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Sample records for positive urine drug

  1. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePlus

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  2. False-positive interferences of common urine drug screen immunoassays: a review.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Park, Hyung-Doo; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Urine drug screen (UDS) immunoassays are a quick and inexpensive method for determining the presence of drugs of abuse. Many cross-reactivities exist with other analytes, potentially causing a false-positive result in an initial drug screen. Knowledge of these potential interferents is important in determining a course of action for patient care. We present an inclusive review of analytes causing false-positive interferences with drugs-of-abuse UDS immunoassays, which covers the literature from the year 2000 to present. English language articles were searched via the SciFinder platform with the strings 'false positive [drug] urine' yielding 173 articles. These articles were then carefully analyzed and condensed to 62 that included data on causes of false-positive results. The discussion is separated into six sections by drug class with a corresponding table of cross-reacting compounds for quick reference. False-positive results were described for amphetamines, opiates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, phencyclidine, lysergic acid diethylamide and barbiturates. These false-positive results support the generally accepted practice that immunoassay positive results are considered presumptive until confirmed by a second independent chemical technique. PMID:24986836

  3. False-positive methadone urine drug screen in a patient treated with quetiapine.

    PubMed

    Lasić, Davor; Uglesić, Boran; Zuljan-Cvitanović, Marija; Supe-Domić, Daniela; Uglesić, Lovro

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of T.M. admitted to University Department of Psychiatry, Split University Hospital Center, in Croatia, because of the acute psychotic reaction (F23.9). The patient's urine tested positive for methadone without a history of methadone ingestion. Urine drug screen was performed with the COBAS Integra Methadone II test kit (kinetic interaction of microparticles in solution /KIMS/ methodology) by Roche. Drugs that have been shown to cross-react with methadone feature a tricyclic structure with a sulfur and nitrogen atom in the middle ring, which is common for both quetiapine and methadone. Therefore, it is plausible that this structural similarity between quetiapine and methadone could underlie the cross-reactivity on methadone drug screen. Besides quetiapine, a number of routinely prescribed medications have been associated with triggering false-positive urine drug screen results. Verification of the test results with a different screening test or additional analytical tests should be performed to avoid adverse consequences for the patients. PMID:23115954

  4. Case Reports of Aripiprazole Causing False-Positive Urine Amphetamine Drug Screens in Children.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Justin; Shah, Pooja; Faley, Brian; Siegel, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Urine drug screens (UDSs) are used to identify the presence of certain medications. One limitation of UDSs is the potential for false-positive results caused by cross-reactivity with other substances. Amphetamines have an extensive list of cross-reacting medications. The literature contains reports of false-positive amphetamine UDSs with multiple antidepressants and antipsychotics. We present 2 cases of presumed false-positive UDSs for amphetamines after ingestion of aripiprazole. Case 1 was a 16-month-old girl who accidently ingested 15 to 45 mg of aripiprazole. She was lethargic and ataxic at home with 1 episode of vomiting containing no identifiable tablets. She remained sluggish with periods of irritability and was admitted for observation. UDS on 2 consecutive days came back positive for amphetamines. Case 2 was of a 20-month-old girl who was brought into the hospital after accidental ingestion of an unknown quantity of her father's medications which included aripiprazole. UDS on the first day of admission came back positive only for amphetamines. Confirmatory testing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on the blood and urine samples were also performed for both patients on presentation to detect amphetamines and were subsequently negative. Both patients returned to baseline and were discharged from the hospital. To our knowledge, these cases represent the first reports of false-positive amphetamine urine drug tests with aripiprazole. In both cases, aripiprazole was the drug with the highest likelihood of causing the positive amphetamine screen. The implications of these false-positives include the possibility of unnecessary treatment and monitoring of patients. PMID:26527556

  5. Urine Toxicology Screen in Multiple Sleep Latency Test: The Correlation of Positive Tetrahydrocannabinol, Drug Negative Patients, and Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dzodzomenyo, Samuel; Stolfi, Adrienne; Splaingard, Deborah; Earley, Elizabeth; Onadeko, Oluwole; Splaingard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Drugs can influence results of multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT). We sought to identify the effect of marijuana on MSLT results in pediatric patients evaluated for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Methods: This is a retrospective study of urine drug screens performed the morning before MSLT in 383 patients < 21 years old referred for EDS. MSLT results were divided into those with (1) (−) urine drug screens, (2) urine drug screens (+) for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alone or THC plus other drugs, and (3) urine drug screens (+) for drugs other than THC. Groups were compared with Fisher exact tests or one-way ANOVA. Results: 38 (10%) urine drug tests were (+): 14 for THC and 24 for other drugs. Forty-three percent of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy, 0% consistent with idiopathic hypersomnia, 29% other, and 29% normal. This was statistically different from those with (−) screens (24% narcolepsy, 20% idiopathic hypersomnia, 6% other, 50% normal), and those (+) for drugs other than THC (17% narcolepsy, 33% idiopathic hypersomnia, 4% other, 46% normal (p = 0.01). Six percent (6/93) of patients with MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy were drug screen (+) for THC; 71% of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had multiple sleep onset REM periods (SOREMS). There were no (+) urine drug screens in patients < 13 years old. Conclusion: Many pediatric patients with (+) urine drug screens for THC met MSLT criteria for narcolepsy or had multiple SOREMs. Drug screening is important in interpreting MSLT findings for children ≥ 13 years. Citation: Dzodzomenyo S, Stolfi A, Splaingard D, Earley E, Onadeko O, Splaingard M. Urine toxicology screen in multiple sleep latency test: the correlation of positive tetrahydrocannabinol, drug negative patients, and narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):93–99. PMID:25348245

  6. A Retrospective Analysis of Urine Drugs of Abuse Immunoassay True Positive Rates at a National Reference Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L; Sadler, Aaron J; Genzen, Jonathan R

    2016-03-01

    Urine drug screens are commonly performed to identify drug use or monitor adherence to drug therapy. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the true positive and false positive rates of one of our in-house urine drug screen panels. The urine drugs of abuse panel studied consists of screening by immunoassay then positive immunoassay results were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Reagents from Syva and Microgenics were used for the immunoassay screen. The screen was performed on a Beckman AU5810 random access automated clinical analyzer. The percent of true positives for each immunoassay was determined. Agreement with previously validated GC-MS or LC-MS-MS confirmatory methods was also evaluated. There were 8,825 de-identified screening results for each of the drugs in the panel, except for alcohol (N = 2,296). The percent of samples that screened positive were: 10.0% for amphetamine/methamphetamine/3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), 12.8% for benzodiazepines, 43.7% for opiates (including oxycodone) and 20.3% for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The false positive rate for amphetamine/methamphetamine was ∼14%, ∼34% for opiates (excluding oxycodone), 25% for propoxyphene and 100% for phencyclidine and MDMA immunoassays. Based on the results from this retrospective study, the true positive rate for THC drug use among adults were similar to the rate of illicit drug use in young adults from the 2013 National Survey; however, our positivity rate for cocaine was higher than the National Survey. PMID:26668238

  7. Hospital length of stay in individuals with schizophrenia with and without cocaine-positive urine drug screens at hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanjing Emily; Mohite, Satyajit; Ngana, Ikenna; Burns, Wilma; Shah, Nurun; Schneider, Laurie; Schmitz, Joy M; Lane, Scott D; Okusaga, Olaoluwa O

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of cocaine use disorder (CUD) in individuals with schizophrenia, current understanding of the effect of cocaine on psychiatric hospital length of stay (LOS) in individuals with schizophrenia is limited. We therefore retrospectively examined the medical records of 5106 hospital admissions due to exacerbation of schizophrenia. Linear regression and t-test were used to compare LOS between individuals with schizophrenia with cocaine-positive urine drug test results and those with negative test results. Individuals with schizophrenia who were also positive for cocaine had shorter LOS from both unadjusted (geometric mean LOS, 8.07 ± 1.92 vs. 11.83 ± 1.83 days; p < 0.001) and adjusted (β = 0.69; confidence interval, 0.63-0.76; p < 0.001) analyses. Our results suggest that individuals with schizophrenia who also have comorbid CUD may require shorter inpatient treatment during periods of exacerbation of symptoms. Replication of this finding has relevance in treatment planning and resource allocation for the subpopulation of individuals with schizophrenia who also have stimulant use disorders. PMID:25489749

  8. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePlus

    Pincus MR, Abraham NZ Jr. Toxicology and therapeutic drug monitoring. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 23.

  9. Comparison of Urine and Oral Fluid for Workplace Drug Testing

    PubMed Central

    Casolin, Armand

    2016-01-01

    Aims To determine the relative detection rates of urine versus oral fluid testing in a safety sensitive industry and the correlation with diagnosed substance use disorders and possible impairment at work. Methods The trial involved 1,500 paired urine and oral fluid tests performed in accordance with Australian Standard/New Zealand Standard (AS/NZS) 4308:2008 and AS 4760:2006. Workers who returned a positive test were screened for substance use disorders, as defined by DSM-5, and for possible impairment at work following that particular episode of substance use. Results Substances were detected in 3.7% (n = 56) of urine samples and 0.5% (n = 8) of oral fluid samples (p < 0.0001). One worker (0.07%) had a substance detected on oral fluid alone versus 49 workers (3.3%) who had substances detected on urine alone. Twelve workers returned a positive result, defined as being consistent with the use of an illicit drug or a controlled substance without a clinical indication and prescription. Nine workers tested positive on urine alone, one on oral fluid alone and two on both (p = 0.0114). Of note, 6/11 workers who tested positive on urine had possible impairment at work and 2/11 had a substance use disorder versus 2/3 and 0/3, respectively, who tested positive on oral fluid. Conclusions Urine drug testing performed in accordance with AS/NZS 4308:2008 is more likely to detect overall substance use and illicit drug use than oral fluid testing conducted in accordance with AS 4760:2006. Urine testing performed in accordance with AS/NZS 4308:2008 may also be more likely to detect workers with possible impairment at work and substance use disorders than oral fluid testing performed in accordance with AS 4760:2006. PMID:27344042

  10. Ethical considerations in urine drug testing.

    PubMed

    Passik, Steven D; Kirsh, Kenneth L

    2011-01-01

    Recent passage of a House Bill in the state of Washington led to a commentary on whether mandates for urine drug testing of pain patients represented a breach of the Fourth and Fourteenth Amendment rights of patients. Issues over true consent to such tests and potential view of warrantless searches were discussed. The authors address these concerns in a broader context of risk management and stratification efforts, along with discussion about the need for a tailored approach in this arena and consideration of cost burden for such tests. Finally, the argument is made that social justice issues need to be considered (along with issues of autonomy, beneficence, and nonmaleficence). PMID:21810007

  11. Cocaine metabolite (benzoylecgonine) in hair and urine of drug users.

    PubMed

    Martinez, F; Poet, T S; Pillai, R; Erickson, J; Estrada, A L; Watson, R R

    1993-01-01

    Two methods of drug detection, urinalysis and hair analysis, were compared with respect to the efficiency of identification of drug use in a population of men living on the Arizona-Mexico border. The standard curve of cannabinoids in urine was linear to 20 ng/mL. The GC/MS levels for all cannabinoids combined in urine were very similar to that obtained by radioimmunoassay (RIA), 91% concordance. Similar results were obtained from samples analyzed dually for the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE) after spiking. As determined by RIA of urine, 74% of the subjects were positive for cannabinoids. The majority were in the range of 100-1000 ng/mg creatinine. The pattern of excretion of THC metabolites with respect to the verbally reported time of first use was fairly normal, with the peak rate of elimination 13-24 hours following the last reported use. Washed hair samples were extracted by overnight acid hydrolysis. Urine samples and neutralized hair extracts were analyzed for cocaine and BE by RIA. Of the hair samples, 55% contained cocaine/BE, as compared with only 4.3% of the urine samples. Most hair samples contained cocaine/BE in the range of 25-100 ng/sample (100 mg hair). All hair samples testing negative for cocaine/BE by RIA also tested negative by GC/MS, and four samples containing the highest amounts of cocaine and BE by RIA were similarly found to contain the highest amounts by GC/MS. Hair analysis, therefore, gives a wider window of detection of drug use than does urinalysis and shows merit in the confirmation of cocaine use in small clinical research studies. PMID:8336486

  12. Fluorescence And Alternative Methods In Urine Drug Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Naresh C.

    1988-04-01

    Drug abuse has become-one of the most compelling realities _ ot contemporary society. It has penetrated every segment ot our population: trom schools to sports and trom organized crime to board rooms . Drugs in tie w9rkplace allegedly cost government agencies and business millions ot dollars each year in increased absenteeism,. poor work performance, thefts,accidents andwastedtime. The President's Commission on Organized Crime and the federal government are in tavor ot urine drug testing. In fact many employers are now resorting to urine drug testing on current and prospective employees. This presep.tation discusses different laboratory methods used in urine drug.testing, including immunoassays, fluorescence polarization, thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, gas chromatography and gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  13. Is urine an alternative to cosmetically treated hair for the detection of drugs and alcohol?

    PubMed

    Agius, Ronald; Dufaux, Bertin; Kahl, Hans-Gerhard; Nadulski, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    This study attempts to assess the utility of the urine matrix as an alternative to cosmetically treated hair for the detection of drugs and alcohol for driving licence re-granting in 1026 cosmetically treated hair samples and 33 262 urine routine samples. No significant difference was observed between the percentage positive samples in cosmetically treated hair to those in urine at both the 95% and 99% significance level for amphetamines, cocaine, opiates, benzodiazepines, and methadone. Significant difference was found between the positivity rates of cannabinoids in cosmetically treated hair and that in urine indicating urine to be a better alternative to the use of the hair matrix even when cosmetically treated. The opposite was observed for the alcohol consumption marker ethyl glucuronide (EtG) for which the positivity rate in cosmetically treated hair was twice that in urine samples. Particularly for alcohol abstinence monitoring, as for the rehabilitative driving licence re-granting medical and psychological assessment (MPA) programme in Germany, it seems that ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in hair presents a much better alternative than urine testing, even when cosmetically treated hair is analyzed. Moreover, segmentation is an additional advantage of hair testing which can provide additional useful information. PMID:24817057

  14. The effects of adulterants and selected ingested compounds on drugs-of-abuse testing in urine.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amitava

    2007-09-01

    Household chemicals such as bleach, table salt, laundry detergent, toilet bowl cleaner, vinegar, lemon juice, and eyedrops are used for adulterating urine specimens. Most of these adulterants except eyedrops can be detected by routine specimen integrity tests (creatinine, pH, temperature, and specific gravity); however, certain adulterants such as Klear, Whizzies, Urine Luck, and Stealth cannot. These adulterants can successfully mask drug testing if the concentrations of certain abused drugs are moderate. Several spot tests have been described to detect the presence of such adulterants in urine. Urine dipsticks are commercially available for detecting the presence of such adulterants, along with performance of tests for creatinine, pH, and specific gravity. Certain hair shampoo and saliva-cleaning mouthwashes are available to escape detection in hair or saliva samples, but the effectiveness of such products in masking drugs-of-abuse testing has not been demonstrated. Ingestion of poppy seed cake may result in positive screening test results for opiates, and hemp oil exposure can cause positive results for marijuana. These would be identified as true-positive results in drugs-of-abuse testing even though they do not represent the actual drug of abuse. PMID:17709324

  15. Ethical aspects of workplace urine screening for drug abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, A R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the ethical and legal implications of the involvement of medical practitioners in workplace screening for drug misuse. CONCLUSIONS: Workplace screening for drugs of abuse raises many ethical issues. If screening is considered as being part of medical practice with the involvement of occupational health physicians, as suggested by the Faculty of Occupational Medicine, then the ethical requirements of a normal medical consultation are fully applicable. The employee's full and informed consent to the process must be obtained and the employee should have an unfettered right of access to all the relevant records and to the urine sample he/she has provided in the event that he/she wishes to challenge the opinion expressed by the physician. If the process is not part of medical practice then employees should have the same rights as they would have if required to provide intimate body samples in the course of a criminal investigation, given the potentially serious consequences of an erroneous positive finding for their livelihood. PMID:9055156

  16. Objective Testing: Urine and Other Drug Tests.

    PubMed

    Hadland, Scott E; Levy, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    Drug testing, when carefully collected and thoughtfully interpreted, offers a critical adjunct to clinical care and substance use treatment. However, because test results can be misleading if not interpreted in the correct clinical context, clinicians should always conduct a careful interview with adolescent patients to understand what testing is likely to show and then use testing to validate or refute their expectations. Because of the ease with which samples can be tampered, providers should also carefully reflect on their own collection protocols and sample validation procedures to ensure optimal accuracy." PMID:27338974

  17. Driving under the influence of drugs -- evaluation of analytical data of drugs in oral fluid, serum and urine, and correlation with impairment symptoms.

    PubMed

    Toennes, Stefan W; Kauert, Gerold F; Steinmeyer, Stefan; Moeller, Manfred R

    2005-09-10

    A study was performed to acquire urine, serum and oral fluid samples in cases of suspected driving under the influence of drugs of abuse. Oral fluid was collected using a novel sampling/testing device (Dräger DrugTest System). The aim of the study was to evaluate oral fluid and urine as a predictor of blood samples positive for drugs and impairment symptoms. Analysis for cannabinoids, amphetamine and its derivatives, opiates and cocaine was performed in urine using the Mahsan Kombi/DOA4-test, in serum using immunoassay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmation and in oral fluid by GC-MS. Police and medical officer observations of impairment symptoms were rated and evaluated using a threshold value for the classification of driving inability. Accuracy in correlating drug detection in oral fluid and serum were >90% for all substances and also >90% in urine and serum except for THC (71.0%). Of the cases with oral fluid positive for any drug 97.1% of corresponding serum samples were also positive for at least one drug; of drug-positive urine samples this were only 82.4%. In 119 of 146 cases, impairment symptoms above threshold were observed (81.5%). Of the cases with drugs detected in serum, 19.1% appeared not impaired which were the same with drug-positive oral fluid while more persons with drug-positive urine samples appeared uninfluenced (32.7%). The data demonstrate that oral fluid is superior to urine in correlating with serum analytical data and impairment symptoms of drivers under the influence of drugs of abuse. PMID:15978340

  18. 49 CFR 40.31 - Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Collection Personnel § 40.31 Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing? (a) Collectors meeting the requirements of this subpart are...

  19. [Uniform analyzes of drugs in urine needed for rule of law].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Therese; Helander, Anders; Beck, Olof; Elmgren, Anders; Kugelberg, Fredrik; Kronstrand, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse testing is used in various areas of society for detection and follow-up of drug use. In routine laboratory drug testing, immunoassays are employed for initial screening of specimens to indicate the presence of drugs. To confirm a positive screening test, a secondary analysis by mass spectrometry is performed. The "cut-off" is the pre-defined concentration threshold of a drug or drug metabolite above which the sample is considered positive. A reading below this level implies a negative test result. Swedish drug testing laboratories currently employ varying cut-offs to distinguish between a positive and a negative test result. Because a positive drug test may have serious legal consequences to the individual, it is of importance that testing is performed and judged equally, regardless of where it is performed. A national harmonization of cut-offs is therefore warranted. Based on data from four major Swedish drug testing laboratories, and considering the recommendations in international guidelines, a proposal for national harmonization of urine cut-offs for the most common set of drugs of abuse is presented. PMID:26393972

  20. Efavirenz does not cause false-positive urine cannabis test in HIV-infected patients on Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Koh, K C; Lee, W Y; Eh, Z W; Nor Julaika, I; Tee, P S; Azizon, O; Thilageswary, M

    2013-06-01

    Efavirenz is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used in combination with other drugs for the treatment of patients with HIV infection. Efavirenz has been reported to cause a positive urine cannabis test reaction which may create problems between HIV-infected patients on Efavirenz and law enforcement agencies. Doctors are at loss whether to issue documents certifying the potential false positive urine cannabis test with Efavirenz to patients. We investigated if the urine of HIV-infected patients on Efavirenz caused a positive urine cannabis test using the AxSYM Cannabinoids Assay®. Urine samples from 51 eligible patients on Efavirenz were tested for cannabis. All tested negative except for one who had used cannabis the day before. Efavirenz does not cause false positive urine cannabis test with the AxSYM Cannabinoids Assay®. Certification documents from doctors are therefore unnecessary. PMID:23749016

  1. Drug Use on Mont Blanc: A Study Using Automated Urine Collection

    PubMed Central

    Robach, Paul; Trebes, Gilles; Lasne, Françoise; Buisson, Corinne; Méchin, Nathalie; Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Roustit, Matthieu; Kérivel, Patricia; Botré, Francesco; Bouzat, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Mont Blanc, the summit of Western Europe, is a popular but demanding high-altitude ascent. Drug use is thought to be widespread among climbers attempting this summit, not only to prevent altitude illnesses, but also to boost physical and/or psychological capacities. This practice may be unsafe in this remote alpine environment. However, robust data on medication during the ascent of Mont Blanc are lacking. Individual urine samples from male climbers using urinals in mountain refuges on access routes to Mont Blanc (Goûter and Cosmiques mountain huts) were blindly and anonymously collected using a hidden automatic sampler. Urine samples were screened for a wide range of drugs, including diuretics, glucocorticoids, stimulants, hypnotics and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors. Out of 430 samples analyzed from both huts, 35.8% contained at least one drug. Diuretics (22.7%) and hypnotics (12.9%) were the most frequently detected drugs, while glucocorticoids (3.5%) and stimulants (3.1%) were less commonly detected. None of the samples contained PDE-5 inhibitors. Two substances were predominant: the diuretic acetazolamide (20.6%) and the hypnotic zolpidem (8.4%). Thirty three samples were found positive for at least two substances, the most frequent combination being acetazolamide and a hypnotic (2.1%). Based on a novel sampling technique, we demonstrate that about one third of the urine samples collected from a random sample of male climbers contained one or several drugs, suggesting frequent drug use amongst climbers ascending Mont Blanc. Our data suggest that medication primarily aims at mitigating the symptoms of altitude illnesses, rather than enhancing performance. In this hazardous environment, the relatively high prevalence of hypnotics must be highlighted, since these molecules may alter vigilance. PMID:27253728

  2. Drug Use on Mont Blanc: A Study Using Automated Urine Collection.

    PubMed

    Robach, Paul; Trebes, Gilles; Lasne, Françoise; Buisson, Corinne; Méchin, Nathalie; Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Roustit, Matthieu; Kérivel, Patricia; Botré, Francesco; Bouzat, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Mont Blanc, the summit of Western Europe, is a popular but demanding high-altitude ascent. Drug use is thought to be widespread among climbers attempting this summit, not only to prevent altitude illnesses, but also to boost physical and/or psychological capacities. This practice may be unsafe in this remote alpine environment. However, robust data on medication during the ascent of Mont Blanc are lacking. Individual urine samples from male climbers using urinals in mountain refuges on access routes to Mont Blanc (Goûter and Cosmiques mountain huts) were blindly and anonymously collected using a hidden automatic sampler. Urine samples were screened for a wide range of drugs, including diuretics, glucocorticoids, stimulants, hypnotics and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors. Out of 430 samples analyzed from both huts, 35.8% contained at least one drug. Diuretics (22.7%) and hypnotics (12.9%) were the most frequently detected drugs, while glucocorticoids (3.5%) and stimulants (3.1%) were less commonly detected. None of the samples contained PDE-5 inhibitors. Two substances were predominant: the diuretic acetazolamide (20.6%) and the hypnotic zolpidem (8.4%). Thirty three samples were found positive for at least two substances, the most frequent combination being acetazolamide and a hypnotic (2.1%). Based on a novel sampling technique, we demonstrate that about one third of the urine samples collected from a random sample of male climbers contained one or several drugs, suggesting frequent drug use amongst climbers ascending Mont Blanc. Our data suggest that medication primarily aims at mitigating the symptoms of altitude illnesses, rather than enhancing performance. In this hazardous environment, the relatively high prevalence of hypnotics must be highlighted, since these molecules may alter vigilance. PMID:27253728

  3. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  4. 49 CFR 40.31 - Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... urine specimens for DOT drug testing? (a) Collectors meeting the requirements of this subpart are the only persons authorized to collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing. (b) A collector must meet... act as the collector when that employee is tested, unless no other collector is available and you...

  5. 49 CFR 40.31 - Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... urine specimens for DOT drug testing? (a) Collectors meeting the requirements of this subpart are the only persons authorized to collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing. (b) A collector must meet... act as the collector when that employee is tested, unless no other collector is available and you...

  6. 49 CFR 40.31 - Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... urine specimens for DOT drug testing? (a) Collectors meeting the requirements of this subpart are the only persons authorized to collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing. (b) A collector must meet... act as the collector when that employee is tested, unless no other collector is available and you...

  7. 49 CFR 40.31 - Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... urine specimens for DOT drug testing? (a) Collectors meeting the requirements of this subpart are the only persons authorized to collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing. (b) A collector must meet... act as the collector when that employee is tested, unless no other collector is available and you...

  8. Effects of pyridinium chlorochromate adulterant (urine luck) on testing for drugs of abuse and a method for quantitative detection of chromium (VI) in urine.

    PubMed

    Paul, B D; Martin, K K; Maguilo, J; Smith, M L

    2000-01-01

    Pyridinium chlorochromate (PCC) as an adulterant is popular for concealing drug-positive results. When 11-nor-delta9-THC-9-carboxylic acid (THC-acid) in urine was treated with 2 mmol/L of PCC (Cr6+ 104 microg/mL), 58-100% of the THC-acid was lost. The loss increased with decreasing pH and increasing reaction time (0-3 days). Free codeine and free morphine remained unaffected by PCC at pH within the physiological range of the urine (pH 5-7). At lower pH, the loss of free morphine varied from 0 to 100%. Amphetamine, methamphetamine, benzoylecgonine, and PCP remained unaffected by PCC when exposed to the oxidant for three days in urine pH of 3-7. Chromium (VI) from PCC in a urine solution was detected by a color reaction with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC). When the reagent was added to the urine, an immediate red-violet color appeared. The chromium-DPC complex showed a characteristic absorption peak at wavelength 544 nm with a shoulder at wavelength 575 nm. The ratio of absorption was used to identify the chromium compound. The concentration of chromium (VI) was determined by measuring absorption at wavelength 544 nm and was linear over 0.5-20 microg/mL. The limit of detection of the procedure was 0.37 microg/mL. PMID:10872568

  9. Hair and urine testing to assess drugs of abuse consumption in couples undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART).

    PubMed

    Pichini, Simona; De Luca, Roberto; Pellegrini, Manuela; Marchei, Emilia; Rotolo, Maria Concetta; Spoletini, Roberta; D'Aloja, Paola; Pacifici, Roberta; Mortali, Claudia; Scaravelli, Giulia

    2012-05-10

    For the first time in Europe hair and urine testing have been applied to assess drugs of abuse consumption in couples undergoing assisted reproductive technology and the eventual association of toxic habits with other lifestyle, health status and sociodemographic factors was also investigated. Couples attending five assisted reproduction centers in Rome were invited to join the study. When they presented at the Centre for the visit, they were asked to answer a structured questionnaire concerning sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits, and at the same time to provide hair and urine samples. Hair and urine testing for drugs of abuse, urinary profile of principal endogenous steroids involved in fertility process (testosterone, epitestosterone, androsterone, etiocholanolone and dehydroepiandrosterone) and of alcohol and tobacco smoke biomarkers were performed with validated methodologies. Of the 594 enrolled individuals (297 couples), 352 (164 couples and 24 single individuals from the couple) completed the questionnaire and gave both hair and urine samples, apart from 3 bald men, who only gave urine samples. Urine testing showed an overall 4.8% (17 individuals) positivity to drugs of abuse: 4.2% to cannabinoids, 1.4% to cocaine and 0.85% to both drugs. Results of 4cm segment hair samples testing matched those from urine samples. Thus, taking together, results of urine and hair testing confirmed repeated use of cannabis, cocaine and both drugs in 3.7, 0.85 and 0.57% examined individuals, respectively. Drug consumers were in a statistically higher percentage active smokers and alcohol drinkers, less prone to physical activity and with a trend towards higher weight than non consumers. Finally, repeated drug consumption was associated with significant lower concentration of urinary testosterone in males and of urinary dehydroepiandrosterone in females. The findings of the present study confirm the suitability of urine testing to disclose recent drugs of

  10. Concentration distribution of the marijuana metabolite Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid and the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine in the department of defense urine drug-testing program.

    PubMed

    Jemionek, John F; Copley, Curtis L; Smith, Michael L; Past, Marilyn R

    2008-01-01

    Urine drug testing has been employed for punitive purposes by the Department of Defense since December 1981 (Memorandum 62884, Deputy Secretary of Defense Frank C. Carlucci). Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs were initiated in response to Executive Order 12564 issued on September 15, 1986, that required Drug-Free Federal Workplaces be established. In their respective programs, a positive urine drug test may be referred to a military court martial or to an administrative board. To address safety and insurance requirements, the testing of civilians has expanded beyond Federal Programs to include pre-employment and post-accident urine drug testing. During adjudication, an Expert Toxicologist may be asked to opine what can be discerned from the concentration of drug or drug metabolite found in the urine. Little can be opined with certainty from a positive urine drug test as to the amount of drug ingested, when the drug was ingested, and in most instances, whether the individual felt the effects of the drug, or was under the influence of the drug found in the urine. What may be useful to both the Expert and to the Trier-of-Facts is the frequency that a particular urine drug concentration is encountered in positive drug tests. The finding that 50% of all positive marijuana and cocaine urine metabolite concentrations in the military testing program over the three-year period of October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2007, are below a median value of 65 and 968 ng/mL, respectively, provide reference points. A median drug concentration combined with the percentile or frequency that a particular urine drug concentration occurs may provide evaluative information for a determination of the facts and the outcome of judicial or administrative proceedings. This may be especially useful to jurors when the concentration of marijuana or cocaine metabolite is perceptibly low. The information would also be applicable to medical review officers, medical examiners, drug treatment

  11. Biochip array technology immunoassay performance and quantitative confirmation of designer piperazines for urine workplace drug testing.

    PubMed

    Castaneto, Marisol S; Barnes, Allan J; Concheiro, Marta; Klette, Kevin L; Martin, Thomas A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-06-01

    detection in urine. In chemiluminescent immunoassay, the labeled-drug (antigen) competes with the drug in the urine. In the absence of drug, the labeled-drug binds to the antibody releasing an enzyme (horseradish peroxidase) to react with the substrate and producing chemiluminescence. The higher the drug concentration in urine, the weaker the chemiluminescent signal is produced. All presumptive positive specimens and randomly selected presumptive negative specimens were analyzed and confirmed by a liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry with limit of quantification of 2.5 or 5 μg/L. PMID:25903022

  12. A computerised real-time measurement system to locate the position of the urine stream in designing urine collection devices for women.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Macaulay, M C; Jowitt, F A; Clarke-O'Neill, S R; Fader, M J; van den Heuvel, E A; Cottenden, A M

    2008-05-01

    A computerised real-time measurement system has been developed and tested for locating the position of the urine stream into a handheld urinal and onto a body-worn pad using arrays of resistive or optical sensors. Experimental data indicates that urine streams were usually scattered over quite a large cross-sectional area (typically 30mm in the anterior/posterior direction) at the point of entry into handheld urinals. However, a correctly placed aperture of length 90mm would have successfully received all the urine from the total of 36 clinical experiments run with seven women. Similarly, experiments to determine the initial position of the urine stream onto body-worn pads indicated that a target area of length 120mm would have received the initial stream of urine from all 54 clinical experiments with 18 women. These data have been used to help with the design of a handheld urinal and a body-worn urine collection interface (the latter using the body-worn pad data) to be used in two variants of a new urine collection device for women (NICMS). Although both resistive and optical sensors provided useful data, the reliability of optical sensors was often compromised by droplets of urine splashing onto light sources or detectors. Future work should focus on protecting them from splashing. PMID:17643336

  13. Trends in occurrence of drugs of abuse in blood and urine of arrested drivers and drug traffickers in the border region of Aachen.

    PubMed

    Schiwy-Bochat, K H; Bogusz, M; Vega, J A; Althoff, H

    1995-01-21

    The region of Aachen is located in a triangle on the German, Dutch and Belgian borders and is heavily exposed to drug traffic, due to the differences in national drug policies. The analysis of toxicological casework in the Institute of Forensic Medicine in Aachen was undertaken for the period 1987-1993, i.e. 6 years before and 1 year after the partial suspension of the border control due to the Maastricht Treaty; 2653 cases were registered, among them 988 automobile drivers. The profile of the casework has changed after the opening of the border: up to 1992 most cases were obtained from the customs. In 1993 the prevalence of police samples was noticed. In the population of drivers, blood samples were only taken in 30% of all the cases. In other cases, concerning mainly motorized drug smugglers, only urine samples or seized drugs have been sent for examination. The urine samples in this group were mostly drug-positive. Drug-smuggling drivers appeared to be a risk-generating group for road traffic safety. The analyses of blood and urine samples revealed multiple drug use in most of the cases. Since 1992, a steep increase in the frequency of cocaine-positive blood samples among drivers was noticed. The results of the study indicate that the abolition of the border control affected the road traffic safety in the region of Aachen. PMID:7875616

  14. Evaluation of Postmortem Drug Concentrations in Bile Compared with Blood and Urine in Forensic Autopsy Cases.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Mariko; Michiue, Tomomi; Oritani, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    For drug screening and pharmaco-/toxicokinetic analysis, bile as a major drug excretion route in addition to urine may be used in forensic autopsy cases; however, there are limited published data on correlations between bile and blood or urine drug concentrations. The present study retrospectively investigated drug concentrations in bile, compared with blood and urine concentrations, reviewing forensic autopsy cases during 6 years (January 2009-December 2014). Drugs were analyzed using automated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following solid-liquid phase extraction. Compared with peripheral blood concentrations, bile concentrations were higher for most drugs; however, caffeine concentrations were similar. Bile concentrations were mostly lower than urine concentrations for amphetamines, caffeine and methylephedrine, but were usually similar to or higher for other drugs. Significant correlations were detected between bile and peripheral blood concentrations for amphetamines, several cold remedies, phenobarbital, phenothiazine derivatives and diazepam, as well as between bile and urine concentrations for amphetamines, caffeine, diphenhydramine, phenobarbital and promethazine derivatives. These findings suggest that bile can provide supplemental data useful in routine forensic toxicology, for the spectrum of drugs mentioned above, as well as for investigating pharmaco-/toxicokinetics and postmortem redistribution when analyzed in combination with drug concentrations at other sites. PMID:27185819

  15. Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse Could your kids be at risk for substance ... drugs. Research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has shown the important role that parents ...

  16. The outcome of urine culture positive and culture negative staghorn calculi after minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Wan, Shaw P; Liu, Yongda; Zeng, Guohua; Yuan, Jian

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the treatment outcomes of staghorn stones using minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MPCNL) in patients who had positive preoperative urine culture to patients with negative urine culture. The records of 284 patients with staghorn calculi, who underwent MPCNL in our center from January 2012 to January 2013, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into positive and negative group, according to the result of preoperative urine culture. Staghorn stones with negative culture received a single dose of broad spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis, whereas stones with positive culture were treated for at least 72 h according to antibiogram. The perioperative findings and postoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. There were 70 (24.6%) patients with positive and 214 (75.4%) patients with negative preoperative urine culture who underwent MPCNL. There were no statistical differences in the duration of hospital stay, operative time, estimated blood loss, final stone free rate (SFR) as well as the incidence of the following infectious complications such as fever, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and septic shock, between both groups. Our retrospective study showed that MPCNL was a safe and effective modality in the treatment of staghorn stones. The morbidity, complication, and SFR were similar between patients with positive and negative preoperative urine cultures, once the culture positive infections were adequately controlled. PMID:24531817

  17. Concordance Between Self-Report and Urine Drug Screen Data in Adolescent Opioid Dependent Clinical Trial Participants

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Claire E; Bogenschutz, Michael P; Nakazawa, Masato; Woody, George

    2013-01-01

    Objective measures of drug use are very important in treatment outcome studies of persons with substance use disorders, but obtaining and interpreting them can be challenging and not always practical. Thus, it is important to determine if, and when, drug-use self-reports are valid. To this end we explored the relationships between urine drug screen results and self-reported substance use among adolescents and young adults with opioid dependence participating in a clinical trial of buprenorphine-naloxone. In this study, 152 individuals seeking treatment for opioid dependence were randomized to a 2-week detoxification with buprenorphine-naloxone (DETOX) or 12 weeks buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP), each with weekly individual and group drug counseling. Urine drug screens and self-reported frequency of drug use were obtained weekly, and patients were paid $5 for completing weekly assessments. At weeks 4, 8, and 12, more extensive assessments were done, and participants were reimbursed $75. Self-report data were dichotomized (positive vs. negative), and for each major drug class we computed the kappa statistic and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of self-report using urine drug screens as the “gold standard”. Generalized linear mixed models were used to explore the effect of treatment group assignment, compensation amounts, and participant characteristics on self-report. In general, findings supported the validity of self-reported drug use. However, those in the BUP group were more likely to under-report cocaine and opioid use. Therefore, if used alone, self-report would have magnified the treatment effect of the BUP condition. PMID:23811060

  18. Concordance between self-report and urine drug screen data in adolescent opioid dependent clinical trial participants.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Claire E; Bogenschutz, Michael P; Nakazawa, Masato; Woody, George

    2013-10-01

    Objective measures of drug use are very important in treatment outcome studies of persons with substance use disorders, but obtaining and interpreting them can be challenging and not always practical. Thus, it is important to determine if, and when, drug-use self-reports are valid. To this end we explored the relationships between urine drug screen results and self-reported substance use among adolescents and young adults with opioid dependence participating in a clinical trial of buprenorphine-naloxone. In this study, 152 individuals seeking treatment for opioid dependence were randomized to a 2-week detoxification with buprenorphine-naloxone (DETOX) or 12weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP), each with weekly individual and group drug counseling. Urine drug screens and self-reported frequency of drug use were obtained weekly, and patients were paid $5 for completing weekly assessments. At weeks 4, 8, and 12, more extensive assessments were done, and participants were reimbursed $75. Self-report data were dichotomized (positive vs. negative), and for each major drug class we computed the kappa statistic and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of self-report using urine drug screens as the "gold standard". Generalized linear mixed models were used to explore the effect of treatment group assignment, compensation amounts, and participant characteristics on self-report. In general, findings supported the validity of self-reported drug use. However, those in the BUP group were more likely to under-report cocaine and opioid use. Therefore, if used alone, self-report would have magnified the treatment effect of the BUP condition. PMID:23811060

  19. Occurrence of ethanol and other drugs in blood and urine specimens from female victims of alleged sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan Wayne; Kugelberg, Fredrik C; Holmgren, Anita; Ahlner, Johan

    2008-10-25

    Results of toxicological analysis of blood and urine specimens from 1806 female victims of alleged non-consensual sexual activity are reported. After making contact with the police authorities, the victims were examined by a physician for injuries and biological specimens were taken for forensic toxicology and other purposes (e.g. DNA). Urine if available or otherwise on an aliquot of blood after protein precipitation was screened for the presence of drugs by enzyme immunoassay methods (EMIT/CEDIA). All positive results from screening were verified by more specific methods, involving isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for illicit drugs. A large number of prescription drugs were analyzed in blood by capillary column gas chromatography with a nitrogen-phosphorous (N-P) detector. Ethanol was determined in blood and urine by headspace gas chromatography and concentrations less than 0.1g/L were reported as negative. The number of reported cases of alleged sexual assault was highest during the warmer summer months and the mean age of victims was 24 years (median 20 years), with approximately 60% being between 15 and 25 years. In 559 cases (31%) ethanol and drugs were negative. In 772 cases (43% of total) ethanol was the only drug identified in blood or urine. In 215 cases (12%) ethanol occurred together with at least one other drug. The mean, median and highest concentrations of ethanol in blood (N=806) were 1.24 g/L, 1.19 g/L and 3.7 g/L, respectively. The age of victims and their blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) were positively correlated (r=0.365, p<0.001). Because BAC decreases at a rate of 0.10-0.25 g/(Lh), owing to metabolism the concentration in blood at time of sampling is often appreciably less than when the crime was committed several hours earlier. Licit or illicit drugs were identified in blood or urine in N=262 cases (15%). Amphetamine and tetrahydrocannabinol were the most common illicit drugs at mean (median) concentrations in

  20. Effectiveness of saliva and fingerprints as alternative specimens to urine and blood in forensic drug testing.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    In forensic drug testing, it is important to immediately take biological specimens from suspects and victims to prove their drug intake. We evaluated the effectiveness of saliva and fingerprints as alternative specimens to urine and blood in terms of ease of sampling, drug detection sensitivity, and drug detection periods for each specimen type. After four commercially available pharmaceutical products were administered to healthy subjects, each in a single dose, their urine, blood, saliva, and fingerprints were taken at predetermined sampling times over approximately four weeks. Fourteen analytes (the administered drugs and their main metabolites) were extracted from each specimen using simple pretreatments, such as dilution and deproteinization, and were analyzed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Most of the analytes were detected in saliva and fingerprints, as well as in urine and blood. The time-courses of drug concentrations were similar between urine and fingerprints, and between blood and saliva. Compared to the other compounds, the acidic compounds, for example ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid, were more difficult to detect in all specimens. Acetaminophen, dihydrocodeine, and methylephedrine were detected in fingerprints at later sampling times than in urine. However, a relationship between the drug structures and their detection periods in each specimen was not found. Saliva and fingerprints could be easily sampled on site without using special techniques or facilities. In addition, fingerprints could be immediately analyzed after simple and rapid treatment. In cases where it would be difficult to immediately obtain urine and blood, saliva and fingerprints could be effective alternative specimens for drug testing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26074137

  1. Detection times of drugs of abuse in blood, urine, and oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Alain G

    2004-04-01

    Data on the detection times of drugs of abuse are based on studies of controlled administration to volunteers or on the analysis of biologic samples of subjects who are forced to stop their (often chronic) use of drugs of abuse, eg, because of imprisonment or detoxification. The detection times depend mainly on the dose and sensitivity of the method used and also on the preparation and route of administration, the duration of use (acute or chronic), the matrix that is analyzed, the molecule or metabolite that is looked for, the pH and concentration of the matrix (urine, oral fluid), and the interindividual variation in metabolic and renal clearance. In general, the detection time is longest in hair, followed by urine, sweat, oral fluid, and blood. In blood or plasma, most drugs of abuse can be detected at the low nanogram per milliliter level for 1 or 2 days. In urine the detection time of a single dose is 1.5 to 4 days. In chronic users, drugs of abuse can be detected in urine for approximately 1 week after last use, and in extreme cases even longer in cocaine and cannabis users. In oral fluid, drugs of abuse can be detected for 5-48 hours at a low nanogram per milliliter level. The duration of detection of GHB is much shorter. After a single dose of 1 or 2 ng of flunitrazepam, the most sensitive methods can detect 7-aminoflunitrazepam for up to 4 weeks in urine. PMID:15228165

  2. Liquid-phase microextraction and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for identification and quantification of basic drugs in human urine.

    PubMed

    Thunig, Janina; Flø, Linda; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Janfelt, Christian

    2012-01-30

    Hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) were evaluated for the identification and quantification of basic drugs in human urine samples. The selective extraction capabilities of three-phase LPME provided a significant reduction in the matrix effects otherwise observed in direct DESI-MS analysis of urine samples. Aqueous LPME extracts (in 10 mM HCl) were deposited on porous Teflon, dried at room temperature, and the dried spots were then analyzed directly with DESI-MS in full scan mode. Pethidine, diphenhydramine, nortriptyline, and methadone were used as model compounds for identification, and their limits of identification were determined to be 100, 25, 100, and 30 ng/mL, respectively. In a reliability test with 19 spiked urine samples, 100% of the positive samples containing the model drugs in concentrations at or above the limit of identification were identified. Diphenhydramine was used as a model compound for quantitative analysis with diphenhydramine-d(5) as an internal standard. The calibration curve was linear in the range 50-2000 ng/mL (R(2) = 0.992) with a limit of quantification at approximately 140 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were <9.5%. In a reliability test with six spiked urine samples, deviations between the measured and the true values for diphenhydramine were in the range 0.2-22.9%. PMID:22173801

  3. The clinical significance of dipstick-negative, culture-positive urines in a veterans population.

    PubMed

    Gutman, S I; Solomon, R R

    1987-08-01

    The consequences of omitting cultures in dipstick-negative urines submitted to the authors' microbiology laboratory were evaluated retrospectively in 1,079 clean-catch midstream samples. Using positive dipstick readings for leukocyte esterase, nitrite, and/or protein as evidence of a positive screen, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for specimens containing more than or 10(3) CFUs/mL (10(6)/L) were 80%, 71%, 48%, and 91%, respectively. Clinical data were reviewed in 38 patients with one or more dipstick-negative, culture-positive urines. Most of these patients lacked clinical or other laboratory evidence suggesting urinary tract infection. Problems with specimen collection were suspected in 19 neurologically compromised patients. Only two patients with dipstick-negative urines received treatment based on the culture reports. Symptoms persisted in both. The authors conclude that in their predominantly male veteran population, clinically significant bacteriuria is an unlikely finding in a dipstick-negative urine. PMID:3618553

  4. Positive reinforcement methods to train chimpanzees to cooperate with urine collection.

    PubMed

    Bloomsmith, Mollie; Neu, Kim; Franklin, Andrea; Griffis, Caroline; McMillan, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Positive reinforcement training can be used in many ways to enhance the welfare of captive primates. Training for biologic sample collection is one application of positive reinforcement training. In this study, 35 adult female chimpanzees were trained to cooperate with the collection of urine samples needed to facilitate a research study. A median of 35 training sessions was required for the subjects to reach reliable performance (4 of 5 sequential attempts successful) of the urine collection behavior. Adult age had no effect on the speed of learning as indicated by a rank order correlation. Individual differences in the rate of learning were pronounced but did not vary with the age of the chimpanzees. Approximately 2 y after the initial training, and with continual sample collection taking place twice weekly, we assessed the reliability of their performance and found that the chimpanzees cooperated 100% of the time and that collection of a urine sample required about 5 min. Positive reinforcement training can markedly reduce staff time, particularly for studies such as this that require frequent biologic sample collection over long durations. Similar approaches could be used to train other laboratory primates to cooperate with urine collection procedures. Animal training programs that emphasize positive reinforcement training are an important refinement in the care of laboratory primates. PMID:25651093

  5. Incidence and predictors of screen failures due to positive urine tests for alcohol, drugs of abuse, and cotinine among normal healthy research volunteers (NHRVs): analysis of data from 687 NHRVs screened at a large clinical pharmacology unit in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nada, Adel; Baxter, Shawn; Loraas, Erik; Somberg, John C

    2008-01-01

    Accurate medical histories for all NHRVs screening to participate in clinical pharmacology trials are vital to ensure volunteers' safety, and integrity of study results. Evidence from previous studies illustrate the potential for NHRVs to misrepresent their histories, especially when monetary incentives are offered, and the need to objectively verify these self-reported histories whenever practical. This study demonstrates that among the sample participants, all of whom self-reported a negative history of drug and alcohol abuse and tobacco smoking, 16% failed urine testing for either alcohol and drugs of abuse (6%), or cotinine (11%). Male sex and increased number of screenings in the preceding 12 months were significantly associated with increased odds for urine screen failure whereas increased enrollments in the same time period and increased study stipend decreased the same odds. These results emphasize the importance of diligently screening NHRVs participating in phase I clinical trails. PMID:18496258

  6. Urine drug testing of chronic pain patients. III. Normetabolites as biomarkers of synthetic opioid use.

    PubMed

    Depriest, Anne; Heltsley, Rebecca; Black, David L; Cawthon, Beverly; Robert, Tim; Moser, Frank; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

    2010-10-01

    Opioids are important therapeutic agents available to patients with moderate to severe pain. The synthetic opioids, buprenorphine, fentanyl, meperidine, methadone, and propoxyphene have been utilized for decades as analgesics. One of the major biotransformation pathways of these drugs occurs through N-demethylation leading to the formation and excretion of normetabolites. Normetabolites generally exhibit longer half-lives than the parent drug leading to accumulation with prolonged use. As part of continuing research efforts to improve monitoring programs of chronic pain patients undergoing opioid treatment, we evaluated the prevalence and relative abundance of normetabolites of buprenorphine, fentanyl, meperidine, methadone, and propoxyphene in patients? urine specimens. Selected sets of specimens were analyzed without prior immunoassay screening by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for buprenorphine, fentanyl, meperidine, methadone, propoxyphene, and their respective normetabolites. Limits of quantitation (LOQ) were as follows: buprenorphine, 1 ng/mL; fentanyl, 0.5 ng/mL; meperidine, 50 ng/mL; methadone, 50 ng/mL; and propoxyphene, 50 ng/mL. LOQs for normetabolites were equal to the parent drug with the exception of norbuprenorphine (2.5 ng/mL). The percentage of positive specimens that contained normetabolite (only) ranged from 8.0% for EDDP (2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine) to 53.1% for norpropoxyphene. Inclusion of the five normetabolites in the test panel produced an increase in detection rates for parent drug use as follows: buprenorphine, 10.0%; fentanyl, 42.1%; meperidine, 98.7%; methadone, 8.7%; and propoxyphene, 113.2%. The authors conclude that testing for synthetic opioid normetabolites enhances the effectiveness of monitoring programs for pain patients. PMID:21819788

  7. Usefulness of roadside urine drug screening in drivers suspected of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID).

    PubMed

    Raes, Elke; Verstraete, Alain G

    2005-10-01

    In Belgium, the driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) procedure consists of three steps: observation of external signs of drug consumption by a police officer; an on-site urine test for amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, and opiates; and blood sampling by a physician for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The driver is sanctioned if THC is greater than 2 ng/mL, morphine is greater than 20 ng/mL, or amphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methylenedioxyethylamphetamine, N-methyl-1-(3.4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-butanamine, cocaine, or benzoylecgonine are greater than 50 ng/mL in plasma. We analyzed the results of 450 blood samples taken from May 2000 to February 2005. Cannabis was most often found above the cut-off (73.5% of the cases), followed by MDMA (20.4%), amphetamine (19.8%), benzoylecgonine (17.9%), cocaine (6.9%), and morphine (2.7%). One drug was found in 72.0% of the cases, two drugs in 22.6%, three drugs in 5.2%, and four drugs in 0.25%. In 10.7% of the plasma samples no target drugs were found above the legal cut-off. This percentage was 8.4% when urine was obtained and tested on-site and 21.2% when no urine was obtained (chi2 = 8.574, P = 0.0034). In 64.6% of these samples, a target drug (THC in 74.2%) was found under the legal cut-off. These data indicate that roadside urine testing significantly decreases the number of unnecessary blood analyses in DUID. PMID:16419392

  8. Validation of the Only Commercially Available Immunoassay for Synthetic Cathinones in Urine: Randox Drugs of Abuse V Biochip Array Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ellefsen, Kayla N.; Anizan, Sébastien; Castaneto, Marisol S.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Martin, LTC Thomas M.; Klette, CAPT Kevin L.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Deterrence of synthetic cathinone abuse is hampered by the lack of a high-throughput immunoassay screen. The Randox Drugs of Abuse V biochip immunoassay (DOA-V) contains two synthetic cathinones antibodies: Bath Salt I (BSI) targets mephedrone/methcathinone and Bath Salt II (BSII) targets 3’,4’-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV)/3’,4’-methylenedioxy-α-pyrrolidinobutiophenone (MDPBP). We evaluated DOA-V synthetic cathinones performance and conducted a full validation on the original assay with calibrators reconstituted in water, and the new assay with calibrators prepared in lyophilized urine; both utilized the same antibodies and were run on the fully automated Evidence® Analyzer. 20,017 authentic military urine specimens were screened and confirmed by LC-MS/MS for 28 synthetic cathinones. Limits of detection (LOD) for the original and new assays were 0.35 and 0.18 (BSI), and 8.5 and 9.2µg/L (BSII), respectively. Linearity was acceptable (R2>0.98); however, a large negative bias was observed with in-house prepared calibrators. Intra-assay imprecision was <20% BSI-II, while inter-assay imprecision was 18–42% BSI and <22% BSII. Precision was acceptable for Randox controls. Cross-reactivities of many additional synthetic cathinones were determined. Authentic drug-free negative urine pH <4 produced false positive results for BSI (6.3µg/L) and BSII (473µg/L). Oxidizing agents reduced BSI and increased BSII results. Sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of 100%, 52.1%, and 53.0% were obtained at manufacturer’s proposed cutoffs (BSI 5µg/L, BSII 30µg/L). Performance improved if cutoff concentrations increased (BSI 7.5µg/L, BSII 40µg/L); however, there were limited confirmed positive specimens. Currently, this is the first and only fully validated immunoassay for preliminary detection of synthetic cathinones in urine. PMID:24659527

  9. Analysis of illicit drugs in human urine by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with on-column fast scanning polychrome absorption detection.

    PubMed

    Wernly, P; Thormann, W

    1991-12-15

    Using micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) with a borate/phosphate buffer containing 75 mM SDS (pH 9.1), common drugs of abuse and/or their metabolites, including opioids, benzoylecgonine, amphetamines, and methaqualone, can easily be analyzed. After solid-phase extraction of 5 mL of urine, drug concentrations down to about 100 ng/mL can be unambiguously monitored with on-column multiwavelength detection. Peak assignment is achieved through comparison of retention times and absorption spectra of eluting peaks with those of computer-stored model runs. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated with data obtained from different patient urines which tested positively for one or several drugs using nonisotopic immunoassays. Results suggest that MECC of illicit drugs is a highly specific and sensitive instrumental approach suitable for confirmation testing following a positive response of a toxicological screening procedure. PMID:1789451

  10. Methotrimeprazine-induced corneal deposits and cataract revealed by urine drug profiling test.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Taeck; Koh, Jae Woong; Kim, Joon Mo; Kim, Won Young; Choi, Gwang Ju

    2010-11-01

    Two schizophrenic patients who had been taking medication for a long period presented with visual disturbance of 6-month duration. Slit-lamp examination revealed fine, discrete, and brownish deposits on the posterior cornea. In addition, bilateral star-shaped anterior subcapsular lens opacities, which were dense, dust-like granular deposits, were noted. Although we strongly suspected that the patient might have taken one of the drugs of the phenothiazine family, we were unable to obtain a history of medications other than haloperidol and risperidone, which were taken for 3 yr. We performed a drug profiling test using urine samples and detected methotrimeprazine. The patient underwent surgery for anterior subcapsular lens opacities. Visual acuity improved in both eyes, but the corneal deposits remained. We report an unusual case of methotrimeprazine-induced corneal deposits and cataract in a patient with psychosis, identified by using the urine drug profiling test. PMID:21060765

  11. Portable kit for identification and detection of drugs in human urine using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenzhen; Liu, Honglin; Meng, Juan; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jing; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-09-15

    A portable kit was demonstrated for rapid and reliable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of drugs in human urine. This kit contains two sealed reagent tubes, a packet of standardized SERS substrates, and a mini Raman device. A 3 min pretreatment for separating amphetamines from human urine was developed with an extraction rate of >80% examined by ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Simultaneously, highly reproducible two-dimensional (2D) gold nanorod (GNR) arrays were assembled by the use of methoxymercaptopoly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG-SH) capping. Thirty batches of GNR arrays produced the 1001 cm(-1) intensity of methamphetamine (MA) molecules with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 7.9%, and a 21 × 21 μm(2) area mapping on a 2D GNR array produced a statistical RSD of <10%, implying an excellent reproducibility and uniformity. The detection limit of amphetamines in human urine was at least 0.1 ppm. Moreover, the portable kit was successfully used for detecting MA, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and methcathinone (MC) in 30 volunteers' urine samples with various clinical natures, and the dual-analyte detection of MA and MDMA implied a good capability of multiplex analysis. UPLC examination and the SERS recovery test clearly indicated that our pretreatment procedure was sufficient to lower the high background signals caused by complex components in urine and demonstrated the practicability and the resistance to false positives, which is a vital problem for law enforcement applications. The excellent performance of our portable kit promises a great prospective toward a rapid, reliable, and on-spot analyzer, especially for public safety and healthcare. PMID:26305415

  12. Rate of positive urine culture and double–J catheters colonization on the basis of microorganism DNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Szymkowiak, Sylwia; Madej, Adam; Blewniewski, Mariusz; Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Bryś, Magdalena; Lipiński, Marek; Różański, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the trial was to estimate the relationship between colonization of the Double–J catheter, and the microorganisms cultured from urine. Material and methods 60 patients, who had Double–J catheters inserted, participated in the study. All the subjects had their midstream urine samples taken prior to the stent insertion and removal. A negative urine culture before catheterization was mandatory to participate in the study. The patients were assigned into three subgroups, according to stenting duration: 1) 20 to 30 days (18 cases); 2) 30 to 90 days (30 cases); 3) longer than 90 days (12 cases). Bacterial and fungal DNA was identified using electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel with a denaturing gradient (PCR–DGGE). The relationship between the genetic analysis of the catheter and the urine culture was estimated. Results Urine cultures were positive in only 8 patients, while Double–J catheter analyses were positive in all cases. In 2 cases one type of microorganism was isolated from the stent surface while the remaining 58 catheters were colonized by more than one pathogen. In three cases fungi were isolated. There were only three types of pathogens cultured from urine specimens. Urine and stent cultures were consistent in 5 cases. In 3 cases urine culture and stent analysis were not consistent. Conclusions Double–J catheter retention in the urinary tract is associated with an extremely high risk of bacterial colonization, while the risk of urine infection is about 8–fold lower. There is a great inconsistency between urine infection and catheter colonization, indicating a low predictive value of urine culture for estimating stent colonization. PMID:24982789

  13. 49 CFR 40.193 - What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... sufficient amount of urine for a drug test? 40.193 Section 40.193 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... § 40.193 What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test... sufficient amount of urine to permit a drug test (i.e., 45 mL of urine). (b) As the collector, you must...

  14. 49 CFR 40.193 - What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... sufficient amount of urine for a drug test? 40.193 Section 40.193 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... § 40.193 What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test... sufficient amount of urine to permit a drug test (i.e., 45 mL of urine). (b) As the collector, you must...

  15. 49 CFR 40.193 - What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sufficient amount of urine for a drug test? 40.193 Section 40.193 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... § 40.193 What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test... sufficient amount of urine to permit a drug test (i.e., 45 mL of urine). (b) As the collector, you must...

  16. 49 CFR 40.193 - What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... sufficient amount of urine for a drug test? 40.193 Section 40.193 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... § 40.193 What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test... sufficient amount of urine to permit a drug test (i.e., 45 mL of urine). (b) As the collector, you must...

  17. Positive predictive values of abused drug immunoassays on the Beckman Synchron in a veteran population.

    PubMed

    Dietzen, D J; Ecos, K; Friedman, D; Beason, S

    2001-04-01

    The pressure to reduce the cost of analytic testing makes it tempting to discontinue routine confirmation of urine specimens positive for drugs of abuse by immunoassay. Beyond the economic motivation, the requirement for confirmation should be driven by the positive predictive value of the screening tests. We have quantitated positive predictive values of our screening immunoassays in a large metropolitan Veterans Affairs Medical Center. We reviewed the confirmatory rate of urine specimens positive for drugs of abuse with Beckman Synchron reagents from June 1998 to June 1999 and tabulated the false-positive screening rate. There were 175 instances of false-positive screens during the 13 months we analyzed. Positive predictive values ranged from 0% (amphetamine) to 100% (THC). We determined that the low positive predictive value of the amphetamine assay in our laboratory was primarily due to the use of ranitidine (Zantac). Urine specimens containing greater than 43 microg/mL ranitidine were positive in our amphetamine assay. This concentration is routinely exceeded in our patients taking ranitidine. In our clinical and analytic setting, the Beckman THC assay did not require confirmation. The positive predictive values of the Beckman opiate, cocaine, barbiturate, propoxyphene, and methadone immunoassays dictate routine confirmatory testing in specimens that screen positive for these substances. Finally, because of its extreme sensitivity to ranitidine, the Beckman amphetamine assay has little utility in our laboratory setting. PMID:11327349

  18. A validated SPME-GC-MS method for simultaneous quantification of club drugs in human urine.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stacy D; Rhodes, Daniel J; Pritchard, Boyd J

    2007-09-13

    A solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (SPME-GC-MS) method has been developed and validated for measuring four club drugs in human urine. These drugs include gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), ketamine (KET), methamphetamine (MAMP), and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). These drugs are referred to as 'club drugs' because of their prevalence at parties and raves. Deuterium labeled internal standards for each of the four drugs was included in the assay to aid in quantitation. The drugs were spiked into human urine and derivatized using pyridine and hexylchloroformate to make them suitable for GC-MS analysis. The SPME conditions of extraction time/temperature and desorption time/temperature were optimized to yield the highest peak area for each of the four drugs. The final SPME parameters included a 90 degrees C extraction for 20min with a 1min desorption in the GC injector at 225 degrees C using a splitless injection. All SPME work was done using a 100microm PDMS fiber by Supelco. The ratio of pyridine to hexylchloroformate for derivatization was also optimized. The GC separation was carried out on a VF-5ht column by Varian (30m, 0.25mm i.d., 0.10microm film thickness) using a temperature program of 150-270 degrees C at 10 degrees C/min. The instrument used was a ThermoFinnigan Trace GC-Polaris Q interfaced with a LEAP CombiPal autosampler. The data was collected by using extracted ion chromatograms of marker m/z values for each drug from the total ion chromatograms (TIC) (full scan mode). Calibration curves with R(2)>0.99 were generated each day using the peak area ratios (peak area drug/peak area internal standard) versus concentration. The validated method resulted in intra-day and inter-day precision (% R.S.D.) of less than 15% and a % error of less than 15% for four concentrations in the range of 0.05-20microg/mL (MAMP) and 0.10-20microg/mL (GHB, KET, and MDMA). This method has the advantage of an easy sample preparation with

  19. A qualitative/quantitative approach for the detection of 37 tryptamine-derived designer drugs, 5 β-carbolines, ibogaine, and yohimbine in human urine and plasma using standard urine screening and multi-analyte approaches.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Markus R; Caspar, Achim; Brandt, Simon D; Maurer, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    The first synthetic tryptamines have entered the designer drug market in the late 1990s and were distributed as psychedelic recreational drugs. In the meantime, several analogs have been brought onto the market indicating a growing interest in this drug class. So far, only scarce analytical data were available on the detectability of tryptamines in human biosamples. Therefore, the aim of the presented study was the development and full validation of a method for their detection in human urine and plasma and their quantification in human plasma. The liquid chromatography-linear ion trap mass spectrometry method presented covered 37 tryptamines as well as five β-carbolines, ibogaine, and yohimbine. Compounds were analyzed after protein precipitation of urine or fast liquid-liquid extraction of plasma using an LXQ linear ion trap coupled to an Accela ultra ultra high-performance liquid chromatography system. Data mining was performed via information-dependent acquisition or targeted product ion scan mode with positive electrospray ionization. The assay was selective for all tested substances with limits of detection in urine between 10 and 100 ng/mL and in plasma between 1 and 100 ng/mL. A validated quantification in plasma according to international recommendation could be demonstrated for 33 out of 44 analytes. PMID:24173660

  20. Positive association between concentration of phthalate metabolites in urine and microparticles in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Lo, Shyh-Chyi; Chen, Pau-Chung; Torng, Pao-Ling; Hu, Anren; Sung, Fung-Chang; Su, Ta-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has been used worldwide in various products for many years. In vitro studies have shown that exposure to DEHP and its metabolite mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) induces endothelial cell apoptosis. Moreover, exposure to DEHP had been linked to cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular diseases in epidemiological studies. Circulating microparticles have been known to be indicators of vascular injury. However, whether DEHP or its metabolites are independently associated with microparticles in humans remains unknown. From 2006 to 2008, we recruited 793 subjects (12-30years) from a population-based sample to participate in this cardiovascular disease prevention examination. Each participant was subjected to interviews and biological sample collection to determine the relationship between concentrations of DEHP metabolites MEHP, mono(ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate, and mono(2-ethly-5-oxoheyl) phthalate in urine and concentrations of endothelial microparticles (CD62E and CD31+/CD42a-), platelet microparticles (CD62P and CD31+/CD42a+), and CD14 in serum. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that an ln-unit increase in MEHP concentration in urine was positively associated with an increase in serum microparticle counts/μL of 0.132 (±0.016) in CD31+/CD42a- (endothelial apoptosis marker), 0.117 (±0.023) in CD31+/CD42a+ (platelet apoptosis marker), and 0.026 (±0.007) in CD14 (monocyte, macrophage, and neutrophil activation marker). There was no association between DEHP metabolite concentration and CD62E or CD62P. In conclusion, a higher MEHP concentration in urine was associated with an increase in endothelial and platelet microparticles in this cohort of adolescents and young adults. Further studies are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between exposure to DEHP and atherosclerosis. PMID:27104673

  1. Screening and quantitative determination of drugs of abuse in diluted urine by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Hegstad, Solfrid; Hermansson, Sigurd; Betnér, Ingvar; Spigset, Olav; Falch, Berit Margrethe Hasle

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate a fast, robust and specific UPLC-MS/MS screening platform for the determination and quantification of a variety of commonly used drugs of abuse in urine, i.e. a high-throughput quantitative analysis. Substances in the drug classes opioids, central nervous system stimulants and benzodiazepines and related agents were included in addition to cannabis and pregabalin, a total of 35 different analytes. Based on the concentrations and the physico-chemical properties of the substances, three UPLC-MS/MS methods were developed in parallel. Prior to analysis, sample preparation consisted of two different simple dilutions with 60 and 100 μL urine, respectively, using a Tecan Freedom Evo pipetting robot platform. A Waters Xevo TQ-S tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled to a Waters I-class UPLC was used for quantitative analysis of one quantitative and one qualifying MRM transition for each analyte, except for tramadol for which the metabolite O-desmethyl-tramadol was included in the MRM method to confirm tramadol identity. Deuterated analogs were included as internal standards. The between-assay relative standard deviations varied from 2% to 11% and the limits of quantification were in the range 1-200 ng/mL for the various analytes. After development and initial testing, the method has been successfully implemented and routinely used at our hospital for quantitative screening of drugs of abuse in more than 35,000 urinary samples. PMID:24413020

  2. Pharmacokinetics of oral 6-mercaptopurine: relationship between plasma levels and urine excretion of parent drug.

    PubMed

    Endresen, L; Lie, S O; Storm-Mathisen, I; Rugstad, H E; Stokke, O

    1990-05-01

    Plasma levels and cumulative urine excretion of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) were measured using a specific and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic assay in seven children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as well as in one healthy volunteer. The dose of 6-MP varied in the range of 25-75 mg/m2 of body surface area and was administered with a standard breakfast. A 4- to 11-fold variation between individuals was found in the pharmacokinetic parameters: peak concentration, time to reach peak, area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), and fraction of dose excreted in the urine. Three repeated determinations in one individual revealed that AUC also varied more than sixfold following an overnight fast. In three individuals, the reducing agents glutathione (10 mg/kg) and ascorbic acid (15 mg/kg) were coadministered with 6-MP to evaluate their possible role in the protection of 6-MP from oxidation and degradation in the intestinal lumen. No consistent effect was observed, however, on the AUCs of either of these agents. A clear relationship was found between AUCs and the 24-h urinary excretion of unchanged drug (r = 0.9381), indicating that determinations of 6-MP in the urine may replace the painful procedure of repeated blood sampling. Further studies are necessary to determine the factors contributing to the unpredictable plasma levels following oral doses of 6-MP and to determine the value of pharmacokinetic monitoring in ALL patients. PMID:2349605

  3. Air-exposed urine dipsticks give false-positive results for glucose and false-negative results for blood.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H T; Spiegel, D M

    1991-09-01

    Urine dipstick jars often are left uncapped, which led the authors to wonder what effect prolonged air exposure might have on dipstick accuracy. Unexpired Ames Multistixs (Miles Inc., Elkhart, IN) were exposed to ambient air for intervals of up to eight weeks and were used to test urine for the presence or absence of blood, protein, and glucose. Multistixs were read by a blinded participant. A urine sample reading negative for glucose with unexposed (control) Multistixs tested trace positive with three of three Multistixs exposed for 7 days, and 1+ (three of six) or trace positive (three of six) (P less than 0.05) with Multistixs exposed for 28 days. A urine sample reading 1+ for blood with controls tested negative with five of six (P less than 0.05) and six of six (P less than 0.05) Multistixs exposed for 28 and 56 days, respectively. Protein detection was accurate up to 56 days. The authors conclude that urine dipstick jars should be recapped to avoid prompting needless evaluations of glucosuria or delaying detection of important causes of microscopic hematuria. PMID:1877540

  4. Commonly Practiced Quality Control and Quality Assurance Procedures for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis in Forensic Urine Drug-Testing Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, B A; Huestis, M A; Wilkins, D G

    1997-12-01

    Forensic urine drug-testing laboratories operate in a prescribed scientific and administrative manner to ensure accurate test results. All specimens positive by an initial immunoassay test must be confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). To provide adequate control and verification of these analytical processes, laboratories must implement appropriate policies and procedures to be used in routine practice. This review describes the following topics regarding GC/MS analyses: method validation, instrument performance, assay calibration, quality control, criteria for designating a positive test result, sample and batch acceptance criteria, and GC/MS data review. PMID:26269941

  5. ELISA Detection of 30 New Amphetamine Designer Drugs in Whole Blood, Urine and Oral Fluid using Neogen® "Amphetamine" and "Methamphetamine/MDMA" Kits.

    PubMed

    Nieddu, Maria; Burrai, Lucia; Baralla, Elena; Pasciu, Valeria; Varoni, Maria Vittoria; Briguglio, Irene; Demontis, Maria Piera; Boatto, Gianpiero

    2016-09-01

    Amphetamine designer drugs are central nervous system stimulants that are widely disseminated in the illegal market. Generally, in forensic laboratories, immunoassay methods are the first line of screening for these types of drugs in a biological specimen (typically blood, urine or oral fluid). In this article, we describe the cross-reactivity profiles of 30 new amphetamine designer drugs, using the Neogen(®) [Amphetamine Specific and Methamphetamine/3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) assays] drug tests. To assess the potential matrix influence on the response, each assay was tested on whole blood, urine and oral fluid. Concentrations of 10,000 ng/mL were not sufficient to produce a positive response for the majority of the analyzed amphetamines. This clearly demonstrates that, although these kits are extremely effective for the target drugs for which they are intended (amphetamine, methamphetamine and MDMA), they cannot be used to reliably identify the tested designer drugs in real cases, as these concentrations greatly exceed those expected to be found in forensic samples. PMID:27405364

  6. Dispersive solid-phase extraction procedure coupled to UPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis for the simultaneous determination of thirteen cytotoxic drugs in human urine.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Giovanni; Fioretti, Marzia; Mainero Rocca, Lucia

    2016-08-01

    A fast and easy tailored dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) procedure has been developed for the determination of 13 cytostatic drugs. Combined with a rapid and simultaneous ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for residue identification and quantification in urine, it has been fully validated and tested to study a realistic situation in working environment. The target compounds were chosen from the most common classes used in hospitals. The d-SPE adsorbent was obtained mixing Oasis HLB® with C18 and applied to a large volume of sample (10 mL). The electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry acquisition was conducted in a mixed period mode: six acquisition windows were in positive ionization and one in negative (for 5-fluorouracil). The lowest limit of quantification was found at 0.04 μg/L urine for methotrexate. The absolute recovery of cytotoxic drugs was assessed at two concentrations levels and ranged from 67.1% (cytarabine) to 102.3% (etoposide) and from 65.3% (cytarabine) to 101.2% (methotrexate) for the lower and higher levels, respectively, with the relative standard deviation always <12%. This method gives the opportunity to analyze drugs in a wide molecular weight range (from 130 to 853 a.m.u.) and in a complex matrix, such as urine, without losing any of the features that a method intended for trace quantification must have. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26762960

  7. Direct and efficient liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method for opiates in urine drug testing - importance of 6-acetylmorphine and reduction of analytes.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Maria; Stephanson, Nikolai; Ohman, Inger; Terzuoli, Tommy; Lindh, Jonatan D; Beck, Olof

    2014-04-01

    Opiates comprise a class of abused drugs that is of primary interest in clinical and forensic urine drug testing. Determination of heroin, codeine, or a multi-drug ingestion is complicated since both heroin and codeine can lead to urinary excretion of free and conjugated morphine. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) offers advantage over gas chromatography-mass spectrometry by simplifying sample preparation but increases the number of analytes. A method based on direct injection of five-fold diluted urine for confirmation of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, morphine-6-glucuronide, codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide and 6-acetylmorphine was validated using LC-MS/MS in positive electrospray mode monitoring two transitions using selected reaction monitoring. The method was applied for the analysis of 3155 unknown urine samples which were positive for opiates in immunochemical screening. A linear response was observed for all compounds in the calibration curves covering more than three orders of magnitude. Cut off was set to 2 ng/ml for 6-acetylmorphine and 150 ng/ml for the other analytes. 6-Acetylmorphine was found to be effective (sensitivity 82%) in detecting samples as heroin intake. Morphine-3-glucuronide and codeine-6-glucuronide was the predominant components of total morphine and codeine, 84% and 93%, respectively. The authors have validated a robust LC-MS/MS method for rapid qualitative and quantitative analysis of opiates in urine. 6-Acetylmorphine has been demonstrated as a sensitive and important parameter for a heroin intake. A possible interpretation strategy to conclude the source of detected analytes was proposed. The method might be further developed by reducing the number of analytes to morphine-3-glucuronide, codeine-6-glucuronide and 6-acetylmorphine without compromising test performance. PMID:23720205

  8. Simultaneous detection of 93 conventional and emerging drugs of abuse and their metabolites in urine by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tang, Magdalene H Y; Ching, C K; Lee, Caroline Y W; Lam, Ying-Hoo; Mak, Tony W L

    2014-10-15

    Novel psychoactive substances (NPS) are becoming increasingly popular worldwide in recent years, some of which have been reported to cause considerable harm and even fatalities. Currently, simultaneous screening for a comprehensive panel of conventional and novel drugs of abuse is not widely available in most clinical laboratories. The aim of this study was to establish a chromatography/mass spectrometry-based analytical system for the simultaneous detection of conventional drugs of abuse and NPS in urine. Sample preparation entails enzyme digestion and solid phase extraction; analytes were then detected by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with multiple reaction monitoring. Forty-seven conventional drugs (28 parent drugs, 19 metabolites) and 46 NPS analytes (44 parent drugs, two metabolites) are covered by the established method, which has been validated according to international guidelines. The method was then applied to 964 urine samples collected from drug abusers and the results revealed the presence of two NPS - TFMPP and methcathinone - as well as conventional drugs of abuse. To conclude, an LC-MS/MS method has been established that allows the simultaneous detection of over 90 conventional as well as novel psychoactive substances and metabolites in urine samples. The method was successfully applied to authentic specimens revealing the presence of conventional as well as novel drugs of abuse in the local population. PMID:25203724

  9. A broad-spectrum equine urine screening method for free and enzyme-hydrolysed conjugated drugs with ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Colton H F; Tang, Francis P W; Wan, Terence S M

    2011-07-01

    The authors' laboratory at one time employed four liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric (LC/MS) methods for the detection of a large variety of drugs in equine urine. Drug classes covered by these methods included anti-diabetics, anti-ulcers, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, sedatives, corticosteroids, anabolic steroids, sulfur diuretics, xanthines, etc. With the objective to reduce labour and instrumental workload, a new ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric (UPLC/MS/MS) method has been developed, which encompasses all target analytes detected by the original four LC/MS methods. The new method has better detection limits than the superseded methods. In addition, it covers new target analytes that could not be adequately detected by the four LC/MS methods. The new method involves solid-phase extraction (SPE) of two aliquots of equine urine using two Abs Elut Nexus cartridges. One aliquot of the urine sample is treated with β-glucuronidase before subjecting to SPE. A second aliquot of the same urine sample is processed directly using another SPE cartridge, so that drugs that are prone to decomposition during enzyme hydrolysis can be preserved. The combined eluate is analysed by UPLC/MS/MS using alternating positive and negative electrospray ionisation in the selected-reaction-monitoring mode. Exceptional chromatographic separation is achieved using an UPLC system equipped with a UPLC(®) BEH C18 column (10 cm L×2.1 mm ID with 1.7 μm particles). With this newly developed UPLC/MS/MS method, the simultaneous detection of 140 drugs at ppb to sub-ppb levels in equine urine can be achieved in less than 13 min inclusive of post-run equilibration. Matrix interference for the selected transitions at the expected retention times is minimised by the excellent UPLC chromatographic separation. The method has been validated for recovery and precision, and is being used regularly in the authors' laboratory as an important component of the

  10. A Laboratory Experiment in Pharmaceutical Analysis: Determination of Drugs of Abuse in Human Urine by Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Leonard C.

    1979-01-01

    An experiment is described that was developed for a course in Inorganic and Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry at Rutgers University to provide pharmacy students with practical experience in the thin-layer chromatography used for the analysis of urine to monitor patient compliance with drug abuse treatment programs. (JMD)

  11. 75 FR 22150 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for Federal Agencies Correction In...

  12. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in Hiv-positive adults

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a global health priority. HIV-associated TB may have different clinical presentations and is challenging to diagnose. Conventional sputum tests have reduced sensitivity in HIV-positive individuals, who have higher rates of extrapulmonary TB compared with HIV-negative individuals. The lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) is a new, commercially available point-of-care test that detects lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a lipopolysaccharide present in mycobacterial cell walls, in people with active TB disease. Objectives To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM for the diagnosis of active TB disease in HIV-positive adults who have signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB diagnosis).To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM as a screening test for active TB disease in HIV-positive adults irrespective of signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB screening). Search methods We searched the following databases without language restriction on 5 February 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE (PubMed,1966); EMBASE (OVID, from 1980); Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, from 1900), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, from 1900), and BIOSIS Previews (from 1926) (all three using the Web of Science platform; MEDION; LILACS (BIREME, from 1982); SCOPUS (from 1995); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&l (from 1861). Selection criteria Eligible study types included randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional studies, and cohort studies that determined LF-LAM accuracy for TB against a microbiological reference standard (culture or nucleic acid amplification test from any body site). A higher quality reference standard was one in which two or more specimen types were

  13. Results of hair analyses for drugs of abuse and comparison with self-reports and urine tests.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, F; Driever, F; Lachenmeier, K; Lachenmeier, D W; Banger, M; Madea, B

    2006-01-27

    Urine as well as head and pubic hair samples from drug abusers were analysed for opiates, cocaine and its metabolites, amphetamines, methadone and cannabinoids. Urine immunoassay results and the results of hair tests by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were compared to the self-reported data of the patients in an interview protocol. With regard to the study group, opiate abuse was claimed from the majority in self-reports (89%), followed by cannabinoids (55%), cocaine (38%), and methadone (32%). Except for opiates the comparison between self-reported drug use and urinalysis at admission showed a low correlation. In contrast to urinalysis, hair tests revealed consumption in more cases. There was also a good agreement between self-reports of patients taking part in an official methadone maintenance program and urine test results concerning methadone. However, hair test results demonstrated that methadone abuse in general was under-reported by people who did not participate in a substitution program. Comparing self-reports and the results of hair analyses drug use was dramatically under-reported, especially cocaine. Cocaine hair tests appeared to be highly sensitive and specific in identifying past cocaine use even in settings of negative urine tests. In contrast to cocaine, hair lacks sensitivity as a detection agent for cannabinoids and a proof of cannabis use by means of hair analysis should include the sensitive detection of the metabolite THC carboxylic acid in the lower picogram range. PMID:16410161

  14. Coupling desorption electrospray ionization with solid-phase microextraction for screening and quantitative analysis of drugs in urine.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Joseph H; Aurand, Craig; Shirey, Robert; Laughlin, Brian C; Wiseman, Justin M

    2010-09-01

    Direct analysis of silica C(18)-coated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for the purpose of analyzing drugs from raw urine is presented. The method combines a simple, inexpensive, and solvent-less sample preparation technique with the specificity and speed of DESI-MS and MS/MS. Extraction of seven drugs from raw urine is performed using specially designed SPME fibers coated uniformly with silica-C(18) stationary phase. Each SPME device is inserted into unprocessed urine under gentle agitation and, then, removed, rinsed, and analyzed directly by DESI-MS (MS/MS). Rapid screening over a wide mass range is afforded by coupling the method with a time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer while quantitative analysis is performed using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The performance of the SPME DESI-MS/MS method was evaluated by preparing calibration standards and quality control (QC) samples of the seven drug compounds from urine over a range from 20 to 1000 ng/mL, with the exception of meprobamate which was prepared from 200 to 10000 ng/mL. The calibration curves constructed for each analyte had an R(2) > 0.99. The range of precision (%CV) and accuracy values (% bias) for low QC samples was 1-11% and 3-38%, respectively. Precision and accuracy values for high QC samples range from 0.9 to 8% and -31 to -8%. Results from urine specimens of actual exposure to drugs screened using the SPME DESI-MS/MS method showed good agreement with the conventional immunoassays and GC/MS analysis. Liquid desorption of the SPME fiber followed by LC/MS/MS also showed good agreement with the SPME DESI-MS/MS method. PMID:20695439

  15. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Liquid Interfacial Nanoparticle Arrays for Multiplex Detecting Drugs in Urine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongmei; Liu, Honglin; Mao, Mei; Meng, Juan; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2016-08-16

    The design and application of liquid interfacial plasmonic platform is still in its infancy but is an exciting topic in tunable optical devices, sensors, and catalysis. Here, we developed an interfacial surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platform through the large-scale self-assembly of gold nanoparticle (GNP) arrays at the cyclohexane (CYH)/water interface for detecting trace drug molecules in the urine of humans. The molecules extracted by the CYH phase from a urine sample were directly localized into the self-organized plasmonic hotspots, yielded excellent Raman enhancement, and realized the substrate-free interfacial SERS detection. Synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SR-SAXS) experiments reveals a good uniformity of approximately 2-3 nm interparticle distance in the GNP arrays. SERS colocalization experiments demonstrated that amphetamine molecules of different concentration levels could be loaded into the interfacial GNP arrays and realized the coassembly together with nanoparticles at the liquid/liquid interface. Interfacial GNP arrays with dynamic nanogaps in liquid interfacial structure can make surrounding molecules easily diffuse into the nanogaps. In contrast, the fixed GNP arrays on Si wafer were more irregular, such as multilayer stack, random aggregates, and voids, during the drying process. When the drugs directly participate in the self-assembly process, it becomes easier for analytes diffusing into the nanogaps of GNP arrays, produces a concentration effect, and amplified the SERS sensitivity. This feature also enables molecules to be adsorbed evenly in the arrays and makes a more uniform distribution of both the analytes and GNPs in the liquid interface and realizes the significant increase in signal reproducibility. Interfacial SERS produced a standard deviation of 12.5% at 1001 cm(-1) peak of methamphetamine (MAMP) molecules under the concentration of 1 ppm, implying a good reproducibility. Moreover, dual-analyte detection

  16. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) procedure for screening of urine specimens for 100 analytes relevant in drug-facilitated crime (DFC).

    PubMed

    Remane, Daniela; Wetzel, Diana; Peters, Frank T

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, drug-facilitated crime (DFC) has become an increasing problem. A minimum list of 80 analytes to be monitored in such cases has been proposed by the Society of Forensic Toxicologists (SOFT) including the recommended minimum performance limits (RMPL). In the present study, two liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based screening procedures, one in positive (method I) and one in negative (method II) electrospray ionization mode were developed and validated. Gradient elution was performed on a ZORBAX Eclipse XDB-C18 column after protein precipitation of the urine samples. Detection was carried out in the scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode monitoring two transitions per compound. A total of 100 analytes (91 basic in method I and nine acidic in method II) could be identified using the described procedure. No interferences were observed in 30 tested blank urine samples. The RMPLs were achieved for all analytes and ranged from 1 ng/mL for fentanyl to 10 μg/mL for γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Matrix effects (ME) were evaluated using the same 30 urine samples and ranged from -90 % for tetrazepam to >6,000 % for the 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH). The relative standard deviations of ME were below 25 % for the vast majority of analytes. Results for urine specimens from nine authentic DFC cases were always negative with exception of drugs prescribed to the victims. Reanalysis with the developed procedure of 24 urine samples, with a positive screening result during routine clinical toxicology analysis, confirmed the routine findings. In an excretion study after a single oral doxylamine dose (30 mg), the parent drug and its nor metabolite could be detected in urine specimens from a young female volunteer for 10 days. The developed procedure allows a selective and sensitive screening of urine samples for almost all recommended analytes relevant in DFC cases. PMID:24817357

  17. Aberrant Opioid Use and Urine Drug Testing in Outpatient Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Joseph A; Haider, Ali; Edwards, Tonya; Waletich-Flemming, Jessica; Reddy, Suresh; Bruera, Eduardo; Hui, David

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant opioid use is a public health issue, which has not been adequately described in the palliative care literature. With the increasing integration of palliative care into oncologic care, palliative care clinicians are seeing patients earlier in the disease trajectory, and therefore, more outpatients with chronic pain requiring chronic opioid therapy. This may have resulted in a concomitant rise in the number of patients with aberrant opioid use. In this article, we report on two patients with aberrant opioid-related behavior seen at our palliative care clinic. A high suspicion of opioid abuse, misuse, or diversion based on certain behavioral cues necessitated the ordering of a urine drug test (UDT). The tests helped the medical team to confirm an already existing pattern of maladaptive opioid use. In both cases, we provided ample opioid education and implemented effective strategies to address their aberrant opioid use. These cases suggest the need for palliative care clinicians to develop strategies to effectively address this issue in our field of medicine. It also highlights the usefulness of UDT in the outpatient palliative care setting. PMID:27171327

  18. Urine tested positive for ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulphate after the consumption of "non-alcoholic" beer.

    PubMed

    Thierauf, Annette; Gnann, Heike; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Auwärter, Volker; Perdekamp, Markus Grosse; Buttler, Klaus-Juergen; Wurst, Friedrich M; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2010-10-10

    In abstinence maintenance programs, for reissuing the driving licence and in workplace monitoring programs abstinence from ethanol and its proof are demanded. Various monitoring programs that mainly use ethyl glucuronide (EtG) as alcohol consumption marker have been established. To abstain from ethanol, but not from the taste of alcoholic beverages, in particular non-alcoholic beer has become more and more popular. In Germany, these "alcohol-free" beverages may still have an ethanol content of up to 0.5vol.% without the duty of declaration. Due to severe negative consequences resulting from positive EtG tests, a drinking experiment with 2.5L of non-alcoholic beer per person was performed to address the question of measurable concentrations of the direct metabolites EtG and EtS (ethyl sulphate) in urine and blood. Both alcohol consumption markers - determined by LC-MS/MS - were found in high concentrations: maximum concentrations in urine found in three volunteers were EtG 0.30-0.87mg/L and EtS 0.04-0.07mg/L, i.e., above the often applied cut-off value for the proof of abstinence of 0.1mg EtG/L. In the urine samples of one further volunteer, EtG and EtS concentrations cumulated over-night and reached up to 14.1mg/L EtG and 16.1mg/L EtS in the next morning's urine. Ethanol concentrations in blood and urine samples were negative (determined by HS-GC-FID and by an ADH-based method). PMID:20457499

  19. Validation of the POSIT: Comparing Drug Using and Abstaining Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, James A.; Richardson, Brad; Spears, Julie; Rembert, Julia K.

    1998-01-01

    The Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers (POSIT) is validated by comparing 42 drug-using and -abstaining youth on several social and behavioral characteristics. All 10 POSIT domain scores for drug users are greater than those for abstainers. Construct validity is established by comparing POSIT domain scores with other instruments.…

  20. Detection of sulfonamide drug in urine using liquid-liquid extraction and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markina, Natalia E.; Shalabay, Victoria V.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.; Markin, Alexey V.

    2016-04-01

    In this article we have applied liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) as a sample preparation technique for detection of sulfadimethoxine (one of sulfonamide drugs) in urine using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). SERS substrate based on silver nanoparticles has been prepared by citrate reduction of silver nitrate. Obtained calibration curve (SERS intensity vs. sulfadimethoxine concentration) has been used for detection of sulfadimethoxine in human urine samples artificially contaminated by sulfadimethoxine. Three different solvents (ethyl acetate, diethyl ether, chloroform) have been used for LLE performance tests. Chloroform being found as the most effective one based on calculation of recoveries after SERS measurements. Thus we would like to propose fast (less than 20 minutes), simple and sensitive (detection limit up to 1 μg/ml) test for detecting sulfa drugs in urine using a combination of SERS with LLE with sample volume as low as 100 μL. Such test can be applied for evaluation of the degree of drug extraction from human body and half-life of such drug applied in the course of therapeutic treatments of certain diseases.

  1. A positive cannabinoids workplace drug test following the ingestion of commercially available hemp seed oil.

    PubMed

    Struempler, R E; Nelson, G; Urry, F M

    1997-01-01

    A commercially available health food product of cold-pressed hemp seed oil ingested by one volunteer twice a day for 4 1/2 days (135 mL total). Urine specimens collected from the volunteer were subjected to standard workplace urine drug testing procedures, and the following concentrations of 11-nor-delta9- tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (9-THCA) were detected: 41 ng/mL 9-THCA at 45 h, 49 ng/mL at 69 h, and 55 ng/mL at 93 h. Ingestion was discontinued after 93 h, and the following concentrations were detected: 68 ng/mL at 108 h, 57 ng/mL at 117 h, 31 ng/mL at 126 h, and 20 ng/mL at 142 h. The first specimen that tested negative (50 ng/mL initial immunoassay test, 15 ng/mL confirmatory gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric test) was at 146 h, which was 53 h after the last hemp seed oil ingestion. Four subsequent specimens taken to 177 h were also negative. This study indicates that a workplace urine drug test positive for cannabinoids may arise from the consumption of commercially available cold-pressed hemp seed oil. PMID:9248945

  2. Simultaneous screening and quantification of 25 opioid drugs in post-mortem blood and urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gergov, M; Nokua, P; Vuori, E; Ojanperä, I

    2009-04-15

    A method for simultaneous screening and quantification was developed for the fentanyls alfentanil, fentanyl, p-fluorofentanyl, cis-3-methylfentanyl, trans-3-methylfentanyl, alpha-methylfentanyl, norfentanyl, remifentanil, sufentanil, and the other opioid drugs 6-acetylmorphine, buprenorphine, codeine, dextropropoxyphene, ethylmorphine, heroin, methadone, morphine, naloxone, naltrexone, norbuprenorphine, normethadone, oxycodone, pentazocine, pethidine, and tramadol in post-mortem blood and urine samples by LC-MS/MS. Samples were extracted with butyl acetate at pH 7. The drugs were separated by LC on a Genesis C(18) reversed-phase column, with a gradient consisting of acetonitrile and ammonium acetate at pH 3.2. The mass spectrometric analysis was performed with a quadrupole-linear ion-trap mass spectrometer equipped with a turbo ion spray interface in positive mode using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Quantification was performed based on five isotope-labelled internal standards. Validation included assessment of linearity, limit of quantification, inaccuracy, precision, and matrix effects. The limits of quantification were adequate for screening and quantification of opioid drugs at low therapeutic or abuse concentration levels, with inaccuracy less than 23% and precision better than 24% both in blood and urine samples. When this method was applied to autopsy cases, its results were in agreement with those of reference methods. PMID:19232849

  3. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605 Section 219.605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug...

  4. 49 CFR 40.193 - What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test? 40.193 Section 40.193 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Drug Tests § 40.193 What happens when...

  5. Immunoelectrophoresis - urine

    MedlinePlus

    Immunoglobulin electrophoresis - urine; Gamma globulin electrophoresis - urine; Urine immunoglobulin electrophoresis; IEP - urine ... is used to measure the amounts of various immunoglobulins in urine. Most often, it is done after ...

  6. Global Urine Metabolomics in Patients Treated with First-Line Tuberculosis Drugs and Identification of a Novel Metabolite of Ethambutol.

    PubMed

    Das, Mrinal Kumar; Arya, Rakesh; Debnath, Sanjita; Debnath, Rahul; Lodh, Anindita; Bishwal, Subasa Chandra; Das, Anjan; Nanda, Ranjan Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Population level variation of drug metabolism phenotype (DMP) has great implications in treatment outcome, drug-related side effects, and resistance development. In this study, we used a gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)-based untargeted urine metabolomics approach to understand the DMP of a tuberculosis (TB) patient cohort (n= 20) from Tripura, a state in the northeastern part of India. Urine samples collected at different postdose time points (2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 36 h, and 48 h) from these newly diagnosed TB patients receiving first-line anti-TB drugs were analyzed, and we have successfully detected three of the four first-line drugs,viz, isoniazid (INH), ethambutol (ETB), and pyrazinamide (PZA). The majority of their known metabolites, acetyl-isoniazid (AcINH), isonicotinic acid (INA), isonicotinuric acid (INTA), 2,2'-(ethylenediimino)-dibutyric acid (EDBA), 5-hydroxypyrazinamide (5OH-PZA), pyrazinoic acid (POA), and 5-hydroxypyrazinoic acid (5OH-POA), were also detected. Analyzing the variation in abundances of drugs and their known metabolites and calculating the metabolic ratios in these samples, we offer comprehensive DMP information on this small patient cohort that represents Tripura, India. The majority (75%) of these patients are found to be slow acetylators of INH. The average metabolic ratios of POA/PZA and 5OH-POA/POA are 3.16 ± 3.03 and 6.09 ± 6.15, respectively. Employing correlation analysis of the metabolomics metadata and a manual prediction of drug catabolism, we have proposed 2-aminobutyric acid (AABA) as a novel metabolite of ETB. These observations indicate the usefulness of GC-MS-based metabolomics to characterize the DMP at a population level and also to identify novel drug metabolites. PMID:26833163

  7. Leukocyte esterase urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the urine. This may mean you have a urinary tract infection . If this test is positive, the urine should ... Results Mean An abnormal result indicates a possible urinary tract infection. Alternative Names WBC esterase Images Male urinary system ...

  8. Hybrid Nanogels for Sustainable Positive Thermosensitive Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon ); Chang, Jeong H.; Liu, Jun; Williford, Rick E. ); Shin, Young-Kook; Exarhos, Gregory J. )

    2001-05-18

    A hybrid nanogel is developed based on interpenetrating networks of thermosensitive PNIPAAm gels and tailored nanoporous silica. Sustainable positive thermo-responsive drug release profile is obtained. When the temperature rises, the polymer gel shrinks, squeezing the drug into the porous channels, and at the same time, opening the pore to the outside media. The drug slowly diffuses out of the porous channels. The overall release rate can be adjusted by changing the composition of the nanogel.

  9. Comment on the Central Drug Authority's position statement on cannabis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The Central Drug Authority's 'Position statement on cannabis' in this issue of SAMJ is a welcome, if somewhat belated, article that gives an indication of the South African government's response to the shifting sands of local and international public opinion and global drug policies. This editorial comments on the statement. PMID:27245714

  10. Palmtop-assisted self-interviewing for the collection of sensitive behavioral data: randomized trial with drug use urine testing.

    PubMed

    van Griensven, Frits; Naorat, Sataphana; Kilmarx, Peter H; Jeeyapant, Supaporn; Manopaiboon, Chomnad; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Jenkins, Richard A; Uthaivoravit, Wat; Wasinrapee, Punneporn; Mock, Philip A; Tappero, Jordan W

    2006-02-01

    Palmtop-assisted self-interviewing (PASI) may provide a cheaper and more mobile alternative to audio-computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) for collecting sensitive behavioral data. To evaluate PASI, in late 2002 the authors enrolled 1,283 Thai students aged 15-21 years in a randomized trial. Data collection used PASI, ACASI, self-administered questionnaire, and face-to-face interview in combination with drug-use urine testing. By use of reported levels of behaviors and agreement between self-reports of smoking and urine test results, PASI and ACASI (alpha = 0.05) were compared for noninferiority, and PASI and interview were compared for superiority (alpha = 0.05). Noninferiority of PASI was demonstrated by use of self-reports of the most sensitive areas of sexual behavior (e.g., oral sex, sexual intercourse, commercial sex, history of genital ulcers, pregnancy), as well as self-reports of less sensitive behaviors (e.g., alcohol use, dietary behaviors, symptoms of depression). Data generally showed noninferiority of PASI, ACASI, and self-administered questionnaires when compared with each other and superiority of PASI, ACASI, and self-administered questionnaires when compared with interviews. PASI agreements between self-reports of tobacco smoking and presence of nicotine metabolites in urine were noninferior to ACASI and superior to interviews. The establishment of PASI noninferiority and superiority using behavioral and biologic measures suggests that PASI is a scientifically acceptable alternative for collecting sensitive behavioral data. PMID:16357109

  11. Approach to a Positive Urine Culture in a Patient Without Urinary Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Grigoryan, Larissa

    2013-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a condition in which bacteria are present in a noncontaminated urine sample collected from a patient without signs or symptoms related to the urinary tract. ASB must be distinguished from symptomatic UTI by the absence of signs and symptoms compatible with UTI or by clinical determination that a nonurinary etiology accounts for the patient's symptoms. ABU is a very common condition that is often treated unnecessarily with antibiotics. Pregnant women and persons undergoing urologic procedures expected to cause mucosal bleeding are the only two groups with convincing evidence that screening for and treating ASB is beneficial. Randomized, controlled trials of ASB screening and/or treatment have established the lack of efficacy in premenopausal adult women, diabetic women, patients with spinal cord injury, catheterized patients, older adults living in the community, and elderly institutionalized adults. The overall purpose of this review is to promote an awareness of ASB as a distinct condition from UTI and to empower clinicians to withhold antibiotics in situations in which antimicrobial treatment of bacteriuria is not indicated. PMID:24484572

  12. Immunoassay detection of drugs in racing horses. IX. Detection of detomidine in equine blood and urine by radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T.; Tai, C.L.; Taylor, D.G.; Woods, W.E.; Wang, C.J.; Houtz, P.K.; Tai, H.H.; Weckman, T.J.; Yang, J.M.; Sturma, L.

    1989-02-01

    Detomidine is a potent non-narcotic sedative agent which is currently in the process of being approved for veterinary clinical use in the United States. Since no effective screening method in horses is available for detomidine, we have developed an /sup 125/I radioimmunoassay for detomidine in equine blood and urine as part of a panel of tests for illegal drugs in performance horses. Our /sup 125/I radioimmunoassay has an I-50 for detomidine of approximately 2 ng/ml. Our assay shows limited cross-reactivity with the pharmacodynamically similar xylazine, but does not cross-react with acepromazine, epinephrine, haloperidol or promazine. The plasma kinetic data from clinical (greater than or equal to 5 mg/horse) as well as sub-clinical doses indicate first-order elimination in a dose-dependent manner. Within the first 30 minutes after intravenous (IV) administration of 30 mg/horse, plasma levels peak at approximately 20 ng/ml and then decline with an apparent plasma half-life of 25 minutes. Diuresis can occur with administration of clinical doses of detomidine and this effect was accounted for in the analysis of urine samples. Using this method, administration of 30 mg/horse can be readily detected in equine urine for up to 8 hours after IV injection. Additionally, doses as low as 0.5 mg/horse can be detected for short periods of time in blood and urine with use of this assay. Utilization of this assay by research scientists and forensic analysts will allow for the establishment of proper guidelines and controls regarding detomidine administration to performance horses and assurance of compliance with these guidelines.

  13. Pharmacologically active drug metabolites: therapeutic and toxic activities, plasma and urine data in man, accumulation in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drayer, D E

    1976-01-01

    Drugs that are administered to man may be biotransformed to yield metabolites that are pharmacologically active. The therapeutic and toxic activities of drug metabolites and the species in which this activity was demonstrated are compiled for the metabolites of 58 drugs. The metabolite to parent drug ratio in the plasma of non-uraemic man and the percentage urinary excretion of the metabolite in non-uraemic man are also tabulated. Those active metabolites with significant pharmacological activity and high plasma levels, both relative to that of the parent drug, will probably contribute substantially to the pharmacological effect ascribed to the parent drug. Active metabolites may accumulate in patients with end stage renal disease if renal excretion is a major elimination pathway for the metabolite. This is true even if the active metabolite is a minor metabolite of the parent drug, as long as the minor metabolite is not further biotransformed and is mainly excreted in the urine. Minor metabolite accumulation may also occur if it is further biotransformed by a pathway inhibited in uraemia. Some clinical examples of the accumulation of active drug metabolites in patients with renal failure are: (a) The abolition of premature ventricular contractions and prevention of paroxysmal atrial tachycardia in some cardiac patients with poor renal function treated with procainamide are associated with high levels of N-acetylprocainamide. (b) The severe irritability and twitching seen in a uraemic patient treated with pethidine (meperidine) are associated with high levels of norpethidine. (c) The severe muscle weakness and tenderness seen in patients with renal failure receiving clofibrate are associated with excessive accumulation of the free acid metabolite of clofibrate. (d) Patients with severe renal insufficiency taking allopurinol appear to experience a higher incidence of side reactions, possibly due to the accumulation of oxipurinol. (e) Accumulation of free and

  14. HPLC determination of cocaine and benzoylecgonine in plasma and urine from drug abusers.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Lafuente, N; Bermejo, A M; López-Rivadulla, M; Cruz, A

    1996-01-01

    Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for the determination of cocaine and its metabolite, benzoylecgonine (BZE), in plasma and urine. Following a solid-liquid extraction with Bond-Elut Certify cartridges and using methaqualone as reference compound, chromatography was performed with a Lichrospher RP 18 (125 x 4-mm i.d.) reversed-phase column, ultraviolet (UV) detection at 235 nm, and methanol (pH 7)-phosphate buffer (70:30 v/v) as mobile phase. Linearity was obtained from 0.1 to 20 micrograms/mL with a good correlation coefficient. Recoveries ranged from 76.9 to 96.5%, and coefficients of variation were always less than 5.0%. Urine samples from live, cocaine-intoxicated patients contained concentrations of 0.21-75.55 micrograms/mL BZE and less than 4.14 micrograms/mL cocaine, whereas postmortem urine analyses gave concentrations of 5.86-198.76 micrograms/mL for BZE and 1.56-33.24 micrograms/mL for its parent compound. Finally, postmortem blood samples were all negative for cocaine and gave BZE concentrations of 0.040-0.53 micrograms/mL. PMID:8835659

  15. Porphyrins - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may be due to: Liver cancer Hepatitis Lead poisoning Porphyria (several types) Alternative Names Urine uroporphyrin; Urine ... More Delta-ALA urine test Enzyme Hemoglobin Hepatitis Lead poisoning Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma PBG urine test Porphyria ...

  16. Direct-injection screening for acidic drugs in plasma and neutral drugs in equine urine by differential-gradient LC-LC coupled MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Shawn M R; Wee, Wei Khee; Lim, Boon Huat; Foo, Hsiao Ching

    2007-04-01

    Direct-injection LC-LC hybrid tandem MS methods have been developed for undertaking broad-based screening for acidic drugs in protein-precipitated plasma and neutral doping agents in equine urine. In both analyses, analytes present in the matrix were trapped using a HLB extraction column before being refocused and separated on a Chromolith RP-18e monolithic analytical column using a controlled differential gradient generated by proportional dilution of the first column's eluent with water. Each method has been optimised by the adoption of a mobile phase and gradient that was tailored to enhance ionisation in the MS source while maintaining good chromatographic behaviour for the majority of the target drugs. The analytical column eluent was fed into the heated nebulizer (HN) part of the Duospray interface attached to a 4000 QTRAP mass spectrometer. Information dependent acquisition (IDA) with dynamic background subtraction (DBS) was configured to trigger a sensitive enhanced product ion (EPI) scan when a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) survey scan signal exceeded the defined criteria. Ninety-one percent of acidic drugs in protein-precipitated plasma and 80% of the neutral compounds in equine urine were detected when spiked at 10 ng/ml. PMID:17101303

  17. Urine Testing for Drugs of Abuse. NIDA Research Monograph Series 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawks, Richard L., Ed.; Chiang, C. Nora, Ed.

    In the past 5 years, a growing concern over the use of illicit drugs in the workplace has led to an interest in urinalysis as a way to detect and deter drug use. This monograph provides information that will assist those involved in the planning or implementation of drug testing programs in making informed choices. Articles include: (1)…

  18. Analysis of ketamine and norketamine in urine by automatic solid-phase extraction (SPE) and positive ion chemical ionization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-mi; Lee, Ju-seon; Choi, Sang-kil; Lim, Mi-ae; Chung, Hee-sun

    2008-01-30

    Ketamine (KT) is widely abused for hallucination and also misused as a "date-rape" drug in recent years. An analytical method using positive ion chemical ionization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS) with an automatic solid-phase extraction (SPE) apparatus was studied for the determination of KT and its major metabolite, norketamine (NK), in urine. Six ketamine suspected urine samples were provided by the police. For the research of KT metabolism, KT was administered to SD rats by i.p. at a single dose of 5, 10 and 20mg/kg, respectively, and urine samples were collected 24, 48 and 72 h after administration. For the detection of KT and NK, urine samples were extracted on an automatic SPE apparatus (RapidTrace, Zymark) with mixed mode type cartridge, Drug-Clean (200 mg, Alltech). The identification of KT and NK was by PCI-GC-MS. m/z238 (M+1), 220 for KT, m/z 224 (M+1), 207 for NK and m/z307 (M+1) for Cocaine-D(3) as internal standard were extracted from the full-scan mass spectrum and the underlined ions were used for quantitation. Extracted calibration curves were linear from 50 to 1000 ng/mL for KT and NK with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.99. The limit of detection (LOD) was 25 ng/mL for KT and NK. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 50 ng/mL for KT and NK. The recoveries of KT and NK at three different concentrations (86, 430 and 860 ng/mL) were 53.1 to 79.7% and 45.7 to 83.0%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day run precisions (CV) for KT and NK were less than 15.0%, and the accuracies (bias) for KT and NK were also less than 15% at the three different concentration levels (86, 430 and 860 ng/mL). The analytical method was also applied to real six KT suspected urine specimens and KT administered rat urines, and the concentrations of KT and NK were determined. Dehydronorketamine (DHNK) was also confirmed in these urine samples, however the concentration of DHNK was not calculated. SPE is simple, and needs less organic solvent than liquid

  19. Choosing the right laboratory: a review of clinical and forensic toxicology services for urine drug testing in pain management.

    PubMed

    Reisfield, Gary M; Goldberger, Bruce A; Bertholf, Roger L

    2015-01-01

    Urine drug testing (UDT) services are provided by a variety of clinical, forensic, and reference/specialty laboratories. These UDT services differ based on the principal activity of the laboratory. Clinical laboratories provide testing primarily focused on medical care (eg, emergency care, inpatients, and outpatient clinics), whereas forensic laboratories perform toxicology tests related to postmortem and criminal investigations, and drug-free workplace programs. Some laboratories now provide UDT specifically designed for monitoring patients on chronic opioid therapy. Accreditation programs for clinical laboratories have existed for nearly half a century, and a federal certification program for drug-testing laboratories was established in the 1980s. Standards of practice for forensic toxicology services other than workplace drug testing have been established in recent years. However, no accreditation program currently exists for UDT in pain management, and this review considers several aspects of laboratory accreditation and certification relevant to toxicology services, with the intention to provide guidance to clinicians in their selection of the appropriate laboratory for UDT surveillance of their patients on opioid therapy. PMID:25750163

  20. Solid-phase dispersive extraction method for analysis of benzodiazepine drugs in serum and urine samples.

    PubMed

    Saito, Koichi; Kikuchi, Yuu; Saito, Rieko

    2014-11-01

    A simple yet highly efficient pretreatment method called solid-phase dispersive extraction (SPDE) was developed and used in combination with liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) for the analysis of benzodiazepines (BZPs) in serum and urine samples. By using a custom-made centrifugal filter, SPDE could be performed in a closed system, thereby minimizing exposure to infectious microbes or hazardous chemicals. The limit of detection and the limit of quantification of nine BZPs were 1-10 and 5-50ng/mL, respectively. The average recoveries of BZPs from pooled serum samples spiked at 50 and 500ng/mL were 89.6-105.0% (RSD: 2.1-6.8%) and 93.6-110.4% (RSD: 2.1-4.2%), respectively, and those from urine samples were 88.7-105.5% (RSD: 2.9-6.4%) and 91.5-101.1% (RSD: 3.6-5.5%), respectively. SPDE-LC/TOF-MS has potential application in forensic science and emergency medicine. PMID:25126966

  1. [Study on in-vitro susceptibility of ESBL-positive Escherichia coli isolated from urine specimens].

    PubMed

    Grandesso, Stefano; Sapino, Barbara; Mazzucato, Sandra; Alessandrini, Roberta; Solinas, Maria; Gion, Massimo

    2010-09-01

    Treatment of infections by beta-lactamase-producing microorganisms is very difficult. Our aim was to determine the in vitro susceptibility of 430 ESBL-positive Escherichia coli strains isolated from urinary tract infections. All the microorganisms were isolated in the Microbiology Unit at the Ospedale dell'Angelo in Mestre (Venice) between May 2008 and September 2009 and were confirmed by the double-disk test. All microorganisms were sensitive to imipenem and meropenem, 98.4% to tigecycline, 95.1% to amikacin, 89.3% to nitrofurantoin, 67.5% to gentamycin and 63.2% to piperacillin/tazobactam. Only 22.6% were sensitive to cotrimoxazole, while fluoroquinolone (norfloxacin and levofloxacin) activity was found to be very low (6%). PMID:20956871

  2. Positive urgency predicts illegal drug use and risky sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Zapolski, Tamika C B; Cyders, Melissa A; Smith, Gregory T

    2009-06-01

    There are several different personality traits that dispose individuals to engage in rash action. One such trait is positive urgency: the tendency to act rashly when experiencing extremely positive affect. This trait may be relevant for college student risky behavior, because it appears that a great deal of college student risky behavior is undertaken during periods of intensely positive mood states. To test this possibility, the authors conducted a longitudinal study designed to predict increases in risky sexual behavior and illegal drug use over the course of the first year of college (n=407). In a well-fitting structural model, positive urgency predicted increases in illegal drug use and risky sexual behavior, even after controlling for time 1 (T1) involvement in both risky behaviors, biological sex, and T1 scores on four other personality dispositions to rash action. The authors discuss the theoretical and practical implications of this finding. PMID:19586152

  3. Urine odor

    MedlinePlus

    Urine odor refers to the smell from your urine. Urine odor varies. Most of the time, urine does not ... Most changes in urine odor are not a sign of disease and go away in time. Some foods and medicines, including vitamins, may affect your ...

  4. Monitoring of biogenic amines and drugs of various therapeutic groups in urine samples with use of HPLC.

    PubMed

    Baranowska, Irena; Płonka, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method for simultaneous separation and determination of biogenic amines [dopamine, epinephrine, serotonin and its six metabolites (normetanephrine, metanephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol, homovanilic acid and 5-hydroxyindoloacetic acid)] with drugs from different therapeutically groups [analgesics (paracetamol, metamizol), diuretics (furosemide) and antibiotics (cefazolin, fluconazole)] was developed. A chromatographic column with pre-column with octadecylsilane phase (C18e ) and two detectors - diode array serial connected and fluorescence - was used. Gradient elution of mixture of acetate buffer (pH 4.66) and methanol as a mobile phase was applied. The limit of detection (LOD) of 8-10 ng/mL and limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 24-30 ng/mL for biogenic amines, as well as the LOD of 50-100 ng/mL and the LOQ of 150-300 ng/mL for drugs, were determined. The applied sample preparation method allowed recoveries of 93% for the biogenic amines and 92% for the drugs to be achieved. The developed procedure has been applied to simultaneous determination of the examined compounds in urine samples and could be used in clinical analysis. PMID:26362402

  5. Evaluation of the in vitro growth of urinary tract infection-causing gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in a proposed synthetic human urine (SHU) medium.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Deepak S; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriuria is a hallmark of urinary tract infection (UTI) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which are among the most frequent infections in humans. A variety of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are associated with these infections but Escherichia coli contributes up to 80% of cases. Multiple bacterial species including E. coli can grow in human urine as a means to maintain colonization during infections. In vitro bacteriuria studies aimed at modeling microbial growth in urine have utilized various compositions of synthetic human urine (SHU) and a Composite SHU formulation was recently proposed. In this study, we sought to validate the recently proposed Composite SHU as a medium that supports the growth of several bacterial species that are known to grow in normal human urine and/or artificial urine. Comparative growth assays of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus faecalis were undertaken using viable bacterial count and optical density measurements over a 48h culture period. Three different SHU formulations were tested in various culture vessels, shaking conditions and volumes and showed that Composite SHU can support the robust growth of gram-negative bacteria but requires supplementation with 0.2% yeast extract to support the growth of gram-positive bacteria. Experiments are also presented that show an unexpected but major influence of P. mirabilis towards the ability to measure bacterial growth in generally accepted multiwell assays using absorbance readings, predicted to have a basis in the release of volatile organic compound(s) from P. mirabilis during growth in Composite SHU medium. This study represents an essential methodological validation of a more chemically defined type of synthetic urine that can be applied to study mechanisms of bacteriuria and we conclude will offer a useful in vitro model to investigate the

  6. [Position statement. Protein/creatinine in a randomly obtained urine sample in the diagnosis of proteinuria in pregnant patients with arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Leaños Miranda and collaborators published that the measurement of protein/creatinine ratio in a single random urine sample is a reliable indicator of significant proteinuria and may be reasonably used as alternative to the 24-hours urine collection method as a diagnostic criteria for urinary protein, and it is also a criterion for identifying the disease severity. This leads us to present this successful result of the investigation as a position statement in the care of pregnant women with hypertension. PMID:23282273

  7. Wide-range screening of banned veterinary drugs in urine by ultra high liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    León, Nuria; Roca, Marta; Igualada, Carmen; Martins, Claudia P B; Pastor, Agustín; Yusá, Vicent

    2012-10-01

    In this work, an ultra high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) methodology is proposed for the multi-class multi-residue screening of banned and unauthorized veterinary drugs in bovine urine, using an Orbitrap Exactive™ analyzer working at a resolving power of 50,000 FWHM in full scan, both in positive and negative mode. The method currently covers 87 analytes belonging to different families such as steroid hormones, β-agonists, resorcylic acid lactones (RAL), stilbens, tranquillizers, nitroimidazoles, corticosteroids, NSAIDs, amphenicoles, thyreostatics and other substances such as dapsone. A database including the elemental composition, the polarity of acquisition, retention time and expected adducts was built for the targeted analysis, and a high mass accuracy (<5 ppm) was set as one of the identification criteria. After comparing different sample preparation procedures, QuEChERS was selected as the most appropriate methodology. An efficient separation of analytes was achieved using ultra high performance liquid chromatography with a column packed with sub-2 μm particles. The performance of the method has been evaluated in accordance with the EU guidelines for the validation of screening methods for the analysis of veterinary drugs residues. The screening target concentrations were established between 0.2 μg/l and 20 μg/l, demonstrating the usefulness of UHPLC-HRMS as an ideal tool for compliance monitoring in regulatory laboratories. PMID:22939377

  8. Urine culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  9. Examining the Relationship between Gender and Drug-Using Behaviors in Adolescents: The Use of Diagnostic Assessments and Biochemical Analyses of Urine Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, William H.; Moore, David D.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the relationship between gender and drug use among adolescents using diagnostic assessments and biochemical analyses of urine samples. Statistical significance was found in the relationship between gender and marijuana use. The study confirms that more research is needed in this area. (Author/MKA)

  10. 28 CFR 550.41 - Urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Urine surveillance. 550.41 Section 550.41... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.41 Urine surveillance. A program of urine testing for drug use shall be established in contract CTCs. (a)...

  11. 28 CFR 550.41 - Urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Urine surveillance. 550.41 Section 550.41... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.41 Urine surveillance. A program of urine testing for drug use shall be established in contract CTCs. (a)...

  12. 28 CFR 550.41 - Urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Urine surveillance. 550.41 Section 550.41... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.41 Urine surveillance. A program of urine testing for drug use shall be established in contract CTCs. (a)...

  13. 28 CFR 550.41 - Urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Urine surveillance. 550.41 Section 550.41... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.41 Urine surveillance. A program of urine testing for drug use shall be established in contract CTCs. (a)...

  14. Urine Trouble: Drug Testing of Students and Teachers in Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Non-individualized (so-called "random") drug testing in public schools presents issues of Constitutional law on both the federal and state levels, particularly with regard to citizens' freedom from "unreasonable searches and seizures." The trend toward increasing acceptance of such testing by the courts (and particularly the U.S. Supreme Court)…

  15. Metabolic profiling of urine and blood plasma in rat models of drug addiction on the basis of morphine, methamphetamine, and cocaine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Zaitsu, Kei; Miyawaki, Izuru; Bando, Kiyoko; Horie, Hiroshi; Shima, Noriaki; Katagi, Munehiro; Tatsuno, Michiaki; Bamba, Takeshi; Sato, Takako; Ishii, Akira; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Koichi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-02-01

    The metabolic profiles of urine and blood plasma in drug-addicted rat models based on morphine (MOR), methamphetamine (MA), and cocaine (COC)-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) were investigated. Rewarding effects induced by each drug were assessed by use of the CPP model. A mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics approach was applied to urine and plasma of MOR, MA, and COC-addicted rats. In total, 57 metabolites in plasma and 70 metabolites in urine were identified by gas chromatography-MS. The metabolomics approach revealed that amounts of some metabolites, including tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, significantly changed in the urine of MOR-addicted rats. This result indicated that disruption of energy metabolism is deeply relevant to MOR addiction. In addition, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, L-tryptophan, cystine, and n-propylamine levels were significantly changed in the plasma of MOR-addicted rats. Lactose, spermidine, and stearic acid levels were significantly changed in the urine of MA-addicted rats. Threonine, cystine, and spermidine levels were significantly increased in the plasma of COC-addicted rats. In conclusion, differences in the metabolic profiles were suggestive of different biological states of MOR, MA, and COC addiction; these may be attributed to the different actions of the drugs on the brain reward circuitry and the resulting adaptation. In addition, the results showed possibility of predict the extent of MOR addiction by metabolic profiling. This is the first study to apply metabolomics to CPP models of drug addiction, and we demonstrated that metabolomics can be a multilateral approach to investigating the mechanism of drug addiction. PMID:23912828

  16. Molecular identification of multi drug resistant bacteria from urinary tract infected urine samples.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M S; Das, A P

    2016-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are of great concern in both developing and developed countries all over the world. Even though the infections are more common in women and children, they are at a considerable rate in men and of all ages. The uropathogens causing the infections are spread through various routes. The treatment generally recommended by the physicians is antibiotic usage. But, most of the uropathogens have evolved antibiotic resistance mechanisms. This makes the present situation hectic in control and prevention of UTIs. The present study aims to illustrate the multidrug resistance patterns among isolated bacterial strains from infected urine samples in Odisha state, India. Four bacterial strains were isolated and identified as Proteus sp. SK3, Pseudomonas sp. ADMK77, Proteus sp. BLKB2 and Enterobacter hormaechei strain CW-3 by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetc analysis indicated the strains belong to three various genera namely, Proteus, Pseudomonas and Enterobacter. The evolutionary timeline of the bacteria was studied by constructing phylogenetic trees by Neighborhood Joining method. The presence of ESBL gene and biofilm forming capability were studied for the four strains. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates were studied toward the commonly recommended antibiotics. Both the Proteus strains were found commonly susceptible to aminoglycoside and sulphonamide groups. Pseudomonas strain was found to be susceptible to cephems, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. Enterobacter sp was found to be resistant to almost all antibiotic groups and susceptible to only sulphonamides group. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the bacteria help in choosing the empirical antibiotic treatment for UTI. PMID:27354209

  17. Synthetic cannabinoids to avoid urine drug screens: Implications for contingency management and other treatments for drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Ninnemann, Andrew L; Lechner, William V; Borges, Allison; Lejuez, C W

    2016-12-01

    Contingency management (CM) is an effective treatment for substance use dependence. Within CM, rewards or vouchers promote continued abstinence by acting as alternative reinforcers to substance use. However, CM relies on the use of accurate biochemical verification methods, such as urinalysis, to verify abstinence. Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) pose a risk for CM treatment because they are not easily detected by common urinalysis techniques. Although SCs pose a risk, there is limited information regarding current rates of SC use within substance dependent populations as well as rates of substance use and psychiatric disorders among those who use SCs in treatment. We discuss emerging research on these topics and potential implications for CM treatments. Findings suggest CM researchers should test for and query SC use among those being treated for cannabis and cocaine use problems as well as among younger populations of substance users. Implications of other novel psychoactive substances for drug treatment and drug urinalysis are also discussed. PMID:27424166

  18. Pholcodine interference in the immunoassay for opiates in urine.

    PubMed

    Svenneby, G; Wedege, E; Karlsen, R L

    1983-01-01

    The excretion in urine after single oral therapeutic doses of morphine derivatives was analysed with radioimmunoassay (RIA) and homogeneous enzyme immunoassay (EMIT) for opiates. In contrast to the rapid excretion of ethylmorphine and codeine, pholcodine showed positive results for opiates 2-6 weeks after intake when the urines were analysed with the RIA-method. When analysed with the EMIT-method, positive results were obtained for pholcodine for approximately 10 days. As pholcodine is a common component in cough mixtures, its prolonged excretion could represent a hazard in interpreting the results from drug analyses of urines. PMID:6347841

  19. Rapid screening of drugs of abuse in human urine by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution and high mass accuracy hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowen; Shen, Baohua; Jiang, Zheng; Huang, Yi; Zhuo, Xianyi

    2013-08-01

    A novel analytical toxicology method has been developed for the analysis of drugs of abuse in human urine by using a high resolution and high mass accuracy hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (LTQ-Orbitrap-MS). This method allows for the detection of different drugs of abuse, including amphetamines, cocaine, opiate alkaloids, cannabinoids, hallucinogens and their metabolites. After solid-phase extraction with Oasis HLB cartridges, spiked urine samples were analysed by HPLC/LTQ-Orbitrap-MS using an electrospray interface in positive ionisation mode, with resolving power of 30,000 full width at half maximum (FWHM). Gradient elution off of a Hypersil Gold PFP column (50mm×2.1mm) allowed to resolve 65 target compounds and 3 internal standards in a total chromatographic run time of 20min. Validation of this method consisted of confirmation of identity, selectivity, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), lowest limits of quantification (LLOQ), accuracy, precision, extraction recovery and matrix effect. The regression coefficients (r(2)) for the calibration curves (LLOQ - 100ng/mL) in the study were ≥0.99. The LODs for 65 validated compounds were better than 5ng/ml except for 4 compounds. The relative standard deviation (RSD), which was used to estimate repeatability at three concentrations, was always less than 15%. The recovery of extraction and matrix effects were above 50 and 70%, respectively. Mass accuracy was always better than 2ppm, corresponding to a maximum mass error of 0.8 millimass units (mmu). The accurate masses of characteristic fragments were obtained by collisional experiments for a more reliable identification of the analytes. Automated data analysis and reporting were performed using ToxID software with an exact mass database. This procedure was then successfully applied to analyse drugs of abuse in a real urine sample from subject who was assumed to be drug addict. PMID:23838299

  20. Coproporphyrins in Plasma and Urine Can Be Appropriate Clinical Biomarkers to Recapitulate Drug-Drug Interactions Mediated by Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yurong; Mandlekar, Sandhya; Shen, Hong; Holenarsipur, Vinay K; Langish, Robert; Rajanna, Prabhakar; Murugesan, Senthilkumar; Gaud, Nilesh; Selvam, Sabariya; Date, Onkar; Cheng, Yaofeng; Shipkova, Petia; Dai, Jun; Humphreys, William G; Marathe, Punit

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, an open-label, three-treatment, three-period clinical study of rosuvastatin (RSV) and rifampicin (RIF) when administered alone and in combination was conducted in 12 male healthy subjects to determine if coproporphyrin I (CP-I) and coproporphyrin III (CP-III) could serve as clinical biomarkers for organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) and 1B3 that belong to the solute carrier organic anion gene subfamily. Genotyping of the human OATP1B1 gene was performed in all 12 subjects and confirmed absence of OATP1B1*5 and OATP1B1*15 mutations. Average plasma concentrations of CP-I and CP-III prior to drug administration were 0.91 ± 0.21 and 0.15 ± 0.04 nM, respectively, with minimum fluctuation over the three periods. CP-I was passively eliminated, whereas CP-III was actively secreted from urine. Administration of RSV caused no significant changes in the plasma and urinary profiles of CP-I and CP-III. RIF markedly increased the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of CP-I and CP-III by 5.7- and 5.4-fold (RIF) or 5.7- and 6.5-fold (RIF+RSV), respectively, as compared with the predose values. The area under the plasma concentration curves from time 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24h) of CP-I and CP-III with RIF and RSV increased by 4.0- and 3.3-fold, respectively, when compared with RSV alone. In agreement with this finding, Cmax and AUC0-24h of RSV increased by 13.2- and 5.0-fold, respectively, when RIF was coadministered. Collectively, we conclude that CP-I and CP-III in plasma and urine can be appropriate endogenous biomarkers specifically and reliably reflecting OATP inhibition, and thus the measurement of these molecules can serve as a useful tool to assess OATP drug-drug interaction liabilities in early clinical studies. PMID:27317801

  1. Studies on the metabolism of mitragynine, the main alkaloid of the herbal drug Kratom, in rat and human urine using liquid chromatography-linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Anika A; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Zoerntlein, Siegfried W; Klein, Oliver N; Kanogsunthornrat, Jidapha; Maurer, Hans H

    2009-08-01

    Mitragynine (MG) is an indole alkaloid of the Thai medicinal plant Mitragyna speciosa (Kratom in Thai) and reported to have opioid agonistic properties. Because of its stimulant and euphoric effects, Kratom is used as a herbal drug of abuse. The aim of the presented study is to identify the phase I and II metabolites of MG in rat and human urine after solid-phase extraction (SPE) using liquid chromatography-linear ion trap mass spectrometry providing detailed structure information in the MSn mode particularly with high resolution. The seven identified phase I metabolites indicated that MG was metabolized by hydrolysis of the methylester in position 16, O-demethylation of the 9-methoxy group and of the 17-methoxy group, followed, via the intermediate aldehydes, by oxidation to carboxylic acids or reduction to alcohols and combinations of some steps. In rats, four metabolites were additionally conjugated to glucuronides and one to sulfate, but in humans, three metabolites to glucuronides and three to sulfates. PMID:19536806

  2. [Cross-reactivity of Instant-View M-1 for detection of benzodiazepine-related drugs and their metabolites in urine].

    PubMed

    Torikoshi, Aiko; Namera, Akira; Arima, Yousuke; Toubou, Hirokazu; Tajima, Takashi; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Nagao, Masataka

    2014-03-01

    Immunoassays are useful methods for the determination of regulated drugs in clinical and forensic laboratories. Although the Instant-View M-1 (IV M-1) immunoassay kit is frequently used to screen drugs in laboratories in Japan, basic information about the IV M-1 such as its specificity and reactivity is not available. In this study, we determined the specificity and cross-reactivity of IV M-1 for the detection of benzodiazepine-related drugs and their metabolites in urine. The IV M-1 could detect triazolobenzodiazepines such as triazolam in urine at concentrations > or = 300 ng/mL. However, thienodiazepines such as etizolam could not be detected because of lack of cross reactivity. A correlation was observed between the structure of the metabolites and the reactivity of the kit; 4-hydroxy metabolites of alprazolam and triazolam were detectable, whereas a-hydroxy metabolites were not. Furthermore, 7-amino metabolites such as nitrazepam could not be detected at any concentration, including high concentrations. The specificity and reactivity of various kits used for detection of drugs in urine are different. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the basic features of the kit used while assessing the results obtained. PMID:24724359

  3. Purple Urine Bag Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abubacker, Naufal Rizwan Taraganar; Jayaraman, Senthil Manikandan Thirumanilayur; R, Kannan; Sivanesan, Magesh Kumar; Mathew, Renu

    2015-08-01

    Purple urine bag syndrome (PUBS) is a rare disorder seen in elderly persons, wherein the urinary bag and the tubing turn in to purple colour. It is usually seen in patients who are on urinary catheters for a long time. Purple coloured urine occurs due to the accumulation of indigo and indirubin, which are the end products of tryptophan metabolism due to the action of sulfatases and phosphatases formed by bacteria like Providencia, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella etc. We present this interesting phenomenon of purple urine in a young male who was on prolonged urinary catheterization. The urine culture was positive for Providencia and constipation was an added risk factor for the purple urine. The urinary catheter and tubing was changed along with a course of antibiotics which lead to the normalization of the urine colour. PMID:26435987

  4. Simultaneous screening for and determination of 128 date-rape drugs in urine by gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Piotr; Kała, Maria

    2010-05-20

    Date-rape drugs (DRDs) are used for the purpose of "drugging" unsuspected victims and raping or robbing them while under the influence of the drug. The wide variety of substances used for criminal purposes, their low concentrations in body fluids and, often, a long time delay between the event and clinical examination make comprehensive screening analysis of biological materials collected from crime victims for the presence of these drugs very difficult. Detection of a drug used to facilitate sexual assault in biological fluids can be very important evidence of a committed crime. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple GC-EI-MS screening procedure for date-rape drugs in urine. Target analytes were isolated by solid-phase extraction. 2-mL urine samples were extracted and then derivatized by using BSTFA+1%TMCS reagent. Detection of all compounds was based on full-scan mass spectra and for each compound one ion was chosen for further quantification. The method allowed the simultaneous screening, detection and quantification of 128 compounds from different groups (number of compounds): opioids (20), amphetamines (11), GHB and related products (3), hallucinogens (9), benzodiazepines (18), antihistamines (9), antidepressants (14), selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (4), antipsychotics (7), barbiturates (7), other sedatives (5), muscle relaxants (2) and other drugs (19). The procedure can easily be expanded to encompass more substances. The developed method appeared to be suitable for screening for the target DRDs. The procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of authentic urine samples collected from victims of rapes and other crimes in routine casework. PMID:20207513

  5. A Case of Psychosis After Use of a Detoxification Kit and a Review of Techniques, Risks, and Regulations Associated With the Subversion of Urine Drug Tests

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Moneeshindra Singh; Kalia, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    Context: The practice of drug testing in the workplace has been adopted for US federal government employees, and many state and local governments as well as private businesses have followed suit. However, a parallel industry dedicated to subverting the results of urine drug testing has emerged with little or no regulation. Evidence Acquisition: First, the case of a 19-year-old man who developed psychosis after the use of a detoxification kit is presented. Second, a review of the existing literature on the techniques, risks, and regulations associated with the use of drug tampering kits is provided. PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Google Scholar were searched using the keywords UDS, urine toxicology, pass the drug test, and clean UA, with no restrictions on publication date. Case reports, letters to the editor, and original research and review articles in multiple languages were reviewed, as were federal regulations and acts on the topic. The search yielded 4,082 results, of which 49 articles were selected for relevance. Some articles were later omitted as they had cited the original article and had nothing new to offer. Results: Three commonly used tampering techniques are in vivo adulteration, urine substitution, and in vitro adulteration. Review of the literature regarding the risks involved with use of tampering kits yielded no results. In 1986, an executive order was issued requiring all federal employees to refrain from illicit drug use, and the 1988 Drug-Free Workplace Act precipitated the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration guidelines and their subsequent revisions. Recently, many states have made regulatory efforts to bring drug test defrauding under the ambit of law. Conclusions: Clinicians need to be aware of the tampering techniques and the possibility of false-negative urine drug tests. Cognizance of inherent risks involved with using these techniques including psychiatric and/or medical complications is also warranted. The

  6. Factors affecting crystal precipitation from urine in individuals with long-term urinary catheters colonized with urease-positive bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Sunil; Suller, Marc T E; Stickler, David J; Feneley, Roger C L

    2006-06-01

    Weekly urinalysis was conducted for 12 weeks on a group of 21 long-term catheter users with confirmed catheter encrustation and urinary tract colonization with urease-positive bacteria, in order to explore the cause of considerable variation in the severity of encrustation between sufferers. The rapidity of catheter blockage correlated significantly with the pH above which crystals precipitated from urine (the nucleation pH) but not the pH of the voided urine itself. Linear regression showed the nucleation pH to be significantly predicted by a combination of urinary calcium and magnesium concentrations, with calcium being the more influential variable. Reducing the rate of catheter encrustation could be achieved by lowering the urinary concentration of calcium and magnesium, which may only require catheter users to increase their fluid intake. PMID:16453146

  7. Capillary electrophoresis combined in-line with solid-phase extraction using magnetic particles as new adsorbents for the determination of drugs of abuse in human urine.

    PubMed

    Baciu, Tatiana; Borrull, Francesc; Neusüß, Christian; Aguilar, Carme; Calull, Marta

    2016-05-01

    A simple approach is presented based on the in-line coupling between magnetic particles-based SPE and CE. Silica-coated iron oxide particles functionalized with C18 were successfully synthesized and used as a reverse-phase sorbent for in-line SPE-CE. Magnets were used to locally immobilize these sorbents inside the capillary. Four drugs of abuse were preconcentrated and determined in urine samples using the developed method with a simple pretreatment procedure based on LLE. Several parameters affecting the preconcentration were evaluated. The obtained results show that this strategy enhanced detection sensitivity in the range of 125-700-fold compared with CE without preconcentration. The developed method provides LODs (S/N = 3) for standard samples in the range of 0.5-20 ng/mL with satisfactory analytical precision, in both intraday and day-to-day experiments (RSDs <20%). The LODs (S/N = 3) reached for urine samples were in the range of 20-50 ng/mL. Relative recoveries greater than 75.9% were obtained. The established method has been applied to the analysis of drugs of abuse in urine samples from drug abusers. PMID:26856766

  8. Immunoelectrophoresis - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the urine can result from: Amyloidosis Leukemia Multiple myeloma Kidney disorders such as IgA nephropathy or IgM ... CLL) IgA nephropathy Immunoelectrophoresis - blood Macroglobulinemia of Waldenstrom Multiple myeloma Protein electrophoresis - urine Protein urine test Urinalysis Update ...

  9. GC-MS analysis of the designer drug α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone and its metabolites in urine and blood in an acute poisoning case.

    PubMed

    Grapp, Marcel; Sauer, Christoph; Vidal, Christian; Müller, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    α-Pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP) is a synthetic cathinone belonging to the group of "second generation" pyrrolidinophenones that becomes more and more popular as a designer psychostimulant. Here we provide toxicological analytical support for a severe poisoning with α-PVP. Serum and urine samples that were sent to our laboratory were subjected to a general unknown screening procedure. The procedure includes immunoassay-based screening of drugs of abuse in serum and systematic toxicological analysis of urine and serum after neutral and basic liquid-liquid extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Whereas the immunoassay delivered negative results, analyzing the urine sample by GC-MS in full scan mode disclosed the presence of α-PVP and its metabolites α-(2″-oxo-pyrrolidino)valerophenone (2″-oxo-α-PVP) and 1-phenyl-2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)pentan-1-ol (OH-α-PVP). In the acetylated urine sample we found additionally N,N-bis-dealkyl-PVP. In serum, α-PVP could be detected after solid phase extraction and a concentration of 29ng/mL was determined. Other forensic relevant substances were not detected. The presented data can explain the psychotic symptoms and behavioural pattern of the subject after abuse of α-PVP, leading to a clinical condition similar to excited delirium syndrome. PMID:26775198

  10. Chemometrics-assisted Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Two Co-administered Drugs of Major Interaction, Methotrexate and Aspirin, in Human Urine Following Acid-induced Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Ragab, Marwa A A; El-Kimary, Eman I

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), mostly along with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the most common of which is aspirin or acetyl salicylic acid (ASA). Since NSAIDs impair MTX clearance and increase its toxicity, it was necessary to develop a simple and reliable method for the monitoring of MTX levels in urine samples, when coadministered with ASA. The method was based on the spectrofluorimetric measurement of the acid-induced hydrolysis product of MTX, 4-amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroic acid (AMP), along with the strongly fluorescent salicylic acid (SA), a product of acid-induced hydrolysis of aspirin and its metabolites in urine. The overlapping emission spectra were resolved using the derivative method (D method). In addition, the corresponding derivative emission spectra were convoluted using discrete Fourier functions, 8-points sin xi polynomials, (D/FF method) for better elimination of interferences. Validation of the developed methods was carried out according to the ICH guidelines. Moreover, the data obtained using derivative and convoluted derivative spectra were treated using the non-parametric Theil's method (NP), compared with the least-squares parametric regression method (LSP). The results treated with Theil's method were more accurate and precise compared with LSP since the former is less affected by the outliers. This work offers the potential of both derivative and convolution using discrete Fourier functions in addition to the effectiveness of using the NP regression analysis of data. The high sensitivity obtained by the proposed methods was promising for measuring low concentration levels of the two drugs in urine samples. These methods were efficiently used to measure the drugs in human urine samples following their co-administration. PMID:26234512

  11. Three-dimensional surface-enhanced Raman scattering hotspots in spherical colloidal superstructure for identification and detection of drugs in human urine.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenzhen; Liu, Honglin; Wang, Bin; Weng, Shizhuang; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-01-01

    Rapid component separation and robust surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) identification of drugs in real human urine remain an attractive challenge because of the sample complexity, low molecular affinity for metal surface, and inefficient use of hotspots in one- or two-dimensional (2D) geometries. Here, we developed a 5 min strategy of cyclohexane (CYH) extraction for separating amphetamines from human urine. Simultaneously, an oil-in-water emulsion method is used to assemble monodisperse Ag nanoparticles in the CYH phase into spherical colloidal superstructures in the aqueous phase. These superstructures create three-dimensional (3D) SERS hotspots which exist between every two adjacent particles in 3D space, break the traditional 2D limitation, and extend the hotspots into the third dimension along the z-axis. In this platform, a conservative estimate of Raman enhancement factor is larger than 10(7), and the same CYH extraction processing results in a high acceptability and enrichment of drug molecules in 3D hotspots which demonstrates excellent stability and reproducibility and is suitable for the quantitative examination of amphetamines in both aqueous and organic phases. Parallel ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) examinations corroborate an excellent performance of our SERS platform for the quantitative analysis of methamphetamine (MA) in both aqueous solution and real human urine, of which the detection limits reach 1 and 10 ppb, respectively, with tolerable signal-to-noise ratios. Moreover, SERS examinations on different proportions of MA and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in human urine demonstrate an excellent capability of multiplex quantification of ultratrace analytes. By virtue of a spectral classification algorithm, we realize the rapid and accurate recognition of weak Raman signals of amphetamines at trace levels and also clearly distinguish various proportions of multiplex components. Our platform for detecting drugs

  12. Sensitive monitoring of monoterpene metabolites in human urine using two-step derivatisation and positive chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lukas; Belov, Vladimir N; Göen, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    A gas chromatographic-positive chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometric (GC-PCI-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of 10 oxidative metabolites of the monoterpenoid hydrocarbons α-pinene, (R)-limonene, and Δ(3)-carene ((+)-3-carene) in human urine was developed and tested for the monoterpene biomonitoring of the general population (n=36). The method involves enzymatic cleavage of the glucuronides followed by solid-supported liquid-liquid extraction and derivatisation using a two-step reaction with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide and N-(trimethylsilyl)imidazole. The method proved to be both sensitive and reliable with detection limits ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 μg L(-1). In contrast to the frequent and distinct quantities of (1S,2S,4R)-limonene-1,2-diol, the (1R,2R,4R)-stereoisomer could not be detected. The expected metabolite of (+)-3-carene, 3-caren-10-ol was not detected in any of the samples. All other metabolites were detected in almost all urine samples. The procedure enables for the first time the analysis of trace levels of a broad spectrum of mono- and bicyclic monoterpenoid metabolites (alcohols, diols, and carboxylic acids) in human urine. This analytical procedure is a powerful tool for population studies as well as for the discovery of human metabolism and toxicokinetics of monoterpenes. PMID:23953203

  13. Monolithic spin column: a new extraction device for analysis of drugs in urine and serum by GC/MS and HPLC/MS.

    PubMed

    Namera, Akira; Nagao, Masakata; Nakamoto, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Shota; Saito, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    A monolithic spin column was developed for the extraction of analytes from biological materials. This column was constructed by packing a monolithic silica disk into a spin column. Sample loading, washing, and elution of the target drugs were accomplished simply by centrifugation of the column. Opiates and benzodiazepines are abused throughout the world. Identification and quantification of these drugs is very important to solve crimes or the cause of death. Three opiates (morphine, codeine, and dihydrocodeine) were extracted from urine and serum by using the column. After conversion to trimethylsilyl derivatives of the opiates by vigorous mixing with the derivatizing reagent, the solution was subjected to GC/MS. A linear curve was observed for opiates from 10 to 2500 ng/mL in urine and 5 to 1200 ng/mL in serum, respectively (correlation coefficient > 0.996). For benzodiazepines, the hydroxyl metabolites of triazolam and etizolam were extracted from urine using the column, and the eluate was directly analyzed by HPLC/MS without evaporation. The LOD values were at the ppb level, with RSD values lower than 15%. The proposed methods were successfully applied to clinical and forensic cases, and good agreement of results was obtained compared to conventional methods. PMID:21797004

  14. A review on development of analytical methods to determine monitorable drugs in serum and urine by micellar liquid chromatography using direct injection.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Romero, Josep; Albiol-Chiva, Jaume; Peris-Vicente, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring is a common practice in clinical studies. It requires the quantification of drugs in biological fluids. Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC), a well-established branch of Reverse Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC), has been proven by many researchers as a useful tool for the analysis of these matrices. This review presents several analytical methods, taken from the literature, devoted to the determination of several monitorable drugs in serum and urine by micellar liquid chromatography. The studied groups are: anticonvulsants, antiarrhythmics, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, analgesics and bronchodilators. We detail the optimization strategy of the sample preparation and the main chromatographic conditions, such as the type of column, mobile phase composition (surfactant, organic solvent and pH), and detection. The finally selected experimental parameters, the validation, and some applications have also been described. In addition, their performances and advantages have been discussed. The main ones were the possibility of direct injection, and the efficient chromatographic elution, in spite of the complexity of the biological fluids. For each substance, the measured concentrations were accurate and precise at their respective therapeutic range. It was found that the MLC-procedures are fast, simple, inexpensive, ecofriendly, safe, selective, enough sensitive and reliable. Therefore, they represent an excellent alternative for the determination of drugs in serum and urine for monitoring purposes. PMID:27216388

  15. Determination of bromazepam, clonazepam and metabolites after a single intake in urine and hair by LC-MS/MS. Application to forensic cases of drug facilitated crimes.

    PubMed

    Chèze, Marjorie; Villain, Marion; Pépin, Gilbert

    2004-10-29

    The number of reports on drug facilitated crimes is increasing these last years. Apart from ethanol and cannabis, benzodiazepines (BZD) and analogs are the most common drugs reported to be used probably due to their amnesic and sedative properties. We have developed a rapid and sensitive method using LC-MS/MS triple stage quadrupole (TSQ) for the determination of single exposure to bromazepam (Lexomil, 6 mg) and clonazepam (Rivotril, 2 mg) in urine and hair of healthy volunteers. Chromatography was carried out on a Uptisphere ODB 5 microm, 2.1 mm x 150 mm column (Interchim) with a gradient of acetonitrile and formate 2 mM buffer, pH 3. Urine was extracted with Toxitube A (Varian) and allowed the detection of bromazepam, 3-hydroxy-bromazepam, clonazepam and 7-Aminoclonazepam for more than 6 days. Head hair, collected 1 month after the exposure, was treated by incubation with Soerensen buffer pH 7.6, followed by liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane for common BZD. A specific pre-treatment for amino-BZD, with an incubation of 15 min at 95 degrees C in 0.1 N NaOH before liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane, gave better recoveries and repeatability. After single exposure, bromazepam was present in powdered hair at 28 pg/mg and 7-Aminoclonazepam at 22 pg/mg in the first 1-cm segment, while no clonazepam was detectable. This method was applied in two forensic cases. It allowed us to determine bromazepam in urine 3 days after the alleged offense and in cut head hair at a concentration of 6.7 pg/mg only in the 2-cm proximal segment. The other case showed the presence of clonazepam and 7-Aminoclonazepam in urine a few hours after the offense and the presence of 7-Aminoclonazepam at about 3.2 pg/mg in axillary hair 4 months later. PMID:15451083

  16. Legal Position of School Personnel -- Drugs and Narcotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Thomas A.

    California educators have been given broad discretionary powers to control students who misuse drugs or narcotics, and to develop drug education programs. This paper outlines and discusses legislation dealing with disciplinary actions against drug offenders, and delineates school responsibilities for developing and implementing effective drug…

  17. Is a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy a predictive factor for positive allergy tests to anaesthetics?

    PubMed Central

    Hagau, Natalia; Gherman-Ionica, Nadia; Hagau, Denisa; Tranca, Sebastian; Sfichi, Manuela; Longrois, Dan

    2012-01-01

    AIMS International recommendations stipulate not performing screening skin tests to a drug in the absence of a clinical history consistent with that specific drug allergy. Nevertheless, two publications showed that a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy was the only predictive factor for a positive skin test when screening for allergy to anaesthetic drugs was done. We selected from a surgical population 40 volunteers with a prior history of allergy to non-anaesthetic drugs in order to analyse the prevalence of positive allergy tests to anaesthetics. METHODS The selected adult patients were tested for 11 anaesthetic drugs using in vivo tests: skin prick (SPT) and intradermal (IDT) tests and in vitro tests: the basophil activation test (BAT) and detection of drug-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). RESULTS The prevalence for the positive SPT and IDT was 1.6% and 5.8% respectively. The result of flow cytometry agreed with the SPT in five out of seven positive SPT (71%). IgEs confirmed two positive SPT with corresponding positive BAT. Ten per cent of the patients had a positive prick test to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). For midazolam none of the SPT was positive, but 11 patients had positive IDT nonconfirmed by BAT. CONCLUSION The prevalence of positive in vivo and in vitro allergy tests to NMBAs is higher in our study population. This could be an argument for pre-operative SPT to NMBAs for the surgical population with reported non-anaesthetic drug allergies. A larger prospective study is needed to validate changes in clinical practice. PMID:21988224

  18. Ionic liquid-based dynamic liquid-phase microextraction: application to the determination of anti-inflammatory drugs in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Marta; Lucena, Rafael; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2008-08-15

    Dynamic liquid-phase microextraction (dLPME) using an ionic liquid as acceptor phase is proposed for the determination of six non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in human urine samples for the first time. The extraction is carried out in a simple and automatic flow configuration. The chemical affinity between the extractant (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate) and the analytes permits a selective isolation of the drugs from the sample matrix allowing also their preconcentration. The whole analytical method has been optimized taking into account all the chemical, physical and hydrodynamic variables. The proposed method is a valuable alternative for the analysis of these drugs in urine within the concentration range 0.1-10 microg mL(-1), allowing their determination at therapeutic and toxic levels. Limits of detection were in the range from 38 ng mL(-1) (indomethacin) to 70 ng mL(-1) (naproxen). The repeatability of the proposed method expressed as RSD (n=5) varied between 2.1% (flurbiprofen) and 3.8% (tolmetin). PMID:18632109

  19. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Determination of Nine Hallucinogenic 25-NBOMe Designer Drugs in Urine Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Poklis, Justin L.; Clay, Deborah J.; Poklis, Alphonse

    2014-01-01

    We present a high-performance liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC–MS-MS) method for the identification and quantification of nine serotonin 5-HT2A receptor agonist hallucinogenic substances from a new class of N-methoxybenzyl derivatives of methoxyphenylethylamine (NBOMe) designer drugs in human urine: 25H-NBOMe, 2CC-NBOMe, 25I-NBF, 25D-NBOMe, 25B-NBOMe, 2CT-NBOMe, 25I-NBMD, 25G-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe. This assay was developed for the Virginia Commonwealth University Clinical and Forensic Toxicology laboratory to screen emergency department specimens in response to an outbreak of N-benzyl-phenethylamine derivative abuse and overdose cases in Virginia. The NBOMe derivatives were rapidly extracted from the urine specimens by use of FASt™ solid-phase extraction columns. Assay performance was determined as recommended for validation by the Scientific Working Group for Forensic Toxicology (SWGTOX) for linearity, lower limit of quantification, lower limit of detection, accuracy/bias, precision, dilution integrity, carryover, selectivity, absolute recovery, ion suppression and stability. Linearity was verified to be from 1 to 100 ng/mL for each of the nine analytes. The bias determined for the NBOMe derivatives was 86–116% with a <14% coefficient of variation over the linear range of the assay. Four different NBOMe derivatives were detected using the presented method in patient urine specimens. PMID:24535338

  20. Simultaneous analysis of several non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in human urine by high-performance liquid chromatography with normal solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Hirai, T; Matsumoto, S; Kishi, I

    1997-05-01

    A practical and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatographic method using normal solid-phase extraction has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of twelve non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in human urine. A urine specimen mixed with acetate buffer pH 5.0 was purified by solid-phase extraction on a Sep-Pak Silica cartridge. The analyte was chromatographed by a reversed-phase Inertsil ODS-2 column using a phosphate buffer-acetonitrile at pH 5.0 as the mobile phase, and the effluent from the column was monitored at 230 or 320 nm. Absolute recoveries were greater than 73% for all of the twelve NSAIDs. The present method enabled simple manipulation and isocratic HPLC with UV analysis as well as high sensitivity of 0.005 microg/ml for naproxen, and 0.05 microg/ml for sulindac, piroxicam, loxoprofen, ketoprofen, felbinac, fenbufen, flurbiprofen, diclofenac, ibuprofen and mefenamic acid as the quantitation limit in human urine using indomethacin as an internal standard. PMID:9188827

  1. Determination of chemotherapeutic drugs in human urine by capillary electrophoresis with UV and fluorimetric detection using solid-supported liquid-liquid extraction for sample clean-up.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Sánchez, María del Carmen; Acedo-Valenzuela, María Isabel; Durán-Merás, Isabel; Rodríguez-Cáceres, María Isabel

    2015-06-01

    Capillary electrophoresis was used for the rapid determination of three chemotherapeutic drugs employed to treat colorectal cancer: irinotecan, tegafur, and leucovorin, and their main metabolites (7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin and 5-fluorouracil), in human urine samples. A phosphate buffer (pH 11.34; 20 mM) was selected as the background electrolyte. A hydrodynamic injection (9 s, 30 mbar) was applied and the separation was carried out using a separation temperature and voltage of 25°C and 25 kV, respectively. A capillary with two detection windows for serial online UV and fluorescence detection was satisfactorily employed. A solid-supported liquid-liquid extraction procedure was optimized for the clean-up of the urine samples and the extraction of the analytes. Matrix effects were assessed and signal suppression was observed for three of the analytes, thus, matrix-matched calibration was used for compensating residual matrix effects on these analytes. The proposed method allows the separation and quantification of the chemotherapeutics in less than 6 min. Detection limits range between 0.01 and 0.30 mg/L. The method was satisfactorily applied to the determination of the target compounds in human urine samples, with recoveries of 92.4-107.7%. PMID:25820908

  2. Single-drop microextraction combined in-line with capillary electrophoresis for the determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in urine samples.

    PubMed

    García-Vázquez, Alejandro; Borrull, Francesc; Calull, Marta; Aguilar, Carme

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a method to determine nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in urine samples based on the use of single-drop microextraction (SDME) in a three-phase design as a preconcentration technique coupled in-line to capillary electrophoresis. Different parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the SDME process were evaluated (e.g. type of extractant, volume of the microdroplet, and extraction time). The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of human urine samples with LODs ranging between 1.0 and 2.5 μg/mL for all of the NSAIDs under study. This method shows RSD values ranging from 8.5 to 15.3% in interday analysis. The enrichment factors were calculated, resulting 27-fold for ketoprofen, 14-fold for diclofenac, 12-fold for ibuprofen, and 44-fold naproxen. Samples were analyzed applying the SDME-CE method and the obtained results presented satisfactory recovery values (82-115%). The overall method can be considered a promising approach for the analysis of NSAIDs in urine samples after minimal sample pretreatment. PMID:26530782

  3. Immunofixation - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... need to supply a clean-catch (midstream) urine sample. Clean the area around where urine leaves the body. Men or boys should wipe the head of the penis. Women or girls should wash the area between the lips of the vagina with soapy water and rinse well. Allow a small amount to ...

  4. Fatal Crashes from Drivers Testing Positive for Drugs in the U.S., 1993–2010

    PubMed Central

    Stimpson, Jim P.; Pagán, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Illegal drug use is a persistent problem, prescription drug abuse is on the rise, and there is clinical evidence that drug use reduces driving performance. This study describes trends in characteristics of drivers involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes who test positive for drugs. Methods We used the Fatality Analysis Reporting System—a census of motor vehicle crashes resulting in at least one fatality on U.S. public roads—to investigate suspected drug use for the period 1993–2010. Results Drugged drivers who were tested for drug use accounted for 11.4% of all drivers involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes in 2010. Drugged drivers are increasingly likely to be older drivers, and the percentage using multiple drugs increased from 32.6% in 1993 to 45.8% in 2010. About half (52.4%) of all drugged drivers used alcohol, but nearly three-quarters of drivers testing positive for cocaine also used alcohol. Prescription drugs accounted for the highest fraction of drugs used by drugged drivers in fatal crashes in 2010 (46.5%), with much of the increase in prevalence occurring since the mid-2000s. Conclusions The profile of a drugged driver has changed substantially over time. An increasing share of these drivers is now testing positive for prescription drugs, cannabis, and multiple drugs. These findings have implications for developing interventions to address the changing nature of drug use among drivers in the U.S. PMID:24982537

  5. Combination of counter current salting-out homogenous liquid-liquid extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as a novel microextraction of drugs in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Akramipour, Reza; Fattahi, Nazir; Pirsaheb, Meghdad; Gheini, Simin

    2016-02-15

    The counter current salting-out homogenous liquid-liquid extraction (CCSHLLE) joined with the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) has been developed as a high preconcentration technique for the determination of different drugs in urine samples. Amphetamines were employed as model compounds to assess the extraction procedure and were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). In this method, initially, NaCl as a separation reagent is filled into a small column and a mixture of urine and acetonitrile is passed through the column. By passing the mixture, NaCl is dissolved and the fine droplets of acetonitrile are formed due to salting-out effect. The produced droplets go up through the remained mixture and collect as a separated layer. Then, the collected acetonitrile is removed with a syringe and mixed with 30.0μL 1-undecanol (extraction solvent). In the second step, the 5.00mLK2CO3 solution (2% w/v) is rapidly injected into the above mixture placed in a test tube for further DLLME-SFO. Under the optimum conditions, calibration curves are linear in the range of 1-3000μgL(-1) and limit of detections (LODs) are in the range of 0.5-2μgL(-1). The extraction recoveries and enrichment factors ranged from 78 to 84% and 157 to 168, respectively. Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 100μgL(-1) of amphetamines were in the range of 3.5-4.5% and 4-5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied for the determination of amphetamines in the actual urine samples. The relative recoveries of urine samples spiked with amphetamine and methamphetamine are 90-108%. PMID:26828152

  6. Biotransformation and detectability of the designer drug 2,5-dimethoxy-4-propylphenethylamine (2C-P) studied in urine by GC-MS, LC-MS(n), and LC-high-resolution-MS(n).

    PubMed

    Wink, Carina S D; Meyer, Markus R; Braun, Tina; Turcant, Alain; Maurer, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    2,5-Dimethoxy-4-propylphenethylamine (2C-P) is a hallucinogenic designer drug of the phenethylamine class, the so-called 2Cs, named according to the ethyl spacer between the nitrogen and the aromatic ring. The aims of the present work were to identify the phases I and II metabolites of 2C-P. In addition, the detectability of 2C-P and its metabolites in urine as proof of an intake in clinical or forensic cases was tested. According to the identified metabolites, the following pathways were proposed: N-acetylation; deamination followed by reduction to the corresponding alcohol and oxidation to carbonic acid; mono- and bis-hydroxylation at different positions; mono- and bis-O-demethylation, followed by glucuronidation, sulfation, or both; and combination of these steps. Proof of an intake of a common user's dose of 2C-P was possible by both standard urine screening approaches, the GC-MS as well as the LC-MS(n) approach. PMID:25120185

  7. Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum-containing drugs in two hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Bettina; Crauste-Manciet, Sylvie; Guibert, Agnès; Mourier, Wilhelmine; Guerrault-Moro, Marie-Noelle; Ferrari, Sylvie; Jomier, Jean-Yves; Brossard, Denis; Schierl, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum containing drugs was implemented in two French hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators and having similar working procedures when preparing antineoplastic drugs. Wipe sampling of surfaces, gloves, and vials was performed in the preparation room and in storage areas. All employees involved in the preparation of antineoplastic drugs were tested for urinary platinum on Monday before work and Friday after shift. Only traces of platinum were detected on surfaces in the preparation room outside the isolators (less than 1.61 pg cm(-2)). However, in one center, significant contamination was found in the storage area of the drug vials, which can most likely be linked to the rupture of a platinum vial and due to inefficient cleaning procedures. Surfaces inside the isolators were found to be contaminated (maximum: 198.4 pg cm(-2)). A higher level of contamination was detected in one pharmacy and could be explained by the lack of overgloving with regular changes during the preparation process. Nitrile gloves used during drug handling outside the isolator showed the highest platinum concentration (maximum: 5.86 ng per pair). With regards to platinum urine concentration, no significant difference was found between exposed and unexposed pharmacy personnel. Isolator technology combined with individual protective measures seems to be efficient to protect workers from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, whereas specific individual protective procedures implemented were focussing on the risk of handling vials outside the isolator (e.g. high frequency of glove changing). Moreover, overgloving inside the isolator would contribute to substantially decrease inner surface contamination and should be recommended in order to limit the transfer of chemical contamination to the end products. PMID:23091112

  8. Sensitive determination of positional isomers of benzenediols in human urine by boronate affinity capillary electrophoresis with chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zian; Sun, Xiaobo; Hu, Wenli; Yin, Yuqing; Chen, Guonan

    2014-04-01

    A boronate ACE coupled with chemiluminescence (CL) detection was developed for sensitive determination of three isomeric benzenediols, which was based on the principle of an inhibited effect of borate complexation on the CL reaction between luminol and potassium hexacyanoferrate (K3 Fe(CN)6 ) in alkaline solution. The effects of some important factors on CE separation and CL intensity were systemically investigated. Baseline separation of isomeric benzenediols including o-benzenediol, m-benzenediol, and p-benzenediol was achieved by using a mobile phase of 40 mmol/L glycine-NaOH buffer at pH 9.4 containing 0.8 mmol/L luminol and 0.4 mol/L 4-iodophenylboronic acid. The calibration curves of the analytes by plotting the peak height against corresponding concentration were linear over the range of 4.5 × 10(-8) ∼ 4.5 × 10(-5) mol/L for p-benzenediol, 6.8 × 10(-8) ∼ 2.7 × 10(-5) mol/L for m-benzenediol, and 9.0 × 10(-8) ∼ 4.5 × 10(-5) mol/L for o-benzenediol. The corresponding detection limits for p-, m-, and o-benzenediols were 2.8 × 10(-8) mol/L (68 amol), 3.2 × 10(-8) mol/L (108.4 amol), and 3.7 × 10(-8) mol/L (125.8 amol; S/N = 3), respectively. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of trace benzenediols in spiked human urine sample and the recoveries were >97.2%. Our primary result demonstrated the proposed CE-CL method has great potential for biomarker determination in clinical diagnosis. PMID:24115126

  9. Treatment for Positive Urine Cultures in Hospitalized Adults: A Survey of Prevalence and Risk Factors in 3 Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Grein, Jonathan D; Kahn, Katherine L; Eells, Samantha J; Choi, Seong K; Go-Wheeler, Marianne; Hossain, Tanzib; Riva, Maya Y; Nguyen, Megan H; Rekha Murthy, A; Miller, Loren G

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND Antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is prevalent but often contrary to published guidelines. OBJECTIVE To evaluate risk factors for treatment of ASB. DESIGN Retrospective observational study. SETTING A tertiary academic hospital, county hospital, and community hospital. PATIENTS Hospitalized adults with bacteriuria. METHODS Patients without documented symptoms of urinary tract infection per Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) criteria were classified as ASB. We examined ASB treatment risk factors as well as broad-spectrum antibiotic usage and quantified diagnostic concordance between IDSA and National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. RESULTS Among 300 patients with bacteriuria, ASB was present in 71% by IDSA criteria. By National Healthcare Safety Network criteria, 71% of patients had ASB; within-patient diagnostic concordance with IDSA was moderate (kappa, 0.52). After excluding those given antibiotics for nonurinary indications, antibiotics were given to 38% (62/164) with ASB. Factors significantly associated with ASB treatment were elevated urine white cell count (65 vs 24 white blood cells per high-powered field, P<.01), hospital identity (hospital C vs A, odds ratio, 0.34 [95% CI, 0.14-0.80], P =.01), presence of leukocyte esterase (5.48 [2.35-12.79], P<.01), presence of nitrites (2.45 [1.11-5.41], P=.03), and Escherichia coli on culture (2.4 [1.2-4.7], P=.01). Of patients treated for ASB, broad-spectrum antibiotics were used in 84%. CONCLUSIONS ASB treatment was prevalent across settings and contributed to broad-spectrum antibiotic use. Associating abnormal urinalysis results with the need for antibiotic treatment regardless of symptoms may drive unnecessary antibiotic use. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(3):319-326. PMID:26607408

  10. Enhanced amperometric detection of metronidazole in drug formulations and urine samples based on chitosan protected tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine thin-film modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, S; Pandian, K; Jayakumari, L S; Inbasekaran, S

    2016-02-01

    An enhanced electrocatalytic reduction of metronidazole antibiotic drug molecule using chitosan protected tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine (Chit/CuTsPc) thin-film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been developed. An irreversible reduction occurs at -0.47V (vs. Ag/AgCl) using Chit/CuTsPc modified GCE. A maximum peak current value is obtained at pH1 and the electrochemical reduction reaction is a diffusion controlled one. The detection limit is found to be 0.41nM from differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) method. This present investigation method is adopted for electrochemical detection of metronidazole in drug formulation and urine samples by using DPV method. PMID:26652358

  11. Frequent Urination

    MedlinePlus

    ... leader Partner Spotlight Become a partner World Prematurity Day Your support helps babies We are determined to ... very strong. After birth For the first few days after delivery, you may urinate even more often ...

  12. Urination Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Urination ...

  13. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... best treatment for the most common type of kidney stone , which is made of calcium. This type of ... the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production ...

  14. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production of ... Milk-alkali syndrome Proximal renal tubular acidosis Rickets Sarcoidosis Vitamin D Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated ...

  15. Urine Preservative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M. (Inventor); Nillen, Jeannie (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is CPG, a combination of a chlorhexidine salt (such as chlorhexidine digluconate, chlorhexidine diacetate, or chlorhexidine dichloride) and n-propyl gallate that can be used at ambient temperatures as a urine preservative.

  16. Bilirubin - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... or gallbladder Considerations Bilirubin can break down in light. That is why babies with jaundice are sometimes placed under blue fluorescent lamps. Alternative Names Conjugated bilirubin - urine; Direct bilirubin - ...

  17. Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.

    2012-01-01

    A method combines solid phase acidification with two non-toxic biocides to prevent ammonia volatilization and microbial proliferation. The safe, non-oxidizing biocide combination consists of a quaternary amine and a food preservative. This combination has exhibited excellent stabilization of both acidified and unacidified urine. During pretreatment tests, composite urine collected from donors was challenged with a microorganism known to proliferate in urine, and then was processed using the nonhazardous urine pre-treatment method. The challenge microorganisms included Escherichia coli, a common gram-negative bacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, a ureolytic gram-positive bacteria; Candida albicans, a yeast commonly found in urine; and Aspergillus niger, a problematic mold that resists urine pre-treatment. Urine processed in this manner remained microbially stable for over 57 days. Such effective urine stabilization was achieved using non-toxic, non-oxidizing biocides at higher pH (3.6 to 5.8) than previous methods in use or projected for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). ISS urine pretreatment methods employ strong oxidants including ozone and hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a carcinogenic material, under very acidic conditions (pH = 1.8 to 2.4). The method described here offers a much more benign chemical environment than previous pretreatment methods, and will lower equivalent system mass (ESM) by reducing containment volume and mass, system complexity, and crew time needed to handle pre-treatment chemicals. The biocides, being non-oxidizing, minimize the potential for chemical reactions with urine constituents to produce volatile, airborne contaminants such as cyanogen chloride. Additionally, the biocides are active under significantly less acidic conditions than those used in the current system, thereby reducing the degree of required acidification. A simple flow-through solid phase acidification (SPA) bed is employed to overcome the natural buffering

  18. Analysis of monofluoroacetic acid in urine by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry and preparation of the positive sample by the bioconversion from monofluoroacetamide to monofluoroacetic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Min; Cai, Zeng-Xuan; Zhang, Jing-Shun; Ren, Yiping; Han, Jian-Long

    2016-08-01

    Whether as a rodenticide or as a natural product, monofluoroacetic acid (FAcOH) may cause poisoning to humans or animals for its high acute toxicity. Urine is one of the most typical specimens for forensic diagnosis when poisoning case about FAcOH happens. The positive sample containing FAcOH plays a key role for the development of an accurate and reliable analytical method. The bioconversion from monofluoroacetamide (FAcNH2) to FAcOH in urine in vitro was studied for the preparation of positive urine sample containing FAcOH without standard spiking or animal experiment. The average bioconversion rates were 0%, 18.6% and 41.3% when incubated the FAcNH2 spiked urine in vitro for 21days at -20°C, room temperature (RT) and 37°C, respectively. Afterwards, a fast and sensitive analytical method was developed for determination of FAcOH in urine. Samples were diluted with water containing formic acid and cleaned with polymeric anion exchange (PAX) cartridge. The acid eluate was neutralized with ammonium hydroxide and directly measured by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using basic mobile phase condition. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of FAcOH in urine were 2 and 5ngmL(-1), respectively. The linear range was 5-1000ngmL(-1) with a correlation coefficient of r=0.9993 in urine calibrated with internal standard. The recoveries at four spiking levels (5, 10, 50 and 500ngmL(-1) in urine) were 87.2%-107% with relative standard deviations ranged between 4.3%-8.8%. PMID:27284971

  19. Urine 24-hour volume

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a day, such as: Creatinine Sodium Potassium Nitrogen Protein This test may also be done if ... disease Potassium urine test Sodium urine test Urea nitrogen urine test Urination - excessive amount Urine output - decreased ...

  20. Ketones urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ...

  1. Research & market strategy: how choice of drug discovery approach can affect market position.

    PubMed

    Sams-Dodd, Frank

    2007-04-01

    In principal, drug discovery approaches can be grouped into target- and function-based, with the respective aims of developing either a target-selective drug or a drug that produces a specific biological effect irrespective of its mode of action. Most analyses of drug discovery approaches focus on productivity, whereas the strategic implications of the choice of drug discovery approach on market position and ability to maintain market exclusivity are rarely considered. However, a comparison of approaches from the perspective of market position indicates that the functional approach is superior for the development of novel, innovative treatments. PMID:17395091

  2. In silico and in vitro metabolism studies support identification of designer drugs in human urine by liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tyrkkö, Elli; Pelander, Anna; Ketola, Raimo A; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-08-01

    Human phase I metabolism of four designer drugs, 2-desoxypipradrol (2-DPMP), 3,4-dimethylmethcathinone (3,4-DMMC), α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP), and methiopropamine (MPA), was studied using in silico and in vitro metabolite prediction. The metabolites were identified in drug abusers’ urine samples using liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/Q-TOF/MS). The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of the in silico and in vitro methods to generate the main urinary metabolites found in vivo. Meteor 14.0.0 software (Lhasa Limited) was used for in silico metabolite prediction, and in vitro metabolites were produced in human liver microsomes (HLMs). 2-DPMP was metabolized by hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and oxidation, resulting in six phase I metabolites. Six metabolites were identified for 3,4-DMMC formed via N-demethylation, reduction, hydroxylation, and oxidation reactions. α-PVP was found to undergo reduction, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and oxidation reactions, as well as degradation of the pyrrolidine ring, and seven phase I metabolites were identified. For MPA, the nor-MPA metabolite was detected. Meteor software predicted the main human urinary phase I metabolites of 3,4-DMMC, α-PVP, and MPA and two of the four main metabolites of 2-DPMP. It assisted in the identification of the previously unreported metabolic reactions for α-PVP. Eight of the 12 most abundant in vivo phase I metabolites were detected in the in vitro HLM experiments. In vitro tests serve as material for exploitation of in silico data when an authentic urine sample is not available. In silico and in vitro designer drug metabolism studies with LC/Q-TOF/MS produced sufficient metabolic information to support identification of the parent compound in vivo. PMID:23797910

  3. Sexual Risk Taking among HIV-Positive Injection Drug Users: Contexts, Characteristics, and Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Kelly R.; Purcell, David; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Halkitis, Perry N.; Gomez, Cynthia A.

    2005-01-01

    HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) (N = 161) were recruited to complete a qualitative interview and a quantitative survey about sexual behavior and transmission risk. We identified two contexts in which exposure encounters occurred most commonly for HIV-positive IDUs: in intimate serodiscordant relationships and in the drug/sex economy.…

  4. Detection of drugs in 275 alcohol-positive blood samples of Korean drivers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunmi; Choe, Sanggil; Lee, Juseon; Jang, Moonhee; Choi, Hyeyoung; Chung, Heesun

    2016-08-01

    Since driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) is as dangerous as drink-driving, many countries regulate DUID by law. However, laws against the use of drugs while driving are not yet established in Korea. In order to investigate the type and frequency of drugs used by drivers in Korea, we analyzed controlled and non-controlled drugs in alcohol-positive blood samples. Total 275 blood samples were taken from Korean drivers, which were positive in roadside alcohol testing. The following analyses were performed: blood alcohol concentrations by GC; screening for controlled drugs by immunoassay and confirmation for positive samples by GC-MS. For the detection of DUID related drugs in blood samples, a total of 49 drugs were selected and were examined by GC-MS. For a rapid detection of these drugs, an automated identification software called "DrugMan" was used. Concentrations of alcohol in 275 blood samples ranged from 0.011 to 0.249% (average 0.119%). Six specimens showed positive results by immunoassay: one methamphetamine and five benzodiazepines I. By GC-MS confirmation, only benzodiazepines in four cases were identified, while methamphetamine and benzodiazepine in two cases were not detected from the presumptive positive blood samples. Using DrugMan, four drugs were detected; chlorpheniramine (5)*, diazepam (4), dextromethorphan (1) and doxylamine (1). In addition, ibuprofen (1), lidocaine (1) and topiramate (1) were also detected as general drugs in blood samples ('*' indicates frequency). The frequency of drug abuse by Korean drivers was relatively low and a total 14 cases were positive in 275 blood samples with a ratio of 5%. However it is necessary to analyze more samples including alcohol negative blood, and to expand the range of drug lists to get the detailed information. PMID:27015372

  5. Assessment of the ion-trap mass spectrometer for routine qualitative and quantitative analysis of drugs of abuse extracted from urine.

    PubMed

    Vorce, S P; Sklerov, J H; Kalasinsky, K S

    2000-10-01

    The ion-trap mass spectrometer (MS) has been available as a detector for gas chromatography (GC) for nearly two decades. However, it still occupies a minor role in forensic toxicology drug-testing laboratories. Quadrupole MS instruments make up the majority of GC detectors used in drug confirmation. This work addresses the use of these two MS detectors, comparing the ion ratio precision and quantitative accuracy for the analysis of different classes of abused drugs extracted from urine. Urine specimens were prepared at five concentrations each for amphetamine (AMP), methamphetamine (METH), benzoylecgonine (BZE), delta9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THCCOOH), phencyclidine (PCP), morphine (MOR), codeine (COD), and 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM). Concentration ranges for AMP, METH, BZE, delta9-THCCOOH, PCP, MOR, COD, and 6-AM were 50-2500, 50-5000, 15-800, 1.5-65, 1-250, 500-32000, 250-21000, and 1.5-118 ng/mL, respectively. Sample extracts were injected into a GC-quadrupole MS operating in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode and a GC-ion-trap MS operating in either selected ion storage (SIS) or full scan (FS) mode. Precision was assessed by the evaluation of five ion ratios for n = 15 injections at each concentration using a single-point calibration. Precision measurements for SIM ion ratios provided coefficients of variation (CV) between 2.6 and 9.8% for all drugs. By comparison, the SIS and FS data yielded CV ranges of 4.0-12.8% and 4.0-11.2%, respectively. The total ion ratio failure rates were 0.2% (SIM), 0.7% (SIS), and 1.2% (FS) for the eight drugs analyzed. Overall, the SIS mode produced stable, comparable mean ratios over the concentration ranges examined, but had greater variance within batch runs. Examination of postmortem and quality-control samples produced forensically accurate quantitation by SIS when compared to SIM. Furthermore, sensitivity of FS was equivalent to SIM for all compounds examined except for 6-AM. PMID:11043665

  6. Pink urine.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, E; Capron, A; Hantson, P

    2014-11-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted after a suspected hypnotic overdose of valerian extracts. In addition to altered consciousness, the first clinical symptoms included not only diffuse rash on the face, trunk, and limbs, but also an inspiratory dyspnea with a marked hypoxemia. A major laryngeal edema was noted during orotracheal intubation. After correction of hypoxemia, the patient became agitated and propofol was administered by continuous infusion. In addition, the patient passed pink urine staining the urine collection bag. The presence of an unidentified toxic substance was suspected. PMID:25233954

  7. Determination of immunosuppressive drugs in human urine and serum by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin-Shiuan; Cheng, Yu-Han; Lin, Sheng-Yu; Chang, Sarah Y

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive method for the determination of immunosuppressive drugs through surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection (SALDI/MS) was developed. Colloidal Pd and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) were used as the SALDI co-matrix. To eliminate interference and enhance the sensitivity, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was employed to extract the immunosuppressive drugs from the aqueous solutions. Under optimal extraction and detection conditions, calibration curves for cyclosporine and everolimus in aqueous solutions were linear over a concentration range from 0.01 to 1.20 μM. For sirolimus, the linear concentration range of the calibration curve was from 0.05 to 2.00 μM. The limits of detection (LODs) were calculated to be 3, 3, and 14 nM for cyclosporine, everolimus, and sirolimus, respectively. The enrichment factors of DLLME were calculated to be 108, 122, and 101 for cyclosporine, everolimus, and sirolimus, respectively. This novel method was successfully applied for the determination of immunosuppressive drugs in human urine and serum samples. PMID:26521180

  8. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  9. Disability of Hearing Impairment Is Positively Associated With Urine Albumin/Creatinine Ratio in Korean Adults: The 2011–2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Soo; Lee, Dong-Hee; Chae, Hiun Suk; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Sohn, Tae Seo; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Kim, Hee Yeon; Lee, Jae-Im; Song, Jae Yen; Yeo, Chang Dong; Lee, Young Bok; Ahn, Hyo-Suk; Hong, Mihee; Han, Kyungdo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine whether chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with hearing thresholds in the nationwide, large-scaled Korean population. Methods. This study analyzed the data of 9,798 subjects of 19 years and older (4,387 males and 5,411 females). Urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured from first-voided spot urine samples. The air-conduction hearing threshold was measured at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 kHz and pure tone audiogram (PTA) average was calculated as the four-frequency average of 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz. Results. Urine ACR was significantly correlated with the PTA average of better ear in both genders, especially at 3 and 6 kHz in males and at 1, 3, 4, and 6 kHz in females. After adjusting, urine ACR also increased the risk of hearing loss in female, especially if urine ACR was 30 mg/g and more (odds ratio, 1.636–2.229. This study showed that the degree of hearing loss was significantly different according to categories of urine ACR in both genders. Hearing loss without disability was found less but that with bilateral hearing disability was found more as urine ACR increased. In generally, prevalence of hearing loss with disability was higher in males than females. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that urine ACR was significantly correlated with the PTA average of better ear in Korean adults of both genders. This study suggests that clinicians should carefully monitor the hearing level for subjects with elevated urine ACR, even though high urine ACR within the normal range. PMID:27416740

  10. Different policy outcomes of the new drugs and currently listed drugs under the positive list system in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui-Kyung; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Mi-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Four years have passed since the positive list system was implemented in South Korea. The system was received well because it has fulfilled its intended objective of enhancing the cost-effectiveness of new drugs. With regard to currently listed drugs, however, debate has lingered since the reevaluation of the cost-effectiveness by therapeutic group. This study intended to review the lessons learned and compromises reached in implementing an evidence-based national formulary. Currently listed drugs are very different from new drugs. In terms of effectiveness, the level of existing evidence tends to be lower for currently listed drugs. Also, the evaluation plan was quite delayed because of the vast amount of literature. In the political decision-making process, a coalition was formed by the pharmaceutical companies with physicians, and the government had difficulty responding because of the strong resistance against the reevaluation of currently listed drugs. Although idealistic, it was an attempt to apply the same standard of cost-effectiveness for currently listed drugs as that for new drugs. To successfully implement the system, however, some factors that need to be considered were limitation of available evidence on currently listed drugs and specific strategies employed against political resistance. PMID:22265054

  11. 28 CFR 550.41 - Urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Urine surveillance. 550.41 Section 550.41 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.41...

  12. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  13. Extraction-Free Ion-Pair Methods for the Assay of Trifluoperazine Dihydrochloride in Bulk Drug, Tablets, and Spiked Human Urine Using Three Sulfonphthalein Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prashanth, K. N.; Swamy, N.; Basavaiah, K.

    2014-11-01

    Three simple and sensitive extraction-free spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of trifluoperazine dihydrochloride (TFH). The methods are based on ion pair complex formation between the nitrogenous compound trifluoperazine (TFP) converted from trifluoperazine dihydrochloride and sulfonphthalein dyes, namely, bromocresol green (BCG), bromothymol blue (BTB), and bromophenol blue (BPB) in dichloromethane medium in which all the above experimental variables were circumvented. The colored products are measured at 425 nm in the BCG method, 415 nm in the BTB method, and 420 nm in the BPB method. The stoichiometry of the ion-pair complexes formed between the drug and dye (1:1) was determined by Job's continuous variations method, and the stability constants of the complexes were also calculated. These methods quantify TFP over the concentration ranges of 1.25-20.0 μg/ml in the BCG method, 1.5-21.0 μg/ml in the BTB method, and 1.5-18.0 μg/ml in the BPB method. The molar absorptivity (l·mol-1·cm-1) and Sandell sensitivity (ng/cm2) were calculated to be 2.06·104 and 0.0197; 1.82·104 and 0.0224; and 2.22·104 and 0.0183 for the BCG, BTB, and BPB methods, respectively. The methods were successfully applied to the determination of TFP in pure drug, pharmaceuticals, and in spiked human urine with good accuracy and precision.

  14. The Human Urine Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Bouatra, Souhaila; Aziat, Farid; Mandal, Rupasri; Guo, An Chi; Wilson, Michael R.; Knox, Craig; Bjorndahl, Trent C.; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Saleem, Fozia; Liu, Philip; Dame, Zerihun T.; Poelzer, Jenna; Huynh, Jessica; Yallou, Faizath S.; Psychogios, Nick; Dong, Edison; Bogumil, Ralf; Roehring, Cornelia; Wishart, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Urine has long been a “favored” biofluid among metabolomics researchers. It is sterile, easy-to-obtain in large volumes, largely free from interfering proteins or lipids and chemically complex. However, this chemical complexity has also made urine a particularly difficult substrate to fully understand. As a biological waste material, urine typically contains metabolic breakdown products from a wide range of foods, drinks, drugs, environmental contaminants, endogenous waste metabolites and bacterial by-products. Many of these compounds are poorly characterized and poorly understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of this biofluid we have undertaken a comprehensive, quantitative, metabolome-wide characterization of human urine. This involved both computer-aided literature mining and comprehensive, quantitative experimental assessment/validation. The experimental portion employed NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), direct flow injection mass spectrometry (DFI/LC-MS/MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiments performed on multiple human urine samples. This multi-platform metabolomic analysis allowed us to identify 445 and quantify 378 unique urine metabolites or metabolite species. The different analytical platforms were able to identify (quantify) a total of: 209 (209) by NMR, 179 (85) by GC-MS, 127 (127) by DFI/LC-MS/MS, 40 (40) by ICP-MS and 10 (10) by HPLC. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to identify several previously unknown urine metabolites and to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage. It also allowed us to critically assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of different platforms or technologies. The literature review led to the identification and annotation of another 2206 urinary compounds and was used to help guide the subsequent experimental studies. An online database containing

  15. Antibiotic therapeutic options for infections caused by drug-resistant Gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed

    Banwan, K; Senok, A C; Rotimi, V O

    2009-01-01

    Serious infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria are currently difficult to treat because many of these pathogens are now resistant to standard antimicrobial agents. As a result of the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, new antimicrobial agents are urgently needed for clinical use. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of drugs that have activity against these Gram-positive pathogens. Daptomycin, tigecycline, linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin and dalbavancin are five antimicrobial agents that are useful for the treatment of infections due to drug-resistant Gram-positive cocci. This review focuses on their mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, spectrum of activity, clinical effectiveness, drug interaction and safety. These antimicrobial agents provide the clinician with additional treatment options among the limited therapies for resistant Gram-positive bacterial infection. PMID:20701863

  16. Determination of mepitiostane metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for sports drug testing.

    PubMed

    Okano, Masato; Sato, Mitsuhiko; Kojima, Asami; Kageyama, Shinji

    2015-11-10

    Mepitiostane (2α,3α-epithio-17β-(1-methoxycyclopentyloxy)-5α-androstane), which is a prodrug of epitiostanol (2α,3α-epitio-5α-androstane-17β-ol), is an epitiosteroid having anti-estrogenic and weak androgenic anabolic activities. The World Anti-Doping Agency prohibits the misuse of mepitiostane by athletes. Detection of the urinary metabolites epitiostanol sulfoxide and epitiostanol was studied using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for doping control purposes. The use of LC-MS provided advantages over gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for detecting heat labile steroids because epitiostanol and epitiostanol sulfoxide were primarily pyrolized to 5α-androst-2-en-17β-ol. The method consists of enzymatic hydrolysis using β-glucuronidase (Escherichia coli), liquid-liquid extraction, and subsequent ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. Epitiostanol sulfoxide was determined at urinary concentrations of 0.5-50ng/mL, recovery was 76.2-96.9%, and assay precision was calculated as 0.9-1.7% (intra-day) and 2.0-6.6% (inter-day). Epitiostanol was determined at urinary concentrations of 0.5-50ng/mL, recovery was 26.1-35.6% and assay precision was calculated as 4.1-4.6% (intra-day) and 3.3-8.5% (inter-day). The limits of detection for epitiostanol sulfoxide and epitiostanol were 0.05ng/mL and 0.10ng/mL, respectively. Epitiostanol sulfoxide and epitiostanol, as their gluco-conjugates, were identified in human urine after oral administration of 10mg mepitiostane. Epitiostanol sulfoxide and epitiostanol could be detected up to 48h and 24h after administration, respectively. The results showed that the detection window of epitiostanol is much shorter than that of epitiostanol sulfoxide. The LC-MS detection of urinary epitiostanol sulfoxide, a specific metabolite with a sulphur atom in its molecular structure, is likely to be able to identify the abuse of mepitiostane. PMID:26247800

  17. Upper airway collapse during drug induced sleep endoscopy: head rotation in supine position compared with lateral head and trunk position.

    PubMed

    Safiruddin, Faiza; Koutsourelakis, Ioannis; de Vries, Nico

    2015-02-01

    Drug induced sedated sleep endoscopy (DISE) is often employed to determine the site, severity and pattern of obstruction in patients with sleep apnea. DISE is usually performed in supine position. We recently showed that the obstruction pattern is different when DISE is performed in lateral position. In this study, we compared the outcomes of DISE performed in supine position with head rotated, with the outcomes of DISE performed with head and trunk in lateral position. The Prospective study design was used in the present study. Sixty patients with OSA (44 male; mean apnea hypopnea index (AHI) 20.8 ± 17.5 events/h) underwent DISE under propofol sedation. Patients were placed in lateral position, and the upper airway collapse was evaluated. The patients were then placed in supine position with the head rotated to the right side. DISE outcomes were scored using the VOTE classification system. In lateral position, nine patients (15.0%) had a complete antero-posterior (A-P) collapse at the level of the velum, nine had a partial A-P collapse. During head rotation and trunk in supine position, at the level of the velum, four patients (6.7%) had a complete A-P collapse, while two patients (3.3%) had a partial A-P collapse. For all other sites, the patterns of collapse were not significantly different between head rotation and lateral position. During DISE, rotation of the head in supine position, and lateral head and trunk position present similar sites, severity and patterns of upper airway collapse, with the exception of collapse at the level of the velum. Here the severity of A-P collapse is less severe during head rotation than in lateral head and trunk position. PMID:25142078

  18. A multi-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry screening procedure for the detection in human urine of drugs non-prohibited in sport commonly used by the athletes.

    PubMed

    Mazzarino, Monica; Cesarei, Lorenzo; de la Torre, Xavier; Fiacco, Ilaria; Robach, Paul; Botrè, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an analytical method for the simultaneous analysis in human urine of 38 pharmacologically active compounds (19 benzodiazepine-like substances, 7 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, 4 azole antifungal drugs, 5 inhibitors of the phosphodiesterases type 4 and 3 inhibitors of the phosphodiesterase type 5) by liquid-chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The above substances classes include both the most common "non banned" drugs used by the athletes (based on the information reported on the "doping control form") and those drugs who are suspected to be performance enhancing and/or act as masking agents in particular conditions. The chromatographic separation was performed by a reverse-phase octadecyl column using as mobile phases acetonitrile and ultra-purified water, both with 0.1% formic acid. The detection was carried out using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometric analyser, positive electro-spray as ionization source and selected reaction monitoring as acquisition mode. Sample pre-treatment consisted in an enzymatic hydrolysis followed by a liquid-liquid extraction in neutral field using tert-butyl methyl-ether. The analytical procedure, once developed, was validated in terms of sensitivity (lower limits of detection in the range of 1-50 ng mL(-1)), specificity (no interferences were detected at the retention time of all the analytes under investigation), recovery (≥60% with a satisfactory repeatability, CV % lower than 10), matrix effect (lower than 30%) and reproducibility of retention times (CV% lower than 0.1) and of relative abundances (CV% lower than 15). The performance and the applicability of the method was evaluated by analyzing real samples containing benzodiazepines (alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem or zoplicone) or inhibitors of the phosphodiesterases type 5 (sildenafil or vardenafil) and samples obtained incubating two of the phosphodiesterases type 4 studied (cilomilast or roflumilast) with pooled human liver

  19. High performance liquid chromatographic determination of ultra traces of two tricyclic antidepressant drugs imipramine and trimipramine in urine samples after their dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with response surface optimization.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Mirmohammadi, Mehrosadat

    2014-11-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography by ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) as a fast and inexpensive technique was applied to the determination of imipramine and trimipramine in urine samples. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for multivariate optimization of the effects of seven different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of the proposed method. Under optimized experimental conditions, the enrichment factors and extraction recoveries were between 161.7-186.7 and 97-112%, respectively. The linear range and limit of detection for both analytes found to be 5-100ng mL(-1) and 0.6ng mL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations for 5ng mL(-1) of the drugs in urine samples were in the range of 5.1-6.1 (n=5). The developed method was successfully applied to real urine sample analyses. PMID:25178259

  20. 28 CFR 550.42 - Procedures for urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedures for urine surveillance. 550.42... DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.42 Procedures for urine surveillance. (a) Contractor authorized personnel of the same sex as...

  1. Prediction of positive food effect: Bioavailability enhancement of BCS class II drugs.

    PubMed

    Raman, Siddarth; Polli, James E

    2016-06-15

    High-throughput screening methods have increased the number of poorly water-soluble, highly permeable drug candidates. Many of these candidates have increased bioavailability when administered with food (i.e., exhibit a positive food effect). Food is known to impact drug bioavailability through a variety of mechanisms, including drug solubilization and prolonged gastric residence time. In vitro dissolution media that aim to mimic in vivo gastrointestinal (GI) conditions have been developed to lessen the need for fed human bioequivalence studies. The objective of this work was to develop an in vitro lipolysis model to predict positive food effect of three BCS Class II drugs (i.e., danazol, amiodarone and ivermectin) in previously developed lipolysis media. This in vitro lipolysis model was comparatively benchmarked against FeSSIF and FaSSIF media that were modified for an in vitro lipolysis approach, as FeSSIF and FaSSIF are widely used in in vitro dissolution studies. The in vitro lipolysis model accurately predicted the in vivo positive food effect for three model BCS class II drugs. The in vitro lipolysis model has potential use as a screening test of drug candidates in early development to assess positive food effect. PMID:27067239

  2. Impact of a positive hepatitis C diagnosis on homeless injecting drug users: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Charlotte NE; Wright, Nat MJ; Jones, Lesley

    2005-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of injecting drug users are presenting to primary care and a growing number of general practices are specifically providing care for homeless people. Injecting drug users are at the greatest risk of hepatitis C infection and homeless drug misusers, because of their drug-taking behaviour and patterns, have been identified as being at greater risk of harm of blood-borne diseases than the general population. However, little work has been conducted with injecting drug users or homeless people who have hepatitis C and little is known about how the virus may affect them. Aim To explore the impact of a positive hepatitis C diagnosis on homeless injecting drug users. Design of study This study employed qualitative research. In-depth interviews allowed the exploration of the impact of a potentially life-threatening diagnosis within the context of a person's expressed hierarchy of needs. Setting A primary care centre for homeless people in the north of England. Method In-depth interviews about the impact of a positive hepatitis C diagnosis on their lives were conducted with 17 homeless injecting drug users who had received a positive hepatitis C diagnosis. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analysed using the framework approach. Results Receiving a positive diagnosis for hepatitis C resulted in feelings of shock, devastation, disbelief, anger, and questioning. A positive diagnosis had lasting social, emotional, psychological, behavioural, and physical effects on homeless injecting drug users, even years after the initial diagnosis. Most responders were diagnosed by a doctor in primary care or by hospital staff; however, not all had sought testing and a number were tested while inpatients and were unaware that blood had been taken for hepatitis C virus serology. Conclusions The implications for clinical policy and primary care practice are discussed, including the issues of patient choice, confidentiality, and pre- and post

  3. Potentiometric sensors enabling fast screening of the benign prostatic hyperplasia drug alfuzosin in pharmaceuticals, urine and serum.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod K; Singh, Ashok K; Gupta, Barkha

    2007-08-01

    The construction and characterization of potentiometric membrane electrodes are described for the quantification of alfuzosin, a drug used in a mono- and combined therapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The membranes of these electrodes consist of alfuzosin hydrochloride-tetraphenyl borate, (Az-TPB), chlorophenyl borate (Az-ClPB), and phosphotungstate (Az(3)-PT) ion associations as molecular recognition reagent dispersed in PVC matrix with dioctylpthalate as plasticizer. The performance characteristics of these electrodes, which were evaluated according to IUPAC recommendations, revealed a fast, stable and liner response for alfuzosin over the concentration ranges of 8.3 x 10(-6) to 1.0 x 10(-2) M, 3.8 x 10(-6) to 1.0 x 10(-2) M, 7.5 x 10(-7) to 1.0 x 10(-2) M AzCl with cationic slopes of 57.0, 56.0 and 58.5 mV/decade, respectively. The solubility product of the ion-pair and the formation constant of the precipitation reaction leading to the ion-pair formation were determined conductometrically. The electrodes, fully characterized in terms of composition, life span and usable pH range, were applied to the potentiometric determination of alfuzosin hydrochloride ion in different pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids without any interference from excipients or diluents commonly used in drug formulations. The potentiometric method was also used in the determination of alfuzosin hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparations in four batches with different expiration dates. Validation of the method showed suitability of the proposed electrodes for use in the quality control assessment of alfuzosin hydrochloride. This potentiometric method offers the advantages of high-throughput determination, simplicity, accuracy, automation feasibility, and applicability to turbid and colored sample solutions. PMID:17979639

  4. Comparison of LUCIO®-direct ELISA with CEDIA immunoassay for 'zero tolerance' drug screening in urine as required by the German re-licensing guidelines.

    PubMed

    Agius, Ronald; Nadulski, Thomas; Kahl, Hans-Gerhard; Dufaux, Bertin

    2013-06-01

    The performance of the previously validated LUCIO(®)-Direct-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (direct ELISA) screening tests according to forensic guidelines is compared to that of cloned enzyme donor immunoassays (CEDIA) test for drugs of abuse in urine as defined in the new re-licensing German medical and psychological assessment (MPA) guidelines. The MPA screening cut-offs correspond to 10 ng/ml 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH), 50 ng/ml amphetamine and designer amphetamines, 25 ng/ml morphine, codeine and dihydrocodeine, 30 ng/ml benzoylecgonine, 50 ng/ml methadone metabolite, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) and metabolites of diazepam, oxazepam, bromazepam, alprazolam, flunitrazepam and lorazepam at 50 ng/ml. Average relative sensitivities and relative specificities were 99.7 % and 98.4 % for direct ELISA and 66 % and 91.4 % for CEDIA, respectively. PMID:23349145

  5. Screening determination of four amphetamine-type drugs in street-grade illegal tablets and urine samples by portable capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Anh Huong; Pham, Thi Ngoc Mai; Ta, Thi Thao; Nguyen, Xuan Truong; Nguyen, Thi Lien; Le, Thi Hong Hao; Koenka, Israel Joel; Sáiz, Jorge; Hauser, Peter C; Mai, Thanh Duc

    2015-12-01

    A simple and inexpensive method for the identification of four substituted amphetamines, namely, 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine (MDMA), methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxy amphetamine (MDA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA) was developed using an in-house constructed semi-automated portable capillary electrophoresis instrument (CE) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D). Arginine 10mM adjusted to pH4.5 with acetic acid was found to be the optimal background electrolyte for the CE-C(4)D determination of these compounds. The best detection limits achieved with and without a sample preconcentration process were 10ppb and 500ppb, respectively. Substituted amphetamines were found in different seized illicit club drug tablets and urine samples collected from different suspected users. Good agreement between results from CE-C(4)D and those with the confirmation method (GC-MS) was achieved, with correlation coefficients for the two pairs of data of more than 0.99. PMID:26654084

  6. The effect of methadone maintenance on positive outcomes for opiate injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, Karen F; Lehman, Wayne K; Booth, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    This study examined outcome variables for 160 opiate injection drug users (IDUs) who entered methadone maintenance between baseline and 6 month follow-up. Outcome variables of interest included drug use, productivity and HIV risk behaviors. Participants were recruited through street outreach in Denver, Colorado from 2000 through 2004 using targeted sampling. The sample was primarily male, 48% White, averaged 39 years of age and had been injecting drugs for an average of nearly 20 years. Significant improvements were found in univariate tests. Logistic regression revealed that spending more time in treatment was a significant predictor of positive outcomes on drug use and HIV risk behaviors. The results underscore the importance of retaining IDUs in methadone maintenance in order to maximize their treatment success. Results from this study show that time in treatment can affect many aspects of the participant’s life in a positive way, including reduction of HIV risk. PMID:19150202

  7. Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Enrollees Report Less Positive Experiences Than Their Medicare Advantage Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Marc N; Landon, Bruce E; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Edwards, Carol; Orr, Nathan; Beckett, Megan K; Mallett, Joshua; Cleary, Paul D

    2016-03-01

    Since 2006, Medicare beneficiaries have been able to obtain prescription drug coverage through standalone prescription drug plans or their Medicare Advantage (MA) health plan, options exercised in 2015 by 72 percent of beneficiaries. Using data from community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries older than age sixty-four in 700 plans surveyed from 2007 to 2014, we compared beneficiaries' assessments of Medicare prescription drug coverage when provided by standalone plans or integrated into an MA plan. Beneficiaries in standalone plans consistently reported less positive experiences with prescription drug plans (ease of getting medications, getting coverage information, and getting cost information) than their MA counterparts. Because MA plans are responsible for overall health care costs, they might have more integrated systems and greater incentives than standalone prescription drug plans to provide enrollees medications and information effectively, including, since 2010, quality bonus payments to these MA plans under provisions of the Affordable Care Act. PMID:26953300

  8. Urinal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurd, Randy; Hacking, Kip; Haymore, Benjamin; Truscott, Tadd; Splash Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    In response to harsh and repeated criticisms from our mothers and several failed relationships with women, we present the splash dynamics of a simulated human male urine stream impacting rigid and free surfaces. Our study aims to reduce undesired splashing that may result from lavatory usage. Experiments are performed at a pressure and flow rate that would be expected from healthy male subjects. For a rigid surface, the effects of stream breakup and surface impact angle on lateral and vertical droplet ejection distances are measured using high-speed photography and image processing. For free surface impact, the effects of velocity and fluid depth on droplet ejection distances are measured. Guided by our results, techniques for splash reduction are proposed.

  9. Combination therapy with nilotinib for drug-sensitive and drug-resistant BCR-ABL-positive leukemia and other malignancies.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Ellen; Nonami, Atsushi; Griffin, James D

    2014-12-01

    Despite the clinical efficacy achieved with frontline therapies for BCR-ABL-positive disease, such as imatinib and second-generation ABL inhibitors like nilotinib or dasatinib that were originally designed to override insensitivity to imatinib, drug resistance still remains a challenge, especially for patients with advanced-stage chronic myeloid leukemia or Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The discovery of BCR-ABL point mutations has been a great asset to furthering our understanding of a major cause of drug resistance, as has discovery of multidrug resistance proteins, dysregulation of signaling molecules downstream of BCR-ABL, and insights into the underlying causes of stromal-mediated chemoresistance. Such elucidation of mechanisms of resistance associated with leukemic cell survival is essential for the optimization of current therapies and enhancement of patient survival via delaying or preventing disease recurrence. Here, we present an overview of the use of nilotinib in combination with other agents against BCR-ABL-positive leukemia, as well as solid tumors, for the purpose of increasing clinical efficacy and overriding drug resistance. PMID:25331939

  10. Chemotherapeutic potential of cow urine: A review

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Gurpreet Kaur; Sharma, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    In the grim scenario where presently about 70% of pathogenic bacteria are resistant to at least one of the drugs for the treatment, cue is to be taken from traditional/indigenous medicine to tackle it urgently. The Indian traditional knowledge emanates from ayurveda, where Bos indicus is placed at a high pedestal for numerous uses of its various products. Urine is one of the products of a cow with many benefits and without toxicity. Various studies have found good antimicrobial activity of cow’s urine (CU) comparable with standard drugs such as ofloxacin, cefpodoxime, and gentamycin, against a vast number of pathogenic bacteria, more so against Gram-positive than negative bacteria. Interestingly antimicrobial activity has also been found against some resistant strains such as multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Antimicrobial action is enhanced still further by it being an immune-enhancer and bioenhancer of some antibiotic drugs. Antifungal activity was comparable to amphotericin B. CU also has anthelmintic and antineoplastic action. CU has, in addition, antioxidant properties, and it can prevent the damage to DNA caused by the environmental stress. In the management of infectious diseases, CU can be used alone or as an adjunctive to prevent the development of resistance and enhance the effect of standard antibiotics. PMID:26401404

  11. Osmolality urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... and urine concentration. Osmolality is a more exact measurement of urine concentration than the urine specific gravity ... slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your provider ...

  12. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration of all chemical particles in the urine. ... changes to will tell the provider the specific gravity of your urine. The dipstick test gives only ...

  13. Urination - difficulty with flow

    MedlinePlus

    ... at night? Has the force of your urine flow decreased? Do you have dribbling or leaking urine? ... conditions or surgeries that could affect your urine flow? What medicines do you take? Tests that may ...

  14. A high-sensitivity ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HR-TOFMS) method for screening synthetic cannabinoids and other drugs of abuse in urine.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Mira; Pelander, Anna; Angerer, Verena; Hutter, Melanie; Kneisel, Stefan; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-10-01

    The continuing emergence of designer drugs imposes high demands on the scope and sensitivity of toxicological drug screening procedures. An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HR-TOFMS) method was developed for screening and simultaneous confirmation of both designer drugs and other drugs of abuse in urine samples in a single run. The method covered selected synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones, amphetamines, natural cannabinoids, opioids, cocaine and other important drugs of abuse, together with their main urinary metabolites. The database consisted of 277 compounds with molecular formula and exact monoisotopic mass; retention time was included for 192 compounds, and primary and secondary qualifier ion exact mass for 191 and 95 compounds, respectively. Following a solid-phase extraction, separation was performed by UHPLC and mass analysis by HR-TOFMS. MS, and broad-band collision-induced dissociation data were acquired at m/z range 50-700. Compound identification was based on a reverse database search with acceptance criteria for retention time, precursor ion mass accuracy, isotopic pattern and abundance of qualifier ions. Mass resolving power in spiked urine samples was on average FWHM 23,500 and mass accuracy 0.3 mDa. The mean and median cut-off concentrations determined for 75 compounds were 4.2 and 1 ng/mL, respectively. The range of cut-off concentrations for synthetic cannabinoids was 0.2-60 ng/mL and for cathinones 0.7-15 ng/mL. The method proved to combine high sensitivity and a wide scope in a manner not previously reported in drugs of abuse screening. The method's feasibility was demonstrated with 50 authentic urine samples. PMID:23954996

  15. DNA intercalative potential of marketed drugs testing positive in in vitro cytogenetics assays.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Ronald D; Ewing, Douglas; Hendry, Lawrence B

    2006-10-10

    We have previously noted that the Physicians' Desk Reference (PDR) contains over 80 instances in which a drug elicited a positive genotoxic response in one or more in vitro assays, despite having no obvious structural features predictive of covalent drug/DNA interactive potential or known mechanistic basis. Furthermore, in most cases, these drugs were "missed" by computational genotoxicity-predicting models such as DEREK, MCASE and TOPKAT. We have previously reported the application of a V79 cell-based model and a 3D DNA docking model for predicting non-covalent chemical/DNA interactions. Those studies suggested that molecules that are very widely structurally diverse may be capable of intercalating into DNA. To determine whether such non-covalent drug/DNA interactions might be involved in unexpected drug genotoxicity, we evaluated, using both models where possible, 56 marketed pharmaceuticals, 40 of which were reported as being clastogenic in in vitro cytogenetics assays (chromosome aberrations/mouse lymphoma assay). As seen before, the two approaches showed good concordance (62%) and 26 of the 40 (65%) drugs exhibiting in vitro clastogenicity were predicted as intercalators by one or both methods. This finding provides support for the hypothesis that non-covalent DNA interaction may be a common mechanism of clastogenicity for many drugs having no obvious structural alerts for covalent DNA interaction. PMID:16857419

  16. Doping control analysis of 46 polar drugs in horse plasma and urine using a 'dilute-and-shoot' ultra high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Wai Him; Choi, Timmy L S; Kwok, Karen Y; Chan, George H M; Wong, Jenny K Y; Wan, Terence S M

    2016-06-17

    The high sensitivity of ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) allows the identification of many prohibited substances without pre-concentration, leading to the development of simple and fast 'dilute-and-shoot' methods for doping control for human and equine sports. While the detection of polar drugs in plasma and urine is difficult using liquid-liquid or solid-phase extraction as these substances are poorly extracted, the 'dilute-and-shoot' approach is plausible. This paper describes a 'dilute-and-shoot' UHPLC-HRMS screening method to detect 46 polar drugs in equine urine and plasma, including some angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, sympathomimetics, anti-epileptics, hemostatics, the new doping agent 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR), as well as two threshold substances, namely dimethyl sulfoxide and theobromine. For plasma, the sample (200μL) was protein precipitated using trichloroacetic acid, and the resulting supernatant was diluted using Buffer A with an overall dilution factor of 3. For urine, the sample (20μL) was simply diluted 50-fold with Buffer A. The diluted plasma or urine sample was then analysed using a UHPLC-HRMS system in full-scan ESI mode. The assay was validated for qualitative identification purpose. This straightforward and reliable approach carried out in combination with other screening procedures has increased the efficiency of doping control analysis in the laboratory. Moreover, since the UHPLC-HRMS data were acquired in full-scan mode, the method could theoretically accommodate an unlimited number of existing and new doping agents, and would allow a retrospectively search for drugs that have not been targeted at the time of analysis. PMID:27180888

  17. Dendrimer-functionalized mesoporous silica as a reversed-phase/anion-exchange mixed-mode sorbent for solid phase extraction of acid drugs in human urine.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Yang, Jiajia; Huang, Chaonan; Wang, Longxing; Wang, Jincheng; Chen, Jiping

    2015-05-01

    A new dendrimer-functionalized mesoporous silica material based on large-pore 3D cubic Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology-6 (KIT-6) was synthesized by the growing of dendritic branches inside the mesopores of aminopropyl functionalized KIT-6. Detailed physical characterizations using transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and elemental analysis reveal that the multifunctional dendrimers have been grown successfully within the confined spaces of mesopores. Although the 3D ordered mesoporous architecture of KIT-6 was well preserved, there was a significant and continuous decrease in pore size, specific surface area (SBET) and pore volume when increasing dendrimer generation up to six. In order to get a compromise between the SBET, pore size and density of functionalities, the dendrimer-functionalized KIT-6 (DF-KIT-6) for generation 2 (SBET, 314.2 m(2) g(-1); pore size, 7.9 nm; carbon and nitrogen contents, 19.80% and 1.92%) was selected for solid phase extraction (SPE) applications. The DF-KIT-6 was then evaluated as a reversed-phase/anion-exchange mixed-mode sorbent for extraction of the selected acidic drugs (ketoprofen, KEP; naproxen, NAP; and ibuprofen, IBU), since the dendrimers contained both hydrocarbonaceous and amine functionalities. The effective parameters on extraction efficiency such as sample pH and volume, type and volume of eluent and wash solvents were optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the DF-KIT-6 based SPE coupled with HPLC-UV method demonstrated good sensitivity (0.4-4.6 ng mL(-1) detection of limits) and linearity (R(2)>0.990 for 10-2000 ng mL(-1) of KEP and IBU, and 1-200 ng mL(-1) of NAP). The potential use of DF-KIT-6 sorbent for preconcentration and cleanup of acid drugs in human urine samples was also demonstrated. Satisfactory recoveries at two spiking levels (30 and 300 ng mL(-1) for KEP and IBU, 3 and 30 ng mL(-1

  18. Developing and implementing a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in prison-based drug treatment: Project BRITE.

    PubMed

    Burdon, William M; St De Lore, Jef; Prendergast, Michael L

    2011-09-01

    Within prison settings, the reliance on punishment for controlling inappropriate or noncompliant behavior is self-evident. What is not so evident is the similarity between this reliance on punishment and the use of positive reinforcements to increase desired behaviors. However, seldom do inmates receive positive reinforcement for engaging in prosocial behaviors or, for inmates receiving drug treatment, behaviors that are consistent with or support their recovery. This study provides an overview of the development and implementation of a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in male and female prison-based drug treatment programs. The active involvement of institutional staff, treatment staff, and inmates enrolled in the treatment programs in the development of the intervention along with the successful branding of the intervention were effective at promoting support and participation. However, these factors may also have ultimately impacted the ability of the randomized design to reliably demonstrate the effectiveness of the intervention. PMID:22185038

  19. Workplace drug testing in Italy: findings about second-stage testing.

    PubMed

    Vignali, Claudia; Stramesi, Cristiana; Morini, Luca; San Bartolomeo, Paolo; Groppi, Angelo

    2015-03-01

    Workplace Drug Testing (WDT) in Italy includes two levels of monitoring: a first stage concerning drug testing on urine samples and a second involving both urine and hair analysis. The second stage is performed only on workers who tested positive at the first level. We analyzed urine and hair specimens from 120 workers undergoing second-level testing between 2009 and 2012. Eighty percent of them had tested positive for cannabinoids during the first level analysis, and 15.8% for cocaine. Both urine and hair samples were analyzed in order to find the following drugs of abuse: amphetamines, buprenorphine, cannabinoids, cocaine, ecstasy, methadone, and opiates. Urine analyses were performed by immunological screening (EMIT); urine confirmatory tests and hair analyses were performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). As regards second-stage testing on urine samples, 71.2% of workers were always negative, whereas 23.9% tested positive at least once for cannabinoids and 2.5% for cocaine. Hair analyses produced surprising results: 61.9% of hair samples tested negative, only 6.2% tested positive for cannabinoids, whereas 28.8% tested positive for cocaine. These findings confirm that second-level surveillance of WDT, which includes hair analysis, is very effective because it highlights drug intake - sometimes heavy - that cannot be revealed only through urine analyses. The employees for whom drug addiction is proved can begin rehabilitation, while keeping their job. Eventually, our results confirmed the widespread and undeclared use of cocaine in Italy. PMID:24652693

  20. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  1. Advances in the Diagnosis of Human Opisthorchiasis: Development of Opisthorchis viverrini Antigen Detection in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Duenngai, Kunyarat; Wangboon, Chompunoot; Sithithaworn, Jiraporn; Watwiengkam, Nattaya; Namwat, Nisana; Techasen, Anchalee; Loilome, Watcharin; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Loukas, Alex; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Bethony, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many strategies to control opisthorchiasis have been employed in Thailand, but not in the other neighbouring countries. Specific control methods include mass drug administration (MDA) and health education to reduce raw fish consumption. These control efforts have greatly shifted the epidemiology of Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) infection over the last decade from presenting as densely concentrated "heavy" infections in single villages to widespread "light" OV infections distributed over wide geographical areas. Currently, the "gold standard" detection method for OV infection is formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique (FECT), which has limited diagnostic sensitivity and diagnostic specificity for light OV infections, with OV eggs often confused with eggs of minute intestinal flukes (MIFs) in feces. In this study, we developed and evaluated the diagnostic performance of a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of OV excretory-secretory (ES) antigens in urine (urine OV-ES assay) for the diagnosis of opisthorchiasis compared to the gold standard detection FECT method. Methodology We tested several methods for pre-treating urine samples prior to testing the diagnostic performance of the urine OV-ES assay. Using trichloroacetic acid (TCA) pre-treated urine, we compared detection and quantification of OV infection using the urine OV-ES assay versus FECT in OV-endemic areas in Northeastern Thailand. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the urine OV-ES assay using TCA pre-treated urine, and to establish diagnostic positivity thresholds. The Positive Predictive Value as well as the likelihood of obtaining a positive test result (LR+) or a negative test result (LR-) were calculated for the established diagnostic positivity threshold. Diagnostic risks (Odds Ratios) were estimated using logistic regression. Results When urine samples were pre

  2. Diagnostic yield of hair and urine toxicology testing in potential child abuse cases.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Stephanie L; Wood, Stephanie M; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2015-07-01

    Detection of drugs in a child may be the first objective finding that can be reported in cases of suspected child abuse. Hair and urine toxicology testing, when performed as part of the initial clinical evaluation for suspected child abuse or maltreatment, may serve to facilitate the identification of at-risk children. Furthermore, significant environmental exposure to a drug (considered by law to constitute child abuse in some states) may be identified by toxicology testing of unwashed hair specimens. In order to determine the clinical utility of hair and urine toxicology testing in this population we performed a retrospective chart review on all children for whom hair toxicology testing was ordered at our academic medical center between January 2004 and April 2014. The medical records of 616 children aged 0-17.5 years were reviewed for injury history, previous medication and illicit drug use by caregiver(s), urine drug screen result (if performed), hair toxicology result, medication list, and outcome of any child abuse evaluation. Hair toxicology testing was positive for at least one compound in 106 cases (17.2%), with unexplained drugs in 82 cases (13.3%). Of these, there were 48 cases in which multiple compounds (including combination of parent drugs and/or metabolites within the same drug class) were identified in the sample of one patient. The compounds most frequently identified in the hair of our study population included cocaine, benzoylecgonine, native (unmetabolized) tetrahydrocannabinol, and methamphetamine. There were 68 instances in which a parent drug was identified in the hair without any of its potential metabolites, suggesting environmental exposure. Among the 82 cases in which hair toxicology testing was positive for unexplained drugs, a change in clinical outcome was noted in 71 cases (86.5%). Urine drug screens (UDS) were performed in 457 of the 616 reviewed cases. Of these, over 95% of positive UDS results could be explained by iatrogenic drug

  3. Trends in positive drug tests, United States Air Force, fiscal years 1997-1999.

    PubMed

    Grayson, J Kevin; Gibson, Roger L; Shanklin, Shari L; Neuhauser, Katerina M; McGhee, Charles

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between various demographic factors and the risk of testing positive for marijuana or cocaine use in the U.S. Air Force in fiscal years 1997 through 1999. Overall test positive rates for marijuana and cocaine were very low, at 0.24 and 0.07% of all tests, respectively. However, monthly test positive rates increased significantly during the study period while the number of tests conducted decreased by more than 50%. Gender, race/ethnicity, service component, military rank, education level, and assignment location each predicted the likelihood of testing positive for marijuana or cocaine use. These findings were consistent with annual surveys of self-reported drug use conducted in military and civilian populations in the United States. We conclude that overall testing percentages should be re-evaluated in light of these findings, but we do not recommend oversampling from population subgroups that demonstrated a higher likelihood of testing positive. PMID:15291178

  4. Recreational drug use and related social factors among HIV-positive men in Japan.

    PubMed

    Togari, Taisuke; Inoue, Yoji; Takaku, Yosuke; Abe, Sakurako; Hosokawa, Rikuya; Itagaki, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Shigeyuki; Oki, Sachiko; Katakura, Naoko; Yamauchi, Asae; Wakabayashi, Chihiro; Yajima, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to determine the relationship between recreational drug use in HIV-positive males in the past year and socio-economic factors and/or social support networks in Japan. A national online survey in a cross-sectional study was conducted by HIV Futures Japan project from July 2013 to February 2014. Of the 1095 HIV-positive individuals who responded, 913 responses were determined to be valid; responses from the 875 males were analysed. A total of 282 participants used addictive drugs (32.2%) in past year. New psychoactive substances were used by 121 participants (13.8%), methamphetamine or amphetamine by 47 (5.4%), air dusters/sprays/gas by 31 (3.5%), 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5MeO-DIPT) by 16 (1.8%) and cannabis (1.0%) by 9. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with the use of alkyl nitrites, addictive drugs, air dusters and thinners, which are low illegality, as dependent variables. We found that the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for use among participants with full-time and temp/contracted/part-time employees compared to management/administration professions were 2.59 (0.99-6.77) and 2.61 (0.91-7.51). Also, a correlation was observed between alkyl nitrites and new psychoactive substances and usage rates in people engaged in few HIV-positive networks. It is necessary to develop targeted policies for drug use prevention and user support among HIV-positive men and to support and provide care for drug users who are isolated or have a narrow HIV/AIDS support network. PMID:26887351

  5. 21 CFR 876.5250 - Urine collector and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urine collector and accessories. 876.5250 Section 876.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5250 Urine collector and accessories. (a) Identification. A...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5250 - Urine collector and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urine collector and accessories. 876.5250 Section 876.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5250 Urine collector and accessories. (a) Identification. A...

  7. Preparation of water stable methyl-modified metal-organic framework-5/polyacrylonitrile composite nanofibers via electrospinning and their application for solid-phase extraction of two estrogenic drugs in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Mina; Mehdinia, Ali; Jabbari, Ali

    2015-12-24

    The nanofibers of methyl-modified metal-organic framework-5/polyacrylonitrile composite (CH3MOF-5/PAN) were successfully synthesized and used as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent for pre-concentration of two estrogenic drugs, levonorgestrel and megestrol acetate, in urine samples. A simple, cheap and accessible electrospinning method was employed to prepare a water stable CH3MOF-5/PAN composite. The nanofibers were packed into the mini-disc cartridges to be used as SPE devices. They were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption-desorption experiments. The effects of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency including the type of eluent and its volume, the amount of the sorbent, pH, the ionic strength, the sample volume and the reusability of the sorbent were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the linearity varied in range of 0.05-100μgL(-1) with R(2) values higher than 0.999. The limit of detection for both of the analytes was 0.02μgL(-1). The applicability of the method was examined by analyzing the analytes in the urine samples. The recovery of the analytes varied in the range of 82.8-94.8% which shows capability of the method for the determination of the drugs in the urine samples. PMID:26639216

  8. Drug testing in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Cotten, Steven W

    2012-09-01

    Drug testing in newborns comes with analytical, therapeutic, and legal issues, and interpretation of results may be left to physicians, nurses, or social services workers. The unique analytical and legal caveats pose a variety of challenges and therapeutic issues. Positive drug screening results can allow for proper medical management of withdrawal symptoms for certain drug classes. Legal implications and involvement of social services for assessment of child safety surround positive urine or meconium drug samples. Because laboratory results can potentially remove newborns from their biological parents, the caveats and limitations of drug testing in this population are of utmost importance. PMID:22939302

  9. Environment-mediated drug resistance in Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Feldhahn, Niklas; Arutyunyan, Anna; Stoddart, Sonia; Zhang, Bin; Schmidhuber, Sabine; Yi, Sun-Ju; Kim, Yong-mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Although cure rates for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased, development of resistance to drugs and patient relapse are common. The environment in which the leukemia cells are present during the drug treatment is known to provide significant survival benefit. Here, we have modeled this process by culturing murine Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in the presence of stroma while treating them with a moderate dose of two unrelated drugs, the farnesyltransferase inhibitor lonafarnib and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib. This results in an initial large reduction in cell viability of the culture and inhibition of cell proliferation. However, after a number of days, cell death ceases and the culture becomes drug-tolerant, enabling cell division to resume. Using gene expression profiling, we found that the development of drug resistance was accompanied by massive transcriptional upregulation of genes that are associated with general inflammatory responses such as the metalloproteinase MMP9. MMP9 protein levels and enzymatic activity were also increased in ALL cells that had become nilotinib-tolerant. Activation of p38, Akt and Erk correlated with the development of environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR), and inhibitors of Akt and Erk in combination with nilotinib reduced the ability of the cells to develop resistance. However, inhibition of p38 promoted increased resistance to nilotinib. We conclude that development of EMDR by ALL cells involves changes in numerous intracellular pathways. Development of tolerance to drugs such as nilotinib may therefore be circumvented by simultaneous treatment with other drugs having divergent targets. PMID:22934254

  10. Combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and SERS detection applied to the analysis of drugs in human blood and urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachta, Gerd; Schwarze, Bernd; Sägmüller, Bernd; Brehm, Georg; Schneider, Siegfried

    2004-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy was employed to characterise different drugs and some of their degradation products contained in bio-matrices after separation by HPLC. Since acetonitrile, which is contained in the widely used Daldrup type eluents, adsorbs readily to the silver surface and disturbs SERS measurements at low analyte concentration, a gradient technique relying on a methanol/buffer mixture was developed. Application of this eluent helps to lower the detection limit of most of the drugs investigated (e.g. Dihydrocodeine, Doxepine, Citalopram, Trimipramine, Carbamazepine, Methadone) into the 1 μg/sample domain. The examples presented also demonstrate that the retention times determined by independent runs of reference solutions alone are not always sufficient for a unique identification of all fractions appearing in the chromatogram of a mixture that may contain degradation products. The Raman band patterns of many derivatives are, however, so distinct that in these cases an assignment to certain families of drugs is possible even without a detailed analysis of the spectrum (correlation of band positions with calculated normal mode frequencies). If SERS spectra of reference solutions recorded under similar experimental conditions are available, the described technique can provide a second, independent means of identification next to HPLC/MS for example if necessary during a law suit.

  11. Position paper from the Spanish Society of Rheumatology on biosimilar drugs.

    PubMed

    Abad Hernández, Miguel Ángel; Andreu, José Luis; Caracuel Ruiz, Miguel Ángel; Belmonte Serrano, Miguel Ángel; Díaz-González, Federico; Moreno Muelas, José Vicente

    2015-01-01

    A biosimilar (BS) is a biological drug that contains a version of the active substance of an already authorized original biological product. The BSs are marketed after patent period of the original drug has ended and once it has been demonstrated that the differences regarding the innovative medicine have no relevant effect on its safety or clinical efficacy. The Spanish Society of Rheumatology, in line with the European Medicines Agency, considers that because of its nature and complexity of production, a BS cannot be considered to be the same as a generic drug. The Spanish Society of Rheumatology expresses an unequivocal commitment to the sustainability of the health system in our country and our steadfast alignment with all measures designed to ensure continuity, without reducing the quality of care. Therefore, we believe that the advent of BSs will likely facilitate access of patients with rheumatic diseases to the biological drugs. This article reviews the European Medicines Agency requirements for authorization, the Spanish legal framework and controversies on BS and presents the position paper of the Spanish Society of Rheumatology on these drugs. PMID:25982595

  12. Pathogens and pharmaceuticals in source-separated urine in eThekwini, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bischel, Heather N; Özel Duygan, Birge D; Strande, Linda; McArdell, Christa S; Udert, Kai M; Kohn, Tamar

    2015-11-15

    In eThekwini, South Africa, the production of agricultural fertilizers from human urine collected from urine-diverting dry toilets is being evaluated at a municipality scale as a way to help finance a decentralized, dry sanitation system. The present study aimed to assess a range of human and environmental health hazards in source-separated urine, which was presumed to be contaminated with feces, by evaluating the presence of human pathogens, pharmaceuticals, and an antibiotic resistance gene. Composite urine samples from households enrolled in a urine collection trial were obtained from urine storage tanks installed in three regions of eThekwini. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeted 9 viral and 10 bacterial human pathogens transmitted by the fecal-oral route. The most frequently detected viral pathogens were JC polyomavirus, rotavirus, and human adenovirus in 100%, 34% and 31% of samples, respectively. Aeromonas spp. and Shigella spp. were frequently detected gram negative bacteria, in 94% and 61% of samples, respectively. The gram positive bacterium, Clostridium perfringens, which is known to survive for extended times in urine, was found in 72% of samples. A screening of 41 trace organic compounds in the urine facilitated selection of 12 priority pharmaceuticals for further evaluation. The antibiotics sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, which are frequently prescribed as prophylaxis for HIV-positive patients, were detected in 95% and 85% of samples, reaching maximum concentrations of 6800 μg/L and 1280 μg/L, respectively. The antiretroviral drug emtricitabine was also detected in 40% of urine samples. A sulfonamide antibiotic resistance gene (sul1) was detected in 100% of urine samples. By coupling analysis of pathogens and pharmaceuticals in geographically dispersed samples in eThekwini, this study reveals a range of human and environmental health hazards in urine intended for fertilizer production. Collection of urine offers the benefit of

  13. Advances in Urine Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Gavin J; Garigali, Giuseppe; Fogazzi, Giovanni B

    2016-06-01

    Urine microscopy is an important tool for the diagnosis and management of several conditions affecting the kidneys and urinary tract. In this review, we describe the automated instruments, based either on flow cytometry or digitized microscopy, that are currently in use in large clinical laboratories. These tools allow the examination of large numbers of samples in short periods. We also discuss manual urinary microscopy commonly performed by nephrologists, which we encourage. After discussing the advantages of phase contrast microscopy over bright field microscopy, we describe the advancements of urine microscopy in various clinical conditions. These include persistent isolated microscopic hematuria (which can be classified as glomerular or nonglomerular on the basis of urinary erythrocyte morphology), drug- and toxin-related cystalluria (which can be a clue for the diagnosis of acute kidney injury associated with intrarenal crystal precipitation), and some inherited conditions (eg, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency, which is associated with 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystalluria, and Fabry disease, which is characterized by unique urinary lamellated fatty particles). Finally, we describe the utility of identifying "decoy cells" and atypical malignant cells, which can be easily done with phase contrast microscopy in unfixed samples. PMID:26806004

  14. Social networks and HCV viremia among anti-HCV positive rural drug users

    PubMed Central

    YOUNG, A. M.; JONAS, A. B.; HAVENS, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Though social networks are known to play an important role in drug-using behaviors associated with HCV infection, literature on social networks and HCV is inconsistent. This exploratory study examined HCV RNA distribution within a social network of anti-HCV positive rural Appalachia nonmedical prescription opioid users (NMPOUs). Participants were tested serologically for HCV RNA, and behavioral, demographic, and network data were collecting using interview-administered questionnaires. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression. Behavioral and demographic characteristics did not differ by RNA status. In the multivariate model, recent injection drug users were more likely to be RNA-positive (OR: 4.06, 95% CI: 1.04 – 15.83), and turnover into one’s drug network was significantly protective (OR: 0.15, 95% CI: 0.03-0.75). This is the first study to date to examine HCV distribution among rural NMPOUs from a network perspective and demonstrates that network characteristics significantly contribute to the epidemiology of HCV in this understudied, high-risk population. PMID:22717190

  15. Screening pharmaceuticals for possible carcinogenic effects: initial positive results for drugs not previously screened

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gary D.; Udaltsova, Natalia; Chan, James; Quesenberry, Charles P; Habel, Laurel A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We screened commonly used prescription drugs for possible carcinogenic effects. Methods In a large health care program we identified 105 commonly used drugs, not previously screened. Recipients were followed for up to 12½ years for incident cancer. Nested case-control analyses of 55 cancer sites and all combined included up to ten matched controls per case, with lag of at least two years between drug dispensing and cancer. Positive associations entailed a relative risk (RR) of 1.50, with p≤ 0.01 and higher risk for three or more, than for one prescription. Evaluation included further analyses, searches of the literature, and clinical judgment. Results There were 101 associations of interest for 61 drugs. Sixty-six associations were judged to have involved substantial confounding. We found evidence that of the remaining 35, the following associations may not be due to chance: sulindac with gallbladder cancer and leukemia, hyoscyamine with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, nortriptyline with esophageal and hepatic cancer, oxazepam with lung cancer, both fluoxetine and paroxetine with testicular cancer, hydrochlorothiazide with renal and lip cancer, and nifedipine with lip cancer. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that further studies are indicated regarding sulindac, hyoscyamine, nortriptyline, oxazepam, fluoxetine, paroxetine, hydrochlorothiazide and nifedipine. PMID:19582585

  16. Use of liquid chromatography coupled to low- and high-resolution linear ion trap mass spectrometry for studying the metabolism of paynantheine, an alkaloid of the herbal drug Kratom in rat and human urine.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Anika A; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Weber, Armin A; Zapp, Josef; Zoerntlein, Siegfried W; Kanogsunthornrat, Jidapha; Maurer, Hans H

    2010-04-01

    The Thai medicinal plant Mitragyna speciosa (Kratom in Thai) is misused as a herbal drug of abuse. During studies on the main Kratom alkaloid mitragynine (MG) in rats and humans, several dehydro analogs could be detected in urine of Kratom users, which were not found in rat urine after administration of pure MG. Questions arose as to whether these compounds are formed from MG only by humans or whether they are metabolites formed from the second abundant Kratom alkaloid paynantheine (PAY), the dehydro analog of MG. Therefore, the aim of the presented study was to identify the phase I and II metabolites of PAY in rat urine after administration of the pure alkaloid. This was first isolated from Kratom leaves. Liquid chromatography-linear ion trap mass spectrometry provided detailed structure information of the metabolites in the MS(n) mode particularly with high resolution. Besides PAY, the following phase I metabolites could be identified: 9-O-demethyl PAY, 16-carboxy PAY, 9-O-demethyl-16-carboxy PAY, 17-O-demethyl PAY, 17-O-demethyl-16,17-dihydro PAY, 9,17-O-bisdemethyl PAY, 9,17-O-bisdemethyl-16,17-dihydro PAY, 17-carboxy-16,17-dihydro PAY, and 9-O-demethyl-17-carboxy-16,17-dihydro PAY. These metabolites indicated that PAY was metabolized via the same pathways as MG. Several metabolites were excreted as glucuronides or sulfates. The metabolism studies in rats showed that PAY and its metabolites corresponded to the MG-related dehydro compounds detected in urine of the Kratom users. In conclusion, PAY and its metabolites may be further markers for a Kratom abuse in addition of MG and its metabolites. PMID:19902190

  17. A polyphenylene dendrimer drug transporter with precisely positioned amphiphilic surface patches.

    PubMed

    Stangenberg, René; Wu, Yuzhou; Hedrich, Jana; Kurzbach, Dennis; Wehner, Daniel; Weidinger, Gilbert; Kuan, Seah Ling; Jansen, Malin Insa; Jelezko, Fedor; Luhmann, Heiko J; Hinderberger, Dariush; Weil, Tanja; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-02-18

    The design and synthesis of a polyphenylene dendrimer (PPD 3) with discrete binding sites for lipophilic guest molecules and characteristic surface patterns is presented. Its semi-rigidity in combination with a precise positioning of hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups at the periphery yields a refined architecture with lipophilic binding pockets that accommodate defined numbers of biologically relevant guest molecules such as fatty acids or the drug doxorubicin. The size, architecture, and surface textures allow to even penetrate brain endothelial cells that are a major component of the extremely tight blood-brain barrier. In addition, low to no toxicity is observed in in vivo studies using zebrafish embryos. The unique PPD scaffold allows the precise placement of functional groups in a given environment and offers a universal platform for designing drug transporters that closely mimic many features of proteins. PMID:25182694

  18. RBC urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Red blood cells in urine; Hematuria test; Urine - red blood cells ... A normal result is 4 red blood cells per high power field (RBC/HPF) or less when the sample is examined under a microscope. The example above ...

  19. Uric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid in urine. Uric acid level can also be checked using a blood ... help determine the cause of a high uric acid level in the blood. It may also be ...

  20. 24-hour urine protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluid (dehydration) Any type of x-ray exam with dye (contrast material) within 3 days before the urine test Fluid from the vagina that gets into the urine Severe emotional stress Strenuous exercise Urinary tract infection

  1. Urine 24-hour volume

    MedlinePlus

    ... test results: Dehydration Any type of x-ray exam with dye (contrast material) within 3 days before the urine test Fluid from the vagina that gets into the urine Emotional stress Heavy exercise Urinary tract infection

  2. Urea nitrogen urine test

    MedlinePlus

    A 24-hour urine sample is often needed. You will need to collect your urine over 24 hours . Your health care provider will tell you how to do this. Follow instructions exactly to ensure accurate results.

  3. Cytology exam of urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... The urine sample can also be collected during cystoscopy . During this procedure, your provider uses a thin, ... discomfort with a clean catch urine specimen. During cystoscopy, there may be slight discomfort when the scope ...

  4. Urination - difficulty with flow

    MedlinePlus

    ... can take to care for yourself include: Keep track of your urination patterns and bring the report ... Medical Professional Call your provider if you notice urinary hesitancy, dribbling, or a weak urine stream. Call ...

  5. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  6. PBG urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... tested in the lab. This is called a random urine sample. If needed, your health care provider ... For a random urine sample, a negative test result is considered normal. If the test is done on a 24-hour ...

  7. Urine concentration test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine concentration test measures the ability of the kidneys to conserve or excrete water. ... Increased urine concentration may be due to different conditions, such as: Heart failure Loss of body fluids (dehydration) from diarrhea or ...

  8. Urine drainage bags

    MedlinePlus

    ... catheter and urine drainage bag because you have urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... wall repair Inflatable artificial sphincter Radical prostatectomy Stress urinary incontinence Urge incontinence Urinary incontinence Urinary incontinence - injectable implant ...

  9. Positive-charged solid lipid nanoparticles as paclitaxel drug delivery system in glioblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Chirio, Daniela; Gallarate, Marina; Peira, Elena; Battaglia, Luigi; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Riganti, Chiara; Biasibetti, Elena; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Valazza, Alberto; Panciani, Pierpaolo; Lanotte, Michele; Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Filice, Gaetano; Corona, Silvia; Schiffer, Davide

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of behenic acid were prepared with the coacervation technique. Generally, spherical shaped SLN with mean diameters in the range 300–600 nm were obtained. The introduction of charged molecules, such as stearylamine and glycol chitosan into the formulation allowed to obtain positive SLN with Zeta potential in the 8-20 mV range and encapsulation efficiency in the 25–90% range.Blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability, tested in vitro through hCMEC/D3 cells monolayer, showed a significantly increase in the permeation of Coumarin-6, used as model drug, when vehicled in SLN. Positive-charged SLN do not seem to enhance permeation although stearylamine-positive SLN resulted the best permeable formulation after 24 h.Cytotoxicity studies on NO3 glioblastoma cell line demonstrated the maintenance of cytotoxic activity of all paclitaxel-loaded SLN that was always unmodified or greater compared with free drug. No difference in cytotoxicity was noted between neutral and charged SLN.Co-culture experiments with hCMEC/D3 and different glioblastoma cells evidenced that, when delivered in SLN, paclitaxel increased its cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma cells. PMID:25445304

  10. Urine sample (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... catch" urine sample is performed by collecting the sample of urine in midstream. Men or boys should wipe clean the head of the penis. Women or girls need to wash the area between the lips of the vagina with soapy water and rinse well. A small amount of urine ...

  11. 28 CFR 550.42 - Procedures for urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for urine surveillance. 550.42 Section 550.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract...

  12. 49 CFR 40.45 - What form is used to document a DOT urine collection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What form is used to document a DOT urine... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.45 What form is used to document a DOT urine collection? (a) The Federal Drug Testing Custody and Control Form (CCF) must be used to document every urine...

  13. The selection of female urinals: results of a multicentre evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fader, M; Pettersson, L; Dean, G; Brooks, R; Cottenden, A

    Female urinals are designed to enable women to empty their bladders while not on the toilet and are therefore potentially useful in preventing incontinence. However, there is little published information to guide product selection. Therefore, an evaluation of these products was undertaken by the Continence Products Evaluation Network (funded by the Medical Devices Agency). All 13 reusable female urinals available in the UK in March 1997 were evaluated. Each urinal was evaluated by 28-32 community-based women. Preliminarily, each subject tested all urinals by trying to place them in one or two of their preferred positions, to establish if the urinals were suitable for full testing. Each of the urinals that were selected for full testing were then used for 1 week each. During this week the subjects kept a diary to record leakage or spillage when using the urinal. At the end of the week a product evaluation form was filled in to record product performance. The results from full testing indicate that all urinals were successful for some subjects. However, some urinals were found to be successful for all four main positions (e.g. Petal Female Urinal) while others were successful mainly in one or two positions (e.g. Bridge Saddle Pan and Subaseal). Many urinals were successful in the standing/crouching and sitting on the edge (of chair or bed) positions, while comparatively few urinals were successful in the lying position. It was found that the chances of finding a suitable urinal increased with levels of independence. This means that subjects with higher levels of dependency found fewer urinals to be suitable for their needs when used without assistance. The results of this evaluation provide guidance for product selection. However, it is recommended that continence specialists keep samples of the full range of female urinals to enable women to experiment with urinals in order to find one that best suits their needs. PMID:10711014

  14. Designer phenethylamines routinely found in human urine: 2-ethylamino-1-phenylbutane and 2-amino-1-phenylbutane.

    PubMed

    Uralets, Victor; App, Mike; Rana, Sumandeep; Morgan, Stewart; Ross, Wayne

    2014-03-01

    2-Ethylamino-1-phenylbutane (EAPB) and 2-amino-1-phenylbutane (APB) were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in multiple urine samples submitted for stimulant drug testing and screened positive for amphetamines by enzyme immunoassay. Forty-two samples from all over the USA were found, containing both analytes during a 3-month period May-July 2013. A sports dietary supplement 'CRAZE' has been determined to be one of the sources of EAPB supply. EAPB along with its suggested metabolite APB were detected in a urine sample, obtained from a person known to use 'CRAZE'. PMID:24451085

  15. Positive Social Impacts Related to Participation in an HIV Prevention Trial Involving People Who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sugarman, Jeremy; Stalter, Randy; Bokoch, Kevin; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Donnell, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Although attention has focused on whether participants actually derive better medical outcomes in research, the social benefits experienced in research have not been systematically examined. At regular follow-up visits during a phase III randomized trial assessing the safety and efficacy of a long-term versus a short-term drug treatment intervention in decreasing HIV transmission and mortality conducted in China and Thailand, participants identified research-related negative and positive social impacts (PSIs). Open-ended PSI responses were coded using standard qualitative techniques. Among 1025 participants, only 4 reported a negative social impact; however, 77% reported at least one PSI over the 104 week follow-up period. Given the high prevalence of PSIs we observed, future research should embed assessments of negative and positive social impacts experienced by participants in research not only to ensure their well-being, but also to inform policy and conceptual work related to research ethics. PMID:26247080

  16. Identification of phenothiazine antihistamines and their metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Maurer, H; Pfleger, K

    1988-01-01

    Identification of the phenothiazine antihistamines alimemazine, dimetotiazine, isothipendyl, mequitazine, oxomemazine, promethazine, thiethylperazine, triflupromazine and their metabolites in urine is described. After acid hydrolysis of the conjugates, extraction and acetylation the urine samples were analysed by computerized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Using ion chromatography with the selective ions m/z 58, 72, 100, 114, 124, 128, 141, and 199 the possible presence of phenothiazine antihistamines and/or their metabolites was indicated. The identity of positive signals in the reconstructed ion chromatograms was confirmed by a visual or computerized comparison of the stored full mass spectra with the reference spectra. The ion chromatograms, reference mass spectra and gas chromatographic retention indices (OV-101) are documented. The procedure presented is integrated in a general screening procedure (general unknown analysis) for several groups of drugs. PMID:2904251

  17. Positioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  18. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety. PMID:25721922

  19. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M; Simões, Bruno M; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B; Carrascosa, José L; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2016-02-12

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully  apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro. PMID:26754042

  20. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M.; Simões, Bruno M.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F.; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B.; Carrascosa, José L.; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro.

  1. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine pH test measures the level of acid in urine. ... pH - urine ... meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH. ... to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to ... more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

  2. Levetiracetam: Probably Associated Diurnal Frequent Urination.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jun; Zou, Li-Ping; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Hu, Lin-Yan; Pang, Ling-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal frequent urination is a common condition in elementary school children who are especially at risk for associated somatic and behavioral problems. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug that has been used in both partial and generalized seizures and less commonly adverse effects including psychiatric and behavioral problems. Diurnal frequent urination is not a well-known adverse effect of LEV. Here, we reported 2 pediatric cases with epilepsy that developed diurnal frequent urination after LEV administration. Case 1 was a 6-year-old male patient who presented urinary frequency and urgency in the daytime since the third day after LEV was given as adjunctive therapy. Symptoms increased accompanied by the raised dosage of LEV. Laboratory tests and auxiliary examinations did not found evidence of organic disease. Diurnal frequent urination due to LEV was suspected, and then the drug was discontinued. As expected, his frequency of urination returned to normal levels. Another 13-year-old female patient got similar clinical manifestations after oral LEV monotherapy and the symptoms became aggravated while in stress state. Since the most common causes of frequent micturition had been ruled out, the patient was considered to be diagnosed with LEV-associated psychogenic frequent urination. The dosage of LEV was reduced to one-third, and the frequency of urination was reduced by 60%. Both patients got the Naranjo score of 6, which indicated that LEV was a "probable" cause of diurnal frequent urination. Although a definite causal link between LEV and diurnal urinary frequency in the 2 cases remains to be established, we argue that diurnal frequent urination associated with LEV deserves clinician's attention. PMID:26938751

  3. Spatial Analysis of HIV Positive Injection Drug Users in San Francisco, 1987 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alexis N.; Mobley, Lee R.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Novak, Scott P.; Lopez, Andrea M.; Kral, Alex H.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial analyses of HIV/AIDS related outcomes are growing in popularity as a tool to understand geographic changes in the epidemic and inform the effectiveness of community-based prevention and treatment programs. The Urban Health Study was a serial, cross-sectional epidemiological study of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco between 1987 and 2005 (N = 29,914). HIV testing was conducted for every participant. Participant residence was geocoded to the level of the United States Census tract for every observation in dataset. Local indicator of spatial autocorrelation (LISA) tests were used to identify univariate and bivariate Census tract clusters of HIV positive IDUs in two time periods. We further compared three tract level characteristics (% poverty, % African Americans, and % unemployment) across areas of clustered and non-clustered tracts. We identified significant spatial clustering of high numbers of HIV positive IDUs in the early period (1987–1995) and late period (1996–2005). We found significant bivariate clusters of Census tracts where HIV positive IDUs and tract level poverty were above average compared to the surrounding areas. Our data suggest that poverty, rather than race, was an important neighborhood characteristic associated with the spatial distribution of HIV in SF and its spatial diffusion over time. PMID:24722543

  4. Workplace drug testing, different matrices different objectives.

    PubMed

    Tsanaclis, Lolita M; Wicks, John F C; Chasin, Alice A M

    2012-02-01

    Drug testing is used by employers to detect drug use by employees or job candidates. It can identify recent use of alcohol, prescription drugs, and illicit drugs as a screening tool for potential health and safety and performance issues. Urine is the most commonly used sample for illicit drugs. It detects the use of a drug within the last few days and as such is evidence of recent use; but a positive test does not necessarily mean that the individual was impaired at the time of the test. Abstention from use for three days will often produce a negative test result. Analysis of hair provides a much longer window of detection, typically 1 to 3 months. Hence the likelihood of a falsely negative test using hair is very much less than with a urine test. Conversely, a negative hair test is a substantially stronger indicator of a non-drug user than a negative urine test. Oral fluid (saliva) is also easy to collect. Drugs remain in oral fluid for a similar time as in blood. The method is a good way of detecting current use and is more likely to reflect current impairment. It offers promise as a test in post-accident, for cause, and on-duty situations. Studies have shown that within the same industrial settings, hair testing can detect twice as many drug users as urine testing. PMID:22362574

  5. On-Demand Urine Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Inscore, Frank; Shende, Chetan

    2010-01-01

    A lab-on-a-chip was developed that is capable of extracting biochemical indicators from urine samples and generating their surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) so that the indicators can be quantified and identified. The development was motivated by the need to monitor and assess the effects of extended weightlessness, which include space motion sickness and loss of bone and muscle mass. The results may lead to developments of effective exercise programs and drug regimes that would maintain astronaut health. The analyzer containing the lab-on-a- chip includes materials to extract 3- methylhistidine (a muscle-loss indicator) and Risedronate (a bone-loss indicator) from the urine sample and detect them at the required concentrations using a Raman analyzer. The lab-on- a-chip has both an extractive material and a SERS-active material. The analyzer could be used to monitor the onset of diseases, such as osteoporosis.

  6. Application of non-linear angle synchronous spectrofluorimetry to the determination of complex mixtures of drugs in urine: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo Pulgarín, J. A.; Alañón Molina, A.; Boras, N.

    2012-12-01

    Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) is a rapid, sensitive and non-destructive method suitable for the analysis of multifluorophoric mixtures. In this study non linear variable angle synchronous spectrofluorimetry was applied to the determination of three fluoroquinololes in urine. Although this technique provides very good results, total resolution of multicomponent mixtures is not always achieved when the spectral profiles strongly overlap. Partial least-squares regression (PLS-1) was utilized to a develop calibration model that related synchronous fluorescence spectra to the analytical concentration of fluoroquinolones in the presence of urine. The same multicomponent mixture was determined using excitation emission matrix fluorescence (EEMF) along with N-way partial least squares regression (N-PLS and U-PLS). The determination was carried out in micellar medium 0.01 M with a pH of 4.8 provided by 0.2 M sodium acetate/acetic acid buffer. A central composite design was selected to obtain a calibration matrix of 25 standards plus a blank sample. The proposed methods were validated by application to a test set of synthetic samples. The results show that SFS with PLS-1 is a better method compared to EEMF with N-PLS or U-PLS because of the low RMSEP values of the former.

  7. Therapeutic siRNA for drug-resistant HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ngamcherdtrakul, Worapol; Castro, David J.; Morry, Jingga; Reda, Moataz M.; Gray, Joe W.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2016-01-01

    HER2 is overexpressed in about 20% of breast cancers and contributes to poor prognosis. Unfortunately, a large fraction of patients have primary or acquired resistance to the HER2-targeted therapy trastuzumab, thus a multi-drug combination is utilized in the clinic, putting significant burden on patients. We systematically identified an optimal HER2 siRNA from 76 potential sequences and demonstrated its utility in overcoming intrinsic and acquired resistance to trastuzumab and lapatinib in 18 HER2-positive cancer cell lines. We provided evidence that the drug-resistant cancer maintains dependence on HER2 for survival. Importantly, cell lines did not readily develop resistance following extended treatment with HER2 siRNA. Using our recently developed nanoparticle platform, systemic delivery of HER2 siRNA to trastuzumab-resistant tumors resulted in significant growth inhibition. Moreover, the optimal HER2 siRNA could also silence an exon 16 skipped HER2 splice variant reported to be highly oncogenic and linked to trastuzumab resistance. PMID:26894975

  8. Pharmacokinetics of Antituberculosis Drugs in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Adults in Malawi.

    PubMed

    van Oosterhout, J J; Dzinjalamala, F K; Dimba, A; Waterhouse, D; Davies, G; Zijlstra, E E; Molyneux, M E; Molyneux, E M; Ward, S

    2015-10-01

    Limited data address the impact of HIV coinfection on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of antituberculosis drugs in sub-Saharan Africa. A total of 47 Malawian adults underwent rich pharmacokinetic sampling at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h postdose. Of the subjects, 51% were male, their mean age was 34 years, and 65% were HIV-positive with a mean CD4 count of 268 cells/μl. Antituberculosis drugs were administered as fixed-dose combinations (150 mg rifampin, 75 mg isoniazid, 400 mg pyrazinamide, and 275 mg ethambutol) according to recommended weight bands. Plasma drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (rifampin and pyrazinamide) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (isoniazid and ethambutol). Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and analysis of variance of log-transformed summary parameters. The pharmacokinetic parameters were as follows (median [interquartile range]): for rifampin, maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax) of 4.129 μg/ml (2.474 to 5.596 μg/ml), area under the curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-∞) of 21.32 μg/ml · h (13.57 to 28.60 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 2.45 h (1.86 to 3.08 h); for isoniazid, Cmax of 3.97 μg/ml (2.979 to 4.544 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 22.5 (14.75 to 34.59 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 3.93 h (3.18 to 4.73 h); for pyrazinamide, Cmax of 34.21 μg/ml (30.00 to 41.60 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 386.6 μg/ml · h (320.0 to 463.7 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 6.821 h (5.71 to 8.042 h); and for ethambutol, Cmax of 2.278 μg/ml (1.694 to 3.098 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 20.41 μg/ml · h (16.18 to 26.27 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 7.507 (6.517 to 8.696 h). The isoniazid PK data analysis suggested that around two-thirds of the participants were slow acetylators. Dose, weight, and weight-adjusted dose were not significant predictors of PK exposure, probably due to weight-banded dosing. In this first pharmacokinetic study of antituberculosis drugs in Malawian adults, measures of

  9. Role of Catheter's Position for Final Results in Intrathecal Drug Delivery. Analysis Based on CSF Dynamics and Specific Drugs Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Perotti; Vicente, Villanueva; Juan Marcos, Asensio Samper; Gustavo, Fabregat-Cid

    2013-01-01

    Intrathecal drug delivery is an effective and safe option for the treatment of chronic pathology refractory to conventional pain therapies. Typical intrathecal administered drugs are opioids, baclofen, local anesthetics and adjuvant medications. Although knowledge about mechanisms of action of intrathecal drugs are every day more clear many doubt remain respect the correct location of intrathecal catheter in order to achieve the best therapeutic result. We analyze the factors that can affect drug distribution within the cerebrospinal fluid. Three categories of variables were identified: drug features, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and patients features. First category includes physicochemical properties and pharmacological features of intrathecal administered drugs with special attention to drug lipophilicity. In the second category, the variables in CSF flow, are considered that can modify the drug distribution within the CSF with special attention to the new theories of liquoral circulation. Last category try to explain inter-individual difference in baclofen response with difference that are specific for each patients such as the anatomical area to treat, patient posture or reaction to inflammatory stimulus. We conclude that a comprehensive evaluation of the patients, including imaging techniques to study the anatomy and physiology of intrathecal environment and CSF dynamics, could become essential in the future to the purpose of optimize the clinical outcome of intrathecal therapy. PMID:24155999

  10. Drug Testing in a University Athletic Program: Protocol and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovere, George D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    An athletic drug education, counseling, and screening program at Wake Forest University is described. Decisions regarding which athletes to test, which drugs to test for and how to test for them, how to collect urine samples, and measures taken for a positive result are discussed. (MT)