacial retreat reconstructions to both the temperature lapse rate and the shading by valley topography. We quantify the effect of shading and lapse rates on idealized glaciers and topography, and assess under what conditions one or the other feedback mechanism is expected to dominate the change in energy balance. We then examine the effect of temperature lapse rates and increased shading on a paleoglacier at Monroe Peak, in the Sevier Plateau, Utah. Although the peak is currently ice-free, lateral moraines on Monroe Peak show that a glacier once extended approximately 4000 m from a 4700 m high headwall on the western side of the peak. Preliminary results suggest that as the glacier retreated from its maximum position, increased shading had a significant positive effect on glacial mass balance which partially compensated for the lapse rate feedback. These preliminary results suggest that reconstructions of smaller glaciers surrounded by steep topography must account for changes in shading of the glacier

  20. Positive feedback and momentum growth during debris-flow entrainment of wet bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Reid, M.E.; Logan, M.; LaHusen, R.G.; Godt, J.W.; Griswold, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Debris flows typically occur when intense rainfall or snowmelt triggers landslides or extensive erosion on steep, debris-mantled slopes. The flows can then grow dramatically in size and speed as they entrain material from their beds and banks, but the mechanism of this growth is unclear. Indeed, momentum conservation implies that entrainment of static material should retard the motion of the flows if friction remains unchanged. Here we use data from large-scale experiments to assess the entrainment of bed material by debris flows. We find that entrainment is accompanied by increased flow momentum and speed only if large positive pore pressures develop in wet bed sediments as the sediments are overridden by debris flows. The increased pore pressure facilitates progressive scour of the bed, reduces basal friction and instigates positive feedback that causes flow speed, mass and momentum to increase. If dryer bed sediment is entrained, however, the feedback becomes negative and flow momentum declines. We infer that analogous feedbacks could operate in other types of gravity-driven mass flow that interact with erodible beds. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  1. Is Positive Feedback a Forgotten Classroom Practice? Findings and Implications for At-Risk Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprouls, Katie; Mathur, Sarup R.; Upreti, Gita

    2015-01-01

    Although using higher rates of positive to negative feedback is one best practice often recommended to teachers, particularly when it comes to students experiencing behavioral problems in classroom settings, research on the use of positive feedback in classroom teaching practice has revealed inconsistent results. Research has documented…

  2. System justification and electrophysiological responses to feedback: support for a positivity bias.

    PubMed

    Tritt, Shona M; Page-Gould, Elizabeth; Peterson, Jordan B; Inzlicht, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Conservatives, compared to liberals, are consistently found to exhibit physiological sensitivity to aversive stimuli. However, it remains unknown whether conservatives are also sensitive to salient positively valenced stimuli. We therefore used event-related potentials to determine the relationship between system justification (SJ), a fundamental component of conservative political ideology, and neural processing of negative and positive feedback. Participants (N = 29) filled out questionnaire assessments of SJ. Feedback-related negativity (FRN), an event-related potential component thought to index activity in neural regions associated with reward processing, was assessed in response to positive and negative feedback on a time estimation task. A significant interaction was noted between SJ and feedback type in predicting FRN. Simple effects tests suggested that SJ predicted greater FRN in response to positive but not to negative feedback. Conservatives may experience salient positive information with a heightened intensity. PMID:24274321

  3. Oscillatory profiles of positive, negative and neutral feedback stimuli during adaptive decision making.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Baker, Travis E; Warren, Chris; Li, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The electrophysiological response to positive and negative feedback during reinforcement learning has been well documented over the past two decades, yet, little is known about the neural response to uninformative events that often follow our actions. To address this issue, we recorded the electroencephalograph (EEG) during a time-estimation task using both informative (positive and negative) and uninformative (neutral) feedback. In the time-frequency domain, uninformative feedback elicited significantly less induced beta-gamma activity than informative feedback. This result suggests that beta-gamma activity is particularly sensitive to feedback that can guide behavioral adjustments, consistent with other work. In contrast, neither theta nor delta activity were sensitive to the difference between negative and neutral feedback, though both frequencies discriminated between positive, and non-positive (neutral or negative) feedback. Interestingly, in the time domain, we observed a linear relationship in the amplitude of the feedback-related negativity (neutral>negative>positive), a component of the event-related brain potential thought to index a specific kind of reinforcement learning signal called a reward prediction error. Taken together, these results suggest that the reinforcement learning system treats neutral feedback as a special case, providing valuable information about the electrophysiological measures used to index the cognitive function of frontal midline cortex. PMID:27378537

  4. Through-wafer optical probe characterization for microelectromechanical systems positional state monitoring and feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jeremy M.; Chen, Jingdong; Brown, Kolin S.; Famouri, Parviz F.; Hornak, Lawrence A.

    2000-12-01

    Implementation of closed-loop microelectromechanical system (MEMS) control enables mechanical microsystems to adapt to the demands of the environment that they are actuating, opening a broad range of new opportunities for future MEMS applications. Integrated optical microsystems have the potential to enable continuous in situ optical interrogation of MEMS microstructure position fully decoupled from the means of mechanical actuation that is necessary for realization of feedback control. We present the results of initial research evaluating through-wafer optical microprobes for surface micromachined MEMS integrated optical position monitoring. Results from the through-wafer free-space optical probe of a lateral comb resonator fabricated using the multiuser MEMS process service (MUMPS) indicate significant positional information content with an achievable return probe signal dynamic range of up to 80% arising from film transmission contrast. Static and dynamic deflection analysis and experimental results indicate a through-wafer probe positional signal sensitivity of 40 mV/micrometers for the present setup or 10% signal change per micrometer. A simulation of the application of nonlinear sliding control is presented illustrating position control of the lateral comb resonator structure given the availability of positional state information.

  5. A Relevance Feedback Mechanism for Content-Based Image Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciocca, G.; Schettini, R.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a relevance-feedback mechanism for content-based image retrieval that evaluates the feature distributions of the images judged relevant by the user and updates both the similarity measure and the query to accurately represent the user's information needs. (Author/LRW)

  6. Positive feedback can lead to dynamic nanometer-scale clustering on cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrens, Martijn; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Mugler, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Clustering of molecules on biological membranes is a widely observed phenomenon. A key example is the clustering of the oncoprotein Ras, which is known to be important for signal transduction in mammalian cells. Yet, the mechanism by which Ras clusters form and are maintained remains unclear. Recently, it has been discovered that activated Ras promotes further Ras activation. Here we show using particle-based simulation that this positive feedback is sufficient to produce persistent clusters of active Ras molecules at the nanometer scale via a dynamic nucleation mechanism. Furthermore, we find that our cluster statistics are consistent with experimental observations of the Ras system. Interestingly, we show that our model does not support a Turing regime of macroscopic reaction-diffusion patterning, and therefore that the clustering we observe is a purely stochastic effect, arising from the coupling of positive feedback with the discrete nature of individual molecules. These results underscore the importance of stochastic and dynamic properties of reaction diffusion systems for biological behavior.

  7. Positive feedback can lead to dynamic nanometer-scale clustering on cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrens, Martijn; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter; Mugler, Andrew

    2014-11-28

    Clustering of molecules on biological membranes is a widely observed phenomenon. A key example is the clustering of the oncoprotein Ras, which is known to be important for signal transduction in mammalian cells. Yet, the mechanism by which Ras clusters form and are maintained remains unclear. Recently, it has been discovered that activated Ras promotes further Ras activation. Here we show using particle-based simulation that this positive feedback is sufficient to produce persistent clusters of active Ras molecules at the nanometer scale via a dynamic nucleation mechanism. Furthermore, we find that our cluster statistics are consistent with experimental observations of the Ras system. Interestingly, we show that our model does not support a Turing regime of macroscopic reaction-diffusion patterning, and therefore that the clustering we observe is a purely stochastic effect, arising from the coupling of positive feedback with the discrete nature of individual molecules. These results underscore the importance of stochastic and dynamic properties of reaction diffusion systems for biological behavior.

  8. Coordination between digit forces and positions: interactions between anticipatory and feedback control.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiushi; Santello, Marco

    2014-04-01

    Humans adjust digit forces to compensate for trial-to-trial variability in digit placement during object manipulation, but the underlying control mechanisms remain to be determined. We hypothesized that such digit position/force coordination was achieved by both visually guided feed-forward planning and haptic-based feedback control. The question arises about the time course of the interaction between these two mechanisms. This was tested with a task in which subjects generated torque (± 70 N·mm) on a virtual object to control a cursor moving to target positions to catch a falling ball, using a virtual reality environment and haptic devices. The width of the virtual object was varied between large (L) and small (S). These object widths result in significantly different horizontal digit relative positions and require different digit forces to exert the same task torque. After training, subjects were tested with random sequences of L and S widths with or without visual information about object width. We found that visual cues allowed subjects to plan manipulation forces before contact. In contrast, when visual cues were not available to predict digit positions, subjects implemented a "default" digit force plan that was corrected after digit contact to eventually accomplish the task. The time course of digit forces revealed that force development was delayed in the absence of visual cues. Specifically, the appropriate digit force adjustments were made 250-300 ms after initial object contact. This result supports our hypothesis and further reveals that haptic feedback alone is sufficient to implement digit force-position coordination. PMID:24401711

  9. Linkages of plant-soil feedbacks and underlying invasion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Inderjit; Cahill, James F

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities and processes have repeatedly been shown to impact plant community assembly and population growth. Soil-driven effects may be particularly pronounced with the introduction of plants to non-native ranges, as introduced plants are not typically accompanied by transference of local soil communities. Here we describe how the mechanisms by which soil community processes influence plant growth overlap with several known and well-described mechanisms of plant invasion. Critically, a given soil community process may either facilitate or limit invasion, depending upon local conditions and the specific mechanisms of soil processes involved. Additionally, as soil communities typically consist of species with short generation times, the net consequences of plant-soil feedbacks for invasion trajectories are likely to change over time, as ecological and evolutionary adjustments occur. Here we provide an overview of the ecological linkages of plant-soil feedbacks and underlying mechanisms of invasion. PMID:25784668

  10. Eco-hydrological feedback mechanisms control ecological services in wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, J.; Hinz, C.; Vogwill, R.; Tareque, H.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems contain various feedback mechanisms between their abiotc and biotic components. The feedbacks are triggered by climate and propagate into patterns of environment partitioning based on distinct zones of hydrological function that vary in time and space. This partitioning co-evolves with vegetation, defines carbon metabolism and creates niches that govern patterns of flora and fauna abundance and distribution. Using a minimalistic model for wetland eco-hydrology, we explore vegetation adaptation to climate variability and the net metabolism of a wetland ecosystem given a range of climate conditions. We then apply the model to characterize the changes in niche habitat availability for a tortoise population endangered by a drying climate.

  11. Processing of Positive and Negative Feedback in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions.

    PubMed

    Rustemeier, Martina; Koch, Benno; Schwarz, Michael; Bellebaum, Christian

    2016-08-01

    It is well accepted that the cerebellum plays a crucial role in the prediction of the sensory consequences of movements. Recent findings of altered error processing in patients with selective cerebellar lesions led to the hypothesis that feedback processing and feedback-based learning might be affected by cerebellar damage as well. Thus, the present study investigated learning from and processing of positive and negative feedback in 12 patients with selective cerebellar lesions and healthy control subjects. Participants performed a monetary feedback learning task. The processing of positive and negative feedback was assessed by means of event-related potentials (ERPs) during the learning task and during a separate task in which the frequencies of positive and negative feedback were balanced. Patients did not show a general learning deficit compared to controls. Relative to the control group, however, patients with cerebellar lesions showed significantly higher ERP difference wave amplitudes (rewards-losses) in a time window between 250 and 450 ms after feedback presentation, possibly indicating impaired outcome prediction. The analysis of the original waveforms suggested that patients and controls primarily differed in their pattern of feedback-related negativity and P300 amplitudes. Our results add to recent findings on altered performance monitoring associated with cerebellar damage and demonstrate, for the first time, alterations of feedback processing in patients with cerebellar damage. Unaffected learning performance appears to suggest that chronic cerebellar lesions can be compensated in behaviour. PMID:26208703

  12. Active vibration control of a sandwich plate by non-collocated positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Giovanni; Amabili, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The active vibration control of a free rectangular sandwich plate by using the Positive Position Feedback (PPF) algorithm was experimentally investigated in a previous study. Four normal modes were controlled by four nearly collocated couples of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The experimental results of the control showed some limitation, especially in the Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO) configuration. This was attributed to the specific type of sensors and their conditioning, as well as to the phase shifts present in the vibration at different points of the structure. An alternative approach is here undertaken by abandoning the configuration of quasi-perfect collocation between sensor and actuator. The positioning of the piezoelectric patches is still led by the strain energy value distribution on the plate; each couple of sensor and actuator is now placed on the same face of the plate but in two distinct positions, opposed and symmetrical with respect to the geometric center of the plate. Single-Input Single-Output (SISO) PPF is tested and the transfer function parameters of the controller are tuned according to the measured values of modal damping. Then the participation matrices necessary for the MIMO control algorithm are determined by means of a completely experimental procedure. PPF is able to mitigate the vibration of the first four natural modes, in spite of the rigid body motions due to the free boundary conditions. The amplitude reduction achieved with the non-collocated configuration is much larger than the one obtained with the nearby collocated one. The phase lags were addressed in the MIMO algorithm by correction phase delays, further increasing the performance of the controller.

  13. Noise-controlled bistability in an excitable system with positive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kromer, Justus A.; Pinto, Reynaldo D.; Lindner, Benjamin; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2014-10-01

    We study the interplay between noise and a positive feedback mechanism in an excitable system that generates events. We show that such a system can exhibit a bistability in the dynamics of the event generation (states of low and high activity). The stability of the two states is determined by the strength of the noise such that a change of noise intensity permits complete control over the probabilities with which the two states are occupied. The bistability also has strong implications for the regularity of the event generation. While the irregularity of the interevent interval (short-time variability) and the asymptotic Fano factor of the event count (long-time variability) are limited if the system is only in one of the two states, we show that both measures of variability display giant values if both states are equally likely. The long-time variability is additionally amplified by long-range positive correlations of the interevent intervals.

  14. Consensus positive position feedback control for vibration attenuation of smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Ehsan; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new network-based approach for active vibration control in smart structures. In this approach, a network with known topology connects collocated actuator/sensor elements of the smart structure to one another. Each of these actuators/sensors, i.e., agent or node, is enhanced by a separate multi-mode positive position feedback (PPF) controller. The decentralized PPF controlled agents collaborate with each other in the designed network, under a certain consensus dynamics. The consensus constraint forces neighboring agents to cooperate with each other such that the disagreement between the time-domain actuation of the agents is driven to zero. The controller output of each agent is calculated using state-space variables; hence, optimal state estimators are designed first for the proposed observer-based consensus PPF control. The consensus controller is numerically investigated for a flexible smart structure, i.e., a thin aluminum beam that is clamped at its both ends. Results demonstrate that the consensus law successfully imposes synchronization between the independently controlled agents, as the disagreements between the decentralized PPF controller variables converge to zero in a short time. The new consensus PPF controller brings extra robustness to vibration suppression in smart structures, where malfunctions of an agent can be compensated for by referencing the neighboring agents’ performance. This is demonstrated in the results by comparing the new controller with former centralized PPF approach.

  15. Understanding Informal Feedback Seeking in the Workplace: The Impact of the Position in the Organizational Hierarchy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Rijt, Janine; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the position of employees in the organizational hierarchy is important in explaining their feedback seeking behaviour. Design/methodology/approach: This study takes a social network perspective by using an ego-centric network survey to investigate employees' feedback seeking behaviour…

  16. Effects of endogenous proteins and microRNA target sequence in a positive feedback system.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Genki N; Togashi, Ryohei; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kamiya, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    A positive feedback system, using GAL4-vp16 (a fusion protein of yeast GAL4 and herpes simplex virus vp16) as an activator and firefly luciferase as a reporter, maintained luciferase expression for 7 d in mice. However, the luciferase expression decreased after 7 d, and this phenomenon could be caused by immunoreactions against these exogenous proteins. This hypothesis was examined by the following three strategies, designed to avoid the putative immunoreactions: (i) use of the endogenous secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) protein as a reporter, (ii) replacement of vp16 with endogenous transcription factors, and (iii) insertion of the target sequence of microRNA expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, to suppress GAL4-vp16 expression in antigen-presenting cells. The results obtained in this study suggested that silencing would be induced by mechanism(s) besides immunoreactions against reporter and activator proteins. PMID:22975505

  17. The effect of positive and negative verbal feedback on surgical skills performance and motivation.

    PubMed

    Kannappan, Aarthy; Yip, Dana T; Lodhia, Nayna A; Morton, John; Lau, James N

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable effort and time invested in providing feedback to medical students and residents during their time in training. However, little effort has been made to measure the effects of positive and negative verbal feedback on skills performance and motivation to learn and practice. To probe these questions, first-year medical students (n = 25) were recruited to perform a peg transfer task on Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery box trainers. Time to completion and number of errors were recorded. The students were then randomized to receive either positive or negative verbal feedback from an expert in the field of laparoscopic surgery. After this delivery of feedback, the students repeated the peg transfer task. Differences in performance pre- and post-feedback and also between the groups who received positive feedback (PF) vs negative feedback (NF) were analyzed. A survey was then completed by all the participants. Baseline task times were similar between groups (PF 209.3 seconds; NF 203 seconds, p = 0.58). The PF group averaged 1.83 first-time errors while the NF group 1 (p = 0.84). Post-feedback task times were significantly decreased for both groups (PF 159.75 seconds, p = 0.05; NF 132.08 seconds, p = 0.002). While the NF group demonstrated a greater improvement in mean time than the PF group, this was not statistically significant. Both groups also made fewer errors (PF 0.33 errors, p = 0.04; NF 0.38 errors, p = 0.23). When surveyed about their responses to standardized feedback scenarios, the students stated that both positive and negative verbal feedback could be potent stimulants for improved performance and motivation. Further research is required to better understand the effects of feedback on learner motivation and the interpersonal dynamic between mentors and their trainees. PMID:23111049

  18. PKCδ maintains phenotypes of tumor initiating cells through cytokine-mediated autocrine loop with positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Kim, R-K; Suh, Y; Hwang, E; Yoo, K-C; Choi, K-S; An, S; Hwang, S-G; Kim, I-G; Kim, M-J; Lee, H-J; Lee, S-J

    2015-11-12

    The existence of tumor initiating cells (TICs) has been emerged as a good therapeutic target for treatment of glioblastoma that is the most aggressive brain tumor with poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the phenotypes of TICs still remain obscure. In this study, we found that PKCδ, among PKC isoforms, is preferentially activated in TICs and acts as a critical regulator for the maintenance of TICs in glioblastoma. By modulating the expression levels or activity of PKCδ, we demonstrated that PKCδ promotes self-renewal and tumorigenic potentials of TICs. Importantly, we found that the activation of PKCδ persists in TICs through an autocrine loop with positive feedback that was driven by PKCδ/STAT3/IL-23/JAK signaling axis. Moreover, for phenotypes of TICs, we showed that PKCδ activates AKT signaling component by phosphorylation specifically on Ser473. Taken together, we proposed that TICs regulate their own population in glioblastoma through an autocrine loop with positive feedback that is driven by PKCδ-dependent secretion of cytokines. PMID:25746003

  19. The MAGNUM survey: positive feedback in the nuclear region of NGC 5643 suggested by MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresci, G.; Marconi, A.; Zibetti, S.; Risaliti, G.; Carniani, S.; Mannucci, F.; Gallazzi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Capetti, A.; Cicone, C.; Feruglio, C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Nagao, T.; Oliva, E.; Salvato, M.; Sani, E.; Tozzi, P.; Urrutia, T.; Venturi, G.

    2015-10-01

    We study the ionization and kinematics of the ionized gas in the nuclear region of the barred Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 5643 using MUSE integral field observations in the framework of the Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope (MAGNUM) survey. The data were used to identify regions with different ionization conditions and to map the gas density and the dust extinction. We find evidence for a double-sided ionization cone, possibly collimated by a dusty structure surrounding the nucleus. At the center of the ionization cone, outflowing ionized gas is revealed as a blueshifted, asymmetric wing of the [OIII] emission line, up to projected velocity v10 ~ -450 km s-1. The outflow is also seen as a diffuse, low-luminosity radio and X-ray jet, with similar extension. The outflowing material points in the direction of two clumps characterized by prominent line emission with spectra typical of HII regions, located at the edge of the dust lane of the bar. We propose that the star formation in the clumps is due to positive feedback induced by gas compression by the nuclear outflow, providing the first candidate for outflow-induced star formation in a Seyfert-like, radio-quiet AGN. This suggests that positive feedback may be a relevant mechanism in shaping the black hole-host galaxy coevolution. This work is based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO program 60.A-9339).

  20. Positive and Negative Feedbacks and Free-Scale Pattern Distribution in Rural-Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Alados, Concepción L.; Errea, Paz; Gartzia, Maite; Saiz, Hugo; Escós, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Depopulation of rural areas is a widespread phenomenon that has occurred in most industrialized countries, and has contributed significantly to a reduction in the productivity of agro-ecological resources. In this study, we identified the main trends in the dynamics of rural populations in the Central Pyrenees in the 20th C and early 21st C, and used density independent and density dependent models and identified the main factors that have influenced the dynamics. In addition, we investigated the change in the power law distribution of population size in those periods. Populations exhibited density-dependent positive feedback between 1960 and 2010, and a long-term positive correlation between agricultural activity and population size, which has resulted in a free-scale population distribution that has been disrupted by the collapse of the traditional agricultural society and by emigration to the industrialized cities. We concluded that complex socio-ecological systems that have strong feedback mechanisms can contribute to disruptive population collapses, which can be identified by changes in the pattern of population distribution. PMID:25474704

  1. Performance Feedback Processing Is Positively Biased As Predicted by Attribution Theory

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Buritica, Julia M.; Heekeren, Hauke R.

    2016-01-01

    A considerable literature on attribution theory has shown that healthy individuals exhibit a positivity bias when inferring the causes of evaluative feedback on their performance. They tend to attribute positive feedback internally (e.g., to their own abilities) but negative feedback externally (e.g., to environmental factors). However, all empirical demonstrations of this bias suffer from at least one of the three following drawbacks: First, participants directly judge explicit causes for their performance. Second, participants have to imagine events instead of experiencing them. Third, participants assess their performance only after receiving feedback and thus differences in baseline assessments cannot be excluded. It is therefore unclear whether the classically reported positivity bias generalizes to setups without these drawbacks. Here, we aimed at establishing the relevance of attributions for decision-making by showing an attribution-related positivity bias in a decision-making task. We developed a novel task, which allowed us to test how participants changed their evaluations in response to positive and negative feedback about performance. Specifically, we used videos of actors expressing different facial emotional expressions. Participants were first asked to evaluate the actors’ credibility in expressing a particular emotion. After this initial rating, participants performed an emotion recognition task and did—or did not—receive feedback on their veridical performance. Finally, participants re-rated the actors’ credibility, which provided a measure of how they changed their evaluations after feedback. Attribution theory predicts that participants change their evaluations of the actors’ credibility toward the positive after receiving positive performance feedback and toward the negative after negative performance feedback. Our results were in line with this prediction. A control condition without feedback showed that correct or incorrect

  2. Performance Feedback Processing Is Positively Biased As Predicted by Attribution Theory.

    PubMed

    Korn, Christoph W; Rosenblau, Gabriela; Rodriguez Buritica, Julia M; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2016-01-01

    A considerable literature on attribution theory has shown that healthy individuals exhibit a positivity bias when inferring the causes of evaluative feedback on their performance. They tend to attribute positive feedback internally (e.g., to their own abilities) but negative feedback externally (e.g., to environmental factors). However, all empirical demonstrations of this bias suffer from at least one of the three following drawbacks: First, participants directly judge explicit causes for their performance. Second, participants have to imagine events instead of experiencing them. Third, participants assess their performance only after receiving feedback and thus differences in baseline assessments cannot be excluded. It is therefore unclear whether the classically reported positivity bias generalizes to setups without these drawbacks. Here, we aimed at establishing the relevance of attributions for decision-making by showing an attribution-related positivity bias in a decision-making task. We developed a novel task, which allowed us to test how participants changed their evaluations in response to positive and negative feedback about performance. Specifically, we used videos of actors expressing different facial emotional expressions. Participants were first asked to evaluate the actors' credibility in expressing a particular emotion. After this initial rating, participants performed an emotion recognition task and did--or did not--receive feedback on their veridical performance. Finally, participants re-rated the actors' credibility, which provided a measure of how they changed their evaluations after feedback. Attribution theory predicts that participants change their evaluations of the actors' credibility toward the positive after receiving positive performance feedback and toward the negative after negative performance feedback. Our results were in line with this prediction. A control condition without feedback showed that correct or incorrect performance

  3. Age-related changes in deterministic learning from positive versus negative performance feedback.

    PubMed

    van de Vijver, Irene; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; de Wit, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Feedback-based learning declines with age. Because older adults are generally biased toward positive information ("positivity effect"), learning from positive feedback may be less impaired than learning from negative outcomes. The literature documents mixed results, due possibly to variability between studies in task design. In the current series of studies, we investigated the influence of feedback valence on reinforcement learning in young and older adults. We used nonprobabilistic learning tasks, to more systematically study the effects of feedback magnitude, learning of stimulus-response (S-R) versus stimulus-outcome (S-O) associations, and working-memory capacity. In most experiments, older adults benefitted more from positive than negative feedback, but only with large feedback magnitudes. Positivity effects were pronounced for S-O learning, whereas S-R learning correlated with working-memory capacity in both age groups. These results underline the context dependence of positivity effects in learning and suggest that older adults focus on high gains when these are informative for behavior. PMID:25761598

  4. Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide and climate feedback mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    As a consequence of fossil fuel burning, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has increased from 314 ppm in 1958, when detailed measurements of this quantity began, to a present value of 335 ppm; and it is estimated that during the next century, the CO2 concentration will double relative to its assumed preindustrial value of 290 ppm. Since CO2 is an infrared-active gas, increases in its atmospheric concentration would lead to a larger infrared opacity for the atmospheric which, by normal logic, would result in a warmer Earth. A number of modeling endeavors suggest a 2 to 4 C increase in global mean surface temperature with doubling of the CO2 concentration. But such estimates of CO2-induced warming are highly uncertain because of a lack of knowledge of climate feedback mechanisms. Interactive influences upon the solar and infrared opacities of the Earth-atmosphere system can either amplify or damp a climate-forcing mechanism such as increasing CO2. Climate feedback mechanisms discussed include climate sensitivity, cloudiness-radiation feedback, climate change predictions, and interactive atmospheric chemistry.

  5. 78 FR 13057 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism... to review and approve a previously approved information collection requirement regarding IT Dashboard... identified by Information Collection 3090- 0285, IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism, by any of the...

  6. A DNA break- and phosphorylation-dependent positive feedback loop promotes immunoglobulin class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Bao Q; Herrick-Reynolds, Kayleigh; Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Pucella, Joseph N; Ucher, Anna J; Donghia, Nina M; Gu, Xiwen; Nicolas, Laura; Nowak, Urszula; Rahman, Numa; Strout, Matthew P; Mills, Kevin D; Stavnezer, Janet; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2013-11-01

    The ability of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to efficiently mediate class-switch recombination (CSR) is dependent on its phosphorylation at Ser38; however, the trigger that induces AID phosphorylation and the mechanism by which phosphorylated AID drives CSR have not been elucidated. Here we found that phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 was induced by DNA breaks. Conversely, in the absence of AID phosphorylation, DNA breaks were not efficiently generated at switch (S) regions in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus (Igh), consistent with a failure of AID to interact with the endonuclease APE1. Additionally, deficiency in the DNA-damage sensor ATM impaired the phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 and the interaction of AID with APE1. Our results identify a positive feedback loop for the amplification of DNA breaks at S regions through the phosphorylation- and ATM-dependent interaction of AID with APE1. PMID:24097111

  7. Predation risk suppresses the positive feedback between size structure and cannibalism.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Osamu; Trussell, Geoffrey C; Ohno, Ayaka; Kuwano, Shinya; Ikawa, Takuya; Nishimura, Kinya

    2011-11-01

    1. Cannibalism can play a prominent role in the structuring and dynamics of ecological communities. Previous studies have emphasized the importance of size structure and density of cannibalistic species in shaping short- and long-term cannibalism dynamics, but our understanding of how predators influence cannibalism dynamics is limited. This is despite widespread evidence that many prey species exhibit behavioural and morphological adaptations in response to predation risk. 2. This study examined how the presence and absence of predation risk from larval dragonflies Aeshna nigroflava affected cannibalism dynamics in its prey larval salamanders Hynobius retardatus. 3. We found that feedback dynamics between size structure and cannibalism depended on whether dragonfly predation risk was present. In the absence of dragonfly risk cues, a positive feedback between salamander size structure and cannibalism through time occurred because most of the replicates in this treatment contained at least one salamander larvae having an enlarged gape (i.e. cannibal). In contrast, this feedback and the emergence of cannibalism were rarely observed in the presence of the dragonfly risk cues. Once salamander size divergence occurred, experimental reversals of the presence or absence of dragonfly risk cues did not alter existing cannibalism dynamics as the experiment progressed. Thus, the effects of risk on the mechanisms driving cannibalism dynamics likely operated during the early developmental period of the salamander larvae. 4. The effects of dragonfly predation risk on behavioural aspects of cannibalistic interactions among hatchlings may prohibit the initiation of dynamics between size structure and cannibalism. Our predation trials clearly showed that encounter rates among hatchlings and biting and ingestion rates of prospective prey by prospective cannibals were significantly lower in the presence vs. absence of dragonfly predation risk even though the size asymmetry

  8. Revealing a Two-Loop Transcriptional Feedback Mechanism in the Cyanobacterial Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Stefanie; Brettschneider, Christian; Axmann, Ilka M.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies in the circadian model organism Synechococcus have revealed that the KaiC protein, the central component of the circadian clock in cyanobacteria, is involved in activation and repression of its own gene transcription. During 24 hours, KaiC hexamers run through different phospho-states during daytime. So far, it has remained unclear which phospho-state of KaiC promotes kaiBC expression and which opposes transcriptional activation. We systematically analyzed various combinations of positive and negative transcriptional feedback regulation by introducing a combined TTFL/PTO model consisting of our previous post-translational oscillator that considers all four phospho-states of KaiC and a transcriptional/translational feedback loop. Only a particular two-loop feedback mechanism out of 32 we have extensively tested is able to reproduce existing experimental observations, including the effects of knockout or overexpression of kai genes. Here, threonine and double phosphorylated KaiC hexamers activate and unphosphorylated KaiC hexamers suppress kaiBC transcription. Our model simulations suggest that the peak expression ratio of the positive and the negative component of kaiBC expression is the main factor for how the different two-loop feedback models respond to removal or to overexpression of kai genes. We discuss parallels between our proposed TTFL/PTO model and two-loop feedback structures found in the mammalian clock. PMID:23516349

  9. Computational Modeling of Morphogenesis Regulated by Mechanical Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanian, Ashok; Taber, Larry A.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical forces cause changes in form during embryogenesis and likely play a role in regulating these changes. This paper explores the idea that changes in homeostatic tissue stress (target stress), possibly modulated by genes, drive some morphogenetic processes. Computational models are presented to illustrate how regional variations in target stress can cause a range of complex behaviors involving the bending of epithelia. These models include growth and cytoskeletal contraction regulated by stress-based mechanical feedback. All simulations were carried out using the commercial finite element code ABAQUS, with growth and contraction included by modifying the zero-stress state in the material constitutive relations. Results presented for bending of bilayered beams and invagination of cylindrical and spherical shells provide insight into some of the mechanical aspects that must be considered in studying morphogenetic mechanisms. PMID:17318485

  10. The FONT5 Bunch-by-Bunch Position and Angle Feedback System at ATF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Bett, D. R.; Burrows, P. N.; Christian, G. B.; Constance, B.; Davis, M. R.; Gerbershagen, A.; Perry, C.; Resta-Lopez, J.

    The FONT5 upstream beam-based feedback system at ATF2 is designed to correct the position and angle jitter at the entrance to the ATF2 final-focus system, and also to demonstrate a prototype intra-train feedback system for the International Linear Collider interaction point. We discuss the hardware, from stripline BPMs to kickers, and RF and digital signal processing, as well as presenting results from the latest beam tests at ATF2.

  11. On the Feed-back Mechanism of Chinese Stock Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shu Quan; Ito, Takao; Zhang, Jianbo

    Feed-back models in the stock markets research imply an adjustment process toward investors' expectation for current information and past experiences. Error-correction and cointegration are often used to evaluate the long-run relation. The Efficient Capital Market Hypothesis, which had ignored the effect of the accumulation of information, cannot explain some anomalies such as bubbles and partial predictability in the stock markets. In order to investigate the feed-back mechanism and to determine an effective model, we use daily data of the stock index of two Chinese stock markets with the expectational model, which is one kind of geometric lag models. Tests and estimations of error-correction show that long-run equilibrium seems to be seldom achieved in Chinese stock markets. Our result clearly shows the common coefficient of expectations and fourth-order autoregressive disturbance exist in the two Chinese stock markets. Furthermore, we find the same coefficient of expectations has an autoregressive effect on disturbances in the two Chinese stock markets. Therefore the presence of such feed-back is also supported in Chinese stock markets.

  12. Positive Feedback Regulation of stgR Expression for Secondary Metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xu-Ming; Sun, Zhi-Hao; Liang, Bi-Rong; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Feng, Wei-Hong; Huang, Fang-Liang

    2013-01-01

    LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs) compose a large family and are responsible for various physiological functions in bacteria, while little is understood about their regulatory mechanism on secondary metabolism in Streptomyces. Here we reported that StgR, a typical LTTR in Streptomyces coelicolor, was a negative regulator of undecylprodigiosin (Red) and γ-actinorhodin (Act) production in the early developmental phase of secondary metabolism by suppressing the expression of two pathway-specific regulator genes, redD and actII-orf4, respectively. Meanwhile, stgR expression was downregulated during secondary metabolism to remove its repressive effects on antibiotic production. Moreover, stgR expression was positively autoregulated by direct binding of StgR to its own promoter (stgRp), and the binding site adjacent to translation start codon was determined by a DNase I footprinting assay. Furthermore, the StgR-stgRp interaction could be destroyed by the antibiotic γ-actinorhodin produced from S. coelicolor. Thus, our results suggested a positive feedback regulatory mechanism of stgR expression and antibiotic production for the rapid and irreversible development of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces. PMID:23457252

  13. Experimental study on active vibration control using genetic algorithm-based system identification and optimized positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszulik, Ryan R.; Shan, Jinjun

    2012-12-01

    A genetic algorithm is implemented to identify the transfer function of an experimental system consisting of a flexible manipulator with a collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair. A multi-mode positive position feedback controller is then designed based upon the identified transfer function. To this end, the same iteratively implemented genetic algorithm is used to optimize all controller parameters by minimization of the closed loop H∞-norm. The designed controller is then applied for vibration suppression on the experimental system.

  14. Dynamics of the interlocked positive feedback loops explaining the robust epigenetic switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sriram, K; Soliman, Sylvain; Fages, François

    2009-05-01

    The two element mutual activation and inhibitory positive feedback loops are a common motifs that occur in many biological systems in both isolated and interlocked form, as for example, in the cell division cycle and thymus differentiation in eukaryotes. The properties of three element interlocked positive feedback loops that embeds both mutual activation and inhibition are studied in depth for their bistable properties by performing bifurcation and stochastic simulations. Codimension one and two bifurcations reveal important properties like robustness to parameter variations and adaptability under various conditions by its ability to fine tune the threshold to a wide range of values and to maintain a wide bistable regime. Furthermore, we show that in the interlocked circuit, mutual inhibition controls the decision to switch from OFF to ON state, while mutual activation enforces the decision. This view is supported through a concrete biological example Candida albicans, a human fungal pathogen that can exist in two distinctive cell types; one in the default white state and the other in an opaque form. Stochastic switching between these two forms takes place due to the epigenetic alternation induced by the transcriptional regulators in the circuit, albeit without any rearrangement of the nuclear chromosomes. The transcriptional regulators constitute interlocked mutual activation and inhibition feedback circuits that provide adaptable threshold and wide bistable regime. These positive feedback loops are shown to be responsible for robust noise induced transitions without chattering, persistence of particular phenotypes for many generations and selective exhibition of one particular form of phenotype when mutated. Finally, we propose for synthetic biology constructs to use interlocked positive feedback loops instead of two element positive feedback loops because they are better controlled than isolated mutual activation and mutual inhibition feedback circuits. PMID

  15. Visual saliency computations: mechanisms, constraints, and the effect of feedback.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Alireza; Koch, Christof

    2010-09-22

    The primate visual system continuously selects spatial proscribed regions, features or objects for further processing. These selection mechanisms--collectively termed selective visual attention--are guided by intrinsic, bottom-up and by task-dependent, top-down signals. While much psychophysical research has shown that overt and covert attention is partially allocated based on saliency-driven exogenous signals, it is unclear how this is accomplished at the neuronal level. Recent electrophysiological experiments in monkeys point to the gradual emergence of saliency signals when ascending the dorsal visual stream and to the influence of top-down attention on these signals. To elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying these observations, we construct a biologically plausible network of spiking neurons to simulate the formation of saliency signals in different cortical areas. We find that saliency signals are rapidly generated through lateral excitation and inhibition in successive layers of neural populations selective to a single feature. These signals can be improved by feedback from a higher cortical area that represents a saliency map. In addition, we show how top-down attention can affect the saliency signals by disrupting this feedback through its action on the saliency map. While we find that saliency computations require dominant slow NMDA currents, the signal rapidly emerges from successive regions of the network. In conclusion, using a detailed spiking network model we find biophysical mechanisms and limitations of saliency computations which can be tested experimentally. PMID:20861387

  16. Hydrogeochemical zonation in intertidal salt marsh sediments: evidence of positive plant-soil feedback?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, K. B.; Dittmar, J.; Seyfferth, A.; Fendorf, S.; Gorelick, S.

    2012-12-01

    Surface and subsurface environments are linked by the biogeochemical activity in near-surface sediment and by the hydrological fluxes that mobilize its reagents and products. A particularly dynamic and interesting setting to study near-surface hydrogeochemistry is the intertidal zone. Here, the very strong tidal hydraulic forcing is often thought to dominate water and solute transport. However, we demonstrated the importance of two additional subsurface drivers: groundwater flow and plant root water uptake. A high-resolution, coupled surface water-groundwater model of an intertidal salt marsh in San Francisco Bay, CA showed that these three drivers vary over different spatial scales: tidal flooding varies over 10's of meters; groundwater flow varies over meters, particularly within channel banks; and plant root water uptake varies in 3D at the sub-meter scale. Expanding on this third driver, we investigated whether the spatial variations in soil-water-plant hydraulic interactions that occur due to vegetation zonation also cause distinct geochemical zonation in salt marsh sediment pore waters. The existence of such geochemical zonation was verified and mapped by detailed field observations of the chemical composition of sediments, pore waters, surface waters, and vegetation. The field data and the coupled hydrologic model were then further analyzed to evaluate potential causal mechanisms for the geochemical zonation, including testing the hypothesis that the vegetation affects pore water geochemistry via a positive feedback beneficial to itself. If further supported by future studies, this geochemical feedback may complement known physical ecosystem engineering mechanisms to help stabilize and organize intertidal wetlands.

  17. Stabilizing PID controllers for a single-link biomechanical model with position, velocity, and force feedback.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Kamran; Roy, Anindo

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we address the problem of PID stabilization of a single-link inverted pendulum-based biomechanical model with force feedback, two levels of position and velocity feedback, and with delays in all the feedback loops. The novelty of the proposed model lies in its physiological relevance, whereby both small and medium latency sensory feedbacks from muscle spindle (MS), and force feedback from Golgi tendon organ (GTO) are included in the formulation. The biomechanical model also includes active and passive viscoelastic feedback from Hill-type muscle model and a second-order low-pass function for muscle activation. The central nervous system (CNS) regulation of postural movement is represented by a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. Padé approximation of delay terms is employed to arrive at an overall rational transfer function of the biomechanical model. The Hermite-Biehler theorem is then used to derive stability results, leading to the existence of stabilizing PID controllers. An algorithm for selection of stabilizing feedback gains is developed using the linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach. PMID:15796343

  18. Positive tropical marine low-cloud cover feedback inferred from cloud-controlling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xin; Hall, Alex; Klein, Stephen A.; DeAngelis, Anthony M.

    2015-09-01

    Differences in simulations of tropical marine low-cloud cover (LCC) feedback are sources of significant spread in temperature responses of climate models to anthropogenic forcing. Here we show that in models the feedback is mainly driven by three large-scale changes—a strengthening tropical inversion, increasing surface latent heat flux, and an increasing vertical moisture gradient. Variations in the LCC response to these changes alone account for most of the spread in model-projected 21st century LCC changes. A methodology is devised to constrain the LCC response observationally using sea surface temperature (SST) as a surrogate for the latent heat flux and moisture gradient. In models where the current climate's LCC sensitivities to inversion strength and SST variations are consistent with observed, LCC decreases systematically, which would increase absorption of solar radiation. These results support a positive LCC feedback. Correcting biases in the sensitivities will be an important step toward more credible simulation of cloud feedbacks.

  19. Control of cardiac alternans by mechanical and electrical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapari, Felicia; Deshpande, Dipen; Belhamadia, Youssef; Dubljevic, Stevan

    2014-07-01

    A persistent alternation in the cardiac action potential duration has been linked to the onset of ventricular arrhythmia, which may lead to sudden cardiac death. A coupling between these cardiac alternans and the intracellular calcium dynamics has also been identified in previous studies. In this paper, the system of PDEs describing the small amplitude of alternans and the alternation of peak intracellular Ca2+ are stabilized by optimal boundary and spatially distributed actuation. A simulation study demonstrating the successful annihilation of both alternans on a one-dimensional cable of cardiac cells by utilizing the full-state feedback controller is presented. Complimentary to these studies, a three variable Nash-Panfilov model is used to investigate alternans annihilation via mechanical (or stretch) perturbations. The coupled model includes the active stress which defines the mechanical properties of the tissue and is utilized in the feedback algorithm as an independent input from the pacing based controller realization in alternans annihilation. Simulation studies of both control methods demonstrate that the proposed methods can successfully annihilate alternans in cables that are significantly longer than 1 cm, thus overcoming the limitations of earlier control efforts.

  20. Positive feedback and alternative stable states in inbreeding, cooperation, sex roles and other evolutionary processes

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, Jussi; Kokko, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    A large proportion of studies in systems science focus on processes involving a mixture of positive and negative feedbacks, which are also common themes in evolutionary ecology. Examples of negative feedback are density dependence (population regulation) and frequency-dependent selection (polymorphisms). Positive feedback, in turn, plays a role in Fisherian ‘runaway’ sexual selection, the evolution of cooperation, selfing and inbreeding tolerance under purging of deleterious alleles, and the evolution of sex differences in parental care. All these examples feature self-reinforcing processes where the increase in the value of a trait selects for further increases, sometimes via a coevolutionary feedback loop with another trait. Positive feedback often leads to alternative stable states (evolutionary endpoints), making the interpretation of evolutionary predictions challenging. Here, we discuss conceptual issues such as the relationship between self-reinforcing selection and disruptive selection. We also present an extension of a previous model on parental care, focusing on the relationship between the operational sex ratio and sexual selection, and the influence of this relationship on the evolution of biparental or uniparental care. PMID:22144384

  1. Coupled Positive and Negative Feedbacks Produce Diverse Gene Expression Patterns in Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Mitarai, Namiko; Jensen, Mogens Høgh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of multicellular organism as well as of microbial communities. To investigate the formation of gene expression patterns in colonies, we build a mathematical model of two-dimensional colony growth, where cells carry a coupled positive-and-negative-feedback circuit. We demonstrate that the model can produce sectored, target (concentric), uniform, and scattered expression patterns of regulators, depending on gene expression dynamics and nutrient diffusion. We reconstructed the same regulatory structure in Escherichia coli cells and found gene expression patterns on the surface of colonies similar to the ones produced by the computer simulations. By comparing computer simulations and experimental results, we observed that very simple rules of gene expression can yield a spectrum of well-defined patterns in a growing colony. Our results suggest that variations of the protein content among cells lead to a high level of heterogeneity in colonies. Importance Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of microbial communities. In this work, we show that a simple genetic circuit composed of a positive-feedback loop and a negative-feedback loop can produce diverse expression patterns in colonies. We obtained similar sets of gene expression patterns in the simulations and in the experiments. Because the combination of positive feedback and negative feedback is common in intracellular molecular networks, our results suggest that the protein content of cells is highly diversified in colonies. PMID:25852158

  2. Precise computer controlled positioning of robot end effectors using sensory feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C.; Tsai, J. S. H.; Mcinnis, B. C.; Shieh, L. S.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary study of the combined position/force control using sensory feedback for a one-dimensional manipulator model, which may count for the spacecraft docking problem or to be extended to the multijoint robot manipulator problem, has been performed. The additional degrees of freedom introduced by the compliant force sensor is included in the system dynamics in the design of precise position control. State feedback based on pole placement method and with integral control is used to design the position controller. A simple constant gain force controller is used as an example to illustrate the dependence of the stability and steady-state accuracy of the overall position/force control on the design of the inner position controller. Supportive simulation results are also provided.

  3. A Positive Autoregulatory BDNF Feedback Loop via C/EBPβ Mediates Hippocampal Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Bambah-Mukku, Dhananjay; Travaglia, Alessio; Chen, Dillon Y.; Pollonini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the temporal progression and regulation of the mechanisms underlying memory consolidation. Brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor (BDNF) has been shown to mediate the maintenance of memory consolidation, but the mechanisms of this regulation remain unclear. Using inhibitory avoidance (IA) in rats, here we show that a hippocampal BDNF-positive autoregulatory feedback loop via CCAAT-enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is necessary to mediate memory consolidation. At training, a very rapid, learning-induced requirement of BDNF accompanied by rapid de novo translation controls the induction of a persistent activation of cAMP-response element binding-protein (CREB) and C/EBPβ expression. The latter, in turn, controls an increase in expression of bdnf exon IV transcripts and BDNF protein, both of which are necessary and, together with the initial BDNF requirement, mediate memory consolidation. The autoregulatory loop terminates by 48 h after training with decreased C/EBPβ and pCREB and increased methyl-CpG binding protein-2, histone-deacetylase-2, and switch-independent-3a binding at the bdnf exon IV promoter. PMID:25209292

  4. Positive And Negative Feedback Loops Coupled By Common Transcription Activator And Repressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2015-03-01

    Dynamical systems consisting of two interlocked loops with negative and positive feedback have been studied using the linear analysis of stability and numerical solutions. Conditions for saddle-node bifurcation were formulated in a general form. Conditions for Hopf bifurcations were found in a few symmetrical cases. Auto-oscillations, when they exist, are generated by the negative feedback repressive loop. This loop determines the frequency and amplitude of oscillations. The positive feedback loop of activation slightly modifies the oscillations. Oscillations are possible when the difference between Hilll's coefficients of the repression and activation is sufficiently high. The highly cooperative activation loop with a fast turnover slows down or even makes the oscillations impossible. The system under consideration can constitute a component of epigenetic or enzymatic regulation network.

  5. Observational and model evidence for positive low-level cloud feedback.

    PubMed

    Clement, Amy C; Burgman, Robert; Norris, Joel R

    2009-07-24

    Feedbacks involving low-level clouds remain a primary cause of uncertainty in global climate model projections. This issue was addressed by examining changes in low-level clouds over the Northeast Pacific in observations and climate models. Decadal fluctuations were identified in multiple, independent cloud data sets, and changes in cloud cover appeared to be linked to changes in both local temperature structure and large-scale circulation. This observational analysis further indicated that clouds act as a positive feedback in this region on decadal time scales. The observed relationships between cloud cover and regional meteorological conditions provide a more complete way of testing the realism of the cloud simulation in current-generation climate models. The only model that passed this test simulated a reduction in cloud cover over much of the Pacific when greenhouse gases were increased, providing modeling evidence for a positive low-level cloud feedback. PMID:19628865

  6. Confinement and diffusion modulate bistability and stochastic switching in a reaction network with positive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynarczyk, Paul J.; Pullen, Robert H.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Positive feedback is a common feature in signal transduction networks and can lead to phenomena such as bistability and signal propagation by domain growth. Physical features of the cellular environment, such as spatial confinement and the mobility of proteins, play important but inadequately understood roles in shaping the behavior of signaling networks. Here, we use stochastic, spatially resolved kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to explore a positive feedback network as a function of system size, system shape, and mobility of molecules. We show that these physical properties can markedly alter characteristics of bistability and stochastic switching when compared with well-mixed simulations. Notably, systems of equal volume but different shapes can exhibit qualitatively different behaviors under otherwise identical conditions. We show that stochastic switching to a state maintained by positive feedback occurs by cluster formation and growth. Additionally, the frequency at which switching occurs depends nontrivially on the diffusion coefficient, which can promote or suppress switching relative to the well-mixed limit. Taken together, the results provide a framework for understanding how confinement and protein mobility influence emergent features of the positive feedback network by modulating molecular concentrations, diffusion-influenced rate parameters, and spatiotemporal correlations between molecules.

  7. Microcantilever Displacement Measurement Using a Mechanically Modulated Optical Feedback Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Azcona, Francisco J; Jha, Ajit; Yáñez, Carlos; Atashkhooei, Reza; Royo, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Microcantilever motion detection is a useful tool for the characterization of the physical, chemical and biological properties of materials. In the past, different approaches have been proposed and tested to enhance the behavior, size and simplicity of microcantilever motion detectors. In this paper, a new approach to measure microcantilever motion with nanometric resolution is presented. The proposed approach is based on the concept of mechanically-modulated optical feedback interferometry, a technique that has shown displacement measurement capabilities well within the nanometric scale and that, due to its size, compactness and low cost, may be a suitable choice for measuring nanometric motions in cantilever-like sensors. It will be shown that the sensor, in its current state of development, is capable of following a cantilever sinusoidal trajectory at different sets of frequencies ranging up to 200 Hz and peak to peak amplitudes up to λ / 2 with experimental resolutions in the λ / 100 range. PMID:27367702

  8. Mechanical Feedback: From Stellar Wind Bubbles to Starbursts (Invited Talk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oey, M. S.; Clarke, C. J.; Massey, P.

    The current understanding of mechanical feedback is reviewed by evaluating the standard, adiabatic model for shell formation and evolution. This model is relevant to phenomena ranging from individual stellar-wind bubbles to galactic superwinds, forming the basis for our understanding of the multiphase ISM, IGM, and galactic evolutionary processes. Although significant discrepancies between the model and observation have been identified, to date there are none that require a fundamental revision. A variety of evidence, ranging over three orders of magnitude in spatial scale, is broadly consistent with the standard model. This includes kinematics of individual objects, observations of hot gas, the size distribution of HI shells, and outflow rates from starburst galaxies. However, some of the most pressing issues relating to shell evolution are still outstanding and obstruct efforts to resolve key questions like the fate of the hot gas.

  9. Microcantilever Displacement Measurement Using a Mechanically Modulated Optical Feedback Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Azcona, Francisco J.; Jha, Ajit; Yáñez, Carlos; Atashkhooei, Reza; Royo, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Microcantilever motion detection is a useful tool for the characterization of the physical, chemical and biological properties of materials. In the past, different approaches have been proposed and tested to enhance the behavior, size and simplicity of microcantilever motion detectors. In this paper, a new approach to measure microcantilever motion with nanometric resolution is presented. The proposed approach is based on the concept of mechanically-modulated optical feedback interferometry, a technique that has shown displacement measurement capabilities well within the nanometric scale and that, due to its size, compactness and low cost, may be a suitable choice for measuring nanometric motions in cantilever-like sensors. It will be shown that the sensor, in its current state of development, is capable of following a cantilever sinusoidal trajectory at different sets of frequencies ranging up to 200 Hz and peak to peak amplitudes up to λ/2 with experimental resolutions in the λ/100 range. PMID:27367702

  10. Feedback-Enhanced Parametric Squeezing of Mechanical Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinante, A.; Falferi, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present a single-quadrature feedback scheme able to overcome the conventional 3 dB limit on parametric squeezing. The method is experimentally demonstrated in a micromechanical system based on a cantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is detected at low temperature by a SQUID susceptometer, while parametric pumping is obtained by modulating the magnetic field gradient at twice the cantilever frequency. A maximum squeezing of 11.5 dB and 11.3 dB is observed, respectively, in the response to a sinusoidal test signal and in the thermomechanical noise. So far, the maximum squeezing factor is limited only by the maximum achievable parametric modulation. The proposed technique might be used to squeeze one quadrature of a mechanical resonator below the quantum noise level, even without the need for a quantum limited detector.

  11. Quantum feedback cooling of a mechanical oscillator using variational measurements: tweaking Heisenberg’s microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Hojat; Zeuthen, Emil; Ghanaatshoar, Majid; Hammerer, Klemens

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the problem of preparing a mechanical oscillator in the vicinity of its quantum-mechanical ground state by means of feedback cooling based on continuous optical detection of the oscillator position. In the parameter regime relevant to ground-state cooling, the optical back-action and imprecision noise set the bottleneck of achievable cooling and must be carefully balanced. This can be achieved by adapting the phase of the local oscillator in the homodyne detection realizing a so-called variational measurement. The trade-off between accurate position measurement and minimal disturbance can be understood in terms of Heisenberg’s microscope and becomes particularly relevant when the measurement and feedback processes happen to be fast within the quantum coherence time of the system to be cooled. This corresponds to the regime of large quantum cooperativity {C}{{q}}≳ 1, which was achieved in recent experiments on feedback cooling. Our method provides a simple path to further pushing the limits of current state-of-the-art experiments in quantum optomechanics.

  12. Can interactive educational technologies support the link between ultrasound theory and practice via feedback mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Linking theory to practice is an area of concern for ultrasound students, clinical mentors and academic staff. The link between theory and practice requires a robust clinical mentorship scheme in addition to careful curricula design considerations to improve student outcomes. The introduction of interactive technology in education provides ripe opportunity to improve feedback to students to support the link between theory and practice. A series of three interactive learning and teaching activities were designed and delivered to a PostGraduate Ultrasound cohort, after which, evaluation was performed to answer the research question: Which interactive technologies support the link between theory and practice through improved feedback mechanisms? An action research methodology was adopted involving an enquiry based literature review, planning, design and action process. Data were collected following action of three interactive teaching and learning sessions within the Medical Ultrasound cohort of 2013/2014 at Glasgow Caledonian University via a paper based questionnaire. A 100% response rate was achieved (n = 14). All three interactive learning and teaching sessions were considered with 100% highest point agreement to support the link between ultrasound theory and practice via feedback. Students found all three designed and facilitated sessions valuable and relevant to their learning, which in turn provided positive experiences which were perceived to support the link between theory and practice through feedback. These activities can be considered valuable in Postgraduate Ultrasound education. PMID:27433244

  13. The regulation of positive and negative social feedback: A psychophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne; Remue, Jonathan; Ng, Kwun Kei; Mueller, Sven C; De Raedt, Rudi

    2015-09-01

    Everyday social evaluations are psychologically potent and trigger self-reflective thoughts and feelings. The present study sought to examine the psychophysiological impact of such evaluations using eye tracking, pupillometry, and heart-rate variability. Fifty-nine healthy adult volunteers received rigged social feedback (criticism and praise) based on their photograph. Gaze data were collected to investigate processes of attentional deployment/allocation toward the self or the evaluator expressing criticism or praise. Whereas voluntary attention was directed to evaluators who expressed praise, attention was drawn to one's own picture after criticism. Pupil dilation and heart-rate variability were larger in response to criticism as compared to praise, suggesting a flexible and adaptive emotion regulatory effort in response to social information that triggers an affective response. Altogether, healthy individuals recruited more regulatory resources to cope with negative (as compared to positive) social feedback, and this processing of social feedback was associated with adjustments in self-focused attention. PMID:25810280

  14. Positive feedback loop between cancer stem cells and angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Liu, Nianli; Lin, Marie C; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-09-01

    Anti-angiogenesis-related therapies have become the standard care for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as HCC is a highly vascularized solid tumor. Unfortunately, only modest and limited efficacies are observed. Emerging evidence have attributed to the limited efficacy to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the tumor. CSCs predominantly drives angiogenesis via releasing proangiogenic factors and exosomes. They have the ability to resistant intratumoral hypoxia via autophagy or by directly forming the tubular structure to obtain blood. On the other hand, the vascular niche in tumor microenvironment also releases growth factors via juxtacrine and paracrine mechanisms to support the growth of CSCs and maintain its stemness features. This positive feedback loop between angiogenesis and CSCs exists in liver tumor microenvironment that is responsible for the development and poor prognosis of HCC. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the crosstalks between angiogenesis and CSCs, and their interactions in liver tumor microenvironment and their purpose that an effective anti-angiogenic therapy should also target CSCs for HCC treatment. PMID:27108065

  15. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes blocks the positive feedback release of luteinizing hormone in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Kienast, S G; Fadden, C; Steger, R W

    1993-01-01

    The effects of streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetes on the release of gonadotropins was studied in female rats. In the first experiment, rats were ovariectomized and 2 days later were injected with STZ. Three weeks later rats were treated with estrogen and progesterone and blood samples were taken via intraatrial cannulae for luteinizing hormone (LH) assay. Afternoon surges of LH were seen in 4/5 control but 0/8 STZ rats. Pituitary responses to LH-releasing hormone in vitro did not differ. In the 2nd experiment, ovariectomized estrogen-primed rats were killed prior to and during a progesterone-induced LH surge. As in Experiment 1, STZ-treatment inhibited the LH surge but did not effect the afternoon rise in median eminence norepinephrine turnover which has previously been shown to be important in stimulating LH release. Turnover of norepinephrine in the anterior hypothalamus was depressed in the diabetic rats both prior to and during the expected time of the LH surge. Dopamine turnover was depressed in all three brain regions studied. It can be concluded that the positive feedback control of LH release is severely attenuated in diabetic rats but the mechanism explaining the loss is not clear. Diabetes-induced alterations in hypothalamic catecholamine metabolism may be involved but further work is needed to more carefully define these relationships. PMID:8221130

  16. On the feedback mechanism in supersonic cavity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weipeng; Nonomura, Taku; Fujii, Kozo

    2013-05-01

    Self-sustained oscillations in supersonic cavity flows are investigated by implicit large-eddy simulations of a supersonic flow (M∞ = 2.0, ReD = 105) past a three-dimensional rectangular cavity with length-to-depth ratio of 2. Both turbulent and laminar inflows are considered, and a variation of boundary-layer thickness in the turbulent inflow case is conducted. An additional simulation of turbulent free shear layer is also performed to illustrate the relationship between shedding vortices and acoustic excitations. Feedback mechanism is identified as the dominant mechanism driving the self-sustained oscillations in supersonic open cavity flows, regardless of the upstream turbulent state and the boundary-layer thickness. The generation of discrete vortices in the cavity shear layer is shown to be highly associated with acoustic excitations rather than natural instabilities of the cavity shear layer. Simulation results support that the primary noise source arises from the successive passage of large-scale vortices over the cavity trailing edge. The effects of upstream boundary layer on the shear-layer characteristics and acoustic fields will also be discussed.

  17. Positive low cloud and dust feedbacks amplify tropical North Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tianle; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Zelinka, Mark; Yu, Hongbin; Norris, Joel R.; Chin, Mian; Platnick, Steven; Meyer, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) is characterized by a horseshoe pattern of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies and has a wide range of climatic impacts. While the tropical arm of AMO is responsible for many of these impacts, it is either too weak or completely absent in many climate model simulations. Here we show, using both observational and model evidence, that the radiative effect of positive low cloud and dust feedbacks is strong enough to generate the tropical arm of AMO, with the low cloud feedback more dominant. The feedbacks can be understood in a consistent dynamical framework: weakened tropical trade wind speed in response to a warm middle latitude SST anomaly reduces dust loading and low cloud fraction over the tropical Atlantic, which warms the tropical North Atlantic SST. Together they contribute to the appearance of the tropical arm of AMO. Most current climate models miss both the critical wind speed response and two positive feedbacks though realistic simulations of them may be essential for many climatic studies related to the AMO.

  18. Positive feedback regulation of type I interferon by the interferon-stimulated gene STING

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Li, Bing; Yu, Yongxin; Iyer, Shankar S; Sun, Mingyu; Cheng, Genhong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is an important regulator of the innate immune response to cytoplasmic DNA. However, regulation of STING itself is largely unknown. Here, we show that STING transcription is induced by innate immune activators, such as cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs), through an IFNAR1- and STAT1-dependent pathway. We also identify a STAT1 binding site in the STING promoter that contributes to the activation of STING transcription. Furthermore, we show that induction of STING mediates the positive feedback regulation of CDN-triggered IFN-I. Thus, our study demonstrates that STING is an interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) and its induction is crucial for the IFN-I positive feedback loop. PMID:25572843

  19. Single screw interrupted thread positive displacement mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boblitt, Wayne W.

    1992-07-01

    A single screw positive displacement compressor mechanism employing shallow gate rotor tooth penetration of the main rotor for purposes of reducing internal leakage and consequent compressor inefficiencies is presented. The invention is provided with an interrupted main rotor thread for purposes of insuring multiple gate rotor teeth meshing with the drive portion of the main rotor thread, thereby reducing gate rotor tooth flank loads in the compressor section of the device. Provision is also made for main rotor thread baffling between the main rotor chamber section and the mechanism inlet.

  20. Eliminating the possibility at Chernobyl 4 of recriticality with positive feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.

    1996-04-29

    We have recently published an article in which we discuss means by which plutonium and other fissile material stored underground could reach criticality with positive feedback and therefore explosive potential. The Chernobyl rubble involving hundreds of tons of material is similar in some respects to the systems analyzed in the paper, and the practices there to control criticality may well increase the probability of a second event at Chernobyl 4. This paper explores the Chernobyl situation and remedial actions are recommended.

  1. Neural mechanisms underlying auditory feedback control of speech

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Kevin J.; Guenther, Frank H.

    2013-01-01

    The neural substrates underlying auditory feedback control of speech were investigated using a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and computational modeling. Neural responses were measured while subjects spoke monosyllabic words under two conditions: (i) normal auditory feedback of their speech, and (ii) auditory feedback in which the first formant frequency of their speech was unexpectedly shifted in real time. Acoustic measurements showed compensation to the shift within approximately 135 ms of onset. Neuroimaging revealed increased activity in bilateral superior temporal cortex during shifted feedback, indicative of neurons coding mismatches between expected and actual auditory signals, as well as right prefrontal and Rolandic cortical activity. Structural equation modeling revealed increased influence of bilateral auditory cortical areas on right frontal areas during shifted speech, indicating that projections from auditory error cells in posterior superior temporal cortex to motor correction cells in right frontal cortex mediate auditory feedback control of speech. PMID:18035557

  2. Successful implementation of a guideline by peer comparisons, education, and positive physician feedback.

    PubMed

    Wigder, H N; Cohan Ballis, S F; Lazar, L; Urgo, R; Dunn, B H

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if peer comparisons, an educational intervention, and positive physician feedback would decrease ordering of knee X-ray studies. We prospectively studied the ordering of knee X-ray studies for patients presenting with knee injuries before and after an educational program to encourage use of the Ottawa decision rule for knee radiography. Physicians were able to privately compare their individual baseline X-ray utilization data with that of their colleagues. Although acceptance of the rule was voluntary, both oral and written feedback encouraged consideration of the rule in clinical decision-making. The percentage of knee injury patients who received X-ray studies, as well as the Percentage Abnormal Results (PAR, defined as the percentage of X-ray studies demonstrating a fracture or effusion), were calculated before and after the educational meeting. Results of the study showed that the percentage of patients presenting with knee injuries who received X-ray studies decreased 23%. In addition, the PAR increased 58.4% between the two study periods. In conclusion, physician behavior can be altered positively with reinforcement. Peer comparisons, education, and positive physician feedback decreased test ordering by physicians even without mandating use of a protocol. PAR is a useful outcome measure to track physician utilization. PMID:10499693

  3. Folding with thermal-mechanical feedback: A reply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Bruce E.; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Ord, Alison

    2009-07-01

    A unified theory of deformation at all scales is outlined. Processes operating during deformation and metamorphism can be coupled in the form of reaction-diffusion equations. Solutions to these equations depend on the specific processes that dominate the dissipation of energy. Hobbs et al. (2008) is concerned with a scale where deformation and conduction of heat dominate and this corresponds to the regional scale. Other papers present results for other length and time scales. Boudinage develops through these processes in materials where the strict Biot theory predicts no boudinage. The strict Biot theory is applicable only at the instant of instability and provides no information on the subsequent growth of the folds. Analytical results for growth to large amplitudes show that only one wavelength develops and not a spectrum of wavelengths as proposed by Treagus and Hudleston (in press) and others. The wavelength to thickness ratio that finally develops is strongly dependent on boundary conditions and so such ratios tell us nothing about the conditions of folding unless these boundary conditions are known. The processes involved in folding with thermal-mechanical feedback are identical for single- and multi-layer systems so that it requires little space to expand the discussion to multi-layers.

  4. CGILS: Results from the First Phase of an International Project to Understand the Physical Mechanisms of Low Cloud Feedbacks in Single Column Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter N.; Austin, Phillip H.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; DelGenio, Anthony; DeRoode, Stephan R.; Endo, Satoshi; Franklin, Charmaine N.; Oolaz, Jean-Christophe; Hannay, Cecile; Heus, Thijs; Isotta, Francesco Alessandro; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Kang, In-Sik; Kawai, Hideaki; Kiehler, Martin; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Yangang; Lock, Adrian P.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Molod, Andrea M.; Suarez, Max J.

    2013-01-01

    1] CGILS-the CFMIP-GASS Intercomparison of Large Eddy Models (LESs) and single column models (SCMs)-investigates the mechanisms of cloud feedback in SCMs and LESs under idealized climate change perturbation. This paper describes the CGILS results from 15 SCMs and 8 LES models. Three cloud regimes over the subtropical oceans are studied: shallow cumulus, cumulus under stratocumulus, and well-mixed coastal stratus/stratocumulus. In the stratocumulus and coastal stratus regimes, SCMs without activated shallow convection generally simulated negative cloud feedbacks, while models with active shallow convection generally simulated positive cloud feedbacks. In the shallow cumulus alone regime, this relationship is less clear, likely due to the changes in cloud depth, lateral mixing, and precipitation or a combination of them. The majority of LES models simulated negative cloud feedback in the well-mixed coastal stratus/stratocumulus regime, and positive feedback in the shallow cumulus and stratocumulus regime. A general framework is provided to interpret SCM results: in a warmer climate, the moistening rate of the cloudy layer associated with the surface-based turbulence parameterization is enhanced; together with weaker large-scale subsidence, it causes negative cloud feedback. In contrast, in the warmer climate, the drying rate associated with the shallow convection scheme is enhanced. This causes positive cloud feedback. These mechanisms are summarized as the "NESTS" negative cloud feedback and the "SCOPE" positive cloud feedback (Negative feedback from Surface Turbulence under weaker Subsidence-Shallow Convection PositivE feedback) with the net cloud feedback depending on how the two opposing effects counteract each other. The LES results are consistent with these interpretations

  5. The Use of Feedback Mechanisms in Interpreting the Robustness of a Neoliberal Educational Assemblage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerath, Peter; Mattheis, Allison

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates how using feedback mechanisms or "loops" as heuristic devices can help ethnographers explain the interior logic, robustness and contradictions within complex educational assemblages. After reviewing the use of feedback mechanisms in the natural and social sciences, particularly practice theory, the article…

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet light source utilizing rare gas scintillation amplification sustained by photon positive feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena (Inventor); Chen, Danli (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A source of light in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region includes a reflective UV-sensitive photocathode supported in spaced parallel relationship with a mesh electrode within a rare gas at low pressure. A high positive potential applied to the mesh electrode creates an electric field which causes drifting of free electrons occurring between the electrodes and producing continuous VUV light output by electric field-driven scintillation amplification sustained by positive photon feedback mediated by photoemission from the photocathode. In one embodiment the lamp emits a narrow-band continuum peaked at 175 nm.

  7. Dynamics and Feedback Control of Plasma Equilibrium Position in a Tokamak.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenko, Oleg

    A brief history of the beginnings of nuclear fusion research involving toroidal closed-system magnetic plasma containment is presented. A tokamak machine is defined mathematically for the purposes of plasma equilibrium position perturbation analysis. The perturbation equations of a tokamak plasma equilibrium position are developed. Solution of the approximated perturbation equations is carried out. A unique, simple, and useful plasma displacement dynamics transfer function of a tokamak is developed. The dominant time constants of the dynamics transfer function are determined in a symbolic form. This symbolic form of the dynamics transfer function makes it possible to study the stability of a tokamak's plasma equilibrium position. Knowledge of the dynamics transfer function permits systematic syntheses of the required plasma displacement feedback control systems. The major parameters governing the plasma equilibrium position stability of a tokamak are shown to be (1) external magnetic field decay index, (2) transformer iron core effect, (3) plasma current, (4) radial rate-of-change inductance parameter, (5) vertical rate-of-change inductance parameter, and (6) vacuum vessel eddy-current time constant. An important and unique result is derived, showing that for a vacuum vessel eddy-current time constant exceeding a certain value the vertical plasma equilibrium position is stable, in spite of an intentional vertical instability design represented by a negative decay index. It is shown that a tokamak design having a theoretical set of positive decay index, negative radical rate-of-change inductance parameter, and positive vertical rate-of-change inductance parameter is expected to have a better plasma equilibrium position stability tolerance than a tokamak design having the same set with the signs reversed. The results of an actual hardware ISX-A tokamak plasma displacement feed-back control system design are presented. It is shown that a theoretical design computer

  8. Positive Feedback-Loop of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and 15-Lipoxygenase-2 Promotes Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tingting; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Xiufeng; Liu, Mengmeng; Hou, Yunlong; Wang, Yanyan; Ma, Cui; Li, Shuzhen; Zhu, Daling

    2013-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized with pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling mediated by 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO)/15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) according to our previous studies. Meanwhile, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) activity is highly correlated with vascular injury and remodeling, suggesting that TERT may be an essential determinant in the development of PH. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution and molecular mechanisms of TERT in the pathogenesis of PH. Approach and Results We measured the right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and ventricular weight, analyzed morphometric change of the pulmonary vessels in the hypoxia or monocrotaline treated rats. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, transwell assay and flow cytometry in pulmonary smooth muscle cells were performed to investigate the roles and relationship of TERT and 15-LO/15-HETE in PH. We revealed that the expression of TERT was increased in pulmonary vasculature of patients with PH and in the monocrotaline or hypoxia rat model of PH. The up-regulation of TERT was associated with experimental elevated RVSP and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments identified TERT as a novel interacting partner of 15-LO-2. TERT and 15-LO-2 augmented protein expression of each other. In addition, the proliferation, migration and cell-cycle transition from G0/G1 phase to S phase induced by hypoxia were inhibited by TERT knockdown, which were rescued by 15-HETE addition. Conclusions These results demonstrate that TERT regulates pulmonary vascular remodeling. TERT and 15-LO-2 form a positive feedback loop and together promote proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, creating a self-amplifying circuit which propels pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24376652

  9. Effectiveness of chest compression feedback during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in lateral tilted and semirecumbent positions: a randomised controlled simulation study.

    PubMed

    Song, Y; Oh, J; Chee, Y; Cho, Y; Lee, S; Lim, T H

    2015-11-01

    Feedback devices have been shown to improve the quality of chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients in the supine position, but no studies have reported the effects of feedback devices on chest compression when the chest is tilted. Basic life support-trained providers were randomly assigned to administer chest compressions to a manikin in the supine, 30° left lateral tilt and 30° semirecumbent positions, with or without the aid of a feedback device incorporated into a smartphone. Thirty-six participants were studied. The feedback device did not affect the quality of chest compressions in the supine position, but improved aspects of performance in the tilted positions. In the lateral tilted position, the median (IQR [range]) chest compression rate was 99 (99-100 [96-117]) compressions.min(-1) with and 115 (95-128 [77-164]) compressions.min(-1) without feedback (p = 0.05), and the proportion of compressions of correct depth was 55 (0-96 [0-100])% with and 1 (0-30 [0-100])% without feedback (p = 0.03). In the semirecumbent position, the proportion of compressions of correct depth was 21 (0-87 [0-100])% with and 1 (0-26 [0-100])% without feedback (p = 0.05). Female participants applied chest compressions at a more accurate rate using the feedback device in the lateral tilted position but were unable to increase the chest compression depth, whereas male participants were able to increase the force of chest compression using the feedback device in the lateral tilted and semirecumbent positions. We conclude that a feedback device improves the application of chest compressions during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation when the chest is tilted. PMID:26349025

  10. Consecutive Positive Feedback Loops Create a Bistable Switch that Controls Preadipocyte-to-Adipocyte Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byung Ouk; Ahrends, Robert; Teruel, Mary N.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Adipogenesis, or the conversion of proliferating preadipocytes into nondividing adipocytes, is an important part of the vertebrate weight-maintenance program. It is not yet understood how and when an irreversible transition occurs into a distinct state capable of accumulating lipid. Here, we use single-cell fluorescence imaging to show that an all-or-none switch is induced before lipid accumulation occurs. Conversion begins by glucocorticoid and cAMP signals raising C/EBPβ levels above a critical threshold, triggering three consecutive positive feedback loops: from PPARγ to C/EBPα, then to C/EBPβ, and last to the insulin receptor. Experiments and modeling show that these feedbacks create a robust, irreversible transition to a terminally differentiated state by rejecting short- and low-amplitude stimuli. After the differentiation switch is triggered, insulin controls fat accumulation in a graded fashion. Altogether, our study introduces a regulatory motif that locks cells in a differentiated state by engaging a sequence of positive feedback loops. PMID:23063366

  11. Rapid in situ X-ray position stabilization via extremum seeking feedback.

    PubMed

    Zohar, S; Venugopalan, N; Kissick, D; Becker, M; Xu, S; Makarov, O; Stepanov, S; Ogata, C; Sanishvili, R; Fischetti, R F

    2016-03-01

    X-ray beam stability is crucial for acquiring high-quality data at synchrotron beamline facilities. When the X-ray beam and defining apertures are of similar dimensions, small misalignments driven by position instabilities give rise to large intensity fluctuations. This problem is solved using extremum seeking feedback control (ESFC) for in situ vertical beam position stabilization. In this setup, the intensity spatial gradient required for ESFC is determined by phase comparison of intensity oscillations downstream from the sample with pre-existing vertical beam oscillations. This approach compensates for vertical position drift from all sources with position recovery times <6 s and intensity stability through a 5 µm aperture measured at 1.5% FWHM over a period of 8 hours. PMID:26917131

  12. Enhanced Positive Water Vapor Feedback Associated with Tropical Deep Convection: New Evidence from Aura MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Hui; Read, William G.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Waters, Joe W.; Wu, Dong L.; Fetzer, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent simultaneous observations of upper tropospheric (UT) water vapor and cloud ice from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite provide new evidence for tropical convective influence on UT water vapor and its associated greenhouse effect. The observations show that UT water vapor increases as cloud ice water content increases. They also show that, when sea surface temperature (SST) exceeds approx.300 K, UT cloud ice associated with tropical deep convection increases sharply with increasing SST. The moistening of the upper troposphere by deep convection leads to an enhanced positive water vapor feedback, about 3 times that implied solely by thermodynamics. Over tropical oceans when SST greater than approx.300 K, the 'convective UT water vapor feedback' inferred from the MLS observations contributes approximately 65% of the sensitivity of the clear-sky greenhouse parameter to SST.

  13. Response to "The Iris Hypothesis: A Negative or Positive Cloud Feedback?"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lindzen, Richard S.; Hou, Arthur Y.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Based on radiance measurements of Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite, Lindzen et al. found that the high-level cloud cover averaged over the tropical western Pacific decreases with increasing sea surface temperature. They further found that the response of high-level clouds to the sea surface temperature had an effect of reducing the magnitude of climate change, which is referred as a negative climate feedback. Lin et al. reassessed the results found by Lindzen et al. by analyzing the radiation and clouds derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System measurements. They found a weak positive feedback between high-level clouds and the surface temperature. We have found that the approach taken by Lin et al. to estimating the albedo and the outgoing longwave radiation is incorrect and that the inferred climate sensitivity is unreliable.

  14. Two-axis antenna positioning mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herald, Michelle; Wai, Leilani C.

    1994-01-01

    The two-axis antenna positioning mechanism (TAAPM) is used to position three Ku-band and one C-band spot antennas on the INTELSAT 7 (I-7) spacecraft, which is a commercial telecommunications satellite purchased and operated by INTELSAT, an international consortium. The first I-7 was successfully launched on 22 Oct. 1993 from French Guiana on an Ariane launch vehicle. The TAAPM's on the first I-7 satellite successfully completed their in-orbit functional testing. The TAAPM was an entirely new design for Space Systems/Loral. This paper will describe the spacecraft/system requirements and application of the TAAPM and present the technical findings of TAAPM qualification and protoflight testing.

  15. A MicroRNA-Mediated Positive Feedback Regulatory Loop of the NF-κB Pathway in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongliang; Yuan, Jia; Chen, Yonggui; Li, Sedong; Su, Ziqi; Wei, Erman; Li, Chaozheng; Weng, Shaoping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2016-05-01

    In the evolutionarily conserved canonical NF-κB pathway, degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor IκB in the cytoplasmic NF-κB/IκB complex allows the liberated NF-κB to translocate into the nucleus to activate various target genes. The regulatory mechanism governing this process needs further investigation. In this study, a novel microRNA, temporarily named miR-1959, was first identified from an invertebrate Litopenaeus vannamei miR-1959 targets the 3'-untranslated region of the IκB homolog Cactus gene and reduces the protein level of Cactus in vivo, whereas the NF-κB homolog Dorsal directly binds the miR-1959 promoter to activate its transcription. Therefore, miR-1959 mediates a positive feedback regulatory loop, in that Dorsal activates miR-1959 expression, and in turn, miR-1959 inhibits the expression of Cactus, further leading to enhanced activation of Dorsal. Moreover, miR-1959 regulates the expression of many antimicrobial peptides in vivo and is involved in antibacterial immunity. To our knowledge, it is the first discovery of a microRNA-mediated feedback loop that directly regulates the NF-κB/IκB complex. This positive feedback loop could collaborate with the known NF-κB/IκB negative loop to generate a dynamic balance to regulate the activity of NF-κB, thus constituting an effective regulatory mechanism at the critical node of the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26994223

  16. Positive Feedback between Mycorrhizal Fungi and Plants Influences Plant Invasion Success and Resistance to Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Ruyi; Tang, Jianjun; Yang, Haishui; Hu, Shuijin; Chen, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Negative or positive feedback between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plants can contribute to plant species interactions, but how this feedback affects plant invasion or resistance to invasion is not well known. Here we tested how alterations in AMF community induced by an invasive plant species generate feedback to the invasive plant itself and affect subsequent interactions between the invasive species and its native neighbors. We first examined the effects of the invasive forb Solidago canadensis L. on AMF communities comprising five different AMF species. We then examined the effects of the altered AMF community on mutualisms formed with the native legume forb species Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl. and on the interaction between the invasive and native plants. The host preferences of the five AMF were also assessed to test whether the AMF form preferred mutualistic relations with the invasive and/or the native species. We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum) while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field. The host preference test showed that S. canadensis had promoted the abundance of AMF species (G. geosporum) that most promoted its own growth. As a consequence, the altered AMF community enhanced the competitiveness of invasive S. canadensis at the expense of K. striata. Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference. This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant. PMID:20808770

  17. Control of position and movement is simplified by combined muscle spindle and Golgi tendon organ feedback.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Dinant A; Van Soest, Arthur J Knoek; Wong, Jeremy D; Kurtzer, Isaac; Gribble, Paul L

    2013-02-01

    Whereas muscle spindles play a prominent role in current theories of human motor control, Golgi tendon organs (GTO) and their associated tendons are often neglected. This is surprising since there is ample evidence that both tendons and GTOs contribute importantly to neuromusculoskeletal dynamics. Using detailed musculoskeletal models, we provide evidence that simple feedback using muscle spindles alone results in very poor control of joint position and movement since muscle spindles cannot sense changes in tendon length that occur with changes in muscle force. We propose that a combination of spindle and GTO afferents can provide an estimate of muscle-tendon complex length, which can be effectively used for low-level feedback during both postural and movement tasks. The feasibility of the proposed scheme was tested using detailed musculoskeletal models of the human arm. Responses to transient and static perturbations were simulated using a 1-degree-of-freedom (DOF) model of the arm and showed that the combined feedback enabled the system to respond faster, reach steady state faster, and achieve smaller static position errors. Finally, we incorporated the proposed scheme in an optimally controlled 2-DOF model of the arm for fast point-to-point shoulder and elbow movements. Simulations showed that the proposed feedback could be easily incorporated in the optimal control framework without complicating the computation of the optimal control solution, yet greatly enhancing the system's response to perturbations. The theoretical analyses in this study might furthermore provide insight about the strong physiological couplings found between muscle spindle and GTO afferents in the human nervous system. PMID:23100138

  18. MECHANISMS OF CARBON MONOXIDE ATTENUATION OF TUBULOGLOMERULAR FEEDBACK (TGF)

    PubMed Central

    Ren, YiLin; D’Ambrosio, Martin A.; Wang, Hong; Falck, John R.; Peterson, Edward L.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a physiological messenger with diverse functions in the kidney, including controlling afferent arteriole (Af-Art) tone both directly and via tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF). We have reported that CO attenuates TGF, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unknown. We hypothesized that CO, acting via cGMP, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), and cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterase-2 (PDE2), reduces cAMP in the macula densa, leading to TGF attenuation. In vitro, microdissected rabbit Af-Arts and their attached macula densa were simultaneously perfused. TGF was measured as the decrease in Af-Art diameter elicited by switching macula densa NaCl from 10 to 80 mM. Adding a CO-releasing molecule (CORM-3, 5×10−5mol/L) to the macula densa blunted TGF from 3.3±0.3 to 2.0±0.3 µm (P<0.001). The guanylate cyclase inhibitor LY-83583 (10−6mol/L) enhanced TGF (5.8±0.6 µm; P<0.001 vs. control) and prevented the effect of CORM-3 on TGF (LY-83583 + CORM-3, 5.5±0.3 µm). Similarly, the PKG inhibitor KT-5823 (2×10−6mol/L) enhanced TGF and prevented the effect of CORM-3 on TGF (KT-5823, 6.0±0.7 µm; KT-5823 + CORM-3, 5.9±0.8 µm). However, the PDE2 inhibitor BAY-60-7550 (10−6mol/L) did not prevent the effect of CORM-3 on TGF (BAY-60-7550, 4.07±0.31 µm; BAY-60-7550 + CORM-3, 1.84±0.31 µm, P<0.001). Finally, the degradation-resistant cAMP analog dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP, 10−3mol/L) prevented the attenuation of TGF by CORM-3 (db-cAMP, 4.6±0.5 µm; db-cAMP + CORM-3, 5.0±0.6 µm). We conclude that CO attenuates TGF by reducing cAMP via a cGMP-dependent pathway mediated by PKG, rather than PDE2. Our results will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that control the renal microcirculation. PMID:22508834

  19. Mechanical implications of chimpanzee positional behavior.

    PubMed

    Hunt, K D

    1991-12-01

    Mechanical hypotheses concerning the function of chimpanzee anatomical specializations are examined in light of recent positional behavior data. Arm-hanging was the only common chimpanzee positional behavior that required full abduction of the humerus, and vertical climbing was the only distinctive chimpanzee positional behavior that required forceful retraction of the humerus and flexion of the elbow. Some elements of the chimpanzee anatomy, including an abductible humerus, a broad thorax, a cone-shaped torso, and a long, narrow scapula, are hypothesized to be a coadapted functional complex that reduces muscle action and structural fatigue during arm-hanging. Large muscles that retract the humerus (latissimus dorsi and probably sternocostal pectoralis major and posterior deltoid) and flex the elbow (biceps brachii, probably brachialis and brachioradialis) are argued to be adaptations to vertical climbing alone. A large ulnar excursion of the manus and long, curved metacarpals and phalanges are interpreted as adaptations to gripping vertical weight-bearing structures during vertical climbing and arm-hanging. A short torso, an iliac origin of the latissimus dorsi, and large muscles for arm-raising (caudal serratus, teres minor, cranial trapezius, and probably anterior deltoid and clavicular pectoralis major) are interpreted as adaptations to both climbing and unimanual suspension. PMID:1776659

  20. Valence-separated representation of reward prediction error in feedback-related negativity and positivity.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Katahira, Kentaro; Ohira, Hideki

    2015-02-11

    Feedback-related negativity (FRN) is an event-related brain potential (ERP) component elicited by errors and negative outcomes. Previous studies proposed that FRN reflects the activity of a general error-processing system that incorporates reward prediction error (RPE). However, other studies reported inconsistent results on this issue - namely, that FRN only reflects the valence of feedback and that the magnitude of RPE is reflected by the other ERP component called P300. The present study focused on the relationship between the FRN amplitude and RPE. ERPs were recorded during a reversal learning task performed by the participants, and a computational model was used to estimate trial-by-trial RPEs, which we correlated with the ERPs. The results indicated that FRN and P300 reflected the magnitude of RPE in negative outcomes and positive outcomes, respectively. In addition, the correlation between RPE and the P300 amplitude was stronger than the correlation between RPE and the FRN amplitude. These differences in the correlation between ERP and RPE components may explain the inconsistent results reported by previous studies; the asymmetry in the correlations might make it difficult to detect the effect of the RPE magnitude on the FRN and makes it appear that the FRN only reflects the valence of feedback. PMID:25634316

  1. A Weak, Positive Feedback Between Sea Level and the Earth's Planetary Energy Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzeion, B.; Levermann, A.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in global mean temperature lead to increasing sea level mostly by loss of land ice mass and thermal expansion of the ocean. On millennial timescales, a warming of 5 K leads to flooding of about 1.6 % of Earth's current land surface, when taking into account the spatial distribution of relative sea-level rise caused by mass redistribution and isostatic rebound (Marzeion & Levermann, 2014). While there is great seasonal and spatial variability, the planetary albedo over the ocean is generally slightly lower than over land. We use millennial-scale, spatially explicit projections of relative sea-level rise, and the observed spatio-temporal distribution of planetary albedo and incident shortwave radiation, to determine the strength of the feedback between sea-level rise and the planetary energy budget. We find that the feedback is positive, but very weak. While the spatial pattern of sea-level rise is varying strongly with temperature, we find that the strength of the feedback is relatively independent of the temperature change, and around 0.8±0.1 %; i.e., an external forcing of 1 W/m2 will result in 1.008 W/m2 change of the energy balance.

  2. A positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiao; Yang, Zhe; Wang, Weiping; Guo, Ting; Jia, Zhuqing; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • ISL-1 is highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL. • ISL-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. • c-Myc positively regulates ISL-1 expression in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells. • ISL-1 and c-Myc forms an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex only in DLBCL. • Positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 does not exist in normal pancreatic β-cell. - Abstract: Insulin enhancer binding protein-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been reported to play essential roles in promoting adult pancreatic β-cells proliferation. Recent studies indicate that ISL-1 may also involve in the occurrence of a variety of tumors. However, whether ISL-1 has any functional effect on tumorigenesis, and what are the differences on ISL-1 function in distinct conditions, are completely unknown. In this study, we found that ISL-1 was highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells, as well as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but to a much less extent in other normal tissues or tumor specimens. Further study revealed that ISL-1 promoted the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL cells, and also accelerated the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. We also found that ISL-1 could activate c-Myc transcription not only in pancreatic β-cells but also in DLBCL cells. However, a cell-specific feedback regulation was detectable only in DLBCL cells. This auto-regulatory loop was established by the interaction of ISL-1 and c-Myc to form an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex, and synergistically to promote ISL-1 transcription through binding on the ISL-1 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells, which might result in the functional diversities of ISL-1 in different physiological and pathological processes.

  3. Positive genetic feedback governs cAMP spiral wave formation in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, H; Aranson, I; Tsimring, L; Truong, T V

    1996-01-01

    The aggregation stage of the life cycle of Dictyostelium discoideum is governed by the chemotactic response of individual amoebae to excitable waves of cAMP. We modeled this process through a recently introduced hybrid automata-continuum scheme and used computer simulation to unravel the role of specific components of this complex developmental process. Our results indicated an essential role for positive feedback between the cAMP signaling and the expression of the genes encoding the signal transduction and response machinery. PMID:8692824

  4. Grassland establishment under varying resource availability: a test of positive and negative feedback.

    PubMed

    Baer, Sara G; Blair, John M

    2008-07-01

    The traditional logic of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) interactions in ecosystems predicts further increases or decreases in productivity (positive feedback) in response to high and low fertility in the soil, respectively; but the potential for development of feedback in ecosystems recovering from disturbance is less well understood. Furthermore, this logic has been challenged in grassland ecosystems where frequent fires or grazing may reduce the contribution of aboveground litter inputs to soil organic matter pools and nutrient supply for plant growth, relative to forest ecosystems. Further, if increases in plant productivity increase soil C content more than soil N content, negative feedback may result from increased microbial demand for N making less available for plant growth. We used a field experiment to test for feedback in an establishing grassland by comparing aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and belowground pools and fluxes of C and N in soil with enriched, ambient, and reduced N availability. For eight years annual N enrichment increased ANPP, root N, and root tissue quality, but root C:N ratios remained well above the threshold for net mineralization of N. There was no evidence that N enrichment increased root biomass, soil C or N accrual rates, or storage of C in total, microbial, or mineralizable pools within this time frame. However, the net nitrogen mineralization potential (NMP) rate was greater following eight years of N enrichment, and we attributed this to N saturation of the microbial biomass. Grassland developing under experimentally imposed N limitation through C addition to the soil exhibited ANPP, root biomass and quality, and net NMP rate similar to the ambient soil. Similarity in productivity and roots in the reduced and ambient N treatments was attributed to the potentially high nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) of the dominant C4 grasses, and increasing cover of legumes over time in the C-amended soil. Thus, in a developing

  5. The Y-located gonadoblastoma gene TSPY amplifies its own expression through a positive feedback loop in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kido, Tatsuo; Lau, Yun-Fai Chris

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Y-encoded proto-oncoprotein TSPY amplifies its expression level via a positive feedback loop. • TSPY binds to the chromatin/DNA at exon 1 of TSPY gene. • TSPY enhances the gene expression in a TSPY exon 1 sequence dependent manner. • The conserved SET/NAP-domain is essential for TSPY transactivation. • Insights on probable mechanisms on TSPY exacerbation on cancer development in men. - Abstract: The testis-specific protein Y-encoded (TSPY) is a repetitive gene located on the gonadoblastoma region of the Y chromosome, and has been considered to be the putative gene for this oncogenic locus on the male-only chromosome. It is expressed in spermatogonial cells and spermatocytes in normal human testis, but abundantly in gonadoblastoma, testicular germ cell tumors and a variety of somatic cancers, including melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and prostate cancer. Various studies suggest that TSPY accelerates cell proliferation and growth, and promotes tumorigenesis. In this report, we show that TSPY could bind directly to the chromatin/DNA at exon 1 of its own gene, and greatly enhance the transcriptional activities of the endogenous gene in the LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Domain mapping analyses of TSPY have localized the critical and sufficient domain to the SET/NAP-domain. These results suggest that TSPY could efficiently amplify its expression and oncogenic functions through a positive feedback loop, and contribute to the overall tumorigenic processes when it is expressed in various human cancers.

  6. Technology Enhanced Feedback Tools as a Knowledge Management Mechanism for Supporting Professional Growth and School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Alan; Swan, Gerry

    2011-01-01

    Attempts at school reform and improvement have experienced difficulty creating and implementing feedback systems that energize and sustain change efforts. If the call for reform at all levels of education is to be met, attention must be given to establishing effective feedback mechanisms in educational institutions as they embark on improvement…

  7. Movement goals and feedback and feedforward control mechanisms in speech production

    PubMed Central

    Perkell, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of speech motor control are described that support a theoretical framework in which fundamental control variables for phonemic movements are multi-dimensional regions in auditory and somatosensory spaces. Auditory feedback is used to acquire and maintain auditory goals and in the development and function of feedback and feedforward control mechanisms. Several lines of evidence support the idea that speakers with more acute sensory discrimination acquire more distinct goal regions and therefore produce speech sounds with greater contrast. Feedback modification findings indicate that fluently produced sound sequences are encoded as feedforward commands, and feedback control serves to correct mismatches between expected and produced sensory consequences. PMID:22661828

  8. Distributed mechanical feedback in arthropods and robots simplifies control of rapid running on challenging terrain.

    PubMed

    Spagna, J C; Goldman, D I; Lin, P-C; Koditschek, D E; Full, R J

    2007-03-01

    Terrestrial arthropods negotiate demanding terrain more effectively than any search-and-rescue robot. Slow, precise stepping using distributed neural feedback is one strategy for dealing with challenging terrain. Alternatively, arthropods could simplify control on demanding surfaces by rapid running that uses kinetic energy to bridge gaps between footholds. We demonstrate that this is achieved using distributed mechanical feedback, resulting from passive contacts along legs positioned by pre-programmed trajectories favorable to their attachment mechanisms. We used wire-mesh experimental surfaces to determine how a decrease in foothold probability affects speed and stability. Spiders and insects attained high running speeds on simulated terrain with 90% of the surface contact area removed. Cockroaches maintained high speeds even with their tarsi ablated, by generating horizontally oriented leg trajectories. Spiders with more vertically directed leg placement used leg spines, which resulted in more effective distributed contact by interlocking with asperities during leg extension, but collapsing during flexion, preventing entanglement. Ghost crabs, which naturally lack leg spines, showed increased mobility on wire mesh after the addition of artificial, collapsible spines. A bioinspired robot, RHex, was redesigned to maximize effective distributed leg contact, by changing leg orientation and adding directional spines. These changes improved RHex's agility on challenging surfaces without adding sensors or changing the control system. PMID:17671322

  9. Shifts in a single muscle's control potential of body dynamics are determined by mechanical feedback

    PubMed Central

    Sponberg, Simon; Libby, Thomas; Mullens, Chris H.; Full, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Muscles are multi-functional structures that interface neural and mechanical systems. Muscle work depends on a large multi-dimensional space of stimulus (neural) and strain (mechanical) parameters. In our companion paper, we rewrote activation to individual muscles in intact, behaving cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis L.), revealing a specific muscle's potential to control body dynamics in different behaviours. Here, we use those results to provide the biologically relevant parameters for in situ work measurements. We test four hypotheses about how muscle function changes to provide mechanisms for the observed control responses. Under isometric conditions, a graded increase in muscle stress underlies its linear actuation during standing behaviours. Despite typically absorbing energy, this muscle can recruit two separate periods of positive work when controlling running. This functional change arises from mechanical feedback filtering a linear increase in neural activation into nonlinear work output. Changing activation phase again led to positive work recruitment, but at different times, consistent with the muscle's ability to also produce a turn. Changes in muscle work required considering the natural sequence of strides and separating swing and stance contributions of work. Both in vivo control potentials and in situ work loops were necessary to discover the neuromechanical coupling enabling control. PMID:21502130

  10. Efficient plant growth using automatic position-feedback laser light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinoki, Yoshiaki; Kato, Yuya; Ogawa, Kosuke; Nakao, Akira; Okai, Zenshiro; Katsuyama, Toshio

    2013-05-01

    The plant growth based on the scanning laser beam is newly developed. Three semiconductor lasers with three primary colors, i.e., blue, green and red are used. Here, the laser scanned position is restricted only to the plant leaves, where the light illumination is needed. The feedback system based on the perspective projection is developed. The system consists of the automatic position correction from the camera image. The automatic image extraction of the leaf parts is also introduced. The electric power needed for this system is as small as 6.25% compared with the traditional white fluorescent lamp. Furthermore, experimental results show that the red-color laser light is particularly efficient for the growth of the radish sprouts.

  11. The Effect of Positive and Negative Feedback on Risk-Taking across Different Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Losecaat Vermeer, Annabel B.; Sanfey, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    Preferences for risky choices have often been shown to be unstable and context-dependent. Though people generally avoid gambles with mixed outcomes, a phenomenon often attributed to loss aversion, contextual factors can impact this dramatically. For example, people typically prefer risky options after a financial loss, while generally choosing safer options after a monetary gain. However, it is unclear what exactly contributes to these preference shifts as a function of prior outcomes, as these gain/loss outcomes are usually confounded with participant performance, and therefore it is unclear whether these effects are driven purely by the monetary gains or losses, or rather by success or failure at the actual task. Here, we experimentally separated the effects of monetary gains/losses from performance success/failure prior to a standard risky choice. Participants performed a task in which they experienced contextual effects: 1) monetary gain or loss based directly on performance, 2) monetary gain or loss that was randomly awarded and was, crucially, independent from performance, and 3) success or failure feedback based on performance, but without any monetary incentive. Immediately following these positive/negative contexts, participants were presented with a gain-loss gamble that they had to decide to either play or pass. We found that risk preferences for identical sets of gambles were biased by positive and negative contexts containing monetary gains and losses, but not by contexts containing performance feedback. This data suggests that the observed framing effects are driven by aversion for monetary losses and not simply by the positive or negative valence of the context, or by potential moods resulting from positive or negative contexts. These results highlight the specific context dependence of risk preferences. PMID:26407298

  12. Theory and calculations of synchrotron instabilities and feedback-mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meijssen, T.E.M.

    1981-08-12

    The properties of the phenomenon synchrotron radiation are given with general theory on the basic processes and betatron and synchrotron oscillations. A more extended theoretical view at transverse instabilities and the influence of a damping feedback system are discussed. The longitudinal case is covered. For the calculations on the longitudinal case with M equally spaced pointbunches, with N electrons each, in the storage ring, the parasitic modes of the radio-frequency cavity were measured. A description of this is given. The values of damping rates of the longitudinal feedback system found, are as expected, but too low to damp the longitudinal instabilities calculated. This might be caused by the input data. The calculated growth rates are very sensitive to changes in frequency and width of the parasitic modes, which were measured under conditions differing slightly from the operating conditions.

  13. Sensitivity of feedback effects in CBMZ/MOSAIC chemical mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San José, R.; Pérez, J. L.; Balzarini, A.; Baró, R.; Curci, G.; Forkel, R.; Galmarini, S.; Grell, G.; Hirtl, M.; Honzak, L.; Im, U.; Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Langer, M.; Pirovano, G.; Tuccella, P.; Werhahn, J.; Žabkar, R.

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the impact of the aerosol effects on meteorological variables and pollutant concentrations two simulations with the WRF-Chem model have been performed over Europe for year 2010. We have performed a baseline simulation without any feedback effects and a second simulation including the direct as well as the indirect aerosol effect. The paper describes the full configuration of the model, the simulation design, special impacts and evaluation. Although low aerosol particle concentrations are detected, the inclusion of the feedback effects results in an increase of solar radiation at the surface over cloudy areas (North-West, including the Atlantic) and decrease over more sunny locations (South-East). Aerosol effects produce an increase of the water vapor and decrease the planet boundary layer height over the whole domain except in the Sahara area, where the maximum particle concentrations are detected. Significant ozone concentrations are found over the Mediterranean area. Simulated feedback effects between aerosol concentrations and meteorological variables and on pollutant distributions strongly depend on the aerosol concentrations and the clouds. Further investigations are necessary with higher aerosol particle concentrations. WRF-Chem variables are evaluated using available hourly observations in terms of performance statistics. Standardized observations from the ENSEMBLE system web-interface were used. The research was developed under the second phase of Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). WRF-Chem demonstrates its capability in capturing temporal and spatial variations of the major meteorological variables and pollutants, except the wind speed over complex terrain. The wind speed bias may affect the accuracy in the chemical predictions (NO2, SO2). The analysis of the correlations between simulated data sets and observational data sets indicates that the simulation with aerosol effects performs slightly better. These

  14. Sahara Heat Low Perturbations and Water Vapor in the Sahel: A Positive Feedback System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, L.; Evan, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    It is necessary to understand the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification, motivated by the increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Climate change and land dynamics are the perturbations that are major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a ';';desertified'' state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. This research focuses on changes in precipitation resulting from land-atmosphere interactions and changes in vegetation cover. We concentrate on the Sahel region of Africa (a strip of land that is a transitional area between the Sahara desert to the North and the rain forest to the South). It is a dry land, semi arid environment and is a bistable ecosystem that can either be in the state of 'dry' or 'wet'. After an abnormally wet/high precipitation period in the 1950s the Sahel experienced terrible droughts and desertification which peaked in the 1980s. Since then, precipitation has gradually increased and a sinusoidal model has been shown run on a multi decadal cycle. Discrepancies in the data exist, however, and although the overall cycle has been modeled well, the large inter-annual fluctuations in precipitation have yet to be sufficiently modeled or explained. This research offers new evidence as to why such a phenomenon exists and attempts to attribute this behavior to a coupled land-atmosphere feedback system, linking together changes in vegetation cover and precipitation in the Sahel. Using the model output data from a high resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to look at Africa and compare the difference between perturbations and the mean, this research asserts that when the surface of the Saharan Heat Low (SHL) becomes extremely hot the pressure drops substantially. Subsequently, due to the West African Monsoon system, air rushes in from high-pressure areas, and pulls monsoon precipitation

  15. Finite-time stabilisation of simple mechanical systems using continuous feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Amit K.; Bohn, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Stabilisation of simple mechanical systems in finite time with continuous state feedback is considered here. The dynamics are represented by generalised (local) coordinates. A general methodology to construct control Lyapunov functions that are Hölder continuous and that can be used to show finite-time stability of the feedback controlled system, is presented. This construction also gives the feedback control law, and results in the feedback system being Hölder continuous as well. Unlike Lipschitz continuous feedback control systems, the feedback control scheme given here converges to the desired equilibrium in finite time. Moreover, unlike discontinuous and hybrid control schemes, the feedback control law does not lead to chattering in the presence of measurement noise, does not excite unmodelled high-frequency dynamics, and can be implemented with actuators that can only deliver continuous control inputs. The advantages of continuous finite-time stabilisation over continuous asymptotic stabilisation of mechanical systems, has been described in some prior research on finite-time stabilisation of the double integrator. The finite-time stabilisation scheme given here generalises this prior research to multiple degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. A numerical comparison is carried out through numerical simulations on two example systems that are representative of a broad class of simple mechanical systems.

  16. Functional characteristics of a double positive feedback loop coupled with autorepression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Subhasis; Bose, Indrani

    2008-12-01

    We study the functional characteristics of a two-gene motif consisting of a double positive feedback loop and an autoregulatory negative feedback loop. The motif appears in the gene regulatory network controlling the functional activity of pancreatic β-cells. The model exhibits bistability and hysteresis in appropriate parameter regions. The two stable steady states correspond to low (OFF state) and high (ON state) protein levels, respectively. Using a deterministic approach, we show that the region of bistability increases in extent when the copy number of one of the genes is reduced from 2 to 1. The negative feedback loop has the effect of reducing the size of the bistable region. Loss of a gene copy, brought about by mutations, hampers the normal functioning of the β-cells giving rise to the genetic disorder, maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The diabetic phenotype makes its appearance when a sizable fraction of the β-cells is in the OFF state. Using stochastic simulation techniques we show that, on reduction of the gene copy number, there is a transition from the monostable ON to the ON state in the bistable region of the parameter space. Fluctuations in the protein levels, arising due to the stochastic nature of gene expression, can give rise to transitions between the ON and OFF states. We show that as the strength of autorepression increases, the ON → OFF state transitions become less probable whereas the reverse transitions are more probable. The implications of the results in the context of the occurrence of MODY are pointed out.

  17. Spatial pattern formation of coastal vegetation in response to external gradients and positive feedbacks affecting soil porewater salinity: A model study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, J.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Smith, T. J., III; Teh, S.Y.; Koh, H. L.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal vegetation of South Florida typically comprises salinity-tolerant mangroves bordering salinity-intolerant hardwood hammocks and fresh water marshes. Two primary ecological factors appear to influence the maintenance of mangrove/hammock ecotones against changes that might occur due to disturbances. One of these is a gradient in one or more environmental factors. The other is the action of positive feedback mechanisms, in which each vegetation community influences its local environment to favor itself, reinforcing the boundary between communities. The relative contributions of these two factors, however, can be hard to discern. A spatially explicit individual-based model of vegetation, coupled with a model of soil hydrology and salinity dynamics is presented here to simulate mangrove/hammock ecotones in the coastal margin habitats of South Florida. The model simulation results indicate that an environmental gradient of salinity, caused by tidal flux, is the key factor separating vegetation communities, while positive feedback involving the different interaction of each vegetation type with the vadose zone salinity increases the sharpness of boundaries, and maintains the ecological resilience of mangrove/hammock ecotones against small disturbances. Investigation of effects of precipitation on positive feedback indicates that the dry season, with its low precipitation, is the period of strongest positive feedback. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. (outside the USA).

  18. Construction of an Oscillator Gene Circuit by Negative and Positive Feedbacks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihui; Ma, Yushu; Ren, Yuhong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic oscillators are gene circuits in which the protein expression will change over time. The delay of transcription, translation, and protein folding is used to form this kind of behavior. Here, we tried to design a synthetic oscillator by a negative feedback combined with a positive feedback. With the mutant promoter PLacC repressed by LacIq and PLux activated by AHL-bound LuxR, two gene circuits, Os-LAA and Os-ASV, were constructed and introduced into LacI-deleted E. coli DH5α cells. When glucose was used as the carbon source, a low level of fluorescence was detected in the culture, and the bacteria with Os-ASV showed no oscillation, whereas a small portion of those carrying Os-LAA demonstrated oscillation behavior with a period of about 68.3 ± 20 min. When glycerol was used as the carbon source, bacteria with Os-ASV demonstrated high fluorescence value and oscillation behavior with the period of about 121 ± 21 min. PMID:26387818

  19. Better Bet-Hedging with coupled positive and negative feedback loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narula, Jatin; Igoshin, Oleg

    2011-03-01

    Bacteria use the phenotypic heterogeneity associated with bistable switches to distribute the risk of activating stress response strategies like sporulation and persistence. However bistable switches offer little control over the timing of phenotype switching and first passage times (FPT) for individual cells are found to be exponentially distributed. We show that a genetic circuit consisting of interlinked positive and negative feedback loops allows cells to control the timing of phenotypic switching. Using a mathematical model we find that in this system a stable high expression state and stable low expression limit cycle coexist and the FPT distribution for stochastic transitions between them shows multiple peaks at regular intervals. A multimodal FPT distribution allows cells to detect the persistence of stress and control the rate of phenotype transition of the population. We further show that extracellular signals from cell-cell communication that change the strength of the feedback loops can modulate the FPT distribution and allow cells even greater control in a bet-hedging strategy.

  20. A simple negative interaction in the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is sufficient to produce reliable oscillations.

    PubMed

    Miró-Bueno, Jesús M; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Negative and positive transcriptional feedback loops are present in natural and synthetic genetic oscillators. A single gene with negative transcriptional feedback needs a time delay and sufficiently strong nonlinearity in the transmission of the feedback signal in order to produce biochemical rhythms. A single gene with only positive transcriptional feedback does not produce oscillations. Here, we demonstrate that this single-gene network in conjunction with a simple negative interaction can also easily produce rhythms. We examine a model comprised of two well-differentiated parts. The first is a positive feedback created by a protein that binds to the promoter of its own gene and activates the transcription. The second is a negative interaction in which a repressor molecule prevents this protein from binding to its promoter. A stochastic study shows that the system is robust to noise. A deterministic study identifies that the dynamics of the oscillator are mainly driven by two types of biomolecules: the protein, and the complex formed by the repressor and this protein. The main conclusion of this paper is that a simple and usual negative interaction, such as degradation, sequestration or inhibition, acting on the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is a sufficient condition to produce reliable oscillations. One gene is enough and the positive transcriptional feedback signal does not need to activate a second repressor gene. This means that at the genetic level an explicit negative feedback loop is not necessary. The model needs neither cooperative binding reactions nor the formation of protein multimers. Therefore, our findings could help to clarify the design principles of cellular clocks and constitute a new efficient tool for engineering synthetic genetic oscillators. PMID:22205920

  1. A Simple Negative Interaction in the Positive Transcriptional Feedback of a Single Gene Is Sufficient to Produce Reliable Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Miró-Bueno, Jesús M.; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Negative and positive transcriptional feedback loops are present in natural and synthetic genetic oscillators. A single gene with negative transcriptional feedback needs a time delay and sufficiently strong nonlinearity in the transmission of the feedback signal in order to produce biochemical rhythms. A single gene with only positive transcriptional feedback does not produce oscillations. Here, we demonstrate that this single-gene network in conjunction with a simple negative interaction can also easily produce rhythms. We examine a model comprised of two well-differentiated parts. The first is a positive feedback created by a protein that binds to the promoter of its own gene and activates the transcription. The second is a negative interaction in which a repressor molecule prevents this protein from binding to its promoter. A stochastic study shows that the system is robust to noise. A deterministic study identifies that the dynamics of the oscillator are mainly driven by two types of biomolecules: the protein, and the complex formed by the repressor and this protein. The main conclusion of this paper is that a simple and usual negative interaction, such as degradation, sequestration or inhibition, acting on the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is a sufficient condition to produce reliable oscillations. One gene is enough and the positive transcriptional feedback signal does not need to activate a second repressor gene. This means that at the genetic level an explicit negative feedback loop is not necessary. The model needs neither cooperative binding reactions nor the formation of protein multimers. Therefore, our findings could help to clarify the design principles of cellular clocks and constitute a new efficient tool for engineering synthetic genetic oscillators. PMID:22205920

  2. Protective role of Commensals against Clostridium difficile Infection via an IL-1β-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Jiao, Yizu; Liu, Meng Zhen; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (Cd) is a Gram-positive obligate anaerobic pathogen that causes pseudomembranous colitis in antibiotic-treated individuals. Commensal bacteria are known to have a significant role in the intestinal accumulation of Cd after antibiotic treatment, but little is known about how they affect host immunity during Cd infection. Here we report that Cd infection results in translocation of commensals across the intestinal epithelial barrier that is critical for neutrophil recruitment through the induction of an IL-1β-mediated positive feedback loop. Mice lacking ASC, an essential mediator of IL-1β and IL-18 processing and secretion, were highly susceptible to Cd infection. ASC−/− mice exhibited enhanced translocation of commensals to multiple organs after Cd infection. Notably, ASC−/− mice exhibited impaired CXCL1 production and neutrophil influx into intestinal tissues in response to Cd infection. The impairment in neutrophil recruitment resulted in reduced production of IL-1β and CXCL1, but not IL-18. Importantly, translocated commensals were required for ASC/Nlrp3-dependent IL-1β secretion by neutrophils. Mice lacking IL-1β were deficient in inducing CXCL1 secretion, suggesting that IL-1β is the dominant inducer of ASC-mediated CXCL1 production during Cd infection. These results indicate that translocated commensals play a crucial role in CXCL1-dependent recruitment of neutrophils to the intestine through an IL-1β/NLRP3/ASC-mediated positive feedback mechanism that is important for host survival and clearance of translocated commensals during Cd infection. PMID:22888139

  3. Healthcare professional and patient codesign and validation of a mechanism for service users to feedback patient safety experiences following a care transfer: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jason; Heavey, Emily; Waring, Justin; Jones, Diana; Dawson, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a mechanism for patients to provide feedback on safety experiences following a care transfer between organisations. Design Qualitative study using participatory methods (codesign workshops) and cognitive interviews. Workshop data were analysed concurrently with participants, and cognitive interviews were thematically analysed using a deductive approach based on the developed feedback mechanism. Participants Expert patients (n=5) and healthcare professionals (n=11) were recruited purposively to develop the feedback mechanism in 2 workshops. Workshop 1 explored principles underpinning safety feedback mechanisms, and workshop 2 included the practical development of the feedback mechanism. Final design and content of the feedback mechanism (a safety survey) were verified by workshop participants, and cognitive interviews (n=28) were conducted with patients. Results Workshop participants identified that safety feedback mechanisms should be patient-centred, short and concise with clear signposting on how to complete, with an option to be anonymous and balanced between positive (safe) and negative (unsafe) experiences. The agreed feedback mechanism consisted of a survey split across 3 stages of the care transfer: departure, journey and arrival. Care across organisational boundaries was recognised as being complex, with healthcare professionals acknowledging the difficulty implementing changes that impact other organisations. Cognitive interview participants agreed the content of the survey was relevant but identified barriers to completion relating to the survey formatting and understanding of a care transfer. Conclusions Participatory, codesign principles helped overcome differences in understandings of safety in the complex setting of care transfers when developing a safety survey. Practical barriers to the survey's usability and acceptability to patients were identified, resulting in a modified survey design. Further research is

  4. Influence of visual feedback on successive control mechanisms in upright quiet stance in humans assessed by fractional Brownian motion modelling.

    PubMed

    Rougier, P

    1999-05-14

    An up-to-date way to model the centre of pressure (CP) trajectories may consist in using fractional Brownian motion (fBm). By doing so, one may note that standing still is in fact controlled by two separate and successive mechanisms. The point raised in this study concerns the nature of these control mechanisms and their level of interaction. Following this idea, visual feedback (VFB), which is known to affect postural control by significantly decreasing sway magnitudes, was used. Twelve healthy adults, instructed to stand as still as possible, were tested under this VFB protocol (via a PC screen). In order to model the CP trajectories as fBm, variograms (mean square distances, MSD, expressed as a function of increasing time intervals deltat) were bi-logarithmically plotted. The main visual effect of VFB on these variograms concerns longest latency scaling regimes which reveal less stochastic and consequently more accurate control (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 for X and Y components, respectively). An increase in the MSD of the transition point, which corresponds to the switch between the two control mechanisms, is also noted (P < 0.05). Overall, evidence is provided from this data that long latency scaling regimes do operate through a feedback process. Interestingly, this improved determinism in feedback control in turn induces a similar effect on the control operating over the shortest deltat. Thus, by privileging a control strategy based on feedback mechanisms, VFB in turn would make the subjects quicker in their initial displacement in order to reach a position capable of initiating a feedback mechanism. PMID:10465697

  5. A Haptic Feedback Scheme to Accurately Position a Virtual Wrist Prosthesis Using a Three-Node Tactor Array.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Andrew; Sup, Frank C

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel haptic feedback scheme, used for accurately positioning a 1DOF virtual wrist prosthesis through sensory substitution, is presented. The scheme employs a three-node tactor array and discretely and selectively modulates the stimulation frequency of each tactor to relay 11 discrete haptic stimuli to the user. Able-bodied participants were able to move the virtual wrist prosthesis via a surface electromyography based controller. The participants evaluated the feedback scheme without visual or audio feedback and relied solely on the haptic feedback alone to correctly position the hand. The scheme was evaluated through both normal (perpendicular) and shear (lateral) stimulations applied on the forearm. Normal stimulations were applied through a prototype device previously developed by the authors while shear stimulations were generated using an ubiquitous coin motor vibrotactor. Trials with no feedback served as a baseline to compare results within the study and to the literature. The results indicated that using normal and shear stimulations resulted in accurately positioning the virtual wrist, but were not significantly different. Using haptic feedback was substantially better than no feedback. The results found in this study are significant since the feedback scheme allows for using relatively few tactors to relay rich haptic information to the user and can be learned easily despite a relatively short amount of training. Additionally, the results are important for the haptic community since they contradict the common conception in the literature that normal stimulation is inferior to shear. From an ergonomic perspective normal stimulation has the potential to benefit upper limb amputees since it can operate at lower frequencies than shear-based vibrotactors while also generating less noise. Through further tuning of the novel haptic feedback scheme and normal stimulation device, a compact and comfortable sensory substitution device for upper

  6. A Haptic Feedback Scheme to Accurately Position a Virtual Wrist Prosthesis Using a Three-Node Tactor Array

    PubMed Central

    Erwin, Andrew; Sup, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel haptic feedback scheme, used for accurately positioning a 1DOF virtual wrist prosthesis through sensory substitution, is presented. The scheme employs a three-node tactor array and discretely and selectively modulates the stimulation frequency of each tactor to relay 11 discrete haptic stimuli to the user. Able-bodied participants were able to move the virtual wrist prosthesis via a surface electromyography based controller. The participants evaluated the feedback scheme without visual or audio feedback and relied solely on the haptic feedback alone to correctly position the hand. The scheme was evaluated through both normal (perpendicular) and shear (lateral) stimulations applied on the forearm. Normal stimulations were applied through a prototype device previously developed by the authors while shear stimulations were generated using an ubiquitous coin motor vibrotactor. Trials with no feedback served as a baseline to compare results within the study and to the literature. The results indicated that using normal and shear stimulations resulted in accurately positioning the virtual wrist, but were not significantly different. Using haptic feedback was substantially better than no feedback. The results found in this study are significant since the feedback scheme allows for using relatively few tactors to relay rich haptic information to the user and can be learned easily despite a relatively short amount of training. Additionally, the results are important for the haptic community since they contradict the common conception in the literature that normal stimulation is inferior to shear. From an ergonomic perspective normal stimulation has the potential to benefit upper limb amputees since it can operate at lower frequencies than shear-based vibrotactors while also generating less noise. Through further tuning of the novel haptic feedback scheme and normal stimulation device, a compact and comfortable sensory substitution device for upper

  7. Preliminary results with saturable microchannel array plates. [featuring positive ion feedback elimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Microchannel array plates with a performance comparable to that of a conventional channel electron multiplier have been obtained for the first time. These array plates employ an angled electrostatic field to inhibit the feedback of positive ions within the microchannels. Saturated output pulse height distributions with modal gain values in excess of 10 million have been obtained and stable operation demonstrated over a range of ambient pressures from 0.0000001 to 0.00008 torr. However, a time-dependent reduction in the gain has been observed with these experimental plates because of the accumulation of charge on the insulating strips which are inserted in the wall of the microchannel to establish the angled electrostatic field.

  8. Optical boundary reconstruction of tokamak plasmas for feedback control of plasma position and shape

    SciTech Connect

    Hommen, G.; Baar, M. de; Nuij, P.; Steinbuch, M.; McArdle, G.; Akers, R.

    2010-11-15

    A new diagnostic is developed to reconstruct the plasma boundary using visible wavelength images. Exploiting the plasma's edge localized and toroidally symmetric emission profile, a new coordinate transform is presented to reconstruct the plasma boundary from a poloidal view image. The plasma boundary reconstruction is implemented in MATLAB and applied to camera images of Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak discharges. The optically reconstructed plasma boundaries are compared to magnetic reconstructions from the offline reconstruction code EFIT, showing very good qualitative and quantitative agreement. Average errors are within 2 cm and correlation is high. In the current software implementation, plasma boundary reconstruction from a single image takes 3 ms. The applicability and system requirements of the new optical boundary reconstruction, called OFIT, for use in both feedback control of plasma position and shape and in offline reconstruction tools are discussed.

  9. Output feedback integral control for nano-positioning using piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jinjun; Yang, Liu; Li, Zhan

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a robust output feedback controller for a piezoelectrically actuated system with only position sensor. This considered piezoelectric actuator (PEA) system is subjected to model imperfection, creep nonlinearity, hysteresis nonlinearity and other external effects. The designed controller employs a second-order auxiliary system and a discontinuous uncertainty and disturbance estimation term to generate filtered error signals and to compensate for the model uncertainties and system disturbance, respectively. The global stability of the proposed controller is proved through Lyapunov-based stability analysis. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed control approach are verified experimentally using a PEA stage. Results demonstrate that both set-point and tracking control without/with external loads are realized with good performance and the PEA system with high-accuracy can be achieved. Moreover, the robustness of the controller is verified and analyzed through the sinusoidal tracking with external disturbance.

  10. Calculating the spontaneous magnetization and defining the Curie temperature using a positive-feedback model

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, R. G.

    2014-01-21

    A positive-feedback mean-field modification of the classical Brillouin magnetization theory provides an explanation of the apparent persistence of the spontaneous magnetization beyond the conventional Curie temperature—the little understood “tail” phenomenon that occurs in many ferromagnetic materials. The classical theory is unable to resolve this apparent anomaly. The modified theory incorporates the temperature-dependent quantum-scale hysteretic and mesoscopic domain-scale anhysteretic magnetization processes and includes the effects of demagnetizing and exchange fields. It is found that the thermal behavior of the reversible and irreversible segments of the hysteresis loops, as predicted by the theory, is a key to the presence or absence of the “tails.” The theory, which permits arbitrary values of the quantum spin number J, generally provides a quantitative agreement with the thermal variations of both the spontaneous magnetization and the shape of the hysteresis loop.

  11. The impact of mechanical AGN feedback on the formation of massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ena; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Moster, Benjamin P.

    2015-06-01

    We employ cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the effects of AGN feedback on the formation of massive galaxies with present-day stellar masses of M_stel= 8.8 × 10^{10}-6.0 × 10^{11} M_{⊙}. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations with a pressure-entropy formulation that allows an improved treatment of contact discontinuities and fluid mixing, we run three sets of simulations of 20 haloes with different AGN feedback models: (1) no feedback, (2) thermal feedback, and (3) mechanical and radiation feedback. We assume that seed black holes are present at early cosmic epochs at the centre of emerging dark matter haloes and trace their mass growth via gas accretion and mergers with other black holes. Both feedback models successfully recover the observed MBH-σ relation and black hole-to-stellar mass ratio for simulated central early-type galaxies. The baryonic conversion efficiencies are reduced by a factor of 2 compared to models without any AGN feedback at all halo masses. However, massive galaxies simulated with thermal AGN feedback show a factor of ˜10-100 higher X-ray luminosities than observed. The mechanical/radiation feedback model reproduces the observed correlation between X-ray luminosities and velocity dispersion, e.g. for galaxies with σ = 200 km s- 1, the X-ray luminosity is reduced from 1042 erg s- 1 to 1040 erg s- 1. It also efficiently suppresses late-time star formation, reducing the specific star formation rate from 10-10.5 yr- 1 to 10-14 yr- 1 on average and resulting in quiescent galaxies since z = 2, whereas the thermal feedback model shows higher late-time in situ star formation rates than observed.

  12. MiR-192-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop Controls the Robustness of Stress-Induced p53 Oscillations in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bleris, Leonidas; Ma, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a critical role in cellular stress and cancer prevention. A number of post-transcriptional regulators, termed microRNAs, are closely connected with the p53-mediated cellular networks. While the molecular interactions among p53 and microRNAs have emerged, a systems-level understanding of the regulatory mechanism and the role of microRNAs-forming feedback loops with the p53 core remains elusive. Here we have identified from literature that there exist three classes of microRNA-mediated feedback loops revolving around p53, all with the nature of positive feedback coincidentally. To explore the relationship between the cellular performance of p53 with the microRNA feedback pathways, we developed a mathematical model of the core p53-MDM2 module coupled with three microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops involving miR-192, miR-34a, and miR-29a. Simulations and bifurcation analysis in relationship to extrinsic noise reproduce the oscillatory behavior of p53 under DNA damage in single cells, and notably show that specific microRNA abrogation can disrupt the wild-type cellular phenotype when the ubiquitous cell-to-cell variability is taken into account. To assess these in silico results we conducted microRNA-perturbation experiments in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Time-lapse microscopy of cell-population behavior in response to DNA double-strand breaks, together with image classification of single-cell phenotypes across a population, confirmed that the cellular p53 oscillations are compromised after miR-192 perturbations, matching well with the model predictions. Our study via modeling in combination with quantitative experiments provides new evidence on the role of microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops in conferring robustness to the system performance of stress-induced response of p53. PMID:26642352

  13. Feedback-free optical cavity with self-resonating mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesugi, Y.; Hosaka, Y.; Honda, Y.; Kosuge, A.; Sakaue, K.; Omori, T.; Takahashi, T.; Urakawa, J.; Washio, M.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated the operation of a high finesse optical cavity without utilizing an active feedback system to stabilize the resonance. The effective finesse, which is a finesse including the overall system performance, of the cavity was measured to be 394 000 ± 10 000, and the laser power stored in the cavity was 2.52 ± 0.13 kW, which is approximately 187 000 times greater than the incident power to the cavity. The stored power was stabilized with a fluctuation of 1.7%, and we confirmed continuous cavity operation for more than two hours. This result has the potential to trigger an innovative evolution for applications that use optical resonant cavities such as compact photon sources with laser-Compton scattering or cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

  14. Comparison of subtropical stratocumulus cloud feedback mechanisms in large-eddy simulations and observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretherton, C. S.; Blossey, P. N.

    2013-12-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) has uncovered competing mechanisms affecting the albedo response of subtropical cloud-topped boundary layers to idealized forcing perturbations representing different facets of global warming. Two stratocumulus-reducing mechanisms involve moist thermodynamic effects of warming on cloud-driven turbulence, and a more emissive free troposphere stifling cloud-top radiative cooling. Two cloud-enhancing effects involve increased inversion stability and reduced mean subsidence. Other effects such as changes in wind speed or free-tropospheric relative humidity may also induce regionally important cloud changes. LES simulations based on the CGILS intercomparison are used to quantify these effects in coupled and decoupled stratocumulus layers. They predict that the net result is a reduction of stratocumulus albedo (positive low cloud feedback) in a greenhouse climate, due mainly to the thermodynamic mechanism. This mechanism is explained in terms of temperature dependence of the moist thermodynamics underlying entrainment liquid-flux (ELF) adjustment, a rapid equilibration between the entrainment rate, the cloud-layer structure, and the turbulence within this layer. The latter mechanism may apply to a broad range of subtropical boundary layer cloud types, including shallow cumulus as well as stratocumulus. The LES-predicted response of shortwave cloud radiative effect (SWCRE) in subtropical stratocumulus regimes to these mechanisms are compared with some recent observational and GCM studies. The fractional changes of SWCRE are found to be qualitatively comparable between the LES and observations. This suggests that idealized LES studies are a useful guide to boundary-layer cloud response mechanisms to climate change, and such studies can help bridge between observations and GCMs.

  15. Self-Management of Patient Body Position, Pose, and Motion Using Wide-Field, Real-Time Optical Measurement Feedback: Results of a Volunteer Study

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, James M.; Price, Gareth J.; Sharrock, Phil J.; Jackson, Andrew S.N.; Stratford, Julie; Moore, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We present the results of a clinical feasibility study, performed in 10 healthy volunteers undergoing a simulated treatment over 3 sessions, to investigate the use of a wide-field visual feedback technique intended to help patients control their pose while reducing motion during radiation therapy treatment. Methods and Materials: An optical surface sensor is used to capture wide-area measurements of a subject's body surface with visualizations of these data displayed back to them in real time. In this study we hypothesize that this active feedback mechanism will enable patients to control their motion and help them maintain their setup pose and position. A capability hierarchy of 3 different level-of-detail abstractions of the measured surface data is systematically compared. Results: Use of the device enabled volunteers to increase their conformance to a reference surface, as measured by decreased variability across their body surfaces. The use of visual feedback also enabled volunteers to reduce their respiratory motion amplitude to 1.7 ± 0.6 mm compared with 2.7 ± 1.4 mm without visual feedback. Conclusions: The use of live feedback of their optically measured body surfaces enabled a set of volunteers to better manage their pose and motion when compared with free breathing. The method is suitable to be taken forward to patient studies.

  16. Positive feedback regulation between IL10 and EGFR promotes lung cancer formation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Wang, Yi-Chang; Hung, Chia-Yang; Yu, Chun-Hui; Su, Wu-Chou; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2016-04-12

    The role of IL10 in the tumorigenesis of various cancer types is still controversial. Here, we found that increased IL10 levels are correlated with a poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. Moreover, IL10 levels were significantly increased in the lungs and serum of EGFRL858R- and Kras4bG12D-induced lung cancer mice, indicating that IL10 might facilitate lung cancer tumorigenesis. IL10 knockout in EGFRL858R and Kras4bG12D mice inhibited the development of lung tumors and decreased the levels of infiltrating M2 macrophages and tumor-promoting Treg lymphocytes. We also showed that EGF increases IL10 expression by enhancing IL10 mRNA stability, and IL10 subsequently activates JAK1/STAT3, Src, PI3K/Akt, and Erk signaling pathways. Interestingly, the IL10-induced recruitment of phosphorylated Src was critical for inducing EGFR through the activation of the JAK1/STAT3 pathway, suggesting that Src and JAK1 positively regulate each other to enhance STAT3 activity. Doxycycline-induced EGFRL858R mice treated with gefitinib and anti-IL10 antibodies exhibited poor tumor formation. In conclusion, IL10 and EGFR regulate each other through positive feedback, which leads to lung cancer formation. PMID:26956044

  17. Positive feedback regulation between IL10 and EGFR promotes lung cancer formation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Wang, Yi-Chang; Hung, Chia-Yang; Yu, Chun-Hui; Su, Wu-Chou; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The role of IL10 in the tumorigenesis of various cancer types is still controversial. Here, we found that increased IL10 levels are correlated with a poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. Moreover, IL10 levels were significantly increased in the lungs and serum of EGFRL858R- and Kras4bG12D-induced lung cancer mice, indicating that IL10 might facilitate lung cancer tumorigenesis. IL10 knockout in EGFRL858R and Kras4bG12D mice inhibited the development of lung tumors and decreased the levels of infiltrating M2 macrophages and tumor-promoting Treg lymphocytes. We also showed that EGF increases IL10 expression by enhancing IL10 mRNA stability, and IL10 subsequently activates JAK1/STAT3, Src, PI3K/Akt, and Erk signaling pathways. Interestingly, the IL10-induced recruitment of phosphorylated Src was critical for inducing EGFR through the activation of the JAK1/STAT3 pathway, suggesting that Src and JAK1 positively regulate each other to enhance STAT3 activity. Doxycycline-induced EGFRL858R mice treated with gefitinib and anti-IL10 antibodies exhibited poor tumor formation. In conclusion, IL10 and EGFR regulate each other through positive feedback, which leads to lung cancer formation. PMID:26956044

  18. Implementation status of the global and local beam position feedback systems for the Advanced Photon Source storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Barr, D.; Decker, G.; Galayda, J.; Kirchman, J.; Lenkszus, F.; Lumpkin, A.; Votaw, A.J.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is implementing an extensive beam position feedback system for both global and local stabilization of particle and photon beams based on digital signal processing. The description and operational experience of the system will be given in this paper. In particular, we will discuss the underlying fundamental principles, hardware layout, controls interface, and automatic software generation for multiple digital signal processors (DSPS) distributed in 20 VME crates around the ring. The feedback system runs at 4-kHz sampling frequency in order to achieve the correction bandwidth of approximately 100 Hz. For the maximum correction efficiency and resolution of conflicts among multiple local feedback systems due to the local bump closure error, the global and local feedback systems are combined into a single unified system. This novel approach is made possible through data sharing among the global and local systems via the fiber-optically networked reflective memories.

  19. Coordination of the Arc Regulatory System and Pheromone-Mediated Positive Feedback in Controlling the Vibrio fischeri lux Operon

    PubMed Central

    Septer, Alecia N.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pheromone signaling is often governed both by environmentally responsive regulators and by positive feedback. This regulatory combination has the potential to coordinate a group response among distinct subpopulations that perceive key environmental stimuli differently. We have explored the interplay between an environmentally responsive regulator and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in intercellular signaling by Vibrio fischeri ES114, a bioluminescent bacterium that colonizes the squid Euprymna scolopes. Bioluminescence in ES114 is controlled in part by N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OC6), a pheromone produced by LuxI that together with LuxR activates transcription of the luxICDABEG operon, initiating a positive feedback loop and inducing luminescence. The lux operon is also regulated by environmentally responsive regulators, including the redox-responsive ArcA/ArcB system, which directly represses lux in culture. Here we show that inactivating arcA leads to increased 3OC6 accumulation to initiate positive feedback. In the absence of positive feedback, arcA-mediated control of luminescence was only ∼2-fold, but luxI-dependent positive feedback contributed more than 100 fold to the net induction of luminescence in the arcA mutant. Consistent with this overriding importance of positive feedback, 3OC6 produced by the arcA mutant induced luminescence in nearby wild-type cells, overcoming their ArcA repression of lux. Similarly, we found that artificially inducing ArcA could effectively repress luminescence before, but not after, positive feedback was initiated. Finally, we show that 3OC6 produced by a subpopulation of symbiotic cells can induce luminescence in other cells co-colonizing the host. Our results suggest that even transient loss of ArcA-mediated regulation in a sub-population of cells can induce luminescence in a wider community. Moreover, they indicate that 3OC6 can communicate information about both cell density and the state of

  20. Load speed regulation in compliant mechanical transmission systems using feedback and feedforward control actions.

    PubMed

    Raul, P R; Dwivedula, R V; Pagilla, P R

    2016-07-01

    The problem of controlling the load speed of a mechanical transmission system consisting of a belt-pulley and gear-pair is considered. The system is modeled as two inertia (motor and load) connected by a compliant transmission. If the transmission is assumed to be rigid, then using either the motor or load speed feedback provides the same result. However, with transmission compliance, due to belts or long shafts, the stability characteristics and performance of the closed-loop system are quite different when either motor or load speed feedback is employed. We investigate motor and load speed feedback schemes by utilizing the singular perturbation method. We propose and discuss a control scheme that utilizes both motor and load speed feedback, and design an adaptive feedforward action to reject load torque disturbances. The control algorithms are implemented on an experimental platform that is typically used in roll-to-roll manufacturing and results are shown and discussed. PMID:27126600

  1. Local feedback mechanisms of the shallow water region around the Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Pengfei; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola; Wei, Jun

    2014-10-01

    The focus of this study is the local-scale air-sea feedback mechanisms over the shallow shelf water region (water depth <200 m) of the Maritime Continent (MC). MC was selected as a pilot study site for its extensive shallow water coverage, geographic complexity, and importance in the global climate system. To identify the local-scale air-sea feedback processes, we ran numerical experiments with perturbed surface layer water temperature using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model and an uncoupled ocean model. By examining the responses of the coupled and uncoupled models to the water temperature perturbation, we identify that, at a local-scale, a negative feedback process through the coupled dynamics that tends to restore the SST from its perturbation could dominate the shallow water region of the MC at a short time scale of several days. The energy budget shows that 38% of initial perturbation-induced heat energy was adjusted through the air-sea feedback mechanisms within 2 weeks, of which 58% is directly transferred into the atmosphere by the adjustment of latent heat flux due to the evaporative cooling mechanism. The increased inputs of heat and moisture into the lower atmosphere then modifies its thermal structure and increases the formation of low-level clouds, which act as a shield preventing incoming solar radiation from reaching the sea surface, accounts for 38% of the total adjustment of surface heat fluxes, serving as the second mechanism for the negative feedback process. The adjustment of sensible heat flux and net longwave radiation play a secondary role. The response of the coupled system to the SST perturbation suggests a response time scale of the coupled feedback process of about 3-5 days. The two-way air-sea feedback tightly links the surface heat fluxes, clouds and SST, and can play an important role in regulating the short-term variability of the SST over the shallow shelf water regions.

  2. Acetyl salicylic acid inhibits Th17 airway inflammation via blockade of IL-6 and IL-17 positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-Geun; Kang, Chil Sung; Choi, Jun-Pyo; Choi, Dong Sic; Choi, Hyun Il; Choi, Yong Wook; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Yoo, Joo-Yeon; Jang, Myoung Ho; Gho, Yong Song; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2013-01-01

    T-helper (Th)17 cell responses are important for the development of neutrophilic inflammatory disease. Recently, we found that acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) inhibited Th17 airway inflammation in an asthma mouse model induced by sensitization with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-containing allergens. To investigate the mechanism(s) of the inhibitory effect of ASA on the development of Th17 airway inflammation, a neutrophilic asthma mouse model was generated by intranasal sensitization with LPS plus ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with OVA alone. Immunologic parameters and airway inflammation were evaluated 6 and 48 h after the last OVA challenge. ASA inhibited the production of interleukin (IL)-17 from lung T cells as well as in vitro Th17 polarization induced by IL-6. Additionally, ASA, but not salicylic acid, suppressed Th17 airway inflammation, which was associated with decreased expression of acetyl-STAT3 (downstream signaling of IL-6) in the lung. Moreover, the production of IL-6 from inflammatory cells, induced by IL-17, was abolished by treatment with ASA, whereas that induced by LPS was not. Altogether, ASA, likely via its acetyl moiety, inhibits Th17 airway inflammation by blockade of IL-6 and IL-17 positive feedback. PMID:23306703

  3. An exploratory pilot study of mechanisms of action within normative feedback for adult drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Muench, Frederick J.; Lee, Rufina; Pena, Juan; Hail, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background. Normative feedback (NF), or receiving information about one’s drinking compared to peer drinking norms, is one of the most widely used brief interventions for prevention and intervention for hazardous alcohol use. NF has demonstrated predominantly small but significant effect sizes for intention to change and other drinking related outcomes. Identifying mechanisms of action may improve the effectiveness of NF; however, few studies have examined NF’s mechanisms of action, particularly among adults. Objective. This study is an exploratory analysis of two theorized mechanisms of NF: discrepancy (specifically personal dissonance—the affective response to feedback) and belief in the accuracy of feedback. Method. Using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, 87 men (n = 56) and women (n = 31) completed an online survey during which they were asked about their perceptions about their drinking and actual drinking behaviors. Then participants were provided tailored NF and evaluated for their reactions. Severity of discrepancy was measured by the difference between one’s estimated percentile ranking of drinking compared to peers and actual percentile ranking. Surprise and worry reported due to the discrepancy were proxies for personal dissonance. Participants were also asked if they believed the feedback and if they had any plans to change their drinking. Mediation analyses were implemented, exploring whether surprise, worry, or belief in the accuracy of feedback mediated severity of discrepancy’s impact on plan for change. Results. Among this sample of adult drinkers, severity of discrepancy did not predict plan for change, and personal dissonance did not mediate severity of discrepancy. Severity of discrepancy was mediated by belief in the accuracy of feedback. In addition, viewing one’s drinking as a problem prior to feedback and post-NF worry both predicted plan for change independently. Conclusions. Results revealed that NF may not work to create personal

  4. An epidemic spreading model on adaptive scale-free networks with feedback mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Liu, Xiongding; Wu, Jie; Wan, Chen; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Yuanmei

    2016-05-01

    A SIRS epidemic model with feedback mechanism on adaptive scale-free networks is presented. Using the mean field theory the spreading dynamics of the epidemic is studied in detail. The basic reproductive number and equilibriums are derived. Theoretical results indicate that the basic reproductive number is significantly dependent on the topology of the underlying networks. The existence of equilibriums is determined by the basic reproductive number. The global stability of disease-free equilibrium and the epidemic permanence are proved in detail. The feedback mechanism cannot change the basic reproductive number, but it can reduce the endemic level and weaken the epidemic spreading. Numerical simulations confirmed the analytical results.

  5. A computerized tablet with visual feedback of hand position for functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Karimpoor, Mahta; Tam, Fred; Strother, Stephen C.; Fischer, Corinne E.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Graham, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological tests behavioral tasks that very commonly involve handwriting and drawing are widely used in the clinic to detect abnormal brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be useful in increasing the specificity of such tests. However, performing complex pen-and-paper tests during fMRI involves engineering challenges. Previously, we developed an fMRI-compatible, computerized tablet system to address this issue. However, the tablet did not include visual feedback of hand position (VFHP), a human factors component that may be important for fMRI of certain patient populations. A real-time system was thus developed to provide VFHP and integrated with the tablet in an augmented reality display. The effectiveness of the system was initially tested in young healthy adults who performed various handwriting tasks in front of a computer display with and without VFHP. Pilot fMRI of writing tasks were performed by two representative individuals with and without VFHP. Quantitative analysis of the behavioral results indicated improved writing performance with VFHP. The pilot fMRI results suggest that writing with VFHP requires less neural resources compared to the without VFHP condition, to maintain similar behavior. Thus, the tablet system with VFHP is recommended for future fMRI studies involving patients with impaired brain function and where ecologically valid behavior is important. PMID:25859201

  6. Speciation as a positive feedback loop between postzygotic and prezygotic barriers to gene flow.

    PubMed Central

    Servedio, Maria R; Saetre, Glenn-Peter

    2003-01-01

    Speciation is intimately associated with the evolution of sex-and-reproduction-related traits, including those affecting hybrid incompatibility (postzygotic isolation) and species recognition (prezygotic isolation). Genes controlling such traits are not randomly distributed in the genome but are particularly abundant on the sex chromosomes. However, the evolutionary consequences of the sex linkage of genes involved in speciation have been little explored. Here, we present simulations of a continent-island diploid model that examines the effects of reduced recombination using both autosomal and sex-linked inheritance. We show first that linkage between genes affecting postzygotic and prezygotic isolation leads to a positive feedback loop in which both are strengthened. As species recognition evolves, genes causing hybrid incompatibility will hitchhike along with those improving premating isolation, leading to stronger hybrid incompatibility and thus increased pressure for further preference divergence. Second, we show that this loop effect is generally enhanced by sex linkage, because recombination is eliminated in the heterogametic sex, leading to tighter effective linkage between the two classes of genes and because natural selection is more efficient at sex-linked loci, as recessive alleles are not masked by dominance in the heterogametic sex. Accordingly, hitchhiking can be important in promoting speciation and can also lead to increased postzygotic isolation through adaptive evolution. PMID:12965012

  7. Positive feedback regulation of p53 transactivity by DNA damage-induced ISG15 modification

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Ho; Yang, Seung Wook; Park, Jung Mi; Ka, Seung Hyeun; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kong, Young-Yun; Jeon, Young Joo; Seol, Jae Hong; Chung, Chin Ha

    2016-01-01

    p53 plays a pivotal role in tumour suppression under stresses, such as DNA damage. ISG15 has been implicated in the control of tumorigenesis. Intriguingly, the expression of ISG15, UBE1L and UBCH8 is induced by DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet and doxorubicin, which are known to induce p53. Here, we show that the genes encoding ISG15, UBE1L, UBCH8 and EFP, have the p53-responsive elements and their expression is induced in a p53-dependent fashion under DNA damage conditions. Furthermore, DNA damage induces ISG15 conjugation to p53 and this modification markedly enhances the binding of p53 to the promoters of its target genes (for example, CDKN1 and BAX) as well as of its own gene by promoting phosphorylation and acetylation, leading to suppression of cell growth and tumorigenesis. These findings establish a novel feedback circuit between p53 and ISG15-conjugating system for positive regulation of the tumour suppressive function of p53 under DNA damage conditions. PMID:27545325

  8. Importance of positive feedbacks and overconfidence in a self-fulfilling Ising model of financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, Didier; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2006-10-01

    Following a long tradition of physicists who have noticed that the Ising model provides a general background to build realistic models of social interactions, we study a model of financial price dynamics resulting from the collective aggregate decisions of agents. This model incorporates imitation, the impact of external news and private information. It has the structure of a dynamical Ising model in which agents have two opinions (buy or sell) with coupling coefficients, which evolve in time with a memory of how past news have explained realized market returns. We study two versions of the model, which differ on how the agents interpret the predictive power of news. We show that the stylized facts of financial markets are reproduced only when agents are overconfident and mis-attribute the success of news to predict return to herding effects, thereby providing positive feedbacks leading to the model functioning close to the critical point. Our model exhibits a rich multifractal structure characterized by a continuous spectrum of exponents of the power law relaxation of endogenous bursts of volatility, in good agreement with previous analytical predictions obtained with the multifractal random walk model and with empirical facts.

  9. Dominant pole and eigenstructure assignment for positive systems with state feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; Lam, James

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the dominant pole assignment problem, the dominant eigenstructure assignment problem and the robust dominant pole assignment problem for linear time-invariant positive systems with state feedback are considered. The dominant pole assignment problem is formulated as a linear programming problem, and the dominant eigenstructure problem is formulated as a quasiconvex optimisation problem with linear constraints. The robust dominant pole assignment problem is formulated as a non-convex optimisation problem with non-linear constraints which is solved using particle swarm optimisation (PSO) with an efficient scheme which employs the dominant eigenstructure assignment technique to accelerate the convergence of the PSO procedure. Each of the three problems can be further constrained by requiring that the controller has a pre-specified structure, or the gain matrix have both elementwise upper and lower bounds. These constraints can be incorporated into the proposed scheme without increasing the complexity of the algorithms. Both the continuous-time case and the discrete-time case are treated in the paper.

  10. Far-Infrared Surface Emissivity Impacts on Climate and the Potential for a Positive Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Collins, W.; Huang, X.; Chen, X.; Walden, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    There are few observational constraints on surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 μm, a spectral region commonly referred to as the far-infrared. Nevertheless, where the precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm, which is common at high latitudes and high altitudes, the infrared energy budget is directly impacted by this emissivity. Calculations based on published indices of refraction of ice, water, and common surficial minerals, and observations based on a limited set of spectroscopic measurements, find that non-frozen ocean and desert scenes will exhibit lower far-infrared surface emissivity than frozen scenes by between 0.1 and 0.2. The representation of surface emissivity in climate models is highly simplified, based on ideal black-body emission, and systematically higher than emissivity of real surfaces. Therefore, we performed sensitivity studies using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and found that Arctic surface temperatures warm by 2 °K and frozen surface extent decreases by 5-10% when the model is subjected to realistic values of far-infrared surface emissivity. This finding may help explain the cold-pole bias, and also suggests the potential for a positive feedback whereby the loss of snow or ice leads to the exposure of surfaces that reduce surface infrared cooling, thus warming the surface further.

  11. Comparing position and force control for interactive molecular simulators with haptic feedback.

    PubMed

    Bolopion, Aude; Cagneau, Barthélemy; Redon, Stephane; Régnier, Stéphane

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a novel tool for the analysis of new molecular structures which enables a wide variety of manipulations. It is composed of a molecular simulator and a haptic device. The simulation software deals with systems of hundreds or thousands of degrees of freedom and computes the reconfiguration of the molecules in a few tenths of a second. For the ease of manipulation and to help the operator understand nanoscale phenomena, a haptic device is connected to the simulator. To handle a wide variety of applications, both position and force control are implemented. To our knowledge, this is the first time the applications of force control are detailed for molecular simulation. These two control modes are compared in terms of adequacy with molecular dynamics, transparency and stability sensitivity with respect to environmental conditions. Based on their specificity the operations they can realize are detailed. Experiments highlight the usability of our tool for the different steps of the analysis of molecular structures. It includes the global reconfiguration of a molecular system, the measurement of molecular properties and the comprehension of nanoscale interactions. Compared to most existing systems, the one developed in this paper offers a wide range of possible experiments. The detailed analysis of the properties of the control modes can be easily used to implement haptic feedback on other molecular simulators. PMID:20727801

  12. Benefit of educational feedback for the use of positive expiratory pressure device

    PubMed Central

    Reychler, Gregory; Jacquemart, Manon; Poncin, William; Aubriot, Anne-Sophie; Liistro, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) is regularly used as a self-administered airway clearance technique. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the need to teach the correct use of the PEP device and to measure the progress of the success rate of the maneuver after training. METHOD: A PEP system (PariPEP-S Sytem) was used to generate PEP in 30 healthy volunteers. They were instructed by a qualified physical therapist to breathe correctly through the PEP device. Then they were evaluated during a set of ten expirations. Two other evaluations were performed at day 2 and day 8 (before and after feedback). The mean PEP and the success rate were calculated for each set of expirations. The number of maneuvers needed to obtain a correct use was calculated on the first session. RESULTS: An optimal PEP was reached after 7.5 SD 2.7 attempts by all subjects. Success rates and mean pressures were similar between the different sets of expirations (p=0.720 and p=0.326, respectively). Pressure variability was around 10%. After one week, 30% of subjects generated more than two non-optimal pressures in the set of ten expirations. No difference in success rate was observed depending on the evaluations. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that good initial training on the use of the PEP device and regular follow-up are required for the subject to reach optimal expiratory pressure. PMID:26647746

  13. Positive, But Not Negative Feedback Actions of Estradiol in Adult Female Mice Require Estrogen Receptor α in Kisspeptin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Sharon L.; Acosta-Martínez, Maricedes; DeJoseph, Mary R.; Wolfe, Andrew; Radovick, Sally; Boehm, Ulrich; Urban, Janice H.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons express estrogen receptor α (ERα) and exert control over GnRH/LH secretion in female rodents. It has been proposed that estradiol (E2) activation of ERα in kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) suppresses GnRH/LH secretion (negative feedback), whereas E2 activation of ERα in kisspeptin neurons in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) mediates the release of preovulatory GnRH/LH surges (positive feedback). To test these hypotheses, we generated mice bearing kisspeptin cell–specific deletion of ERα (KERαKO) and treated them with E2 regimens that evoke either negative or positive feedback actions on GnRH/LH secretion. Using negative feedback regimens, as expected, E2 effectively suppressed LH levels in ovariectomized (OVX) wild-type (WT) mice to the levels seen in ovary-intact mice. Surprisingly, however, despite the fact that E2 regulation of Kiss1 mRNA expression was abrogated in both the ARC and AVPV of KERαKO mice, E2 also effectively decreased LH levels in OVX KERαKO mice to the levels seen in ovary-intact mice. Conversely, using a positive feedback regimen, E2 stimulated LH surges in WT mice, but had no effect in KERαKO mice. These experiments clearly demonstrate that ERα in kisspeptin neurons is required for the positive, but not negative feedback actions of E2 on GnRH/LH secretion in adult female mice. It remains to be determined whether the failure of KERαKO mice to exhibit GnRH/LH surges reflects the role of ERα in the development of kisspeptin neurons, in the active signaling processes leading to the release of GnRH/LH surges, or both. PMID:25545386

  14. A phase plane graph based model of the ovulatory cycle lacking the "positive feedback" phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    When hormones during the ovulatory cycle are shown in phase plane graphs, reported FSH and estrogen values form a specific pattern that resembles the leaning “&" symbol, while LH and progesterone (Pg) values form a "boomerang" shape. Graphs in this paper were made using data reported by Stricker et al. [Clin Chem Lab Med 2006;44:883–887]. These patterns were used to construct a simplistic model of the ovulatory cycle without the conventional "positive feedback" phenomenon. The model is based on few well-established relations: hypothalamic GnRH secretion is increased under estrogen exposure during two weeks that start before the ovulatory surge and lasts till lutheolysis. the pituitary GnRH receptors are so prone to downregulation through ligand binding that this must be important for their function. in several estrogen target tissue progesterone receptor (PgR) expression depends on previous estrogen binding to functional estrogen receptors (ER), while Pg binding to the expressed PgRs reduces both ER and PgR expression. Some key features of the presented model are here listed: High GnRH secretion induced by the recovered estrogen exposure starts in the late follicular phase and lasts till lutheolysis. The LH and FSH surges start due to combination of accumulated pituitary GnRH receptors and increased GnRH secretion. The surges quickly end due to partial downregulation of the pituitary GnRH receptors (64% reduction of the follicular phase pituitary GnRH receptors is needed to explain the reported LH drop after the surge). A strong increase in the lutheal Pg blood level, despite modest decline in LH levels, is explained as delayed expression of pituitary PgRs. Postponed pituitary PgRs expression enforces a negative feedback loop between Pg levels and LH secretions not before the mid lutheal phase. Lutheolysis is explained as a consequence of Pg binding to hypothalamic and pituitary PgRs that reduces local ER expression. When hypothalamic sensitivity to estrogen is

  15. Video-Feedback Intervention to Promote Positive Parenting Adapted to Autism (VIPP-AUTI): A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poslawsky, Irina E; Naber, Fabiënne BA; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van Daalen, Emma; van Engeland, Herman; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2015-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, we evaluated the early intervention program Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting adapted to Autism (VIPP-AUTI) with 78 primary caregivers and their child (16-61 months) with Autism Spectrum Disorder. VIPP-AUTI is a brief attachment-based intervention program, focusing on improving parent-child…

  16. Does Gender Influence Emotions Resulting from Positive Applause Feedback in Self-Assessment Testing? Evidence from Neuroscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chia-Ju; Huang, Chin-Fei; Liu, Ming-Chi; Chien, Yu-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hung; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2015-01-01

    Computerized self-assessment testing can help learners reflect on learning content and can also promote their motivation toward learning. However, a positive affective state is the key to achieving these learning goals. This study aims to examine learning gains and emotional reactions resulting from receiving emotional feedback in the form of…

  17. Method to quantify accuracy of position feedback signals of a three-dimensional two-photon laser-scanning microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Witte, Otto W.; Haueisen, Jens; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy enables to record neuronal network activity in three-dimensional space while maintaining single-cellular resolution. One of the proposed approaches combines galvanometric x-y scanning with piezo-driven objective movements and employs hardware feedback signals for position monitoring. However, readily applicable methods to quantify the accuracy of those feedback signals are currently lacking. Here we provide techniques based on contact-free laser reflection and laser triangulation for the quantification of positioning accuracy of each spatial axis. We found that the lateral feedback signals are sufficiently accurate (defined as <2.5 µm) for a wide range of scan trajectories and frequencies. We further show that axial positioning accuracy does not only depend on objective acceleration and mass but also its geometry. We conclude that the introduced methods allow a reliable quantification of position feedback signals in a cost-efficient, easy-to-install manner and should be applicable for a wide range of two-photon laser scanning microscopes. PMID:26504620

  18. Method to quantify accuracy of position feedback signals of a three-dimensional two-photon laser-scanning microscope.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Witte, Otto W; Haueisen, Jens; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy enables to record neuronal network activity in three-dimensional space while maintaining single-cellular resolution. One of the proposed approaches combines galvanometric x-y scanning with piezo-driven objective movements and employs hardware feedback signals for position monitoring. However, readily applicable methods to quantify the accuracy of those feedback signals are currently lacking. Here we provide techniques based on contact-free laser reflection and laser triangulation for the quantification of positioning accuracy of each spatial axis. We found that the lateral feedback signals are sufficiently accurate (defined as <2.5 µm) for a wide range of scan trajectories and frequencies. We further show that axial positioning accuracy does not only depend on objective acceleration and mass but also its geometry. We conclude that the introduced methods allow a reliable quantification of position feedback signals in a cost-efficient, easy-to-install manner and should be applicable for a wide range of two-photon laser scanning microscopes. PMID:26504620

  19. Visual Feedback of the Non-Moving Limb Improves Active Joint-Position Sense of the Impaired Limb in Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smorenburg, Ana R. P.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the active joint-position sense in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) and the effect of static visual feedback and static mirror visual feedback, of the non-moving limb, on the joint-position sense. Participants were asked to match the position of one upper limb with that of the contralateral limb. The task…

  20. Mammary blood flow and metabolic activity are linked by a feedback mechanism involving nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cieslar, S R L; Madsen, T G; Purdie, N G; Trout, D R; Osborne, V R; Cant, J P

    2014-01-01

    To test which, if any, of the major milk precursors can elicit a rapid change in the rate of mammary blood flow (MBF) and to define the time course and magnitude of such changes, 4 lactating cows were infused with glucose, amino acids, or triacylglycerol into the external iliac artery feeding one udder half while iliac plasma flow (IPF) was monitored continuously by dye dilution. Adenosine and saline were infused as positive and negative controls, respectively, and insulin was infused to characterize the response to a centrally produced anabolic hormone. To test the roles of cyclooxygenase, NO synthase and ATP-sensitive K (KATP) channels in nutrient-mediated changes in blood flow, their respective inhibitors-indomethacin, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME), and glibenclamide-were infused simultaneously with glucose. Each day, 1 infusate was given twice to each cow, over a 20-min period each time, separated by a 20-min washout period. In addition, each treatment protocol was administered on 2 separate days. A 73% increase in IPF during adenosine infusion showed that the mammary vasodilatory response was quadratic in time, with most changes occurring in the first 5min. Glucose infusion decreased IPF by 9% in a quadratic manner, most rapidly in the first 5min, indicating that a feedback mechanism of local blood flow control, likely through adenosine release, was operative in the mammary vasculature. Amino acid infusion increased IPF 9% in a linear manner, suggesting that mammary ATP utilization was stimulated more than ATP production. This could reflect a stimulation of protein synthesis. Triacylglycerol only tended to decrease IPF and insulin did not affect IPF. A lack of IPF response to glibenclamide indicates that KATP channels are not involved in MBF regulation. Indomethacin and L-NAME both depressed IPF. In the presence of indomethacin, glucose infusion caused a quadratic 9% increase in IPF. Indomethacin is an inhibitor of mitochondrial

  1. Distinct noise-controlling roles of multiple negative feedback mechanisms in a prokaryotic operon system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L K; Kulasiri, D

    2011-03-01

    Molecular fluctuations are known to affect dynamics of cellular systems in important ways. Studies aimed at understanding how molecular systems of certain regulatory architectures control noise therefore become essential. The interplay between feedback regulation and noise has been previously explored for cellular networks governed by a single negative feedback loop. However, similar issues within networks consisting of more complex regulatory structures remain elusive. The authors investigate how negative feedback loops manage noise within a biochemical cascade concurrently governed by multiple negative feedback loops, using the prokaryotic tryptophan (trp) operon system in Escherechia coli as the model system. To the authors knowledge, this is the first study of noise in the trp operon system. They show that the loops in the trp operon system possess distinct, even opposing, noise-controlling effects despite their seemingly analogous feedback structures. The enzyme inhibition loop, although controlling the last reaction of the cascade, was found to suppress noise not only for the tryptophan output but also for other upstream components. In contrast, the Repression (Rep) loop enhances noise for all systems components. Attenuation (Att) poses intermediate effects by attenuating noise for the upstream components but promoting noise for components downstream of its target. Regarding noise at the output tryptophan, Rep and Att can be categorised as noise-enhancing loops whereas Enzyme Inhibition as a noise-reducing loop. These findings suggest novel implications in how cellular systems with multiple feedback mechanisms control noise. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:21405203

  2. TLR4 signaling promotes a COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 positive feedback loop in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ang; Wang, Guan; Zhao, Huajun; Zhang, Yuyi; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can be expressed by tumor cells, and each TLR exhibits different biological functions. Evidences showed the activation of some certain TLRs could promote tumor progression. One of which TLR4 has been found to promote hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells proliferation, but the detailed mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we verified that TLR4 was functionally expressed on HCC cells, and TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could stimulate the proliferation and clone formation of HCC cells. Most importantly, we found a COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 positive feedback loop exists in HCC cells, which could be provoked by TLR4 activation. Consistently, the expression of TLR4, COX-2 and p-STAT3Y705 was positively correlated with each other in liver tumor tissues from patients with primary HCC. Further investigation demonstrated this loop played a dominant role in TLR4-induced HCC cell proliferation and multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy. Inhibition of TLR4 or COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 loop would attenuate LPS-induced inflammation and proliferation of HCC cells, and enhance the sensitivity of HCC cells to chemotherapeutics in vitro. By using a primary HCC model, we observed COX-2/PGE2/STAT3 loop was significantly blocked in TLR4−/− mice compared to wild type mice, and there was no obvious tumorgenesis sign in TLR4−/− mice. Therefore, these findings provided the precise molecular mechanism of TLR4 signaling pathway involved in HCC progress, and suggested that TLR4 may be a promising target for HCC treatment. PMID:27057441

  3. Version pressure feedback mechanisms for speculative versioning caches

    DOEpatents

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E.; Gara, Alan; O& #x27; Brien, Kathryn M.; Ohmacht, Martin; Zhuang, Xiaotong

    2013-03-12

    Mechanisms are provided for controlling version pressure on a speculative versioning cache. Raw version pressure data is collected based on one or more threads accessing cache lines of the speculative versioning cache. One or more statistical measures of version pressure are generated based on the collected raw version pressure data. A determination is made as to whether one or more modifications to an operation of a data processing system are to be performed based on the one or more statistical measures of version pressure, the one or more modifications affecting version pressure exerted on the speculative versioning cache. An operation of the data processing system is modified based on the one or more determined modifications, in response to a determination that one or more modifications to the operation of the data processing system are to be performed, to affect the version pressure exerted on the speculative versioning cache.

  4. A study on positive-feedback configuration of a bipolar SiC high temperature operational amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargarrazi, Saleh; Lanni, Luigia; Zetterling, Carl-Mikael

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on the design and implementation of an integrated operational amplifier in bipolar SiC, and elaborates on its operation in positive-feedback configuration.The opamp is studied in different feedback setups: closed-loop compensated amplifier, comparator with hysteresis (Schmitt trigger), and as a relaxation oscillator. Measurement results suggest a stable closed-loop opamp with ∼40 dB gain, a Schmitt trigger with constant threshold levels over a wide temperature range, and a relaxation oscillator tested up to 540 kHz. All the setups were tested from 25 °C up to 500 °C.

  5. Filtering for distributed mechanical systems using position measurements: perspectives in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moireau, Philippe; Chapelle, Dominique; LeTallec, Patrick

    2009-03-01

    We propose an effective filtering methodology designed to perform estimation in a distributed mechanical system using position measurements. As in a previously introduced method, the filter is inspired by robust control feedback, but here we take full advantage of the estimation specificity to choose a feedback law that can act on displacements instead of velocities and still retain the same kind of dissipativity property which guarantees robustness. This is very valuable in many applications for which positions are more readily available than velocities, as in medical imaging. We provide an in-depth analysis of the proposed procedure, as well as detailed numerical assessments using a test problem inspired by cardiac biomechanics, as medical diagnosis assistance is an important perspective for this approach. The method is formulated first for measurements based on Lagrangian displacements, but we then derive a nonlinear extension allowing us to instead consider segmented images, which of course is even more relevant in medical applications.

  6. Star formation driven mechanical feedback in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Andrew J.

    The ubiquity and high density of outflows from young stars in clusters make them an intriguing candidate for the source of turbulence energy in molecular clouds. This work addresses, by direct numerical simulation, elements of protostellar outflow evolution that is relevant to their ability to drive turbulent flows in molecular clouds. The result of this work is surprising in that it shows that fossil cavities, rather than how shocks from active outflows, constitute the primary avenue by which outflows re-energize turbulence. This work first considers collisions between active jets, showing that this process is ineffective at converting the directed momentum and mechanical energy of outflows into turbulence. This effect is due to radiative energy loss which constrains the surface area through which colliding outflows entrain ambient gas. Recent observational results are discussed which indicate that fossil cavities from extinct outflows are abundant in molecular material surrounding clusters such as NGC1333. These structures, rather than the bow shocks of active outflows, comprise the link between outflow energy input, and re-energizing turbulence in the parent molecular cloud core. Numerical simulations are presented winch confirm that the evolution of cavities front decaying outflow sources leads to structures which match the observations of fossil cavities. The algorithms and tests of the AstroBEAR adaptive mesh refinement code for astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics are also presented. The code was developed during the course of this work and used for the numerical simulations.

  7. 78 FR 36190 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... request to review and approve a previously approved information collection requirement regarding IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism. A notice was published in the Federal Register at 78 FR 13057, on February 26... ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; IT Dashboard...

  8. Landscape urbanization and economic growth in China: positive feedbacks and sustainability dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xuemei; Chen, Jing; Shi, Peijun

    2012-01-01

    Accelerating urbanization has been viewed as an important instrument for economic development and reducing regional income disparity in some developing countries, including China. Recent studies (Bloom et al. 2008) indicate that demographic urbanization level has no causal effect on economic growth. However, due to the varying and changing definition of urban population, the use of demographic indicators as a sole representing indicator for urbanization might be misleading. Here, we re-examine the causal relationship between urbanization and economic growth in Chinese cities and provinces in recent decades, using built-up areas as a landscape urbanization indicator. Our analysis shows that (1) larger cities, both in terms of population size and built-up area, and richer cities tend to gain more income, have larger built-up area expansion, and attract more population, than poorer cities or smaller cities; and (2) that there is a long-term bidirectional causality between urban built-up area expansion and GDP per capita at both city and provincial level, and a short-term bidirectional causality at provincial level, revealing a positive feedback between landscape urbanization and urban and regional economic growth in China. Our results suggest that urbanization, if measured by a landscape indicator, does have causal effect on economic growth in China, both within the city and with spillover effect to the region, and that urban land expansion is not only the consequences of economic growth in cities, but also drivers of such growth. The results also suggest that under its current economic growth model, it might be difficult for China to control urban expansion without sacrificing economic growth, and China's policy to stop the loss of agricultural land, for food security, might be challenged by its policy to promote economic growth through urbanization. PMID:22103244

  9. Landscape Urbanization and Economic Growth in China: Positive Feedbacks and Sustainability Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Accelerating urbanization has been viewed as an important instrument for economic development and reducing regional income disparity in some developing countries, including China. Recent studies (Bloom et al. 2008) indicate that demographic urbanization level has no causal effect on economic growth. However, due to the varying and changing definition of urban population, the use of demographic indicators as a sole representing indicator for urbanization might be misleading. Here, we re-examine the causal relationship between urbanization and economic growth in Chinese cities and provinces in recent decades, using built-up areas as a landscape urbanization indicator. Our analysis shows that (1) larger cities, both in terms of population size and built-up area, and richer cities tend to gain more income, have larger built-up area expansion, and attract more population, than poorer cities or smaller cities; and (2) that there is a long-term bidirectional causality between urban built-up area expansion and GDP per capita at both city and provincial level, and a short-term bidirectional causality at provincial level, revealing a positive feedback between landscape urbanization and urban and regional economic growth in China. Our results suggest that urbanization, if measured by a landscape indicator, does have causal effect on economic growth in China, both within the city and with spillover effect to the region, and that urban land expansion is not only the consequences of economic growth in cities, but also drivers of such growth. The results also suggest that under its current economic growth model, it might be difficult for China to control urban expansion without sacrificing economic growth, and China’s policy to stop the loss of agricultural land, for food security, might be challenged by its policy to promote economic growth through urbanization. PMID:22103244

  10. ADAMTS-7 forms a positive feedback loop with TNF-α in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yongjie; Bai, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yunpeng; Tian, Qingyun; Liu, Ben; Lin, Edward A.; Chen, Yuqing; Lee, Brendan; Appleton, C Thomas G.; Beier, Frank; Yu, Xiu-Ping; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the expression of ADAMTS-7 during the progression of osteoarthritis (OA), defining its role in the pathogenesis of OA, and elucidating the molecular events involved. Methods ADAMTS-7 expression in cartilage of a rat OA model was assayed using immunohistochemistry. Cartilage-specific ADAMTS-7 transgenic mice and ADAMTS-7 small interfering (si)RNA knockdown mice were generated and used to analyse OA progression in both spontaneous and surgically induced OA models. Cartilage degradation and OA was evaluated using Safranin-O staining, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and western blotting. In addition, mRNA expression of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and metalloproteinases known to be involved in cartilage degeneration in OA was analysed. Furthermore, the transactivation of ADAMTS-7 by TNF-α and its downstream NF-κB signalling was measured using reporter gene assay. Results ADAMTS-7 expression was elevated during disease progression in the surgically induced rat OA model. Targeted overexpression of ADAMTS-7 in chondrocytes led to chondrodysplasia characterised by short-limbed dwarfism and a delay in endochondral ossification in ‘young mice’ and a spontaneous OA-like phenotype in ‘aged’ mice. In addition, overexpression of ADAMTS-7 led to exaggerated breakdown of cartilage and accelerated OA progression, while knockdown of ADAMTS-7 attenuated degradation of cartilage matrix and protected against OA development, in surgically induced OA models. ADAMTS-7 upregulated TNF-α and metalloproteinases associated with OA; in addition, TNF-α induced ADAMTS-7 through NF-κB signalling. Conclusions ADAMTS-7 and TNF-α form a positive feedback loop in the regulation of cartilage degradation and OA progression, making them potential molecular targets for prevention and treatment of joint degenerative diseases, including OA. PMID:23928557

  11. Feedback inhibition of ENaC: Acute and chronic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankit B; Yang, Lei; Deng, Su; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular [Na+] ([Na+]i) modulates the activity of the epithelial Na channel (ENaC) to help prevent cell swelling and regulate epithelial Na+ transport, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We show here that short-term (60–80 min) incubation of ENaC-expressing oocytes in high Na+ results in a 75% decrease in channel activity. When the β subunit was truncated, corresponding to a gain-of-function mutation found in Liddle's syndrome, the same maneuver reduced activity by 45% despite a larger increase in [Na+]i. In both cases the inhibition occurred with little to no change in cell-surface expression of γENaC. Long-term incubation (18 hours) in high Na+ reduced activity by 92% and 75% in wild-type channels and Liddle's mutant, respectively, with concomitant 70% and 52% decreases in cell-surface γENaC. In the presence of Brefeldin A to inhibit forward protein trafficking, high-Na+ incubation decreased wt ENaC activity by 52% and 88% after 4 and 8 hour incubations, respectively. Cleaved γENaC at the cell surface had lifetimes at the surface of 6 hrs in low Na+ and 4 hrs in high Na+, suggesting that [Na+]i increased the rate of retrieval of cleaved γ ENaC by 50%. This implies that enhanced retrieval of ENaC channels at the cell surface accounts for part, but not all, of the downregulation of ENaC activity shown with chronic increases in [Na+]i. PMID:25483587

  12. A general non-equilibrium framework for the parameterization of positive and negative feedbacks in atmospheric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    For any identifiable system, regardless of its complexity or scale, evolution can be treated as a spontaneous thermodynamic response to a local convergence of down-gradient material flows. In climate studies, examples of identifiable systems might include cloud cover or the global incidence of temperatures warmer than a certain threshold. Here it is shown how the time-dependent evolution of such systems is constrained by positive and negative feedbacks that fall into a few mathematically distinct modes. In general, evolution depends on the time integral of past flows and the current availability of material and energetic resources. More specifically, negative feedbacks arise from the depletion or predation of the material and potential energy reservoirs that supply the system. Positive feedbacks are due to either new reservoir "discovery" or system expansion into existing reservoirs. When positive feedbacks dominate, the time dependent response of system growth falls into a few clearly identifiable behaviors that include a law of diminishing returns, logistic behavior, and, if reservoirs are expanding very rapidly, unstable super-exponential or explosive growth. For open systems (e.g. radiative flows in our atmosphere) that have a resolved sink as well as a source, oscillatory behavior emerges and can be characterized in terms of a slightly modified form of the predator-prey equations commonly employed in ecology. The perturbation formulation of these equations is equivalent to a damped simple harmonic oscillator. Specific examples of non-equilibrium positive and negative feedback response can be described for the sudden development of rain and the oscillatory evolution of open-celled stratocumulus cloud decks.

  13. CaCDPK15 positively regulates pepper responses to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation and forms a positive-feedback loop with CaWRKY40 to amplify defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Cheng, Wei; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; Liu, Zhiqin; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    CaWRKY40 is a positive regulator of pepper (Capsicum annum) response to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI), but the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we functionally characterize CaCDPK15 in the defense signaling mediated by CaWRKY40. Pathogen-responsive TGA, W, and ERE boxes were identified in the CaCDPK15 promoter (pCaCDPK15), and pCaCDPK15-driven GUS expression was significantly enhanced in response to RSI and exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, and ethephon. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaCDPK15 significantly increased the susceptibility of pepper to RSI and downregulated the immunity-associated markers CaNPR1, CaPR1, and CaDEF1. By contrast, transient CaCDPK15 overexpression significantly activated hypersensitive response associated cell death, upregulated the immunity-associated marker genes, upregulated CaWRKY40 expression, and enriched CaWRKY40 at the promoters of its targets genes. Although CaCDPK15 failed to interact with CaWRKY40, the direct binding of CaWRKY40 to pCaCDPK15 was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation, which was significantly potentiated by RSI in pepper plants. These combined results suggest that RSI in pepper induces CaCDPK15 and indirectly activates downstream CaWRKY40, which in turn potentiates CaCDPK15 expression. This positive-feedback loop would amplify defense signaling against RSI and efficiently activate strong plant immunity. PMID:26928570

  14. CaCDPK15 positively regulates pepper responses to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation and forms a positive-feedback loop with CaWRKY40 to amplify defense signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Cheng, Wei; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; Liu, Zhiqin; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    CaWRKY40 is a positive regulator of pepper (Capsicum annum) response to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI), but the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we functionally characterize CaCDPK15 in the defense signaling mediated by CaWRKY40. Pathogen-responsive TGA, W, and ERE boxes were identified in the CaCDPK15 promoter (pCaCDPK15), and pCaCDPK15-driven GUS expression was significantly enhanced in response to RSI and exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, and ethephon. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaCDPK15 significantly increased the susceptibility of pepper to RSI and downregulated the immunity-associated markers CaNPR1, CaPR1, and CaDEF1. By contrast, transient CaCDPK15 overexpression significantly activated hypersensitive response associated cell death, upregulated the immunity-associated marker genes, upregulated CaWRKY40 expression, and enriched CaWRKY40 at the promoters of its targets genes. Although CaCDPK15 failed to interact with CaWRKY40, the direct binding of CaWRKY40 to pCaCDPK15 was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation, which was significantly potentiated by RSI in pepper plants. These combined results suggest that RSI in pepper induces CaCDPK15 and indirectly activates downstream CaWRKY40, which in turn potentiates CaCDPK15 expression. This positive-feedback loop would amplify defense signaling against RSI and efficiently activate strong plant immunity. PMID:26928570

  15. On the dynamic forcing of short-term climate fluctuations by feedback mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    Various internal feedback mechanisms in the ocean atmosphere system were studied. A variability pattern of sea surface temperature with a quasibiennial oscillation (QBO) was detected off the coast of Senegal, in the Gulf of Guinea and even in the Gulf Stream as it leaves the North American continental shelf. Possible physical connections between some of these QBO's were pointed out by a hypothetical feedback model. Interaction of a QBO with the annual cycle may lead to beating frequencies resembling climatic trends of a duration of several years.

  16. Positive and negative feedbacks to climate change associated with methane emissions from arctic permafrost systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter Anthony, K. M.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    Arctic permafrost contains 950 billion tons of organic carbon (C) in the surface tens of meters, an amount comparable to the current atmospheric CO2 burden of 750 billion tons. This C pool, which accumulated in permafrost over tens of thousands of years, is a threat to global climate because of its vulnerability to rapid microbial decomposition upon thaw, resulting in the release of greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. Greenhouse gas release from thawing permafrost constitutes one of the most important positive feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate warming in a warmer world. Based on patterns of permafrost degradation during the present interglacial period, estimates of the amount of C remaining in permafrost today, long term field measurements of CH4 and CO2 flux, laboratory incubation experiments, and mass balance calculations of the efficiency of CH4 production from thawed permafrost, we predict that at least 50 billion tons of CH4 (equivalent to 10 times the current atmospheric methane burden) will escape from thermokarst (thaw) lakes in Siberia’s Yedoma Ice Complex as it warms and thaws. Additional CH4 will be released from the remainder of arctic lakes. Under current projections of arctic warming of 7-8 deg C by 2100, widespread permafrost thaw will release 0.1-0.2 billion tons of CH4 yr-1 by 2100, an order of magnitude more than its current source strength, adding another 20-40% of all human and natural sources of CH4 to the atmosphere. Permafrost thaw may lead to an additional source of methane if expanding thaw bulbs beneath lakes and rivers intersect faults and unconsolidated sediments leading to the escape of CH4 from geological sources, such as those recently observed on the North Slope of Alaska with a flux of 60-100 kg CH4 m-2 d-1. Thermokarst lake dynamics play a pivotal role in permafrost degradation and aggradation in the Arctic such that the landscape resembles a palimpsest of lakes and drained lake basins. Analysis of remote

  17. Failure of feedback as a putative common mechanism of spreading depolarizations in migraine and stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlem, Markus A.; Schneider, Felix M.; Schöll, Eckehard

    2008-06-01

    The stability of cortical function depends critically on proper regulation. Under conditions of migraine and stroke a breakdown of transmembrane chemical gradients can spread through cortical tissue. A concomitant component of this emergent spatio-temporal pattern is a depolarization of cells detected as slow voltage variations. The propagation velocity of ˜3mm/min indicates a contribution of diffusion. We propose a mechanism for spreading depolarizations (SD) that rests upon a nonlocal or noninstantaneous feedback in a reaction-diffusion system. Depending upon the characteristic space and time scales of the feedback, the propagation of cortical SD can be suppressed by shifting the bifurcation line, which separates the parameter regime of pulse propagation from the regime where a local disturbance dies out. The optimization of this feedback is elaborated for different control schemes and ranges of control parameters.

  18. A positive feedback between p53 and miR-34 miRNAs mediates tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Nobuhiro; Lin, Chao-Po; Ribeiro, Marcelo C.; Biton, Anne; Lai, Gregory; He, Xingyue; Bu, Pengcheng; Vogel, Hannes; Jablons, David M.; Keller, Andreas C.; Wilkinson, J. Erby; He, Biao; Speed, Terry P.; He, Lin

    2014-01-01

    As bona fide p53 transcriptional targets, miR-34 microRNAs (miRNAs) exhibit frequent alterations in many human tumor types and elicit multiple p53 downstream effects upon overexpression. Unexpectedly, miR-34 deletion alone fails to impair multiple p53-mediated tumor suppressor effects in mice, possibly due to the considerable redundancy in the p53 pathway. Here, we demonstrate that miR-34a represses HDM4, a potent negative regulator of p53, creating a positive feedback loop acting on p53. In a Kras-induced mouse lung cancer model, miR-34a deficiency alone does not exhibit a strong oncogenic effect. However, miR-34a deficiency strongly promotes tumorigenesis when p53 is haploinsufficient, suggesting that the defective p53–miR-34 feedback loop can enhance oncogenesis in a specific context. The importance of the p53/miR-34/HDM4 feedback loop is further confirmed by an inverse correlation between miR-34 and full-length HDM4 in human lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, human lung adenocarcinomas generate an elevated level of a short HDM4 isoform through alternative polyadenylation. This short HDM4 isoform lacks miR-34-binding sites in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR), thereby evading miR-34 regulation to disable the p53-miR-34 positive feedback. Taken together, our results elucidated the intricate cross-talk between p53 and miR-34 miRNAs and revealed an important tumor suppressor effect generated by this positive feedback loop. PMID:24532687

  19. Positive feedback regulation between adiponectin and T-cadherin impacts adiponectin levels in tissue and plasma of male mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Keisuke; Fujishima, Yuya; Maeda, Norikazu; Mori, Takuya; Hirata, Ayumu; Sekimoto, Ryohei; Tsushima, Yu; Masuda, Shigeki; Yamaoka, Masaya; Inoue, Kana; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Kita, Shunbun; Ranscht, Barbara; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-03-01

    Adiponectin (Adipo), a multimeric adipocyte-secreted protein abundant in the circulation, is implicated in cardiovascular protective functions. Recent work documented that Adipo locally associates with responsive tissues through interactions with T-cadherin (Tcad), an atypical, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cadherin cell surface glycoprotein. Mice deficient for Tcad lack tissue-associated Adipo, accumulate Adipo in the circulation, and mimic the Adipo knockout (KO) cardiovascular phenotype. In reverse, Tcad protein is visibly reduced from cardiac tissue in Adipo-KO mice, suggesting interdependent regulation of the 2 proteins. Here, we evaluate the effect of Adipo on Tcad protein expression. Adipo and Tcad proteins were colocalized in aorta, heart, and skeletal muscle. Adipo positively regulated levels of Tcad protein in vivo and in endothelial cell (EC) cultures. In Tcad-KO mice, binding of endogenous and exogenously administered Adipo to cardiovascular tissues was dramatically reduced. Consistently, knockdown of Tcad in cultured murine vascular ECs significantly diminished Adipo binding. In search for a possible mechanism, we found that enzymatic cleavage of Tcad with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C increases plasma Adipo while decreasing tissue-bound levels. Similarly, pretreatment of cultured ECs with serum containing Adipo attenuated phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C-mediated Tcad cleavage. In vivo administration of adenovirus producing Adipo suppressed plasma levels of GPI phospholipase D, the endogenous cleavage enzyme for GPI-anchored proteins. In conclusion, our data show that both circulating and tissue-bound Adipo levels are dependent on Tcad and, in reverse, regulate tissue Tcad levels through a positive feedback loop that operates by suppressing phospholipase-mediated Tcad release from the cell surface. PMID:25514086

  20. Combined prokaryotic-eukaryotic delivery and expression of therapeutic factors through a primed autocatalytic positive-feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yu, Bin; Cai, Chun-Hui; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Smith, David Keith; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2016-01-28

    Progress in bacterial therapy for cancer and infectious diseases is hampered by the absence of safe and efficient vectors. Sustained delivery and high gene expression levels are critical for the therapeutic efficacy. Here we developed a Salmonella typhimrium strain to maintain and safely deliver a plasmid vector to target tissues. This vector is designed to allow dual transcription of therapeutic factors, such as cytotoxic proteins, short hairpin RNAs or combinations, in the nucleus or cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, with this expression sustained by an autocatalytic positive-feedback loop. Mechanisms to prime the system and maintain the plasmid in the bacterium are also provided. Synergistic effects of attenuated Salmonella and our inter-kingdom system allow the precise expression of Diphtheria toxin A chain (DTA) gene in tumor microenvironment and eradicate large established tumors in immunocompetent animals. In the experiments reported here, 26% of mice (n=5/19) with aggressive tumors were cured and the others all survived until the end of the experiment. We also demonstrated that ST4 packaged with shRNA-encoding plasmids has sustained knockdown effects in nude mice bearing human MDA-MB-231 xenografts. Three weeks after injection of 5×10(6) ST4/pIKT-shPlk, PLK1 transcript levels in tumors were 62.5±18.6% lower than the vector control group (P=0.015). The presence of PLK1 5' RACE-PCR cleavage products confirmed a sustained RNAi-mediated mechanism of action. This innovative technology provides an effective and versatile vehicle for efficient inter-kingdom gene delivery that can be applied to cancer therapy and other purposes. PMID:26682504

  1. Positive feedback produces broad distributions in maximum activation attained within a narrow time window in stochastic biochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit

    2013-01-01

    How do single cell fate decisions induced by activation of key signaling proteins above threshold concentrations within a time interval are affected by stochastic fluctuations in biochemical reactions? We address this question using minimal models of stochastic chemical reactions commonly found in cell signaling and gene regulatory systems. Employing exact solutions and semi-analytical methods we calculate distributions of the maximum value (N) of activated species concentrations (Pmax(N)) and the time (t) taken to reach the maximum value (Pmax(t)) within a time interval in the minimal models. We find, the presence of positive feedback interactions make Pmax(N) more spread out with a higher "peakedness" in Pmax(t). Thus positive feedback interactions may help single cells to respond sensitively to a stimulus when cell decision processes require upregulation of activated forms of key proteins to a threshold number within a time window.

  2. Performance Analysis of Positive-feedback-based Active Anti-islanding Schemes for Inverter-Based Distributed Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Pengwei; Aponte, Erick E.; Nelson, J. Keith

    2010-06-14

    Recently proposed positive-feedback-based anti-islanding schemes (AI) are highly effective in preventing islanding without causing any degradation in power quality. This paper aims to analyze the performance of these schemes quantitatively in the context of the dynamic models of inverter-based distributed generators (DG). In this study, the characteristics of these active anti-islanding methods are discussed and design guidelines are derived.

  3. Early Detection of Online Auction Opportunistic Sellers through the Use of Negative-Positive Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinert, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Apparently fraud is a growth industry. The monetary losses from Internet fraud have increased every year since first officially reported by the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) in 2000. Prior research studies and third-party reports of fraud show rates substantially higher than eBay's reported negative feedback rate of less than 1%. The…

  4. The positive feedback action of vasopressin on its own release from rat septal tissue in vitro is receptor-mediated.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, R; Ramirez, A D; Ramirez, V D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on its own septal release was evaluated using an in vitro superfusion procedure. As compared to basal release from septal fragments, pulses of synthetic AVP (15 pg/5 min) resulted in a 25-fold augmented release of endogenous AVP, indicating a positive feedback action. Both the basal and stimulated AVP release were significantly increased by 60 mM potassium and markedly reduced by omission of calcium. Preincubation of the septal fragments with the V2/V1 AVP receptor antagonist d(CH2)5 [D-Tyr (Et)2,Val4]AVP resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of the positive feedback action of AVP which was nearly completely blocked at doses between 1.25 and 5 ng per 100 microliters incubation medium. As compared to this effect, the V1 antagonist d(CH2)5 Tyr (Me)2 AVP as well as oxytocin were significantly less potent. The results suggest that the positive feedback action of AVP on its own release from septal fragments is potassium-stimulated, calcium-dependent and mainly V2 receptor-mediated. The physiological significance of this phenomenon remains to be shown. PMID:1830507

  5. Low-power feedback-enhanced electro-mechanical impedance (FEMI) sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ji Eun; Yue, C. Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) method utilizing smart piezoelectric sensors has emerged as a promising technology for structural health monitoring in civil, mechanical and aerospace engineering. However, two major limiting factors have prevented field deployment of this method in real life. First, smart piezoelectric sensors, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) patches, are highly sensitive to environmental changes such as temperature, humidity, and vibration. Secondly, bulky and expensive equipment is needed for performing impedance measurement. This paper proposes a feedback-enhanced electro-mechanical impedance (FEMI) technique for improving robustness against environmental variations and a design of a low-power EMI sensor with built-in measurement circuitries based on this new technique. The proposed FEMI technique employs a feedback scheme to amplify the peaking characteristics of the natural resonance frequencies in the EMI frequency response. The feedback loop includes a phase-locked loop (PLL) and a transimpedance amplifier (TIA). An analog EMI measurement circuit is developed to replace bulky EMI measurement instruments. To keep the power consumption low, the proposed system does not require any analog-to-digital conversion or DSP circuit blocks, but uses a simple analog mixer to multiply input and output waveforms of the PZT sensor, and then extract the EMI amplitude by passing the mixer output through a low-pass filter (LPF). The performance of the proposed FEMI sensor is verified by simulations using MATLAB. Simulated natural frequency peaks in the EMI spectrum are noticeably sharper with the feedback scheme than the one without feedback. As a result, the natural frequency shift due to any structural change can be more easily detected. To quantify the shift of these natural frequency peaks, the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the difference between cases with and without damage is calculated. The simulation results show that the RMSD with

  6. 2D tilting MEMS micro mirror integrating a piezoresistive sensor position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lani, S.; Bayat, D.; Despont, M.

    2015-02-01

    An integrated position sensor for a dual-axis electromagnetic tilting mirror is presented. This tilting mirror is composed of a silicon based mirror directly assembled on a silicon membrane supported by flexible beams. The position sensors are constituted by 4 Wheatstone bridges of piezoresistors which are fabricated by doping locally the flexible beams. A permanent magnet is attached to the membrane and the scanner is mounted above planar coils deposited on a ceramic substrate to achieve electromagnetic actuation. The performances of the piezoresistive sensors are evaluated by measuring the output signal of the piezoresistors as a function of the tilt of the mirror and the temperature. White light interferometry was performed for all measurement to measure the exact tilt angle. The minimum detectable angle with such sensors was 30µrad (around 13bits) in the range of the minimum resolution of the interferometer. The tilt reproducibility was 0.0186%, obtained by measuring the tilt after repeated actuations with a coil current of 50mA during 30 min and the stability over time was 0.05% in 1h without actuation. The maximum measured tilt angle was 6° (mechanical) limited by nonlinearity of the MEMS system.

  7. GATA Factor-Dependent Positive-Feedback Circuit in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Katsumura, Koichi R; Ong, Irene M; DeVilbiss, Andrew W; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Bresnick, Emery H

    2016-08-30

    The master regulatory transcription factor GATA-2 triggers hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell generation. GATA2 haploinsufficiency is implicated in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and GATA2 overexpression portends a poor prognosis for AML. However, the constituents of the GATA-2-dependent genetic network mediating pathogenesis are unknown. We described a p38-dependent mechanism that phosphorylates GATA-2 and increases GATA-2 target gene activation. We demonstrate that this mechanism establishes a growth-promoting chemokine/cytokine circuit in AML cells. p38/ERK-dependent GATA-2 phosphorylation facilitated positive autoregulation of GATA2 transcription and expression of target genes, including IL1B and CXCL2. IL-1β and CXCL2 enhanced GATA-2 phosphorylation, which increased GATA-2-mediated transcriptional activation. p38/ERK-GATA-2 stimulated AML cell proliferation via CXCL2 induction. As GATA2 mRNA correlated with IL1B and CXCL2 mRNAs in AML-M5 and high expression of these genes predicted poor prognosis of cytogenetically normal AML, we propose that the circuit is functionally important in specific AML contexts. PMID:27545880

  8. Feedback as a mechanism for the resurrection of oscillations from death states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, V. K.; Karthiga, S.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-07-01

    The quenching of oscillations in interacting systems leads to several unwanted situations, which necessitate a suitable remedy to overcome the quenching. In this connection, this work addresses a mechanism that can resurrect oscillations in a typical situation. Through both numerical and analytical studies, we show that the candidate which is capable of resurrecting oscillations is nothing but the feedback, the one which is profoundly used in dynamical control and in biotherapies. Even in the case of a rather general system, we demonstrate analytically the applicability of the technique over one of the oscillation quenched states called amplitude death states. We also discuss some of the features of this mechanism such as adaptability of the technique with the feedback of only a few of the oscillators.

  9. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Dust-Collector Requirements § 33.23 Mechanical positioning of parts. All parts of a unit that...

  10. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Dust-Collector Requirements § 33.23 Mechanical positioning of parts. All parts of a unit that...

  11. 30 CFR 33.23 - Mechanical positioning of parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Dust-Collector Requirements § 33.23 Mechanical positioning of parts. All parts of a unit that...

  12. Feedback reciprocity mechanism promotes the cooperation of highly clustered scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Zhihai; Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2010-10-01

    We study how the clustering coefficient influences the evolution of cooperation in scale-free public goods games. In games played by groups of individuals, triangle loops provide stronger support for mutual cooperation to resist invasion of selfish behavior than that in the absence of such loops, so that diffusion of cooperative behavior is relatively promoted. The feedback reciprocity mechanism of triangle plays a key role in facilitating cooperation in high clustered networks.

  13. Modeling Discontinuous Phase Transitions in Gel Membranes: Focus on Hysteresis and Feedback Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksenok, Olga

    Feedback mechanisms are vital in a number of processes in biological systems. For example, feedback loops play an essential role during a limb development in mammals and are responsible for the asymmetric cell division to constrain the growth in plants to the specific regions. An integration of well-controlled feedback loops into the fully synthetic materials is an important step in designing a range of biomimetic functionalities. Herein, we focus on hydrogels functionalized with light-sensitive trisodium salt of copper chlorophyllin and study discontinuous phase transitions in these systems. Prior experimental studies had shown that illumination of these functionalized gels results in their heating and in discontinuous, first order phase transition upon the variation in temperature. Herein, we develop the first computational model for these gels; the framework of the model is based on the gel Lattice Spring Model, in this work we account for the gel heating under the illumination. The results of our simulations are in a good agreement with prior experimental studies. We focus on pattern development during the volume phase transitions in membranes of various thicknesses and show that one can effectively utilize light intensity to remotely control feedback loops in these systems.

  14. A positive feedback loop involving Erk5 and Akt turns on mesangial cell proliferation in response to PDGF.

    PubMed

    Bera, Amit; Das, Falguni; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Li, Xiaonan; Pal, Sanjay; Gorin, Yves; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S; Abboud, Hanna E; Ghosh Choudhury, Goutam

    2014-06-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor BB and its receptor (PDGFRβ) play a pivotal role in the development of renal glomerular mesangial cells. Their roles in increased mesangial cell proliferation during mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis have long been noted, but the operating logic of signaling mechanisms regulating these changes remains poorly understood. We examined the role of a recently identified MAPK, Erk5, in this process. PDGF increased the activating phosphorylation of Erk5 and tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins in a time-dependent manner. A pharmacologic inhibitor of Erk5, XMD8-92, abrogated PDGF-induced DNA synthesis and mesangial cell proliferation. Similarly, expression of dominant negative Erk5 or siRNAs against Erk5 blocked PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis and proliferation. Inhibition of Erk5 attenuated expression of cyclin D1 mRNA and protein, resulting in suppression of CDK4-mediated phosphorylation of the tumor suppressor protein pRb. Expression of cyclin D1 or CDK4 prevented the dominant negative Erk5- or siErk5-mediated inhibition of DNA synthesis and mesangial cell proliferation induced by PDGF. We have previously shown that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) contributes to PDGF-induced proliferation of mesangial cells. Inhibition of PI3-kinase blocked PDGF-induced phosphorylation of Erk5. Since PI3-kinase acts through Akt, we determined the role of Erk5 on Akt phosphorylation. XMD8-92, dominant negative Erk5, and siErk5 inhibited phosphorylation of Akt by PDGF. Interestingly, we found inhibition of PDGF-induced Erk5 phosphorylation by a pharmacological inhibitor of Akt kinase and kinase dead Akt in mesangial cells. Thus our data unfold the presence of a positive feedback microcircuit between Erk5 and Akt downstream of PI3-kinase nodal point for PDGF-induced mesangial cell proliferation. PMID:24740537

  15. Positive feedback regulation of type I IFN production by the IFN-inducible DNA sensor cGAS

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Li, Bing; Liu, Su-yang; Iyer, Shankar S; Yu, Yongxin; Wu, Aiping; Cheng, Genhong

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and robust induction of type I interferon (IFN-I) is a critical event in host antiviral innate immune response. It has been well demonstrated that cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) plays an important role in sensing cytosolic DNA and triggering stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-dependent signaling to induce IFN-I. However, it is largely unknown how cGAS itself is regulated during pathogen infection and IFN-I production. Here, we show that pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) ligands including lipidA, LPS, polyI:C, polydA:dT, and cGAMP induce cGAS expression in a IFN-I-dependent manner in both mouse and human macrophages. Further experiments indicate that cGAS is an IFN-stimulated gene (ISG), and two adjacent IFN-sensitive response elements (ISREs) in the promoter region of cGAS mediate the induction of cGAS by IFN-I. In addition, we show that optimal production of IFNβ triggered by polydA:dT or HSV-1 requires IFNAR signaling. Knockdown of the constitutively expressed DNA sensor DDX41 attenuates polydA:dT-triggered IFNβ production and cGAS induction. By analyzing the dynamic expression of polydA:dT-induced IFNβ and cGAS transcripts, we have found that induction of IFNβ is earlier than cGAS. Furthermore, we have provided evidence that induction of cGAS by IFN-I meditates the subsequent positive feedback regulation of DNA-triggered IFN-I production. Thus, our study not only provides a novel mechanism of modulating cGAS expression, but also adds another layer of regulation in DNA-triggered IFN-I production by induction of cGAS. PMID:25609843

  16. F-actin waves, actin cortex disassembly and focal exocytosis driven by actin-phosphoinositide positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas A; Sheetz, Michael P; Gauthier, Nils C

    2016-04-01

    Actin polymerization is controlled by the phosphoinositide composition of the plasma membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the spatiotemporal regulation of actin network organization over extended length scales are still unclear. To observe phosphoinositide-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics we combined the model system of frustrated phagocytosis, total internal reflection microscopy and manipulation of the buffer tonicity. We found that macrophages interacting with IgG-coated glass substrates formed circular F-actin waves on their ventral surface enclosing a region of plasma membrane devoid of cortical actin. Plasma membrane free of actin cortex was strongly depleted of PI(4,5)P2 , but enriched in PI(3,4)P2 and displayed a fivefold increase in exocytosis. Wave formation could be promoted by application of a hypotonic shock. The actin waves were characteristic of a bistable wavefront at the boundary between the regions of membrane containing and lacking cortical actin. Phosphoinositide modifiers and RhoGTPase activities dramatically redistributed with respect to the wavefronts, which often exhibited spatial oscillations. Perturbation of either lipid or actin cytoskeleton-related pathways led to rapid loss of both the polarized lipid distribution and the wavefront. As waves travelled over the plasma membrane, wavefront actin was seen to rapidly polymerize and depolymerize at pre-existing clusters of FcγRIIA, coincident with rapid changes in lipid composition. Thus the potential of receptors to support rapid F-actin polymerization appears to depend acutely on the local concentrations of multiple lipid species. We propose that interdependence through positive feedback from the cytoskeleton to lipid modifiers leads to coordinated local cortex remodeling, focal exocytosis, and organizes extended actin networks. PMID:26915738

  17. Reliable Control Using Disturbance Observer and Equivalent Transfer Function for Position Servo System in Current Feedback Loop Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kaoru; Nakamura, Taro; Osumi, Hisashi

    A reliable control method is proposed for multiple loop control system. After a feedback loop failure, such as case of the sensor break down, the control system becomes unstable and has a big fluctuation even if it has a disturbance observer. To cope with this problem, the proposed method uses an equivalent transfer function (ETF) as active redundancy compensation after the loop failure. The ETF is designed so that it does not change the transfer function of the whole system before and after the loop failure. In this paper, the characteristic of reliable control system that uses an ETF and a disturbance observer is examined by the experiment that uses the DC servo motor for the current feedback loop failure in the position servo system.

  18. ASSESSING RADIATION PRESSURE AS A FEEDBACK MECHANISM IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Brett H.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2011-02-01

    Radiation pressure from the absorption and scattering of starlight by dust grains may be an important feedback mechanism in regulating star-forming galaxies. We compile data from the literature on star clusters, star-forming subregions, normal star-forming galaxies, and starbursts to assess the importance of radiation pressure on dust as a feedback mechanism, by comparing the luminosity and flux of these systems to their dust Eddington limit. This exercise motivates a novel interpretation of the Schmidt law, the L{sub IR}-L'{sub CO} correlation, and the L{sub IR}-L'{sub HCN} correlation. In particular, the linear L{sub IR}-L'{sub HCN} correlation is a natural prediction of radiation pressure regulated star formation. Overall, we find that the Eddington limit sets a hard upper bound to the luminosity of any star-forming region. Importantly, however, many normal star-forming galaxies have luminosities significantly below the Eddington limit. We explore several explanations for this discrepancy, especially the role of 'intermittency' in normal spirals-the tendency for only a small number of subregions within a galaxy to be actively forming stars at any moment because of the time dependence of the feedback process and the luminosity evolution of the stellar population. If radiation pressure regulates star formation in dense gas, then the gas depletion timescale is 6 Myr, in good agreement with observations of the densest starbursts. Finally, we highlight the importance of observational uncertainties, namely, the dust-to-gas ratio and the CO-to-H{sub 2} and HCN-to-H{sub 2} conversion factors, that must be understood before a definitive assessment of radiation pressure as a feedback mechanism in star-forming galaxies.

  19. State transitions and feedback mechanisms control hydrology in the constructed catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang; Gerwin, Werner; Hinz, Christoph; Zaplata, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Landscapes and ecosystems are complex systems with many feedback mechanisms acting between the various abiotic and biotic components. The knowledge about these interacting processes is mainly derived from mature ecosystems. The initial development of ecosystem complexity may involve state transitions following catastrophic shifts, disturbances or transgression of thresholds. The Chicken Creek catchment was constructed in 2005 in the mining area of Lusatia/Germany to study processes and feedback mechanisms during ecosystem evolution. The hillslope-shaped 6 ha site has defined boundary conditions and well-documented inner structures. The dominating substrate above the underlying clay layer is Pleistocene sandy material representing mainly the lower C horizon of the former landscape. Since 2005, the unrestricted, unmanaged development of the catchment was intensively monitored. During the ten years since then, we observed characteristic state transitions in catchment functioning driven by feedbacks between original substrate properties, surface structures, soil development and vegetation succession. Whereas surface runoff induced by surface crusting and infiltration dominated catchment hydrology in the first years, the impact of vegetation on hydrological pathways and groundwater levels became more and more evident during the last years. Discharge from the catchment changed from episodic events driven by precipitation and surface runoff to groundwater driven. This general picture is overlain by spatial patterns and single episodic events of external drivers. The scientific value of the Chicken Creek site with known boundary conditions and structure information could help in disentangling general feedback mechanisms between hydrologic, pedogenic, biological and geomorphological processes as well as a in gaining a more integrative view of succession and its drivers during the transition from initial, less complex systems to more mature ecosystems. Long-term time series

  20. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  1. Force Feedback Controls Motor Activity and Mechanical Properties of Self-Assembling Branched Actin Networks.

    PubMed

    Bieling, Peter; Li, Tai-De; Weichsel, Julian; McGorty, Ryan; Jreij, Pamela; Huang, Bo; Fletcher, Daniel A; Mullins, R Dyche

    2016-01-14

    Branched actin networks--created by the Arp2/3 complex, capping protein, and a nucleation promoting factor--generate and transmit forces required for many cellular processes, but their response to force is poorly understood. To address this, we assembled branched actin networks in vitro from purified components and used simultaneous fluorescence and atomic force microscopy to quantify their molecular composition and material properties under various forces. Remarkably, mechanical loading of these self-assembling materials increases their density, power, and efficiency. Microscopically, increased density reflects increased filament number and altered geometry but no change in average length. Macroscopically, increased density enhances network stiffness and resistance to mechanical failure beyond those of isotropic actin networks. These effects endow branched actin networks with memory of their mechanical history that shapes their material properties and motor activity. This work reveals intrinsic force feedback mechanisms by which mechanical resistance makes self-assembling actin networks stiffer, stronger, and more powerful. PMID:26771487

  2. Construction and Modelling of an Inducible Positive Feedback Loop Stably Integrated in a Mammalian Cell-Line

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Velia; Fracassi, Chiara; Garzilli, Immacolata; Moretti, Maria Nicoletta; di Bernardo, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between topology and dynamics of transcriptional regulatory networks in mammalian cells is essential to elucidate the biology of complex regulatory and signaling pathways. Here, we characterised, via a synthetic biology approach, a transcriptional positive feedback loop (PFL) by generating a clonal population of mammalian cells (CHO) carrying a stable integration of the construct. The PFL network consists of the Tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA), whose expression is regulated by a tTA responsive promoter (CMV-TET), thus giving rise to a positive feedback. The same CMV-TET promoter drives also the expression of a destabilised yellow fluorescent protein (d2EYFP), thus the dynamic behaviour can be followed by time-lapse microscopy. The PFL network was compared to an engineered version of the network lacking the positive feedback loop (NOPFL), by expressing the tTA mRNA from a constitutive promoter. Doxycycline was used to repress tTA activation (switch off), and the resulting changes in fluorescence intensity for both the PFL and NOPFL networks were followed for up to 43 h. We observed a striking difference in the dynamics of the PFL and NOPFL networks. Using non-linear dynamical models, able to recapitulate experimental observations, we demonstrated a link between network topology and network dynamics. Namely, transcriptional positive autoregulation can significantly slow down the “switch off” times, as comparared to the nonautoregulatated system. Doxycycline concentration can modulate the response times of the PFL, whereas the NOPFL always switches off with the same dynamics. Moreover, the PFL can exhibit bistability for a range of Doxycycline concentrations. Since the PFL motif is often found in naturally occurring transcriptional and signaling pathways, we believe our work can be instrumental to characterise their behaviour. PMID:21765813

  3. Entropy Limit and the Cold Feedback Mechanism in Cooling Flow Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2008-09-01

    I propose an explanation for the finding that star formation and visible filaments strong in Hα emission in cooling flow clusters occur only if the minimum specific entropy and the radiative cooling time of the intracluster medium (ICM) are below a specific threshold. The explanation is based on the cold feedback mechanism. In this mechanism, the mass accreted by the central black hole originates in nonlinear overdense blobs of gas residing in an extended region of the cooling flow region. I use the criterion that the feedback cycle period must be longer than the radiative cooling time of dense blobs, for large quantities of gas to cool to low temperatures. The falling time of the dense blobs is parameterized by the ratio of the infall velocity to the sound speed. Another parameter is the ratio of the blobs' density to that of the surrounding ICM. By taking the values of the parameters as in previous papers on the cold feedback model, I derive an expression that gives the right value of the entropy threshold. Future studies will have to examine in more detail the role these parameters play, and will have to show that the observed sharp change in the behavior of clusters across the entropy, or radiative cooling time, threshold can be reproduced by the model.

  4. Teachers' Discoursal Strategies in Providing Positive Feedback to Student Responses: A Study of Four English Immersion Teachers in People's Republic of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pei, Miao

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the discoursal strategies of four teachers in providing feedback to student responses in English classrooms in Xi'an, People's Republic of China. The findings indicate that the teachers provide positive feedback for students English learning in various ways, including using the most common strategies such as accepting,…

  5. A Collaborative Approach to Implement Positive Behavior Support Plans for Children with Problem Behaviors: A Comparison of Consultation versus Consultation and Feedback Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erbas, Dilek

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of consultation alone and consultation plus feedback on the proper use of positive behavior support strategies (PBS) on behaviors of three mothers with children with developmental disabilities. Results indicated that consultation plus feedback was more effective than consultation alone…

  6. Positive and negative feedbacks among Amazon land uses, drought, and fire: the drought of 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepstad, D.; Brando, P.; Soares-Filho, B.; Balch, J.; Moutinho, P.

    2006-12-01

    Climate, rural economies, and ecosystems are connected in the Amazon basin through complex interactions with important implications for greenhouse gas fluxes, biodiversity, and the well-being of rural people. In the historically severe drought of 2005, drought-induced tree mortality and fire-dependent land uses (cattle ranching, swidden agriculture) favored forest fire as it increased the likelihood of further drought. Regions with fire-sensitive investments in the landscape, including improved cattle forage, agroforestry systems, and forest management, were also regions of high investments in the prevention of accidental fire, and experienced low levels of forest fire, in a negative feedback cycle. Some areas of agroindustrial production(cultivated soy) also experienced low forest fire occurrence because of the low flammability of crop fields. The combination of drought- and fire-induced carbon emissions can approach one billion tons in years of severe drought. The negative feedbacks between some types of land use and forest fire could substantially reduce these emissions in the short term.

  7. Analysis of Links Positions in Landing Gear Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewczyński, D.; Tora, G.

    2014-08-01

    This article contains a kinematic analysis of an aircraft chassis mechanism in a range of positions. The mechanism of the chassis is made up of several smaller subsystems with different functions. The first mechanism is used to eject the chassis before landing (touchdown) and fold it to hatchway after the lift off. The second mechanism is designed to perform rotation of the crossover with the wheel, in order to adjust the position of the wheel to fit it in the limited space in the hold. The third mechanism allows movement of the chassis resulting from the change in length of the damper. To determine the position of the following links of the mechanism calculus of vectors was applied in which unit vectors were used to represent the angular position of the links. The aim of the analysis is to determine the angle of convergence and the angle of heel wheels as a function of the variable length of hydraulic cylinder, length of the shock absorber, length of the regulations rods

  8. A Mechanism for Land-Atmosphere Feedback Involving Planetary Wave Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Chang, Yehui; Schubert, Siegfried D.

    2014-01-01

    While the ability of land surface conditions to influence the atmosphere has been demonstrated in various modeling and observational studies, the precise mechanisms by which land-atmosphere feedback occurs are still largely unknown particularly the mechanisms that allow land moisture state in one region to affect atmospheric conditions in another. Such remote impacts are examined here in the context of atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations, leading to the identification of one potential mechanism: the phase-locking and amplification of a planetary wave through the imposition of a spatial pattern of soil moisture at the land surface. This mechanism, shown here to be relevant in the AGCM, apparently also operates in nature, as suggested by supporting evidence found in reanalysis data.

  9. Design of a High Resolution Hexapod Positioning Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Jamie

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high resolution, six-degree of freedom positioning mechanism. This mechanism, based on the Stewart platform concept, was designed for use with the Developmental Comparative Active Optics Telescope Testbed (DCATT), a ground-based technology testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). The mechanism provides active control to the DCATT telescope's segmented primary mirror. Emphasis is on design decisions and technical challenges. Significant issues include undesirable motion properties of PZT-inchworm actuators, testing difficulties, dimensional stability, and use of advanced composite materials. Supporting test data from prototype mechanisms is presented.

  10. Design of a High Resolution Hexapod Positioning Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Jamie; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high resolution, six-degree of freedom positioning mechanism. This mechanism, based on the Stewart platform concept, was designed for use with the Developmental Comparative Active Optics Telescope Testbed (DCATT), a ground-based technology testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). The mechanism provides active control to the DCATT telescope's segmented primary mirror. Emphasis is on design decisions and technical challenges. Significant issues include undesirable motion properties of PZT-inchworm actuators, testing difficulties, dimensional stability and use of advanced composite materials. Supporting test data from prototype mechanisms is presented.