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Sample records for positive urine drug

  1. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePLUS

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  2. False-positive interferences of common urine drug screen immunoassays: a review.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Park, Hyung-Doo; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Urine drug screen (UDS) immunoassays are a quick and inexpensive method for determining the presence of drugs of abuse. Many cross-reactivities exist with other analytes, potentially causing a false-positive result in an initial drug screen. Knowledge of these potential interferents is important in determining a course of action for patient care. We present an inclusive review of analytes causing false-positive interferences with drugs-of-abuse UDS immunoassays, which covers the literature from the year 2000 to present. English language articles were searched via the SciFinder platform with the strings 'false positive [drug] urine' yielding 173 articles. These articles were then carefully analyzed and condensed to 62 that included data on causes of false-positive results. The discussion is separated into six sections by drug class with a corresponding table of cross-reacting compounds for quick reference. False-positive results were described for amphetamines, opiates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, phencyclidine, lysergic acid diethylamide and barbiturates. These false-positive results support the generally accepted practice that immunoassay positive results are considered presumptive until confirmed by a second independent chemical technique. PMID:24986836

  3. Case Reports of Aripiprazole Causing False-Positive Urine Amphetamine Drug Screens in Children.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Justin; Shah, Pooja; Faley, Brian; Siegel, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Urine drug screens (UDSs) are used to identify the presence of certain medications. One limitation of UDSs is the potential for false-positive results caused by cross-reactivity with other substances. Amphetamines have an extensive list of cross-reacting medications. The literature contains reports of false-positive amphetamine UDSs with multiple antidepressants and antipsychotics. We present 2 cases of presumed false-positive UDSs for amphetamines after ingestion of aripiprazole. Case 1 was a 16-month-old girl who accidently ingested 15 to 45 mg of aripiprazole. She was lethargic and ataxic at home with 1 episode of vomiting containing no identifiable tablets. She remained sluggish with periods of irritability and was admitted for observation. UDS on 2 consecutive days came back positive for amphetamines. Case 2 was of a 20-month-old girl who was brought into the hospital after accidental ingestion of an unknown quantity of her father's medications which included aripiprazole. UDS on the first day of admission came back positive only for amphetamines. Confirmatory testing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on the blood and urine samples were also performed for both patients on presentation to detect amphetamines and were subsequently negative. Both patients returned to baseline and were discharged from the hospital. To our knowledge, these cases represent the first reports of false-positive amphetamine urine drug tests with aripiprazole. In both cases, aripiprazole was the drug with the highest likelihood of causing the positive amphetamine screen. The implications of these false-positives include the possibility of unnecessary treatment and monitoring of patients. PMID:26527556

  4. Urine Toxicology Screen in Multiple Sleep Latency Test: The Correlation of Positive Tetrahydrocannabinol, Drug Negative Patients, and Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dzodzomenyo, Samuel; Stolfi, Adrienne; Splaingard, Deborah; Earley, Elizabeth; Onadeko, Oluwole; Splaingard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Drugs can influence results of multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT). We sought to identify the effect of marijuana on MSLT results in pediatric patients evaluated for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Methods: This is a retrospective study of urine drug screens performed the morning before MSLT in 383 patients < 21 years old referred for EDS. MSLT results were divided into those with (1) (?) urine drug screens, (2) urine drug screens (+) for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alone or THC plus other drugs, and (3) urine drug screens (+) for drugs other than THC. Groups were compared with Fisher exact tests or one-way ANOVA. Results: 38 (10%) urine drug tests were (+): 14 for THC and 24 for other drugs. Forty-three percent of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy, 0% consistent with idiopathic hypersomnia, 29% other, and 29% normal. This was statistically different from those with (?) screens (24% narcolepsy, 20% idiopathic hypersomnia, 6% other, 50% normal), and those (+) for drugs other than THC (17% narcolepsy, 33% idiopathic hypersomnia, 4% other, 46% normal (p = 0.01). Six percent (6/93) of patients with MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy were drug screen (+) for THC; 71% of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had multiple sleep onset REM periods (SOREMS). There were no (+) urine drug screens in patients < 13 years old. Conclusion: Many pediatric patients with (+) urine drug screens for THC met MSLT criteria for narcolepsy or had multiple SOREMs. Drug screening is important in interpreting MSLT findings for children ? 13 years. Citation: Dzodzomenyo S, Stolfi A, Splaingard D, Earley E, Onadeko O, Splaingard M. Urine toxicology screen in multiple sleep latency test: the correlation of positive tetrahydrocannabinol, drug negative patients, and narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):93–99. PMID:25348245

  5. Urine drug screening: practical guide for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Karen E; Lee, Kelly C; Kissack, Julie C

    2008-01-01

    Drug testing, commonly used in health care, workplace, and criminal settings, has become widespread during the past decade. Urine drug screens have been the most common method for analysis because of ease of sampling. The simplicity of use and access to rapid results have increased demand for and use of immunoassays; however, these assays are not perfect. False-positive results of immunoassays can lead to serious medical or social consequences if results are not confirmed by secondary analysis, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Department of Health and Human Services' guidelines for the workplace require testing for the following 5 substances: amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, and phencyclidine. This article discusses potential false-positive results and false-negative results that occur with immunoassays of these substances and with alcohol, benzodiazepines, and tricyclic antidepressants. Other pitfalls, such as adulteration, substitution, and dilution of urine samples, are discussed. Pragmatic concepts summarized in this article should minimize the potential risks of misinterpreting urine drug screens. PMID:18174009

  6. Urine Drug Screening of Adolescents on Request of Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Forest

    1994-01-01

    Of 100 adolescents screened for drug use, 43% tested positive for drugs of abuse. Twenty-five percent of these adolescents entered treatment, with 8% requiring medical detoxification or inpatient treatment. Urine screening, when done for clinical rather than punitive purposes, appeared to facilitate entry into treatment. (RJM)

  7. Fluorescence And Alternative Methods In Urine Drug Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Naresh C.

    1988-04-01

    Drug abuse has become-one of the most compelling realities _ ot contemporary society. It has penetrated every segment ot our population: trom schools to sports and trom organized crime to board rooms . Drugs in tie w9rkplace allegedly cost government agencies and business millions ot dollars each year in increased absenteeism,. poor work performance, thefts,accidents andwastedtime. The President's Commission on Organized Crime and the federal government are in tavor ot urine drug testing. In fact many employers are now resorting to urine drug testing on current and prospective employees. This presep.tation discusses different laboratory methods used in urine drug.testing, including immunoassays, fluorescence polarization, thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, gas chromatography and gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  8. Urine nandrolone metabolites: false positive doping test?

    PubMed

    Kohler, R M N; Lambert, M I

    2002-10-01

    The aim of this review is to analyse the studies on nandrolone metabolism to determine if it is possible for an athlete to test positive for nandrolone without having ingested or injected nandrolone. PMID:12351328

  9. The effects of adulterants and selected ingested compounds on drugs-of-abuse testing in urine.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amitava

    2007-09-01

    Household chemicals such as bleach, table salt, laundry detergent, toilet bowl cleaner, vinegar, lemon juice, and eyedrops are used for adulterating urine specimens. Most of these adulterants except eyedrops can be detected by routine specimen integrity tests (creatinine, pH, temperature, and specific gravity); however, certain adulterants such as Klear, Whizzies, Urine Luck, and Stealth cannot. These adulterants can successfully mask drug testing if the concentrations of certain abused drugs are moderate. Several spot tests have been described to detect the presence of such adulterants in urine. Urine dipsticks are commercially available for detecting the presence of such adulterants, along with performance of tests for creatinine, pH, and specific gravity. Certain hair shampoo and saliva-cleaning mouthwashes are available to escape detection in hair or saliva samples, but the effectiveness of such products in masking drugs-of-abuse testing has not been demonstrated. Ingestion of poppy seed cake may result in positive screening test results for opiates, and hemp oil exposure can cause positive results for marijuana. These would be identified as true-positive results in drugs-of-abuse testing even though they do not represent the actual drug of abuse. PMID:17709324

  10. 49 CFR 40.31 - Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Collection Personnel § 40.31 Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing? (a) Collectors meeting the requirements of this subpart are...

  11. 49 CFR 40.31 - Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing? 40.31 Section 40.31 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Collection Personnel § 40.31 Who may collect urine specimens for DOT drug testing?...

  12. Fenofibric Acid Can Cause False-Positive Urine Methylenedioxymethamphetamine Immunoassay Results.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Loreto; Gomila, Isabel; Fe, Antonia; Servera, Miguel A; Yates, Christopher; Morell-Garcia, Daniel; Castanyer, Bartomeu; Barceló, Bernardino

    2015-11-01

    We present a false-positive result of ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxy-NN-methylamphetamine) screening due to the therapeutic use of fenofibrate, an antihyperlipidemic drug. Our hypothesis was that the main metabolite of fenofibrate, fenofibric acid, was responsible for this cross-reactivity on a DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay, using a cut-off of 500 ng/mL. We estimated that the addition of 225 µg/mL pure fenofibric acid to blank urine would be sufficient to result in a positive DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay. The results obtained on the urine samples analyses of the patient show that the DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay resulted negative 2 days after discontinuing fenofibrate treatment, when the urine fenofibric acid concentration corrected by creatinine and determinated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was 20.3 µg/mg creatinine. The cross-reactivity data for fenofibric acid would seem to indicate that there was insufficient concentration of measured compound to account for the positive immunochemical results for ecstasy. This apparent discrepancy can be explained in several ways, one of them is that the ?-glucuronidase-resistent fenofibric acid isomers are responsible. This process could explain the low recovery of free fenofibric acid when we use the developed method for its quantification in urine samples. Positive results on immunoassay screening must be considered presumptive until confirmation with another method based on a different principle, preferably gas chromatography-mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:26203185

  13. Thyreostatic drugs, stability in bovine and porcine urine.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bussche, J; Sterk, S S; De Brabander, H F; Blokland, M H; Deceuninck, Y; Le Bizec, B; Vanhaecke, L

    2012-07-01

    Thyreostatic drugs, illegally administrated to livestock for fattening purposes, are banned in the European Union since 1981. For monitoring their illegal use, sensitive and specific analytical methods are required. In this context, the knowledge of the stability in a matrix is of primary importance. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of preservation, number of freeze-thaw cycles, and matrix-related variables on the stability of thyreostatic drugs in the urine of livestock. Finally, the developed conservation approach was applied on incurred urine samples, which displayed traces of the thyreostat thiouracil below the recommended concentration of 10 ?g L(-1). The stability study confirmed the negative influence of preservation (8 h) at room temperature and at -70 °C, decreases in concentration of more than 78.0% were observed for all thyreostats, except for 1-methyl-2-mercaptoimidazole and 2-mercaptobenzimidazole. Additionally, investigation of matrix-related variables indicated significant impacts of the presence of copper (p = 0.001) and the pH (p = 0.002). Next, an optimised pre-treatment (pH 1 and 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt dehydrate) significantly differing from the original conservation approach (p < 0.05) was developed, which proved capable of delaying the decrease in concentration and improved the detection in time for both spiked as well as incurred urine samples. In the future, it seems highly advisable to apply the developed pre-treatment on incurred urines upon sampling, before thyreostat analysis. Additionally, it is recommendable to limit preservation of urine samples at room temperature, but also in the freezer prior to thyreostat analysis. PMID:22349321

  14. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  15. Morphine formation from ethylmorphine: implications for drugs-of-abuse testing in urine.

    PubMed

    Popa, C; Beck, O; Brodin, K

    1998-01-01

    In drugs-of-abuse testing, opiates constitute a delicate and controversial task because morphine may occur in urine for several reasons. Ethylmorphine (EtM), which is used as an antitussive drug in many countries, is metabolically converted to morphine. The present study was performed in order to document intra- and interindividual differences in morphine formation after single-dose intake of EtM at two different doses (25 and 50 mg). The urinary excretion of opiates was measured during 48 h with EMIT and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in 10 healthy volunteers. The mean values of totally recovered EtM and morphine in hydrolyzed urine during 48 h were 42 and 47% of the given dose at high and low dose level, respectively. The ratio between total recovered morphine and EtM ranged from 19 to 131% with a mean value of 48%. The rate of positive outcome in the EMIT opiate-screening assay was 100% during the first 24 h for both doses, and it was still high (> or = 67%) in the 24-48 h time interval. It was found that the decline in urinary EtM is more rapid than for morphine, which leads to an increasing morphine/EtM ratio in urine over time. THe mean value of the morphine/EtM ratio was found to be greater than 1 during the 12-24 h interval and finally increased to greater than 10. There was an intra-individual concordance in morphine/EtM ratio between doses, but there was marked interindividual variation. Morphine/EtM ratios that were greater than 1 were only seen when the concentration of morphine was below 300 micrograms/mmol creatinine. Our results demonstrate that morphine is formed from EtM at a high and variable rate and may be present in urine in concentrations greater than those of EtM even shortly after drug intake. PMID:9547411

  16. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? 40.41 Section...urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection...source of water for washing hands, that, if...

  17. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? 40.41 Section...urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection...source of water for washing hands, that, if...

  18. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? 40.41 Section...urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection...source of water for washing hands, that, if...

  19. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? 40.41 Section...urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection...source of water for washing hands, that, if...

  20. Comprehensive Urine Drug Screen by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Ramoo, Bheemraj; Funke, Melissa; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Drug screening is an essential component of clinical toxicology laboratory service. Some laboratories use only automated chemistry analyzers for limited screening of drugs of abuse and few other drugs. Other laboratories use a combination of various techniques such as immunoassays, colorimetric tests, and mass spectrometry to provide more detailed comprehensive drug screening. Mass spectrometry, gas or liquid, can screen for hundreds of drugs and is often considered the gold standard for comprehensive drug screening. We describe an efficient and rapid gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for comprehensive drug screening in urine which utilizes a liquid-liquid extraction, sample concentration, and analysis by GC/MS. PMID:26660182

  1. Detection times of drugs of abuse in blood, urine, and oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Alain G

    2004-04-01

    Data on the detection times of drugs of abuse are based on studies of controlled administration to volunteers or on the analysis of biologic samples of subjects who are forced to stop their (often chronic) use of drugs of abuse, eg, because of imprisonment or detoxification. The detection times depend mainly on the dose and sensitivity of the method used and also on the preparation and route of administration, the duration of use (acute or chronic), the matrix that is analyzed, the molecule or metabolite that is looked for, the pH and concentration of the matrix (urine, oral fluid), and the interindividual variation in metabolic and renal clearance. In general, the detection time is longest in hair, followed by urine, sweat, oral fluid, and blood. In blood or plasma, most drugs of abuse can be detected at the low nanogram per milliliter level for 1 or 2 days. In urine the detection time of a single dose is 1.5 to 4 days. In chronic users, drugs of abuse can be detected in urine for approximately 1 week after last use, and in extreme cases even longer in cocaine and cannabis users. In oral fluid, drugs of abuse can be detected for 5-48 hours at a low nanogram per milliliter level. The duration of detection of GHB is much shorter. After a single dose of 1 or 2 ng of flunitrazepam, the most sensitive methods can detect 7-aminoflunitrazepam for up to 4 weeks in urine. PMID:15228165

  2. Analysis on the Go: Quantitation of Drugs of Abuse in Dried Urine with Digital Microfluidics and Miniature Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Analysis on the Go: Quantitation of Drugs of Abuse in Dried Urine with Digital Microfluidics of drugs of abuse in urine. A custom digital microfluidic system was designed to deliver droplets by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. More importantly, the LOQ of the new method is superior

  3. The outcome of urine culture positive and culture negative staghorn calculi after minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Wan, Shaw P; Liu, Yongda; Zeng, Guohua; Yuan, Jian

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the treatment outcomes of staghorn stones using minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MPCNL) in patients who had positive preoperative urine culture to patients with negative urine culture. The records of 284 patients with staghorn calculi, who underwent MPCNL in our center from January 2012 to January 2013, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into positive and negative group, according to the result of preoperative urine culture. Staghorn stones with negative culture received a single dose of broad spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis, whereas stones with positive culture were treated for at least 72 h according to antibiogram. The perioperative findings and postoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. There were 70 (24.6%) patients with positive and 214 (75.4%) patients with negative preoperative urine culture who underwent MPCNL. There were no statistical differences in the duration of hospital stay, operative time, estimated blood loss, final stone free rate (SFR) as well as the incidence of the following infectious complications such as fever, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and septic shock, between both groups. Our retrospective study showed that MPCNL was a safe and effective modality in the treatment of staghorn stones. The morbidity, complication, and SFR were similar between patients with positive and negative preoperative urine cultures, once the culture positive infections were adequately controlled. PMID:24531817

  4. How Often Do False-positive Phencyclidine (PCP) Urine Screens Occur with Use of Common Medications?

    PubMed Central

    Rengarajan, Arvind; Mullins, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous reports describe false positive urine immunoassay screens for phencyclidine (PCP) associated with use of tramadol, dextromethorphan, or diphenhydramine. The likelihood of these false positives is unknown. Objective We sought to find the relative frequency of false-positive PCP screens associated with these medications and to look for any other medications with similar associations. Methods In an IRB-approved study, we retrospectively reviewed charts of all ED encounters with positive urine screens for PCP in our hospital from 2007 through 2011, inclusive. Our laboratory routinely confirmed all positive screens using GC-MS with results classified as either “confirmed” (true positive) or “failed to confirm” (false positive). We recorded all medications mentioned in the chart as current medications or medications given before the urine sample. We compared frequencies of tramadol, dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, and other medications between the two groups. Results Tramadol, dextromethorphan, alprazolam, clonazepam, and carvedilol all were significantly more frequent among the false positive group. Diphenhydramine was more frequently recorded among the false positive group, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion False positive urine screens for PCP are common with tramadol, dextromethorphan, alprazolam, clonazepam, and carvedilol and may also occur with diphenhydramine. PMID:23697457

  5. Orbitrap technology for comprehensive metabolite-based liquid chromatographic-high resolution-tandem mass spectrometric urine drug screening - Exemplified for cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Andreas G; Michely, Julian A; Weber, Armin A; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2015-09-01

    LC-high resolution (HR)-MS well established in proteomics has become more and more important in bioanalysis of small molecules over the last few years. Its high selectivity and specificity provide best prerequisites for its use in broad screening approaches. Therefore, Orbitrap technology was tested for developing a general metabolite-based LC-HR-MS/MS screening approach for urinalysis of drugs necessary in clinical and forensic toxicology. After simple urine precipitation, the drugs and their metabolites were separated within 10 min and detected by a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer in full scan with positive/negative switching, and subsequent data dependent acquisition (DDA) mode. Identification criteria were the presence of accurate precursor ions, isotopic patterns, five most intense fragment ions, and comparison with full HR-MS/MS library spectra. The current library contains over 1900 parent drugs and 1200 metabolites. The method was validated for typical drug representatives and metabolites concerning recovery, matrix effects, process efficiency, and limits showed acceptable results. The applicability was tested first for cardiovascular drugs, which should be screened for in poisoning cases and for medication adherence of hypertension patients. The novel LC-HR-MS/MS method allowed fast, simple, and robust urine screening, particularly for cardiovascular drugs showing the usefulness of Orbitrap technology for drug testing. PMID:26388381

  6. Urine drug testing of chronic pain patients. V. Prevalence of propoxyphene following its withdrawal from the United States market.

    PubMed

    Puet, Brandi; DePriest, Anne; Knight, Julie; Heltsley, Rebecca; Black, David L; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    Propoxyphene is an opioid analgesic that was surrounded by controversy concerning its safety and efficacy during its lifespan in the US market. Propoxyphene was withdrawn in November of 2010 from the US market and is still being detected one year post-withdrawal in urine specimens from the pain management population. In this study, the prevalence of propoxyphene was determined in a total of 417,914 urine specimens collected from 630 clinics involved in pain management located in 24 states during the period of January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2011. Propoxyphene and norpropoxyphene were measured in urine by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry procedure with a lower limit of quantitation of 50 ng/mL. The positivity rate for propoxyphene prevalence declined sharply between November and December of 2010 and further declined at a gradual rate, ending in a prevalence of 0.27% (one out of every 370 specimens, n = 25,658) for the month of December 2011. The presented data provide evidence of the dramatic decline in the use of propoxyphene products since their removal from the medical market, and may be beneficial to US urine drug testing programs determining the need for continual monitoring of propoxyphene levels. PMID:23129731

  7. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? 40.41 Section 40.41 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Collection Sites, Forms, Equipment and Supplies Used in DOT Urine Collections §...

  8. Validation of the Only Commercially Available Immunoassay for Synthetic Cathinones in Urine: Randox Drugs of Abuse V Biochip Array Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ellefsen, Kayla N.; Anizan, Sébastien; Castaneto, Marisol S.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Martin, LTC Thomas M.; Klette, CAPT Kevin L.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Deterrence of synthetic cathinone abuse is hampered by the lack of a high-throughput immunoassay screen. The Randox Drugs of Abuse V biochip immunoassay (DOA-V) contains two synthetic cathinones antibodies: Bath Salt I (BSI) targets mephedrone/methcathinone and Bath Salt II (BSII) targets 3’,4’-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV)/3’,4’-methylenedioxy-?-pyrrolidinobutiophenone (MDPBP). We evaluated DOA-V synthetic cathinones performance and conducted a full validation on the original assay with calibrators reconstituted in water, and the new assay with calibrators prepared in lyophilized urine; both utilized the same antibodies and were run on the fully automated Evidence® Analyzer. 20,017 authentic military urine specimens were screened and confirmed by LC-MS/MS for 28 synthetic cathinones. Limits of detection (LOD) for the original and new assays were 0.35 and 0.18 (BSI), and 8.5 and 9.2µg/L (BSII), respectively. Linearity was acceptable (R2>0.98); however, a large negative bias was observed with in-house prepared calibrators. Intra-assay imprecision was <20% BSI-II, while inter-assay imprecision was 18–42% BSI and <22% BSII. Precision was acceptable for Randox controls. Cross-reactivities of many additional synthetic cathinones were determined. Authentic drug-free negative urine pH <4 produced false positive results for BSI (6.3µg/L) and BSII (473µg/L). Oxidizing agents reduced BSI and increased BSII results. Sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of 100%, 52.1%, and 53.0% were obtained at manufacturer’s proposed cutoffs (BSI 5µg/L, BSII 30µg/L). Performance improved if cutoff concentrations increased (BSI 7.5µg/L, BSII 40µg/L); however, there were limited confirmed positive specimens. Currently, this is the first and only fully validated immunoassay for preliminary detection of synthetic cathinones in urine. PMID:24659527

  9. Analysis of illicit drugs in human urine by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with on-column fast scanning polychrome absorption detection.

    PubMed

    Wernly, P; Thormann, W

    1991-12-15

    Using micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) with a borate/phosphate buffer containing 75 mM SDS (pH 9.1), common drugs of abuse and/or their metabolites, including opioids, benzoylecgonine, amphetamines, and methaqualone, can easily be analyzed. After solid-phase extraction of 5 mL of urine, drug concentrations down to about 100 ng/mL can be unambiguously monitored with on-column multiwavelength detection. Peak assignment is achieved through comparison of retention times and absorption spectra of eluting peaks with those of computer-stored model runs. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated with data obtained from different patient urines which tested positively for one or several drugs using nonisotopic immunoassays. Results suggest that MECC of illicit drugs is a highly specific and sensitive instrumental approach suitable for confirmation testing following a positive response of a toxicological screening procedure. PMID:1789451

  10. Positive Reinforcement Methods to Train Chimpanzees to Cooperate with Urine Collection

    PubMed Central

    Bloomsmith, Mollie; Neu, Kim; Franklin, Andrea; Griffis, Caroline; McMillan, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Positive reinforcement training can be used in many ways to enhance the welfare of captive primates. Training for biologic sample collection is one application of positive reinforcement training. In this study, 35 adult female chimpanzees were trained to cooperate with the collection of urine samples needed to facilitate a research study. A median of 35 training sessions was required for the subjects to reach reliable performance (4 of 5 sequential attempts successful) of the urine collection behavior. Adult age had no effect on the speed of learning as indicated by a rank order correlation. Individual differences in the rate of learning were pronounced but did not vary with the age of the chimpanzees. Approximately 2 y after the initial training, and with continual sample collection taking place twice weekly, we assessed the reliability of their performance and found that the chimpanzees cooperated 100% of the time and that collection of a urine sample required about 5 min. Positive reinforcement training can markedly reduce staff time, particularly for studies such as this that require frequent biologic sample collection over long durations. Similar approaches could be used to train other laboratory primates to cooperate with urine collection procedures. Animal training programs that emphasize positive reinforcement training are an important refinement in the care of laboratory primates. PMID:25651093

  11. Experience in the identification of abuse drugs in urines collected under Treatment Alternatives to Street Crime.

    PubMed

    Cordova, V F; Banford, T A

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the criteria and analytical approach that were employed to cope with a mass drug urine screening program. Motives and justifications for selecting one technique over another are covered, along with a detailed description of those methods selected. Advantages, disadvantages, and limitations of each procedure are discussed. Results are presented for over 11,500 samples of urine collected from the criminal segment of Philadelphia's population over a period of six months. These were examined for amphetamine, methamphetamine, amobarbital, butabarbital, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, secobarbital, cocaine, codeine, methadone, and morphine. PMID:1117273

  12. Methotrimeprazine-induced Corneal Deposits and Cataract Revealed by Urine Drug Profiling Test

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Taeck; Kim, Joon Mo; Kim, Won Young; Choi, Gwang Ju

    2010-01-01

    Two schizophrenic patients who had been taking medication for a long period presented with visual disturbance of 6-month duration. Slit-lamp examination revealed fine, discrete, and brownish deposits on the posterior cornea. In addition, bilateral star-shaped anterior subcapsular lens opacities, which were dense, dust-like granular deposits, were noted. Although we strongly suspected that the patient might have taken one of the drugs of the phenothiazine family, we were unable to obtain a history of medications other than haloperidol and risperidone, which were taken for 3 yr. We performed a drug profiling test using urine samples and detected methotrimeprazine. The patient underwent surgery for anterior subcapsular lens opacities. Visual acuity improved in both eyes, but the corneal deposits remained. We report an unusual case of methotrimeprazine-induced corneal deposits and cataract in a patient with psychosis, identified by using the urine drug profiling test. PMID:21060765

  13. Biological monitoring of cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in urine of hospital personnel occupationally exposed to cytostatic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Ensslin, A S; Stoll, Y; Pethran, A; Pfaller, A; Römmelt, H; Fruhmann, G

    1994-01-01

    The occupational exposure of 21 nurses and pharmacy personnel from eight hospitals to cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide was determined by quantifying the amount of the drugs handled and by measuring the urinary excretion of the unmetabolised substances. Preparing antineoplastic drugs for intravenous treatment was the major task of all study participants. Twenty four hour urine was collected on days when cyclophosphamide and/or ifosfamide were mixed, on average 3900 mg cyclophosphamide and/or 5900 mg ifosfamide. The analyses were performed by gas chromatography with electron capture, detection limit 2.5 micrograms/24 hour urine. Despite standard safety precautions, including a vertical laminar air flow safety cabinet and gloves, cyclophosphamide was detected in 12 of 31 and ifosfamide in four of 21 urine samples on days when the drugs were handled. Excretion of cyclophosphamide ranged from 3.5 to 38 micrograms/24 h (mean 11.4 micrograms/24 h) urine, ifosfamide from 5 to 12.7 micrograms/24 h (mean 9 micrograms/24 h) urine. Based on an excretion rate of 11.3% unmetabolised cyclophosphamide, the average amount excreted corresponded to an uptake of 101 micrograms cyclophosphamide. For ifosfamide the mean quantity incorporated was 20 micrograms assuming that 45% of the drug was excreted. Pertaining to the doses handled, the uptake of cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide was estimated to be approximately 0.0025% and 0.0004% respectively. Despite time-consuming purification procedures, gas chromatographic analysis is a suitable method for monitoring personnel occupationally exposed to cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide and is a major contribution to the evaluation of potential health risks of exposed personnel. PMID:8199663

  14. Urine specimen detection of concurrent nonprescribed medicinal and illicit drug use in patients prescribed buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Alexander Y; Ma, Joseph D; Best, Brookie M; Atayee, Rabia S

    2013-01-01

    Patients being treated with buprenorphine usually have a history of opioid dependence and may be predisposed to misuse of drugs. Concurrent drug misuse increases the risk of life-threatening drug interactions. This retrospective data analysis observed which nonprescribed and illicit drugs were most commonly detected in the urine of patients from pain management clinics taking buprenorphine with or without a prescription. GC, LC/MS and LC-MS-MS were used to quantify 20,929 urine specimens. The most prevalent illicit drug used in both the groups (prescribed and nonprescribed buprenorphine) was marijuana, followed by cocaine. The most prevalent nonprescribed medications abused by both the groups were benzodiazepines, followed by oxycodone and hydrocodone. The overall prevalence of illicit and nonprescribed drug use was significantly higher in subjects who used buprenorphine without a prescription versus prescribed use. Of the concurrent use of marijuana and cocaine with buprenorphine, cocaine is most concerning since it decreases exposure to buprenorphine (lower area under the concentration-time curve and maximum concentration). The concurrent use of nonprescribed benzodiazepines with buprenorphine can cause excess sedation leading to respiratory depression and even death. These findings highlight the importance of educating patients about these potential toxicities. Furthermore, pain providers should consider expanding the spectrum of drugs that they monitor in patients under treatment. PMID:24080973

  15. 49 CFR 40.193 - What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... sufficient amount of urine for a drug test? 40.193 Section 40.193 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... § 40.193 What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test... sufficient amount of urine to permit a drug test (i.e., 45 mL of urine). (b) As the collector, you must...

  16. 49 CFR 40.193 - What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... sufficient amount of urine for a drug test? 40.193 Section 40.193 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... § 40.193 What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test... sufficient amount of urine to permit a drug test (i.e., 45 mL of urine). (b) As the collector, you must...

  17. 49 CFR 40.193 - What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sufficient amount of urine for a drug test? 40.193 Section 40.193 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... § 40.193 What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test... sufficient amount of urine to permit a drug test (i.e., 45 mL of urine). (b) As the collector, you must...

  18. 49 CFR 40.193 - What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... sufficient amount of urine for a drug test? 40.193 Section 40.193 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... § 40.193 What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test... sufficient amount of urine to permit a drug test (i.e., 45 mL of urine). (b) As the collector, you must...

  19. Online extraction LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantitative confirmation of urine drugs of abuse and metabolites: amphetamines, opiates, cocaine, cannabis, benzodiazepines and methadone.

    PubMed

    de Jager, Andrew D; Bailey, Neville L

    2011-09-01

    A rapid LC-MS/MS method for confirmatory testing of five major categories of drugs of abuse (amphetamine-type substances, opiates, cocaine, cannabis metabolites and benzodiazepines) in urine has been developed. All drugs of abuse mandated by the Australian/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4308:2008 are quantified in a single chromatographic run. Urine samples are diluted with a mixture of isotope labelled internal standards. An on-line trap-and-flush approach, followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS has been successfully used to process samples in a functioning drugs of abuse laboratory. Following injection of diluted urine samples, compounds retained on the trap cartridge are flushed onto a reverse-phase C18 HPLC column (5-?m particle size) with embedded hydrophylic functionality. A total chromatographic run-time of 15 min is required for adequate resolution. Automated quantitation software algorithms have been developed in-house using XML scripting to partially automate the identification of positive samples, taking into account ion ratio (IR) and retention times (Rt). The sensitivity of the assay was found to be adequate for the quantitation of drugs in urine at and below the confirmation cut-off concentrations prescribed by AS/NZS 4308:2008. PMID:21839693

  20. Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... conflicts with your teenager and work toward a solution? Are you able to calmly set limits when ... Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse Question 1: Communication Question 2: Encouragement Question 3: Negotiation Question ...

  1. Analysis of drugs of abuse in urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry: experience and application.

    PubMed

    Karaci?, V; Skender, L

    2000-12-01

    This paper describes quantitative methods for determination of urinary drugs/metabolites. The analysis included indicators of opiate (morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine) and methadone (methadone) consumption, indicator of marihuana/hashish consumption (11-nor-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid), indicators of cocaine consumption (cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and ecgonine methyl ester) and of amphetamines consumption (amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine). The methods included solid-phase extraction of urine, concentration of eluent, derivatisation, and quantitative analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) on a capillary column in the electron impact and selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy were determined for all analytes (limit of detection between 3 and 12 ng/ml, precision < 10%, accuracy > 92%). The accuracy was checked through analysis of standard reference materials and participation in an international quality assessment programme. The methods were used in the analysis of spot urine samples of 60 subjects suspected of drug abuse. Negative findings indicated several disadvantages of urine as a biological sample. PMID:11276966

  2. Screening and quantitative determination of drugs of abuse in diluted urine by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Hegstad, Solfrid; Hermansson, Sigurd; Betnér, Ingvar; Spigset, Olav; Falch, Berit Margrethe Hasle

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate a fast, robust and specific UPLC-MS/MS screening platform for the determination and quantification of a variety of commonly used drugs of abuse in urine, i.e. a high-throughput quantitative analysis. Substances in the drug classes opioids, central nervous system stimulants and benzodiazepines and related agents were included in addition to cannabis and pregabalin, a total of 35 different analytes. Based on the concentrations and the physico-chemical properties of the substances, three UPLC-MS/MS methods were developed in parallel. Prior to analysis, sample preparation consisted of two different simple dilutions with 60 and 100 ?L urine, respectively, using a Tecan Freedom Evo pipetting robot platform. A Waters Xevo TQ-S tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled to a Waters I-class UPLC was used for quantitative analysis of one quantitative and one qualifying MRM transition for each analyte, except for tramadol for which the metabolite O-desmethyl-tramadol was included in the MRM method to confirm tramadol identity. Deuterated analogs were included as internal standards. The between-assay relative standard deviations varied from 2% to 11% and the limits of quantification were in the range 1-200 ng/mL for the various analytes. After development and initial testing, the method has been successfully implemented and routinely used at our hospital for quantitative screening of drugs of abuse in more than 35,000 urinary samples. PMID:24413020

  3. [Studies on analytical method for 10 drugs of abuse in urine using HPLC].

    PubMed

    Ma, C; Duan, H; Zhang, H; Xu, Y; Zhou, T

    1998-10-01

    A systematic determination method for 10 drugs of abuse, morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, heroin, levorphanol, pethidine, ethylmorphine, anadol, pentazocine and ethamivan, using high performance liquid chromatography is described. Separation of the 10 drugs was achieved on a 25 cm x 4.6 mm ID, 10 microns Zorbax C8 column, using methanol--0.05 mol.L-1 KH2PO4--diethyl amine (27:73:0.5, pH 4) as mobile phase. Codeine was used as the interal standard. Calibration graphs were linear over the concentration range of 10-200 micrograms.ml-1 and regression equations showed correlation coefficients of greater than 0.999. Precision (RSD) were found to be better than 3% for each compound. Precision and linearity of the method are satisfactory for clinical toxicological applications. The extraction procedure yielded cleaner extracts. The recovery rates from urine were all above 87% without interference. This method is rapid, sensitive and specific. PMID:12016930

  4. Catecholamines - urine

    MedlinePLUS

    Dopamine-urine test; Epinephrine-urine test; Adrenalin-urine test; Urine metanephrine; Normetanephrine; Norepinephrine-urine test; Urine catecholamines; VMA; HVA; Metanephrine; Homovanillic acid (HVA)

  5. Metabolism of the designer drug ?-pyrrolidinobutiophenone (?-PBP) in humans: identification and quantification of the phase I metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Matsuta, Shuntaro; Shima, Noriaki; Kamata, Hiroe; Kakehashi, Hidenao; Nakano, Shihoko; Sasaki, Keiko; Kamata, Tooru; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Miki, Akihiro; Katagi, Munehiro; Zaitsu, Kei; Sato, Takako; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    Urinary phase I metabolites of ?-pyrrolidinobutiophenone (?-PBP) in humans were investigated by analyzing urine specimens obtained from drug abusers. Unequivocal identification and accurate quantification of major metabolites were realized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with newly synthesized authentic standards. Two major phase I metabolic pathways were revealed: (1) reduction of the ketone group to 1-phenyl-2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)butan-1-ol (OH-?-PBP, diastereomers) partly followed by conjugation to its glucuronide and (2) oxidation at the 2?-position of the pyrrolidine ring to ?-(2?-oxo-pyrrolidino)butiophenone (2?-oxo-?-PBP) via the putative intermediate ?-(2?-hydroxypyrrolidino)butiophenone (2?-OH-?-PBP). Of the phase I metabolites retaining the structural characteristics of the parent drug, OH-?-PBP was the most abundant in all specimens examined. Comparison of the phase I metabolism of ?-PBP and ?-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (?-PVP) suggested a relationship between the aliphatic side chain length and the metabolic pathways in ?-pyrrolidinophenones: the shorter aliphatic side chain (1) led to more extensive metabolism via reduction of the ketone group than via the oxidation at the 2?-position of the pyrrolidine ring and (2) influenced the isomeric ratio of a pair of diastereomers. PMID:25703013

  6. Fast, simultaneous quantification of three novel cardiac drugs in human urine by MEPS-UHPLC-MS/MS for therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Magiera, Sylwia

    2013-11-01

    A sensitive and selective ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for the fast, simultaneous quantification of three novel cardiac drugs (aliskiren, prasugrel and rivaroxaban) in human urine. Sample preparation was performed with microextraction with packed sorbent (MEPS), which is a miniaturization of solid phase extraction. The optimal conditions for MEPS extraction were obtained using C8 sorbent, small sample volumes and a short time period (about 3min for the entire sample preparation step). Chromatographic separation of the selected compounds was achieved in less than 1.5min on a Zorbax Rapid Resolution High Definition SB-C18 column using isocratic elution with 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile (70:30, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.8mLmin(-1). The detection was performed on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer by multiple reaction monitoring via an electrospray ionization source with positive ionization mode. The method was fully validated according to the latest recommendations of international guidelines. The lower limit of quantification was 5.0pgmL(-1) for aliskiren and rivaroxaban and 0.5pgmL(-1) for prasugrel. The intra- and inter-day precision was within 7.12% and the accuracy ranged from -7.54% to 4.17%. The mean extraction recoveries of the MEPSC8 methodology were found to be 98.3% for aliskiren, 100.3% for rivaroxaban and 99.9% for prasugrel. This MEPSC8-UHPLC-MS/MS method offers a fast, simple and precise way to determine selected novel cardiac drugs in human urine that could be applied to therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:24076522

  7. Cyclodextrin Micellar LC for Direct Selective Analysis of Combined Dosage Drugs in Urine.

    PubMed

    Albishri, Hassan M; Abd El-Hady, Deia; Tayeb, Roaa A

    2015-08-01

    Two cyclodextrin micellar liquid chromatographic methods were developed and applied to the simultaneous determination of bisoprolol/hydrochlorothiazide and atenolol/chlorthalidone combinations in urine matrices without sample pretreatment. These combined ?-blockers and diuretics chemotherapies are commonly used in the treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Hybrid isocratic mobile phases containing hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin, sodium dodecyl sulfate, phosphate buffer and methanol on a Luna C18 column with 0.5 mL min(-1) flow rate and 25.0°C column temperature were used. The methods were sensitive enough for the determination of analytes at the therapeutic urine levels with limits of detections down to 1.0 µg mL(-1); relative standard deviations and recoveries were ranged between 1.5-4.4% and 98.00-109.52%, respectively. Urinary excretion studies showed that the detection of drugs is possible up to 24 h after their ingestion. The selective proposed separations with less consumption of organic solvents over the hitherto ones could be attributed to the four point competitive interactions among analysts, pseudostationary phases and a real stationary phase. PMID:25540291

  8. Determination of platinum originated from antitumoral drugs in human urine by atomic absorption spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Anilton Coelho; Vieira, Mariana Antunes; Luna, Aderval Severino; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto

    2010-10-15

    Cisplatin and carboplatin are the most common platinum-based drugs used in cancer treatment. Pharmacokinetic investigations, the evaluation of the body burden during the treatment, as well as baseline levels of platinum in humans have attracted great interest. Thus, accurate analytical methods for fast and easy Pt monitoring in clinical samples become necessary. In the present study atomic absorption spectrometric methods for the determination of platinum in the forms of cisplatin and carboplatin in human urine were investigated. Platinum, in these different forms, could be determined in urine, after simple sample dilution. Regarding electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, the optimum parameters were defined by a central composite design optimization. Multiplicative matrix effects were overcome by using a mixture of HCl and NaCl as modifier. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.004 mgL(-1) of platinum in the original sample. For the analysis of more concentrated samples, high resolution continuous source flame atomic absorption spectrometry was also investigated. Flame conditions were optimized by a multivariate D-optimal design, using as response the sum of the analyte addition calibration slopes and their standard deviations. Matrix matched external calibration with PtCl(2) calibration solutions, was possible, and the LOD was 0.06 mgL(-1) in the original sample. The results obtained by the proposed procedures were also in good agreement with those obtained by an independent comparative procedure. PMID:20875558

  9. 75 FR 22150 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for Federal Agencies Correction In notice document...

  10. Hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography for the determination of phenothiazine drugs in urine.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qin; Hu, Bin

    2010-06-01

    A simple method of hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) combined with gas chromatography (GC) was developed for the analysis of four phenothiazine drugs (promethazine, promazine, chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine) in human urine samples. All variables affecting the extraction of target analytes including organic solvent type, stirring rate, extraction time, extraction temperature, pH of sample solution and ionic strength were carefully studied and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the analytical performance of HF-LPME-GC-flame photometric detector (FPD) and HF-LPME-GC-flame ionization detector (FID) were evaluated and compared. The results showed that the HF-LPME-GC-FID was more sensitive than HF-LPME-GC-FPD for the determination of four target phenothiazine drugs, while the signal peak shape and resolution obtained by HF-LPME-GC-FPD was better than that obtained by HF-LPME-GC-FID. HF-LPME-GC-FPD/FID was successfully applied for the assay of the interested phenothiazine drugs in urine sample, and the excretion of the drugs was also investigated by monitoring the variation of the concentration of chlorpromazine in urine of a psychopath within 8 h after drug-taking. The proposed method provided an effective and fast way for the therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of phenothiazine. PMID:20451475

  11. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) [Reserved] (b)...

  12. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) [Reserved] (b)...

  13. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) [Reserved] (b)...

  14. New drugs for Gram-positive uropathogens.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Naber, K G

    2004-09-01

    Complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent nosocomial infections. The bacterial spectrum encompasses Gram-negative but also Gram-positive pathogens in up to 30-40%. The existing treatment for Gram-positive pathogens is not always optimal. Antimicrobials for the treatment of Gram-positive uropathogens comprise older agents, such as aminopenicillins with or without beta-lactamase inhibitors and vancomycin, as well as newer fluoroquinolones, such as levofloxacin or gatifloxacin. However, resistant bacteria such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (except vancomycin-resistant) are generally also not susceptible to the fluoroquinolones. Therefore new agents need to be assessed in the treatment of UTI. Daptomycin and linezolid are new antimicrobial agents with good efficacy against Gram-positive uropathogens as shown by their minimal inhibitory concentrations. In a phase II study the urinary bactericidal activity of linezolid versus ciprofloxacin in volunteers showed comparable activity of both drugs against fluoroquinolone susceptible Gram-positive uropathogens, whereas linezolid was also as active against fluoroquinolone resistant ones. The pharmacokinetics and the mode of action of these two antibiotics are discussed together with some clinical data in the context of therapeutic use in patients with complicated UTIs. PMID:15364305

  15. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605 Section 219.605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.605 Positive drug...

  16. Simultaneous screening and quantification of 25 opioid drugs in post-mortem blood and urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gergov, M; Nokua, P; Vuori, E; Ojanperä, I

    2009-04-15

    A method for simultaneous screening and quantification was developed for the fentanyls alfentanil, fentanyl, p-fluorofentanyl, cis-3-methylfentanyl, trans-3-methylfentanyl, alpha-methylfentanyl, norfentanyl, remifentanil, sufentanil, and the other opioid drugs 6-acetylmorphine, buprenorphine, codeine, dextropropoxyphene, ethylmorphine, heroin, methadone, morphine, naloxone, naltrexone, norbuprenorphine, normethadone, oxycodone, pentazocine, pethidine, and tramadol in post-mortem blood and urine samples by LC-MS/MS. Samples were extracted with butyl acetate at pH 7. The drugs were separated by LC on a Genesis C(18) reversed-phase column, with a gradient consisting of acetonitrile and ammonium acetate at pH 3.2. The mass spectrometric analysis was performed with a quadrupole-linear ion-trap mass spectrometer equipped with a turbo ion spray interface in positive mode using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Quantification was performed based on five isotope-labelled internal standards. Validation included assessment of linearity, limit of quantification, inaccuracy, precision, and matrix effects. The limits of quantification were adequate for screening and quantification of opioid drugs at low therapeutic or abuse concentration levels, with inaccuracy less than 23% and precision better than 24% both in blood and urine samples. When this method was applied to autopsy cases, its results were in agreement with those of reference methods. PMID:19232849

  17. Evaluation of a rapid method for the therapeutic drug monitoring of aliskiren, enalapril and its active metabolite in plasma and urine by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Magiera, Sylwia; Kusa, Jacek

    2015-02-01

    Given the increasing popularity of aliskiren, particularly in combination with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (e.g. enalapril), it is important to determine whether its use in combination with these agents is associated with potentially life threatening safety events. Analytical methods for the simultaneous determination of both drugs in plasma and urine utilized in clinical studies on efficacy and safety have not been fully described in the literature. In this work, a new, fast and reliable method using a digitally controlled microextraction by packed sorbent (eVol(®)-MEPS) followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was developed and validated to quantify an aliskiren, enalapril and its active metabolite in both human plasma and urine. Chromatographic separation was accomplished on a Poroshell 120 EC-C18 column with a gradient elution system consisting of 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile (1.5min of total analysis). Detection was performed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using electrospray ionization in the positive ion mode. This assay method has been fully validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, stability, recovery and matrix effect. The developed method can be applied to the routine determination of selected compounds in human plasma and urine and can be useful to elucidate the mechanisms of the potential risks triggered by the combination of aliskiren and enalapril as well as its active metabolite enalaprilat. PMID:25589258

  18. Rethinking drug policy: an integrity preserving compromise position 

    E-print Network

    Crispino, Azzurra

    2006-10-30

    The "War on Drugs" has been raging for twenty years without resolution. This work attempts to provide a compromise position between the prohibitionists and the legalizers that preserves the integrity of both positions. This compromise position...

  19. Analysis on the go: quantitation of drugs of abuse in dried urine with digital microfluidics and miniature mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Andrea E; Lafreničre, Nelson M; Seale, Brendon; Hendricks, Paul I; Cooks, R Graham; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2014-06-17

    We report the development of a method coupling microfluidics and a miniature mass spectrometer, applied to quantitation of drugs of abuse in urine. A custom digital microfluidic system was designed to deliver droplets of solvent to dried urine samples and then transport extracted analytes to an array of nanoelectrospray emitters for analysis. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection was performed using a fully autonomous 25 kg instrument. Using the new method, cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and codeine can be quantified from four samples in less than 15 min from (dried) sample to analysis. The figures of merit for the new method suggest that it is suitable for on-site screening; for example, the limit of quantitation (LOQ) for cocaine is 40 ng/mL, which is compatible with the performance criteria for laboratory analyses established by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. More importantly, the LOQ of the new method is superior to the 300 ng/mL cutoff values used by the only other portable analysis systems we are aware of (relying on immunoassays). This work serves as a proof-of-concept for integration of microfluidics with miniature mass spectrometry. The system is attractive for the quantitation of drugs of abuse from urine and, more generally, may be useful for a wide range of applications that would benefit from portable, quantitative, on-site analysis. PMID:24906177

  20. Method comparison of the Ortho Vitros Fusion 5,1 chemistry analyzer and the Roche COBAS Integra 400 for urine drug screen testing in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L; Thompson, Catherine D; Clark, Chantry J; McMillin, Gwen A; Lehman, Christopher M

    2012-06-01

    Exposure to drugs and toxins is a major cause for the rising number of emergency department visits each year. Immunoassays are commonly used in the emergency department to provide rapid turnaround time for acute care. The purpose of this study was to compare two automated immunoassay chemistry analyzers to determine which platform produced the fewest number of false positive/negative results. Residual patient urine samples were were collected for each of the following drugs/drug classes: cocaine (n = 40), opiates (n = 45), and amphetamines (n = 54) and confirmed either positive or negative by mass spectrometry. Split sample analyses of these specimens were performed on both the Roche COBAS INTEGRA 400 plus and Ortho Vitros 5,1 FS instruments. The results from the two chemistry analyzers were compared to confirmed results. Both immunoassays were prone to false positive results for cocaine and false negative results for opiates and amphetamines. The Vitros Fusion analyzer generated fewer false positive and false negative results for opiate and amphetamine testing than the Roche Integra, but the platforms performed comparably for cocaine. PMID:22582270

  1. On-site testing of saliva and sweat with Drugwipe and determination of concentrations of drugs of abuse in saliva, plasma and urine of suspected users.

    PubMed

    Samyn, N; van Haeren, C

    2000-01-01

    Potential drug users participated voluntarily in a Belgian study on the usefulness of the non-instrumental immunoassay Drugwipe (Securetec, Germany) for the screening of cocaine, opiates, amphetamine and cannabinoids in saliva and sweat. If one of the screening assays (urine, oral fluid, sweat) showed a positive result, blood and saliva were collected. The on-site Drugwipe results were correlated with the Drugwipe results for saliva in the laboratory and with the GC/MS results of the corresponding saliva, plasma and urine samples and pharmacological effects at the time of sampling. The Drugwipe assay proved to be sufficiently sensitive for the detection of recent cocaine (n = 6) and amphetamine (n = 15) abuse, whether the device was wiped on the tongue or on the surface of the body, or when a saliva sample was applied to the wiping part. In five of the six potential cocaine users, the saliva concentrations of cocaine exceeded 1,000 ng/ml. In the amphetamine group, the saliva concentrations of amphetamine, MDMA or both were high (> 1,000 ng/ml) in 13 subjects. For cocaine and amphetamine, the positive scores for Drugwipe matched the GC/MS results for the three body fluids. Recent heroin abuse (n = 5) could be demonstrated to some extent with Drugwipe on samples from the tongue but only the two subjects with the highest saliva concentrations of MAM (> 500 ng/ml) and morphine (> 500 ng/ml) were positive. If the legal cut-off value for driving under the influence of opiates in Belgium (20 ng/ml of free morphine in plasma) was taken into account, only three subjects would have been legally positive. For cannabinoids (n = 15), false negatives and even some false positives were observed. Saliva can be considered as a useful analytical matrix for the detection of drugs of abuse after recent abuse when analysed with GC/MS. PMID:10876986

  2. Pseudo-Outbreak of Extremely Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Urinary Tract Infections Due to Contamination of an Automated Urine Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Deplano, A.; Roisin, S.; Boyart, V.; De Ryck, R.; Nonhoff, C.; Byl, B.; Glupczynski, Y.; Denis, O.

    2012-01-01

    By the end of May 2010, an increase in the number of urine specimens that were culture positive for extremely drug-resistant (XDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa was observed in our 800-bed university hospital. This led to an infection control alert. No epidemiological link between the patients and no increase in the frequency of XDR P. aeruginosa in non-urine samples were observed. Therefore, a pseudo-outbreak due to analytical contamination in the laboratory was rapidly suspected. A prospective and retrospective search of cases was initiated, and the sampling of the automated urine analyzers used in the laboratory was performed. Antibiotypes were determined by disc diffusion, and genotypes were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). From February to July 2010, 17 patients admitted to 12 different departments and 6 outpatients were included. The mixing device of the cytometric analyzer used for the numeration of urinary particles (Sysmex UF1000i) proved to be heavily contaminated. Isolates recovered from 12 patients belonged to the same antibiotype and PFGE type as the isolate recovered from the analyzer. Extensive disinfection with a broad-spectrum disinfectant and the replacement of the entire tubing was necessary to achieve the complete negativity of culture samples taken from the analyzer. A pseudo-outbreak caused by an XDR P. aeruginosa clone was proven to be due to the contamination of the cytometric analyzer for urinary sediment. Users of such analyzers should be aware that contamination can occur and should always perform culture either before the processing of the urine sample on the analyzer or on a distinct sample tube. PMID:22219304

  3. A positive cannabinoids workplace drug test following the ingestion of commercially available hemp seed oil.

    PubMed

    Struempler, R E; Nelson, G; Urry, F M

    1997-01-01

    A commercially available health food product of cold-pressed hemp seed oil ingested by one volunteer twice a day for 4 1/2 days (135 mL total). Urine specimens collected from the volunteer were subjected to standard workplace urine drug testing procedures, and the following concentrations of 11-nor-delta9- tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (9-THCA) were detected: 41 ng/mL 9-THCA at 45 h, 49 ng/mL at 69 h, and 55 ng/mL at 93 h. Ingestion was discontinued after 93 h, and the following concentrations were detected: 68 ng/mL at 108 h, 57 ng/mL at 117 h, 31 ng/mL at 126 h, and 20 ng/mL at 142 h. The first specimen that tested negative (50 ng/mL initial immunoassay test, 15 ng/mL confirmatory gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric test) was at 146 h, which was 53 h after the last hemp seed oil ingestion. Four subsequent specimens taken to 177 h were also negative. This study indicates that a workplace urine drug test positive for cannabinoids may arise from the consumption of commercially available cold-pressed hemp seed oil. PMID:9248945

  4. 49 CFR 40.193 - What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What happens when an employee does not provide a sufficient amount of urine for a drug test? 40.193 Section 40.193 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Drug Tests § 40.193 What happens when...

  5. Bilirubin - urine

    MedlinePLUS

    Conjugated bilirubin - urine; Direct bilirubin - urine ... This test can be done on any urine sample. For an infant, thoroughly wash the area where urine exits the body. Open a urine collection bag (a plastic bag with an ...

  6. Immunoelectrophoresis - urine

    MedlinePLUS

    Immunoglobulin electrophoresis - urine; Gamma globulin electrophoresis - urine; Urine immunoglobulin electrophoresis; IEP - urine ... A clean-catch urine sample is needed. The clean-catch method is used to prevent germs from the penis or vagina from getting ...

  7. Urine and Urination

    MedlinePLUS

    Your kidneys make urine by filtering wastes and extra water from your blood. The waste is called urea. Your blood carries it to the kidneys. From the kidneys, urine travels down two thin tubes called ureters to ...

  8. The Sociological and Mathematical Implications of Mandatory Urine Tests for Drug Use in the Work Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Janell; Campbell, Richard

    1987-01-01

    Mandatory drug testing of workers will create problems due to the low predictive ability of urinalysis. The predictive value of drug testing in populations of low drug incidence is illustrated using Bayes' Theorem. (MT)

  9. Immunoassay detection of drugs in racing horses. IX. Detection of detomidine in equine blood and urine by radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T.; Tai, C.L.; Taylor, D.G.; Woods, W.E.; Wang, C.J.; Houtz, P.K.; Tai, H.H.; Weckman, T.J.; Yang, J.M.; Sturma, L.

    1989-02-01

    Detomidine is a potent non-narcotic sedative agent which is currently in the process of being approved for veterinary clinical use in the United States. Since no effective screening method in horses is available for detomidine, we have developed an /sup 125/I radioimmunoassay for detomidine in equine blood and urine as part of a panel of tests for illegal drugs in performance horses. Our /sup 125/I radioimmunoassay has an I-50 for detomidine of approximately 2 ng/ml. Our assay shows limited cross-reactivity with the pharmacodynamically similar xylazine, but does not cross-react with acepromazine, epinephrine, haloperidol or promazine. The plasma kinetic data from clinical (greater than or equal to 5 mg/horse) as well as sub-clinical doses indicate first-order elimination in a dose-dependent manner. Within the first 30 minutes after intravenous (IV) administration of 30 mg/horse, plasma levels peak at approximately 20 ng/ml and then decline with an apparent plasma half-life of 25 minutes. Diuresis can occur with administration of clinical doses of detomidine and this effect was accounted for in the analysis of urine samples. Using this method, administration of 30 mg/horse can be readily detected in equine urine for up to 8 hours after IV injection. Additionally, doses as low as 0.5 mg/horse can be detected for short periods of time in blood and urine with use of this assay. Utilization of this assay by research scientists and forensic analysts will allow for the establishment of proper guidelines and controls regarding detomidine administration to performance horses and assurance of compliance with these guidelines.

  10. Oral fluid testing for drugs of abuse: positive prevalence rates by Intercept immunoassay screening and GC-MS-MS confirmation and suggested cutoff concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cone, Edward J; Presley, Lance; Lehrer, Michael; Seiter, William; Smith, Melissa; Kardos, Keith W; Fritch, Dean; Salamone, Sal; Niedbala, R Sam

    2002-01-01

    Draft guidelines for the use of oral fluid for workplace drug testing are under development by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in cooperation with industry and researchers. Comparison studies of the effectiveness of oral fluid testing versus urine testing are needed to establish scientifically reliable cutoff concentrations for oral fluid testing. We present the results of the first large scale database on oral fluid testing in private industry. A total of 77,218 oral fluid specimens were tested over the period of January through October 2001 at LabOne. Specimens were screened by Intercept immunoassay at manufacturer's recommended cutoff concentrations for the five SAMHSA drug categories (marijuana, cocaine, opiates, phencyclidine, and amphetamines). Presumptive positive specimens were confirmed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 3908 positive tests were reported over the 10-month period, representing a positive rate of 5.06%. Of the five drug categories, marijuana and cocaine accounted for 85.75% of the positives. The pattern and frequency of drug positives showed remarkable similarity to urine drug prevalence rates reported for the general workforce according to the Quest Diagnostics' Drug Testing Index over the same general period, suggesting that oral fluid testing produces equivalent results to urine testing. The data on oral fluid testing also revealed a surprisingly high 66.7% prevalence of 6-acetylmorphine confirmations for morphine positives suggesting that oral fluid testing may be superior in some cases to urine testing. Comparison of oral fluid drug concentrations to SAMHSA-recommended cutoff concentrations in Draft Guidelines indicated that adoption of the screening and confirmation cutoff concentrations of Draft Guidelines #3 would produce the most consistent reporting results for all drug classes except amphetamines. Consequently, it is suggested that the final Guidelines adopt the screening and cutoff concentrations listed in Draft Guidelines #3 with the exception of lowering the amphetamines cutoff concentrations (screening/confirmation) to 50/50 ng/mL for amphetamine and methamphetamine. PMID:12501910

  11. Urine culture

    MedlinePLUS

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... sample will be collected as a clean catch urine sample in your health care provider's office or ... will use a special kit to collect the urine. A urine sample can also be taken by ...

  12. Hemp oil ingestion causes positive urine tests for delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Costantino, A; Schwartz, R H; Kaplan, P

    1997-10-01

    A hemp oil product (Hemp Liquid Gold) was purchased from a specialty food store. Fifteen milliliters was consumed by seven adult volunteers. Urine samples were taken from the subjects before ingestion and at 8, 24, and 48 h after the dose was taken. All specimens were screened by enzyme immunoassay with SYVA EMIT II THC 20, THC 50, and THC 100 kits. The tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THCA) concentration was determined on all samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (5). A total of 18 postingestion samples were submitted. Fourteen of the samples screened above the 20-ng cutoff, seven were above the 50-ng cutoff, and two screened greater than the 100-ng cutoff. All of the postingestion samples showed the presence of THCA by GC-MS. PMID:9323529

  13. HPLC determination of cocaine and benzoylecgonine in plasma and urine from drug abusers.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Lafuente, N; Bermejo, A M; López-Rivadulla, M; Cruz, A

    1996-01-01

    Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for the determination of cocaine and its metabolite, benzoylecgonine (BZE), in plasma and urine. Following a solid-liquid extraction with Bond-Elut Certify cartridges and using methaqualone as reference compound, chromatography was performed with a Lichrospher RP 18 (125 x 4-mm i.d.) reversed-phase column, ultraviolet (UV) detection at 235 nm, and methanol (pH 7)-phosphate buffer (70:30 v/v) as mobile phase. Linearity was obtained from 0.1 to 20 micrograms/mL with a good correlation coefficient. Recoveries ranged from 76.9 to 96.5%, and coefficients of variation were always less than 5.0%. Urine samples from live, cocaine-intoxicated patients contained concentrations of 0.21-75.55 micrograms/mL BZE and less than 4.14 micrograms/mL cocaine, whereas postmortem urine analyses gave concentrations of 5.86-198.76 micrograms/mL for BZE and 1.56-33.24 micrograms/mL for its parent compound. Finally, postmortem blood samples were all negative for cocaine and gave BZE concentrations of 0.040-0.53 micrograms/mL. PMID:8835659

  14. Risk of urinary tract infection in patients with positive urine culture and antibiotic therapy undergoing cystoscopy in a third-level hospital.

    PubMed

    Escandón-Vargas, Kevin; García-Perdomo, Herney Andrés; Echeverría, Fernando; Osorio, José Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the risk of urinary tract infection (UTI) following rigid cystoscopy in outpatients with positive urine culture and antibiotic treatment compared to outpatients with negative urine culture and without antibiotic prophylaxis. A prospective pilot study in two groups of patients was conducted in a third-level hospital in Cali, Colombia. Group 1 comprised asymptomatic patients with positive urine culture and group 2 were asymptomatic patients with sterile urine. UTI and urosepsis were assessed after seven and 30 days. Eighty-nine patients, 13 from group 1 and 76 from group 2, were followed up in this pilot study. General incidence of UTI at the seventh or 30th day was 4.5% (4/89). There were no statistically significant differences in risk of UTI or urosepsis at the seventh or 30th day between the two groups. The risk of UTI following rigid cystoscopy in outpatients with positive urine culture and antibiotic treatment did not differ significantly from the risk in outpatients with negative urine culture without antibiotic prophylaxis at day 7 and 30. PMID:26700084

  15. Drug Failure: The Theoretical Position of the Drop-Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Charles B.

    This paper examines the theoretical position of the person who drops out of illegal drug use. A person was considered a drop-out if he admittedly no longer used any or all the drugs in the following categories: marijuana, hallucinogens, speed, downers, and inhalants. A purposive sample was drawn to capture as many people fitting this criterion as…

  16. Urine Testing for Drugs of Abuse. NIDA Research Monograph Series 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawks, Richard L., Ed.; Chiang, C. Nora, Ed.

    In the past 5 years, a growing concern over the use of illicit drugs in the workplace has led to an interest in urinalysis as a way to detect and deter drug use. This monograph provides information that will assist those involved in the planning or implementation of drug testing programs in making informed choices. Articles include: (1)…

  17. Analysis of ketamine and norketamine in urine by automatic solid-phase extraction (SPE) and positive ion chemical ionization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-mi; Lee, Ju-seon; Choi, Sang-kil; Lim, Mi-ae; Chung, Hee-sun

    2008-01-30

    Ketamine (KT) is widely abused for hallucination and also misused as a "date-rape" drug in recent years. An analytical method using positive ion chemical ionization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS) with an automatic solid-phase extraction (SPE) apparatus was studied for the determination of KT and its major metabolite, norketamine (NK), in urine. Six ketamine suspected urine samples were provided by the police. For the research of KT metabolism, KT was administered to SD rats by i.p. at a single dose of 5, 10 and 20mg/kg, respectively, and urine samples were collected 24, 48 and 72 h after administration. For the detection of KT and NK, urine samples were extracted on an automatic SPE apparatus (RapidTrace, Zymark) with mixed mode type cartridge, Drug-Clean (200 mg, Alltech). The identification of KT and NK was by PCI-GC-MS. m/z238 (M+1), 220 for KT, m/z 224 (M+1), 207 for NK and m/z307 (M+1) for Cocaine-D(3) as internal standard were extracted from the full-scan mass spectrum and the underlined ions were used for quantitation. Extracted calibration curves were linear from 50 to 1000 ng/mL for KT and NK with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.99. The limit of detection (LOD) was 25 ng/mL for KT and NK. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 50 ng/mL for KT and NK. The recoveries of KT and NK at three different concentrations (86, 430 and 860 ng/mL) were 53.1 to 79.7% and 45.7 to 83.0%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day run precisions (CV) for KT and NK were less than 15.0%, and the accuracies (bias) for KT and NK were also less than 15% at the three different concentration levels (86, 430 and 860 ng/mL). The analytical method was also applied to real six KT suspected urine specimens and KT administered rat urines, and the concentrations of KT and NK were determined. Dehydronorketamine (DHNK) was also confirmed in these urine samples, however the concentration of DHNK was not calculated. SPE is simple, and needs less organic solvent than liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), and PCI-GC-MS can offer both qualitative and quantitative information for urinalysis of KT in forensic analysis. PMID:17553643

  18. Urine odor

    MedlinePLUS

    Urine odor refers to the smell from your urine. Urine odor varies. Most of the time, urine does not have a strong smell if you ... Most changes in urine odor are not a sign of disease and go away in time. Some foods and medicines, including vitamins, may ...

  19. 28 CFR 550.41 - Urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Urine surveillance. 550.41 Section 550.41... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.41 Urine surveillance. A program of urine testing for drug use shall be established in contract CTCs. (a)...

  20. Urinating Standing versus Sitting: Position Is of Influence in Men with Prostate Enlargement. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lycklama ŕ Nijeholt, Augustinus Aizo Beent; Dekkers, Olaf Matthijs

    2014-01-01

    Background It is suggested that the body posture during urination can influence urodynamic parameters in patients with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) to an extent approaching pharmacological interventions. In this article, the influence of body position during micturition on maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), voiding time (TQ) and post-void residual volume (PVR) in healthy males and patients with LUTS is analyzed by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis. Evidence Acquisition A systematic search was conducted in 14 medical databases. Studies comparing urodynamic parameters in standing versus sitting position were eligible for inclusion. Studies were stratified according to health status of included male participants: healthy individuals and patients with LUTS. Standardized mean differences for Qmax, TQ and PVR were pooled in a random effects model. Results Eleven articles were included. In men with LUTS, a significantly lower PVR (?24.96 ml; 95%CI ?48.70 to ?1.23) was shown in sitting position compared to standing. In accordance, Qmax was increased (1.23 ml/s; 95%CI ?1.02 to 3.48), and TQ was decreased (?0.62 s; 95%CI ?1.66 to 0.42) in sitting position, although these differences did not reach statistical significance. In healthy men, Qmax (0.18 ml/s; 95% CI ?1.67 to 2.02), TQ (0.49 s; 95%CI ?3.30 to 4.27) and PVR (0.43 ml; 95%CI ?0.79 to 1,65) were similar in sitting and standing position. Conclusion For healthy men, no difference is found in any of the urodynamic parameters. In patients with LUTS, the sitting position is linked with an improved urodynamic profile. PMID:25051345

  1. Examining the Relationship between Gender and Drug-Using Behaviors in Adolescents: The Use of Diagnostic Assessments and Biochemical Analyses of Urine Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, William H.; Moore, David D.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the relationship between gender and drug use among adolescents using diagnostic assessments and biochemical analyses of urine samples. Statistical significance was found in the relationship between gender and marijuana use. The study confirms that more research is needed in this area. (Author/MKA)

  2. Large volume sample stacking for rapid and sensitive determination of antidiabetic drug metformin in human urine and serum by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    T?ma, Petr

    2014-06-01

    Two CE methods with contactless conductivity detection have been developed for determining the oral antidiabetic drug metformin in human urine and blood. The determination of metformin is performed on a separation capillary with an effective length of 14 cm, using a maximum voltage of 30 kV and with a small injection of 50-fold diluted urine into the capillary. Under these conditions, the migration time of metformin is 35s and the LOD is 0.3 ?M. Large-volume sample stacking was used to determine low metformin levels in serum. The injection of a sample of serum deproteinized with acetonitrile was 10 times greater compared to the injected amount of urine. This enabled reduction of the LOD to 0.03 ?M and the metformin migration time equalled 86 s. The undesirable solvent from sample zone was forced out of the capillary to ensure rapidity and good repeatability of the determination. The RSD values for the migration time are 0.1% for urine and 0.7% for serum; RSD for the peak areas equalled 1.4% for urine and 2.6% for serum. The developed CE technique was tested on performance of routine analyses of metformin in the urine and serum of patients suffering from type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:24792694

  3. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs from human plasma and urine using response surface experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Purificación; Fernández, Ana M; Bermejo, Ana M; Lorenzo, Rosa A; Carro, Antonia M

    2013-04-01

    The performance of microwave-assisted extraction and HPLC with photodiode array detection method for determination of six analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs from plasma and urine, is described, optimized, and validated. Several parameters affecting the extraction technique were optimized using experimental designs. A four-factor (temperature, phosphate buffer pH 4.0 volume, extraction solvent volume, and time) hybrid experimental design was used for extraction optimization in plasma, and three-factor (temperature, extraction solvent volume, and time) Doehlert design was chosen to extraction optimization in urine. The use of desirability functions revealed the optimal extraction conditions as follows: 67°C, 4 mL phosphate buffer pH 4.0, 12 mL of ethyl acetate and 9 min, for plasma and the same volume of buffer and ethyl acetate, 115°C and 4 min for urine. Limits of detection ranged from 4 to 45 ng/mL in plasma and from 8 to 85 ng/mL in urine. The reproducibility evaluated at two concentration levels was less than 6.5% for both specimens. The recoveries were from 89 to 99% for plasma and from 83 to 99% for urine. The proposed method was successfully applied in plasma and urine samples obtained from analgesic users. PMID:23505248

  4. Urine chemistry

    MedlinePLUS

    Chemistry - urine ... For this test, a clean catch (midstream) urine sample is needed. Some tests require that you collect all of your urine for 24 hours. Your doctor will order certain tests, which ...

  5. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePLUS

    This test measures the amount of calcium in urine. All cells need calcium in order to work. ... A 24-hour urine sample is usually needed: On day 1, urinate into the toilet when you wake up in the morning. Collect ...

  6. New designer drug alpha-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (PVP): studies on its metabolism and toxicological detection in rat urine using gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Christoph; Peters, Frank T; Haas, Claudia; Meyer, Markus R; Fritschi, Giselher; Maurer, Hans H

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the metabolites of the new designer drug alpha-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (PVP) in rat urine using GC/MS techniques. Eleven metabolites of PVP could be identified suggesting the following metabolic steps: hydroxylation of the side chain followed by dehydrogenation to the corresponding ketone; hydroxylation of the 2''-position of the pyrrolidine ring followed by dehydrogenation to the corresponding lactam or followed by ring opening to the respective aliphatic aldehyde and further oxidation to the respective carboxylic acid; degradation of the pyrrolidine ring to the corresponding primary amine; and hydroxylation of the phenyl ring, most probably in the 4'-position. The authors' screening procedure for pyrrolidinophenones allowed the detection of PVP metabolites after application of a dose corresponding to a presumed user's dose. In addition, the involvement of nine different human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes in the side chain hydroxylation of PVP was investigated and CYP 2B6, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 were found to catalyze this reaction. PMID:19241365

  7. Pholcodine interference in the immunoassay for opiates in urine.

    PubMed

    Svenneby, G; Wedege, E; Karlsen, R L

    1983-01-01

    The excretion in urine after single oral therapeutic doses of morphine derivatives was analysed with radioimmunoassay (RIA) and homogeneous enzyme immunoassay (EMIT) for opiates. In contrast to the rapid excretion of ethylmorphine and codeine, pholcodine showed positive results for opiates 2-6 weeks after intake when the urines were analysed with the RIA-method. When analysed with the EMIT-method, positive results were obtained for pholcodine for approximately 10 days. As pholcodine is a common component in cough mixtures, its prolonged excretion could represent a hazard in interpreting the results from drug analyses of urines. PMID:6347841

  8. Urine Trouble: Drug Testing of Students and Teachers in Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Non-individualized (so-called "random") drug testing in public schools presents issues of Constitutional law on both the federal and state levels, particularly with regard to citizens' freedom from "unreasonable searches and seizures." The trend toward increasing acceptance of such testing by the courts (and particularly the U.S. Supreme Court)…

  9. Urine melanin

    MedlinePLUS

    Thormahlen's test; Melanin - urine ... A clean-catch urine sample is needed. ... this substance that it shows up in the urine. ... Normally, melanin is not present in urine. Normal value ranges may ... measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor ...

  10. Urine - bloody

    MedlinePLUS

    Hematuria; Blood in the urine ... are many possible causes of blood in the urine. Bloody urine is may be due to a problem in ... glomerulonephritis ) -- a common cause of blood in the urine in children Kidney failure Polycystic kidney disease Recent ...

  11. Purple Urine Bag Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abubacker, Naufal Rizwan Taraganar; Jayaraman, Senthil Manikandan Thirumanilayur; R, Kannan; Sivanesan, Magesh Kumar; Mathew, Renu

    2015-08-01

    Purple urine bag syndrome (PUBS) is a rare disorder seen in elderly persons, wherein the urinary bag and the tubing turn in to purple colour. It is usually seen in patients who are on urinary catheters for a long time. Purple coloured urine occurs due to the accumulation of indigo and indirubin, which are the end products of tryptophan metabolism due to the action of sulfatases and phosphatases formed by bacteria like Providencia, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella etc. We present this interesting phenomenon of purple urine in a young male who was on prolonged urinary catheterization. The urine culture was positive for Providencia and constipation was an added risk factor for the purple urine. The urinary catheter and tubing was changed along with a course of antibiotics which lead to the normalization of the urine colour. PMID:26435987

  12. A Case of Psychosis After Use of a Detoxification Kit and a Review of Techniques, Risks, and Regulations Associated With the Subversion of Urine Drug Tests

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Moneeshindra Singh; Kalia, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    Context: The practice of drug testing in the workplace has been adopted for US federal government employees, and many state and local governments as well as private businesses have followed suit. However, a parallel industry dedicated to subverting the results of urine drug testing has emerged with little or no regulation. Evidence Acquisition: First, the case of a 19-year-old man who developed psychosis after the use of a detoxification kit is presented. Second, a review of the existing literature on the techniques, risks, and regulations associated with the use of drug tampering kits is provided. PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Google Scholar were searched using the keywords UDS, urine toxicology, pass the drug test, and clean UA, with no restrictions on publication date. Case reports, letters to the editor, and original research and review articles in multiple languages were reviewed, as were federal regulations and acts on the topic. The search yielded 4,082 results, of which 49 articles were selected for relevance. Some articles were later omitted as they had cited the original article and had nothing new to offer. Results: Three commonly used tampering techniques are in vivo adulteration, urine substitution, and in vitro adulteration. Review of the literature regarding the risks involved with use of tampering kits yielded no results. In 1986, an executive order was issued requiring all federal employees to refrain from illicit drug use, and the 1988 Drug-Free Workplace Act precipitated the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration guidelines and their subsequent revisions. Recently, many states have made regulatory efforts to bring drug test defrauding under the ambit of law. Conclusions: Clinicians need to be aware of the tampering techniques and the possibility of false-negative urine drug tests. Cognizance of inherent risks involved with using these techniques including psychiatric and/or medical complications is also warranted. The manufacture, sale, and use of these products have little or no regulation by state or federal authorities, making them potentially dangerous and imposing new challenges in testing for abused drugs. The extent of use of these products and techniques is not known at this time and is an area that warrants further research. PMID:22295274

  13. Urine Metanephrines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Urine Metanephrines, Total and Fractionated Related tests: Catecholamines , Plasma Free Metanephrines , VMA All content on Lab Tests ... The Endocrine Society recommends using a test for plasma free metanephrines or urine metanephrines to evaluate an ...

  14. Myoglobin - urine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... urine exits the body. Open a urine collection bag (a plastic bag with an adhesive paper on one end), and ... For boys, place the entire penis in the bag and attach the adhesive to the skin. For ...

  15. Creatinine - urine

    MedlinePLUS

    Urine creatinine test ... Urine creatinine (24-hour sample) values can range from 500 to 2000 mg/day. Results depend on your ... Abnormal results of urine creatinine may be due to any of the following: High meat diet Kidney problems, such as damage to the tubule ...

  16. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Determination of Nine Hallucinogenic 25-NBOMe Designer Drugs in Urine Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Poklis, Justin L.; Clay, Deborah J.; Poklis, Alphonse

    2014-01-01

    We present a high-performance liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC–MS-MS) method for the identification and quantification of nine serotonin 5-HT2A receptor agonist hallucinogenic substances from a new class of N-methoxybenzyl derivatives of methoxyphenylethylamine (NBOMe) designer drugs in human urine: 25H-NBOMe, 2CC-NBOMe, 25I-NBF, 25D-NBOMe, 25B-NBOMe, 2CT-NBOMe, 25I-NBMD, 25G-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe. This assay was developed for the Virginia Commonwealth University Clinical and Forensic Toxicology laboratory to screen emergency department specimens in response to an outbreak of N-benzyl-phenethylamine derivative abuse and overdose cases in Virginia. The NBOMe derivatives were rapidly extracted from the urine specimens by use of FASt™ solid-phase extraction columns. Assay performance was determined as recommended for validation by the Scientific Working Group for Forensic Toxicology (SWGTOX) for linearity, lower limit of quantification, lower limit of detection, accuracy/bias, precision, dilution integrity, carryover, selectivity, absolute recovery, ion suppression and stability. Linearity was verified to be from 1 to 100 ng/mL for each of the nine analytes. The bias determined for the NBOMe derivatives was 86–116% with a <14% coefficient of variation over the linear range of the assay. Four different NBOMe derivatives were detected using the presented method in patient urine specimens. PMID:24535338

  17. High-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of nine hallucinogenic 25-NBOMe designer drugs in urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Poklis, Justin L; Clay, Deborah J; Poklis, Alphonse

    2014-04-01

    We present a high-performance liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) method for the identification and quantification of nine serotonin 5-HT2A receptor agonist hallucinogenic substances from a new class of N-methoxybenzyl derivatives of methoxyphenylethylamine (NBOMe) designer drugs in human urine: 25H-NBOMe, 2CC-NBOMe, 25I-NBF, 25D-NBOMe, 25B-NBOMe, 2CT-NBOMe, 25I-NBMD, 25G-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe. This assay was developed for the Virginia Commonwealth University Clinical and Forensic Toxicology laboratory to screen emergency department specimens in response to an outbreak of N-benzyl-phenethylamine derivative abuse and overdose cases in Virginia. The NBOMe derivatives were rapidly extracted from the urine specimens by use of FASt™ solid-phase extraction columns. Assay performance was determined as recommended for validation by the Scientific Working Group for Forensic Toxicology (SWGTOX) for linearity, lower limit of quantification, lower limit of detection, accuracy/bias, precision, dilution integrity, carryover, selectivity, absolute recovery, ion suppression and stability. Linearity was verified to be from 1 to 100 ng/mL for each of the nine analytes. The bias determined for the NBOMe derivatives was 86-116% with a <14% coefficient of variation over the linear range of the assay. Four different NBOMe derivatives were detected using the presented method in patient urine specimens. PMID:24535338

  18. Comparison of RapiTest with Emit d.a.u. and GC-MS for the analysis of drugs in urine.

    PubMed

    Korte, T; Pykäläinen, J; Lillsunde, P; Seppälä, T

    1997-01-01

    Results obtained with RapiTest THC (One Step delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Test), RapiTest MOP (One Step Morphine Test), RapiTest MET (One Step Methamphetamine Test), and RapiTest COC (One Step Cocaine Test) were compared with the results obtained with Emit d.a.u. and with gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) methods. In all, 81 urine samples taken from specimens submitted for routine analysis in the Laboratory of Pharmacology and Toxicology were analyzed. Samples were screened with Emit, reanalyzed by RapiTests, and quantitated using GC-MS methods. Both positive and negative urine samples were tested. The results obtained with RapiTests correlated well with the Emit d.a.u. and GC-MS data when operating above the cutoff concentrations specified for these methods. RapiTest MOP was found to have crossreactivity with codeine and ethylmorphine, and RapiTest MET crossreacted with amphetamine. PMID:9013293

  19. Legal Position of School Personnel -- Drugs and Narcotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Thomas A.

    California educators have been given broad discretionary powers to control students who misuse drugs or narcotics, and to develop drug education programs. This paper outlines and discusses legislation dealing with disciplinary actions against drug offenders, and delineates school responsibilities for developing and implementing effective drug

  20. Urine Eggs

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-07-25

    Broadcast Transcript: In spring, a young man's fancy turns to thoughts of urine-soaked eggs. You heard that right. Here in Dongyang, China, eggs boiled in the urine of 10-year-old boys are a considered a delicacy of spring. Also known as virgin boy...

  1. Biotransformation and detectability of the designer drug 2,5-dimethoxy-4-propylphenethylamine (2C-P) studied in urine by GC-MS, LC-MS(n), and LC-high-resolution-MS(n).

    PubMed

    Wink, Carina S D; Meyer, Markus R; Braun, Tina; Turcant, Alain; Maurer, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    2,5-Dimethoxy-4-propylphenethylamine (2C-P) is a hallucinogenic designer drug of the phenethylamine class, the so-called 2Cs, named according to the ethyl spacer between the nitrogen and the aromatic ring. The aims of the present work were to identify the phases I and II metabolites of 2C-P. In addition, the detectability of 2C-P and its metabolites in urine as proof of an intake in clinical or forensic cases was tested. According to the identified metabolites, the following pathways were proposed: N-acetylation; deamination followed by reduction to the corresponding alcohol and oxidation to carbonic acid; mono- and bis-hydroxylation at different positions; mono- and bis-O-demethylation, followed by glucuronidation, sulfation, or both; and combination of these steps. Proof of an intake of a common user's dose of 2C-P was possible by both standard urine screening approaches, the GC-MS as well as the LC-MS(n) approach. PMID:25120185

  2. Enhanced amperometric detection of metronidazole in drug formulations and urine samples based on chitosan protected tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine thin-film modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, S; Pandian, K; Jayakumari, L S; Inbasekaran, S

    2016-02-01

    An enhanced electrocatalytic reduction of metronidazole antibiotic drug molecule using chitosan protected tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine (Chit/CuTsPc) thin-film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been developed. An irreversible reduction occurs at -0.47V (vs. Ag/AgCl) using Chit/CuTsPc modified GCE. A maximum peak current value is obtained at pH1 and the electrochemical reduction reaction is a diffusion controlled one. The detection limit is found to be 0.41nM from differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) method. This present investigation method is adopted for electrochemical detection of metronidazole in drug formulation and urine samples by using DPV method. PMID:26652358

  3. Is a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy a predictive factor for positive allergy tests to anaesthetics?

    PubMed Central

    Hagau, Natalia; Gherman-Ionica, Nadia; Hagau, Denisa; Tranca, Sebastian; Sfichi, Manuela; Longrois, Dan

    2012-01-01

    AIMS International recommendations stipulate not performing screening skin tests to a drug in the absence of a clinical history consistent with that specific drug allergy. Nevertheless, two publications showed that a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy was the only predictive factor for a positive skin test when screening for allergy to anaesthetic drugs was done. We selected from a surgical population 40 volunteers with a prior history of allergy to non-anaesthetic drugs in order to analyse the prevalence of positive allergy tests to anaesthetics. METHODS The selected adult patients were tested for 11 anaesthetic drugs using in vivo tests: skin prick (SPT) and intradermal (IDT) tests and in vitro tests: the basophil activation test (BAT) and detection of drug-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). RESULTS The prevalence for the positive SPT and IDT was 1.6% and 5.8% respectively. The result of flow cytometry agreed with the SPT in five out of seven positive SPT (71%). IgEs confirmed two positive SPT with corresponding positive BAT. Ten per cent of the patients had a positive prick test to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). For midazolam none of the SPT was positive, but 11 patients had positive IDT nonconfirmed by BAT. CONCLUSION The prevalence of positive in vivo and in vitro allergy tests to NMBAs is higher in our study population. This could be an argument for pre-operative SPT to NMBAs for the surgical population with reported non-anaesthetic drug allergies. A larger prospective study is needed to validate changes in clinical practice. PMID:21988224

  4. Fatal Crashes from Drivers Testing Positive for Drugs in the U.S., 1993–2010

    PubMed Central

    Stimpson, Jim P.; Pagán, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Illegal drug use is a persistent problem, prescription drug abuse is on the rise, and there is clinical evidence that drug use reduces driving performance. This study describes trends in characteristics of drivers involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes who test positive for drugs. Methods We used the Fatality Analysis Reporting System—a census of motor vehicle crashes resulting in at least one fatality on U.S. public roads—to investigate suspected drug use for the period 1993–2010. Results Drugged drivers who were tested for drug use accounted for 11.4% of all drivers involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes in 2010. Drugged drivers are increasingly likely to be older drivers, and the percentage using multiple drugs increased from 32.6% in 1993 to 45.8% in 2010. About half (52.4%) of all drugged drivers used alcohol, but nearly three-quarters of drivers testing positive for cocaine also used alcohol. Prescription drugs accounted for the highest fraction of drugs used by drugged drivers in fatal crashes in 2010 (46.5%), with much of the increase in prevalence occurring since the mid-2000s. Conclusions The profile of a drugged driver has changed substantially over time. An increasing share of these drivers is now testing positive for prescription drugs, cannabis, and multiple drugs. These findings have implications for developing interventions to address the changing nature of drug use among drivers in the U.S. PMID:24982537

  5. Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.

    2012-01-01

    A method combines solid phase acidification with two non-toxic biocides to prevent ammonia volatilization and microbial proliferation. The safe, non-oxidizing biocide combination consists of a quaternary amine and a food preservative. This combination has exhibited excellent stabilization of both acidified and unacidified urine. During pretreatment tests, composite urine collected from donors was challenged with a microorganism known to proliferate in urine, and then was processed using the nonhazardous urine pre-treatment method. The challenge microorganisms included Escherichia coli, a common gram-negative bacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, a ureolytic gram-positive bacteria; Candida albicans, a yeast commonly found in urine; and Aspergillus niger, a problematic mold that resists urine pre-treatment. Urine processed in this manner remained microbially stable for over 57 days. Such effective urine stabilization was achieved using non-toxic, non-oxidizing biocides at higher pH (3.6 to 5.8) than previous methods in use or projected for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). ISS urine pretreatment methods employ strong oxidants including ozone and hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a carcinogenic material, under very acidic conditions (pH = 1.8 to 2.4). The method described here offers a much more benign chemical environment than previous pretreatment methods, and will lower equivalent system mass (ESM) by reducing containment volume and mass, system complexity, and crew time needed to handle pre-treatment chemicals. The biocides, being non-oxidizing, minimize the potential for chemical reactions with urine constituents to produce volatile, airborne contaminants such as cyanogen chloride. Additionally, the biocides are active under significantly less acidic conditions than those used in the current system, thereby reducing the degree of required acidification. A simple flow-through solid phase acidification (SPA) bed is employed to overcome the natural buffering capacity of urine, and to lower the pH to levels that fix ammoniacal nitrogen in the non-volatile and highly water soluble NH4 + form. Citric acid, a highly soluble, solid tricarboxylic acid essential to cellular metabolism, and typically used as a food preservative, has also been shown to efficiently acidify urine in conjunction with non-oxidizing biocides to provide effective stabilization with respect to both microbial growth and ammonia volatilization.

  6. Absorptive constituents and their metabolites in drug-containing urine samples from Wuzhishan miniature pigs orally administered with Buyang Huanwu decoction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Hui; Ren, Xiang-Liang; Xu, Feng; Ma, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Guang-Xue; Li, Cang-Hai; Li, Chen; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Buyang Huanwu decoction (BYHWD), a famous traditional Chinese medicine prescription for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, is composed of seven commonly used Chinese herbs--Astragali Radix, Angelicae Sinensis Radix, Paeoniae Radix Rubra, Chuanxiong Rhizoma, Carthami Flos, Persicae Semen and Pheretima. To determine the main absorptive constituents and the metabolites of BYHWD in vivo, urine samples from Wuzhishan (WZS) miniature pigs orally administered with BYHWD (13.6 g crude drugs/kg) were collected to investigate the characteristic compounds. By comparing the high-performance liquid chromatography of a drug-containing urine sample with that of a drug-free sample, 17 characteristic compounds were isolated from the methanol extract of a drug-containing urine sample by column chromatography. Their structures, including 11 isoflavanoids, 2 pterocarpanoids and 4 isoflavonoids, were identified by spectroscopic means. Of the 17 compounds, 8 (1-8) were new compounds with the following structures: 3S-7,3',4'-trihydroxyisoflavan-3'-O-?-D-glucuronide (1), 3S-7,3',4'-trihydroxyisoflavan-4'-O-?-D-glucuronide (2), 3S-7,2',4'-trihydroxyisoflavan-2'-O-?-D-glucuronide (3), 3R-7,2'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethoxyisoflavan-2'-O-?-D-glucuronide (4), 3R-7,2'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethoxyisoflavan-2'-O-?-D-glucuronide-6"-methyl ester (5), 3R-7,2'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethoxyisoflavan-7-O-?-D-glucuronide-6"-methyl ester (6), 3R-7,2',3'-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavan-3'-O-?-D-glucuronide-6"-methyl ester (7), and 3S-7,4',5'-trihydroxy-2',3'-dimethoxyisoflavan-5'-O-?-D-glucuronide (8). Based on the possible relationship and metabolic pathways of the 17 compounds in vivo, 3R-7,2'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethoxyisoflavan (isomucronulatol, 11), 6aR,11aR-3-hydroxy-9,10-dimethoxypterocarpan (methylnissolin, astrapterocarpan, 13), 7,3'-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavone (calycosin, 16) and 7-hydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavone (formononetin, 17) were thought to be the most important absorptive original isoflavonoid constituents of BYHWD in vivo, which underwent reactions of glucuronidation, hydroxylation, demethylation and reduction. The other 13 compounds were deduced to be their metabolites. PMID:23516044

  7. Urine Preservative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M. (Inventor); Nillen, Jeannie (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is CPG, a combination of a chlorhexidine salt (such as chlorhexidine digluconate, chlorhexidine diacetate, or chlorhexidine dichloride) and n-propyl gallate that can be used at ambient temperatures as a urine preservative.

  8. Frequent Urination

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Spotlight Become a youth volunteer leader World Prematurity Day World Prematurity Your support helps babies We are ... very strong. After birth For the first few days after delivery, you may urinate even more often ...

  9. In silico and in vitro metabolism studies support identification of designer drugs in human urine by liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tyrkkö, Elli; Pelander, Anna; Ketola, Raimo A; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-08-01

    Human phase I metabolism of four designer drugs, 2-desoxypipradrol (2-DPMP), 3,4-dimethylmethcathinone (3,4-DMMC), ?-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (?-PVP), and methiopropamine (MPA), was studied using in silico and in vitro metabolite prediction. The metabolites were identified in drug abusers’ urine samples using liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/Q-TOF/MS). The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of the in silico and in vitro methods to generate the main urinary metabolites found in vivo. Meteor 14.0.0 software (Lhasa Limited) was used for in silico metabolite prediction, and in vitro metabolites were produced in human liver microsomes (HLMs). 2-DPMP was metabolized by hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and oxidation, resulting in six phase I metabolites. Six metabolites were identified for 3,4-DMMC formed via N-demethylation, reduction, hydroxylation, and oxidation reactions. ?-PVP was found to undergo reduction, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and oxidation reactions, as well as degradation of the pyrrolidine ring, and seven phase I metabolites were identified. For MPA, the nor-MPA metabolite was detected. Meteor software predicted the main human urinary phase I metabolites of 3,4-DMMC, ?-PVP, and MPA and two of the four main metabolites of 2-DPMP. It assisted in the identification of the previously unreported metabolic reactions for ?-PVP. Eight of the 12 most abundant in vivo phase I metabolites were detected in the in vitro HLM experiments. In vitro tests serve as material for exploitation of in silico data when an authentic urine sample is not available. In silico and in vitro designer drug metabolism studies with LC/Q-TOF/MS produced sufficient metabolic information to support identification of the parent compound in vivo. PMID:23797910

  10. Fabrication of aluminum terephthalate metal-organic framework incorporated polymer monolith for the microextraction of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in water and urine samples.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Dan-Ya; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Polymer monolith microextraction (PMME) based on capillary monolithic column is an effective and useful technique to preconcentrate trace analytes from environmental and biological samples. Here, we report the fabrication of a novel aluminum terephthalate metal-organic framework (MIL-53(Al)) incorporated capillary monolithic column via in situ polymerization for the PMME of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ketoprofen, fenbufen and ibuprofen) in water and urine samples. The fabricated MIL-53(Al) incorporated monolith was characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and nitrogen adsorption experiment. The MIL-53(Al) incorporated monolith gave larger surface area than the neat polymer monolith. A 2-cm long MIL-53(Al) incorporated capillary monolith was applied for PMME coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of the NSAIDs. Potential factors affecting the PMME were studied in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the developed method gave the enhancement factors of 46-51, the linear range of 0.40-200?gL(-1), the detection limits (S/N=3) of 0.12-0.24?gL(-1), and the quantification limits (S/N=10) of 0.40-0.85?gL(-1). The recoveries for spiked NSAIDs (20?gL(-1)) in water and urine samples were in the range of 77.3-104%. Besides, the MIL-53(Al) incorporated monolith was stable enough for 120 extraction cycles without significant loss of extraction efficiency. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of NSAIDs in water and urine samples. PMID:25840660

  11. The detection and characterization of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs on high performance thin-layer chromatography plates using tandem mass spectrometry: application to drugs and metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Morden, W; Wilson, I D

    1996-01-01

    The application of tandem mass spectrometry to the analysis and identification of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as paracetamol, ibuprofen and indomethacin following thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is described. TLC was combined successfully with mass spectrometry and with tandem mass spectrometry using silica gel and diol-bonded silica gel high performance TLC plates. The diol-bonded phase was found to be superior for use with biological samples and enabled the identification of paracetamol, ibuprofen and salicylhippuric acid (the major metabolite of acetylsalicylic acid) in human urine extracts following normal therapeutic doses. PMID:9004530

  12. Validation of LUCIO-Direct-ELISA kits for the detection of drugs of abuse in urine: application to the new German driving licence re-granting guidelines.

    PubMed

    Agius, Ronald; Nadulski, Thomas; Moore, Christine

    2012-02-10

    LUCIO-Direct-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests were validated for the screening of drugs of abuse cannabis, opiates, amphetamines and cocaine in urine for the new German medical and psychological assessment (MPA) guidelines with subsequent gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) confirmation. The screening cut-offs corresponding to 10 ng/mL 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH), 50 ng/mL amphetamine, 25 ng/mL morphine and codeine and 30 ng/mL benzoylecgonine were chosen at the point where the number of false negatives was lower than 1%. Due to their accuracy, ease of use and rapid analysis, these ELISA tests are very promising for cases where a large proportion of the tests are expected to be negative such as for abstinence monitoring as part of the driving licence re-granting process. PMID:22075096

  13. Pink urine.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, E; Capron, A; Hantson, P

    2014-11-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted after a suspected hypnotic overdose of valerian extracts. In addition to altered consciousness, the first clinical symptoms included not only diffuse rash on the face, trunk, and limbs, but also an inspiratory dyspnea with a marked hypoxemia. A major laryngeal edema was noted during orotracheal intubation. After correction of hypoxemia, the patient became agitated and propofol was administered by continuous infusion. In addition, the patient passed pink urine staining the urine collection bag. The presence of an unidentified toxic substance was suspected. PMID:25233954

  14. Fit-for-purpose in veterinary drug residue analysis: development and validation of an LC-MS/MS method for the screening of thirty illicit drugs in bovine urine.

    PubMed

    Leporati, Marta; Capra, Pierluigi; Brizio, Paola; Ciccotelli, Valentina; Abete, Maria Cesarina; Vincenti, Marco

    2012-02-01

    A selective and sensitive method for screening 31 analytes (nine corticosteroids, eight ?-agonists, seven anabolic steroids, six promazines and zeranol) in bovine urine was validated according to 2002/657/EC guidelines. Upon optimization of sample treatment conditions, the extraction was performed by diethylether at pH 9, after deconjugation. Extraction yields (R%) proved higher than 70% for 19 analytes, 50drugs for which the European legislation prescribes official controls. Its practical applicability was verified on 494 real samples as an alternative to the traditional screening protocols based on multiple immunometric analysis, demonstrating high efficiency and comprehensive investigation capacity, allowing epidemiological assessment of the current trends in cattle breeding drug abuse. Among non-compliant results, nine borderline cases of growth-promoters illegal treatments, making use of long-term low-dosage administrations and typically yielding urine residues below the cut-off value for immunochemical methods, were detected by using the present LC-MS/MS method. PMID:22228613

  15. Detection of Zika virus in urine.

    PubMed

    Gourinat, Ann-Claire; O'Connor, Olivia; Calvez, Elodie; Goarant, Cyrille; Dupont-Rouzeyrol, Myrielle

    2015-01-01

    We describe the kinetics of Zika virus (ZIKV) detection in serum and urine samples of 6 patients. Urine samples were positive for ZIKV >10 days after onset of disease, which was a notably longer period than for serum samples. This finding supports the conclusion that urine samples are useful for diagnosis of ZIKV infections. PMID:25530324

  16. Detection of Zika Virus in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Gourinat, Ann-Claire; O’Connor, Olivia; Calvez, Elodie; Goarant, Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    We describe the kinetics of Zika virus (ZIKV) detection in serum and urine samples of 6 patients. Urine samples were positive for ZIKV >10 days after onset of disease, which was a notably longer period than for serum samples. This finding supports the conclusion that urine samples are useful for diagnosis of ZIKV infections. PMID:25530324

  17. Protein urine test

    MedlinePLUS

    Urine protein; Albumin - urine; Urine albumin; Proteinuria; Albuminuria ... After you provide a urine sample, it is tested. The health care provider uses a dipstick made with a color-sensitive pad. The color the ...

  18. Chloride - urine test

    MedlinePLUS

    The urine chloride test measures the amount of chloride in a certain volume of urine. ... After you provide a urine sample, it is tested in the lab. If needed, the health care provider may ask you to collect your urine ...

  19. Ketones urine test

    MedlinePLUS

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ... ketone bodies. A dipstick is dipped in the urine sample. A color change indicates the presence of ...

  20. Cytology exam of urine

    MedlinePLUS

    Urine cytology ... time, the sample is collected as clean catch urine sample in your doctor's office or at home. ... the penis or vagina from getting into a urine sample. To collect your urine, the health care ...

  1. Extraction-Free Ion-Pair Methods for the Assay of Trifluoperazine Dihydrochloride in Bulk Drug, Tablets, and Spiked Human Urine Using Three Sulfonphthalein Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prashanth, K. N.; Swamy, N.; Basavaiah, K.

    2014-11-01

    Three simple and sensitive extraction-free spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of trifluoperazine dihydrochloride (TFH). The methods are based on ion pair complex formation between the nitrogenous compound trifluoperazine (TFP) converted from trifluoperazine dihydrochloride and sulfonphthalein dyes, namely, bromocresol green (BCG), bromothymol blue (BTB), and bromophenol blue (BPB) in dichloromethane medium in which all the above experimental variables were circumvented. The colored products are measured at 425 nm in the BCG method, 415 nm in the BTB method, and 420 nm in the BPB method. The stoichiometry of the ion-pair complexes formed between the drug and dye (1:1) was determined by Job's continuous variations method, and the stability constants of the complexes were also calculated. These methods quantify TFP over the concentration ranges of 1.25-20.0 ?g/ml in the BCG method, 1.5-21.0 ?g/ml in the BTB method, and 1.5-18.0 ?g/ml in the BPB method. The molar absorptivity (l·mol-1·cm-1) and Sandell sensitivity (ng/cm2) were calculated to be 2.06·104 and 0.0197; 1.82·104 and 0.0224; and 2.22·104 and 0.0183 for the BCG, BTB, and BPB methods, respectively. The methods were successfully applied to the determination of TFP in pure drug, pharmaceuticals, and in spiked human urine with good accuracy and precision.

  2. The Human Urine Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Bouatra, Souhaila; Aziat, Farid; Mandal, Rupasri; Guo, An Chi; Wilson, Michael R.; Knox, Craig; Bjorndahl, Trent C.; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Saleem, Fozia; Liu, Philip; Dame, Zerihun T.; Poelzer, Jenna; Huynh, Jessica; Yallou, Faizath S.; Psychogios, Nick; Dong, Edison; Bogumil, Ralf; Roehring, Cornelia; Wishart, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Urine has long been a “favored” biofluid among metabolomics researchers. It is sterile, easy-to-obtain in large volumes, largely free from interfering proteins or lipids and chemically complex. However, this chemical complexity has also made urine a particularly difficult substrate to fully understand. As a biological waste material, urine typically contains metabolic breakdown products from a wide range of foods, drinks, drugs, environmental contaminants, endogenous waste metabolites and bacterial by-products. Many of these compounds are poorly characterized and poorly understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of this biofluid we have undertaken a comprehensive, quantitative, metabolome-wide characterization of human urine. This involved both computer-aided literature mining and comprehensive, quantitative experimental assessment/validation. The experimental portion employed NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), direct flow injection mass spectrometry (DFI/LC-MS/MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiments performed on multiple human urine samples. This multi-platform metabolomic analysis allowed us to identify 445 and quantify 378 unique urine metabolites or metabolite species. The different analytical platforms were able to identify (quantify) a total of: 209 (209) by NMR, 179 (85) by GC-MS, 127 (127) by DFI/LC-MS/MS, 40 (40) by ICP-MS and 10 (10) by HPLC. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to identify several previously unknown urine metabolites and to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage. It also allowed us to critically assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of different platforms or technologies. The literature review led to the identification and annotation of another 2206 urinary compounds and was used to help guide the subsequent experimental studies. An online database containing the complete set of 2651 confirmed human urine metabolite species, their structures (3079 in total), concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.urinemetabolome.ca. PMID:24023812

  3. 28 CFR 550.42 - Procedures for urine surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for urine surveillance. 550.42... DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.42 Procedures for urine surveillance. (a) Contractor authorized personnel of the same sex as...

  4. 75 FR 154 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ...The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notifies Federal agencies of the laboratories currently certified to meet the standards of Subpart C of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines). The Mandatory Guidelines were first published in the Federal Register on April 11, 1988 (53 FR 11970), and subsequently revised in the Federal......

  5. 75 FR 32950 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ...The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notifies Federal agencies of the laboratories currently certified to meet the standards of Subpart C of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines). The Mandatory Guidelines were first published in the Federal Register on April 11, 1988 (53 FR 11970), and subsequently revised in the Federal......

  6. 75 FR 75485 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ...The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notifies Federal agencies of the Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities (IITF) currently certified to meet the standards of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines). The Mandatory Guidelines were first published in the Federal Register on April 11, 1988 (53 FR 11970), and......

  7. 75 FR 27348 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ...The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notifies Federal agencies of the laboratories currently certified to meet the standards of Subpart C of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines). The Mandatory Guidelines were first published in the Federal Register on April 11, 1988 (53 FR 11970), and subsequently revised in the Federal......

  8. A multi-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry screening procedure for the detection in human urine of drugs non-prohibited in sport commonly used by the athletes.

    PubMed

    Mazzarino, Monica; Cesarei, Lorenzo; de la Torre, Xavier; Fiacco, Ilaria; Robach, Paul; Botrč, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an analytical method for the simultaneous analysis in human urine of 38 pharmacologically active compounds (19 benzodiazepine-like substances, 7 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, 4 azole antifungal drugs, 5 inhibitors of the phosphodiesterases type 4 and 3 inhibitors of the phosphodiesterase type 5) by liquid-chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The above substances classes include both the most common "non banned" drugs used by the athletes (based on the information reported on the "doping control form") and those drugs who are suspected to be performance enhancing and/or act as masking agents in particular conditions. The chromatographic separation was performed by a reverse-phase octadecyl column using as mobile phases acetonitrile and ultra-purified water, both with 0.1% formic acid. The detection was carried out using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometric analyser, positive electro-spray as ionization source and selected reaction monitoring as acquisition mode. Sample pre-treatment consisted in an enzymatic hydrolysis followed by a liquid-liquid extraction in neutral field using tert-butyl methyl-ether. The analytical procedure, once developed, was validated in terms of sensitivity (lower limits of detection in the range of 1-50ngmL(-1)), specificity (no interferences were detected at the retention time of all the analytes under investigation), recovery (?60% with a satisfactory repeatability, CV % lower than 10), matrix effect (lower than 30%) and reproducibility of retention times (CV% lower than 0.1) and of relative abundances (CV% lower than 15). The performance and the applicability of the method was evaluated by analyzing real samples containing benzodiazepines (alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem or zoplicone) or inhibitors of the phosphodiesterases type 5 (sildenafil or vardenafil) and samples obtained incubating two of the phosphodiesterases type 4 studied (cilomilast or roflumilast) with pooled human liver microsomes. All the parent compounds, together with their main phase I metabolites, were clearly detected using the analytical procedures here developed. PMID:26342446

  9. Determination of mepitiostane metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for sports drug testing.

    PubMed

    Okano, Masato; Sato, Mitsuhiko; Kojima, Asami; Kageyama, Shinji

    2015-11-10

    Mepitiostane (2?,3?-epithio-17?-(1-methoxycyclopentyloxy)-5?-androstane), which is a prodrug of epitiostanol (2?,3?-epitio-5?-androstane-17?-ol), is an epitiosteroid having anti-estrogenic and weak androgenic anabolic activities. The World Anti-Doping Agency prohibits the misuse of mepitiostane by athletes. Detection of the urinary metabolites epitiostanol sulfoxide and epitiostanol was studied using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for doping control purposes. The use of LC-MS provided advantages over gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for detecting heat labile steroids because epitiostanol and epitiostanol sulfoxide were primarily pyrolized to 5?-androst-2-en-17?-ol. The method consists of enzymatic hydrolysis using ?-glucuronidase (Escherichia coli), liquid-liquid extraction, and subsequent ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. Epitiostanol sulfoxide was determined at urinary concentrations of 0.5-50ng/mL, recovery was 76.2-96.9%, and assay precision was calculated as 0.9-1.7% (intra-day) and 2.0-6.6% (inter-day). Epitiostanol was determined at urinary concentrations of 0.5-50ng/mL, recovery was 26.1-35.6% and assay precision was calculated as 4.1-4.6% (intra-day) and 3.3-8.5% (inter-day). The limits of detection for epitiostanol sulfoxide and epitiostanol were 0.05ng/mL and 0.10ng/mL, respectively. Epitiostanol sulfoxide and epitiostanol, as their gluco-conjugates, were identified in human urine after oral administration of 10mg mepitiostane. Epitiostanol sulfoxide and epitiostanol could be detected up to 48h and 24h after administration, respectively. The results showed that the detection window of epitiostanol is much shorter than that of epitiostanol sulfoxide. The LC-MS detection of urinary epitiostanol sulfoxide, a specific metabolite with a sulphur atom in its molecular structure, is likely to be able to identify the abuse of mepitiostane. PMID:26247800

  10. MCM-41 solid phase membrane tip extraction combined with liquid chromatography for the determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in human urine.

    PubMed

    Kamaruzaman, Sazlinda; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Endud, Salasiah; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Yahaya, Noorfatimah

    2013-12-01

    Mesoporous silica material, MCM-41, was utilized for the first time as an adsorbent in solid phase membrane tip extraction (SPMTE) of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in urine prior to high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) analysis. The prepared MCM-41 material was enclosed in a polypropylene membrane tip and used as an adsorbent in SPMTE. Four NSAIDs namely ketoprofen, diclofenac, mefenamic acid and naproxen were selected as model analytes. Several important parameters, such as conditioning solvent, sample pH, salting-out effect, sample volume, extraction time, desorption solvent and desorption time were optimized. Under the optimum extraction conditions, the MCM-41-SPMTE method showed good linearity in the range of 0.01-10?g/mL with excellent correlation coefficients (r=0.9977-0.9995), acceptable RSDs (0.4-9.4%, n=3), good limits of detection (5.7-10.6?g/L) and relative recoveries (81.4-108.1%). The developed method showed a good tolerance to biological sample matrices. PMID:24140656

  11. Screening determination of four amphetamine-type drugs in street-grade illegal tablets and urine samples by portable capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Anh Huong; Pham, Thi Ngoc Mai; Ta, Thi Thao; Nguyen, Xuan Truong; Nguyen, Thi Lien; Le, Thi Hong Hao; Koenka, Israel Joel; Sáiz, Jorge; Hauser, Peter C; Mai, Thanh Duc

    2015-12-01

    A simple and inexpensive method for the identification of four substituted amphetamines, namely, 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine (MDMA), methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxy amphetamine (MDA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA) was developed using an in-house constructed semi-automated portable capillary electrophoresis instrument (CE) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D). Arginine 10mM adjusted to pH4.5 with acetic acid was found to be the optimal background electrolyte for the CE-C(4)D determination of these compounds. The best detection limits achieved with and without a sample preconcentration process were 10ppb and 500ppb, respectively. Substituted amphetamines were found in different seized illicit club drug tablets and urine samples collected from different suspected users. Good agreement between results from CE-C(4)D and those with the confirmation method (GC-MS) was achieved, with correlation coefficients for the two pairs of data of more than 0.99. PMID:26654084

  12. Chemotherapeutic potential of cow urine: A review

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Gurpreet Kaur; Sharma, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    In the grim scenario where presently about 70% of pathogenic bacteria are resistant to at least one of the drugs for the treatment, cue is to be taken from traditional/indigenous medicine to tackle it urgently. The Indian traditional knowledge emanates from ayurveda, where Bos indicus is placed at a high pedestal for numerous uses of its various products. Urine is one of the products of a cow with many benefits and without toxicity. Various studies have found good antimicrobial activity of cow’s urine (CU) comparable with standard drugs such as ofloxacin, cefpodoxime, and gentamycin, against a vast number of pathogenic bacteria, more so against Gram-positive than negative bacteria. Interestingly antimicrobial activity has also been found against some resistant strains such as multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Antimicrobial action is enhanced still further by it being an immune-enhancer and bioenhancer of some antibiotic drugs. Antifungal activity was comparable to amphotericin B. CU also has anthelmintic and antineoplastic action. CU has, in addition, antioxidant properties, and it can prevent the damage to DNA caused by the environmental stress. In the management of infectious diseases, CU can be used alone or as an adjunctive to prevent the development of resistance and enhance the effect of standard antibiotics. PMID:26401404

  13. Clean catch urine sample

    MedlinePLUS

    Urine culture - clean catch; Urinalysis - clean catch; Clean catch urine specimen; Urine collection - clean catch ... If possible, collect the sample when urine has been in your bladder for 2 to 3 hours. You will use a special kit to collect the urine. It will ...

  14. Diagnostic yield of hair and urine toxicology testing in potential child abuse cases.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Stephanie L; Wood, Stephanie M; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2015-07-01

    Detection of drugs in a child may be the first objective finding that can be reported in cases of suspected child abuse. Hair and urine toxicology testing, when performed as part of the initial clinical evaluation for suspected child abuse or maltreatment, may serve to facilitate the identification of at-risk children. Furthermore, significant environmental exposure to a drug (considered by law to constitute child abuse in some states) may be identified by toxicology testing of unwashed hair specimens. In order to determine the clinical utility of hair and urine toxicology testing in this population we performed a retrospective chart review on all children for whom hair toxicology testing was ordered at our academic medical center between January 2004 and April 2014. The medical records of 616 children aged 0-17.5 years were reviewed for injury history, previous medication and illicit drug use by caregiver(s), urine drug screen result (if performed), hair toxicology result, medication list, and outcome of any child abuse evaluation. Hair toxicology testing was positive for at least one compound in 106 cases (17.2%), with unexplained drugs in 82 cases (13.3%). Of these, there were 48 cases in which multiple compounds (including combination of parent drugs and/or metabolites within the same drug class) were identified in the sample of one patient. The compounds most frequently identified in the hair of our study population included cocaine, benzoylecgonine, native (unmetabolized) tetrahydrocannabinol, and methamphetamine. There were 68 instances in which a parent drug was identified in the hair without any of its potential metabolites, suggesting environmental exposure. Among the 82 cases in which hair toxicology testing was positive for unexplained drugs, a change in clinical outcome was noted in 71 cases (86.5%). Urine drug screens (UDS) were performed in 457 of the 616 reviewed cases. Of these, over 95% of positive UDS results could be explained by iatrogenic drug administration. There were no cases in which a urine drug screen alone altered the outcome of a case. In summary, hair toxicology testing proved clinically useful in the evaluation of a child for suspected abuse; in contrast, urine drug testing showed low clinical yield. PMID:26048499

  15. A high-sensitivity ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HR-TOFMS) method for screening synthetic cannabinoids and other drugs of abuse in urine.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Mira; Pelander, Anna; Angerer, Verena; Hutter, Melanie; Kneisel, Stefan; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-10-01

    The continuing emergence of designer drugs imposes high demands on the scope and sensitivity of toxicological drug screening procedures. An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HR-TOFMS) method was developed for screening and simultaneous confirmation of both designer drugs and other drugs of abuse in urine samples in a single run. The method covered selected synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones, amphetamines, natural cannabinoids, opioids, cocaine and other important drugs of abuse, together with their main urinary metabolites. The database consisted of 277 compounds with molecular formula and exact monoisotopic mass; retention time was included for 192 compounds, and primary and secondary qualifier ion exact mass for 191 and 95 compounds, respectively. Following a solid-phase extraction, separation was performed by UHPLC and mass analysis by HR-TOFMS. MS, and broad-band collision-induced dissociation data were acquired at m/z range 50-700. Compound identification was based on a reverse database search with acceptance criteria for retention time, precursor ion mass accuracy, isotopic pattern and abundance of qualifier ions. Mass resolving power in spiked urine samples was on average FWHM 23,500 and mass accuracy 0.3 mDa. The mean and median cut-off concentrations determined for 75 compounds were 4.2 and 1 ng/mL, respectively. The range of cut-off concentrations for synthetic cannabinoids was 0.2-60 ng/mL and for cathinones 0.7-15 ng/mL. The method proved to combine high sensitivity and a wide scope in a manner not previously reported in drugs of abuse screening. The method's feasibility was demonstrated with 50 authentic urine samples. PMID:23954996

  16. Urinal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurd, Randy; Hacking, Kip; Haymore, Benjamin; Truscott, Tadd; Splash Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    In response to harsh and repeated criticisms from our mothers and several failed relationships with women, we present the splash dynamics of a simulated human male urine stream impacting rigid and free surfaces. Our study aims to reduce undesired splashing that may result from lavatory usage. Experiments are performed at a pressure and flow rate that would be expected from healthy male subjects. For a rigid surface, the effects of stream breakup and surface impact angle on lateral and vertical droplet ejection distances are measured using high-speed photography and image processing. For free surface impact, the effects of velocity and fluid depth on droplet ejection distances are measured. Guided by our results, techniques for splash reduction are proposed.

  17. Leucine aminopeptidase - urine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... how much of this protein appears in your urine. Your blood can also be checked for this ... A 24-hour urine sample is needed. On day 1, urinate into the toilet when you get up in the morning. Afterwards, collect ...

  18. Glucose urine test

    MedlinePLUS

    Urine sugar test; Urine glucose test; Glucosuria test; Glycosuria test ... After you provide a urine sample, it is tested right away. The health care provider uses a dipstick made with a color-sensitive pad. The ...

  19. Frequent or urgent urination

    MedlinePLUS

    Urgent urination; Urinary frequency or urgency ... Common causes of these symptoms are: Urinary tract infection (UTI) Enlarged prostate in middle-aged and older men Leakage of urine from the urethra (the tube that carries urine ...

  20. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePLUS

    Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration of all chemical particles in the urine. ... changes to will tell the provider the specific gravity of your urine. The dipstick test gives only ...

  1. Advances in the Diagnosis of Human Opisthorchiasis: Development of Opisthorchis viverrini Antigen Detection in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Duenngai, Kunyarat; Wangboon, Chompunoot; Sithithaworn, Jiraporn; Watwiengkam, Nattaya; Namwat, Nisana; Techasen, Anchalee; Loilome, Watcharin; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Loukas, Alex; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Bethony, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many strategies to control opisthorchiasis have been employed in Thailand, but not in the other neighbouring countries. Specific control methods include mass drug administration (MDA) and health education to reduce raw fish consumption. These control efforts have greatly shifted the epidemiology of Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) infection over the last decade from presenting as densely concentrated "heavy" infections in single villages to widespread "light" OV infections distributed over wide geographical areas. Currently, the "gold standard" detection method for OV infection is formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique (FECT), which has limited diagnostic sensitivity and diagnostic specificity for light OV infections, with OV eggs often confused with eggs of minute intestinal flukes (MIFs) in feces. In this study, we developed and evaluated the diagnostic performance of a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of OV excretory-secretory (ES) antigens in urine (urine OV-ES assay) for the diagnosis of opisthorchiasis compared to the gold standard detection FECT method. Methodology We tested several methods for pre-treating urine samples prior to testing the diagnostic performance of the urine OV-ES assay. Using trichloroacetic acid (TCA) pre-treated urine, we compared detection and quantification of OV infection using the urine OV-ES assay versus FECT in OV-endemic areas in Northeastern Thailand. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the urine OV-ES assay using TCA pre-treated urine, and to establish diagnostic positivity thresholds. The Positive Predictive Value as well as the likelihood of obtaining a positive test result (LR+) or a negative test result (LR-) were calculated for the established diagnostic positivity threshold. Diagnostic risks (Odds Ratios) were estimated using logistic regression. Results When urine samples were pre-treated with TCA prior to use in the urine OV-ES assay, the analytical sensitivity was significantly improved. Using TCA pre-treatment of urine, the urine OV-ES assay had a limit of detection (LoD) of 39 ng/ml compared to the LoD of 52 ng/mL reported for coprological antigen detection methods. Similarly, the urine OV-ES assay correlated significantly with intensity of OV infection as measured by FECT. The urine OV-ES assay was also able to detect 28 individuals as positive from the 63 (44.4%) individuals previously determined to be negative using FECT. The likelihood of a positive diagnosis of OV infection by urine OV-ES assay increased significantly with the intensity of OV infection as determined by FECT. With reference to FECT, the sensitivity and specificity of the urine OV-ES assay was 81% and 70%, respectively. Conclusion The detection of OV-infection by the urine OV-ES assay showed much greater diagnostic sensitivity and diagnostic specificity than the current "gold standard" FECT method for the detection and quantification of OV infection. Due to its ease-of-use, and noninvasive sample collection (urine), the urine OV-ES assay offers the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis of liver fluke infection and provide an effective tool for control and elimination of these tumorigenic parasites. PMID:26485024

  2. Blood pressure reductions following catheter-based renal denervation are not related to improvements in adherence to antihypertensive drugs measured by urine/plasma toxicological analysis.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Sebastian; Meyer, Markus R; Cremers, Bodo; Laufs, Ulrich; Helfer, Andreas G; Linz, Dominik; Kindermann, Ingrid; Ukena, Christian; Burnier, Michel; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Maurer, Hans H; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Renal denervation can reduce blood pressure in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. The adherence to prescribed antihypertensive medication following renal denervation is unknown. This study investigated adherence to prescribed antihypertensive treatment by liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in plasma and urine at baseline and 6 months after renal denervation in 100 patients with resistant hypertension, defined as baseline office systolic blood pressure ?140 mmHg despite treatment with ?3 antihypertensive agents. At baseline, complete adherence to all prescribed antihypertensive agents was observed in 52 patients, 46 patients were partially adherent, and two patients were completely non-adherent. Baseline office blood pressure was 167/88 ± 19/16 mmHg with a corresponding 24-h blood pressure of 154/86 ± 15/13 mmHg. Renal denervation significantly reduced office and ambulatory blood pressure at 6-month follow-up by 15/5 mmHg (p < 0.001/p < 0.001) and 8/4 mmHg (p < 0.001/p = 0.001), respectively. Mean adherence to prescribed treatment was significantly reduced from 85.0 % at baseline to 80.7 %, 6 months after renal denervation (p = 0.005). The blood pressure decrease was not explained by improvements in adherence following the procedure. Patients not responding to treatment significantly reduced their drug intake following the procedure. Adherence was highest for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and beta blockers (>90 %) and lowest for vasodilators (21 %). In conclusion, renal denervation can reduce office and ambulatory blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension despite a significant reduction in adherence to antihypertensive treatment after 6 months. PMID:26306594

  3. 21 CFR 876.5250 - Urine collector and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urine collector and accessories. 876.5250 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5250 Urine collector and accessories. (a) Identification. A urine collector and accessories is a device intended to...

  4. Dendrimer-functionalized mesoporous silica as a reversed-phase/anion-exchange mixed-mode sorbent for solid phase extraction of acid drugs in human urine.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Yang, Jiajia; Huang, Chaonan; Wang, Longxing; Wang, Jincheng; Chen, Jiping

    2015-05-01

    A new dendrimer-functionalized mesoporous silica material based on large-pore 3D cubic Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology-6 (KIT-6) was synthesized by the growing of dendritic branches inside the mesopores of aminopropyl functionalized KIT-6. Detailed physical characterizations using transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and elemental analysis reveal that the multifunctional dendrimers have been grown successfully within the confined spaces of mesopores. Although the 3D ordered mesoporous architecture of KIT-6 was well preserved, there was a significant and continuous decrease in pore size, specific surface area (SBET) and pore volume when increasing dendrimer generation up to six. In order to get a compromise between the SBET, pore size and density of functionalities, the dendrimer-functionalized KIT-6 (DF-KIT-6) for generation 2 (SBET, 314.2 m(2) g(-1); pore size, 7.9 nm; carbon and nitrogen contents, 19.80% and 1.92%) was selected for solid phase extraction (SPE) applications. The DF-KIT-6 was then evaluated as a reversed-phase/anion-exchange mixed-mode sorbent for extraction of the selected acidic drugs (ketoprofen, KEP; naproxen, NAP; and ibuprofen, IBU), since the dendrimers contained both hydrocarbonaceous and amine functionalities. The effective parameters on extraction efficiency such as sample pH and volume, type and volume of eluent and wash solvents were optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the DF-KIT-6 based SPE coupled with HPLC-UV method demonstrated good sensitivity (0.4-4.6 ng mL(-1) detection of limits) and linearity (R(2)>0.990 for 10-2000 ng mL(-1) of KEP and IBU, and 1-200 ng mL(-1) of NAP). The potential use of DF-KIT-6 sorbent for preconcentration and cleanup of acid drugs in human urine samples was also demonstrated. Satisfactory recoveries at two spiking levels (30 and 300 ng mL(-1) for KEP and IBU, 3 and 30 ng mL(-1) for NAP) were obtained in the range of 85.7-113.9% with RSD values below 9.3% (n=3). PMID:25795396

  5. Medication Interactions: Food, Supplements and Other Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... drugs or diuretic (urine-producing) drugs, including Hydrodiuril (hydrochlorothiazide) and Aldactone (spironolactone). Alcohol: If you’re taking ... drugs or diuretic (urine-producing) drugs, including Hydrodiuril (hydrochlorothiazide) and Aldactone (spironolactone). Alcohol: If you’re taking ...

  6. Preparation of water stable methyl-modified metal-organic framework-5/polyacrylonitrile composite nanofibers via electrospinning and their application for solid-phase extraction of two estrogenic drugs in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Mina; Mehdinia, Ali; Jabbari, Ali

    2015-12-24

    The nanofibers of methyl-modified metal-organic framework-5/polyacrylonitrile composite (CH3MOF-5/PAN) were successfully synthesized and used as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent for pre-concentration of two estrogenic drugs, levonorgestrel and megestrol acetate, in urine samples. A simple, cheap and accessible electrospinning method was employed to prepare a water stable CH3MOF-5/PAN composite. The nanofibers were packed into the mini-disc cartridges to be used as SPE devices. They were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption-desorption experiments. The effects of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency including the type of eluent and its volume, the amount of the sorbent, pH, the ionic strength, the sample volume and the reusability of the sorbent were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the linearity varied in range of 0.05-100?gL(-1) with R(2) values higher than 0.999. The limit of detection for both of the analytes was 0.02?gL(-1). The applicability of the method was examined by analyzing the analytes in the urine samples. The recovery of the analytes varied in the range of 82.8-94.8% which shows capability of the method for the determination of the drugs in the urine samples. PMID:26639216

  7. Sodium urine test

    MedlinePLUS

    Urinary 24 hours sodium; Urine Na+ ... your kidneys are able to maintain or remove sodium from the urine. It may be used to ... For adults, normal urine sodium values are generally 20 mEq/L in a random urine sample and 40 to 220 mEq/L per day (mEq/ ...

  8. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePLUS

    The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. ... Abnormal urine color may be caused by infection, disease, medicines, or food you eat. Cloudy or milky urine is a sign ...

  9. Pathogens and pharmaceuticals in source-separated urine in eThekwini, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bischel, Heather N; Özel Duygan, Birge D; Strande, Linda; McArdell, Christa S; Udert, Kai M; Kohn, Tamar

    2015-11-15

    In eThekwini, South Africa, the production of agricultural fertilizers from human urine collected from urine-diverting dry toilets is being evaluated at a municipality scale as a way to help finance a decentralized, dry sanitation system. The present study aimed to assess a range of human and environmental health hazards in source-separated urine, which was presumed to be contaminated with feces, by evaluating the presence of human pathogens, pharmaceuticals, and an antibiotic resistance gene. Composite urine samples from households enrolled in a urine collection trial were obtained from urine storage tanks installed in three regions of eThekwini. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeted 9 viral and 10 bacterial human pathogens transmitted by the fecal-oral route. The most frequently detected viral pathogens were JC polyomavirus, rotavirus, and human adenovirus in 100%, 34% and 31% of samples, respectively. Aeromonas spp. and Shigella spp. were frequently detected gram negative bacteria, in 94% and 61% of samples, respectively. The gram positive bacterium, Clostridium perfringens, which is known to survive for extended times in urine, was found in 72% of samples. A screening of 41 trace organic compounds in the urine facilitated selection of 12 priority pharmaceuticals for further evaluation. The antibiotics sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, which are frequently prescribed as prophylaxis for HIV-positive patients, were detected in 95% and 85% of samples, reaching maximum concentrations of 6800 ?g/L and 1280 ?g/L, respectively. The antiretroviral drug emtricitabine was also detected in 40% of urine samples. A sulfonamide antibiotic resistance gene (sul1) was detected in 100% of urine samples. By coupling analysis of pathogens and pharmaceuticals in geographically dispersed samples in eThekwini, this study reveals a range of human and environmental health hazards in urine intended for fertilizer production. Collection of urine offers the benefit of sequestering contaminants from environmental release and allows for targeted treatment of potential health hazards prior to agricultural application. The efficacy of pathogen and pharmaceutical inactivation, transformation or removal during urine nutrient recovery processes is thus briefly reviewed. PMID:26302215

  10. Combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and SERS detection applied to the analysis of drugs in human blood and urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachta, Gerd; Schwarze, Bernd; Sägmüller, Bernd; Brehm, Georg; Schneider, Siegfried

    2004-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy was employed to characterise different drugs and some of their degradation products contained in bio-matrices after separation by HPLC. Since acetonitrile, which is contained in the widely used Daldrup type eluents, adsorbs readily to the silver surface and disturbs SERS measurements at low analyte concentration, a gradient technique relying on a methanol/buffer mixture was developed. Application of this eluent helps to lower the detection limit of most of the drugs investigated (e.g. Dihydrocodeine, Doxepine, Citalopram, Trimipramine, Carbamazepine, Methadone) into the 1 ?g/sample domain. The examples presented also demonstrate that the retention times determined by independent runs of reference solutions alone are not always sufficient for a unique identification of all fractions appearing in the chromatogram of a mixture that may contain degradation products. The Raman band patterns of many derivatives are, however, so distinct that in these cases an assignment to certain families of drugs is possible even without a detailed analysis of the spectrum (correlation of band positions with calculated normal mode frequencies). If SERS spectra of reference solutions recorded under similar experimental conditions are available, the described technique can provide a second, independent means of identification next to HPLC/MS for example if necessary during a law suit.

  11. 49 CFR 40.45 - What form is used to document a DOT urine collection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What form is used to document a DOT urine... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.45 What form is used to document a DOT urine collection? (a) The Federal Drug Testing Custody and Control Form (CCF) must be used to document every urine...

  12. Identification of phenothiazine antihistamines and their metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Maurer, H; Pfleger, K

    1988-01-01

    Identification of the phenothiazine antihistamines alimemazine, dimetotiazine, isothipendyl, mequitazine, oxomemazine, promethazine, thiethylperazine, triflupromazine and their metabolites in urine is described. After acid hydrolysis of the conjugates, extraction and acetylation the urine samples were analysed by computerized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Using ion chromatography with the selective ions m/z 58, 72, 100, 114, 124, 128, 141, and 199 the possible presence of phenothiazine antihistamines and/or their metabolites was indicated. The identity of positive signals in the reconstructed ion chromatograms was confirmed by a visual or computerized comparison of the stored full mass spectra with the reference spectra. The ion chromatograms, reference mass spectra and gas chromatographic retention indices (OV-101) are documented. The procedure presented is integrated in a general screening procedure (general unknown analysis) for several groups of drugs. PMID:2904251

  13. Position paper of Italian rheumatologists on the use of biosimilar drugs.

    PubMed

    Atzeni, Fabiola; Sebastiani, Marco; Ricci, Cristian; Celano, Antonella; Gremese, Elisa; Iannone, Florenzo; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Minghetti, Paola; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Lapadula, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The recent availability of biosimilars as a result of the expiry of the patents of first-generation biotechnological drugs may theoretically reduce the direct costs of such treatments, making their use accessible to a larger number of patients. However, the currently available clinical data refer to a relatively small number of patients, and do not provide sufficient information concerning long-term efficacy and safety or the frequency of rare adverse events. Given the importance of the introduction of biosimilar drugs and the limitations of our current knowledge of their efficacy and safety profiles, we believe it is mandatory to draw up a position paper for Italian Rheumatologists. Moreover, in order to guarantee their safety, it is mandatory to indicate behavioural rules for the involved specialists and competent authorities, and perform ad hoc clinical trials and appropriate drug surveillance. PMID:25436597

  14. Urination - excessive amount

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood sugar (glucose) test Blood urea nitrogen test Creatinine (serum) Electrolytes (serum) Fluid deprivation test (limiting fluids to see if the urine volume decreases) Osmolality blood test Urinalysis Urine osmolality ...

  15. Postdoctoral Position at the University of Idaho: Evolution of drug resistance plasmid persistence in biofilms

    E-print Network

    Top, Eva

    . The goal of this project is to gain insight into the evolutionary mechanisms by which multi-drug resistance the supervision of Dr. Eva Top (Professor of Biological Sciences, evatop@uidaho.edu) and in collaboration with Drs://www.ibest.uidaho.edu/ibest/index.html). The project will be funded by a two-year grant from the Department of the Army and the position should

  16. Urine sample (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    A "clean-catch" urine sample is performed by collecting the sample of urine in midstream. Men or boys should wipe clean the head ... water and rinse well. A small amount of urine should initially fall into the toilet bowl before ...

  17. Getting a Urine Test

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the Body Works Main Page Getting a Urine Test (Video) KidsHealth > Kids > Movies & More > Movies > Getting a Urine Test (Video) Print A A A Text Size It ... cup, but docs learn a lot from urine tests. Obviously, this test doesn't hurt. And if ...

  18. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; UPCR Formal name: Urine Protein Related tests: Urinalysis ; Albumin ; Microalbumin ; Protein Electrophoresis ; ...

  19. 24-hour urine copper test

    MedlinePLUS

    The 24-hour urine copper test measures the amount of copper in a urine sample. ... A 24-hour urine sample is needed. On day 1, urinate into the toilet when you get up in the morning. Afterwards, collect ...

  20. Urine Collection Method for the Diagnosis of Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Ross, Shannon A; Ahmed, Amina; Palmer, April L; Michaels, Marian G; Sánchez, Pablo J; Stewart, Audra; Bernstein, David I; Feja, Kristina; Novak, Zdenek; Fowler, Karen B; Boppana, Suresh B

    2015-08-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is traditionally diagnosed by virus detection in saliva or urine. Virus culture was positive in significantly fewer urine samples collected using cotton balls in diapers (55.2%) than with samples collected by bags (93.2%) from newborns screened positive for CMV in saliva. However, polymerase chain reaction was positive in 95% of urine samples regardless of the collection method. PMID:25973993

  1. Positively Charged Polyethylenimines Enhance Nasal Absorption of the Negatively Charged Drug, Low Molecular Weight Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianzhi; Hussain, Alamdar; Bai, Shuhua; Khalil, Ikramy A.; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2007-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that positively charged polyethylenimines (PEIs) enhance nasal absorption of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) by reducing the negative surface charge of the drug molecule. Physical interactions between PEIs and LMWH were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, particle size analysis, conductivity measurements, zeta potential analysis, and azure A assay. The efficacy of PEIs in enhancing nasal absorption of LMWH was studied by administering LMWH formulated with PEI into the nose of anesthetized rats and monitoring drug absorption by measuring plasma anti-factor Xa activity. The metabolic stability of LMWH was evaluated by incubating the drug in rat nasal mucosal homogenates. FTIR spectra of the LMWH-PEI formulation showed a shift in peak position compared to LMWH or PEI alone. Decreases in conductivity, zeta potential and the amount of free LMWH in the PEI-LMWH formulation, as revealed by azure A assay, suggest that PEIs possibly neutralize the negative surface charge of LMWH. The efficacy of PEI in enhancing the bioavailability of nasally administered LMWH can be ranked as PEI-1000 KDa ? PEI-750 KDa > PEI-25 KDa. When PEI-1000 KDa was used at a concentration of 0.25%, there was a 4-fold increase in both the absolute and relative bioavailabilities of LMWH compared to the control formulation. Overall, these results indicate that polyethylenimines can be used as potential carriers for nasally administered LMWHs. PMID:17023085

  2. Use of glomerular filtration rate estimating equations for drug dosing in HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Okparavero, Aghogho A; Tighiouart, Hocine; Krishnasami, Zipporah; Wyatt, Christina M; Graham, Hiba; Hellinger, James; Inker, Lesley A

    2014-01-01

    Background Current HIV treatment guidelines recommend using the Cockcroft-Gault equation for drug dosing adjustments. The use of newer glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations for drug dosing and the appropriateness of physician antiretroviral dosing based on estimated kidney function have not been studied in an HIV-positive population. Methods We evaluated concordance between measured and estimated GFR for the assignment of kidney function categories designated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Guidance for Industry for pharmacokinetic studies, and appropriateness of physician antiretroviral drug dosing for level of kidney function in 200 HIV-positive patients on stable antiretroviral therapy. Estimated kidney function was determined using the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI), Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study and Cockcroft-Gault equations. Results For assignment of FDA-designated kidney function categories, concordance rates between measured and estimated GFR using the CKD-EPI, MDRD Study and Cockcroft-Gault equations were 79%, 71% and 77%, respectively. This pattern was consistent across most subgroups. When actual prescribed dosages were compared to recommended dosages based on the level of estimated kidney function, 3% to 19% of study participants were prescribed higher than recommended dosages. The largest discordance between prescribed and recommended dosages was observed for the Cockcroft-Gault equation. Conclusions The CKD-EPI equation has the highest concordance with measured GFR for the assignment of FDA-designated kidney function categories. Its use may lead to lower dosing related errors in HIV-infected US adults on stable antiretroviral therapy. More education is required with respect to dose adjustment for level of kidney function. PMID:23963249

  3. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, Mbj

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety. PMID:25721922

  4. Positive-charged solid lipid nanoparticles as paclitaxel drug delivery system in glioblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Chirio, Daniela; Gallarate, Marina; Peira, Elena; Battaglia, Luigi; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Riganti, Chiara; Biasibetti, Elena; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Valazza, Alberto; Panciani, Pierpaolo; Lanotte, Michele; Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Filice, Gaetano; Corona, Silvia; Schiffer, Davide

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of behenic acid were prepared with the coacervation technique. Generally, spherical shaped SLN with mean diameters in the range 300–600 nm were obtained. The introduction of charged molecules, such as stearylamine and glycol chitosan into the formulation allowed to obtain positive SLN with Zeta potential in the 8-20 mV range and encapsulation efficiency in the 25–90% range.Blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability, tested in vitro through hCMEC/D3 cells monolayer, showed a significantly increase in the permeation of Coumarin-6, used as model drug, when vehicled in SLN. Positive-charged SLN do not seem to enhance permeation although stearylamine-positive SLN resulted the best permeable formulation after 24 h.Cytotoxicity studies on NO3 glioblastoma cell line demonstrated the maintenance of cytotoxic activity of all paclitaxel-loaded SLN that was always unmodified or greater compared with free drug. No difference in cytotoxicity was noted between neutral and charged SLN.Co-culture experiments with hCMEC/D3 and different glioblastoma cells evidenced that, when delivered in SLN, paclitaxel increased its cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma cells. PMID:25445304

  5. Identification of phase I and II metabolites of the new designer drug ?-pyrrolidinohexiophenone (?-PHP) in human urine by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS).

    PubMed

    Paul, Michael; Bleicher, Sergej; Guber, Susanne; Ippisch, Josef; Polettini, Aldo; Schultis, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Pyrrolidinophenones represent one emerging class of newly encountered drugs of abuse, also known as 'new psychoactive substances', with stimulating psychoactive effects. In this work, we report on the detection of the new designer drug ?-pyrrolidinohexiophenone (?-PHP) and its phase I and II metabolites in a human urine sample of a drug abuser. Determination and structural elucidation of these metabolites have been achieved by liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QTOF-MS). By tentative identification, the exact and approximate structures of 19 phase I metabolites and nine phase II glucuronides were elucidated. Major metabolic pathways revealed the reduction of the ß-keto moieties to their corresponding alcohols, didesalkylation of the pyrrolidine ring, hydroxylation and oxidation of the aliphatic side chain leading to n-hydroxy, aldehyde and carboxylate metabolites, and oxidation of the pyrrolidine ring to its lactam followed by ring cleavage and additional hydroxylation, reduction and oxidation steps and combinations thereof. The most abundant phase II metabolites were glucuronidated ß-keto-reduced alcohols. Besides the great number of metabolites detected in this sample, ?-PHP is still one of the most abundant ions together with its ß-keto-reduced alcoholic dihydro metabolite. Monitoring of these metabolites in clinical and forensic toxicology may unambiguously prove the abuse of the new designer drug ?-PHP. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26505776

  6. On-Demand Urine Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Inscore, Frank; Shende, Chetan

    2010-01-01

    A lab-on-a-chip was developed that is capable of extracting biochemical indicators from urine samples and generating their surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) so that the indicators can be quantified and identified. The development was motivated by the need to monitor and assess the effects of extended weightlessness, which include space motion sickness and loss of bone and muscle mass. The results may lead to developments of effective exercise programs and drug regimes that would maintain astronaut health. The analyzer containing the lab-on-a- chip includes materials to extract 3- methylhistidine (a muscle-loss indicator) and Risedronate (a bone-loss indicator) from the urine sample and detect them at the required concentrations using a Raman analyzer. The lab-on- a-chip has both an extractive material and a SERS-active material. The analyzer could be used to monitor the onset of diseases, such as osteoporosis.

  7. The Drug User's Identity and How It Relates to Being Hepatitis C Antibody Positive: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The increasing health problem of hepatitis C virus infection has only recently attracted the attention of psychosocial research, especially among subjects at higher risk (e.g. injecting drug users). There is a lack of information about the knowledge, perceptions and feelings that injecting drug users hold about their hepatitis C antibody positive

  8. Scientific issues in drug testing: council on scientific affairs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-12

    Testing for drugs in biologic fluids, especially urine, is a practice that has become widespread. The technology of testing for drugs in urine has greatly improved in recent years. Inexpensive screening techniques are not sufficiently accurate for forensic testing standards, which must be met wihen a person's employment or reputation may be affected by results. This is particularly a concern during screening of a population in which the prevalence of drug use is very low, in which the predictive value of a positive result would be quite low. Physicians should be aware that results from drug testing can yield accurate evidence of prior exposure to drugs, but they do not provide information about patterns of drug use, about abuse of or dependence on drugs, or about mental or physical impairments that may result from drug use.

  9. Automated homogeneous immunoassay analysis of cotinine in urine.

    PubMed

    Niedbala, R Sam; Haley, Nancy; Kardos, Stephanie; Kardos, Keith

    2002-04-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the performance comparison of a homogeneous enzyme immunoassay (EIA) designed to detect cotinine in urine and carbon monoxide (CO) breath measurements to determine smoking status. The clinical comparison was done using urine and breath specimens from 218 volunteers. Urine samples were analyzed by immunoassay and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Breath carbon monoxide was determined by a commercial analyzer. Using cutoffs of 10 ppm for CO and 500 ng/mL for urinary cotinine, the relative sensitivity/specificity was 93.6%/74.0%. The positive predictive value was 86.8%, and the negative predictive value was 86.5%. However, comparison of the EIA to GC-MS showed a sensitivity/specificity of 96.2%/98.4% and a positive predictive value of 99.3%. The EIA was also evaluated non-clinically for precision, stability, recovery, and interferences. In addition, the non-clinical evaluation demonstrated coefficients of variation from 0.37 to 1.09% across cotinine concentrations ranging from 0 to 5000 ng/mL. The assay was found to be highly specific for cotinine and cross-reacted to a limited degree with 3-hydroxycotinine. Finally, multiple freeze-thaw cycles of urines containing cotinine showed no degradation of the drug in the specimen when tested in the EIA. Thus, the EIA tested is a rapid, lab-based test that can reliably determine cotinine levels and their relation to smoking status. PMID:11991533

  10. Urine Pretreat Injection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A new method of introducing the OXONE (Registered Trademark) Monopersulfate Compound for urine pretreat into a two-phase urine/air flow stream has been successfully tested and evaluated. The feasibility of this innovative method has been established for purposes of providing a simple, convenient, and safe method of handling a chemical pretreat required for urine processing in a microgravity space environment. Also, the Oxone portion of the urine pretreat has demonstrated the following advantages during real time collection of 750 pounds of urine in a Space Station design two-phase urine Fan/Separator: Eliminated urine precipitate buildup on internal hardware and plumbing; Minimized odor from collected urine; and Virtually eliminated airborne bacteria. The urine pretreat, as presently defined for the Space Station program for proper downstream processing of urine, is a two-part chemical treatment of 5.0 grams of Oxone and 2.3 ml of H2SO4 per liter of urine. This study program and test demonstrated only the addition of the proper ratio of Oxone into the urine collection system upstream of the Fan/Separator. This program was divided into the following three major tasks: (1) A trade study, to define and recommend the type of Oxone injection method to pursue further; (2) The design and fabrication of the selected method; and (3) A test program using high fidelity hardware and fresh urine to demonstrate the method feasibility. The trade study was conducted which included defining several methods for injecting Oxone in different forms into a urine system. Oxone was considered in a liquid, solid, paste and powered form. The trade study and the resulting recommendation were presented at a trade study review held at Hamilton Standard on 24-25 October 94. An agreement was reached at the meeting to continue the solid tablet in a bag concept which included a series of tablets suspended in the urine/air flow stream. These Oxone tablets would slowly dissolve at a controlled rate providing the proper concentration in the collected urine. To implement the solid tablet in a bag approach, a design concept was completed with prototype drawings of the complete urine pretreat prefilter assembly. A successful fabrication technique was developed for retaining the Oxone tablets in a fabric casing attached to the end of the existing Space Station Waste Collection System urine prefilter assembly. The final pretreat prefilter configuration held sufficient Oxone in a tablet form to allow normal scheduled daily (or twice daily) change out of the urine filter depending on the use rate of the Space Station urine collection system. The actual tests to prove the concept were conducted using the Urine Fan/Separator assembly that was originally used in the STS-52 Design Test Objective (DTO) urinal assembly. Other related tests were conducted to demonstrate the actual minimum ratio of Oxone to urine that will control microbial growth.

  11. Positive allosteric modulators to peptide GPCRs: a promising class of drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bartfai, Tamas; Wang, Ming-wei

    2013-01-01

    The task of finding selective and stable peptide receptor agonists with low molecular weight, desirable pharmacokinetic properties and penetrable to the blood-brain barrier has proven too difficult for many highly coveted drug targets, including receptors for endothelin, vasoactive intestinal peptide and galanin. These receptors and ligand-gated ion channels activated by structurally simple agonists such as glutamate, glycine and GABA present such a narrow chemical space that the design of subtype-selective molecules capable of distinguishing a dozen of glutamate and GABA receptor subtypes and possessing desirable pharmacokinetic properties has also been problematic. In contrast, the pharmaceutical industry demonstrates a remarkable success in developing 1,4-benzodiazepines, positive allosteric modulators (PMAs) of the GABAA receptor. They were synthesized over 50 years ago and discovered to have anxiolytic potential through an in vivo assay. As exemplified by Librium, Valium and Dormicum, these allosteric ligands of the receptor became the world's first blockbuster drugs. Through molecular manipulation over the past 2 decades, including mutations and knockouts of the endogenous ligands or their receptors, and by in-depth physiological and pharmacological studies, more peptide and glutamate receptors have become well-validated drug targets for which an agonist is sought. In such cases, the pursuit for PAMs has also intensified, and a working paradigm to identify drug candidates that are designed as PAMs has emerged. This review, which focuses on the general principles of finding PAMs of peptide receptors in the 21st century, describes the workflow and some of its resulting compounds such as PAMs of galanin receptor 2 that act as potent anticonvulsant agents. PMID:23624758

  12. Leukocyte esterase urine test

    MedlinePLUS

    Leukocyte esterase is a urine test to look for white blood cells and other signs of infection. ... A clean-catch urine sample is preferred. The clean-catch method is used to prevent germs from the penis or vagina from getting ...

  13. RBC urine test

    MedlinePLUS

    Red blood cells in urine; Hematuria test; Urine - red blood cells ... A normal result is 4 red blood cells per high power field (RBC/HPF) or less when the sample is examined under a microscope. The example above is a common measurement ...

  14. Spatial Analysis of HIV Positive Injection Drug Users in San Francisco, 1987 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alexis N.; Mobley, Lee R.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Novak, Scott P.; Lopez, Andrea M.; Kral, Alex H.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial analyses of HIV/AIDS related outcomes are growing in popularity as a tool to understand geographic changes in the epidemic and inform the effectiveness of community-based prevention and treatment programs. The Urban Health Study was a serial, cross-sectional epidemiological study of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco between 1987 and 2005 (N = 29,914). HIV testing was conducted for every participant. Participant residence was geocoded to the level of the United States Census tract for every observation in dataset. Local indicator of spatial autocorrelation (LISA) tests were used to identify univariate and bivariate Census tract clusters of HIV positive IDUs in two time periods. We further compared three tract level characteristics (% poverty, % African Americans, and % unemployment) across areas of clustered and non-clustered tracts. We identified significant spatial clustering of high numbers of HIV positive IDUs in the early period (1987–1995) and late period (1996–2005). We found significant bivariate clusters of Census tracts where HIV positive IDUs and tract level poverty were above average compared to the surrounding areas. Our data suggest that poverty, rather than race, was an important neighborhood characteristic associated with the spatial distribution of HIV in SF and its spatial diffusion over time. PMID:24722543

  15. Weighing the Consequences: Self-Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status among African American Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Maribel; Levy, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Theorists posit that personal decisions to disclose being HIV positive are made based on the perceived consequences of that disclosure. This study examines the perceived costs and benefits of self-disclosure among African American injection drug users (IDUs). A total of 80 African American IDUs were interviewed in-depth subsequent to testing HIV…

  16. Urine collection device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, R. B. (inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A urine collection device for females is described. It is comprised of a collection element defining a urine collection chamber and an inlet opening into the chamber and is adapted to be disposed in surrounding relation to the urethral opening of the user. A drainage conduit is connected to the collection element in communication with the chamber whereby the chamber and conduit together comprise a urine flow pathway for carrying urine generally away from the inlet. A first body of wicking material is mounted adjacent the collection element and extends at least partially into the flow pathway. The device preferably also comprise a vaginal insert element including a seal portion for preventing the entry of urine into the vagina.

  17. Urine Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feedback, Daniel L.; Cibuzar, Branelle R.

    2009-01-01

    The Urine Monitoring System (UMS) is a system designed to collect an individual crewmember's void, gently separate urine from air, accurately measure void volume, allow for void sample acquisition, and discharge remaining urine into the Waste Collector Subsystem (WCS) onboard the International Space Station. The Urine Monitoring System (UMS) is a successor design to the existing Space Shuttle system and will resolve anomalies such as: liquid carry-over, inaccurate void volume measurements, and cross contamination in void samples. The crew will perform an evaluation of airflow at the ISS UMS urinal hose interface, a calibration evaluation, and a full user interface evaluation. o The UMS can be used to facilitate non-invasive methods for monitoring crew health, evaluation of countermeasures, and implementation of a variety of biomedical research protocols on future exploration missions.

  18. Human Urine as a Noninvasive Source of Kidney Cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Arcolino, Fanny; Tort Piella, Agnčs; Papadimitriou, Elli; Bussolati, Benedetta; Antonie, Daniel J; Murray, Patricia; van den Heuvel, Lamberthus; Levtchenko, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Urine represents an unlimited source of patient-specific kidney cells that can be harvested noninvasively. Urine derived podocytes and proximal tubule cells have been used to study disease mechanisms and to screen for novel drug therapies in a variety of human kidney disorders. The urinary kidney stem/progenitor cells and extracellular vesicles, instead, might be promising for therapeutic treatments of kidney injury. The greatest advantages of urine as a source of viable cells are the easy collection and less complicated ethical issues. However, extensive characterization and in vivo studies still have to be performed before the clinical use of urine-derived kidney progenitors. PMID:26089913

  19. Human Urine as a Noninvasive Source of Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira Arcolino, Fanny; Tort Piella, Agnčs; Papadimitriou, Elli; Bussolati, Benedetta; Antonie, Daniel J.; Murray, Patricia; van den Heuvel, Lamberthus; Levtchenko, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Urine represents an unlimited source of patient-specific kidney cells that can be harvested noninvasively. Urine derived podocytes and proximal tubule cells have been used to study disease mechanisms and to screen for novel drug therapies in a variety of human kidney disorders. The urinary kidney stem/progenitor cells and extracellular vesicles, instead, might be promising for therapeutic treatments of kidney injury. The greatest advantages of urine as a source of viable cells are the easy collection and less complicated ethical issues. However, extensive characterization and in vivo studies still have to be performed before the clinical use of urine-derived kidney progenitors. PMID:26089913

  20. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents?

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Navas-Acien, Ana; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-01-01

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 ?g/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (? coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m2; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. PMID:24815335

  1. Evaluation of adverse drug reactions in HIV positive patients in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Anshu Kumar; Gadgade, Akash; Shenoy, Ashok K.; Chowta, Mukta N.; Ramapuram, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The advancement and development of new drugs and treatment strategies increase the risk of unusual Adverse Events (AEs) in HIV patients. Aims: The objective of our study was to assess the incidence, types and nature of AEs in HIV positive subjects. Settings and Design: Patients with WHO stage IV disease irrespective of the CD4 cell count, or WHO stage III disease with a CD4 cell count <350 cell/cu. Mm, or, WHO stage I or II disease with a CD4 cell count of <200 cells/cu. mm, and on prior anti-retroviral therapy for not more than six months preceding the observation date, were included in the study. After initiation of therapy, the patients were examined for the occurrence any adverse events including the type and severity, or any other abnormal laboratory findings. Causality assessment of the adverse events was done using the Naranjo's scale. Results: Out of 327 patients studied prospectively, 43 patients developed AEs. Out of these, 23 (53.5%) were males and 20 (46.5%) were females. A total of 53 (16.21%) AEs were reported. Antitubercular drugs caused the maximum AEs (28.3%) followed by zidovudine (20.7%), nevirapine (15.0%) and efavirenz (5.6%). Stavudine, ethambutol, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, and atazanavir were also responsible for 3.7% of AEs individually. Causality assessment done according to the Naranjo's scale revealed that 66.04% AEs were ‘probable’ and 33.96% were ‘possible’. Conclusions: Anemia, hepatitis and dermatological adverse effects are the most common AEs. Antitubercular drugs contributed significantly for the incidence of AEs in these patients. Frequency of AEs was slightly more in males compared to females. PMID:25657900

  2. Personalized drug combinations to overcome trastuzumab resistance in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Thuy; Sliwkowski, Mark X.; Claret, Francois X.

    2014-01-01

    HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer accounts for 18%–20% of all breast cancer cases and has the second poorest prognosis among breast cancer subtypes. Trastuzumab, the first Food and Drug Administration-approved targeted therapy for breast cancer, established the era of personalized treatment for HER2+ metastatic disease. It is well tolerated and improves overall survival and time-to-disease progression; with chemotherapy, it is part of the standard of care for patients with HER2+ metastatic disease. However, many patients do not benefit from it because of resistance. Substantial research has been performed to understand the mechanism of trastuzumab resistance and develop combination strategies to overcome the resistance. In this review, we provide insight into the current pipeline of drugs used in combination with trastuzumab and the degree to which these combinations have been evaluated, especially in patients who have experienced disease progression on trastuzumab. We conclude with a discussion of the current challenges and future therapeutic approaches to trastuzumab-based combination therapy. PMID:25065528

  3. Micropreparative isolation and NMR structure elucidation of metabolites of the drug candidate 1-isopropyl-4-(4-isopropylphenyl)-6-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy) quinazolin-2(1H)-one from rat bile and urine.

    PubMed

    Blanz, Joachim; Délémonté, Thierry; Pearson, David; Luneau, Alexandre; Ritzau, Michael; Gertsch, Werner; Ramstein, Philippe; Dayer, Jérôme; Desrayaud, Sandrine; Braun, Elisabeth; Aichholz, Reiner

    2015-05-01

    LC-MS based drug metabolism studies are effective in the optimization stage of drug discovery for rapid partial structure identification of metabolites. However, these studies usually do not provide unambiguous structural characterization of all metabolites, due to the limitations of MS-based structure identification. LC-MS-SPE-NMR is a technique that allows complete structure identification, but is difficult to apply to complex in vivo samples (such as bile collected during in vivo drug metabolism studies) due to the presence, at high concentrations, of interfering endogenous components, and potentially also dosage excipient components (e.g. polyethylene glycols). Here, we describe the isolation and structure characterization of seven metabolites of the drug development candidate 1-isopropyl-4-(4-isopropylphenyl)-6-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy) quinazolin-2(1H)-one from a routine metabolism study in a bile-duct cannulated rat by LC-MS-SPE. The metabolites were isolated from bile and urine by repeated automatic trapping of the chromatographic peak of each metabolite on separate Oasis HLB SPE columns. The micropreparative HPLC/MS was performed on an XBridge BEH130 C18 HPLC column using aqueous formic acid/acetonitrile/methanol as mobile phase for the gradient elution. Mass spectrometric detection was performed on a LTQ XL linear ion trap mass spectrometer using electrospray ionization. Desorption of each metabolite was performed after the separation sequence. NMR spectra ((1)H, (13)C, 2D ROESY, HSQC and HMBC were measured on a Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer (600 MHz proton frequency) equipped with a 1.7 mm (1)H{(13)C,(15)N} Bruker Biospin's TCI MicroCryoProbe™. PMID:25797717

  4. Cannabinoid receptor 1 is a potential drug target for treatment of translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Oesch, Susanne; Walter, Dagmar; Wachtel, Marco; Pretre, Kathya; Salazar, Maria; Guzmán, Manuel; Velasco, Guillermo; Schäfer, Beat W

    2009-07-01

    Gene expression profiling has revealed that the gene coding for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is highly up-regulated in rhabdomyosarcoma biopsies bearing the typical chromosomal translocations PAX3/FKHR or PAX7/FKHR. Because cannabinoid receptor agonists are capable of reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis in diverse cancer cells such as glioma, breast cancer, and melanoma, we evaluated whether CB1 is a potential drug target in rhabdomyosarcoma. Our study shows that treatment with the cannabinoid receptor agonists HU210 and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol lowers the viability of translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma cells through the induction of apoptosis. This effect relies on inhibition of AKT signaling and induction of the stress-associated transcription factor p8 because small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of p8 rescued cell viability upon cannabinoid treatment. Finally, treatment of xenografts with HU210 led to a significant suppression of tumor growth in vivo. These results support the notion that cannabinoid receptor agonists could represent a novel targeted approach for treatment of translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:19509271

  5. Active and latent tuberculosis among HIV-positive injecting drug users in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Meijerink, Hinta; Wisaksana, Rudi; Lestari, Mery; Meilana, Intan; Chaidir, Lydia; van der Ven, Andre JAM; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Injecting drug use (IDU) is associated with tuberculosis but few data are available from low-income settings. We examined IDU in relation to active and latent tuberculosis (LTBI) among HIV-positive individuals in Indonesia, which has a high burden of tuberculosis and a rapidly growing HIV epidemic strongly driven by IDU. Methods Active tuberculosis was measured prospectively among 1900 consecutive antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naďve adult patients entering care in a clinic in West Java. Prevalence of LTBI was determined cross-sectionally in a subset of 518 ART-experienced patients using an interferon-gamma release assay. Results Patients with a history of IDU (53.1%) more often reported a history of tuberculosis treatment (34.8% vs. 21.9%, p<0.001), more often received tuberculosis treatment during follow-up (adjusted HR=1.71; 95% CI: 1.25–2.35) and more often had bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (OR=1.67; 95% CI: 0.94–2.96). LTBI was equally prevalent among people with and without a history of IDU (29.1 vs. 30.4%, NS). The risk estimates did not change after adjustment for CD4 cell count or ART. Conclusions HIV-positive individuals with a history of IDU in Indonesia have more active tuberculosis, with similar rates of LTBI. Within the HIV clinic, LTBI screening and isoniazid preventive therapy may be prioritized to patients with a history of IDU. PMID:25690530

  6. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 40 - DOT Standards for Urine Collection Kits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false DOT Standards for Urine Collection Kits A Appendix... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. A Appendix A to Part 40—DOT Standards for Urine..., large enough to easily catch and hold at least 55 mL of urine voided from the body. b. Must...

  7. 21 CFR 876.1800 - Urine flow or volume measuring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urine flow or volume measuring system. 876.1800... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1800 Urine flow or volume measuring system. (a) Identification. A urine flow or volume measuring system is a device...

  8. Construction of an Integrated Positive Youth Development Conceptual Framework for the Prevention of the Use of Psychotropic Drugs among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tak Yan

    2011-01-01

    This is a theoretical paper with an aim to construct an integrated conceptual framework for the prevention of adolescents' use and abuse of psychotropic drugs. This paper first reports the subjective reasons for adolescents' drug use and abuse in Hong Kong and reviews the theoretical underpinnings. Theories of drug use and abuse, including neurological, pharmacological, genetic predisposition, psychological, and sociological theories, were reviewed. It provides a critical re-examination of crucial factors that support the construction of a conceptual framework for primary prevention of adolescents' drug use and abuse building on, with minor revision, the model of victimization and substance abuse among women presented by Logan et al. This revised model provides a comprehensive and coherent framework synthesized from theories of drug abuse. This paper then provides empirical support for integrating a positive youth development perspective in the revised model. It further explains how the 15 empirically sound constructs identified by Catalano et al. and used in a positive youth development program, the Project P.A.T.H.S., relate generally to the components of the revised model to formulate an integrated positive youth development conceptual framework for primary prevention of adolescent drug use. Theoretical and practical implications as well as limitations and recommendations are discussed. PMID:22194671

  9. Urinating more at night

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you to urinate more often during the night. Caffeine and alcohol after dinner can also lead to ... or urinary tract Drinking a lot of alcohol, caffeine, or other fluids before bedtime Enlarged prostate gland ( ...

  10. Osmolality urine - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... area around the urethra. Open a urine-collection bag (a plastic bag with adhesive paper on one end), and place ... the entire penis can be placed in the bag with the adhesive attached to the skin. For ...

  11. 24-hour urine protein

    MedlinePLUS

    ... area around the urethra. Open a urine collection bag (a plastic bag with an adhesive paper on one end), and ... For males, place the entire penis in the bag and attach the adhesive to the skin. For ...

  12. PBG urine test

    MedlinePLUS

    Porphobilinogen test ... temporarily stop taking medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ... This test involves only normal urination, and there is no discomfort.

  13. Maple syrup urine disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Persons with this condition cannot break down the amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine. This leads to a ... Plasma amino acid test Urine amino acid test There will be signs of ketosis and excess acid in blood (acidosis).

  14. Punitive policing and associated substance use risks among HIV-positive people in Russia who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lunze, Karsten; Raj, Anita; Cheng, Debbie M.; Quinn, Emily K.; Bridden, Carly; Blokhina, Elena; Walley, Alexander Y.; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Drug law enforcement is part of the HIV risk environment among people who inject drugs (PWID). Punitive policing practices such as extrajudicial arrests for needle possession and police planting of drugs have been described anecdotally in Russia, but these experiences and their associations with risky drug behaviours have not been quantified. This study aims to quantify the burden of extrajudicial police arrests among a cohort of HIV-positive PWID in Russia and to explore its links to drug-related health outcomes. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 582 HIV-positive people with lifetime injection drug use (IDU) in St. Petersburg, Russia, we estimated the prevalence of self-reported extrajudicial police arrests. We used multiple logistic regression to evaluate associations between arrests and the following outcomes: overdose, recent IDU and receptive needle sharing. Findings This cohort's mean age was 29.8 years, 60.8% were male; 75.3% reported non-fatal drug overdose, 50.3% recent IDU and 47.3% receptive needle sharing. Extrajudicial arrests were reported by more than half (60.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 56.5–64.5) and were associated with higher odds of non-fatal drug overdose (AOR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.02–2.25) but not with recent IDU (AOR 1.17, arrests were associated with receptive needle sharing (AOR 1.84, 95% CI: 1.09–3.09). Conclusions Extrajudicial police arrests were common among this cohort of Russian HIV-positive PWID and associated with non-fatal overdose and, among those with recent IDU, receptive needle sharing. As a part of the HIV risk environment of PWIDs, these practices might contribute to HIV transmission and overdose mortality. Further research is needed to relate these findings to the operational environment of law enforcement and to better understand how police interventions among PWIDs can improve the HIV risk environment. PMID:25014321

  15. Successful management of drug-induced hypercapnic acidosis with naloxone and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation.

    PubMed

    Agrafiotis, Michalis; Tryfon, Stavros; Siopi, Demetra; Chassapidou, Georgia; Galanou, Artemis; Tsara, Venetia

    2015-02-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to deteriorating level of consciousness and desaturation. His Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, and his pupils were constricted but responded to light. Chest radiograph was negative for significant findings. Arterial blood gas evaluation on supplemental oxygen revealed severe acute on chronic respiratory acidosis: pH 7.15; PCO2, 133 mm Hg; PO2,64 mm Hg; and HCO3, 31 mmol/L. He regained full consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale, 15) after receiving a 0.4 mg dose of naloxone, but because of persistent severe respiratory acidosis (pH 7.21; PCO2, 105 mm Hg), he was immediately commenced on noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV) displaying a remarkable improvement in arterial blood gas values within the next few hours. However, in the days that followed, he remained dependent on NIV, and he was finally discharged on a home mechanical ventilation prescription. In cases of drug-induced respiratory depression, NIV should be regarded as an acceptable treatment, as it can provide ventilatory support without the increased risks associated with invasive mechanical ventilation. PMID:25176564

  16. Development testing of a shuttle urine collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Flight tests conducted in December 1973 demonstrated the ability of an unisexual urine collection subsystem to function in a zero-g environment. The urinal, which could be adjusted with three degrees of freedom, accommodated 16 female test subjects with a wide range of stature, as well as five male test subjects. The urinal was in intimate contact with the female and was contoured to form an effective air seal at the periphery. When positioned 2-4 inches forward, the urinal could be used for male collection and contact was not required.

  17. Ethanol production in a postmortem urine sample.

    PubMed

    Antonides, Heather; Marinetti, Laureen

    2011-09-01

    Significant ethanol production in a urine sample is not a common phenomenon that occurs in postmortem volatile anaylsis. Here, a 66-year-old female decedent with a history of renal failure and diabetes originally presented at the hospital as "acting funny". After expiring at the hospital, the toxicology section received both hospital and postmortem samples for analysis. Initially, only hospital blood and urine were analyzed for volatiles. The hospital blood was only positive for acetone. As a second matrix confirmation, the autopsy urine was also analyzed and found to be positive for acetone and ethanol. Upon initial examination, the urine sample had an ethanol value of 0.10 g%, which continued to increase to a peak concentration of 0.28 g%. This case study focuses on the production of ethanol in a urine sample that was analyzed over a three-month period. Also presented is a vitreous humor metabolic panel that contains glucose, creatinine, and urea nitrogen data for this case. PMID:21871162

  18. Selective solid-phase extraction of naproxen drug from human urine samples using molecularly imprinted polymer-coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes prior to its spectrofluorometric determination.

    PubMed

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Ahmadi, Mazaher; Afkhami, Abbas; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2013-08-21

    A drug imprinted polymer based on suspension polymerization on magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MIPMCNTs) was prepared with a synthesized amidoamine as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker, naproxen (NAP) as the template and ammonium persulfate as the initiator. The MIPMCNTs were characterized by TEM, FT-IR and XRD measurements. The prepared magnetic adsorbent can be well dispersed in aqueous media and can be easily separated magnetically from the medium after loading with NAP. All the aspects influencing the adsorption (extraction time, adsorbent dosage and pH) and desorption (desorption time and desorption solvent) of the analyte on the MIPMCNTs have been investigated. The extracted NAP could be easily desorbed with a mixture of methanol/sodium hydroxide aqueous solution and determined spectrofluorometrically at ?em = 353 nm (?ex = 271 nm). A linear dynamic range was established from 4.0 to 40.0 ng mL?ą of NAP and the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 2.0 ng mL?ą. In addition, the equilibrium adsorption data of NAP by imprinted polymer were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The developed method was utilized for the determination of NAP in human urine samples with satisfactory results. PMID:23739162

  19. Rapid processing of urine specimens by urine screening and the AutoMicrobic system.

    PubMed Central

    Wadke, M; McDonnell, C; Ashton, J K

    1982-01-01

    A total of 1,500 clean-voided urine specimens were analyzed for the presence of bacteria by urine screening with the Autobac 1 system. The specimens found positive by this method were further processed on the same day for identification and for antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the AutoMicrobic system with the Enterobacteriaceae-plus Card and the General Susceptibility Card, respectively. The inocula for these tests were prepared from the centrifuged and washed growth in the eugonic broth aspirated from the Autobac cuvette chambers. Of 1,500 specimens that were analyzed, 183 contained single isolates of gram-negative bacilli. The results of these rapid procedures were compared with results for the same organisms isolated from urine specimens cultured by the conventional method. The data showed 92.3% agreement for identification and a correlation of 93.6% for antibiotic susceptibility between the two procedures. It is concluded that gram-negative bacilli can be rapidly identified and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility with a high degree of accuracy from the centrifuged eugonic broth after urine screening. These findings also suggest that the AutoMicrobic system provides a rapid and convenient method for same-day processing of positive urine cultures when combined with the urine screening procedure. PMID:6759524

  20. Morphine and Codeine Concentrations in Human Urine following Controlled Poppy Seeds Administration of Known Opiate Content

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael L.; Nichols, Daniel C.; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A.; LoDico, Charles; Gorelick, David A.; Newmeyer, Matthew N.; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Opiates are an important component for drug testing due to their high abuse potential. Proper urine opiate interpretation includes ruling out poppy seed ingestion; however, detailed elimination studies after controlled poppy seed administration with known morphine and codeine doses are not available. Therefore, we investigated urine opiate pharmacokinetics after controlled oral administration of uncooked poppy seeds with known morphine and codeine content. Participants were administered two 45g oral poppy seed doses 8h apart, each containing 15.7mg morphine and 3mg codeine. Urine was collected ad libitum up to 32h after the first dose. Specimens were analyzed with the Roche Opiates II immunoassay at 2,000 and 300?g/L cutoffs, and the ThermoFisher CEDIA® Heroin Metabolite (6-acetylmorphine, 6AM) and Lin-Zhi 6AM immunoassays with 10?g/L cutoffs to determine if poppy seed ingestion could produce positive results in these heroin marker assays. In addition, all specimens were quantified for morphine and codeine by GC/MS. Participants (N=22) provided 391 urine specimens over 32h following dosing; 26.6% and 83.4% were positive for morphine at 2,000 and 300?g/L GC/MS cutoffs, respectively. For the 19 subjects who completed the study, morphine concentrations ranged from <300 to 7,522?g/L with a median peak concentration of 5,239?g/L. The median first morphine-positive urine sample at 2,000?g/L cutoff concentration occurred at 6.6h (1.2-12.1), with the last positive from 2.6 to 18h after the second dose. No specimens were positive for codeine at a cutoff concentration of 2,000?g/L, but 20.2% exceeded 300?g/L, with peak concentrations of 658 ?g/L (284-1540). The Roche Opiates II immunoassay had efficiencies greater than 96% for the 2000 and 300?g/L cutoffs. The CEDIA 6AM immunoassay had a specificity of 91%, while the Lin-Zhi assay had no false positive results. These data provide valuable information for interpreting urine opiate results. PMID:24887324

  1. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Random drug testing requirements and identification...AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7 Random drug testing requirements and identification...substance abuse program will provide for random testing for evidence of the use of...

  2. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Random drug testing requirements and identification...AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7 Random drug testing requirements and identification...substance abuse program will provide for random testing for evidence of the use of...

  3. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Random drug testing requirements and identification...AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7 Random drug testing requirements and identification...substance abuse program will provide for random testing for evidence of the use of...

  4. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Random drug testing requirements and identification...AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7 Random drug testing requirements and identification...substance abuse program will provide for random testing for evidence of the use of...

  5. Distinguishing heroin abuse from codeine administration in the urine of Chinese people by UPLC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Bu, Jun; Zhan, Changshu; Huang, Yi; Shen, Baohua; Zhuo, Xianyi

    2013-04-01

    Heroin is a highly addictive drug, and heroin abuse is considered to be a serious criminal act. The major metabolite of heroin, morphine, can usually be detected as evidence of heroin abuse. However, it is difficult to determine heroin use when morphine and codeine are both detected, because codeine use will also result in the presence of morphine in urine. Therefore, it is important to distinguish heroin abuse from codeine administration. In this study, urine samples from 21 volunteers with various ingestion patterns of a compound codeine phosphate oral solution were used as negative controls, and urine samples from 89 alleged heroin users were used as positive controls. Urine from single and multiple doses of codeine administration were collected at different time points for a systematic comparison. After protein precipitation, the urine samples were analyzed for the presence of free morphine, free codeine and their metabolites by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method of percentiles, with median and standard interquartile ranges, was used to describe and analyze the data based on the normality of the distribution. The ratios of concentration of morphine and morphine to codeine were found to be the possible criteria to distinguish heroin users from codeine users in Chinese people. PMID:23316032

  6. Urine and Urination - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of All Topics All Urine and Urination - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Traditional (????) French (français) Japanese (???) Korean (???) Russian (???????) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (espańol) ...

  7. Characterization of antibody drug conjugate positional isomers at cysteine residues by peptide mapping LC-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Janin-Bussat, Marie-Claire; Dillenbourg, Marina; Corvaia, Nathalie; Beck, Alain; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine

    2015-02-15

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are becoming a major class of oncology therapeutics. Because ADCs combine the monoclonal antibody specificity with the high toxicity of a drug, they can selectively kill tumor cells while minimizing toxicity to normal cells. Most of the current ADCs in clinical trials are controlled, but heterogeneous mixtures of isomers and isoforms. Very few protocols on ADC characterization at the peptide level have been published to date. Here, we report on the improvement of an ADC peptide mapping protocol to characterize the drug-loaded peptides by LC-MS analysis. These methods were developed on brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris), a commercial ADC with an average of four drugs linked to interchain cysteine residues of its antibody component. Because of the drug hydrophobicity, all the steps of this protocol including enzymatic digestion were improved to maintain the hydrophobic drug-loaded peptides in solution, allowing their unambiguous identification by LC-MS. For the first time, the payloads positional isomers observed by RP-HPLC after IdeS-digestion and reduction of the ADC were also characterized. PMID:25596378

  8. Traditional Chinese medicine and sports drug testing: identification of natural steroid administration in doping control urine samples resulting from musk (pod) extracts.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Geyer, Hans; Thieme, Detlef; Grosse, Joachim; Rautenberg, Claudia; Flenker, Ulrich; Beuck, Simon; Thomas, Andreas; Holland, Ruben; Dvorak, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    The administration of musk extract, that is, ingredients obtained by extraction of the liquid secreted from the preputial gland or resulting grains of the male musk deer (eg, Moschus moschiferus), has been recommended in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) applications and was listed in the Japanese pharmacopoeia for various indications requiring cardiovascular stimulation, anti-inflammatory medication or androgenic hormone therapy. Numerous steroidal components including cholesterol, 5?-androstane-3,17-dione, 5?-androstane-3,17-dione, androsterone, etiocholanolone, epiandrosterone, 3?-hydroxy-androst-5-en-17-one, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione and the corresponding urea adduct 3?-ureido-androst-4-en-17-one were characterised as natural ingredients of musk over several decades, implicating an issue concerning doping controls if used for the treatment of elite athletes. In the present study, the impact of musk extract administration on sports drug testing results of five females competing in an international sporting event is reported. In the course of routine doping controls, adverse analytical findings concerning the athletes' steroid profile, corroborated by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) data, were obtained. The athletes' medical advisors admitted the prescription of TCM-based musk pod preparations and provided musk pod samples for comparison purposes to clarify the antidoping rule violation. Steroid profiles, IRMS results, literature data and a musk sample obtained from a living musk deer of a local zoo conclusively demonstrated the use of musk pod extracts in all cases which, however, represented a doping offence as prohibited anabolic-androgenic steroids were administered. PMID:22554845

  9. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43 ...Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43 Drug counseling. (a) Drug counseling...

  10. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43 ...Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43 Drug counseling. (a) Drug counseling...

  11. Urine collection - infants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gave you. You will be given a special bag to collect the urine. It will be a plastic bag with a sticky strip on one end, made ... fit over your baby's genital area. Open this bag and place it on the infant. For males, ...

  12. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  13. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  14. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  15. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  16. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  17. A cost-utility analysis of drug treatments in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Only lamivudine has been included for patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in the National List of Essential Drugs (NLED), a pharmaceutical reimbursement list in Thailand. There have also been no economic evaluation studies of CHB drug treatments conducted in Thailand yet. In order to fill this gap in policy research, the objective of this study was to compare the cost-utility of each drug therapy (Figure 1) with palliative care in patients with HBeAg-positive CHB. Methods A cost-utility analysis using an economic evaluation model was performed to compare each drug treatment for HBeAg-positive CHB patients. A Markov model was used to estimate the relevant costs and health outcomes during a lifetime horizon based on a societal perspective. Direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs, and indirect costs were included, and health outcomes were denoted in life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The results were presented as an incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) in Thai baht (THB) per LY or QALY gained. One-way sensitivity and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were applied to investigate the effects of model parameter uncertainties. Results The ICER values of providing generic lamivudine with the addition of tenofovir when drug resistance occurred, generic lamivudine with the addition of tenofovir based on the road map guideline, and tenofovir monotherapy were -14,000 (USD -467), -8,000 (USD -267) , and -5,000 (USD -167) THB per QALY gained, respectively. However, when taking into account all parameter uncertainties in the model, providing generic lamivudine with the addition of tenofovir when drug resistance occurred (78% and 75%) and tenofovir monotherapy (18% and 24%) would yield higher probabilities of being cost-effective at the societal willingness to pay thresholds of 100,000 (USD 3,333) and 300,000 (USD 10,000) THB per QALY gained in Thailand, respectively. Conclusions Based on the policy recommendations from this study, the Thai government decided to include tenofovir into the NLED in addition to generic lamivudine which is already on the list. Moreover, the results have shown that the preferred treatment regimen involves using generic lamivudine as the first-line drug with tenofovir added if drug resistance occurs in HBeAg-positive CHB patients. PMID:24731689

  18. Position Statement: Drug Holiday in Osteoporosis Treatment with Bisphosphonates in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hun; Gong, Hyun Sik; Kim, Tae-Hee; Park, Si Young; Shin, Jung-Ho; Cho, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have been widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis with robust data from many placebo-controlled trials demonstrating its efficacy in fracture risk reduction over 3 to 5 years of treatment. Although bisphosphonates are generally safe and well tolerated, concerns have emerged about the adverse effects related to its long-term use, including osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures. Because bisphosphonates are incorporated into the skeleton and continue to exert an anti-resorptive effect for a period of time after the discontinuation of drugs, the concept of a "drug holiday" has emerged, whereby the risk of adverse effects might be decreased while the patient still benefits from anti-fracture efficacy. As randomized clinical trial evidence is not yet available on who may qualify for a drug holiday, there is considerable controversy regarding the selection of candidates for the drug holiday and monitoring during a drug holiday, both of which should be based on individual assessments of risk and benefit. This statement will provide suggestions for clinicians in South Korea on the identification of possible candidates and monitoring during a bisphosphonate drug holiday. PMID:26713307

  19. [Cardiovascular safety of non-insulin anti-diabetic drugs. Scientific position statement of SEMERGEN].

    PubMed

    Prieto, M Á; Comas Samper, J M; Escobar Cervantes, C; Gasull Molinera, V

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of both microvascular and macrovascular complications. Although reducing plasma glucose levels to recommended targets decreases the risk of microvascular outcomes, the effects of anti-diabetic drugs on macrovascular complications and cardiovascular death are of concern. In fact, it has been suggested that some anti-diabetic agents could even be harmful for cardiovascular outcomes. In this context, several health care regulatory agencies have established the need for performing clinical trials specifically designed to assess the cardiovascular safety of anti-diabetic drugs. The results of 2 clinical trials have recently been published that provide important information on the cardiovascular safety of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. The aim of this document was to review the available evidence on the cardiovascular safety of non-insulin anti-diabetic drugs and provide practical recommendations on their use in this context. PMID:24882393

  20. SELF-REPORTS OF ILLEGAL ACTIVITY, SCL-90-R PERSONALITY SCALES, AND URINE TESTS IN METHADONE PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Cernovsky, Zack; Sadek, Gamal; Chiu, Simon

    2015-12-01

    -In routine work, medical staff usually has to rely on the patient's self-reports of criminal activity and of recent involvement in fights. This study examines how these self-reports of crime correlate with the patients' routine urine tests and personality measures. Pearson correlations of these self-reports by 55 methadone patients (M age = 34.1 yr., SD = 9.1; 35 men, 20 women) were calculated to their urine screening tests (those for opiates, benzodiazepines, and cocaine) and to personality scores on the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Patients who reported being involved in recent illegal activities to obtain drugs had significantly higher scores on the SCL-90-R scale assessing obsessive-compulsive symptoms (r = .28) and had more frequent positive urine tests for cocaine (r = .35). Those who reported having engaged in fights within the last 12 mo. had higher scores on SCL-90-R measures of somatic complaints (r = .32), anxiety (r = .31), and depression (r = .29), and of overall psychopathology (r = .29), and they also had more often positive urine tests for cocaine (r = .28) than other patients. Studies on larger samples are needed to help clinicians to predict criminal or hostile behavior during methadone treatment. PMID:26595299

  1. Electrolytic pretreatment of urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Electrolysis has been under evaluation for several years as a process to pretreat urine for ultimate recovery of potable water in manned spacecraft applications. The conclusions that were drawn from this investigation are the following: (1) A platinum alloy containing 10 percent rhodium has been shown to be an effective, corrosion-resistant anode material for the electrolytic pretreatment of urine. Black platinum has been found to be suitable as a cathode material. (2) The mechanism of the reactions occurring during the electrolysis of urine is two-stage: (a) a total Kjeldahl nitrogen and total organic carbon (TOC) removal in the first stage is the result of electrochemical oxidation of urea to CO2, H2O, and ammonia followed by chloride interaction to produce N2 from ammonia, (b) after the urea has been essentially removed and the chloride ions have no more ammonia to interact with, the chloride ions start to oxidize to higher valence states, thus producing perchlorates. (3) Formation of perchlorates can be suppressed by high/low current operation, elevated temperature, and pH adjustment. (4) UV-radiation showed promise in assisting electrolytic TOC removal in beaker tests, but was not substantiated in limited single cell testing. This may have been due to non-optimum configurations of the single cell test rig and the light source.

  2. Pyrrolidine bis-cyclic guanidines with antimicrobial activity against drug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Pyrrolidine bis-cyclic guanidines with antimicrobial activity against drug-resistant Gram chemical libraries amenable to high-throughput screening for antimicrobial activities. Here we report and bactericidal activities against the important human pathogen methicillin-resis- tant Staphylococcus aureus

  3. Urine Mescaline Screening With a Biochip Array Immunoassay and Quantification by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Battal, Dilek; Barnes, Allan J; Castaneto, Marisol S; Martin, Thomas M; Klette, Kevin L; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-12-01

    Mescaline, the primary psychoactive chemical in peyote cactus, has been consumed for thousands of years in ancient religious ceremonies. The US military wanted to determine if mescaline intake was a problem for personnel readiness. Twenty thousand seventeen urine specimens negative for cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, and amphetamines were tested for mescaline with the Randox Drugs of Abuse V (DOA-V) biochip array immunoassay at the manufacturer's recommended cutoff of 6 mcg/L. A sensitive and specific method for mescaline quantification in urine was developed and fully validated. Extracted analytes were derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride and pentafluoropropanol and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with electron impact ionization. Standard curves, using linear least squares regression with 1/x weighting, were linear from 1 to 250 mcg/L with coefficients of determination >0.994. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision was <4.4 coefficient of variation (%CV), with accuracies >90.4%. Mean extraction efficiencies were >92.0% across the linear range. This fully validated method was applied for the confirmation of urinary mescaline in 526 presumptive-positive specimens and 198 randomly selected presumptive-negative specimens at the manufacturer's 6 mcg/L cutoff. No specimen confirmed positive at the GC/MS limit of quantification of 1 mcg/L. Results indicated that during this time frame, there was insufficient mescaline drug use in the military to warrant routine screening in the drug testing program. However, mescaline stability, although assessed, could have contributed to lower prevalence. We also present a validated GC/MS method for mescaline quantification in urine for reliable confirmation of suspected mescaline intake. PMID:25992796

  4. False positive in the IV drug self-administration test in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, S. Barak

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine C57BL/6J (B6) mice during extinction conditions, following food training, for rates and patterns of operant behavior that appear similar to behavior maintained by IV cocaine injections. The rationale was to evaluate the potential for false positives in the IV self-administration test using protocols common in studies of knockout mice backcrossed to B6. An additional aim was to assess the influence of food- and drug- associated cues and mouse strain. Mice were allowed to acquire lever pressing reinforced by sweetened condensed milk under a fixed ratio (FR) 1 then FR 2 schedule of reinforcement accompanied by a flashing light. A catheter base was then implanted for simulation of IV self-administration conditions. Mice were allowed to lever press with cues remaining the same as during food training but without further scheduled consequences (i.e., no drug or food reinforcers delivered). All mice sustained lever pressing for several weeks, and over half met commonly used criteria for “self-administration behavior”. Thus B6 mice showed perseveration of a previously reinforced behavior that closely resembled rates and patterns of drug self-administration. This effect in B6 mice was greater than with A/J mice, and the lack of extinction was even more robust in the presence of cocaine-associated cues than with food-associated cues. We suggest that a necessary criteria for positive results in the IV drug self-administration test include an increase in responding when cocaine is made available after extinction with saline self-administration. PMID:21522054

  5. Prevalence of illicit drug use in patients without controlled substance abuse in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Damron, Kim S; Beyer, Carla D; Barnhill, Renee C

    2003-04-01

    Drug abuse with illicit drugs and licit drugs has been increasing steadily over the past decade. A recent National Household Survey on Drug Abuse found statistically significant increases between 2000 and 2001 in the use of multiple drugs, including marijuana, cocaine, and non-medical use of pain relievers and tranquilizers. Prescription controlled substance abuse is a major issue in chronic pain management. Various means suggested to avoid or monitor abuse in patients in treatment include urine/serum drug screening whenever requested, along with other precautions including one prescribing physician and one designated pharmacy, etc. Based on the present evidence, physicians assume that patients adhering to controlled substance agreements and without obvious dependency behavior do not abuse either illicit or licit drugs. Thus, it is accepted that there is no necessity to perform routine urine/drug testing in this specific group of the patient population. One hundred patients undergoing interventional pain management and receiving controlled substances were randomly selected for evaluation of illicit drug abuse by urine drug testing. They were selected from a total of 250 patients who were identified as non-abusers of prescription drugs. Results showed that illicit drug abuse in patients without history of controlled substance abuse was seen in 16 patients. Thirteen of the 16 patients tested positive for marijuana and 3 patients tested positive for cocaine. Only one patient tested positive for a combined use of both marijuana and cocaine. This study showed that, in an interventional pain management setting, there is significant use of illicit drugs (16%) with 13% use of marijuana and 3% use of cocaine in patients who are considered as non-abusers of prescription controlled substances and those who are adherent to controlled substance agreements. However, if cocaine is considered as a hardcore drug in contrast to marijuana, abuse of hardcore illicit drugs is only 3%. PMID:16883377

  6. Pre-employment Drug Testing of Housestaff Physicians at a Large Urban Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewy, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center (New York City) program of preemployment urine toxicology examinations for beginning housestaff physicians has resulted in treatment for two physicians testing positive for illegal drugs. The program's primary purpose is to focus on substance abuse issues in graduate medical education. (Author/MSE)

  7. Ethnic hair care products may increase false positives in hair drug testing.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, David A; Smith, Frederick P; Shepherd, Arica R

    2015-12-01

    The question of why different races appear more susceptible to hair contamination by external drugs remains controversial. This research studied susceptibility of head hair to external cocaine and methamphetamine when hair products have been applied. Three different chemical classes of ethnic hair products were applied to Caucasian, Asian, and African hair. Some products increased the methamphetamine and cocaine concentrations in all hair types. A unique finding of this research is that certain ethnic hair products can replace moisture as a diffusion medium, thereby increasing the susceptibility to contamination over 100-fold compared to petroleum-based products. PMID:26338354

  8. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF A NOVEL POSITIVE ALLOSTERIC MODULATOR OF AMPA RECEPTORS DERIVED FROM A STRUCTURE-BASED DRUG DESIGN STRATEGY

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Jonathan E.; Benveniste, Morris; Maclean, John K. F.; Partin, Kathryn M.; Jamieson, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors facilitate synaptic plasticity and can improve various forms of learning and memory. These modulators show promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, ADHD, and mental depression. Three classes of positive modulator, the benzamides, the thiadiazides, and the biarylsulfonamides differentially occupy a solvent accessible binding pocket at the interface between the two subunits that form the AMPA receptor ligand-binding pocket. Here, we describe the electrophysiological properties of a new chemotype derived from a structure-based drug design strategy (SBDD), which makes similar receptor interactions compared to previously reported classes of modulator. This pyrazole amide derivative, JAMI1001A, with a promising developability profile, efficaciously modulates AMPA receptor deactivation and desensitization of both flip and flop receptor isoforms. PMID:22735771

  9. Please see the job posting listed below. Postdoctoral Position in the Neuroscience of Drug and Alcohol Addiction at the University of Pittsburgh.

    E-print Network

    Pillow, Jonathan

    and Alcohol Addiction at the University of Pittsburgh. Up to two postdoctoral positions are currently (particularly in the PFC) and increases susceptibility to alcoholism and drug addiction. Studies include both

  10. Positive and negative features of a computer assisted drug treatment program delivered by mentors to homeless drug users living in hostels.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne; Stevenson, Caral

    2014-10-01

    This paper explores positive and negative features of computer assisted therapy (CAT) delivered by mentors to homeless drug users (HDUs) living in hostels. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 HDUs and 15 mentors (all hostel staff) at the beginning and end of a 12-week CAT program. Findings indicate that successful delivery of the CAT relates to: 'program features' (e.g. its accessibility, flexibility, user-friendly interface); 'delivery context' (e.g. privacy, having appropriate computing equipment), 'client characteristics' (HDUs being recovery-focused and committed to using the program), and 'mentor support' (clients having personalized attention from an encouraging and sympathetic other). It is concluded that CATs can be used with HDUs but are unlikely to replace addiction therapists. Rather, they are more likely to be effective when combined with a strong therapeutic relationship. Services using CATs with HDUs need to provide staff training, support, and time to maximize the potential benefits. PMID:25037480

  11. Current cigarette smoking among HIV-positive current and former drug users: associations with individual and social characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Pacek, Lauren R.; Latkin, Carl; Crum, Rosa M.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Knowlton, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is endemic among HIV-positive populations and is related to substantial morbidity and mortality. Research has largely focused on individual-level characteristics associated with smoking, with less attention to social factors. We aimed to explore individual- and social-level characteristics associated with current cigarette smoking among people living with HIV. Data came from 358 individuals on antiretroviral therapy interviewed in a study on informal HIV caregiving, conducted in Baltimore, Maryland. Most participants (75%) were current smokers and 45% reported current illegal drug use. In adjusted logistic regression analyses, current drug use (aOR=2.90, 95% CI=1.58–5.30), 12-step program participation (aOR=1.74, 95% CI=1.02–2.97), and having a main Supporter who is a current smoker (aOR=1.93, 95% CI=1.12–3.33) were associated with current smoking. Findings suggest the importance of social-level factors in cigarette smoking among HIV seropositive drug users and have implications for developing targeted smoking cessation interventions for smokers living with HIV. PMID:24287787

  12. Effect of the position of the cyano-group of cyanopregnenolones on their drug metabolic inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Kourounakis, P N; Rekka, E; Demopoulos, V J; Retsas, S

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the position of the cyano-group of several cyanopregnenolones on the body's resistance to drugs and on drug metabolism was investigated. Female rats were pretreated with 2 alpha-, 6-, 16 alpha-, 17 alpha-cyano- or 16 alpha-cyanomethyl-pregnenolone or with pregnenolone, and the (in vivo) resistance to zoxazolamine, digitoxin and indomethacin, as well as the in vitro drug metabolism (post mitochondrial fraction) of zoxazolamine and ethylmorphine were determined. It was found that the 16-derivative was the most active in this respect, the 2- and 17-cyanopregnenolones were less active but significantly potent compared to controls, while the 6-cyano, the 16-cyanomethyl derivatives and pregnenolone were essentially inactive. These differences were explained in terms of an effective or poor fit of the steroids to their receptor. The poor performance of pregnenolone-16 alpha-acetonitrile was attributed to electronic effects. A hypothesis of some structural features of the receptor site for its interaction with the cyanopregnenolone inducers was presented. PMID:1936067

  13. Urine cytomorphology of micropapillary urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Rohan, Stephen M; Lin, Xiaoqi

    2013-06-01

    Micropapillary urothelial carcinoma (MPUC) is a rare subtype of urothelial carcinoma (UC) with an aggressive clinical course. The cytomorphologic features of MPUC in urine cytology have not been well described. In this study, 23 urine specimens (11 voided urines and 12 bladder washings) from 23 patients with MPUC on follow-up surgical material and 28 specimens (14voided urines and 14 bladder washings) from 28 patients with high-grade UCs (HGUC) were retrieved. Cytologic features (nuclear grade, cytoplasmic characteristics), architectural features (single cell pattern, true papillary structures, flat sheets/nests, three dimensional clusters, micropapillary (inside-out, acinar-like, or cauliflower with nuclei located peripherally)), and necrosis were evaluated. Clinical follow-up was obtained by chart review. Two findings, micropapillae and cytoplasmic vacuoles, were seen more frequently in MPUC compared to HGUC, 81.0% vs. 14.3%, and 57.1% vs. 14.3%, respectively. The combination of these two findings had a sensitivity of 78%, a specificity of 86%, a positive predictive value of 82%, and a negative predictive value of 83% for the diagnosis of MPUC on subsequent biopsy. MPUC and HGUC can both exhibit a single cell pattern, papillary structures, flat sheets/nests, three dimensional clusters, high-nuclear grade, and necrosis, thus these findings are not useful in distinguishing these entities. Chart review revealed that patients with MPUC had a higher rate of metastasis to lymph nodes and distant organs than HGUC, 57% vs. 4%. Therefore, the findings of cytoplasmic vacuoles and micropapillary structures in UC from a urine cytology specimen are associated with MPUC on subsequent biopsy. PMID:22623512

  14. Confirmation and quantification of clenbuterol in horse urine using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry triple quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jennifer; Heffron, Brendan; Taddei, Lisa; Benoit, Marc; Hurt, Laura; Costello, Sara; Gross, Melissa; Negrusz, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Clenbuterol (CLE) is used in horses as a bronchodilator and for its anabolic steroid-like effects. CLE is a Class 3 drug according to current Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) Uniform Classification Guidelines. The Racing Medication and Testing Consortium recommended a urine CLE threshold of 140 pg/mL after careful scientific review of the results of studies describing the disposition of CLE in the horse and this threshold was adopted by the ARCI. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was previously used to screen samples for CLE in Illinois, but could not detect such low concentrations in urine. Thus, a liquid-liquid extraction of CLE from urine followed by quantification by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. Method validation included testing stability, ion suppression and enhancement, precision, accuracy and uncertainty. Intra-, interday and total precision and accuracy were calculated for each control and found to be within the ±15% acceptance range. The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement approach was used to calculate uncertainty, which was 11% at the 95% confidence level. In the past 5 years, only 15 samples were reported as positive for CLE in Illinois. This new method was used in a pilot program to screen and confirm samples received from thoroughbred and harness horses. PMID:25505053

  15. Some historical aspects of urinals and urine receptacles.

    PubMed

    Mattelaer, J J

    1999-06-01

    In the history of mankind the first receptacles for urine were made and employed for diagnostic purposes and developed over centuries to a sophisticated matula. In ancient Greek and Roman history, chamber pots existed and urine was collected to bleach sheets, but it was only in the late medieval and renaissance times that a real urine receptacle or urinal for daily use was developed. We give a short description of the materials used, including clay, pewter, copper, and silver, but more sophisticated receptacles made of china, such as the bourdaloue, and of glass, such as the Kuttrolf, were also developed for use during long church ceremonies. Less known are the wooden "pipes" from Turkestan, used to keep babies dry. In the long history of mankind, urinals sometimes became very original objects. PMID:10418087

  16. 49 CFR 40.45 - What form is used to document a DOT urine collection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What form is used to document a DOT urine collection? 40.45 Section 40.45 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Collection Sites, Forms, Equipment and Supplies Used in DOT Urine Collections § 40.45 What...

  17. Hematuria (Blood in the Urine)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tract is the body’s drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. The urinary tract includes two kidneys, two ureters, ... 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra water. The urine flows from the kidneys to the ...

  18. Urine Pretreatment Configuration and Test Results for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Stanley G.; Hutchens, Cindy F.; Rethke, Donald W.; Swartley, Vernon L.; Marsh, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Pretreatment of urine using Oxone and sulfuric acid is baselined in the International Space Station (ISS) waste water reclamation system to control odors, fix urea and control microbial growth. In addition, pretreatment is recommended for long term flight use of urine collection and two phase separation to reduce or eliminate fouling of the associated hardware and plumbing with urine precipitates. This is important for ISS application because the amount of maintenance time for cleaning and repairing hardware must be minimized. This paper describes the development of a chemical pretreatment system based on solid tablet shapes which are positioned in the urine collection hose and are dissolved by the intrained urine at the proper ratio of pretreatment to urine. Building upon the prior success of the developed and tested solid Oxone tablet a trade study was completed to confirm if a similar approach, or alternative, would be appropriate for the sulfuric acid injection method. In addition, a recommended handling and packaging approach of the solid tablets for long term, safe and convenient use on ISS was addressed. Consequently, the solid tablet concept with suitable packaging was identified as the Urine Pretreat / Prefilter Assembly (UPPA). Testing of the UPPA configuration confirmed the disolution rates and ratios required by ISS were achieved. This testing included laboratory controlled methods as well as a 'real world' test evaluation that occurred during the 150 day Stage 10 Water Recovery Test (WRT) conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  19. Hair: A Diagnostic Tool to Complement Blood Serum and Urine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maugh, Thomas H., II

    1978-01-01

    Trace elements and some drugs can be identified in hair and it seems likely that other organic chemicals will be identifiable in the future. Since hair is so easily collected, stored, and analyzed it promises to be an ideal complement to serum and urine analysis as a diagnostic tool. (BB)

  20. Uric acid - urine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... take. These include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing medicines Gout medicines Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as ... test may be done to monitor people with gout, and to choose the best medicine to lower ...

  1. Assessment of the use of oral fluid as a matrix for drug monitoring in patients undergoing treatment for opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Frank; Fey, Elizabeth; Borg, Damon; Stripp, Richard; Getto, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Drug testing is an important clinical tool that is available to physicians who are assessing the effectiveness of drug treatment as well as patient compliance to the administered program. While urine has traditionally been the matrix of choice for drug monitoring, oral fluid, a filtrate of the blood, has shown great promise as an alternative matrix for such applications. Oral fluid collection can be accomplished without the need for highly trained medical staff through the use of a simple, noninvasive oral fluid collection device, which obtains an adequate sample in only a few minutes. There has been a significant amount of research performed on the use of oral fluid for forensic toxicology application; however, more studies assessing the use of oral fluid drug testing are required to validate its ability to achieve clinical drug monitoring goals. Testing for various drugs in oral fluid may yield a different result when compared to the same drugs in urine, requiring an assessment of the utility of oral fluid for such practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the application of oral fluid drug testing in patients undergoing buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. A retrospective analysis of drug testing results obtained from 6,928 patients (4,560 unobserved urine collections and 2,368 observed oral fluid collections) monitored for heroin metabolite, amphetamine, benzodiazepines, buprenorphine, tetrahydrocannabinol, cocaine, codeine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, and oxymorphone was completed. Results of this statistical exercise indicated that patients undergoing observed oral fluid collection tested positive more frequently than those unobserved urine collections for several illicit drugs and prescription medications targeted. Oral fluid was shown to detect illicit drug use as well as noncompliance in this patient population under the studied conditions more often than the urine specimens. PMID:26535971

  2. Evaluation of urine culture screening by light-scatter photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D.C.; Thrupp, L.D.; Matsen, J.M.

    1981-08-01

    Urine screening for bacteriuria by light-scatter photometry (Autobac) was evaluated for accuracy and compared with a colony count by the calibrated loop method. Incubation time, inoculum size, precision, and interference of particulate matter were evaluated in an effort to standardize the screening procedure. Results showed that urines could be accurately screened for Enterobacteriaceae by inoculating a single Autobac cuvette chamber with 0.1 or 0.2 ml of urine and determining the voltage change after four hours. A change of greater than or equal to 0.2 units indicates significant bacteriuria. Decreased accuracy was noted for urines having greater than 10(5) cfu/ml of Pseudomonas species or gram-positive cocci, possibly because these organisms grow more slowly.

  3. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of five bisphosphonates in equine urine and plasma.

    PubMed

    Wong, April S Y; Ho, Emmie N M; Wan, Terence S M; Lam, Kenneth K H; Stewart, Brian D

    2015-08-15

    Bisphosphonates are used in the management of skeletal disorder in humans and horses, with tiludronic acid being the first licensed veterinary medicine in the treatment of lameness associated with degenerative joint disease. Bisphosphonates are prohibited in horseracing according to Article 6 of the International Agreement on Breeding, Racing and Wagering (published by the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities). In order to control the use of bisphosphonates in equine sports, an effective method to detect the use of bisphosphonates is required. Bisphosphonates are difficult-to-detect drugs due to their hydrophilic properties. The complexity of equine matrices also added to their extraction difficulties. This study describes a method for the simultaneous detection of five bisphosphonates, namely alendronic acid, clodronic acid, ibandronic acid, risedronic acid and tiludronic acid, in equine urine and plasma. Bisphosphonates were first isolated from the sample matrices by solid-phase extractions, followed by methylation with trimethylsilyldiazomethane prior to liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry analysis using selective reaction monitoring in the positive electrospray ionization mode. The five bisphosphonates could be detected at low ppb levels in 0.5mL equine plasma or urine with acceptable precision, fast instrumental turnaround time, and negligible matrix interferences. The method has also been applied to the excretion study of tiludronic acid in plasma and urine collected from a horse having been administered a single dose of tiludronic acid. The applicability and effectiveness of the method was demonstrated by the successful detection and confirmation of the presence of tiludronic acid in an overseas equine urine sample. To our knowledge, this is the first reported method in the successful screening and confirmation of five amino- and non-amino bisphosphonates in equine biological samples. PMID:26143477

  4. [GABAB receptor as therapeutic target for drug addiction: from baclofen to positive allosteric modulators].

    PubMed

    Agabio, Roberta; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The present paper summarizes experimental and clinical data indicating the therapeutic potential of the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, in the treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD) and substance use disorder (SUD). Multiple preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of baclofen to suppress alcohol drinking (including binge- and relapse-like drinking), oral alcohol self-administration, and intravenous self-administration of cocaine, nicotine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, morphine, and heroin in rodents. Some randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) and case reports support the efficacy of baclofen in suppressing alcohol consumption, craving for alcohol, and alcohol withdrawal symptomatology in alcohol-dependent patients. Data from RCTs and open studies investigating baclofen efficacy on SUD are currently less conclusive. Interest in testing high doses of baclofen in AUD and SUD treatment has recently emerged. Preclinical research has extended the anti-addictive properties of baclofen to positive allosteric modulators of the GABAB receptor (GABAB PAMs). In light of their more favourable side effect profile (compared to baclofen), GABAB PAMs may represent a major step forward in a GABAB receptor-based pharmacotherapy of AUD and SUD. PMID:26093587

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospital admissions and drugs—unexpected positive associations: a retrospective general practice cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Timothy H; Seed, Paul T; Jones, Simon; Schofield, Peter; White, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increased prescribing of inhaled long-acting anti-muscarinic (LAMA) and combined inhaled long-acting ?2-agonist and corticosteroid (LABA+ICS) drugs for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has led to hopes of reduced hospital admissions from this disease. Aims: To investigate the impact of rising primary care prescribing of LAMA and LABA+ICS drugs on COPD admissions. Methods: This retrospective cohort study of general practice COPD admission and prescribing data between 2007 and 2010 comprised a representative group of 806 English general practices (population 5,264,506). Outcome measures were practice rates of COPD patient admissions and prescription costs of LAMA and LABA+ICS. General practice characteristics were based on the UK quality and outcomes framework. Results: Rates of COPD admissions remained stable from 2001 to 2010. Practice-prescribing volumes of LAMA per practice patient and LABA+ICS per practice patient increased by 61 and 26%, respectively, between 2007 and 2010. Correlation between costs of LAMA and those of LABA+ICS increased year on year, and was the highest in 2010 (Pearson’s r=0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64–0.72). Practice COPD admission rates were positively predicted by practice-prescribing volumes of LAMA (2010: B=1.23, 95% CI, 0.61–1.85) and of LABA+ICS (2010: B=0.32, 95% CI, 0.12–0.52) when controlling for practice list size, COPD prevalence and deprivation. Conclusion: The increase in the prescribing of LAMA and LABA+ICS inhalers was not associated with the predicted fall in hospital admission rates for COPD patients. The positive correlation between high practice COPD prescribing and high practice COPD admissions was not explained. PMID:24842126

  6. The bacteriology of normal urine

    E-print Network

    Milligan, Jay McDonald

    1917-01-01

    $ carbolic solution, bacteria were still present in the urine even if it were obtained by a catheter. Eraus8,and ClwosteliJ, found bacteria in the urethra at a depth of sis to eight c.o. in 60$ of healthy males ezamined. while ScheriklQ,and Austerlitz11... that it is possible. In the practical Uranalysis and Urinary Diagnosis, Charles ?/. Purdy-^ says:,"It has been generally accepted that healthy urine when freshly voided is free from bacteria and is, in fact, an aseptic fluid. If however the ordinary normal urine...

  7. Determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in urine by hollow-fiber liquid membrane-protected solid-phase microextraction based on sol-gel fiber coating.

    PubMed

    Sarafraz-Yazdi, Ali; Amiri, Amirhassan; Rounaghi, Gholamhossein; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    A new rapid, simple and effective cleanup procedure is demonstrated for the determination of ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac in urine samples by using hollow-fiber liquid membrane-protected solid-phase microextraction (HFLM-SPME) based on sol-gel technique and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). In this technique, a sol-gel coated fiber was protected with a length of porous polypropylene hollow fiber membrane which was filled with water-immiscible organic phase. Subsequently the whole device was immersed into urine sample for extraction. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-g-MWCNTs) was used as extraction phase to prepare the sol-gel SPME fiber. Important parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as desorption temperature and time, organic solvent, extraction temperature and time, pH, stirring speed and salt effect were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the method detection limits (S/N=3) were in the range of 0.03-0.07ngmL(-1) and the limits of quantification (S/N=10) between 0.08 and 0.15ngmL(-1). Relative standard deviations for intra-day and inter-day precisions were 4.8-9.0% and 4.9-8.1%, respectively. Subsequently, the method was successfully applied to human urine fractions after administration of ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac. PMID:23122403

  8. Psychopathology and Urine Toxicology in Methadone Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Gamal; Cernovsky, Zack; Chiu, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Several studies reported high rates of psychiatric commorbidity among methadone patients. We examined the relationships of measures of psychopathology to outcomes of screening urine tests for cocaine, opiates, and benzodiazepines in a sample of 56 methadone patients. They also completed the Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). The highest scales in the SCL-90-R profile of our patients were those indicating somatic discomfort, anger, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and also obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms (scores above the 39th percentile). The only significant correlations between urine tests and SCL-90-R psychopathology were those involving benzodiazepines: patients with urine tests positive for benzodiazepines had lower social self-confidence (r=0.48), were more obsessive-compulsive (r=0.44), reported a higher level of anger (r=0.41), of phobic tendencies (r=40), of anxiety (r=0.39), and of paranoid tendencies (r=0.38), and also reported more frequent psychotic symptoms (r=0.43). PMID:26266026

  9. Psychopathology and Urine Toxicology in Methadone Patients.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Gamal; Cernovsky, Zack; Chiu, Simon

    2015-02-24

    Several studies reported high rates of psychiatric commorbidity among methadone patients. We examined the relationships of measures of psychopathology to outcomes of screening urine tests for cocaine, opiates, and benzodiazepines in a sample of 56 methadone patients. They also completed the Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). The highest scales in the SCL-90-R profile of our patients were those indicating somatic discomfort, anger, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and also obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms (scores above the 39(th) percentile). The only significant correlations between urine tests and SCL-90-R psychopathology were those involving benzodiazepines: patients with urine tests positive for benzodiazepines had lower social self-confidence (r=0.48), were more obsessive-compulsive (r=0.44), reported a higher level of anger (r=0.41), of phobic tendencies (r=40), of anxiety (r=0.39), and of paranoid tendencies (r=0.38), and also reported more frequent psychotic symptoms (r=0.43). PMID:26266026

  10. Cross-reactivity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay in drugs-of-abuse screening: influence of dose and metabolites of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jon Andsnes; Schjřtt, Jan; Fossan, Kjell O; Riedel, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (CEDIA) for buprenorphine is applied for both urine drugs-of-abuse screening and compliance monitoring. Sensitivity, specificity, and optimal cutoff of this assay have differed between studies. This may indicate that cross-reactivity has to be taken into account during assay evaluation. We therefore investigated the performance of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay for use in our patient population and explored the impact of cross-reactivity on assay accuracy. Methods The CEDIA buprenorphine assay and high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry were employed to analyze drugs-of-abuse in urine samples from a healthy drug-naďve male volunteer after intake of two tablets of a prescription drug containing 400 mg paracetamol +30 mg codeine phosphate, and in urine samples (n=2,272) from drug-addicted patients. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed to express the diagnostic accuracy of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay. Results CEDIA buprenorphine was positive in one urine sample from the drug-naďve person after intake of the prescription drug. Twenty-five (1.1%) of the patient urine samples were positive for buprenorphine by CEDIA, but negative by high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Codeine, morphine, and their respective metabolites were prevalent in samples that were false positive for buprenorphine. The specificity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay increased to 99.7% when the cutoff was increased from 5 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL. Conclusion Intake of a therapeutic dose of codeine can yield a false-positive CEDIA buprenorphine result. Additive effects from metabolites of codeine contribute to cross-reactivity in concentrations much lower than listed in the manufacturer’s cross-reactivity guide. Raising the cutoff from 5 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL increased the diagnostic accuracy. Clinicians should be informed about the risk of false-positive results with the CEDIA buprenorphine assay. PMID:26604854

  11. Validation of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10): A study on illicit drug use among Chinese pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lap Po; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ip, Patrick; Chow, Chun Bong; Chan, Mei Fung; Ng, Judy Wai Ying; Sing, Chu; Lam, Ying Hoo; Mak, Wing Lai Tony; Chow, Kam Ming; Chin, Robert Kien Howe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the Chinese version of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) for identifying illicit drug use during pregnancy among Chinese population. Chinese pregnant women attending their first antenatal visit or their first unbooked visit to the maternity ward were recruited during a 4-month study period in 2011. The participants completed self-administered questionnaires on demographic information, a single question on illicit drug use during pregnancy and the DAST-10. Urine samples screened positive by the urine Point-of-Care Test were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. DAST-10 performance was compared with three different gold standards: urinalysis, self-reported drug use, and evidence of drug use by urinalysis or self-report. 1214 Chinese pregnant women participated in the study and 1085 complete DAST-10 forms were collected. Women who had used illicit drugs had significantly different DAST-10 scores than those who had not. The sensitivity of DAST-10 for identify illicit drug use in pregnant women ranged from 79.2% to 33.3% and specificity ranged from 67.7% to 99.7% using cut-off scores from ?1 to ?3. The ~80% sensitivity of DAST-10 using a cut-off score of ?1 should be sufficient for screening of illicit drug use in Chinese pregnant women, but validation tests for drug use are needed. PMID:26091290

  12. Urine collection apparatus. [feminine hygiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, R. B. (inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A urine collection device for females comprises an interface body with an interface surface for engagement with the user's body. The interface body comprises a forward portion defining a urine-receiving bore which has an inlet in the interface surface adapted to be disposed in surrounding relation to the urethral opening of the user. The interface body also has a rear portion integrally adjoining the forward portion and a non-invasive vaginal seal on the interface surface for sealing the vagina of the user from communication with the urine-receiving bore. An absorbent pad is removably supported on the interface body and extends laterally therefrom. A garment for supporting the urine collection is also disclosed.

  13. Treating urine by Spirulina platensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenliang; Liu, Hong; Li, Ming; Yu, Chengying; Yu, Gurevich

    In this paper Spirulina platensis with relatively high nutrition was cultivated to treat human urine. Batch culture showed that the consumption of N in human urine could reach to 99%, and the consumption of P was more than 99.9%, and 1.05 g biomass was obtained by treating 12.5 ml synthetic human urine; continuous culture showed that S. platensis could consume N, Cl, K and S in human urine effectively, and the consumption could reach to 99.9%, 75.0%, 83.7% and 96.0%, respectively, and the consumption of P was over 99.9%, which is very important to increase the closure and safety of the bioregenerative life support system (BLSS).

  14. Urine Test: Dipstick (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dipstick test may point to a diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney disease, diabetes, or a urinary tract injury. ... Diabetes Urine Tests Kidney Diseases in Childhood Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions Urinary Tract Infections Kidneys and ...

  15. A urine volume measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Sabin, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    An improved urine volume measurement system for use in the unusual environment of manned space flight is reported. The system utilizes a low time-constant thermal flowmeter. The time integral of the transient response of the flowmeter gives the urine volume during a void as it occurs. In addition, the two phase flows through the flowmeter present no problem. Developments of the thermal flowmeter and a verification of the predicted performance characteristics are summarized.

  16. A prototype urine collection device for female aircrew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Roger U.; Delger, Karlyna L.

    1993-01-01

    Women are gaining increased access to small military cockpits. This shift has stimulated the search for practical urine containment and disposal methods for female aircrew. There are no external urine collection devices (UCD) for women that are comfortable, convenient, and leak free. We describe a prototype UCD that begins to meet this need. Materials used to make custom aviator masks were adapted to mold a perineal mask. First, a perineal cast (negative) was used to make a mold (positive). Next, a perineal mask made of wax was formed to fit the positive mold. Finally, a soft, pliable perineal mask was fabricated using the wax model as a guide. The prototype was tested for comfort, fit, and leakage. In the sitting position, less than 5 cc of urine leakage occurred with each 600 cc of urine collected. Comfort was mostly satisfactory, but ambulation was limited and the outlet design could lead to kinking and obstruction. We concluded that a perineal mask may serve as a comfortable and functional external UCD acceptable for use by females in confined environments. Changes are needed to improve comfort, fit, and urine drainage. Integration into cockpits, pressure suits, chemical defense gear, and environments where access to relief facilities is restricted is planned.

  17. Uncertainties of Mayak urine data

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Guthrie; Vostrotin, Vadim; Vvdensky, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    For internal dose calculations for the Mayak worker epidemiological study, quantitative estimates of uncertainty of the urine measurements are necessary. Some of the data consist of measurements of 24h urine excretion on successive days (e.g. 3 or 4 days). In a recent publication, dose calculations were done where the uncertainty of the urine measurements was estimated starting from the statistical standard deviation of these replicate mesurements. This approach is straightforward and accurate when the number of replicate measurements is large, however, a Monte Carlo study showed it to be problematic for the actual number of replicate measurements (median from 3 to 4). Also, it is sometimes important to characterize the uncertainty of a single urine measurement. Therefore this alternate method has been developed. A method of parameterizing the uncertainty of Mayak urine bioassay measmements is described. The Poisson lognormal model is assumed and data from 63 cases (1099 urine measurements in all) are used to empirically determine the lognormal normalization uncertainty, given the measurement uncertainties obtained from count quantities. The natural logarithm of the geometric standard deviation of the normalization uncertainty is found to be in the range 0.31 to 0.35 including a measurement component estimated to be 0.2.

  18. Identification of some new clemastine metabolites in dog, horse, and human urine with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tevell, Annica; Bondesson, Ulf; Törneke, Karolina; Hedeland, Mikael

    2004-01-01

    The metabolism of clemastine was studied in dogs, horses, and humans after a single dose of Tavegyl. The urine collected was extracted by solid-phase extraction or hydrolyzed with beta-glucuronidase and then extracted by liquid-liquid extraction, prior to analysis for unchanged drug and phase I and II metabolites by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The metabolites were identified by their molecular mass and interpretation of the product ion spectra, since no standard substances were available. Unchanged drug was recovered in urine samples from dogs and humans, but not from horses. In dogs and humans, the phase I metabolite, norclemastine, was identified, and clemastine metabolites with one and two additional oxygens were found in all three species. In horses and dogs monohydroxylation on one of the aromatic rings or the adjacent methyl group was favored while, in humans, the additional oxygen was positioned on either the aromatic or the aliphatic part of the structure, and the aliphatic reaction seemed to result in at least three isomers. In the metabolites with two additional oxygens, both the oxygens were found on the aliphatic fragment in humans and dogs, whereas they were situated on the aromatic part of the structure in horses. In human patients, glucuronidated monohydroxyclemastine was recovered, and in urine from horses both mono- and dihydroxyclemastine glucuronides were identified, while phase II metabolites could not be recovered from the dog urine. Clemastine metabolism in dogs and horses has, to our knowledge, not been studied before, and new metabolites from humans are presented in this article. Thus, the metabolites described in the present work have not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:15384147

  19. Position of chromatographic techniques in screening for detection of drugs or poisons in clinical and forensic toxicology and/or doping control.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Hans H

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews chromatographic screening procedures for simultaneous detection of several drug classes relevant to clinical and forensic toxicology or doping control in urine or blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography coupled with a diode-array detector (LC-DAD) or a mass spectrometer (LC-MS). The pros and cons of the different techniques and procedures are discussed leading to the following conclusions and perspectives. GC-MS, especially in the electron ionization full-scan mode, is still the method of choice for comprehensive screening providing best separation power, specificity and universality, although requiring derivatization. LC-DAD is also often used for screening, but its separation power and its specificity are still inferior to those of GC-MS. Finally, LC-MS has shown to be an ideal supplement, especially for the detection of more polar, thermolabile and/or low-dose drugs, especially in blood plasma. It may become the gold standard in clinical and forensic toxicology and doping control if, at a later date, the costs of the apparatus will be markedly reduced, the current disadvantages like irreproducibility of fragmentation, reduction of ionization by matrix, etc. will be overcome, and finally if one of the increasing number of quite different techniques will become the apparatus standard. PMID:15576292

  20. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2015-01-01

    An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS). The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under IND (Investigational New Drug) guidelines. The aim of the project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationships among plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial protocol with INSCOP. Twelve healthy human subjects were administered at three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. PK compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling time, were established using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL (i.e. log-likelihood ratio test)) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. The results: Predictable correlations among scopolamine concentrations in compartments of plasma, saliva and urine were established, and for the first time the model satisfactorily predicted the population and individual PK of INSCOP in plasma, saliva and urine. The model can be utilized to predict the INSCOP plasma concentration by saliva and urine data, and it will be useful for monitoring the PK of scopolamine in space and other remote environments using non-invasive sampling of saliva and/or urine.

  1. The influence of social and endocrine factors on urine-marking by captive wolves (Canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asa, C.S.; Mech, L.D.; Seal, U.S.; Plotka, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    Although serum hormones varied seasonally in all adult animals, only dominant male and female wolves urine-marked. Serum testosterone and urine-marking rates, which increased during the fall/winter breeding season, were positively correlated in both male and female dominant wolves. Estradiol, which increased in conjunction with proestrus and estrus, was not correlated with female urine-marking. These findings suggest that hormonal influence on urine-marking in the wolf is modulated by social factors and contrast with those for both domestic dogs and coyotes, two other members of the genus Canis.

  2. Enzyme immunoassay validation for the detection of buprenorphine in urine.

    PubMed

    Cirimele, V; Kintz, P; Lohner, S; Ludes, B

    2003-03-01

    A solid-phase enzyme immunoassay involving microtiter plates was proposed by Microgenics to screen buprenorphine in urine. The intra-assay precision at 10 ng/mL was 7.7% (coefficient of variation). The immunoassay was determined to have no cross-reactivity with codeine, dihydrocodeine, morphine, ethylmorphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, methadone, pholcodine, propoxyphene, dextromoramide, and dextromethorphan at 1 and 10 mg/L. A low cross-reactivity (3% at 1 ng/mL) was observed at low concentrations of norbuprenorphine. After comparing this new immunological test (Singlestep ELISA) for 76 urine specimens with our validated high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC-ES-MS) procedure, an optimum cutoff concentration of 2 ng/mL was determined for the kit. At this cutoff, the screening assay was able to determine more than 90% of true results with 43.4% true positives and 48.7% true negatives. Four positive urines (5.3%) were not confirmed by HPLC-ES-MS. In only one case, the negative urine test was confirmed as positive by HPLC-ES-MS (buprenorphine: 62.5 ng/mL). Buprenorphine concentrations determined by HPLC-ES-MS ranged from 1.2 to 1052 ng/mL. Of the four potential adulterants (hypochloride 50 mL/L, sodium nitrite 50 g/L, liquid soap 50 mL/L, and sodium chloride 50 g/L) that might be added to a positive urine specimen, none were able to cause a false-negative response by the immunoassay. The results of this study support the concept that the Singlestep ELISA for buprenorphine determination in urine should be considered as a new, valided screening procedure. PMID:12670004

  3. SELENIUM LEVELS IN HUMAN BLOOD, URINE, AND HAIR IN RESPONSE TO EXPOSURE VIA DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Blood, hair, urine and tap water samples were obtained from participants in a population exposed to varying amounts of selenium via water from home wells. Concentrations of selenium in urine and hair produced significant positive correlations with well-water selenium levels. Bloo...

  4. Rapid quantification of tilidine, nortilidine, and bisnortilidine in urine by automated online SPE-LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Christoph; Grobosch, Thomas; Binscheck, Torsten

    2011-04-01

    The opioid tilidine is a prodrug which is hepatically metabolized to active nortilidine and bisnortilidine. Due to the increasing abuse of tilidine by drug users and the lack of a specific immunoassay, we developed an analytical method for the quantification of tilidine, nortilidine, and bisnortilidine in urine suitable for screening. In a following step, this method was used to establish data on excretion kinetics of the substances in order to evaluate the time window of detection after a single oral dose of tilidine/naloxone and also was applied to authentic urine samples from correctional facilities. Urine samples were mixed with internal standard solution and extracted on a weak cation exchanger at pH 6 using a Symbiosis Pico system. The chromatographic separation was achieved within a 3.5-min run time on a Phenylhexyl column (50 × 2.0 mm, 5 ?m) via gradient elution (methanol and 0.2% formic acid) at a flow rate of 0.50 mL/min. The ESI-MS/MS was performed on a QTrap 3,200 in positive multiple reaction monitoring mode using two mass transitions per analyte. Validating the method resulted in a lower limit of quantification of 1.0 ?g/L followed by a linear calibration range to 100 ?g/L for each analyte (r(2) > 0.99). The analytical method allowed the detection of a single dose of a commercially available tilidine solution up to 7 days after administration. Using this highly sensitive method, 55 of 3,665 urine samples were tested positive. PMID:21140136

  5. Evaluation of the on-site immunoassay drug-screening device Triage-TOX in routine forensic autopsy.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Mariko; Michiue, Tomomi; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    Instrumental identification of drugs with quantification is essential in forensic toxicology, while on-site immunoassay urinalysis drug-screening devices conveniently provide preliminary information when adequately used. However, suitable or sufficient urine specimens are not always available. The present study evaluated the efficacy of a new on-site immunoassay drug-screening device Triage-TOX (Alere Inc., San Diego, CA, USA), which has recently been developed to provide objective data on the one-step automated processor, using 51 urine and 19 pericardial fluid samples from 66 forensic autopsy cases, compared with Triage-Drug of Abuse (DOA) and Monitect-9. For benzodiazepines, the positive predictive value and specificity of Triage-TOX were higher than those of Triage-DOA; however, sensitivity was higher with Monitect-9, despite frequent false-positives. The results for the other drugs with the three devices also included a few false-negatives and false-positives. These observations indicate the applicability of Triage-TOX in preliminary drug screening using urine or alternative materials in routine forensic autopsy, when a possible false-negative is considered, especially for benzodiazepines, providing objective information; however, the combined use of another device such as Monitect-9 can help minimize misinterpretation prior to instrumental analysis. PMID:26593997

  6. 28 CFR 550.44 - Procedures for arranging drug counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Procedures for arranging drug counseling. 550.44 Section 550.44 Judicial...Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs...44 Procedures for arranging drug counseling. The contract center staff...

  7. 28 CFR 550.44 - Procedures for arranging drug counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false Procedures for arranging drug counseling. 550.44 Section 550.44 Judicial...Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs...44 Procedures for arranging drug counseling. The contract center staff...

  8. Automated drug identification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campen, C. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    System speeds up analysis of blood and urine and is capable of identifying 100 commonly abused drugs. System includes computer that controls entire analytical process by ordering various steps in specific sequences. Computer processes data output and has readout of identified drugs.

  9. Litomosoides sigmodontis: A jird urine metabolome study.

    PubMed

    Globisch, Daniel; Specht, Sabine; Pfarr, Kenneth M; Eubanks, Lisa M; Hoerauf, Achim; Janda, Kim D

    2015-12-15

    The neglected tropical disease onchocerciasis affects more than 35 million people worldwide with over 95% in Africa. Disease infection initiates from the filarial parasitic nematode Onchocerca volvulus, which is transmitted by the blackfly vector Simulium sp. carrying infectious L3 larvae. New treatments and diagnostics are required to eradicate this parasitic disease. Herein, we describe that a previously discovered biomarker for onchocerciasis, N-acetyltyramine-O-glucuronide (NATOG) is also present in urine samples of jirds infected with the onchocerciasis model nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis. Increased NATOG values paralleled a progressing infection and demonstrated that quantification of NATOG in this rodent model can be utilized to track its infectivity. Moreover, our findings suggest how NATOG monitoring may be used for evaluating potential drug candidates. PMID:26573416

  10. Urine oligosaccharide pattern in patients with hyperprolactinaemia.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Bertil; Wahlberg, Jeanette; Landberg, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Free milk-type oligosaccharides are produced during pregnancy and lactation and may have an impact on several cells in the immune system. Our aim was to investigate if patients with isolated hyperprolactinaemia, not related to pregnancy, also have increased synthesis and urinary excretion of milk-type oligosaccharides and to compare the excretion pattern with that found during pregnancy. Urine samples were collected as morning sample from 18 patients with hyperprolactinaemia, 13 healthy controls with normal prolactin levels and four pregnant women. After purification, lactose and free oligosaccharides were analysed and quantified by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The identity of peaks was confirmed by exoglycosidase treatment and comparison with oligosaccharide standards. Prolactin was measured in serum collected between 09 and 11 a.m. by a standardized immunochemical method. Patients with hyperprolactinaemia had higher urinary excretion of lactose than normoprolactinemic controls and urinary lactose correlated positively to prolactin levels (r?=?0.51, p?urine from three and two patients, respectively. The acidic oligosaccharide 3-sialyl lactose was found in high amount in urine from two patients with prolactin of >10,000 mU/l. However, pregnant women in their third trimester had the highest concentration of all these oligosaccharides and excretion increased during pregnancy. This study is first to show that both lactose and certain fucosylated and sialylated milk-type oligosaccharides are increased in some patients with hyperprolactinaemia. It remains to elucidate the functional importance of these findings. PMID:26275984

  11. Quantitation of Carisoprodol and Meprobamate in Urine and Plasma Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Slawson, Matthew H; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L

    2016-01-01

    Carisoprodol and meprobamate are centrally acting muscle relaxant/anxiolytic drugs that can exist in a parent-metabolite relationship (carisoprodol???meprobamate) or as a separate pharmaceutical preparation (meprobamate aka Equanil, others). The monitoring of the use of these drugs has both clinical and forensic applications in pain management applications and in overdose situations. LC-MS/MS is used to analyze urine or plasma/serum extracts with deuterated analogs of each analyte as internal standards to ensure accurate quantitation and control for any potential matrix effects. Positive ion electrospray is used to introduce the analytes into the mass spectrometer. Selected reaction monitoring of two product ions for each analyte allows for the calculation of ion ratios which ensures correct identification of each analyte, while a matrix-matched calibration curve is used for quantitation. PMID:26660179

  12. Chemical measurement of urine volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Chemical method of measuring volume of urine samples using lithium chloride dilution technique, does not interfere with analysis, is faster, and more accurate than standard volumetric of specific gravity/weight techniques. Adaptation of procedure to urinalysis could prove generally practical for hospital mineral balance and catechoamine determinations.

  13. Blood in the Urine (Hematuria)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... time, microscopic hematuria goes away without causing any problems. In fact, people might never know they have it unless ... often clears up on its own with no problems. Sometimes, though, it can be a sign of a more ... diseases mineral imbalances in the urine, like too much calcium ...

  14. Other Causes of Painful Urination

    MedlinePLUS

    ... them. Do I need to see a doctor? Yes. Painful urination can be a symptom of a more serious problem. You should tell your doctor about your symptoms and how long you've had them. Tell your doctor about any medical conditions you have, such as diabetes mellitus ...

  15. Residual cannabis levels in blood, urine and oral fluid following heavy cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Odell, Morris S; Frei, Matthew Y; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Chu, Mark; Lubman, Dan I

    2015-04-01

    An understanding of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) kinetics and residual levels after cannabis use is essential in interpreting toxicology tests in body fluids from live subjects, particularly when used in forensic settings for drug abuse, traffic and interpersonal violence cases. However the current literature is largely based on laboratory studies using controlled cannabis dosages in experienced users, with limited research investigating the kinetics of residual THC concentrations in regular high dose cannabis users. Twenty-one dependent cannabis users were recruited at admission to two residential detoxification units in Melbourne, Australia. After being provided with information about, and consenting to, the study, subjects volunteered to provide once-daily blood, urine and oral fluid (saliva) samples for seven consecutive days following admission, involving cessation and abstinence from all cannabis use. Blood and oral fluid specimens were analysed for THC and urine specimens for the metabolite THC-COOH. In some subjects THC was detectable in blood for at least 7 days and oral fluid specimens were positive for THC up to 78 h after admission to the unit. Urinary THC-COOH concentrations exceeded 1000 ng/mL for some subjects 129 h after last use. The presented blood THC levels are higher and persist longer in some individuals than previously described, our understanding and interpretation of THC levels in long term heavy cannabis users may need to be reconsidered. PMID:25698515

  16. Collagen gel droplet-embedded culture-drug sensitivity test and Ki67 expression in estrogen receptor-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tozuka, Katsunori; Horiguchi, Jun; Takata, Daisuke; Rokutanda, Nana; Nagaoka, Rin; Tokiniwa, Hideaki; Kikuchi, Mami; Satou, Ayako; Takei, Hiroyuki; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2013-01-01

    Anthracyclines and taxanes are standard anticancer drugs used in breast cancer chemotherapy. In general, the efficacy of chemotherapy is lower in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors compared to patients with ER-negative tumors. Although less chemosensitive, ER-positive disease includes a subset of patients who significantly benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The collagen gel droplet-embedded culture-drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) is an in vitro chemosensitivity test that has several advantages over conventional tests. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation between CD-DST and the expression of Ki67, an indicator of tumor proliferation, to evaluate the efficacy of anthracyclines and taxanes in patients with ER-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. CD-DST was performed in 68 patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer between August 2001 and November 2006. The specimens obtained during surgery were used for the CD-DST and immunohistological examination of Ki67 expression. Chemosensitivity to the anticancer drugs adriamycin (ADM), epirubicin (EPI), docetaxel (DOC) and paclitaxel (PTX) was estimated using CD-DST. Results obtained from the CD-DST showed the chemosensitivity to each anticancer drug to be ADM, 23.7%; EPI, 75.0%; DOC, 69.2% and PTX, 43.6%. Ki67 expression was significantly higher in the group that was sensitive to DOC compared to the group that was resistant to DOC (P=0.048) and PTX (P=0.036). In addition, a significant correlation was observed between a Ki67 labeling index (LI) of >30% and chemosensitivity to PTX. In conclusion, results obtained from CD-DST and Ki67 expression levels are able to identify a subset of patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer who exhibit sensitivity to chemotherapy, particularly to taxane therapy. PMID:24649129

  17. Urine Albumin and Albumin/ Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Albumin; Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio Related tests: Albumin ; Creatinine ; Glucose ; A1c ; Urine Protein ; Beta-2 Microglobulin All content on Lab ... urine ). Most of the time, both albumin and creatinine are measured in a random urine sample and an albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) is ...

  18. Sexual Risk Behavior Associated with Co-administration of Methamphetamine and Other Drugs in a Sample of HIV-positive Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Shirley J.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Zians, Jim; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the association between sexual risk behavior and co-administration of methamphetamine with other drugs in a sample of 341 HIV-positive MSM. Those who reported methamphetamine co-administration in the past two months (65%) reported significantly more unprotected anal and oral sex and a greater number of casual, anonymous, and paid sex partners in this timeframe compared to men who used methamphetamine alone. Two primary patterns of co-administration were identified: 1) drug combinations motivated by sexual performance and enhancement (e.g., methamphetamine, poppers, sildenafil) and 2) “party drug” combinations (e.g., methamphetamine, GHB, ketamine). Implications for further research and possible applications to risk-reduction interventions are discussed. PMID:19219667

  19. Effect of storage temperature on endogenous GHB levels in urine.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, M A; Miller, M L; Levine, B

    2001-06-15

    Because gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is an endogenous substance present in the body and is rapidly eliminated after ingestion, toxicologists investigating drug-facilitated sexual assault cases are often asked to differentiate between endogenous and exogenous levels of GHB in urine samples. This study was designed to determine the effects of storage temperature on endogenous GHB levels in urine. Specifically, it was designed to ascertain whether endogenous levels can be elevated to a range considered indicative of GHB ingestion. Urine specimens from two subjects that had not been administered exogenous GHB were collected during a 24h period and individually pooled. The pooled specimens were separated into standard sample cups and divided into three storage groups: room temperature ( approximately 25 degrees C), refrigerated (5 degrees C), and frozen (-10 degrees C). Additionally, some specimens were put through numerous freeze/thaw cycles to mimic situations that may occur if multiple laboratories analyze the same specimen. Periodic analysis of the samples revealed increases in the levels of endogenous GHB over a 6-month period. The greatest increase (up to 404%) was observed in the samples maintained at room temperature. The refrigerated specimens showed increases of 140-208%, while the frozen specimens showed smaller changes (88-116%). The specimens subjected to multiple freeze/thaw cycles mirrored specimens that had been thawed only once. None of the stored urine specimens demonstrated increases in GHB concentrations that would be consistent with exogenous GHB ingestion. PMID:11376982

  20. Urine marking in male common voles: does behavioural activity matter?

    PubMed

    Lantová, Petra; Brixová, Lenka; Lanta, Vojt?ch

    2012-06-01

    Rodent urine provides animals with a large amount of information, from the identity of the animal through its physical condition to social status. Many studies therefore focus on rodent urine-marking behaviour and use marking frequency as an indicator of social status or competitive ability. However, marking, like many other aspects of rodent behaviour, may be affected by individual behavioural activity, a factor that has not been examined so far. We therefore studied a relationship between male urine-marking in reaction to another male's marks (standard opponent) and individual personality profile, characterised by behavioural activity in an open field test (OFT). The marking appeared to be consistent and specific for particular individuals as there was a significant positive relationship between individual markings in two different phases of the experiment. The linkage between behavioural activity in the OFT and urine-marking frequency was non-linear (quadratic), which suggested that males with intermediate activity marked more intensively than males from the extremes of the behavioural spectra. The relationship between the opponent's and the tested males' markings was positive, however, we found no statistically significant evidence that the voles would attempt to overmark the opponent. Marking thus seems to have more of a self-advertising than a competitive function in the common vole. Further, as high marking activity is under strong intra- or intersexual selection, the result might suggest a stabilising selection of the personality trait described as behavioural activity in our study. PMID:22285890

  1. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ute; Forster, Michael; Rinaldi, Anna; Risch, Thomas; Sungalee, Stéphanie; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélčne; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P; Kronnie, Geertruy Te; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C; Moorman, Anthony V; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; Weid, Nicolas von der; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-09-01

    TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Using an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. We identified recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 in constellation with the fusion of TCF3 and HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin toward a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics but sensitivity to glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  2. Urine bag as a modern day matula.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    Since time immemorial uroscopic analysis has been a staple of diagnostic medicine. It received prominence during the middle ages with the introduction of the matula. Urinary discoloration is generally due to changes in urochrome concentration associated with the presence of other endogenous or exogenous pigments. Observation of urine colors has received less attention due to the advances made in urinalysis. A gamut of urine colors can be seen in urine bags of hospitalized patients that may give clue to presence of infections, medications, poisons, and hemolysis. Although worrisome to the patient, urine discoloration is mostly benign and resolves with removal of the offending agent. Twelve urine bags with discolored urine (and their predisposing causes) have been shown as examples. Urine colors (blue-green, yellow, orange, pink, red, brown, black, white, and purple) and their etiologies have been reviewed following a literature search in these databases: Pubmed, EBSCO, Science Direct, Proquest, Google Scholar, Springer, and Ovid. PMID:24959539

  3. Urine Bag as a Modern Day Matula

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    Since time immemorial uroscopic analysis has been a staple of diagnostic medicine. It received prominence during the middle ages with the introduction of the matula. Urinary discoloration is generally due to changes in urochrome concentration associated with the presence of other endogenous or exogenous pigments. Observation of urine colors has received less attention due to the advances made in urinalysis. A gamut of urine colors can be seen in urine bags of hospitalized patients that may give clue to presence of infections, medications, poisons, and hemolysis. Although worrisome to the patient, urine discoloration is mostly benign and resolves with removal of the offending agent. Twelve urine bags with discolored urine (and their predisposing causes) have been shown as examples. Urine colors (blue-green, yellow, orange, pink, red, brown, black, white, and purple) and their etiologies have been reviewed following a literature search in these databases: Pubmed, EBSCO, Science Direct, Proquest, Google Scholar, Springer, and Ovid. PMID:24959539

  4. Antibiotic Exposure in a Low-Income Country: Screening Urine Samples for Presence of Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance in Coagulase Negative Staphylococcal Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Lerbech, Anne Mette; Opintan, Japheth A.; Bekoe, Samuel Oppong; Ahiabu, Mary-Anne; Tersbřl, Britt Pinkowski; Hansen, Martin; Brightson, Kennedy T. C.; Ametepeh, Samuel; Frimodt-Mřller, Niels; Styrishave, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Development of antimicrobial resistance has been assigned to excess and misuse of antimicrobial agents. Staphylococci are part of the normal flora but are also potential pathogens that have become essentially resistant to many known antibiotics. Resistances in coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) are suggested to evolve due to positive selective pressure following antibiotic treatment. This study investigated the presence of the nine most commonly used antimicrobial agents in human urine from outpatients in two hospitals in Ghana in relation to CoNS resistance. Urine and CoNS were sampled (n?=?246 and n?=?96 respectively) from patients in two hospitals in Ghana. CoNS were identified using Gram staining, coagulase test, and MALDI-TOF/MS, and the antimicrobial susceptibility to 12 commonly used antimicrobials was determined by disk diffusion. Moreover an analytical method was developed for the determination of the nine most commonly used antimicrobial agents in Ghana by using solid-phase extraction in combination with HPLC-MS/MS using electron spray ionization. The highest frequency of resistance to CoNS was observed for penicillin V (98%), trimethoprim (67%), and tetracycline (63%). S. haemolyticus was the most common isolate (75%), followed by S. epidermidis (13%) and S. hominis (6%). S. haemolyticus was also the species displaying the highest resistance prevalence (82%). 69% of the isolated CoNS were multiple drug resistant (?4 antibiotics) and 45% of the CoNS were methicillin resistant. Antimicrobial agents were detected in 64% of the analysed urine samples (n?=?121) where the most frequently detected antimicrobials were ciprofloxacin (30%), trimethoprim (27%), and metronidazole (17%). The major findings of this study was that the prevalence of detected antimicrobials in urine was more frequent than the use reported by the patients and the prevalence of resistant S. haemolyticus was more frequent than other resistant CoNS species when antimicrobial agents were detected in the urine. PMID:25462162

  5. Purple Urine Bag Syndrome in Two Elderly Men with Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Van Keer, Jan; Detroyer, Daan; Bammens, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Purple urine bag syndrome is a rare condition in which purple discoloration of urine inside its collection bag occurs. We describe two illustrative cases. The first patient is an 81-year-old man who was hospitalized for a newly diagnosed lymphoma with acute obstructive renal failure for which a nephrostomy procedure was performed. During the hospitalization, a sudden purple discoloration of the suprapubic catheter urine was noted, while the nephrostomy urine had a normal color. Urine culture from the suprapubic catheter was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis; urine from the nephrostomy was sterile. The second case is an 80-year-old man who was admitted for heart failure with cardiorenal dilemma and who was started on intermittent hemodialysis. There was a sudden purple discoloration of the urine in the collection bag from his indwelling catheter. He was diagnosed with an E. coli urinary infection and treated with amoxicillin and removal of the indwelling catheter. These two cases illustrate the typical characteristics of purple urine bag syndrome. PMID:26351597

  6. Serum and Urine Biomarkers for Human Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, A. L.; Palleschi, G.; Silvestri, L.; Moschese, D.; Ricci, S.; Petrozza, V.; Carbone, A.; Di Carlo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosis is mostly achieved incidentally by imaging provided for unrelated clinical reasons. The surgical management of localized tumors has reported excellent results. The therapy of advanced RCC has evolved considerably over recent years with the widespread use of the so-called “targeted therapies.” The identification of molecular markers in body fluids (e.g., sera and urine), which can be used for screening, diagnosis, follow-up, and monitoring of drug-based therapy in RCC patients, is one of the most ambitious challenges in oncologic research. Although there are some promising reports about potential biomarkers in sera, there is limited available data regarding urine markers for RCC. The following review reports some of the most promising biomarkers identified in the biological fluids of RCC patients. PMID:25922552

  7. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative People Who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Hilary A.; Fennell, Christina E.; Gillison, Maura; Xiao, Weihong; Guo, Yingshi; Wentz, Alicia; Kirk, Gregory D.; Mehta, Shruti H.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes most oropharyngeal cancers in the United States. Oral HPV prevalence is associated with immunosuppression, and drug use can be immunosuppressive, but the epidemiology of oral HPV among people who use drugs is not well described. Methods We enrolled men and women with a current or prior history of injection drug use in this cross-sectional sub-study within the AIDS Linked to the Intravenous Experience (ALIVE) cohort. We tested oral rinse samples for 37 types of HPV DNA and collected self-reported risk factor information. We compared oral HPV prevalence across categories using chi-squared statistics and multivariable logistic regression. Results Among 199 subjects, 32% were HIV-positive (median CD4 count 384 cells/?L), 90% were Black, 56% had less than a high school education, 17% had recently used injection drugs, and the median age was 54 years. Most had performed oral sex (82%) but had fewer than 5 lifetime partners (58%). The prevalence of any oral HPV was 29%, and of any oncogenic oral HPV was 13%. Oral HPV prevalence was high among both heterosexual men (30%) and women (20%). After adjustment, odds of oral HPV were increased among HIV-positive individuals with a low CD4 count (<350 cells/?l, aOR = 2.7, 95%CI = 1.2–6.4, vs. HIV-negative individuals), but not among HIV-positive individuals with a higher CD4 cell count. Odds were also elevated for those who had recently performed oral sex on a woman (aOR = 2.2, 95%CI = 1.01–4.6) and, even after this adjustment, among bisexual/lesbian females (aOR = 5.6, 95%CI = 1.4–23, vs. heterosexual females). Oral HPV prevalence was not associated with vaginal sex, performing oral sex on a man, or recent drug use. Conclusions Recent drug use was not associated with oral HPV prevalence in our study. However, despite modest numbers of sexual partners, the prevalence of oral HPV among this largely Black population with lower socioeconomic status was high. PMID:26600158

  8. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection & risk factors for HCV positivity in injecting & non-injecting drug users attending a de-addiction centre in northern India

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Debasish; Sharma, Arun Kumar; Gupta, Sunil; Nebhinani, Naresh; Kumar, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Injecting drug use is a major route of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in India, but there may be other risk factors also. This study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody in injecting drug users (IDUs) vs. non-IDUs (NIDUs), and to study the risk estimates for HCV seropositivity in the total sample of substance users with regard to various demographic, clinical, behavioural and personality factors. Methods: The IDUs (n = 201) and NIDUs (n = 219) were assessed for demographic, clinical and behavioural information, and were rated on instruments for severity of dependence, risk behaviour and personality profiles. Anti-HCV antibody was tested by ELISA and confirmed by recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) test. Results: Almost one-third of the IDUs (64 of 201; 31.8%) were positive for anti-HCV antibody, as opposed to only seven (3.2%) of the NIDUs. The four risk factors strongly associated with HCV positivity in multivariate analysis were sharing syringe [Exp(B) 75.04; 95%CI 18.28-307.96; P<0.001], reuse of injection accessories (16.39; 3.51-76.92; P<0.001), blood transfusion (5.88; 1.63-21.23; P=0.007) and IDU status (3.60; 1.26-10.31; P=0.017). Other variables less strongly but significantly associated with HCV positivity were multiple sex partners, opioid dependence, risk behaviour scores, impulsivity, and lower age of onset of drug use. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed a high seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody in IDUs. In the substance users, HCV positivity was significantly and independently associated with several clinical, behavioural, and personality risk factors. PMID:26458347

  9. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Tam, V.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials for an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP. METHODS: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model discrimination was performed, by minimizing the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), maximizing the coefficient of determination (r˛) and by comparison of the quality of fit plots. RESULTS: The best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition after INSCOP administration (minimal AIC =907.2) consisted of one compartment for plasma, saliva and urine respectively that were inter-connected with different rate constants. The estimated values of PK parameters were compiled in Table 1. The model fitting exercises revealed a nonlinear PK for scopolamine between plasma and saliva compartments for K21, Vmax and Km. CONCLUSION: PK model for INSCOP was developed and for the first time it satisfactorily predicted the PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after INSCOP administration. Using non-linear PK yielded the best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition between plasma and saliva compartments, and inclusion of non-linear PK resulted in a significant improved model fitting. The model can be utilized to predict scopolamine plasma concentration using saliva and/or urine data that allows non-invasive assessment of pharmacotherapeutics of scopolamine in space and other remote environments without requiring blood sampling.

  10. Sysmex UF-1000i performance for screening yeasts in urine.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, José; Riazzo, Cristina; Sanbonmatsu, Sara; de Dios Luna, Juan; Sorlózano, Antonio; Miranda, Consuelo; Navarro, José María

    2014-04-01

    We tested the capacity of the Sysmex UF-1000i system to detect yeasts in urine by screening a total of 22 132 urine samples received for culture in our microbiology laboratory during 1 year. We also analyzed different dilutions of previously filtered urine inoculated with a strain of Candida albicans. With clinical samples, a single cut-off point of 50 yeast-like cells (YLCs)/?L detected candiduria ?10 000 colony forming units (CFU)/mL and >100 000 CFU/mL with a sensitivity of 87.3%/95.4%, a specificity of 97%, a negative predictive value of 95.9%, and a positive predictive value of 9.3%/5.7%. With the simulated samples, a linear relationship was observed between the dilution factor and the number of cells detected by UF-1000i. This instrument appears to be able to reliably rule out candiduria of a magnitude of at least 10 000 CFU/mL and facilitate urine sample screening, thereby providing fast results. The Sysmex UF1000i system can be adapted for candiduria screening by the use of an appropriate YLCs/?L cut-off point that takes account of the prevalence of candiduria in the population. PMID:23919730

  11. A simple high performance liquid chromatography method for determination of rebamipide in rat urine.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Dustin L; Harirforoosh, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Rebamipide is a mucoprotective agent commonly used to prevent nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastrointenstinal side effects [1]. Human plasma and urine analysis of rebamipide utilizing high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) have been reported [2]. Recently, we reported on the plasma levels of rebamipide in presense or absence of celecoxib or diclofenac in rats [3] using a modified HPLC method of detection developed by Jeoung et al. [4]. To tailor the method towards use in urinary rebamipide extraction and analysis, the following modifications were made:•To compensate for high concentrations of rebamipide found in urine, a new rebamipide stock solution was prepared with a final concentration of 50,000 ng/mL.•Rat urine calibration standards were obtained within the range of 50-1000 ng/mL and 1000-50,000 ng/mL.•Plasma samples were replaced with urine samples. PMID:26150934

  12. A simple high performance liquid chromatography method for determination of rebamipide in rat urine

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dustin L.; Harirforoosh, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Rebamipide is a mucoprotective agent commonly used to prevent nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastrointenstinal side effects [1]. Human plasma and urine analysis of rebamipide utilizing high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) have been reported [2]. Recently, we reported on the plasma levels of rebamipide in presense or absence of celecoxib or diclofenac in rats [3] using a modified HPLC method of detection developed by Jeoung et al. [4]. To tailor the method towards use in urinary rebamipide extraction and analysis, the following modifications were made:•To compensate for high concentrations of rebamipide found in urine, a new rebamipide stock solution was prepared with a final concentration of 50,000 ng/mL.•Rat urine calibration standards were obtained within the range of 50–1000 ng/mL and 1000–50,000 ng/mL.•Plasma samples were replaced with urine samples. PMID:26150934

  13. A history of urine microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-11-01

    The naked-eye appearance of the urine must have been studied by shamans and healers since the Stone Age, and an elaborate interpretation of so-called Uroscopy began around 600 AD as a form of divination. A 1000 years later, the first primitive monocular and compound microscopes appeared in the Netherlands, and along with many other objects and liquids, urine was studied from around 1680 onwards as the enlightenment evolved. However, the crude early instruments did not permit fine study because of chromatic and linear/spherical blurring. Only after complex multi-glass lenses which avoided these problems had been made and used in the 1820s in London by Lister, and in Paris by Chevalier and Amici, could urinary microscopy become a practical, clinically useful tool in the 1830s. Clinical urinary microscopy was pioneered by Rayer and his pupils in Paris (especially Vigla), in the late 1830s, and spread to UK and Germany in the 1840s, with detailed descriptions and interpretations of cells and formed elements of the urinary sediment by Nasse, Henle, Robinson and Golding Bird. Classes were held, most notably by Donné in Paris. After another 50 years, optical microscopy had reached its apogee, with magnifications of over 1000 times obtainable free of aberration, using immersion techniques. Atlases of the urinary sediment were published in all major European countries and in the US. Polarised light and phase contrast was used also after 1900 to study urine, and by the early 20th century, photomicroscopy (pioneered by Donné and Daguerre 50 years previously, but then ignored) became usual for teaching and recording. In the 1940s electron microscopy began, followed by detection of specific proteins and cells using immunofluorescent antibodies. All this had been using handheld methodology. Around 1980, machine-assisted observations began, and have dominated progress since. PMID:26079823

  14. Prevalence of heroin markers in urine for pain management patients.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julie; Puet, Brandi L; DePriest, Anne; Heltsley, Rebecca; Hild, Cheryl; Black, David L; Robert, Timothy; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

    2014-10-01

    Surveys of current trends indicate heroin abuse is associated with nonmedical use of pain relievers. Consequently, there is an interest in evaluating the presence of heroin-specific markers in chronic pain patients who are prescribed controlled substances. A total of 926,084 urine specimens from chronic pain patients were tested for heroin/diacetylmorphine (DAM), 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), 6-acetylcodeine (6AC), codeine (COD), and morphine (MOR). Heroin and markers were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Opiates were analyzed following hydrolysis using LC-MS-MS. The prevalence of heroin use was 0.31%, as 2871 were positive for one or more heroin-specific markers including DAM, 6AM, or 6AC (a known contaminant of illicit heroin). Of these, 1884 were additionally tested for the following markers of illicit drug use: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methamphetamine (MAMP), 11-nor-9-carboxy-?(9)-tetracannabinol (THCCOOH), and benzoylecgonine (BZE); 654 (34.7%) had positive findings for one or more of these analytes. The overall prevalence of heroin markers were as follows: DAM 1203 (41.9%), 6AM 2570 (89.5%), 6AC 1082 (37.7%). MOR was present in 2194 (76.4%) and absent (positive specimens. COD was present in 1218 (42.4%) specimens. Prevalence of combinations for specimens containing MOR were as follows: DAM only 13 (0.59%), 6AM only 1140 (52.0%), 6AC only 24 (1.1%), DAM/6AM/6AC 710 (32.4%), 6AM/6AC 188 (8.6%), DAM/6AM 113 (5.2%), DAM/6AC 6 (0.27%). Importantly, the prevalence of combinations for specimens without MOR were as follows: DAM only 161 (23.8%), 6AM only 217 (32.1%), 6AC only 92 (13.6%), DAM/6AM/6AC 50 (7.4%), 6AM/6AC 7 (1.0%), DAM/6AM 145 (21.4%), DAM/6AC 5 (0.74%). Unexpected patterns of excretion were observed, such as the presence of DAM and 6AC in the absence of 6AM and MOR; therefore, multiple heroin markers may be useful to assess for heroin use. PMID:24858136

  15. 49 CFR 219.603 - Participation in drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.603 Participation...of this part, require a covered employee selected through the random testing program to cooperate in urine testing to determine...

  16. 49 CFR 219.603 - Participation in drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.603 Participation...of this part, require a covered employee selected through the random testing program to cooperate in urine testing to determine...

  17. 49 CFR 219.603 - Participation in drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.603 Participation...of this part, require a covered employee selected through the random testing program to cooperate in urine testing to determine...

  18. 49 CFR 219.603 - Participation in drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.603 Participation...of this part, require a covered employee selected through the random testing program to cooperate in urine testing to determine...

  19. 49 CFR 219.603 - Participation in drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.603 Participation...of this part, require a covered employee selected through the random testing program to cooperate in urine testing to determine...

  20. Social-structural contexts of needle and syringe sharing behaviours of HIV-positive injecting drug users in Manipur, India: a mixed methods investigation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few investigations have assessed risk behaviours and social-structural contexts of risk among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Northeast India, where injecting drug use is the major route of HIV transmission. Investigations of risk environments are needed to inform development of effective risk reduction interventions. Methods This mixed methods study of HIV-positive IDUs in Manipur included a structured survey (n = 75), two focus groups (n = 17), seven in-depth interviews, and two key informant interviews. Results One-third of survey participants reported having shared a needle/syringe in the past 30 days; among these, all the men and about one-third of the women did so with persons of unknown HIV serostatus. A variety of social-structural contextual factors influenced individual risk behaviours: barriers to carrying sterile needles/syringes due to fear of harassment by police and "anti-drug" organizations; lack of sterile needles/syringes in drug dealers' locales; limited access to pharmacy-sold needles/syringes; inadequate coverage by needle and syringe programmes (NSPs); non-availability of sterile needles/syringes in prisons; and withdrawal symptoms superseding concern for health. Some HIV-positive IDUs who shared needles/syringes reported adopting risk reduction strategies: being the 'last receiver' of needles/syringes and not a 'giver;' sharing only with other IDUs they knew to be HIV-positive; and, when a 'giver,' asking other IDUs to wash used needles/syringes with bleach before using. Conclusions Effective HIV prevention and care programmes for IDUs in Northeast India may hinge on several enabling contexts: supportive government policy on harm reduction programmes, including in prisons; an end to harassment by the police, army, and anti-drug groups, with education of these entities regarding harm reduction, creation of partnerships with the public health sector, and accountability to government policies that protect IDUs' human rights; adequate and sustained funding for NSPs to cover all IDU populations, including prisoners; and non-discriminatory access by IDUs to affordable needles/syringes in pharmacies. PMID:21569478

  1. Urine proteomics in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Steven C; Page, Eugenia K; Knechtle, Stuart J

    2014-01-01

    The transplanted kidney, through its urinary output, provides a medium through which the molecular constitution can provide insight into either the healthy function or developing dysfunction of a newly transplanted organ. An assay that would detect the aberration of early biomarkers of allograft injury using only urine samples from patients would provide many advantages over the current use of creatinine and tissue biopsies, as these means are either relatively non-specific or very invasive. Several urine biomarkers have been correlated with allograft injury, including CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL2, NGAL, IL-18, cystatin C, KIM-1 and Tim-3. The recent results of the CTOT-01 trial serve to validate the predictive value of the CXCL9 biomarker as a non-invasive biomarker for rejection and a prognostic indicator of graft function. There is now a preponderance of evidence showing a value of urinary monitoring of CXCL9 and CXCL10 with respect to detection of acute kidney allograft rejection. The value of the assay has been validated as a means of reducing the need for kidney transplant biopsy and applying biopsy in a more targeted manner. Additional goals for non-invasive monitoring would include predictive value prior to creatinine elevation that in turn would permit earlier, preemptive treatment of rejection. PMID:24321302

  2. Drug-induced urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Urinary incontinence can have a significant impact on patients' quality of life. Some causes involve physiologic and structural disorders of the urinary system. Other causes do not directly affect the urinary system but are related to difficulties in reacting to the urge to urinate or getting to the toilet alone, or an increase in urine output. Toxic substances or drugs are sometimes implicated. Drugs that affect one or more of the components of the normal continence mechanism expose patients to the risk of urinary incontinence. Some of these drugs act on the urinary system, particularly the autonomic nervous system; some increase urine output; some impair physical or cognitive function; and others cause urinary retention, leading to overflow incontinence. Drugs known to cause urinary incontinence are often prescribed for older patients, who are already at increased risk: sedatives, neuroleptics, antidepressants, cholinesterase inhibitors used in Alzheimer's disease, diuretics, alpha blockers used in hypertension or benign prostatic hyperplasia, and menopausal hormone replacement therapy. PMID:26240882

  3. Bladder Cancer Biomarker Discovery Using Global Metabolomic Profiling of Urine

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Bryan M.; Stirdivant, Steven M.; Mitchell, Matthew W.; Wulff, Jacob E.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Li, Zhen; Dennis-Barrie, Aphrihl; Neri, Bruce P.; Milburn, Michael V.; Lotan, Yair; Wolfert, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is a common malignancy worldwide and has a high probability of recurrence after initial diagnosis and treatment. As a result, recurrent surveillance, primarily involving repeated cystoscopies, is a critical component of post diagnosis patient management. Since cystoscopy is invasive, expensive and a possible deterrent to patient compliance with regular follow-up screening, new non-invasive technologies to aid in the detection of recurrent and/or primary bladder cancer are strongly needed. In this study, mass spectrometry based metabolomics was employed to identify biochemical signatures in human urine that differentiate bladder cancer from non-cancer controls. Over 1000 distinct compounds were measured including 587 named compounds of known chemical identity. Initial biomarker identification was conducted using a 332 subject sample set of retrospective urine samples (cohort 1), which included 66 BCa positive samples. A set of 25 candidate biomarkers was selected based on statistical significance, fold difference and metabolic pathway coverage. The 25 candidate biomarkers were tested against an independent urine sample set (cohort 2) using random forest analysis, with palmitoyl sphingomyelin, lactate, adenosine and succinate providing the strongest predictive power for differentiating cohort 2 cancer from non-cancer urines. Cohort 2 metabolite profiling revealed additional metabolites, including arachidonate, that were higher in cohort 2 cancer vs. non-cancer controls, but were below quantitation limits in the cohort 1 profiling. Metabolites related to lipid metabolism may be especially interesting biomarkers. The results suggest that urine metabolites may provide a much needed non-invasive adjunct diagnostic to cystoscopy for detection of bladder cancer and recurrent disease management. PMID:25541698

  4. The identification of tuberculosis biomarkers in human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Young, Brandy L; Mlamla, Zandile; Gqamana, Putuma P; Smit, Salome; Roberts, Teri; Peter, Jonathan; Theron, Grant; Govender, Ureshnie; Dheda, Keertan; Blackburn, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    We aimed to determine whether shotgun proteomic approaches could be used to identify tuberculosis (TB)-specific biomarkers in the urine of well-characterised patients with active TB versus no TB. Patients with suspected TB (n=63) were classified as: definite TB (Mycobacterium tuberculosis positive culture, n=21); presumed latent-TB infection (LTBI) (M. tuberculosis negative culture, no radiological features of active TB, a positive QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT) test and a positive T-SPOT.TB test, n=24); and presumed non-TB/non-LTBI (M. tuberculosis negative culture, no radiological features of active TB, a negative QFT-IT test and a negative T-SPOT.TB test, n=18). Urine proteins, in the range of 3-50 kDa, were collected, separated by a one-dimensional SDS-PAGE gel and digested using trypsin, after which high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the urinary proteome. 10 mycobacterial proteins were observed exclusively in the urine of definite TB patients, while six mycobacterial proteins were found exclusively in the urine of presumed LTBI patients. In addition, a gene ontology enrichment analysis identified a panel of 20 human proteins that were significant discriminators (p<0.05) for TB disease compared to no TB disease. Furthermore, seven common human proteins were differentially over- or under-expressed in the TB versus the non-TB group. These biomarkers hold promise for the development of new point-of-care diagnostics for TB. PMID:24743962

  5. Urine specimen collection following consensual intercourse - A forensic evidence collection method for Y-DNA and spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Joki-Erkkilä, Minna; Tuomisto, Sari; Seppänen, Mervi; Huhtala, Heini; Ahola, Arja; Karhunen, Pekka J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the prospective research was to evaluate the benefit of urine specimen as a collection technique for biological forensic evidence in adult volunteers following consensual intercourse. For detecting Y-chromosomal material Buccal Swab Spin Protocol(®) was used in DNA extraction and purification and samples were analysed with Quantifiler Y Human Male DNA Quantification Kit(®). The time frame for positive Y-DNA was evaluated. Immediate microscopy for detection of spermatozoa was performed. Y-DNA was detected in 173/205 (84.4%) urine samples. Of the 86 first post-coital void urine samples available, Y-DNA was detected in 83 (96.5%) specimens. Of the 119 urine samples from volunteers with post-coital activities Y-DNA was still measurable in 70 (58.8%) urine specimens. The male DNA amount was below 0.023 ng/?l in 28/153 (18.3%) urine samples. Of the 22 urine samples obtained after 24 post-coital hours, 9 (40.9%) were still Y-DNA positive. No associations were found between coital durance, coital frequency during the past two weeks prior to the study intercourse, post-coital activities, and the urine sample Y-DNA positivity. Of the 111 urine samples where the immediate microscopy was performed, in 66 (59.5%) samples spermatozoa were verified and one sample even contained motile spermatozoa. Microscopy detected 66 (67.3%) and failed to detect spermatozoa in 32 (32.7%) of Y-DNA positive samples. In addition to conventional invasive swab techniques, urine samples seem to be an effective biological trace collection method for Y-DNA and spermatozoa within 24 h following penile-vaginal penetration. Furthermore, it may be considered as a non-invasive collection method in suspected acute child sexual abuse cases to diminish time delay in forensic evidence collection and to improve patients' positive attitudes towards evidence collection. PMID:26580725

  6. 49 CFR 40.13 - How do DOT drug and alcohol tests relate to non-DOT tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... drugs, and a laboratory is prohibited from making a DOT urine specimen available for a DNA test or other... a blood or urine specimen collected by the employee's physician or a DNA test result purporting...

  7. 49 CFR 40.13 - How do DOT drug and alcohol tests relate to non-DOT tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... drugs, and a laboratory is prohibited from making a DOT urine specimen available for a DNA test or other... a blood or urine specimen collected by the employee's physician or a DNA test result purporting...

  8. 49 CFR 40.13 - How do DOT drug and alcohol tests relate to non-DOT tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... drugs, and a laboratory is prohibited from making a DOT urine specimen available for a DNA test or other... a blood or urine specimen collected by the employee's physician or a DNA test result purporting...

  9. 49 CFR 40.13 - How do DOT drug and alcohol tests relate to non-DOT tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... drugs, and a laboratory is prohibited from making a DOT urine specimen available for a DNA test or other... a blood or urine specimen collected by the employee's physician or a DNA test result purporting...

  10. 49 CFR 40.13 - How do DOT drug and alcohol tests relate to non-DOT tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... drugs, and a laboratory is prohibited from making a DOT urine specimen available for a DNA test or other... a blood or urine specimen collected by the employee's physician or a DNA test result purporting...

  11. Urine Output Assessment as a Clinical Quality Measure.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Urine output (UO) is a relevant marker of kidney function and an independent marker of serum creatinine. Although oliguria can be the result of transitory changes in volume status or due to external influences, such as drug administration, UO is currently included as a criterion to diagnose and stage acute kidney injury (AKI). In clinical practice, the potential of earlier alert of kidney injury with frequent assessment of UO can help patient screening and risk assessment. In this review, we will discuss recent studies applying UO for AKI diagnosis and prognostication and propose methods to assess UO and improve quality of care. PMID:26673635

  12. Differential Predictors of Medication Adherence in HIV: Findings from a Sample of African American and Caucasian HIV-Positive Drug-Using Adults

    PubMed Central

    Moizel, Jennifer; Panos, Stella E.; Patel, Sapna M.; Byrd, Desiree A.; Myers, Hector F.; Wyatt, Gail E.; Hinkin, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Modest or even occasional nonadherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can result in adverse clinical outcomes. African Americans demonstrate lower rates of adherence than Caucasians or Latinos. Identifying factors that influence medication adherence among African Americans is a critical step toward reducing HIV/AIDS disease progression and mortality. In a sample of 181 African American (n=144) and Caucasian (n=37) HIV-positive drug-using individuals [age (M=42.31; SD=6.6) education (M=13.41; SD=2.1)], we examined the influence of baseline drug use, literacy, neurocognition, depression, treatment-specific social support, and patient satisfaction with health care provider on medication adherence averaged over the course of 6 months (study dates 2002–2006). Our findings suggest differential baseline predictors of medication adherence for African Americans and Caucasians, such that patient satisfaction with provider was the strongest predictor of follow-up medication adherence for African Americans whereas for Caucasians depressive symptoms and treatment-specific social support were predictive of medication adherence (after controlling for duration of drug use). PMID:22889235

  13. Measurement of Menadione in urine by HPLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Menadione may be an important metabolite of vitamin K that is excreted in urine. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with a C30 column, fluorescence detection and post-column zinc reduction was developed to measure menadione in urine. The mobile phase was composed of 95% methanol...

  14. Advanced imaging technique for automated classification of casts and crystals in urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Amit S.; Castleman, Kenneth; Milner, Thomas E.; Rylander, H. Grady

    2007-02-01

    We present the development and demonstration of a novel technique for microscopic analysis of urine particles. Casts and crystals in urine are indicative of clinically important abnormalities. Current urinalysis techniques using flow cytometry and image analysis are limited by their inability to detect, identify and classify crystals and casts. Casts, crystals and yeast cells reported by current automated urine particle analyzers must be confirmed by a second microscopic review involving a human operator to prevent false positives. Human examination of suspect urine samples is resource intensive and time consuming. We introduce a new imaging method to add functionality for recognition of casts and crystals in urine. Our approach uses a polarization microscopy technique to aid classification of crystals, casts and other urine particles. Crystals and casts in urine exhibit unique interference patterns when imaged using a fixed polarizer and analyzer in a crossed configuration. These interference patterns are a measure of birefringence (retardation angle) of the cast or crystal being imaged. Preliminary experiments indicate that uric acid shows a polarization color, and larger crystals exhibit a series of concentric black lines. We show that these unique 'signatures' when used in conjunction with a hierarchical pattern recognition technique can reliably classify the analytes with improved accuracy. The new imaging technique combined with the classification algorithm can address the shortcomings of current urinalysis techniques; and provide quicker and more accurate results.

  15. Challenges for environmental epidemiology research: are biomarker concentrations altered by kidney function or urine concentration adjustment?

    PubMed

    Weaver, Virginia M; Kotchmar, Dennis J; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2016-01-01

    Biomonitoring has become a standard approach for exposure assessment in occupational and environmental epidemiology. The use of biological effect markers to identify early adverse changes in target organs has also become widely adopted. However, the potential for kidney function to affect biomarker levels in the body and the optimal approach to adjustment of biomarker concentrations in spot urine samples for hydration status are two important but underappreciated challenges associated with biomarker use. Several unexpected findings, such as positive associations between urine nephrotoxicant levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), have been reported recently in research using biomarkers. These and other findings, discussed herein, suggest an impact of kidney glomerular filtration or tubule processing on biomarker levels. This is more commonly raised in the context of decreased kidney filtration, traditionally referred to as reverse causality; however, recent data suggest that populations with normal kidney filtration may be affected as well. Misclassification bias would result if biomarkers reflect kidney function as well as either exposures or early biological effect outcomes. Furthermore, urine biomarker associations with eGFR that differ markedly by approach used to adjust for urine concentration have been reported. Associations between urine measures commonly used for this adjustment, such as urine creatinine, and specific research outcomes could alter observed biomarker associations with outcomes. Research recommendations to address the potential impact of kidney function and hydration status adjustment on biomarkers are provided, including a range of approaches to study design, exposure and outcome assessment, and adjustment for urine concentration. PMID:25736163

  16. Diagnostic aids for the detection of urine in the equine ejaculate.

    PubMed

    Althouse, G C; Seager, S W; Varner, D D; Webb, G W

    1989-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate three commercially available test kits, the Azostix, Multistix and Uric-acid test, for the detection of urine in the equine ejaculate. Azostix, which tests for urea nitrogen, consistently detected urine in the equine ejaculate. Urine contamination was evident when a color change occurred in the reagent pad, going from yellow to green after 10 sec of exposure. The sensitivity of Azostix to urea nitrogen in contaminated samples was 39 mg/dl. The Multistix test kit also successfully detected urine in semen. In the Multistix nitrite pad the color changed from yellow to organge after 3.5 min of exposure to urine-contaminated semen. The Uricacid test kit did not accurately detect urine-contaminated samples. It constantly elicited false positive results in all the control trials. The results of this study show that Azostix and Multistix are cost effective ($1.25 per analysis) and accurate diagnostic aids for detecting urine in the stallion ejaculate. PMID:16726631

  17. [Determination of coproporphyrin in urine].

    PubMed

    Grubina, L A; Gurinovich, I F; Shishporenok, S I

    1991-01-01

    Methods for urinary coproporphyrin measurements are analyzed. Data obtained by two methods, spectrophotometry and fluorescent method, are presented, the advantages and shortcomings of both are discussed. The authors recommend the fluorescent technique as a universal rapid method for wide medical practice. The problem of the units of coproporphyrin measurement is also discussed. The authors suggest replacing measurements per g of creatinine or daily portion by estimation of the coproporphyrin index in the morning portion of the urine. Study of the effects of various factors (climatic conditions, nutrition, patient's age and sex) on normal coproporphyrin excretion from the body has demonstrated that these factors do not noticeably influence porphyrin metabolism; for normal subjects the coproporphyrin index varies from 30 to 110 micrograms/day. PMID:1710719

  18. Novel Imidazoline Antimicrobial Scaffold That Inhibits DNA Replication with Activity against Mycobacteria and Drug Resistant Gram-Positive Cocci

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial antimicrobial resistance is an escalating public health threat, yet the current antimicrobial pipeline remains alarmingly depleted, making the development of new antimicrobials an urgent need. Here, we identify a novel, potent, imidazoline antimicrobial compound, SKI-356313, with bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Gram-positive cocci, including vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). SKI-356313 is active in murine models of Streptococcus pneumoniae and MRSA infection and is potently bactericidal for both replicating and nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. Using a combination of genetics, whole genome sequencing, and a novel target ID approach using real time imaging of core macromolecular biosynthesis, we show that SKI-356313 inhibits DNA replication and displaces the replisome from the bacterial nucleoid. These results identify a new antimicrobial scaffold with a novel mechanism of action and potential therapeutic utility against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and antibiotic resistant Gram-positive cocci. PMID:25222597

  19. Nanoparticle mediated drug delivery of rolipram to tyrosine kinase B positive cells in the inner ear with targeting peptides and agonistic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Pritz, Christian O.; Roy, Soumen; Dudas, Jozsef; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Systemic pharmacotherapies have limitation due to blood-labyrinth barrier, so local delivery via the round window membrane opens a path for effective treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticle (NP)-mediated cell specific drug delivery may enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. Different NPs with ligands to target TrkB receptor were tested. Distribution, uptake mechanisms, trafficking, and bioefficacy of drug release of rolipram loaded NPs were evaluated. Methods: We tested lipid based nanocapsules (LNCs), Quantum Dot, silica NPs with surface modification by peptides mimicking TrkB or TrkB activating antibodies. Bioefficacy of drug release was tested with rolipram loaded LNCs to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We established different cell culture models with SH-SY-5Y and inner ear derived cell lines and used neonatal and adult mouse explants. Uptake and trafficking was evaluated with FACS and confocal as well as transmission electron microscopy. Results: Plain NPs show some selectivity in uptake related to the in vitro system properties, carrier material, and NP size. Some peptide ligands provide enhanced targeted uptake to neuronal cells but failed to show this in cell cultures. Agonistic antibodies linked to silica NPs showed TrkB activation and enhanced binding to inner ear derived cells. Rolipram loaded LNCs proved as effective carriers to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Discussion: Most NPs with targeting ligands showed limited effects to enhance uptake. NP aggregation and unspecific binding may change uptake mechanisms and impair endocytosis by an overload of NPs. This may affect survival signaling. NPs with antibodies activate survival signaling and show effective binding to TrkB positive cells but needs further optimization for specific internalization. Bioefficiacy of rolipram release confirms LNCs as encouraging vectors for drug delivery of lipophilic agents to the inner ear with ideal release characteristics independent of endocytosis. PMID:26042029

  20. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 40 - DOT Standards for Urine Collection Kits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false DOT Standards for Urine Collection Kits A Appendix A to Part 40 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. A Appendix A to Part 40—DOT Standards for...

  1. Urine Test: Microalbumin-to-Creatinine Ratio (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Urine Test: 24-Hour Analysis for Kidney Stones Long-Term Complications of Diabetes Diabetes Center Urine Test: Microscopic ... Diseases Kidney Disease Diabetes Center Urine Test (Video) Long-Term Complications of Diabetes Kidneys and Urinary Tract Contact ...

  2. Quantitative PCR detection of feline morbillivirus in cat urine samples.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Tetsuya; Wachi, Akiko; Sassa, Yukiko; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Nagai, Makoto; Fukushima, Ryuji; Shibutani, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Uematsu, Yosuke; Shirota, Kinji; Mizutani, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Feline morbillivirus (FmoPV) is a new virus species and its detection is important, since correlation has been reported between FmoPV virus infection and tubulointerstitial nephritis in cats. Here, we report a real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR system that can detect the FmoPV L-gene sequence with more than 10-time higher sensitivity than a conventional PCR system, resulting in detection of less than 10 copies of the template DNA. The total FmoPV positive rate of urine samples from veterinary clinics and hospitals in Japan was 15.1% (25/166) using this system. This study demonstrates usefulness of the real-time RT-PCR system for detection of FmoPV for cat urine samples. PMID:26227478

  3. Determination of methaqualone and its metabolites in urine and blood by UV, GC/FID and GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Liu, Y T; Feng, C L; Luo, Y

    1994-01-01

    A systematic procedure for the determination of methaqualone and its metabolites in blood and urine by UV spectrophotometry, GC and GC/MS was developed. Urine and blood samples were from a suicidal patient who ingested 18 tablets of methaqualone. Both solid phase and liquid-liquid extractions were used in the extraction and clean-up of the samples. The total amount of methaqualone and its metabolites was measured by UV spectrophotometry. The amount of parent methaqualone was quantitated by GC/FID. Methaqualone and its 10 metabolites including two acetyl metabolites were found in urine and blood. This procedure is useful for monitoring drugs in emergency treatment. PMID:7985519

  4. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43...

  5. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43...

  6. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43...

  7. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43...

  8. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43...

  9. Testing for designer stimulants: metabolic profiles of 16 synthetic cathinones excreted free in human urine.

    PubMed

    Uralets, Victor; Rana, Sumandeep; Morgan, Stewart; Ross, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The study of 34,561 urine specimens, submitted for designer stimulant testing between February 2011 and January 2013, provided an opportunity: to estimate the range of synthetic cathinones (SC) abused in the USA, to observe multiple examples of metabolic profiles for each drug in various stages of excretion in human urine, to evaluate the extent of metabolism of specific SC and to select metabolites or parent drugs for routine testing. Sixteen SC were found in random patient samples: buphedrone; butylone; 3,4-dimethylmethcathinone; ethcathinone; N-ethylbuphedrone; ethylone; flephedrone; mephedrone; 4-methylbuphedrone; 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV); 4-methyl-N-ethylcathinone; methylone; pentedrone; pentylone; ?-pyrrolidinobutiophenone (PBP) and ?-pyrrolidinopentiophenone (PVP). After liquid/liquid extraction and trifluoroacetylation, specimens were screened by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for drugs and metabolites excreted free in urine. Each SC exhibited a characteristic metabolic profile, as shown by multiple examples. Metabolites' structures were postulated on the basis of their mass spectra. A large group of SC appears to metabolize extensively by carbonyl reduction into respective substituted ephedrines and further by N-dealkylation into norephedrines. Abundant metabolites in this group are essential markers of the parent drug use. Unchanged drugs are far less abundant or not found at all. SC with methylenedioxy attachment to the aromatic ring, metabolize by carbonyl reduction to a much lesser extent and are best detected as such in free urine fraction. PBP and PVP can be detected either unchanged or as metabolites, resulting from pyrrolidine ring degradation into primary amine followed by carbonyl reduction. MDPV appears in urine as such with no apparent free metabolites. PMID:24668489

  10. Routine Urine Culture at the Time of Percutaneous Urinary Drainage: Does Every Patient Need One?

    SciTech Connect

    Brody, L.A. Brown, K.T.; Covey, A.M.; Brown, A.E.; Getrajdman, G.I.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. To determine the clinical variables associated with bacteriuria in patients undergoing primary percutaneous antegrade urinary drainage procedures in order to predict the utility of routinely obtaining urine cultures at the time of the procedure. Methods. Between October 1995 and March 1998 urine cultures were prospectively obtained in all patients undergoing a primary percutaneous antegrade urinary drainage procedure. One hundred and eighty-seven patients underwent 264 procedures. Results were available in 252 cases. Culture results were correlated with clinical, laboratory, and demographic variables. Anaerobic cultures were not uniformly performed. Results. Urine cultures were positive in 24 of 252 (9.5%) cases. An indwelling or recently removed ipsilateral device (catheter or stent) and a history of previous cystectomy with urinary diversion were significant predictors of a positive culture. Patients without either of these predictors, and without clinical or laboratory evidence of infection, were rarely found to have positive cultures. Conclusion. The likelihood of a positive urine culture can be predicted on the basis of the aforementioned clinical variables. In the absence of these clinical indicators routine urine cultures are neither useful nor cost-effective.

  11. A field test for the estimation of chloroquine in urine*

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Gerhard

    1960-01-01

    The use of antimalarial drugs is indissolubly linked with the use of insecticides in malaria eradication campaigns and is, indeed, of quite particular importance in areas in which insecticides have for various reasons—such as acquired resistance by anophelines—proved to be of limited value or in which residual spraying has ceased and potential foci of infection must be suppressed. With the increasing use of chloroquine for mass prophylaxis it has become desirable to develop a reasonably simple technique for ensuring that the drug distributed is in fact taken regularly. The author describes a modification of a method first developed by him in 1950, which, although simpler than the original method, nevertheless permits the estimation of chloroquine in urine in amounts of 0.25-0.95 mg per 100 ml of urine. The equipment required, including a colorimeter needing no electrical current, is suitable for use in relatively primitive working conditions, and the test is designed for field application. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:13825563

  12. [Development of automatic urine monitoring system].

    PubMed

    Wei, Liang; Li, Yongqin; Chen, Bihua

    2014-03-01

    An automatic urine monitoring system is presented to replace manual operation. The system is composed of the flow sensor, MSP430f149 single chip microcomputer, human-computer interaction module, LCD module, clock module and memory module. The signal of urine volume is captured when the urine flows through the flow sensor and then displayed on the LCD after data processing. The experiment results suggest that the design of the monitor provides a high stability, accurate measurement and good real-time, and meets the demand of the clinical application. PMID:24941774

  13. Programmable probiotics for detection of cancer in urine

    PubMed Central

    Danino, Tal; Prindle, Arthur; Kwong, Gabriel A.; Skalak, Matthew; Li, Howard; Allen, Kaitlin; Hasty, Jeff; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in the forward engineering of genetic circuitry in living cells has positioned synthetic biology as a potential means to solve numerous biomedical problems, including disease diagnosis and therapy. One challenge in exploiting synthetic biology for translational applications is to engineer microbes that are well tolerated by patients and seamlessly integrate with existing clinical methods. We use the safe and widely used probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 to develop an orally administered diagnostic that can noninvasively indicate the presence of liver metastasis by producing easily detectable signals in urine. Our microbial diagnostic generated a high-contrast urine signal through selective expansion in liver metastases (106-fold enrichment) and high expression of a lacZ reporter maintained by engineering a stable plasmid system. The lacZ reporter cleaves a substrate to produce a small molecule that can be detected in urine. E. coli Nissle 1917 robustly colonized tumor tissue in rodent models of liver metastasis after oral delivery but did not colonize healthy organs or fibrotic liver tissue. We saw no deleterious health effects on the mice for more than 12 months after oral delivery. Our results demonstrate that probiotics can be programmed to safely and selectively deliver synthetic gene circuits to diseased tissue microenvironments in vivo. PMID:26019220

  14. Antiretroviral Drug-Related Liver Mortality Among HIV-Positive Persons in the Absence of Hepatitis B or C Virus Coinfection: The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs Study

    PubMed Central

    Kovari, Helen; Sabin, Caroline A.; Ledergerber, Bruno; Ryom, Lene; Worm, Signe W.; Smith, Colette; Phillips, Andrew; Reiss, Peter; Fontas, Eric; Petoumenos, Kathy; De Wit, Stéphane; Morlat, Philippe; Lundgren, Jens D.; Weber, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Background.?Liver diseases are the leading causes of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive persons since the widespread use of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). Most of these deaths are due to hepatitis C (HCV) or B (HBV) virus coinfections. Little is known about other causes. Prolonged exposure to some antiretroviral drugs might increase hepatic mortality. Methods.?All patients in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study without HCV or HBV coinfection were prospectively followed from date of entry until death or last follow-up. In patients with liver-related death, clinical charts were reviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results.?We followed 22 910 participants without hepatitis virus coinfection for 114 478 person-years. There were 12 liver-related deaths (incidence, 0.10/1000 person-years); 7 due to severe alcohol use and 5 due to established ART-related toxicity. The rate of ART-related deaths in treatment-experienced persons was 0.04/1000 person-years (95% confidence interval, .01, .10). Conclusions.?We found a low incidence of liver-related deaths in HIV-infected persons without HCV or HBV coinfection. Liver-related mortality because of ART-related toxicity was rare. PMID:23090925

  15. Blood in the Urine (Hematuria) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can cause hematuria, including: bladder or kidney infections kidney stones mineral imbalances in the urine abnormal development of ... Your Urinary System Your Kidneys Movie: Urinary System Kidney Stones Kidneys and Urinary Tract Glomerulonephritis Blood in the ...

  16. Waterless Urinals: Features, Benefits and Applications 

    E-print Network

    Bristow, G.; McClure, J. D.; Fisher, D.

    2004-01-01

    . Waterless, or no-flush urinals, may help mitigate these effects and offer other advantages, including lower utility charges, improved restroom hygiene, and decreased fixture maintenance. Some notable caveats include possible lack of acceptance by users, odor...

  17. Selective detection of bacteria in urine with a long-range surface plasmon waveguide biosensor.

    PubMed

    Béland, Paul; Krupin, Oleksiy; Berini, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Experimentation demonstrates long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides as a useful biosensor to selectively detect gram negative or gram positive bacteria in human urine having a low concentration of constituents. The biosensor can detect bacteria at concentrations of 10(5) CFU/ml, the internationally recommended threshold for diagnostic of urinary tract infection. Using a negative control urine solution of bacterial concentration 1000? higher than the targeted bacteria, we obtain a ratio of 5.4 for the positive to negative signals. PMID:26309755

  18. Selective detection of bacteria in urine with a long-range surface plasmon waveguide biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Béland, Paul; Krupin, Oleksiy; Berini, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Experimentation demonstrates long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides as a useful biosensor to selectively detect gram negative or gram positive bacteria in human urine having a low concentration of constituents. The biosensor can detect bacteria at concentrations of 105 CFU/ml, the internationally recommended threshold for diagnostic of urinary tract infection. Using a negative control urine solution of bacterial concentration 1000? higher than the targeted bacteria, we obtain a ratio of 5.4 for the positive to negative signals. PMID:26309755

  19. Simultaneous determination of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, doxorubicin, epirubicin and daunorubicin in human urine using high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry: bioanalytical method validation.

    PubMed

    Sottani, Cristina; Rinaldi, Paola; Leoni, Emanuela; Poggi, Guido; Teragni, Cristina; Delmonte, Angelo; Minoia, Claudio

    2008-09-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (rp-HPLC) system interfaced with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was developed and validated for the determination of cyclophosphamide (CP), ifosfamide (IF), daunorubicin (DNR), doxorubicin (DXR), and epirubicin (EPI) in human urine. The analysis of samples containing multiple analytes with a dissimilar range of polarities was carried out using a conventional reversed-phase chromatographic BDS Hypersil C8 column. The analytical run was 15 min. The triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was operated in positive ion mode and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was used for drug quantification. The method was validated over a concentration range of 0.2 to 4.0 microg.L(-1) for CP, IF, DXR, EPI and 0.15-2.0 microg.L(-1) for DNR in human urine. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.2 microg.L(-1) for CP, IF, EPI and was set at 0.3 and 0.15 microg.L(-1) for DXR and DNR, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSD%) were <11.2% for inter- and intra-day precisions. The overall accuracy was also within 114.7% for all analytes at the concentrations of the quality control samples. The potential of ionization suppression resulting from the endogenous biological material on the rp-HPLC/MS/MS method was evaluated and measured. The feasibility of the proposed HPLC/ESI-MS/MS procedure was demonstrated by analyzing urine samples from pharmacy technicians and nurses working in hospitals or personnel employed in drug-manufacturing plants. PMID:18666202

  20. Treatment processes for source-separated urine.

    PubMed

    Maurer, M; Pronk, W; Larsen, T A

    2006-10-01

    The separate collection and treatment of urine has attracted considerable attention in the engineering community in the last few years and is seen as a viable option for enhancing the flexibility of wastewater treatment systems. This comprehensive review focuses on the status of current urine treatment processes and summarises the properties of collected urine. We distinguish between seven main purposes of urine-treatment processes: hygienisation (storage), volume reduction (evaporation, freeze-thaw, reverse osmosis), stabilisation (acidification, nitrification), P-recovery (struvite formation), N-recovery (ion-exchange, ammonia stripping, isobutylaldehyde-diurea (IBDU) precipitation), nutrient removal (anammox) and handling of micropollutants (electrodialysis, nanofiltration, ozonation). The review shows clearly that a wide range of technical options is available to treat collected urine effectively, but that none of these single options can accomplish all seven purposes. Depending on the overall goal of the treatment process, a specific technical solution or a combination of solutions can be found to meet the requirements. Such combinations are not discussed in this paper unless they are explicitly presented in the literature. Except for 'evaporation' and 'storage', none of the processes described have so far advanced beyond the laboratory stage. Considerable development work remains to be done to optimise urine-processing techniques in order to create marketable products. PMID:16949123

  1. A Computational Method for Prediction of Excretory Proteins and Application to Identification of Gastric Cancer Markers in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Celine S.; Cui, Juan; Ni, Zhaohui; Su, Yingying; Puett, David; Li, Fan; Xu, Ying

    2011-01-01

    A novel computational method for prediction of proteins excreted into urine is presented. The method is based on the identification of a list of distinguishing features between proteins found in the urine of healthy people and proteins deemed not to be urine excretory. These features are used to train a classifier to distinguish the two classes of proteins. When used in conjunction with information of which proteins are differentially expressed in diseased tissues of a specific type versus control tissues, this method can be used to predict potential urine markers for the disease. Here we report the detailed algorithm of this method and an application to identification of urine markers for gastric cancer. The performance of the trained classifier on 163 proteins was experimentally validated using antibody arrays, achieving >80% true positive rate. By applying the classifier on differentially expressed genes in gastric cancer vs normal gastric tissues, it was found that endothelial lipase (EL) was substantially suppressed in the urine samples of 21 gastric cancer patients versus 21 healthy individuals. Overall, we have demonstrated that our predictor for urine excretory proteins is highly effective and could potentially serve as a powerful tool in searches for disease biomarkers in urine in general. PMID:21365014

  2. Pattern of Antibiotic Resistance Among Community Derived Isolates of Enterobacteriaceae Using Urine Sample: A Study From Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, Ayush; Kapil, Arti; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Misra, Puneet; Rai, Sanjay K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite world-wide evidence of increased antibiotic resistance, there is scarce data on antibiotic resistance in community settings. One of the reason being difficulty in collection of biological specimen (traditionally stool) in community from apparently healthy individuals. Hence, finding an alternative specimen that is easier to obtain in a community setting or in large scale surveys for the purpose, is crucial. We conducted this study to explore the feasibility of using urine samples for deriving community based estimates of antibiotic resistance and to estimate the magnitude of resistance among urinary isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonia against multiple antibiotics in apparently healthy individuals residing in a rural community of Haryana, North India. Materials and Methods Eligible individuals were apparently healthy, aged 18 years or older. Using the health management information system (HMIS) of Ballabgarh Health Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), sampling frame was prepared. Potential individuals were identified using simple random sampling. Random urine sample was collected in a sterile container and transported to laboratory under ambient condition. Species identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing for Enterobacteriaceae was done using Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute (CLSI) 2012 guidelines. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae, Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacteriaceae, and Carbapenem producing Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) were identified from the urine samples. Results A total of 433 individuals participated in the study (non-response rate – 13.4%), out of which 58 (13.4%) were positive for Enterobacteriaceae, 8.1% for E. coli and 5.3% for K. pneumoniae. Resistance against penicillin (amoxicillin/ampicillin) for E. coli and K. pneumoniae was 62.8% and 100.0% respectively. Isolates resistant to co-trimoxazole were 5.7% and 0.0% respectively. None of the isolates were resistant to imipenem, and meropenem. Conclusion and recommendations It is feasible to use urine sample to study magnitude of antibiotic resistance in population based surveys. At community level, resistance to amoxicillin was considerable, negligible for co-trimoxazole, and to higher antibiotics including carbapenems. PMID:26393150

  3. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Urine Lipoarabinomannan Test for Tuberculosis Screening in a South African Correctional Facility

    PubMed Central

    Hanifa, Yasmeen; Telisinghe, Lilanganee; Fielding, Katherine L.; Malden, Justin L.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Grant, Alison D.; Charalambous, Salome

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) antigen detection assay (Clearview TB-ELISA) to screen for tuberculosis in a South African correctional facility. Methods Between September 2009 and October 2010, male offenders were screened for tuberculosis (symptoms, chest radiograph, two spot sputum specimens for microscopy and culture), and urine tested for LAM. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of LAM were calculated using definite and probable tuberculosis combined as our gold standard. Findings 33/871 (3.8%) participants (26% HIV-positive) had tuberculosis. Amongst HIV-positive vs. HIV-negative offenders the sensitivity and specificity of LAM was 7.1% vs. 0% and 98.5% vs. 99.8% respectively. Conclusion Urine LAM ELISA has inadequate sensitivity for TB screening in this population. PMID:26010840

  4. Prenatal lignan exposures, pregnancy urine estrogen profiles and birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rong; Chen, Minjian; Zhou, Kun; Chen, Daozhen; Yu, Jing; Hu, Weiyue; Song, Ling; Hang, Bo; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2015-10-01

    During pregnancy, human exposure to endogenous estrogens and xenoestrogens (such as lignans) may comprehensively impact the gestational maintenance and fetal growth. We measured the concentrations of 5 lignans and the profile of 13 estrogen metabolites (EMs) in the urine samples of 328 pregnant women and examined their associations with birth outcomes. We found significantly positive associations between gestational age and urinary matairesinol (MAT), enterodiol (END) and enterolactone (ENL), as well as 16-hydroxylation pathway EMs. There were consistently positive relationships between END and the 16-hydroxylation pathway EMs. The positive relationships of MAT, END and ENL exposures with the length of gestation were mainly in the low exposure strata of the levels of these EMs. This study reveals that MAT, END and ENL as well as 16-hydroxylation pathway EMs are associated with birth outcomes, and that there are interactive relationships between lignans and 16-hydroxylation pathway EMs with birth outcomes. PMID:26093977

  5. Effect of Human Urine on Cell Cycle and Infectivity of Leismania Species Promastigotes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M.; Bagirova, Melahat; Elcicek, Serhat; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Oztel, Olga N.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro cultivation of Leishmania parasites plays an important role in diagnosis and treatment of leishmaniasis and in vaccine and drug development studies. Conversely, long-term cultivation of Leishmania parasites usually results in decreased infectivity potential. Some studies reported a stimulatory effect of human urine in Leishmania promastigotes. However, there is no information about the effects of urine within culture on the infectivity of Leishmania parasites. Analysis of the effect of urine have showed that proliferation indexes were significantly increased in culture medium supplemented with human urine (L. tropica = 38.17 ± 5.12, L. donovani = 34.74 ± 5.6, L. major = 34.22 ± 4.66, and L. infantum 35.88 ± 6.40) than in controls. Infection indexes were 13 ± 1.7 for L. tropica, 55 ± 2.2 for L. infantum, 41 ± 3.14 for L. donovani, and 49 ± 3.26 for L. major. Our results showed that human urine increased the infectivity and proliferation of Leishmania parasites. PMID:21976564

  6. Racial differences in the validity of self-reported drug use among men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA

    PubMed Central

    White, Darcy; Rosenberg, Eli S.; Cooper, Hannah L.F.; del Rio, Carlos; Sanchez, Travis H.; Salazar, Laura F.; Sullivan, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM), particularly young black MSM, are disproportionately affected in the United States’ HIV epidemic. Drug use may contribute to these disparities, yet previous studies have failed to provide evidence of elevated use among black MSM, relying exclusively on self-reported usage. This study uses biological assays to validate self-reports of drug use and explore the potential for misclassification to distort findings on racial patterns of use in this population. Methods From an Atlanta-based cohort study of 454 black and 349 white MSM from 2010 to 2012, participants’ self-reported drug use was compared to urine drug screening findings. The sensitivity of self-report was calculated as the proportion reporting recent usage among those who screened positive. Multivariable regression models were constructed to examine racial patterns in self-report, urine-detection, and self-report sensitivity of marijuana and cocaine usage, adjusted for socio-demographic factors. Results In analyses that adjusted for age, education, income, sexual orientation, and history of arrest, black MSM were less likely to report recent use of marijuana (P<0.001) and cocaine (P=0.02), but equally likely to screen positive for either drug. This discrepancy between self-reported and urine-detected drug use was explained by significantly lower sensitivity of self-report for black participants (P<0.001 for marijuana, P<0.05 for cocaine). Conclusions The contribution of individual drug-related risk behaviors to the HIV disparities between black and white MSM should be revisited with methods that validate self-reports of illegal drug use. PMID:24629628

  7. Differential Modulation of Thresholds for Intracranial Self-Stimulation by mGlu5 Positive and Negative Allosteric Modulators: Implications for Effects on Drug Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Cleva, Richard M.; Watterson, Lucas R.; Johnson, Meagan A.; Olive, M. Foster

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of the type 5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu5) receptor alters various addiction related behaviors such as drug self-administration and the extinction and reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. However, the effects of pharmacological modulation of mGlu5 receptors on brain reward function have not been widely investigated. We examined the effects of acute administration of positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively) on brain reward function by assessing thresholds for intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In addition, when acute effects were observed, we examined changes in ICSS thresholds following repeated administration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with bipolar electrodes into the medial forebrain bundle and trained to respond for ICSS, followed by assessment of effects of mGlu5 ligands on ICSS thresholds using a discrete trials current–intensity threshold determination procedure. Acute administration of the selective mGlu5 NAMs MTEP (0, 0.3, 1, or 3?mg/kg) and fenobam (0, 3, 10, or 30?mg/kg) dose-dependently increased ICSS thresholds (?70% at the highest dose tested), suggesting a deficit in brain reward function. Acute administration of the mGlu5 PAMs CDPPB (0, 10, 30, and 60?mg/kg) or ADX47273 (0, 10, 30, and 60?mg/kg) was without effect at any dose tested. When administered once daily for five consecutive days, the development of tolerance to the ability of threshold-elevating doses of MTEP and fenobam to increase ICSS thresholds was observed. We conclude that mGlu5 PAMs and NAMs differentially affect brain reward function, and that tolerance to the ability of mGlu5 NAMs to reduce brain reward function develops with repeated administration. These brain reward deficits should be taken into consideration when interpreting acute effects of mGlu5 NAMs on drug self-administration, and repeated administration of these ligands may be an effective method to reduce these deficits. PMID:22232603

  8. Extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) detection directly from urine samples with the rapid isothermal amplification-based eazyplex® SuperBug CRE assay: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Hini?, V; Ziegler, J; Straub, C; Goldenberger, D; Frei, R

    2015-12-01

    A commercially available assay (eazyplex® SuperBug CRE) detecting the most common carbapenemase and ESBL types was evaluated directly on 50 urine samples. Eazyplex® correctly detected ESBL-encoding genes in all 30 urine samples with confirmed ESBL production (sensitivity 100%). Two specimens showed invalid and one specimen false-positive results (specificity 97.9%). PMID:26506282

  9. Comparison of 3 Methods to Assess Urine Specific Gravity in Collegiate Wrestlers.

    PubMed

    Stuempfle, Kristin J.; Drury, Daniel G.

    2003-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the reliability and validity of refractometry, hydrometry, and reagent strips in assessing urine specific gravity in collegiate wrestlers. DESIGN AND SETTING: We assessed the reliability of refractometry, hydrometry, and reagent strips between 2 trials and among 4 testers. The validity of hydrometry and reagent strips was assessed by comparison with refractometry, the criterion measure for urine specific gravity. SUBJECTS: Twenty-one National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III collegiate wrestlers provided fresh urine samples. MEASUREMENTS: Four testers measured the specific gravity of each urine sample 6 times: twice by refractometry, twice by hydrometry, and twice by reagent strips. RESULTS: Refractometer measurements were consistent between trials (R =.998) and among testers; hydrometer measurements were consistent between trials (R =.987) but not among testers; and reagent-strip measurements were not consistent between trials or among testers. Hydrometer (1.018 +/- 0.006) and reagent-strip (1.017 +/- 0.007) measurements were significantly higher than refractometer (1.015 +/- 0.006) measurements. Intraclass correlation coefficients were moderate between refractometry and hydrometry (R =.869) and low between refractometry and reagent strips (R =.573). The hydrometer produced 28% false positives and 2% false negatives, and reagent strips produced 15% false positives and 9% false negatives. CONCLUSIONS: Only the refractometer should be used to determine urine specific gravity in collegiate wrestlers during the weight-certification process. PMID:14737213

  10. Cancer detection by native fluorescence of urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masilamani, Vadivel; Vijmasi, Trinka; Al Salhi, Mohammad; Govindaraj, Kanagaraj; Vijaya-Raghavan, Ayanam Parthasarathy; Antonisamy, Belavendra

    2010-09-01

    Because cancer is a dreaded disease, a number of techniques such as biomarker evaluation, mammograms, colposcopy, and computed tomography scan are currently employed for early diagnosis. Many of these are specific to a particular site, invasive, and often expensive. Hence, there is a definite need for a simple, generic, noninvasive protocol for cancer detection, comparable to blood and urine tests for diabetes. Our objective is to show the results of a novel study in the diagnosis of several cancer types from the native or intrinsic fluorescence of urine. We use fluorescence emission spectra (FES) and stokes shift spectra (SSS) to analyze the native fluorescence of the first voided urine samples of healthy controls (N=100) and those of cancer patients (N=50) of different etiology. We show that flavoproteins and porphyrins released into urine can act as generic biomarkers of cancer with a specificity of 92%, a sensitivity of 76%, and an overall accuracy of 86.7%. We employ FES and SSS for rapid and cost-effective quantification of certain intrinsic biomarkers in urine for screening and diagnosis of most common cancer types with an overall accuracy of 86.7%.

  11. Contingent Take-Home Incentive: Effects on Drug Use of Methadone Maintenance Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitzer, Maxine L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined contingent methadone take-home privileges for effectiveness in reducing supplemental drug use of methadone maintenance patients. Assigned 53 new intakes to begin receiving take-home privileges after 2 consecutive weeks of drug-free urines or to noncontingent procedure in which take-homes were delivered independently of urine results.…

  12. Solid-phase extraction and GC/MS confirmation of barbiturates from human urine.

    PubMed

    Pocci, R; Dixit, V; Dixit, V M

    1992-01-01

    A highly selective and sensitive procedure has been developed for isolating and identifying barbiturates in human urine. With a new disposable bonded silica gel solid-phase extraction (SPE) column and hexobarbital as an internal standard (IS), amobarbital, butabarbital, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, secobarbital, and methaqualone were selectively isolated from endogenous urine components. Capillary gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of the extracts generated a full mass spectrum for the detection, identification, and quantitation of barbiturates. Linear quantitative response curves for the drugs have been generated over a concentration range of 20-500 ng/mL. Overall extraction efficiencies for drugs averaged greater than 90%, and the quantitative response curves exhibited correlation coefficients of 0.996 to 0.999. PMID:1353548

  13. Determination of tuaminoheptane in doping control urine samples.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Sigmund, Gerd; Koch, Anja; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2007-01-01

    Since January 2007, the list of prohibited substances established by the World Anti-Doping Agency includes the sympathomimetic compound tuaminoheptane (1-methyl-hexylamine, 2-heptylamine). Primarily used as nasal decongestant drug it has been considered relevant for sports drug testing due to its stimulating properties. A confirmatory gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric procedure was developed including liquid-liquid extraction and imine formation of tuaminoheptane employing various aldehydes and ketones such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzaldehyde and acetone. Extraction and derivatisation conditions were optimised for utmost efficiency, and characteristic fragment ions obtained after electron ionisation allowed for a sensitive and selective analytical assay, which was validated with regard to recovery (50%), lower limit of detection (20 ng mL(-1)) as well as interday- and intraday precision (<15%). The applicability to authentic urine samples was demonstrated using administration study specimens obtained from two male persons using Rhinofluimucil (tuaminoheptane hemisulfate) for intranasal application. The administered drug was detected up to 46 h after repeated topical instillation of a total of approximately 3 mg. PMID:17881789

  14. A Very Low Geno2pheno False Positive Rate Is Associated with Poor Viro-Immunological Response in Drug-Naďve Patients Starting a First-Line HAART

    PubMed Central

    Armenia, Daniele; Soulie, Cathia; Di Carlo, Domenico; Fabeni, Lavinia; Gori, Caterina; Forbici, Federica; Svicher, Valentina; Bertoli, Ada; Sarmati, Loredana; Giuliani, Massimo; Latini, Alessandra; Boumis, Evangelo; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Bellagamba, Rita; Andreoni, Massimo; Marcelin, Anne-Genevičve; Calvez, Vincent; Antinori, Andrea; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Santoro, Maria Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously found that a very low geno2pheno false positive rate (FPR ?2%) defines a viral population associated with low CD4 cell count and the highest amount of X4-quasispecies. In this study, we aimed at evaluating whether FPR ?2% might impact on the viro-immunological response in HIV-1 infected patients starting a first-line HAART. Methods The analysis was performed on 305 HIV-1 B subtype infected drug-naďve patients who started their first-line HAART. Baseline FPR (%) values were stratified according to the following ranges: ?2; 2–5; 5–10; 10–20; 20–60; >60. The impact of genotypically-inferred tropism on the time to achieve immunological reconstitution (a CD4 cell count gain from HAART initiation ?150 cells/mm3) and on the time to achieve virological success (the first HIV-RNA measurement <50 copies/mL from HAART initiation) was evaluated by survival analyses. Results Overall, at therapy start, 27% of patients had FPR ?10 (6%, FPR ?2; 7%, FPR 2–5; 14%, FPR 5–10). By 12 months of therapy the rate of immunological reconstitution was overall 75.5%, and it was significantly lower for FPR ?2 (54.1%) in comparison to other FPR ranks (78.8%, FPR 2–5; 77.5%, FPR 5–10; 71.7%, FPR 10–20; 81.8%, FPR 20–60; 75.1%, FPR >60; p?=?0.008). The overall proportion of patients achieving virological success was 95.5% by 12 months of therapy. Multivariable Cox analyses showed that patients having pre-HAART FPR ?2% had a significant lower relative adjusted hazard [95% C.I.] both to achieve immunological reconstitution (0.37 [0.20–0.71], p?=?0.003) and to achieve virological success (0.50 [0.26–0.94], p?=?0.031) than those with pre-HAART FPR >60%. Conclusions Beyond the genotypically-inferred tropism determination, FPR ?2% predicts both a poor immunological reconstitution and a lower virological response in drug-naďve patients who started their first-line therapy. This parameter could be useful to identify patients potentially with less chance of achieving adequate immunological reconstitution and virological undetectability. PMID:25153969

  15. Back to the basics: identifying positive youth development as the theoretical framework for a youth drug prevention program in rural Saskatchewan, Canada amidst a program evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite endorsement by the Saskatchewan government to apply empirically-based approaches to youth drug prevention services in the province, programs are sometimes delivered prior to the establishment of evidence-informed goals and objectives. This paper shares the 'preptory’ outcomes of our team’s program evaluation of the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services’ Outreach Worker Service (OWS) in eight rural, community schools three years following its implementation. Before our independent evaluation team could assess whether expectations of the OWS were being met, we had to assist with establishing its overarching program goals and objectives and 'at-risk’ student population, alongside its alliance with an empirically-informed theoretical framework. Methods A mixed-methods approach was applied, beginning with in-depth focus groups with the OWS staff to identify the program’s goals and objectives and targeted student population. These were supplemented with OWS and school administrator interviews and focus groups with school staff. Alignment with a theoretical focus was determined though a review of the OWS’s work to date and explored in focus groups between our evaluation team and the OWS staff and validated with the school staff and OWS and school administration. Results With improved understanding of the OWS’s goals and objectives, our evaluation team and the OWS staff aligned the program with the Positive Youth Development theoretical evidence-base, emphasizing the program’s universality, systems focus, strength base, and promotion of assets. Together we also gained clarity about the OWS’s definition of and engagement with its 'at-risk’ student population. Conclusions It is important to draw on expert knowledge to develop youth drug prevention programming, but attention must also be paid to aligning professional health care services with a theoretically informed evidence-base for evaluation purposes. If time does not permit for the establishment of evidence-informed goals and objectives at the start-up of a program, obtaining insight and expertise from program personnel and school staff and administrators can bring the program to a point where this can still be achieved and theoretical linkages made after a program has been implemented. This is a necessary foundation for measuring an intervention’s success. PMID:24148918

  16. Evaluation of commercial multi-drug oral fluid devices to identify 39 new amphetamine-designer drugs.

    PubMed

    Nieddu, Maria; Burrai, Lucia; Trignano, Claudia; Boatto, Gianpiero

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the diffusion on the black market of new psychoactive substances not controlled and often sold as 'legal highs', is exponentially increasing in Europe. Generally, the first analysis for these drugs involves an immunoassay screening in urine or plasma. Actually, there is growing interest in the use of oral fluid (OF) as alternative specimen over conventional biological fluids for drug testing, because of the significant advantages, as a non-invasive collection under direct observation without undue embarrassment or invasion of privacy, and a good correlation with plasma analytical data. Few assays have been developed for detection of new psychoactive compounds in biological samples, so it is important to investigate how they may or may not react in pre-existing commercial immunoassays. In this paper, two different multi-drugs oral fluid screen devices (OFDs) (Screen® Multi-Drug OFD and GIMA One Step Multi-Line Screen Test OFD) were evaluated to determine the cross-reactivity of thirty-nine new amphetamine designer drugs, including twelve substances officially recognized as illicit by italian legislation. Cross-reactivity towards most drugs analyzed was <1 in assays targeting amphetamine (AMP) or methamphetamine (MET). Only two (p-methoxyamphetamine and p-methoxymethamphetamine) of all tested amphetamines gave a positive result. PMID:24360925

  17. Excretion of cannabinoids in urine after ingestion of cannabis seed oil.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, T; Sager, F; Brenneisen, R

    1997-09-01

    Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) quantitation of 25 cannabis sed oils determined delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations from 3 to 1500 micrograms/g oil. In a pilot study, the morning urine of six volunteers who had ingested 11 or 22 g of the oil, which contained the highest THC content (1500 micrograms/g), was collected for six days. The urine samples were screened by immunoassay, and the content of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-THC (THCCOOH) was determined by GC-MS. Urine samples were found cannabis positive for up to six days with THCCOOH-equivalent concentrations up to 243 ng/mL. by the Abuscreen OnLine immunoassay and THCCOOH contents from 5 to 431 ng/mL by the GC-MS method. All subjects reported THC-specific psychotropic effects. PMID:9288590

  18. Noninvasive quantification of drug delivery from an implantable MEMS device

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Audrey M., 1976-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) sensors in vivo in real time and corroborated by scintillation of urine samples. The goal of monitoring drug delivery from an implant in vivo, in real time and without disturbing the tissue environment, was ...

  19. Preliminary screening method for the determination of inorganic arsenic in urine.

    PubMed

    Hua, Li; Nishida, Manami; Fujiwara, Akira; Yashiki, Mikio; Nagao, Masataka; Namera, Akira

    2009-03-01

    A simple and rapid method was developed for the routine determination and classification of inorganic arsenic based on its clinical and forensic properties. Inorganic arsenic was isolated from urine by using copper granules, which was then made to react with ammonium molybdate in order to detect its presence with the naked eye. Based on studies of extraction and reaction conditions, e.g., reaction temperature and time, a colorimetric screening method was established. The reaction mixture was measured by a spectrophotometer, and there was linearity from 0.05 to 2.0microg/ml and the correlation coefficients of the calibration curves were greater than 0.99. The coefficients of intra-day variation at 0.2 and 2.0microg/ml of inorganic arsenic in urine were 9.6 and 4.2%, respectively (n=5). The minimum detectable level in urine is 0.03microg/ml, and it is possible to detect the lowest level of poisoning according to the published reports. The proposed method was applied to a poisoning case wherein the patient ingested NEOARSEN BLACK with alcohol, which contained 45% of arsenic trioxide. This method produced positive results in all the urine samples tested, and this method is useful for the screening of inorganic arsenic based on its clinical properties because it enables the detection of inorganic arsenic in urine without expensive equipment. PMID:19041271

  20. Urine sample collection protocols for bioassay samples

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.; McFadden, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In vitro radiobioassay analyses are used to measure the amount of radioactive material excreted by personnel exposed to the potential intake of radioactive material. The analytical results are then used with various metabolic models to estimate the amount of radioactive material in the subject`s body and the original intake of radioactive material. Proper application of these metabolic models requires knowledge of the excretion period. It is normal practice to design the bioassay program based on a 24-hour excretion sample. The Hanford bioassay program simulates a total 24-hour urine excretion sample with urine collection periods lasting from one-half hour before retiring to one-half hour after rising on two consecutive days. Urine passed during the specified periods is collected in three 1-L bottles. Because the daily excretion volume given in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1975, p. 354) for Reference Man is 1.4 L, it was proposed to use only two 1-L bottles as a cost-saving measure. This raised the broader question of what should be the design capacity of a 24-hour urine sample kit.

  1. Urine sample collection protocols for bioassay samples

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.; McFadden, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In vitro radiobioassay analyses are used to measure the amount of radioactive material excreted by personnel exposed to the potential intake of radioactive material. The analytical results are then used with various metabolic models to estimate the amount of radioactive material in the subject's body and the original intake of radioactive material. Proper application of these metabolic models requires knowledge of the excretion period. It is normal practice to design the bioassay program based on a 24-hour excretion sample. The Hanford bioassay program simulates a total 24-hour urine excretion sample with urine collection periods lasting from one-half hour before retiring to one-half hour after rising on two consecutive days. Urine passed during the specified periods is collected in three 1-L bottles. Because the daily excretion volume given in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1975, p. 354) for Reference Man is 1.4 L, it was proposed to use only two 1-L bottles as a cost-saving measure. This raised the broader question of what should be the design capacity of a 24-hour urine sample kit.

  2. Automated detection of bacteria in urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, A. J.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Kelbaugh, B. N.

    1972-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of bacteria in urine was developed which utilizes the bioluminescent reaction of adenosine triphosphate with luciferin and luciferase derived from the tails of fireflies. The method was derived from work on extraterrestrial life detection. A device was developed which completely automates the assay process.

  3. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The...

  4. 10 CFR 26.105 - Preparing for urine collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Preparing for urine collection. 26.105 Section 26.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.105 Preparing for urine collection. (a) The...

  5. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Urine specimen quantity. 26.109 Section 26.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.109 Urine specimen quantity. (a)...

  6. COLLECTING URINE SAMPLES FROM YOUNG CHILDREN FOR PESTICIDE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    To estimate pesticide exposure for young children wearing diapers, a method for collecting urine samples for analysis of pesticide metabolites is needed. To find a practical method, two possibilities were investigated: (1) analysis of expressed urine from cotton diaper inserts ...

  7. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of use of the synthetic cannabinoid agonists UR-144 and XLR-11 in human urine.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Amanda L A; Ofsa, Bill; Keil, Alyssa Marie; Simon, John R; McMullin, Matthew; Logan, Barry K

    2014-09-01

    Ongoing changes in the synthetic cannabinoid drug market create the need for relevant targeted immunoassays for rapid screening of biological samples. We describe the validation and performance characteristics of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay designed to detect use of one of the most prevalent synthetic cannabinoids in urine, UR-144, by targeting its pentanoic acid metabolite. Fluorinated UR-144 (XLR-11) has been demonstrated to metabolize to this common product. The assay has significant cross-reactivity with UR-144-5-OH, UR-144-4-OH and XLR-11-4-OH metabolites, but <10% cross-reactivity with the parent compounds, and no measurable cross-reactivity with other synthetic cannabinoids and their metabolites at concentrations of <1,000 ng/mL. The assay's cutoff is 5 ng/mL relative to the pentanoic acid metabolite of UR-144, which is used as the calibrator. The method was validated with 90 positive and negative control urine samples for UR-144, XLR-11 and its metabolites tested versus liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were determined to be 100% for the assay at the specified cutoff. PMID:24908262

  8. Anthocyanin metabolites in human urine and serum.

    PubMed

    Kay, Colin D; Mazza, G; Holub, Bruce J; Wang, Jian

    2004-06-01

    In the present study we investigated the metabolic conversion of cyanidin glycosides in human subjects using solid-phase extraction,HPLC-diode array detector, MS, GC, and enzymic techniques. Volunteers consumed approximately 20 g chokeberry extract containing 1.3 g cyanidin 3-glycosides (899 mg cyanidin 3-galactoside, 321 mg cyanidin 3-arabinoside, 51 mg cyanidin 3-xyloside and 50 mg cyanidin 3-glucoside). Blood samples were drawn at 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 h post-consumption of the extract. Urine samples were also collected at 0, 4-5,and 22-24h. We have confirmed that human subjects have the capacity to metabolise cyanidin 3-glycosides, as we observed at least ten individual anthocyanin metabolites in the urine and serum. Average concentrations of anthocyanins and anthocyanin metabolites in the urine reached levels of 17.9 (range 14.9-20.9) l.mol/l within 5 h post-consumption and persisted in 24h urine samples at levels of 12.1 (range 11.1-13.0) nmol/l. In addition, average total levels of anthocyanins and anthocyanin metabolites detected in the serum were observed at 5917 (range 197.3-986.1) nmol/ within 2h post-consumption. Cyanidin 3-galactoside accounted for 55.4% (9.9(range 7-2-12-6) l.mol/) and 66.0% (390.6 (range 119.4-661-9) nmol V) of the detected anthocyanins in the urine and serum samples,respectively. The metabolites were identified as glucuronide conjugates, as well as methylated and oxidised derivatives of cyanidin 3-galactoside and cyanidin glucuronide. Conjugation probably affects the biological activity of anthocyanins and these metabolic products are likely in part responsible for the reported health benefits associated with the consumption of anthocyanins. PMID:15228048

  9. Heterotropic Activation of the Midazolam Hydroxylase Activity of CYP3A by a Positive Allosteric Modulator of mGlu5: In Vitro to In Vivo Translation and Potential Impact on Clinically Relevant Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Blobaum, Anna L.; Bridges, Thomas M.; Byers, Frank W.; Turlington, Mark L.; Mattmann, Margrith E.; Morrison, Ryan D.; Mackie, Claire; Lavreysen, Hilde; Bartolomé, José M.; MacDonald, Gregor J.; Steckler, Thomas; Jones, Carrie K.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.

    2013-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptors has gained considerable attention in the drug discovery arena because it opens avenues to achieve greater selectivity over orthosteric ligands. We recently identified a series of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) for the treatment of schizophrenia that exhibited robust heterotropic activation of CYP3A4 enzymatic activity. The prototypical compound from this series, 5-(4-fluorobenzyl)-2-((3-fluorophenoxy)methyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrazine (VU0448187), was found to activate CYP3A4 to >100% of its baseline intrinsic midazolam (MDZ) hydroxylase activity in vitro; activation was CYP3A substrate specific and mGlu5 PAM dependent. Additional studies revealed the concentration-dependence of CYP3A activation by VU0448187 in multispecies hepatic and intestinal microsomes and hepatocytes, as well as a diminished effect observed in the presence of ketoconazole. Kinetic analyses of the effect of VU0448187 on MDZ metabolism in recombinant P450 or human liver microsomes resulted in a significant increase in Vmax (minimal change in Km) and required the presence of cytochrome b5. The atypical kinetics translated in vivo, as rats receiving an intraperitoneal administration of VU0448187 prior to MDZ treatment demonstrated a significant increase in circulating 1- and 4-hydroxy- midazolam (1-OH-MDZ, 4-OH-MDZ) levels compared with rats administered MDZ alone. The discovery of a potent substrate-selective activator of rodent CYP3A with an in vitro to in vivo translation serves to illuminate the impact of increasing intrinsic enzymatic activity of hepatic and extrahepatic CYP3A in rodents, and presents the basis to build models capable of framing the clinical relevance of substrate-dependent heterotropic activation. PMID:24003250

  10. Improvement in quantification of urine components: Alternate technique

    E-print Network

    Kumar, S

    2014-01-01

    Urea and creatinine are two important diagnostic components of urine. The study of creatinine in liquid phase is difficult due to its feeble concentration in urine. To bring down the detection limit, DCD Raman spectroscopy was employed. Raman studies in association with partial least square algorithm of artificial urine samples gave improved results in dried phase as compared to liquid phase. These findings were further validated on real urine samples.

  11. The establishment of resistance phenotypes for bacteria isolated from outpatients in urine cultures.

    PubMed

    Zugravu, Roxana; Licker, Monica; Berceanu-V?duva, Delia; R?dulescu, Matilda; Ad?mu?, Marcela; Dragomirescu, Liliana; Branea, Dorina; Hogea, Elena; Muntean, Delia; Mihaela, Diana Popa; Moldovan, Roxana; Loredana, Gabriela Popa

    2006-01-01

    From 1911 outpatients, who addressed a Timi?oara private clinical laboratory, from January to December 2005, we collected 1,889 urine cultures, 431 being positive. Bacteria identification was generally done using morphological, cultural, biochemical characters and pathogenicity tests. Sensitivity testing to antimicrobial medical drugs was done by using the classical diffusion Kirby-Bauer method and the automatic analyzer Osiris, also. The main bacteria involved in the etiology of these infections were represented by Enterobacteriaceae, head of the list being Escherichia coli (81.21%), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.35%) and Proteus mirabilis (3.02%). We also isolated Gram positive cocci (in a much smaller proportion), mainly represented by Enterococcus faecalis (1.16%), Staphylococcus aureus (0.93%), Streptococcus agalactiae, and also Gram negative non-fermentative bacilli, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (0.93%) or Acinetobacter baumanii (0.23%). As soon as we performed the sensitivity tests, we divided them in resistance phenotypes: Most of the Enterobacteriaceae were integrated in the wild phenotype, followed by the penicillinase producing phenotype. An E. coli strain (0.29%) and 3 Klebsiella pneumoniae strains (8.33%) were integrated in the large spectrum, multidrug resistant, beta-lactamase producing phenotype, also associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides; Non-fermentative bacilli did not present special resistance problems, the four Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were integrated in the wild phenotype (secreting induced chromosomal cephalosporinase). As for Staphylococcus aureus it was identified a strain having fluoroquinolone resistance, two strains secreting penicillinase and having a K (Nm) phenotype and a strain secreting penicillinase only. Antibiotic resistance represents a major concern for patients, physicians, healthcare managers, and policymakers. The use of antibiotics is closely linked with the development of acquired antibiotic resistance. PMID:18389723

  12. Refinement of a commercial bench-top relaxin assay for pregnancy diagnosis using urine from domestic and nondomestic felids.

    PubMed

    Harris, Laurie A; Steinetz, Bernard G; Bond, Jennifer B; Lasano, Sally; Swanson, William F

    2008-06-01

    Relaxin, a 6-kDa polypeptide hormone, is excreted in the urine during pregnancy in several mammalian species. A recent study showed that detection of urinary relaxin using a bench-top serum assay (Witness relaxin kit, Synbiotics Corp., San Diego, California 92127, USA) can be diagnostic for pregnancy in domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus), but it is unknown whether the bench-top kit is applicable with urine across felid species. Our objectives were to 1) examine modifications in urine processing to improve kit reliability in pregnant cats, 2) evaluate the impact of concentrating urine via filtration on relaxin detection, 3) assess the effect of sample freezing on relaxin concentrations, and 4) begin quantifying urinary relaxin levels in nondomestic felids. Urine and serum were collected from domestic cats and nondomestic cat species (Pallas' cat, Otocolobus manul; sand cat, Felis margarita; cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus; and lion, Panthera leo) at several times after breeding. Urine samples, subjected to various processing methods, were tested using the bench-top kit, and relaxin levels were later quantified via radioimmunoassay. For domestic cat urine samples, filtration and addition of protein/phosphate buffer improved the consistency of the relaxin kit for early pregnancy diagnosis. Urine freezing caused a slight (approximately 13%) but significant decrease in relaxin concentrations, but frozen-thawed samples still tested positive with the bench-top kit. In nondomestic felids, urinary relaxin immunoreactivity during pregnancy was similar to or higher than that of pregnant domestic cats, suggesting that relaxin is a reliable cross-species marker of pregnancy. Urinary relaxin was detectable using the bench-top kit in pregnant Pallas' cats, but urine samples from other species tested negative, regardless of processing methods. Findings suggest that measurement of urinary relaxin is a promising approach for noninvasive pregnancy diagnosis in exotic felids, but further assessment of urinary relaxin profiles among cat species and modification of the bench-top relaxin kit are warranted to improve cross-species utility. PMID:18634207

  13. 28 CFR 550.44 - Procedures for arranging drug counseling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for arranging drug counseling. 550.44 Section 550.44 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in...

  14. ECLSS Sustaining Compatibility Testing on Urine Processor Assembly Nonmetallic Materials for Reformulation of Pretreated Urine Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    On International Space Station (ISS), the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) converts human urine and flush water into potable water. The urine is acid-pretreated primarily to control microbial growth. In recent years, the sulfuric acid (H2SO4) pretreatment was believed to be largely responsible for producing salt crystals capable of plugging filters in UPA components and significantly reducing the percentage of water recovery from urine. In 2012, ISS management decided to change the acid pretreatment for urine from sulfuric to phosphoric with the goal of eliminating or minimizing formation of salt crystals. In 2013-2014, as part of the qualification of the phosphoric acid (H3PO4) formulation, samples of 12 nonmetallic materials used in UPA components were immersed for up to one year in pretreated urine and brine solutions made with the new H3PO4 formulation. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was used to measure modulus (stiffness) of the immersed samples compared to virgin control samples. Such compatibility data obtained by DMA for the H3PO4-based solutions were compared to DMA data obtained for the H2SO4-based solutions in 2002-2003.

  15. 9 CFR 311.37 - Odors, foreign and urine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Odors, foreign and urine. 311.37..., foreign and urine. (a) Carcasses which give off a pronounced odor of medicinal, chemical, or other foreign substance shall be condemned. (b) Carcasses which give off a pronounced urine odor shall be condemned....

  16. Determination of opiates and cocaine in urine by high pH mobile phase reversed phase UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Berg, Thomas; Lundanes, Elsa; Christophersen, Asbjřrg S; Strand, Dag Helge

    2009-02-01

    A fast and selective ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of opiates (morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), pholcodine, oxycodone, ethylmorphine), cocaine and benzoylecgonine in urine has been developed and validated. Sample preparation was performed by solid phase extraction (SPE) on a mixed mode cation exchange (MCX) cartridge. For optimized chromatographic performance with repeatable retention times, narrow and symmetrical peaks, and focusing of all analytes at the column inlet at gradient start, a basic mobile phase consisting of 5mM ammonium bicarbonate, pH 10.2, and methanol (MeOH) was chosen. Positive electrospray ionization (ESI(+)) MS/MS detection was performed with a minimum of two multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for each analyte. Deuterium labelled-internal standards were used for six of the analytes. Between-assay retention time repeatabilities (n=10 series, 225 injections in total) had relative standard deviation (RSD) values within 0.1-0.6%. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values were in the range 0.003-0.05 microM (0.001-0.02 microg/mL) and 0.01-0.16 microM (0.003-0.06 microg/mL), respectively. The RSD values of the between-assay repeatabilities of concentrations were drugs and internal standards in total. Co-eluting compounds were in all cases separated by the MS/MS detection. No or only minor matrix effects were observed. Total run time, including injection and equilibration time was 5.7 min. The method has been routinely used at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH) since August 2007 for qualitative detection of opiates, cocaine and benzoylecgonine in more than 2000 urine samples with two replicates of each sample. PMID:19144579

  17. Drug Testing in Children with Excessive Daytime Sleepiness During Multiple Sleep Latency Testing

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Eliot S.; Maski, Kiran; Jenkins, Amanda J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the incidence of positive drug screens in children undergoing a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) for evaluation of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed in children evaluated at the Boston Children's Hospital Sleep Center between 1998 and 2013 who underwent MSLT for EDS with a concurrent urine and/or serum drug screen. Results: A total of 210 MSLTs were accompanied by drug testing. Children were 12.7 ± 3.7 years old (mean ± SD), 43% were female, and 24% had narcolepsy. Positive tests were obtained in 32% for caffeine, 5% for prescription medications, and 4% for over-the-counter drugs. No drugs of abuse were identified. Children testing positive for caffeine were older (13.8 ± 3.5 vs. 12.4 ± 3.7) and more likely female (59% vs. 36%), but did not differ in MSLT or overnight polysomnographic parameters compared to children without caffeine detected. Overall, only 14% had specific documentation regarding caffeine intake, though 90% were referred from a sleep clinic. Of the children testing positive for caffeine, 5% acknowledged use, 3% denied use, and 92% did not have a documented caffeine intake history during their sleep clinic visit. Conclusions: Routine drug testing for drugs of abuse during an MSLT for EDS yielded no positive results over a 15-year period, indicating that this routine practice is unnecessary in our pediatric population without specific concerns. However, objective evidence for caffeine exposure was found in 32% of tested children undergoing an MSLT. Sleep physicians rarely documented the caffeine intake history during clinic visits for EDS. Citation: Katz ES, Maski K, Jenkins AJ. Drug testing in children with excessive daytime sleepiness during multiple sleep latency testing. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(8):897-901. PMID:25126037

  18. Quantitation of Albumin in Urine by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ketha, Hemamalini; Singh, Ravinder J

    2016-01-01

    Urinary excretion of human serum albumin (HSA), a 6.65 kDa monomeric protein, is a sensitive marker of renal damage associated with many diseases including diabetes mellitus. Albumin is synthesized by the liver and functions as a transport protein for fat-soluble hormones and drugs and for maintaining plasma colloid osmotic pressure and pH. Albumin is not filtered at the glomerulus and its presence in the urine at concentration above 30 mg/day is suggestive of glomerular damage. Early diagnosis of microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/24 h urine albumin excretion or 30-300 mg/g creatinine in random collections) has prognostic value for monitoring disease progression and early clinical management of diabetic nephropathy in prediabetic patients. Current methods for quantitation of urine albumin are based on immunoassays or size exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV detection (SEC-HPLC-UV). Studies have demonstrated discordance between the existing methods. It has been suggested that while immunoassays underestimate albumin in urine, SEC-HPLC-UV method overestimates albumin as it cannot separate co-eluting interferences. This chapter describes a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry LC-MS/MS candidate reference method for albumin quantitation. PMID:26602114

  19. Comprehensive drug screening in blood for detecting abused drugs or drugs potentially hazardous for traffic safety.

    PubMed

    Lillsunde, P; Michelson, L; Forsstrom, T; Korte, T; Schultz, E; Ariniemi, K; Portman, M; Sihvonen, M L; Seppala, T

    1996-02-01

    A comprehensive drug screening procedure for detecting drugs in the blood samples of car drivers suspected of driving under the influence of drugs, is presented. Amphetamines, cannabinoids, opioids, cocaine and benzodiazepines were screened by an immunological EMIT ETS system after acetone precipitation. Gas chromatographic methods were used to screen and quantitate basic, neutral and acidic drugs. The free amino groups of basic drugs were derivatized with heptafluorobutyric anhydride. Analysis was performed by a dual channel gas chromatograph combined with a nitrogen phosphorus and an electron capture detector. Phenyltrimethylammonium hydroxide was used as a methylathing agent for acidic substances before analysis with a gas chromatograph connected to a nitrogen phosphorus detector. A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry was used as a common confirmation method. Tetrahydrocannabinol was quantitated after bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide derivatization, opiates after pentafluoropropionic anhydride derivatization and benzoylecgonine after pentafluoropropionic anhydride and pentafluoropropanol derivatization. Excluding benzodiazepines, which were confirmed with a gas chromatograph connected to a nitrogen phosphorus and an electron capture detector, the other basic drugs as well as the acidic drugs were confirmed after the same derivatization procedures as in the screening methods. Alcohols were quantitated in triplicate by gas chromatography using three different kinds of columns. Although urine is the most important specimen for screening abused drugs, it has only limited use in forensic toxicology. The described system is most useful for analyzing a wide range of substances, including illicit drugs, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, antidepressants and phenothiazenes in forensic samples when urine is not available. PMID:8819994

  20. Drug and alcohol testing in the workplace: moral, ethical and legal issues.

    PubMed

    Raskin, C

    1993-01-01

    The proponents of drug and alcohol testing advance several safety and productivity arguments in support of their position. It is asserted that persons who test positively for drug and alcohol at the workplace experience higher levels of absenteeism and use sick leave to a much greater extent than non-users. Moreover, it is claimed that they have levels of productivity from 10 to 60 per cent lower than persons who do not test positively for drugs or alcohol. Perhaps the greatest argument advanced by those in favour of testing, however, is the safety element. Persons who abuse drugs or who consume alcohol to excess are involved in significantly more accidents than those who test negatively. In other words, proponents take the position that persons who test positively for the presence of drugs or alcohol form a category of individuals and that being in this category is grounds for labelling them as problematic employees. Moreover, so the reasoning goes, the only way to find out if an employee is a member of the category of drug or alcohol users is to test. Opponents of alcohol testing feel that the goal of ensuring a drug- and alcohol-free workplace is reached at too high a social cost and that the testing process constitutes an unwarranted invasion of the privacy of the individual. The provision of urine for analysis is a search, which, if conducted without consent or reason, would constitute an assault. Some opponents to testing feel that the real motivation for testing is controlling employee behaviour. Enterprises impose behavioural constraints on employees that may extend to off-duty times. Moreover, it is advanced that the testing process itself is humiliating to many people. In order to obtain a sample for testing, the person being tested must urinate in the presence of an attendant or supervisor. Often, medical standards are not used. Another moral issue is the implication of discrimination as a result of drug or alcohol testing. Perhaps the greatest concern is the systemic discrimination against disabled persons, persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), visible minorities and pregnant women that testing may engender. Again, different countries have addressed the discrimination issue in varying ways. Finally, opponents to drug and alcohol testing question the need to test. It is asserted that all testing shows is that, at some point in time, the person being tested ingested the screened substance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7920542

  1. Sensitivity of an opiate immunoassay for detecting hydrocodone and hydromorphone in urine from a clinical population: analysis of subthreshold results.

    PubMed

    Bertholf, Roger L; Johannsen, Laura M; Reisfield, Gary M

    2015-01-01

    Urine drug testing (UDT) is an emerging standard of care in the evaluation and treatment of chronic non-cancer pain patients with opioid analgesics. UDT may be used both to verify adherence with the opioid analgesic regimen and to monitor abstinence from non-prescribed or illicit controlled substances. In the former scenario, it is vital to determine whether the drug is present in the urine, even at low concentrations, because failure to detect the drug may lead to accusations of opioid abuse or diversion. Opiate immunoassays typically are developed to detect morphine and are most sensitive to morphine and codeine. Although many opiate immunoassays also detect hydrocodone (HC) and/or hydromorphone (HM), sensitivities for these analytes are often much lower, increasing the possibility of negative screening results when the drug is present in the urine. We selected 112 urine specimens from patients who had been prescribed HC or hydromorphone but were presumptive negative by the Roche Online DAT Opiate II™ urine drug screening assay, which is calibrated to 300 ng/mL morphine. Using a GC/MS confirmatory method with a detection limit of 50 ng/mL both for HC and for HM, one or both of these opiates were detected in 81 (72.3%) of the urine specimens. Examination of the raw data from these presumptive negative opiate screens revealed that, in many cases, the turbidity signal was greater than the signal obtained for the negative control, but less than the signal for the 300 ng/mL (morphine) threshold calibrator. A receiver operating characteristic curve generated for the reciprocal of the ratio of turbidity measurements in the patient specimens and negative (drug-free) controls, against the presence or absence of HC and/or HM by confirmatory analyses, produced an area under the curve of 0.910. We conclude that this opiate immunoassay has sufficient sensitivity to detect HC and/or HM in some urine specimens that screen presumptive negative for these commonly prescribed opiates at the established threshold. PMID:25288720

  2. Adjustment of creatinine-adjusted value to urine flow rate in lead workers.

    PubMed

    Sata, F; Araki, S

    1996-01-01

    Two male lead workers, aged 57 and 51 y, were studied to compare the urinary flow/creatinine-adjusted values published earlier by Araki et al. and by Greenberg and Levine. We collected 24-h urine samples once a month for 31 mo and 16 mo for workers 1 and 2, respectively. The workers' urinary excretions of lead, delta-aminolevulinic acid, and coproporphyrin were measured. No significant correlations between urine flow rate and urinary flow/creatinine-adjusted values published by Araki et al. for the three substances were found for these two workers. However, urinary flow/creatinine-adjusted values presented by Greenberg and Levine for lead and delta-aminolevulinic acid were correlated positively with urine flow rate in the two workers, and their adjusted value for coproporphyrin was correlated positively with urine flow rate in one of the workers. We concluded that use of the urinary flow/creatinine-adjusted value by Greenberg and Levine for biological monitoring poses a problem because of the theoretical fallacy. PMID:8757415

  3. Urine fibroblast growth factor 23 levels in hypertensive children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zaj?c, Magdalena; Rybi-Szumi?ska, Agnieszka; Wasilewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the correlation of urinary fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) excretion with blood pressure and calcium-phosphorus metabolism. Methods The study included 42 hypertensive (17 girls) and 46 healthy children and adolescents (17 girls) aged 6-18 years admitted to the Department of Pediatrics and Nephrology, Medical University of Bia?ystok between January 2013 and December 2013. FGF23 in urine was measured using Human Intact FGF-23 ELISA Kit. Results Hypertensive participants had significantly higher urine FGF23/creatinine values than the reference group (8.65 vs 5.59 RU/mg creatinine, P?=?0.007). Urine FGF23/creatinine positively correlated with systolic blood pressure in all participants. In hypertensive patients, urine FGF23/creatinine positively correlated with serum calcium and negatively with serum 25(OH)D, urinary calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium. Conclusion This study found that FGF23 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in children and adolescents, but our results should be confirmed by further studies. PMID:26321027

  4. Purple Urine Bag Syndrome: Time for Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Reginald; Manjunath, Krishna; Srinivasan, Rajan; Basu, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    Purple urine bag syndrome occurs commonly in long-term catheterized patients causing significant stress for patients, care takers, and health care providers. This may lead to unwarranted investigation as well as treatment when not identified early. Demographic changes in Indian population with increasing geriatric care make it a case to increase awareness of this condition among health care providers in primary and secondary care settings. PMID:25811004

  5. Anthocyanin metabolites are abundant and persistent in human urine.

    PubMed

    Kalt, Wilhelmina; Liu, Yan; McDonald, Jane E; Vinqvist-Tymchuk, Melinda R; Fillmore, Sherry A E

    2014-05-01

    LC-MS/MS revealed that metabolites of anthocyanins (Acn) were abundant in human urine (n = 17) even after 5 days with no dietary Acn. After intake of 250 mL of blueberry juice, parent Acn were 4% and Acn metabolites were 96% of the total urinary Acn for the following 24 h. Multiple reaction monitoring revealed 226 combinations of mass transition × retention times for known Acn and predicted Acn metabolites. These were dominated by aglycones, especially aglycone glucuronides. The diversity of Acn metabolites could include positional isomers of Acn conjugates and chalcones. The persistence of Acn metabolites suggested enterohepatic recycling leading to prolonged residence time. The prevalence of Acn metabolites based on pelargonidin, which is not present in blueberry juice, may reflect ongoing dehydroxylation and demethylation of other Acn via xenobiotic and colonic bacterial action. The results suggest that exposure to Acn-based flavonoid moieties is substantially greater than suggested by earlier research. PMID:24432743

  6. Development and validation of two LC-MS/MS methods for the detection and quantification of amphetamines, designer amphetamines, benzoylecgonine, benzodiazepines, opiates, and opioids in urine using turbulent flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nadine; Peters, Benjamin; Schmidt, Peter; Ewald, Andreas H

    2013-01-01

    In the context of driving ability diagnostics in Germany, administrative cutoffs for various drugs and pharmaceuticals in urine have been established. Two liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for simultaneous detection and quantification of amphetamines, designer amphetamines, benzoylecgonine, benzodiazepines, opiates, and opioids in urine were developed and validated. A 500-?L aliquot of urine was diluted and fortified with an internal standard solution. After enzymatic cleavage, online extraction was performed by an ion-exchange/reversed-phase turbulent flow column. Separation was achieved by using a reversed-phase column and gradient elution. For detection, a Thermo Fisher TSQ Quantum Ultra Accurate Mass tandem mass spectrometer with positive electrospray ionization was used, and the analytes were measured in multiple-reaction monitoring mode detecting two transitions per precursor ion. The total run time for both methods was about 15 min. Validation was performed according to the guidelines of the Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry. The results of matrix effect determination were between 78% and 116%. The limits of detection and quantification for all drugs, except zopiclone, were less than 10 ng/mL and less than 25 ng/mL, respectively. Calibration curves ranged from 25 to 200 ng/mL for amphetamines, designer amphetamines, and benzoylecgonine, from 25 to 250 ng/mL for benzodiazepines, from 12.5 to 100 ng/mL for morphine, codeine, and dihydrocodeine, and from 5 to 50 ng/mL for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine. Intraday and interday precision values were lower than 15%, and bias values within ± 15% were achieved. Turbulent flow chromatography needs no laborious sample preparation, so the workup is less time-consuming compared with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. The methods are suitable for quantification of multiple analytes at the cutoff concentrations required for driving ability diagnostics in Germany. PMID:23076398

  7. Quantitation of Buprenorphine, Norbuprenorphine, Buprenorphine Glucuronide, Norbuprenorphine Glucuronide, and Naloxone in Urine by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid drug that has been used to treat opioid dependence on an outpatient basis, and is also prescribed for managing moderate to severe pain. Some formulations of buprenorphine also contain naloxone to discourage misuse. The major metabolite of buprenorphine is norbuprenorphine. Both compounds are pharmacologically active and both are extensively metabolized to their glucuronide conjugates, which are also active metabolites. Direct quantitation of the glucuronide conjugates in conjunction with free buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone in urine can distinguish compliance with prescribed therapy from specimen adulteration intended to mimic compliance with prescribed buprenorphine.This chapter quantitates buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, their glucuronide conjugates and naloxone directly in urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Urine is pretreated with formic acid and undergoes solid phase extraction (SPE) prior to analysis by LC-MS/MS. PMID:26660175

  8. Looking at the urine: the renaissance of an unbroken tradition.

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2007-06-01

    The science of looking at the urine for diagnostic purposes, uroscopy, is as ancient as disease. Throughout history, urine, the first bodily fluid to be examined, has continuously and persistently provided medicine with an increasing body of knowledge about the workings of the inner body. For most of its history, uroscopy was a visual science; this focus peaked in the Middle Ages, when the vessel used to examine urine, the matula, became a symbol of the medical profession. Over time, the practice of uroscopy spread into the hands of quacks and apothecaries, who prescribed and sold their potions by merely looking at the urine. The consequent reformation measures of the 16th and 17th centuries coincided with the first attempts at analyzing the contents of urine. As a result, many of the chemical components now reported in metabolic profiles were first analyzed and identified in urine during the first half of the 18th century. In the process, what started as a science that bordered on divination laid the foundations of chemical analysis and spawned the disciplines of urology, endocrinology, and, after the use of urine in clearance studies, nephrology. The analytical methods and remarkable achievements of each of these disciplines have increased the value of examining urine. A renaissance of this oldest diagnostic tool of medicine is now under way in the proteomic profiling and detection of biomarkers in the urine, an approach which promises to further extend the merits of the unbroken tradition of looking at the urine. PMID:17533032

  9. Clinical assessment and urine testing for anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Brower, K J; Catlin, D H; Blow, F C; Eliopulos, G A; Beresford, T P

    1991-06-01

    The emerging epidemic of anabolic-androgenic steroid use, no longer confined to elite athletes, is associated with adverse health consequences for which users may seek treatment. As with other forms of drug abuse, patients may deny or hide their use of steroids while seeking treatment for bothersome side effects or other problems. Thus, clinicians may increasingly, but unknowingly, see patients who are using steroids. Early detection and treatment of steroid abuse and dependence is critical in order to prevent serious and potentially fatal consequences. Therefore, it is incumbent upon clinicians to know the signs and symptoms of using steroids, and to be familiar with the clinical indications for urine testing. Using case examples, the authors review the assessment of steroid abuse and dependence in clinical practice and illustrate the role of urine testing in the assessment process. PMID:1862790

  10. Phthalate metabolites in urine and asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Callesen, Michael; Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J; Langer, Sarka; Brive, Lena; Clausen, Geo; Toftum, Jřrn; Sigsgaard, Torben; Hřst, Arne; Jensen, Tina Kold

    2014-07-01

    Phthalate esters are among the most ubiquitous of indoor pollutants and have been associated with various adverse health effects. In the present study we assessed the cross-sectional association between eight different phthalate metabolites in urine and allergic disease in young children. As part of the Danish Indoor Environment and Children's Health study, urine samples were collected from 440 children aged 3-5 years, of whom 222 were healthy controls, 68 were clinically diagnosed with asthma, 76 with rhinoconjunctivitis and 81 with atopic dermatitis (disease subgroups are not mutually exclusive; some children had more than one disease). There were no statistically significant differences in the urine concentrations of phthalate metabolites between cases and healthy controls with the exception of MnBP and MECPP, which were higher in healthy controls compared with the asthma case group. In the crude analysis MnBP and MiBP were negatively associated with asthma. In the analysis adjusted for multiple factors, only a weak positive association between MEP in urine and atopic dermatitis was found; there were no positive associations between any phthalate metabolites in urine and either asthma or rhinoconjunctivitis. These findings appear to contradict earlier studies. Differences may be due to higher exposures to certain phthalates (e.g., BBzP) via non-dietary pathways in earlier studies, phthalates serving as surrogates for an agent associated with asthma (e.g., PVC flooring) in previous studies but not the present study or altered cleaning habits and the use of "allergy friendly" products by parents of children with allergic disease in the current study in contrast to studies conducted earlier. PMID:24388279

  11. Catecholamine Levels and Delay Discounting Forecast Drug Use among African American Youths

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Gene H.; Yu, Tianyi; MacKillop, James; Miller, Gregory E.; Chen, Edith; Obasi, Ezemenari M.; Beach, Steven R. H.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To test hypotheses about the contributions of the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine (which serve as biological markers of life stress through sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation), delay discounting, and their interaction to the prediction of drug use among young African American adults. Design A 1-year prospective study that involved assessment of SNS activity and collection of self-report data involving delay discounting and drug use. Setting Rural communities in the southeastern United States. Participants 456 African Americans who were 19 years of age at the beginning of the study. Measurements At age 19, participants provided overnight urine voids that were assayed for epinephrine and norepinephrine. Participants were also assessed for hyperbolic temporal discounting functions (k) and drug use. At age 20, the participants again reported their drug use. Findings Linear regression analyses revealed that (a) catecholamine levels at age 19 forecast increases in drug use (B = .087, p < .01, 95% CI [.025, .148]), and (b) among young men, catecholamine levels interacted positively with delay discounting to forecast increases in drug use (simple slope = .113, p < . 001,95% CI [.074, .152]). Conclusions Higher urinary catecholamine concentrations in your adulthood predict higher levels of drug use a year later among young African American men in the USA who engage in high, but not low, levels of delay discounting. PMID:24521257

  12. Spot Protein/Creatinine Ratio in Preeclampsia as an Alternative for 24-Hour Urine Protein

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Oya; Kumru, P?nar; Ar?nkan, Arzu; Ard?ç, Cem; Ar?soy, Resul; Tozk?r, Elif; Tando?an, Bülent; Ayvac?, Habibe; Tu?rul, Ahmet S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proteinuria is a major component of preeclampsia. Urine protein measurement after 24-hour urine collection is the traditional standard method for the detection of proteinuria. It is time-consuming. As an alternative, random spot sampling for a urine protein to creatinine (P/C) ratio has been investigated. Aims: The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the protein to creatinine ratio (P/C) compared with 24-hour urine collection for the detection of remarkable proteinuria and to evaluate the P/C ratio for different proteinuria ranges in patients with preeclampsia. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: Two hundred and eleven pregnant women who met the criteria of preeclampsia comprised the study group and fifty three pregnant women were taken as the control group. Spot urine specimens for measuring P/C ratio were obtained taken immediately before 24-hour urine collection. The correlation between the P/C ratio in the spot urine samples and urinary protein excretion in the 24-hour collections was examined using the Spearman correlation test. Results: It was found a good positive correlation between the P/C ratio and 24-hour protein excretion, with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.758. The best cut-off which gave the maximum area under the curve was 0.45 for 300 mg, 0.9 for 1000 mg, 1.16 for 2000 mg, 1.49 for 3000 mg, 2.28 for 4000 mg and 2.63 for 5000 mg per 24h. A P/C ratio above 0.9 strongly predicts significant proteinuria for more than 1 gram (AUC 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94–0.99 and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of 91%, 95.4%, 95.2%, and 91.2%, respectively). Conclusion: The P/C ratio can be used as a screening test as a good predictor for remarkable proteinuria. The P/C ratio seems to be highly predictive for diagnosis to detect proteinuria over one gram and it could be used as a rapid alternative test in preeclamptic patients not to delay implementation treatment. PMID:25759772

  13. Analysis of melamine cyanurate in urine using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ho-Wai; Ng, Kwan-Ming; Chui, Stephen Sin-Yin; Che, Chi-Ming; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Siu, Tak-Shing; Lan, Lawrence Chuen-Leung; Che, Xiaoyan

    2009-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was applied to the direct analysis of melamine cyanurate (MC). The three commonly used MALDI matrixes, namely, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), sinapinic acid (SA), and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), were able to desorb/ionize melamine from MC upon N(2) laser irradiation, with CHCA showing the highest detection sensitivity in the positive mode. Only DHB and SA were able to desorb/ionize cyanuric acid from MC in the negative mode but with remarkably lower sensitivity. The method is able to detect melamine unambiguously from a small amount of MC (down to 12.5 microg) spiked into urine and was successfully applied for the rapid and sensitive detection of melamine in urine stones/residues of the samples collected from patients clinically confirmed of having kidney stones associated with the consumption of melamine-tainted food products. The urine matrix resulted in interfering ion peaks and suppressed the ion intensity of melamine, while a cleanup process consisting of simply washing with water eliminated such interference and enhanced the ion intensity. The merit of the method is simplicity in sample preparation. The analytical time of the method for high-throughput analysis from the time of sample treatment to analysis is less than 7 minutes per sample, with sensitive detection of the presence of melamine in the urine stones/residues of the patient samples. PMID:19341248

  14. RAPID DIAGNOSIS OF PNEUMOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA AMONG HIV-INFECTED ADULTS WITH URINE ANTIGEN DETECTION

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R; Daley, Charles L.; Merrifield, Cynthia; Hopewell, Philip C.; Janoff, Edward N.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia and associated bacteremia during HIV infection. Rapid diagnostic assays may limit inappropriate therapy. Methods Clinical signs and symptoms and sera and urine were collected prospectively from 70 adults with pneumococcal pneumonia, including 47 with HIV co-infection. Pneumococcal C-polysaccharide antigen was detected in urine using the Binax® immunochromatographic test (ICT). A systematic review of 24 published studies was conducted. Results Clinical symptoms, signs, and laboratory parameters except leukocytosis, were similar in HIV-infected and HIV-seronegative pneumonia. The performance of the urine antigen ICT was independent of HIV-status (sensitivity 81%, specificity 98%, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) 98%, and 82%, respectively). The sensitivity of sputum Gram’s stain was 58% [34/59] with sputum unable to be provided by 16%. The CRP response was identical in HIV-infected (mean ± SD) 133 ± 88 vs. seronegative 135 ± 104 mg/L (p=0.9). In the systematic review, the ICT performance revealed 74% sensitivity (95% CI: 72% to 77%) and 94% specificity (95% CI: 93% to 95%). Urine antigen testing increases etiologic diagnosis by 23% (Range: 10% –59%) when testing adults with community acquired pneumonia of unknown etiology. Conclusions Urinary antigen detection provides a credible rapid diagnostic test for pneumococcal pneumonia regardless of HIV-status. CRP response to acute infection is similar in HIV co-infection and increases diagnostic certainty. PMID:17692384

  15. Urine Is Not Sterile: Use of Enhanced Urine Culture Techniques To Detect Resident Bacterial Flora in the Adult Female Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Hilt, Evann E.; McKinley, Kathleen; Pearce, Meghan M.; Rosenfeld, Amy B.; Zilliox, Michael J.; Mueller, Elizabeth R.; Brubaker, Linda; Gai, Xiaowu; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that bacterial genomes can be identified using 16S rRNA sequencing in urine specimens of both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who are culture negative according to standard urine culture protocols. In the present study, we used a modified culture protocol that included plating larger volumes of urine, incubation under varied atmospheric conditions, and prolonged incubation times to demonstrate that many of the organisms identified in urine by 16S rRNA gene sequencing are, in fact, cultivable using an expanded quantitative urine culture (EQUC) protocol. Sixty-five urine specimens (from 41 patients with overactive bladder and 24 controls) were examined using both the standard and EQUC culture techniques. Fifty-two of the 65 urine samples (80%) grew bacterial species using EQUC, while the majority of these (48/52 [92%]) were reported as no growth at 103 CFU/ml by the clinical microbiology laboratory using the standard urine culture protocol. Thirty-five different genera and 85 different species were identified by EQUC. The most prevalent genera isolated were Lactobacillus (15%), followed by Corynebacterium (14.2%), Streptococcus (11.9%), Actinomyces (6.9%), and Staphylococcus (6.9%). Other genera commonly isolated include Aerococcus, Gardnerella, Bifidobacterium, and Actinobaculum. Our current study demonstrates that urine contains communities of living bacteria that comprise a resident female urine microbiota. PMID:24371246

  16. First confirmation of imported dengue virus serotype 2 complete genome in urine from a Chinese traveler returning from India.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuezheng; Zhen, Wei; Yang, Pengfei; Sun, Xiaohong; Nie, Weizhong; Zhang, Liping; Xu, Huanzhou; Hu, Kongxin

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne virus that has four serotypes. Collection of serum from patients is time- and labor- consuming, and presents a high injury risk for infants and children. The genomic and serological diagnosis of imported dengue fever from a urine sample was used as a non-invasive diagnostic method in this study. A serum sample was collected on disease day 5, and a serum and urine sample were collected on disease day 8 and 18. The results of serological tests for DENV IgM revealed that the serum samples were positive for DENV. The results of RT-qPCR assay revealed that the serum sample collected on day 5 was DENV-positive; however, the serum sample collected on day 8 and 18 were negative for DENV. The urine sample collected on day 8 and 18 were DENV-positive. We also sequenced the complete DENV genome (10723 bp) from the urine sample (GenBank KF479233). The results of phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis indicated strong confirmation that the strain was located within the DENV-2 group with a 100% bootstrap value. In this report, we (1) provided the first evidence of a DENV infection that was imported from India to a non-endemic city of China, (2) investigated the DENV genome detection having a longer timeframe for positive detection in urine sample compared to previous studies, (3) provided the sequence results for the complete DENV-2 genome from a concentrated urine sample (4) discussed how virus-typing results could be used to manage the risk of sero-specific and re-infected travel-associated dengue fever. PMID:24666930

  17. Separation of isomers L-alanine and sarcosine in urine by electrospray ionization and tandem differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lozano, Pablo; Rus, Juan

    2010-07-01

    Sarcosine, an isomer of L-alanine, has been proposed as a prostate cancer progression biomarker [1]. Both compounds are detected in urine, where the measured sarcosine/alanine ratio has been found to be higher in prostate biopsy-positive group versus controls. We present here preliminary evidence showing that urine samples spiked with sarcosine/alanine can be partially resolved in 3 min via tandem differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry (DMA-MS). Based on the calibration curves obtained for two mobility peaks, we finally estimate their concentration ratio in urine. PMID:20304672

  18. Water recovery by catalytic treatment of urine vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Quattrone, P. D.; Leban, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of water recovery on a man-rated scale by the catalytic processing of untreated urine vapor. For this purpose, two catalytic systems, one capable of processing an air stream containing low urine vapor concentrations and another to process streams with high urine vapor concentrations, were designed, constructed, and tested to establish the quality of the recovered water.

  19. The myth of the clean catch urine specimen.

    PubMed

    Immergut, M A; Gilbert, E C; Frensilli, F J; Goble, M

    1981-04-01

    Urine specimens obtained from unprepped ambulatory females who voided into an unsterile disposable plastic cup showed a 95-per cent correlation with a catheterized specimen collected from a prepped patient through a sterile cystoscope. From these data, it appears that the midstream urine specimen and its unpleasant collection routine can be eliminated. We have found that specimens collected at anytime during voiding in unsterile disposable plastic cups result in reliable urine cultures. PMID:7222324

  20. Zero-gravity open-type urine receptacle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girala, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    The development of the zero-gravity open-type urine receptacle used in the Apollo command module is described. This type receptacle eliminates the need for a cuff-type urine collector or for the penis to circumferentially contact the receptacle in order to urinate. This device may be used in a gravity environment, varying from zero gravity to earth gravity, such as may be experienced in a space station or space base.

  1. Use of urine in snow to indicate condition of wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Seal, U.S.; DelGiudice, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    Urine deposited in snow by wild gray wolves (Canis lupus) and by fed and fasted captive wolves was analyzed for urea nitrogen, calcium, sodium, potassium, and creatinine. Ratios of the elements with creatinine were considerably higher for fed than for fasted animals, and ratios for fed wolves compared favorably with ratios from wolf urine in snow along trails leading from kills. Thus, wolf urine in the snow can indicate whether wolves have fed recently, and a series of such urine collections from any given pack can indicate relative nutritional state.

  2. INTERIOR, RESTROOM WITH URINAL, MOP SINK, AND LAVATORY; VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR, RESTROOM WITH URINAL, MOP SINK, AND LAVATORY; VIEW TO SOUTHEAST - Fort Bragg, Noncommissioned Officers' Service Club, Guest House Building, South of Butner Road, Fayetteville, Cumberland County, NC

  3. Black Coloured Urine following Organophosphorus Poisoning: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mookkappan, Sudhagar; Shanmugham, Vijay; Kulirankal, Kiran

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphorus poisoning is common in rural Asia. Clinical features result from overactivity of acetylcholine receptors. Blackish discoloration of urine is not a feature of organophosphorus poisoning. Only one case of black colored urine following quinalphos poisoning has been reported in literature. We report two cases of organophosphorus poisoning from two different compounds, following which patients passed black colored urine, in the absence of haemolysis or rhabdomyolysis. These cases indicate that blackish discoloration of urine in organophosphorus poisoning might not be as uncommon as it was believed to be. Besides, urinary excretion of metabolites might be an underlying mechanism, rather than hemolysis. PMID:24826348

  4. Employment-based Reinforcement of Adherence to Oral Naltrexone in Unemployed Injection Drug Users: 12-month Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly; DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J.; Donlin, Wendy D.; Aklin, Will M.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Oral naltrexone could be a promising relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for recently detoxified opioid-dependent patients, however interventions are often needed to promote adherence with this treatment approach. We recently conducted a study to evaluate a 26-week employment-based reinforcement intervention of oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users (Dunn et al., 2013). Participants were randomly assigned into a Contingency (n=35) group required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain entry into a therapeutic workplace, or a Prescription (n=32) group given a take-home supply of oral naltrexone and access to the workplace without observed ingestion. Monthly urine samples were collected and analyzed for evidence for naltrexone adherence, opioid use, and cocaine use. As previously reported, Contingency participants provided significantly more naltrexone-positive urine samples than Prescription participants during the 26-week intervention period. The goal of this current study is to report the 12-month outcomes, which occurred 6 months after the intervention ended. Results at the 12-month visit showed no between-group differences in naltrexone-positive, opioid-negative, or cocaine-negative urine samples, and no participant self-reported using naltrexone at the follow-up visit. These results show that even after a period of successfully reinforced oral naltrexone adherence longer-term naltrexone use is unlikely to be maintained after reinforcement contingencies are discontinued. PMID:25134047

  5. An Automatic Critical Care Urine Meter

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Abraham; Fernández, Roemi; Apalkov, Andrey; Armada, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays patients admitted to critical care units have most of their physiological parameters measured automatically by sophisticated commercial monitoring devices. More often than not, these devices supervise whether the values of the parameters they measure lie within a pre-established range, and issue warning of deviations from this range by triggering alarms. The automation of measuring and supervising tasks not only discharges the healthcare staff of a considerable workload but also avoids human errors in these repetitive and monotonous tasks. Arguably, the most relevant physiological parameter that is still measured and supervised manually by critical care unit staff is urine output (UO). In this paper we present a patent-pending device that provides continuous and accurate measurements of patient's UO. The device uses capacitive sensors to take continuous measurements of the height of the column of liquid accumulated in two chambers that make up a plastic container. The first chamber, where the urine inputs, has a small volume. Once it has been filled it overflows into a second bigger chamber. The first chamber provides accurate UO measures of patients whose UO has to be closely supervised, while the second one avoids the need for frequent interventions by the nursing staff to empty the container. PMID:23201988

  6. Urine-activated paper batteries for biosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang Lee, Ki

    2005-09-01

    The first urine-activated laminated paper batteries have been demonstrated and reported in this paper. A simple and cheap fabrication process for the paper batteries has been developed which is compatible with the existing plastic laminating technologies or plastic molding technologies. In this battery, a magnesium (Mg) layer and copper chloride (CuCl) in the filter paper are used as the anode and the cathode, respectively. A stack consisting of a Mg layer, CuCl-doped filter paper and a copper (Cu) layer sandwiched between two plastic layers is laminated into the paper batteries by passing through the heating roller at 120 °C. The paper battery is tested and it can deliver a power greater than 1.5 mW. In addition, these urine-activated laminated paper batteries could be integrated with bioMEMS devices such as home-based health test kits providing a power source for the electronic circuit. A portion of this paper was presented at The 4th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2004), 28 30 November, 2004, Kyoto, Japan.

  7. Urine proteomics and biomarkers in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jeong; Frankel, Andrew H; Tam, Frederick W K

    2011-01-01

    The application of urine proteomics is a useful approach to the study of the proteins involved in healthy and diseased kidneys and may provide a noninvasive approach to assess disease activity and to monitor clinical response in patients with renal diseases. This technique may provide an additional tool in clinical trials and for the assessment of prognosis for patients. Both soluble proteins and membrane-bound (exosomal) proteins may be studied, and multiple approaches are available. Discovery proteomics is an unbiased approach to detect novel proteins in urine samples. Mass spectrometry (MS) is often needed to identify specific protein fragments. Targeted proteomics often involves specific immunoassays or modified MS, which enables a hypothesis-based design. These approaches may be integrated. For example, specific proteins may be identified by the discovery approach or laboratory study of disease mechanisms. These proteins will then be studied further by targeted proteomics. In order to translate to clinical practice, the specific assays need vigorous validation by means of sufficiently statistically powered clinical trials. PMID:21606655

  8. Acceptability of Global Positioning System technology to survey injecting drug users’ movements and social interactions: a pilot study from San Francisco, USA

    PubMed Central

    Mirzazadeh, A; Grasso, M; Johnson, K; Briceno, A; Navadeh, S; McFarland, W; Page, K

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite potential applications for improving health services using GPS technology, little is known about ethical concerns, acceptability, and logistical barriers for their use, particularly among marginalized groups. Objectives We garnered the insights of people who inject drug (PWID) in San Francisco on these topics. Methods PWID were enrolled through street-outreach (n=20) and an ongoing study (n=4) for 4 focus group discussions. Participants also completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographic characteristics and their numbers and types of interactions with other PWID. Results Median age was 30.5 years, majorities were male (83.3%) and white (68.2%). Most interacted with other PWID for eating meals and purchasing drugs over the last week; fewer reported interactions such as sexual contact, drug treatment, or work. Participants identified several concerns about carrying GPS devices, including what authorities might do with the data, that other PWID and dealers may suspect them as informants, and adherence to carrying and use. Most felt concerns were surmountable with detailed informed consent on the purpose of the study and practical ways to carry, charge, and hide devices. Conclusions PWID felt data collection on their movements and social interactions with other PWID using GPS can be acceptable with addressing specific concerns. The technology is now in hand to greatly expand the ability to monitor health conditions with respect to the environment and improve the location of prevention, care, and treatment facilities to serve hard to reach, mobile, and hidden populations. PMID:24990173

  9. Alcohol and Drug Use in Injured Drivers – An Emergency Room Study in a Regional Tertiary Care Centre of North West India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil; Singh, Dalbir; Medhi, Bikash

    2015-01-01

    Background Statistics show an increasing proportion of alcohol and drug use in drivers in more recent times throughout the world. It has been found that among the various human factors, alcohol consumption, using drugs and subsequent driving on the roads are major risk factors. Traffic regulations in India penalises drivers who drive beyond permissible alcohol limit of 30 mg%. Consumption of psychoactive drugs such as opioid, cannabis and benzodiazepines has been reported mainly among youngsters. Hardly any data is available in Indian context particularly from North-West Zone of India. Study objective To study the pattern of alcohol, opioid, cannabis and benzodiazepines use in injured drivers presenting to a designated trauma centre in Chandigarh zone of North-West India. Materials and Methods Consenting injured drivers who presented to the trauma centre in Chandigarh from September 2013 to January 2014 were included. Urine samples collected from the subjects were screened for abusive drug exposure (opioid, cannabis and benzodiazepines) and alcohol using commercial bedside urine immunoassay kits. In urine alcohol positive cases blood samples were collected and analysed for alcohol concentration using standard gas chromatography. Retrograde extrapolation method was used to assess BAC at the time of accident. Results A total of 200 injured drivers were included in this study. We found substance consumption in 54.5% of drivers and alcohol (40.5%) was the most prevalent substance consumed followed by opiates (13%), cannabis (7%) and benzodiazepines (7%). More than one substance was shown in urine of 11.5% of drivers. Among 81 alcohol positive screening cases, the quantitative analysis was successfully done for 76 cases. Except one, all cases showed BAC value more than 30 mg% which is the legal limit for driving any vehicle in India. The values of alcohol concentration in blood at the time of accident were in the range of 20 to 391 mg%. Conclusion This study has shown that drivers are consuming not only alcohol but other psychoactive drugs also. Indian traffic regulatory authorities are penalising drunk drivers by doing road side breath alcohol testing with no protocols for drug screening. Appropriate measures should be adopted to screen traffic offenders for psychoactive drugs also. PMID:26393144

  10. Pooling Urine Samples for Ligase Chain Reaction Screening for Genital Chlamydia trachomatis Infection in Asymptomatic Women

    PubMed Central

    Kacena, Katherine A.; Quinn, Sean B.; Howell, M. René; Madico, Guillermo E.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    1998-01-01

    The accuracy of pooling urine samples for the detection of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection by ligase chain reaction (LCR) was examined. A model was also developed to determine the number of samples to be pooled for optimal cost savings at various population prevalences. Estimated costs included technician time, laboratory consumables, and assay costs of testing pooled samples and retesting individual specimens from presumptive positive pools. Estimation of population prevalence based on the pooled LCR results was also applied. After individual urine specimens were processed, 568 specimens were pooled by 4 into 142 pools and another 520 specimens were pooled by 10 into 52 pools. For comparison, all 1,088 urine specimens were tested individually. The sample-to-cut-off ratio was lowered from 1.0 to 0.2 for pooled samples, after a pilot study which tested 148 samples pooled by 4 was conducted. The pooling algorithm was 100% (48 of 48) sensitive when samples were pooled by 4 and 98.4% (61 of 62) sensitive when samples were pooled by 10. Although 2.0% (2 of 99) of the negative pools of 4 and 7.1% (1 of 14) of the negative pools of 10 tested presumptive positive, all samples in these presumptive-positive pools were negative when retested individually, making the pooling algorithm 100% specific. In a population with 8% genital C. trachomatis prevalence, pooling by four would reduce costs by 39%. The model demonstrated that with a lower prevalence of 2%, pooling eight samples would reduce costs by 59%. Pooling urine samples for detection of C. trachomatis by LCR is sensitive, specific, and cost saving compared to testing individual samples. PMID:9466763

  11. Frequency and structure of stimulant designer drug consumption among suspected drug users in Budapest and South-East Hungary in 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Institóris, László; Árok, Zsófia; Seprenyi, Katalin; Varga, Tibor; Sára-Klausz, Gabriella; Keller, Éva; Tóth, Réka A; Sala, Leonardo; Kereszty, Éva; Róna, Kálmán

    2015-03-01

    Identification of abuse and frequency patterns of stimulant designer drugs (SDDs) provides important information for their risk assessment and legislative control. In the present study urine and/or blood samples of suspected drug users in criminal cases were analysed by GC-MS for 38 SDDs, and for the most frequent illicit and psychoactive licit drugs in Hungary. Between July 2012 and June 2013, 2744 suspected drug users were sampled in Budapest and during 2012 and 2013, 774 persons were sampled in South-East Hungary (Csongrád County - neighbour the Romanian and Serbian borders). In Budapest 71.4% of cases, and in South-East Hungary 61% of cases were positive for at least one substance. Pentedrone was the most frequent SDD in both regions; however, the frequency distribution of the remaining drugs was highly diverse. SDDs were frequently present in combination with other drugs - generally with amphetamine or other stimulants, cannabis and/or benzodiazepines. The quarterly distribution of positive samples indicated remarkable seasonal changes in the frequency and pattern of consumption. Substances placed on the list of illicit drugs (mephedrone, 4-fluoro-amphetamine, MDPV, methylone, 4-MEC) showed a subsequent drop in frequency and were replaced by other SDDs (pentedrone, 3-MMC, methiopropamine, etc.). Newly identified compounds from seized materials were added to the list of new psychoactive substances ("Schedule C"). While the risk assessment of substances listed in Schedule C has to be performed within 2 years after scheduling, continuous monitoring of their presence and frequency among drug users is essential. In summary, our results suggest which substances should be dropped from the list of SDDs measured in biological samples; while the appearance of new substances from seized materials indicate the need for developing adequate standard analytical methods. PMID:25671307

  12. Prevalence of drugs used in cases of alleged sexual assault.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, M A; Salamone, S J

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of reports in the U.S. of the use of drugs, often in conjunction with alcohol, to commit sexual assault. A study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of drug use in sexual assault cases in which substances are suspected of being involved. Law enforcement agencies, emergency rooms, and rape crisis centers across the U.S. were offered the opportunity to submit urine samples collected from victims of alleged sexual assault, where drug use was suspected, for analysis of alcohol and drugs which may be associated with sexual assault. Each sample was tested by immunoassay for amphetamines, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, cocaine metabolite (benzoylecgonine), cannabinoids, methaqualone, opiates, phencyclidine and propoxyphene. The positive screen results were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). In addition, each sample was tested for flunitrazepam metabolites and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) by GC-MS and for ethanol by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Over a 26-month period, 1179 samples were collected and analyzed from 49 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. The states sending the most samples were California (183), Texas (119), Florida (61), Pennsylvania (61), New York (61), Minnesota (50), Illinois (47), Indiana (44), Michigan (40), Maryland (37), Virginia (32), and Massachusetts (31). Four-hundred sixty eight of the samples were found negative for all the substances tested; 451 were positive for ethanol, 218 for cannabinoids, 97 for benzoylecgonine, 97 for benzodiazepines, 51 for amphetamines, 48 for GHB, 25 for opiates, 17 for propoxyphene, and 12 for barbiturates. There were no samples identified as positive for phencyclidine or methaqualone. In addition, 35% of the drug-positive samples contained multiple drugs. This study indicates that, with respect to alleged sexual assault cases, the prevalence of ethanol is very high, followed by cannabinoids, cocaine, benzodiazepines, amphetamines, and GHB. Although only a couple of substances have been implicated with sexual assault, this study has shown that almost 20 different substances have been associated with this crime. This study also raises the concern of illicit and licit drug use in sexual assault cases and suggests the need to test for a range of drugs in these cases. It also highlights the need to test for GHB, which is not generally tested for in a normal toxicology screen. PMID:10369321

  13. Evaluation of the Drug Free Youth in Town Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strusinski, Marianne; Collins, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluates a program that rewards Miami-area youths for adhering to a drug-free lifestyle. Students may belong to the Drug Free Youth in Town Club by presenting clear urine samples and agreeing to random testing. Principals and students like the program, which includes a community-service component. (MLH)

  14. The calibration of cellphone camera-based colorimetric sensor array and its application in the determination of glucose in urine.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ming-Yan; Wu, Qiong-Shui; Li, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Guan, Ya-Feng; Feng, Liang

    2015-12-15

    In this work, a novel approach that can calibrate the colors obtained with a cellphone camera was proposed for the colorimetric sensor array. The variations of ambient light conditions, imaging positions and even cellphone brands could all be compensated via taking the black and white backgrounds of the sensor array as references, thereby yielding accurate measurements. The proposed calibration approach was successfully applied to the detection of glucose in urine by a colorimetric sensor array. Snapshots of the glucose sensor array by a cellphone camera were calibrated by the proposed compensation method and the urine samples at different glucose concentrations were well discriminated with no confusion after a hierarchical clustering analysis. PMID:26275712

  15. Analysis of Fluconazole in Human Urine Sample by High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermawan, D.; Ali, N. A. Md; Ibrahim, W. A. Wan; Sanagi, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    A method for determination of fluconazole, antifungal drug in human urine by using reversed-phased high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detector was developed. Optimization HPLC conditions were carried out by changing the flow rate and composition of mobile phase. The optimum separation conditions at a flow rate 0.85 mL/min with a composition of mobile phase containing methanol:water (70:30, v/v) with UV detection at a wavelength 254 nm was able to analyze fluconazole within 3 min. The excellent linearity was obtained in the range of concentration 1 to 10 ?g/mL with r2 = 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 0.39 ?g/mL and 1.28 ?g/mL, respectively. Solid phase extraction (SPE) method using octadecylsilane (C18) as a sorbent was used to clean-up and pre-concentrated of the urine sample prior to HPLC analysis. The average recoveries of fluconazole in spiked urine sample was 72.4% with RSD of 3.21% (n=3).

  16. Comparison of self-reported drug use with quantitative and qualitative urinalysis for assessment of drug use in treatment studies.

    PubMed

    Preston, K L; Silverman, K; Schuster, C R; Cone, E J

    1997-01-01

    The effectiveness of substance abuse treatment programs can be monitored by self-reported drug use and objectively measured by qualitative and quantitative urinalysis. The advantages and disadvantages of each of these three methods of assessing drug use are reviewed. Data collected in a clinical trial of a behavioral treatment for cocaine abuse are used to evaluate the relationships among qualitative and quantitative urinalysis for cocaine metabolite and self-reported cocaine use. Qualitative and quantitative urine testing showed greater rates of drug use than that shown by self-report, though there were significant correlations between self-reported use and urine toxicology results. Benzoylecgonine concentrations in urine specimens supported the suggestions that rates of drug use as determined by qualitative urinalysis are artificially high due to carryover and were informative about subjects' patterns of use. PMID:9243560

  17. Identification and differentiation of barbiturates, other sedative-hypnotics and their metabolites in urine integrated in a general screening procedure using computerized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maurer, H H

    1990-09-14

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric procedure is described for the identification and differentiation of sedative-hypnotics and their metabolites in urine. The following 24 barbiturates and thirteen other hypnotics could be detected: acecarbromal, allobarbital, amobarbital, aprobarbital, barbital, brallobarbital, bromisoval, (sec)butabarbital, butalbital, butobarbital, carbromal, clomethiazole, crotylbarbital, cyclobarbital, cyclopentobarbital, diethylallylacetamide, dipropylbarbital, glutethimide, guaifenesin, ethinamate, heptabarbital, hexobarbital, meprobamate, methaqualone, metharbital, methohexital, methylphenobarbital, methyprylone, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, propallylonal, pyrithyldione, secobarbital, thiobutabarbital, thiopental, vinbarbital and vinylbital. The procedure presented is integrated in a general screening procedure (general unknown analysis) for several groups of drugs detecting over 300 drugs and over 1000 of their metabolites. It includes cleavage of conjugates by acid hydrolysis, isolation by liquid-liquid extraction, derivatization by acetylation, separation by capillary gas chromatography, and identification by computerized mass spectrometry. Using mass chromatography with the selected ions m/z 83, 117, 141, 167, 169, 207, 221 and 235, the presence of barbiturates, other hypnotics and/or their metabolites was indicated. The identity of positive signals in the reconstructed mass chromatograms was confirmed by a visual or computerized comparison of the stored full mass spectra with the reference spectra. The sample preparation, mass chromatograms, reference mass spectra and gas chromatographic retention indices are documented. PMID:2079506

  18. Microchemical urinalysis. IX - Determination of hydroxyproline in urine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunbaum, B. W.; Pace, N.

    1973-01-01

    A simplified procedure is described for the determination of hydroxyproline in human or monkey urine. In this procedure 1 ml of urine is subjected in succession to hydrolysis, oxidation, extraction, and color development. During these steps impurities and interfering substances are eliminated, thus resulting in a chromophore due to hydroxyproline alone.

  19. Automated biowaste sampling system urine subsystem operating model, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.; Mangialardi, J. K.; Rosen, F.

    1973-01-01

    The urine subsystem automatically provides for the collection, volume sensing, and sampling of urine from six subjects during space flight. Verification of the subsystem design was a primary objective of the current effort which was accomplished thru the detail design, fabrication, and verification testing of an operating model of the subsystem.

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Chlorine isotopic composition of perchlorate in human urine

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Chlorine isotopic composition of perchlorate in human urine as a means chlorine isotopes of perchlorate extracted from composite urine samples from two distinct populations: one for the two sample populations, and that chlorine isotope ratios provide a robust tool for elucidating

  1. 21 CFR 876.5250 - Urine collector and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... catheter, which includes the urinary drainage collection kit and the closed urine drainage system and... catheter, which includes the corrugated rubber sheath, pediatric urine collector, leg bag for external use... catheter. The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5250 - Urine collector and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... catheter, which includes the urinary drainage collection kit and the closed urine drainage system and... catheter, which includes the corrugated rubber sheath, pediatric urine collector, leg bag for external use... catheter. The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5250 - Urine collector and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... catheter, which includes the urinary drainage collection kit and the closed urine drainage system and... catheter, which includes the corrugated rubber sheath, pediatric urine collector, leg bag for external use... catheter. The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5250 - Urine collector and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... catheter, which includes the urinary drainage collection kit and the closed urine drainage system and... catheter, which includes the corrugated rubber sheath, pediatric urine collector, leg bag for external use... catheter. The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of...

  5. NEW COLUMN SEPARATION METHOD FOR EMERGENCY URINE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S; Brian Culligan, B

    2007-08-28

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Bioassay Lab participated in the 2007 NRIP Emergency Response program administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in May, 2007. A new rapid column separation method was applied directly to the NRIP 2007 emergency urine samples, with only minimal sample preparation to reduce preparation time. Calcium phosphate precipitation, previously used to pre-concentrate actinides and Sr-90 in NRIP 2006 urine and water samples, was not used for the NRIP 2007 urine samples. Instead, the raw urine was acidified and passed directly through the stacked resin columns (TEVA+TRU+SR Resins) to separate the actinides and strontium from the NRIP urine samples more quickly. This improvement reduced sample preparation time for the NRIP 2007 emergency urine analyses significantly. This approach works well for small volume urine samples expected during an emergency response event. Based on initial feedback from NIST, the SRS Environmental Bioassay Lab had the most rapid analysis times for actinides and strontium-90 analyses for NRIP 2007 urine samples.

  6. USE OF DISPOSABLE DIAPERS TO COLLECT URINE IN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large studies of children's health as it relates to exposures to chemicals in the environment often require measurements of biomarkers of chemical exposures or effects in urine samples. But collection of urine samples from infants and toddlers is difficult. For large exposure s...

  7. Gas chromatographic analysis of metaldehyde in urine and plasma.

    PubMed

    Booze, T F; Oehme, F W

    1985-01-01

    A gas chromatographic assay specific for the direct analysis of metaldehyde in plasma and urine is reported. This assay takes less than 30 min to perform, has good reproducibility, requires only routine equipment, and has a sensitivity of 1 ng/microL for urine and 2 ng/microL for plasma. PMID:4033074

  8. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The collector shall direct the donor to go into the room or stall used...

  9. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Urine specimen quantity. 26.109 Section 26.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.109 Urine specimen quantity. (a) Licensees and other entities who are subject to this subpart shall establish...

  10. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Urine specimen quantity. 26.109 Section 26.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.109 Urine specimen quantity. (a) Licensees and other entities who are subject to this subpart shall establish...

  11. 10 CFR 26.105 - Preparing for urine collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Preparing for urine collection. 26.105 Section 26.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.105 Preparing for urine collection. (a) The collector shall ask the donor to remove any unnecessary...

  12. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Urine specimen quantity. 26.109 Section 26.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.109 Urine specimen quantity. (a) Licensees and other entities who are subject to this subpart shall establish...

  13. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Urine specimen quantity. 26.109 Section 26.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.109 Urine specimen quantity. (a) Licensees and other entities who are subject to this subpart shall establish...

  14. 10 CFR 26.109 - Urine specimen quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Urine specimen quantity. 26.109 Section 26.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.109 Urine specimen quantity. (a) Licensees and other entities who are subject to this subpart shall establish...

  15. 10 CFR 26.105 - Preparing for urine collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Preparing for urine collection. 26.105 Section 26.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.105 Preparing for urine collection. (a) The collector shall ask the donor to remove any unnecessary...

  16. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The collector shall direct the donor to go into the room or stall used...

  17. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.113 Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use...

  18. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.113 Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use...

  19. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The collector shall direct the donor to go into the room or stall used...

  20. 10 CFR 26.105 - Preparing for urine collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preparing for urine collection. 26.105 Section 26.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.105 Preparing for urine collection. (a) The collector shall ask the donor to remove any unnecessary...

  1. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.113 Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use...

  2. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The collector shall direct the donor to go into the room or stall used...

  3. 10 CFR 26.105 - Preparing for urine collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Preparing for urine collection. 26.105 Section 26.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.105 Preparing for urine collection. (a) The collector shall ask the donor to remove any unnecessary...

  4. 10 CFR 26.107 - Collecting a urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen. 26.107 Section 26.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.107 Collecting a urine specimen. (a) The collector shall direct the donor to go into the room or stall used...

  5. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.113 Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use...

  6. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.113 Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use...

  7. 10 CFR 26.105 - Preparing for urine collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Preparing for urine collection. 26.105 Section 26.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.105 Preparing for urine collection. (a) The collector shall ask the donor to remove any unnecessary...

  8. Anti-JCV antibodies detection and JCV DNA levels in PBMC, serum and urine in a cohort of Spanish Multiple Sclerosis patients treated with natalizumab.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Mozo, Maria Inmaculada; Garcia-Montojo, Marta; De Las Heras, Virginia; Garcia-Martinez, Angel; Arias-Leal, Ana María; Casanova, Ignacio; Arroyo, Rafael; Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    One of the most effective multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment is natalizumab. Nevertheless, it has been associated with an increased risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) caused by the JC virus (JCV). Our main objective was to assess the utility of testing JCV-DNA, apart from anti-JCV antibodies, to determine which natalizumab-treated MS patients has been previously in contact with the virus. For this purpose, 138 MS natalizumab/non-natalizumab treated patients participated in several studies. Cross-sectional study (CS): association of several epidemiological variables with anti-JCV antibodies and JCV-DNA levels in PBMC/serum/urine. First longitudinal study (A): evaluation of JCV-DNA prevalence in urine throughout the treatment. Second longitudinal study (B): simultaneous assessment of antibodies and viral DNA levels in PBMC/serum/urine at two time points. CS: The seropositivity rate for anti-JCV antibodies (62.3 %) and JCV prevalence in urine (59.4 %) were similar; although 26 % of our population was positive only using one of the two techniques. A: The viral prevalence in urine seemed to increase between the baseline visit and the others (Baseline-Visit/V18months, p?=?0.006). B: Our rate of positive antibody seroconversion was 36 %. Nearly all patients with detectable JCV-DNA levels in PBMC excreted the virus intermittently in urine; while our PML case, positive in PBMC and serum samples 2 month before the PML, excreted JCV permanently. In conclusion, the determination of JCV DNA levels in urine could be complementary to anti-JCV antibodies for identifying MS patients who has been infected by the JCV. Further research would be necessary to understand the different JCV excretion profiles in urine. PMID:23979860

  9. Club Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug ... Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant associated with serious ...

  10. Urine-drainage leg bags: an overview.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mary

    This article looks at leg bags from the perspective of the clinical guidance available, published research, review papers, the diverse nature of products available, and their use with catheters, sheaths or urinals. The part that leg bags play in catheter-associated urinary tract infection control is addressed. Other aspects of catheter safety are discussed, including the avoidance of catheter traction. Variations in leg-bag structure including bag size, inlet tubing, tap, connector and backing, along with the reasons for selecting a particular leg bag are considered, along with the choice of either leg-bag straps or sleeves. The article concludes that, as a result of the variation of leg bags available, patients may require assistance and support from health professionals in finding the right leg bag for them. PMID:26450819

  11. Genotyping of Leptospira directly in urine samples of cattle demonstrates a diversity of species and strains in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hamond, C; Pestana, C P; Medeiros, M A; Lilenbaum, W

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Leptospira in urine samples of cattle by direct sequencing of the secY gene. The validity of this approach was assessed using ten Leptospira strains obtained from cattle in Brazil and 77 DNA samples previously extracted from cattle urine, that were positive by PCR for the genus-specific lipL32 gene of Leptospira. Direct sequencing identified 24 (31·1%) interpretable secY sequences and these were identical to those obtained from direct DNA sequencing of the urine samples from which they were recovered. Phylogenetic analyses identified four species: L. interrogans, L. borgpetersenii, L. noguchii, and L. santarosai with the most prevalent genotypes being associated with L. borgpetersenii. While direct sequencing cannot, as yet, replace culturing of leptospires, it is a valid additional tool for epidemiological studies. An unexpected finding from this study was the genetic diversity of Leptospira infecting Brazilian cattle. PMID:26076668

  12. Forgotten hardware: how to urinate in a spacesuit.

    PubMed

    Hollins, Hunter

    2013-06-01

    On May 5, 1961, astronaut Alan Shepard became the first American to fly in space. Although National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had discounted the need for him to urinate, Shepard did, in his spacesuit, short circuiting his electronic biosensors. With the development of the pressure suit needed for high-altitude and space flight during the 1950s, technicians had developed the means for urine collection. However, cultural mores, combined with a lack of interagency communication, and the technical difficulties of spaceflight made human waste collection a difficult task. Despite the difficulties, technicians at NASA created a successful urine collection device that John Glenn wore on the first Mercury orbital flight on February 20, 1962. With minor modifications, male astronauts used this system to collect urine until the Space Shuttle program. John Glenn's urine collection device is at the National Air and Space Museum and has been on view to the public since 1976. PMID:23728129

  13. Application of electrolysis for detoxification of an antineoplastic in urine.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toyohide; Hirose, Jun; Sano, Kouichi; Kato, Ryuji; Ijiri, Yoshio; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Goto, Emi; Tamai, Hiroshi; Nakano, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Antineoplastics in excreta from patients have been considered to be one of the origins of cytotoxic, carcinogenic, teratogenic, and mutagenic contaminants in surface water. Recent studies have demonstrated that antineoplastics in clinical wastewater can be detoxified by electrolysis. In this study, to develop a method for the detoxification of antineoplastics in excreta, methotrexate solution in the presence of human urine was electrolyzed and evaluated. We found that urine inhibits detoxification by electrolysis; however, this inhibition decreased by diluting urine. In urine samples, the concentrations of active chlorine generated by anodic oxidation from 0.9% NaCl solution for inactivation of antineoplastics increased in dilution-dependent and time-dependent manner. These results indicate that electrolysis with platinum-based iridium oxide composite electrode is a possible method for the detoxification of a certain antineoplastic in urine. PMID:22154144

  14. Quantitative analysis of creatinine in urine by metalized nanostructured parylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Malvadkar, Niranjan; Koytek, S.; Bylander, J.; Reeves, W. Brian; Demirel, Melik C.

    2010-03-01

    A highly accurate, real-time multisensor agent monitor for biomarker detection is required for early detection of kidney diseases. Urine creatinine level can provide useful information on the status of the kidney. We prepare nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates without template or lithography, which provides controllable, well-organized nanostructures on the surface, for the quantitative analysis of creatinine concentration in urine. We present our work on sensitivity of the SERS substrate to urine samples collected from diabetic patients and healthy persons. We report the preparation of a new type of SERS substrate, which provides fast (<10 s), highly sensitive (creatinine concentration <0.5 ?g/mL) and reproducible (<5% variation) detection of urine. Our method to analyze the creatinine level in urine is in good agreement with the enzymatic method.

  15. Porphyrinogens in urine in various types of porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Martásek, P; Jirsa, M; Kordac, V

    1982-03-01

    Porphyrinogens were determined in very fresh, diluted morning urine in two types of hepatic porphyria, using a simple and very quick spectrophotometric method. It was shown that acidification by itself is insufficient for the complete conversion of colourless porphyrinogens into porphyrins in photometric determination of porphyrins in diluted urine. A correlation was shown between percentual content of porphyrinogens and the sum of pentacarboxyporphyrins and coprophyrin. A difference was found between the excretion of porphyrinogens in morning fresh urine in porphyria cutanea tarda (average porphyrinogen fraction 22.5%, SD 10.3% of total porphyrins) and in acute intermittent porphyria (average porphyrinogen fraction 77.1%, SD 9.3% of total porphyrins). The method is at the same time suitable for the detection of urobilinoids in urine. Oxidation of the urine in acute intermittent porphyria is recommended before absorption on talc and subsequent thin-layer chromatography, because porphyrinogens are not adsorbed on talc. PMID:7077225

  16. Urine biomarkers of schistosomiais and its associated bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Sanaa; Matboli, Marwa; Shawky, Sherif; Essawy, Nada O E

    2015-08-01

    Schistosomiasis (SCH) is the second only to malaria among the parasitic diseases affecting humans regarding the prevalence of infection worldwide. In this nonsystematic review, we summarize the existing data on commercially available and promising investigational urine markers for the detection of SCH and its associated bladder cancer (BC). We searched PubMed, Scopus and Cochran without time limits. We reviewed the recent literatures on urine-based markers for SCH and its associated BC. Many studies identified several urine biomarkers of Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni worms and their associated BC using automated, inexpensive, quantitative assays in urine. These markers may aid in early detection of bladder carcinoma and have the potential to reduce the number of follow-up cystoscopy, thus reducing healthcare costs and patient discomfort, at the same time. Nevertheless, clinical evidence is insufficient to warrant the substitution of the cystoscopic follow-up scheme by any of the currently available urine marker tests. PMID:26105083

  17. Endothelial function and urine albumin levels among asymptomatic Mexican-Americans and non-Hispanic whites

    E-print Network

    2008-01-01

    Model 3), or urine albu- min:creatinine (Alb:Cr) ratio (A spot urine was collected for albumin and creatinineUrine Samples Fasting venous blood samples were obtained for analysis of serum electrolytes and creatinine;

  18. Drug screening and confirmation by GC-MS: comparison of EMIT II and Online KIMS against 10 drugs between US and England laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lu, Natalie T; Taylor, Bruce G

    2006-03-10

    Drug screening through urinalysis is a widely accepted tool for rapid detection of potential drug use at a relatively low cost. It is, therefore, a potentially useful method for detecting and monitoring drug use in a variety of contexts such as the criminal justice system, pre-employment screening and a variety of treatment centers. This article explores the efficacy of two commercially available drug-screening assays: Online KIMS assay (Roche) and EMIT II assays. First, we evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of two immunoassays. A total of 738 urine samples were collected among adult arrestee populations from Chicago, New Orleans and Seattle through the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program. Partial samples were split within one laboratory and analyzed by both enzymes multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) II and kinetic interaction of microparticle in solution (KIMS) assays for a 10-drug panel (amphetamine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, marijuana, cocaine, methadone, methaqualone, opiate, phencyclidine and propoxyphene). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used as a confirmation method for all positives from either EMIT II or KIMS for all experiments. Second, the paper examines whether using different testing laboratories plays a role in the final results. The same experiments were repeated at two different testing locations: one in California and one in London and England. Third, the paper studies whether drug testing results vary between two laboratories when each of them had used their own routine screening method: the Forensic Science Service (FSS) at Birmingham, United Kingdom with KIMS assay and Medscreen Limited at London, United Kingdom with EMIT II. In summary, both EMIT II and KIMS assays generate fairly consistent results. The concordance rate against each of the 10 drugs tested is relatively high (97.4-100%). The discrepancies, in most cases, occurred at drug concentrations near the cut-off levels. There were more discrepant results between two laboratories compared to when specimens were analyzed at the same laboratory using two different assays. PMID:15899564

  19. Drug Usage and Attitude Toward Drugs Among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Herbert J.; Keir, Richard G.

    1971-01-01

    Results of the data presented suggest that there is considerable experimentation among college students with illegal drugs, especially marijuana. Their attitudes toward other drugs still seems cautious. Marijuana, however, seems-to be accepted and generally positively evaluated. (Author)

  20. [Liver and drug metabolism].

    PubMed

    Mikheeva, O M

    2011-01-01

    Liver metabolism aims to change the biological activity of drugs to make them water-soluble to be excreted with bile and urine. The degree of metabolism depends on fermentative capacity for each drag (P450 fermentative system is localized in microsomal fraction of hepatocyte). Metabolism ability also changes under the influence of other substances. Liver diseases lead up to decrease of drug clirens and to increase the semi-excretion time because of reduction of liver metabolism. Therefore the drags usually undergoing intensive liver metabolism necessitate a high risk of overdose when liver diseases present. On the other hand no risk of overdose exist when drags with low liver metabolism are used. PMID:21560652

  1. Halogenated Anesthetics Determination in Urine by SPME/GC/MS and Urine Levels Relationship Evaluation with Surgical Theatres Contamination.

    PubMed

    Indelicato, Serena; Bongiorno, David; Indelicato, Sergio; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Tranchina, Ernesto; Avellone, Giuseppe; Arcadipane, Concetta; Giambartino, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a new sensitive analytical method has been developed and evaluated for the determination of the most commonly used gaseous anesthetics, desflurane, sevoflurane, and this latter's hepatic metabolite hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) in the urine. In addition, an evaluation of anesthetics exposition on the urine levels of a small population of surgical operators has been performed and results are briefly discussed. PMID:24719778

  2. Halogenated Anesthetics Determination in Urine by SPME/GC/MS and Urine Levels Relationship Evaluation with Surgical Theatres Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Indelicato, Serena; Tranchina, Ernesto; Arcadipane, Concetta; Giambartino, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a new sensitive analytical method has been developed and evaluated for the determination of the most commonly used gaseous anesthetics, desflurane, sevoflurane, and this latter's hepatic metabolite hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) in the urine. In addition, an evaluation of anesthetics exposition on the urine levels of a small population of surgical operators has been performed and results are briefly discussed. PMID:24719778

  3. Quantitative analysis of zopiclone, N-desmethylzopiclone, zopiclone N-oxide and 2-amino-5-chloropyridine in urine using LC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Gunnel H; Kugelberg, Fredrik C; Ahlner, Johan; Kronstrand, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was validated to allow determination of zopiclone (ZOP), N-desmethylzopiclone (NDZOP), zopiclone N-oxide (ZOPNO) and 2-amino-5-chloropyridine (ACP) in urine at concentrations up to 3,000 ng/mL within 3.5 min. This method was used for quantitative analysis of the analytes in authentic urine samples obtained 10 h after oral administration of zopiclone (Imovane(®)) and in aliquots of the same urine samples after different storage conditions. In addition, pH of each studied urine sample was measured over time. The results showed that formation of ACP occurred at elevated pH and/or temperature by degradation of ZOP, NDZOP and ZOPNO. This method was also applied to samples obtained from two female victims of drug-facilitated assault. One sample had been exposed to long-term storage conditions at different temperatures and at pH >8.2, which resulted in high concentrations of ACP. The other sample, which was exposed to pH <6.5, showed no formation of ACP. ACP is formed both from ZOP and from its metabolites NDZOP and ZOPNO depending on the pH of the urine, time of storage and/or the temperature conditions. For correct interpretation in forensic cases, ZOP, its major metabolites and ACP should be analyzed. When ACP is identified in urine, the concentrations of ZOP, NDZOP and ZOPNO should be interpreted with great caution. PMID:24790062

  4. [Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production by Enterobacteriaceae isolates from urine cultures of outpatients: results of a 7-year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Çelikbilek, Nevreste; Gözalan, Ay?egül; Özdem, Birsen; K?rca, Fisun; Aç?kgöz, Ziya Cibali

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the change of the frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates from urine samples of outpatients in years and to analyse the antibiotic resistance profiles for a rational drug use. The urine samples cultured in our laboratory from the patients who were admitted to outpatient clinics of our hospital between years 2007-2013 were included in this study. Enterobacteriaceae strains were isolated and identified by conventional methods and API 20E system (BioMérieux, France). The standard antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed by Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. ESBL production were screened by double-disk synergy method according to CLSI guidelines. E-test method (BioMérieux, France) were used for the verification of suspicious ESBL production. The identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed for a total of 12.535 isolates. Of the isolates 8716 were identified as Escherichia coli (69.3%), 1514 were Klebsiella pneumoniae/oxytoca (12.1%), 257 were Proteus mirabilis (2.1%), 345 were other Enterobacteriae members (8%), 411 were various non-fermentative gram-negative bacteria (3.3%) and 1292 were various gram-positive bacteria (10.3%). The total positivity rate of ESBL was found as 21.8% (2.283/10.487), and the ESBL positive rates for E.coli, K.pneumoniae/oxytoca and P.mirabilis were 21.2%, 28.2% and 4.7%, respectively. Other Enterobacteriaceae isolates were not evaluated because of the absence of standardized methods and breakpoint values. There was no statistically significant difference among ESBL producing isolates within seven years (p= 0.364). The antibiotic resistance rates of the ESBL-positive isolates were statistically higher than ESBL-negative isolates [amoxicillin-clavulanate (73.1%/11.3%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (63.1%/31.0%), nitrofurantoin (17.3%/8.6%), gentamicin (42.2%/10.1%), amikacin (3.5%/0.9%), tobramisin (56.8%/10.5%), imipenem (0.3%/0.1%), ofloxacin (66.8%/19.8%), ticarcillin-clavulanate (73.5%/19.8%), piperacillin-tazobactam (28.8%/5.0%)] (p< 0.05). Statistically significant variations were detected within the years for the resistance rates of amoxicillin-clavulanate (p= 0.001), tobramycin (p=0.003), ofloxacin (p= 0.001), ticarcillin-clavulanate (p= 0.001) and piperacillin-tazobactam (p= 0.001) were detected within the years. Although a quite high percentage of ESBL positivity in Enterobacteriaceae isolates was determined, there was a slight but not statistically significant increase of this value during the seven-year period. The stability of the percentage of ESBL positivity may indicate a positive change in the habit of the usage of beta-lactam antibiotics. According to the results of our study, the most effective drugs for ESBL-producing isolates were piperacillin-tazobactam among inhibitor combinations, amikacin among aminoglycosides and nitrofurantoin among orally-used drugs. PMID:26167826

  5. Post mortem concentrations of endogenous gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and in vitro formation in stored blood and urine samples.

    PubMed

    Busardň, Francesco Paolo; Bertol, Elisabetta; Vaiano, Fabio; Baglio, Giovanni; Montana, Angelo; Barbera, Nunziata; Zaami, Simona; Romano, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a central nervous system depressant, primarily used as a recreational drug of abuse with numerous names. It has also been involved in various instances of drug-facilitated sexual assault due to its potential incapacitating effects. The first aim of this paper is to measure the post-mortem concentration of endogenous GHB in whole blood and urine samples of 30 GHB free-users, who have been divided according to the post-mortem interval (PMI) in three groups (first group: 24-36h; second group: 37-72h; third group: 73-192h), trying to evaluate the role of PMI in affecting post mortem levels. Second, the Authors have evaluated the new formation of GHB in vitro in blood and urine samples of the three groups, which have been stored at -20°C, 4°C and 20°C over a period of one month. The concentrations were measured by GC-MS after liquid-liquid extraction according to the method validated and published by Elliot (For. Sci. Int., 2003). For urine samples, GHB concentrations were creatinine-normalized. In the first group the GHB mean concentration measured after autopsy was: 2.14mg/L (range 0.54-3.21mg/L) in blood and 3.90mg/g (range 0.60-4.81mg/g) in urine; in the second group it was: 5.13mg/L (range 1.11-9.60mg/L) in blood and 3.93mg/g (range 0.91-7.25mg/g) in urine; in the third group it was: 11.8mg/L (range 3.95-24.12mg/L) in blood and 9.83mg/g (range 3.67-21.90mg/g) in urine. The results obtained in blood and urine samples showed a statistically significant difference among groups (p<0.001) in the first analysis performed immediately after autopsy. Throughout the period of investigation up to 4 weeks, the comparison of storage temperatures within each group showed in blood and urine samples a mean difference at 20°C compared to -20°C not statistically significant at the 10% level. These findings allow us to affirm that the PMI strongly affects the post mortem production of GHB in blood and urine samples. Regarding the new formation of GHB in vitro both in blood and urine samples of the three groups, which have been stored at -20°C, 4°C and 20°C over a period of one month, although there was no significant increases of GHB levels throughout the period of investigation, the lowest increases were found both in blood and urine at -20°C, therefore we recommend the latter as optimal storage temperature. PMID:25123534

  6. Drug Arrests and Injection Drug Deterrence

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Enrique R.; Chatterjee, Sudip; Cleland, Charles M.; Tempalski, Barbara; Brady, Joanne E.; Cooper, Hannah L. F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We tested the hypothesis that higher rates of previous hard drug–related arrests predict lower rates of injection drug use. Methods. We analyzed drug-related arrest data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program for 93 large US metropolitan statistical areas in 1992 to 2002 to predict previously published annual estimates of the number of injection drug users (IDUs) per 10 000 population. Results. In linear mixed-effects regression, hard drug–related arrest rates were positively associated (parameter = +1.59; SE = 0.57) with the population rate of IDUs in 1992 and were not associated with change in the IDU rate over time (parameter = ?0.15; SE = 0.39). Conclusions. Deterrence-based approaches to reducing drug use seem not to reduce IDU prevalence. Alternative approaches such as harm reduction, which prevents HIV transmission and increases referrals to treatment, may be a better foundation for policy. PMID:21164088

  7. The Urine Sediment as a Biomarker of Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Perazella, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    The modern era of medicine has ushered in new diagnostic technologies to assist the clinician in evaluating patients with kidney disease. The birth of automated urine analysis technology and centralized laboratory testing has unfortunately made examination of urine sediment by physicians a rare event. At the same time, identifying novel urine biomarkers for kidney disease has become a research priority in nephrology, and the search for the "renal troponin" has progressed at a fast pace. Despite this, urine sediment examination remains a time-honored test that provides a wealth of information about the patient's kidney condition and performs favorably as a urinary biomarker. It alerts the clinician to the presence of kidney disease and provides diagnostic information that often identifies the compartment of kidney injury. In addition, sediment findings may guide therapy and assist in prognostication. As such, it is premature to abandon urine sediment examination. It may be more appropriate to combine urine sediment examination with new candidate biomarkers that enter clinical practice to create a "diagnostic panel" that provides clinicians with a useful battery of diagnostic tests. To accomplish this, we as nephrologists must encourage continued training and maintenance of competency in urine sediment examination. PMID:25943719

  8. Hygienic quality of faeces treated in urine diverting vermicomposting toilets.

    PubMed

    Lalander, Cecilia H; Hill, Geoffrey B; Vinnerĺs, Björn

    2013-11-01

    On-site sanitation solutions have gained much interest in recent years. One such solution is the urine diverting vermicomposting toilet (UDVT). This study evaluated the hygienic quality of the composted material in six UDVTs in operation in France. Samples were taken from three sampling positions in each toilet, with increasing distance from the fresh material. The concentration of Salmonella spp., Enterococcus spp., thermotolarent coliforms and coliphages were analysed and plotted against a number of variables. The variables found to have the greatest impact was the pH (for Enterococcus spp. and thermotolarent coliforms (TTC)) and time since last maintenance (coliphages). The pH was found to correlate with the material maturity. The current practise of maintenance can cause recontamination of the stabilised material and increase the risk of regrowth of pathogenic microorganisms. A modification in the maintenance procedure, in which a fourth maturation point is introduced, would eliminate this risk. UDVTs were found to be a good on-site sanitation option as the maintenance requirement is small and the system effectively reduced odour and concentration of pathogen and indicator organisms in human waste while keeping the accumulation of material down to a minimum. If the vermicompost is to be used for crops consumed raw, an additional sanitisation step is recommended. PMID:23932466

  9. Significance of 19?norandrosterone in athletes' urine samples

    PubMed Central

    Ayotte, C

    2006-01-01

    Nandrolone and other 19?norsteroid potent anabolic steroids have been prohibited in sports for 30 years. The detection of the main urinary metabolite—19?norandrosterone—in amounts greater than 2?ng/ml constitutes an adverse analytical finding. The presence in nutritional sport supplements of steroids not listed on the label has undoubtedly resulted in positive tests, but inadvertent consumption of meat containing residues of hormonal treatment should not realistically cause apprehension. Although highly improbable, athletes should prudently avoid meals composed of pig offal in the hours preceding the test since the consumption of edible parts of a non?castrated pig, containing 19?nortestosterone, has been shown to results in the excretion of 19?norandrosterone in the following hours. Norsteroid metabolites are formed during pregnancy and excreted as minor metabolites of norethisterone, and minute amounts have been identified in some male and female samples when using more sensitive techniques of detection. Whereas exercise does not seem to be a significant factor in 19?norandrosterone excretion, some rare urine samples were found to be a suitable medium for in situ 19?demethylation of urinary metabolites. PMID:16799098

  10. Pooling of Urine Samples for Screening for Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Ligase Chain Reaction: Accuracy and Application

    PubMed Central

    Kacena, Katherine A.; Quinn, Sean B.; Hartman, Suzanne C.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    1998-01-01

    The accuracy of detection of genital Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection in pooled urine samples by ligase chain reaction (LCR) was examined in three populations. Firstly, urine specimens from 300 female military recruits (FMR) were tested by LCR individually and in pools of four and six. Secondly, 300 urine specimens from middle-school students (MSS) were tested individually by LCR, and then the processed specimens were stored frozen for subsequent testing in pools of 4 and 10. Thirdly, 600 frozen urine specimens from high-school students (HSS) were tested by using the LCR pooling algorithm, i.e., testing processed specimens in pools of four in one test unit dose, and retesting individual specimens from positive pools. Finally, the pooling algorithm results were compared to culture results for a subset of 344 students from the original 600 HSS from whom cervical or urethral samples were taken at the discretion of the school nurse practitioners. Compared to individual testing of specimens by LCR in the FMR population, the pooling-by-four algorithm was 100% sensitive (5 of 5) and 100% pool specific (70 of 70), and the pool-by-six algorithm was 100% sensitive (5 of 5) and 100% pool specific (45 of 45). In the MSS population, the pool-by-4 algorithm was 95.8% sensitive (23 of 24) and 100% (52 of 52) pool specific, and the pool-by-10 algorithm was 95.8% sensitive (23 of 24) and 100% (17 of 17) pool specific. In the subset of 344 HSS from whom endocervical or urethral specimens were collected for culture, 31 were positive by LCR in urine and 26 were positive by culture. After results discrepant between culture and LCR were adjudicated by a confirmatory LCR test, the pooling algorithm was 93.8% (30 of 32) sensitive and 99.7% (311 of 312) specific. Culture from these 344 HSS was 81.3% (26 of 32) sensitive. The pooling algorithm reduced the cost of the N. gonorrhoeae LCR assay by 60% compared to individual testing of the HSS specimens and was both sensitive and specific. PMID:9817885

  11. Analysis of Drugs in Saliva.

    PubMed

    Samyn, N; Verstraete, A; van Haeren, C; Kintz, P

    1999-06-01

    Saliva is presented as an alternative matrix in the establishment of drug abuse. The ultimate salivary concentration is determined by the route of administration, the salivary pH, the degree of plasma protein binding, and the physico-chemical properties of the abused drug. Since the saliva/plasma ratio can exceed 1, saliva might be a better analytical tool than blood during roadside testing of potentially intoxicated drivers. Moreover, saliva can be obtained non-invasively and under supervision. Although drugs of abuse have been determined in saliva for more than a decade, the use of saliva drug testing for forensic purposes is still limited. Several problems have been demonstrated: (a) differences in the collection protocol produce variable results and often, e.g., during roadside testing, only very small volumes of saliva are obtained; (b) the salivary concentrations are much lower than in urine; (c) saliva principally contains the parent drug and until now, no suitable immunoassays have been commercialized. Although salivary drug concentrations are well correlated with pharmacological effects for some drugs, e.g., cocaine, further studies have to prove whether saliva is a suitable matrix to demonstrate "driving under the influence" of psychoactive drugs. Furthermore, an on-site screening assay for drugs of abuse in saliva and the establishment of appropriate cutoff levels should facilitate the use of saliva during roadside testing. PMID:26255819

  12. Making drugs accessible.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Making drugs accessible for common HIV-associated illnesses in West Africa is discussed. HIV-positive people in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, could not afford drugs for treating their illnesses; thus, volunteers from La Bergerie-FUC, a Christian organization, have established a day care center for HIV-positive people. A French church supplies the drugs; oral rehydration salts are provided through the Ministry of Health. Since the organization did not have enough drugs to meet the needs of all its patients, two strategies were developed to improve its drug supply. The first strategy was to raise money to buy drugs through the support of a local NGO, the Initiative Privee et Communautaire de lutte contre le SIDA (IPC). IPC initially refused to support them, but, eventually agreed to fund drug purchasing as a pilot project. The second strategy was to look at ways of reducing the cost of drugs, which resulted in a list of essential drugs for HIV-associated infections. The list was approved by Care and Support Committee of the national AIDS program for use by other organizations. The organizations have created a national network to improve the delivery of community-based care and support services in Burkina Faso. Recently, the national AIDS program has asked this network to help them change the national essential drugs list to include essential drugs for treating common HIV-associated infections. PMID:12349193

  13. Pharmacokinetics and bactericidal rates of daptomycin and vancomycin in intravenous drug abusers being treated for gram-positive endocarditis and bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rybak, M J; Bailey, E M; Lamp, K C; Kaatz, G W

    1992-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bactericidal killing rates (BR) of daptomycin (D) and vancomycin (V) in 12 intravenous drug abusers (6 treated with daptomycin and 6 treated with vancomycin) were evaluated. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined from multiple serum samples drawn at steady state over a 12-h dosing interval after intravenous infusions of 3 mg of D per kg of body weight and 1,000 mg of V. The BRs were determined from the 1- and 6-h serum samples by using four isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (three methicillin susceptible and one methicillin resistant) obtained from the patients enrolled in the study. Peak serum daptomycin concentrations were lower and volumes of distribution were higher than reported in healthy volunteers. Although not statistically different, D clearance was 22% higher than reported in healthy volunteers. V pharmacokinetics were similar to those reported in previous studies. Daptomycin's BRs, although comparable to those of V in patients' serum, were significantly decreased compared with those found in broth. This may be related to the high degree of protein binding of D (93% versus 50% for V). Conversely, the BRs of V in serum were significantly greater than those in broth. The BRs of D and V in broth were greater when killing curves were performed with test strains in logarithmic versus stationary-phase growth. The ability to kill organisms in stationary phase may be an important factor in determining the performance of an antibiotic in deep-seated infections such as endocarditis.3+ PMID:1324637

  14. Coproporphyrin in urine of newborns with meconium aspiration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Francoual, J; Lindenbaum, A; Dehan, M; de Verneuil, H; Nordmann, Y; Leluc, R

    1983-12-01

    We evaluated coproporphyrin in the first urine passed by newborn infants with and without meconium aspiration, by spectrophotometric analysis and thin-layer and "high-performance" liquid chromatography. Urines of newborn infants without meconium aspiration contained only very small quantities of coproporphyrin, detected, after partial purification, by "high-performance" liquid chromatography. Urines of newborn infants with meconium aspiration contained large quantities of coproporphyrin, identified by all three techniques. Urinary coproporphyrin as measured spectrophotometrically correlates well with the "urinary meconium index," and the method is simple, rapid, and reliable, even for samples containing hemoglobin. PMID:6640899

  15. Chemical composition of rainbow trout urine following acute hypoxic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, Joseph B.

    1969-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) were anesthetized with MS-222, catheterized, and introduced into urine collecting chambers. Twenty-four hours after introduction, a 4-hour accumulation of urine was collected to serve as the control. Water flow to the chambers was then discontinued for 30 minutes during which the oxygen content of the water exiting in the chamber dropped from 4.9 to 2.8 mg/l. Following this hypoxic stress fresh water was restored and accumulated urine samples were taken for analysis at 1, 4, and 20 hours post-hypoxic stress. Rainbow trout excrete abnormally high concentrations of Na, K, Mg, Cl, and inorganic PO4 following hypoxia.

  16. Keys to a drug-free workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Joseph J.; Fortuna, Patricia B.

    1997-01-01

    What does it take to establish a drug free work place. Are technologies available other than urine testing for pre- employment screening and monitoring of employees. Various methods are now available to screen for illicit drug residues on items handled by individuals. The residues can be acquired from the surfaces of items such as telephones, door knobs, steering wheels, lockers, clothing, identification cards, etc. Test kits are also available for urine testing at NIDA threshold levels. Analysis of hair, saliva, and sweat is now possible. How good ar these methods and kits. What value are they to the public. What are the legal concerns facing employers. What do the screening test show. These questions and others are addressed in this paper. The authors review for the reader how drug abuse by US workers costs businesses. The paper then addresses the various aspects of the DOT regulations to determine why urine analysis (UA) is insufficient to eliminate drug abuse. The authors present applications of screening technologies in addition to UA. Finally, the authors provide a conclusion of findings and recommendations for businesses that truly want or need drug free work places.

  17. Trace drug analysis by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Lee, Vincent Y.

    2000-12-01

    Drug overdose involves more than 10 percent of emergency room (ER) cases, and a method to rapidly identify and quantify the abused drug is critical to the ability of the ER physician to administer the appropriate care. To this end, we have been developing a surface-enhanced Raman (SER) active material capable of detecting target drugs at physiological concentrations in urine. The SER-active material consists of a metal-doped sol-gel that provides not only a million fold increase in sensitivity but also reproducible measurements. The porous silica network offers a unique environment for stabilizing SER active metal particles and the high surface area increase the interaction between the analyte and metal particles. The sol-gel has been coated on the inside walls of glass samples vials, such that urine specimens may simply be introduced for analysis. Here we present the surface-enhanced Raman spectra of a series of barbiturates, actual urine specimens, and a drug 'spiked' urine specimen. The utility of pH adjustment to suppress dominant biochemicals associated with urine is also presented.

  18. 76 FR 7743 - Professional Labeling for Laxative Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... urine creatinine concentration, urine flow rate, and plasma creatinine concentration, while the... monograph for OTC laxative drug products published January 15, 1985 (50 FR 2124), FDA proposed labeling for... document March 21, 1975 (40 FR 12902), Recommendations of the Advisory Review advance notice of...

  19. Study of transaldolase deficiency in urine samples by capillary LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Vas, György; Conkrite, Karina; Amidon, Wendy; Qian, Yueming; Bánki, Katalin; Perl, András

    2006-04-01

    Transaldolase (TAL) is a key enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). TAL deficiency is a newly recognized cause of liver cirrhosis. We have developed an ion-pair LC separation combined with negative ion electrospray MS/MS detection method to assess PPP metabolites in urine samples from TAL-deficient mice. Sedoheptulose 7-phosphate (S7P), C5-polyols D-arabitol and D-ribitol, and 6-phosphogluconate (6PG) levels were markedly increased in urine of TAL-deficient mice with respect to those of wild-type and heterozygote littermates. The detection limits of S7P, D-arabitol, and 6PG were 0.15 +/- 0.015 pmol, 3.5 +/- 0.41 pmol, and 0.61 +/- 0.055 pmol, respectively. The limit of quantitation was 0.4 +/- 0.024 nmol/ml for S7P, 1.6 +/- 0.11 nmol/ml for 6PG and 10 +/- 0.7 nmol/ml for D-arabitol. Additional metabolites, hexose 6-phosphates (m/z 259), D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-xylulose 5-phosphate (m/z 229), D-fructose 1,6-diphosphate (m/z 339), C6-polyols (m/z 181) and GSSG (m/z 611), that have been positively identified in mouse urine, showed similar levels in control and TAL-deficient mice. PMID:16470722

  20. Drug therapy smartens up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  1. Drug abuse first aid

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rapid breathing . Downers (depressants) do just the opposite. Mind-altering drugs are called hallucinogens. They include LSD , ... in the recovery position. If the patient is conscious, loosen the clothing, keep the person warm, and ...

  2. Drug allergies

    MedlinePLUS

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... Adverse reactions to drugs are common. (adverse means unwanted or unexpected.) Almost any drug can cause an adverse reaction. Reactions range from irritating ...

  3. Estimation of D-Arabinose by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry as Surrogate for Mycobacterial Lipoarabinomannan in Human Urine.

    PubMed

    De, Prithwiraj; Amin, Anita G; Valli, Eloise; Perkins, Mark D; McNeil, Michael; Chatterjee, Delphi

    2015-01-01

    Globally, tuberculosis is slowly declining each year and it is estimated that 37 million lives were saved between 2000 and 2013 through effective diagnosis and treatment. Currently, diagnosis relies on demonstration of the bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), in clinical specimens by serial sputum microscopy, culture and molecular testing. Commercial immunoassay lateral flow kits developed to detect Mtb lipoglycan lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in urine as a marker of active TB exhibit poor sensitivity, especially in immunocompetent individuals, perhaps due to low abundance of the analyte. Our present study was designed to develop methods to validate the presence of LAM in a quantitative fashion in human urine samples obtained from culture-confirmed TB patients. Herein we describe, a consolidated approach for isolating LAM from the urine and quantifying D-arabinose as a proxy for LAM, using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. 298 urine samples obtained from a repository were rigorously analyzed and shown to contain varying amounts of LAM-equivalent ranging between ~10-40 ng/mL. To further substantiate that D-arabinose detected in the samples originated from LAM, tuberculostearic acid, the unique 10-methyloctadecanoic acid present at the phosphatidylinositol end of LAM was also analyzed in a set of samples and found to be present confirming that the D-arabinose was indeed derived from LAM. Among the 144 samples from culture-negative TB suspects, 30 showed presence of D-arabinose suggesting another source of the analyte, such as disseminated TB or from non-tuberculosis mycobacterium. Our work validates that LAM is present in the urine samples of culture-positive patients in small but readily detectable amounts. The study further substantiates LAM in urine as a powerful biomarker for active tuberculosis. PMID:26633829

  4. Estimation of D-Arabinose by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry as Surrogate for Mycobacterial Lipoarabinomannan in Human Urine

    PubMed Central

    De, Prithwiraj; Amin, Anita G.; Valli, Eloise; Perkins, Mark D.; McNeil, Michael; Chatterjee, Delphi

    2015-01-01

    Globally, tuberculosis is slowly declining each year and it is estimated that 37 million lives were saved between 2000 and 2013 through effective diagnosis and treatment. Currently, diagnosis relies on demonstration of the bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), in clinical specimens by serial sputum microscopy, culture and molecular testing. Commercial immunoassay lateral flow kits developed to detect Mtb lipoglycan lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in urine as a marker of active TB exhibit poor sensitivity, especially in immunocompetent individuals, perhaps due to low abundance of the analyte. Our present study was designed to develop methods to validate the presence of LAM in a quantitative fashion in human urine samples obtained from culture-confirmed TB patients. Herein we describe, a consolidated approach for isolating LAM from the urine and quantifying D-arabinose as a proxy for LAM, using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. 298 urine samples obtained from a repository were rigorously analyzed and shown to contain varying amounts of LAM-equivalent ranging between ~10–40 ng/mL. To further substantiate that D-arabinose detected in the samples originated from LAM, tuberculostearic acid, the unique 10-methyloctadecanoic acid present at the phosphatidylinositol end of LAM was also analyzed in a set of samples and found to be present confirming that the D-arabinose was indeed derived from LAM. Among the 144 samples from culture-negative TB suspects, 30 showed presence of D-arabinose suggesting another source of the analyte, such as disseminated TB or from non-tuberculosis mycobacterium. Our work validates that LAM is present in the urine samples of culture-positive patients in small but readily detectable amounts. The study further substantiates LAM in urine as a powerful biomarker for active tuberculosis. PMID:26633829

  5. Microdetermination of urea in urine using p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde /PDAB/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, P. J.

    1969-01-01

    Adaptation of the p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde method for determining urea concentration in urine is an improved micromechanical method. Accuracy and precision are satisfactory. This method avoids extra steps of deproteinizing or removing normal urinary chromogens.

  6. Urine pretreatment for waste water processing systems. [for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, H. E.; Verostko, C. E.; Dehner, G. F.

    1983-01-01

    Recovery of high quality water from urine is an essential part of life support on a Space Station to avoid costly launch and resupply penalties. Water can be effectively recovered from urine by distillation following pretreatment by a chemical agent to inhibit microorganism contamination and fix volatile ammonia constituents. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of several pretreatment chemicals which were tested at several concentration levels in combination with sulfuric acid in urine. The optimum pretreatment formulation was then evaluated with urine in the Hamilton Standard Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES). Over 2600 hours of test time was accumulated. Results of these laboratory and system tests are presented in this paper.

  7. Development of online NIR urine analyzing system based on AOTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Feng; Sun, Zhendong; Li, Xiaoxia

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, some key techniques on development of on-line MR urine analyzing system based on AOTF (Acousto - Optics Tunable Filter) are introduced. Problems about designing the optical system including collimation of incident light and working distance (the shortest distance for separating incident light and diffracted light) are analyzed and researched. DDS (Direct Digital Synthesizer) controlled by microprocessor is used to realize the wavelength scan. The experiment results show that this MR urine analyzing system based on. AOTF has 10000 - 4000cm -1 wavelength range and O.3ms wavelength transfer rate. Compare with the conventional Fourier Transform NIP. spectrophotometer for analyzing multi-components in urine, this system features low cost, small volume and on-line measurement function. Unscrambler software (multivariate statistical software by CAMO Inc. Norway) is selected as the software for processing the data. This system can realize on line quantitative analysis of protein, urea and creatinine in urine.

  8. The Hydrodynamics of Urination: to drip or jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Jonathan; Yang, Patricia; Choo, Jerome; Hu, David

    2013-11-01

    The release of waste products is fundamental to all life. How are fluids released from the body quickly and efficiently? In a combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we elucidate the hydrodynamics of urination across five orders of magnitude in animal mass. Using high-speed videography and flow-rate measurement at the Atlanta Zoo, we report discrete regimes for urination style. We observe dripping by small mammals such as rats and jetting by large mammals such as elephants. We discover urination duration is independent of animal size among animals that use jetting. We rationalize urination styles, along with the constant-time scaling, by consideration of the relative magnitudes of the driving forces, gravity and bladder pressure, and the corresponding viscous losses within the urethra. This study may give insight into why certain animals are more prone to diseases of the urinary tract, and how the urinary system evolved under the laws of fluid mechanics.

  9. Purple urine bag syndrome in an elderly patient from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Mondragón-Cardona, Alvaro; Jiménez-Canizales, Carlos Eduardo; Alzate-Carvajal, Verónica; Bastidas-Rivera, Fabricio; Sepúlveda-Arias, Juan Carlos

    2015-07-01

    A 71-year-old woman in a nursing home, with indwelling urinary catheter, bedridden, presented with a purple urine collector bag. The purple urine bag syndrome is a rare condition associated with the metabolism of tryptophan by overgrowth of intestinal bacteria. The purple color is formed by a combination of indigo and indirubin produced as a result of phosphatase and sulfatase enzymatic activity of bacteria on indoxyl sulfate, under alkaline pH of the urine. We present the second case of this syndrome reported in Colombia detailing the management of this rare syndrome associated with urinary tract infection. Several conditions should be considered in the differential diagnose of diseases that cause discoloration of the urine. PMID:26230133

  10. 76 FR 52644 - Faucets, Showerheads, Water Closets and Urinals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...EERE-2011-BT-NOA-0053] Faucets, Showerheads, Water Closets and Urinals AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency...with respect to any State regulation concerning the water use or water efficiency of faucets, showerheads, water...

  11. 28. SHOWER AND URINALS, OVERHEAD TOILET STRUCTURE ABOVE ROOF PANEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. SHOWER AND URINALS, OVERHEAD TOILET STRUCTURE ABOVE ROOF PANEL STORAGE AREA. VIEW TO SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. Using human urine as food for cyanobacteria in LSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, Galina; Gribovskaya, Iliada; Kolmakova, Angela

    In biological LSS: human, higher plants, algae, united by common cycle of matter, native human urine is the most problematic substance for using in inter-link exchange. It contains urea, ammonium compounds and up to 10 g/l of NaCl. Each of the mentioned components is toxic for growing higher plants. As for inferior plants, experiments showed that cyanobacteria of genus Spirulina platensis and similar genus Oscillatoria deflexa can grow at NaCl concentrations up to 20 g/l and NH4Cl concentrations up to 800 mg/l. These cyanobacteria can be used in LSS as a photosynthesizing link. Besides, S. platensis is edible for humans and fish. To use urine as food for algae, it is necessary to remove urea and organics. All previously used methods for urine treatment aimed at urea destruction: heating to 300oC, ultraviolet exposure, freezing, oxidation on reactor with hydrogen peroxide, had no effect. We used the following method of urine treatment: urine evaporation till dry residue, subsequent combustion in muffle furnace at 450-500oC and creation of ash water extract of the same volume as the initial urine. Comparison of standard Zarrouk's solution for S. platensis and O. deflexa with the water extract of urine ash showed that the concentrations of K, Ca, Mg, P, S were similar. Successful experiments were made with O. deflexa that were grown on nutrient solution made of the water extract of urine ash with 10 g/l of NaHCO3 and 2 g/l of NaNO3. The sources of intersystem production of HCO3 and NO3 were shown, and the biochemical composition of the investigated algae species, including mineral composition, protein, carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid and vitamin content were studied.

  13. White Cells and Bacteria in Voided Urine of Healthy Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, James M.

    1971-01-01

    During a screening survey for urinary infection, 600 infants had one or more urines examined on the sixth or seventh day of life and 592 were subsequently shown to be uninfected. Bacterial and white cell counts on the first urine specimen to be examined from each infant are reported, comprising 363 specimens (188 from boys, 177 from girls) collected into plastic bags and 229 specimens (116 from boys, 113 from girls) collected by a clean catch technique. Bag specimens contained 5 white cells per mm3 or less in 98% of boys but in only 56% of girls, in whom 11% contained more than 100 white cells per mm3. Clean catch specimens contained up to 5 white cells per mm3 in 97% of boys and 94% of girls, suggesting perineal contamination in girls to be the cause of the higher white cell counts in urine collected into plastic bags. Total bacterial counts of 10,000 colonies per ml or less were obtained from bag urines in 41% of both boys and girls and from midstream urines of 73% of boys and 77% of girls. Midstream specimens were significantly better than bag specimens for purposes of culture. Examination of voided urine specimens from newborns allows infection to be excluded in approximately 45% of infants if only one bag specimen is examined and in approximately 75% if a single midstream specimen is obtained. Even bag specimens are therefore not without value. Suprapubic aspiration should be reserved for infants where difficulty arises due to repeated equivocal results from voided urines, when urgent confirmation is required, or when the presence of perineal lesions makes suitable voided urine collection impracticable. PMID:5576025

  14. Uranium internal exposure evaluation based on urine assay data

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.N.P.

    1984-09-01

    The difficulties in assessing internal exposures to uranium from urine assay data are described. A simplified application of the ICRP-30 and ICRP Lung Model concepts to the estimation of uranium intake is presented. A discussion follows on the development of a computer code utilizing the ICRP-30-based uranium elimination model with the existing urine assay information. The calculated uranium exposures from 1949 through 1983 are discussed. 13 references, 1 table.

  15. Estimating energy losses with urine in the cat.

    PubMed

    Wichert, B; Liesegang, A; Hartnack, S

    2014-08-01

    Urinary energy losses in cats have to be determined in energy balance trials as well as for the calculation of the metabolizable energy (ME) content of cat food. The aim of the present study was: first, to assess whether the energy content of cat urine quantified by bomb calorimetry differs from that quantified using GE (kJ) urine = 33 kJ × g C urine + 9 kJ × g N urine and investigate whether this difference could be attributed to influences of diets. Second, to assess whether the subtraction of 3.1 kJ/g of protein intake used for estimation of metabolizable energy content of cat foods is confirmed as usable. Data from 27 energy and protein balance trials from different studies with complete sampling of urine and faeces (29 cats in part A and 35 cats in part B) were used. Gross energy, carbon and nitrogen were determined in food, faeces and urine. Gross energy values in urine tended to be higher when determined with the formula of Hoffman and Klein compared to bomb calorimetry. The average relative difference of gross energy values between the methods was 18.8%. The mean energy loss in kJ/g of protein intake resulted in 3.7 kJ/g protein intake, which was not statistically significantly different (p = 0.12) from the tested value of 3.1 kJ/g of protein intake. In conclusion, the formula of Hoffman and Klein is not appropriate for the estimation of energy in cat urine. In balance studies, it is advisable to quantify the urinary energy content by bomb calorimetry. In the second part of the study, the protein correction factor to determine ME of 3.1 kJ/g protein intake for urinary energy losses of Kienzle et al. could be confirmed. PMID:23855592

  16. Electrochemically driven extraction and recovery of ammonia from human urine.

    PubMed

    Luther, Amanda K; Desloover, Joachim; Fennell, Donna E; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-12-15

    Human urine contains high concentrations of nitrogen, contributing about 75% of the nitrogen in municipal wastewaters yet only 1% of the volume. Source separation of urine produces an ideal waste stream for nitrogen and phosphorus recovery, reducing downstream costs of nutrient treatment at wastewater treatment facilities. We examined the efficiency and feasibility of ammonia extraction and recovery from synthetic and undiluted human urine using an electrochemical cell (EC). EC processing of synthetic urine produced an ammonium flux of 384 ± 8 g N m(-2) d(-1) with a 61 ± 1% current efficiency at an energy input of 12 kWh kg(-1) N removed. EC processing of real urine displayed similar performance, with an average ammonium flux of 275 ± 5 g N m(-2) d(-1) sustained over 10 days with 55 ± 1% current efficiency for ammonia and at an energy input of 13 kWh kg(-1) N removed. With the incorporation of an ammonia stripping and absorption unit into the real urine system, 57 ± 0.5% of the total nitrogen was recovered as ammonium sulfate. A system configuration additionally incorporating stripping of the influent headspace increased total nitrogen recovery to 79% but led to reduced performance of the EC as the urine ammonium concentration decrease. Direct stripping of ammonia (NH3) from urine with no chemical addition achieved only 12% total nitrogen recovery at hydraulic retention times comparable with the EC systems. Our results demonstrate that ammonia can be extracted via electrochemical means at reasonable energy inputs of approximately 12 kWh kg(-1) N. Considering also that the hydrogen generated is worth 4.3 kWh kg(-1) N, the net electrical input for extraction becomes approximately 8 kWh kg(-1) N if the hydrogen can be used. Critical for further development will be the inclusion of a passive means for ammonia stripping to reduce additional energy inputs. PMID:26453942

  17. RESUMPTION OF POSTPARTUM LUTEAL FUNCTION OF PRIMIPAROUS, SUCKLED BEEF COWS EXPOSED CONTINUOUSLY TO BULL URINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the hypotheses that interval from urine exposure to resumption of luteal activity and proportions of cows that resume luteal activity by the end of the urine-exposure period do not differ between cows exposed to mature bull urine or steer urine. Thirty-eight Angus x Hereford cows, four mat...

  18. Quantitation of products from riboflavin in rat urine

    SciTech Connect

    Chastain, J.L.; McCormick, D.B.

    1986-03-05

    When (2-/sup 14/C) riboflavin is injected i.p. into rats, the excreted vitamin in urine and feces has been shown to be the intact vitamin with trace amounts of lumichrome and lumiflavin. Recent findings with /sup 14/C-riboflavin fed to rats indicated higher levels of riboflavin catabolites in urine, e.g., 7- and 8-carboxylumichromes. The authors have determined catabolites in urine from male rats fed 0, 2, and 6 ..mu..g riboflavin/g diet/day for six weeks. Two rats from each group were placed weekly in metabolic cages, and urine was collected for 24 hours. On the fourth week, a third animal from each group received an i.p. injection of /sup 14/C-riboflavin and the urine was collected for 48 hours. Urine samples were extracted with phenol for flavin components and with chloroform for derivatives of lumichrome and lumiflavin. Riboflavin was the predominant flavin excreted by all diet groups with trace amounts of coenzymes and 7- and 8-hydroxymethylriboflavin. Riboflavin accounted for 85% of all the radioactivity recovered from the deficient and sufficient rats and 90% in rats fed excess. Lumichrome-type compounds including carboxylumichromes accounted for only a few % of recovered radioactivity. Thus, these components are primarily a product of intestinal microfloral degradation rather than significant tissue catabolites of riboflavin.

  19. The impact of stress on the prevalence of prednisolone in bovine urine: A metabolic fingerprinting approach.

    PubMed

    Clercq, Nathalie De; Meulebroek, Lieven Van; Bussche, Julie Vanden; Croubels, Siska; Delahaut, Philippe; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies support the hypothesis that the glucocorticoid prednisolone can be formed from cortisol under influence of stress. To evaluate this hypothesis, urine samples of supposedly non-stressed bovines (at the farm) and bovines subjected to two different forms of stress, i.e. upon slaughter (natural stress) or following administration of a synthetic analog of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (pharmacologically-induced stress) were analysed, and their urinary cortisol and prednisolone levels evaluated. At the farm, none of the examined samples exhibited urinary prednisolone levels higher than the CC? (0.09?gL(-1)). Upon slaughter or following synthetically induced stress, significantly positive correlations between cortisol and prednisolone could be demonstrated, 0.52 and 0.69, respectively. Of all prednisolone-positive urine samples (n=84), only one showed a prednisolone levels (i.e. 6.45?gL(-1)) above the threshold level of 5?gL(-1) suggested by the European Reference Laboratories. Subsequently, an untargeted analysis was performed (metabolic fingerprinting) to characterize the urinary metabolite patterns related to the three different cattle groups. In this context, multivariate statistics assigned a total of 169 differentiating metabolites as playing a key role in the urinary pattern in response to stress. Three of these ions were defined as steroids using an in-house created database. As a result, the metabolic fingerprinting approach proved to be a powerful tool to classify unknown bovine urine samples that tested positive for prednisolone, while providing information about the stress status of the animal. PMID:26321385

  20. Phenylbutyrate therapy for maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lanpher, Brendan; Erez, Ayelet; Ananieva, Elitsa A; Islam, Mohammad; Marini, Juan C; Sun, Qin; Yu, Chunli; Hegde, Madhuri; Li, Jun; Wynn, R Max; Chuang, David T; Hutson, Susan; Lee, Brendan

    2011-02-15

    Therapy with sodium phenylacetate/benzoate or sodium phenylbutyrate in urea cycle disorder patients has been associated with a selective reduction in branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in spite of adequate dietary protein intake. Based on this clinical observation, we investigated the potential of phenylbutyrate treatment to lower BCAA and their corresponding ?-keto acids (BCKA) in patients with classic and variant late-onset forms of maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). We also performed in vitro and in vivo experiments to elucidate the mechanism for this effect. We found that BCAA and BCKA are both significantly reduced following phenylbutyrate therapy in control subjects and in patients with late-onset, intermediate MSUD. In vitro treatment with phenylbutyrate of control fibroblasts and lymphoblasts resulted in an increase in the residual enzyme activity, while treatment of MSUD cells resulted in the variable response which did not simply predict the biochemical response in the patients. In vivo phenylbutyrate increases the proportion of active hepatic enzyme and unphosphorylated form over the inactive phosphorylated form of the E1? subunit of the branched-chain ?-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC). Using recombinant enzymes, we show that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1? by inhibition of the BCKDC kinase to activate BCKDC overall activity, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate in a subset of MSUD patients. Phenylbutyrate treatment may be a valuable treatment for reducing the plasma levels of neurotoxic BCAA and their corresponding BCKA in a subset of MSUD patients and studies of its long-term efficacy are indicated. PMID:21098507