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Sample records for positive-energy particle models

  1. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boning; Herbold, Eric B.; Homel, Michael A.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  2. Modeling atmospheric particle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Msafiri M.

    Experimentally determined dry deposition velocities for atmospheric particles in the size range of 5-80 μm in diameter have been shown to be greater than predictions made with the current state-of-the-art (Sehmel-Hodgson) model which is based on wind tunnel experiment, particularly at higher wind speed. In this research, a model to predict the atmospheric dry deposition velocities of particles has been developed that is similar to a model developed for particle deposition in vertical pipes. The model uses a sigmoid curve to correlate nondimensional inertial deposition velocity (Vdi+) with dimensionless particle relaxation time (/tau+) and flow Reynolds number (Re). Vdi+ obtained from data collected in the atmosphere with particle size classifier system and a flat greased plate, Re, and /tau+ for particles between 1 and 100 μm diameter were fit with a sigmoid curve using the least square procedure to obtain coefficients for the sigmoid curve. Deposition velocities data for particles between 0.06 and 4 μm diameter developed by Sehmel-Hodgson model were used to introduce a Schmidt number (Sc) term to take care of Brownian diffusion. The atmospheric plate deposition velocity model is a function of Vst (Stokes settling velocity), V* (friction velocity), /tau+, Re, and Sc. Model application to 62 atmospheric data set revealed that: generated flux predictions agreed well with atmospheric measurements, and its performance is better than Sehmel-Hodgson model. By comparing the sigmoid curve coefficients developed for vertical pipe data with the coefficients developed for atmospheric data it is concluded that, the two types of deposition are similar when the effects of Re and /tau+ are properly considered. Sensitivity analysis for the model has revealed three distinct regions based on particle size. Of the three physical parameters (/tau+, Re, Sc) in the model, not more than two controls the deposition in any of the identified regions. The plate deposition model which is

  3. Particle bed reactor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  4. Gyrokinetic particle simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.

    1986-07-01

    A new type of particle simulation model based on the gyrophase-averaged Vlasov and Poisson equations is presented. The reduced system, in which particle gyrations are removed from the equations of motion while the finite Larmor radius effects are still preserved, is most suitable for studying low frequency microinstabilities in magnetized plasmas. It is feasible to simulate an elongated system (L/sub parallel/ >> L/sub perpendicular/) with a three-dimensional grid using the present model without resorting to the usual mode expansion technique, since there is essentially no restriction on the size of ..delta..x/sub parallel/ in a gyrokinetic plasma. The new approach also enables us to further separate the time and spatial scales of the simulation from those associated with global transport through the use of multiple spatial scale expansion. Thus, the model can be a very efficient tool for studying anomalous transport problems related to steady-state drift-wave turbulence in magnetic confinement devices. It can also be applied to other areas of plasma physics.

  5. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  6. Patchy Particle Model for Vitrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Leibler, Ludwik; Sciortino, Francesco

    2013-11-01

    Vitrimers—a recently invented new class of polymers—consist of covalent networks that can rearrange their topology via a bond shuffling mechanism, preserving the total number of network links. We introduce a patchy particle model whose dynamics directly mimic the bond exchange mechanism and reproduce the observed glass-forming ability. We calculate the free energy of this model in the limit of strong (chemical) bonds between the particles, both via the Wertheim thermodynamic perturbation theory and using computer simulations. The system exhibits an entropy-driven phase separation between a network phase and a dilute cluster gas, bringing new insight into the swelling behavior of vitrimers in solvents.

  7. A Particle-Particle Collision Model for Smoothed Profile Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghegh, Fazlolah; Mousel, John; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2014-11-01

    Smoothed Profile Method (SPM) is a type of continuous forcing approach that adds the particles to the fluid using a forcing. The fluid-structure interaction is through a diffuse interface which avoids sudden transition from solid to fluid. The SPM simulation as a monolithic approach uses an indicator function field in the whole domain based on the distance from each particle's boundary where the possible particle-particle interaction can occur. A soft sphere potential based on the indicator function field has been defined to add an artificial pressure to the flow pressure in the potential overlapping regions. Thus, a repulsion force is obtained to avoid overlapping. Study of two particles which impulsively start moving in an initially uniform flow shows that the particle in the wake of the other one will have less acceleration leading to frequent collisions. Various Reynolds numbers and initial distances have been chosen to test the robustness of the method. Study of Drafting-Kissing Tumbling of two cylindrical particles shows a deviation from the benchmarks due to lack of rotation modeling. The method is shown to be accurate enough for simulating particle-particle collision and can easily be extended for particle-wall modeling and for non-spherical particles.

  8. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.

  9. Discrete Element Modeling of Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Weitzman, Peter S.; Curry, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carry out experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. While simple Coulombic force between two particles is well understood, its operation in an ensemble of particles is more complex. When the tribocharging of particles and surfaces due to frictional contact is also considered, it is necessary to consider longer range of interaction of particles in response to electrostatic charging. The standard DEM algorithm accounts for particle mechanical properties and inertia as a function of particle shape and mass. If fluid drag is neglected, then particle dynamics are governed by contact between particles, between particles and equipment surfaces and gravity forces. Consideration of particle charge and any tribocharging and

  10. Exploring the Standard Model of Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Watkins, P. M.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent discovery of a new particle at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the Higgs boson could be about to be discovered. This paper provides a brief summary of the standard model of particle physics and the importance of the Higgs boson and field in that model for non-specialists. The role of Feynman diagrams in making predictions for…

  11. Modeling and simulation of bubbles and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Andrew James

    The interaction of particles, drops, and bubbles with a fluid (gas or liquid) is important in a number of engineering problems. The present works seeks to extend the understanding of these interactions through numerical simulation. To model many of these relevant flows, it is often important to consider finite Reynolds number effects on drag, lift, torque and history force. Thus, the present work develops an equation of motion for spherical particles with a no-slip surface based on theoretical analysis, experimental data and surface-resolved simulations which is appropriate for dispersed multiphase flows. The equation of motion is then extended to account for finite particle size. This extension is critical for particles which will have a size significantly larger than the grid cell size, particularly important for bubbles and low-density particles. The extension to finite particle size is accomplished through spatial-averaging (both volume-based and surface-based) of the continuous flow properties. This averaging is consistent with the Faxen limit for solid spheres at small Reynolds numbers and added mass and fluid stress forces at inviscid limits. Further work is needed for more quantitative assessment of the truncation terms in complex flows. The new equation of motion is then used to assess the relative importance of each force in the context of two low-density particles (an air bubble and a sand particle) in a boundary layer of water. This relative importance is measured by considering effects on particle concentration, visualization of particle-fluid interactions, diffusion rates, and Lagrangian statistics collected along the particle trajectory. Strong added mass and stress gradient effects are observed for the bubble but these were found to have little effect on a sand particle of equal diameter. Lift was shown to be important for both conditions provided the terminal velocity was aligned with the flow direction. The influence of lift was found to be

  12. Sugar cane. Positive energy source for alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Polack, J.A.; Birkett, H.S.; West, M.D.

    1981-06-01

    Sugar cane stands out as a renewable resource for fuel alcohol production, thanks to its unique, highly positive energy balance. It supplies its own processing fuel, bagasse. Net liquid fuel usage is only that consumed on the farm, amounting to a maximum of 0.3 volume per volume of ethanol produced. In some locations, the net liquid fuel consumption of the farm is as low as 0.12 volume/volume produced. This small debit may be offset by generating electric power and by foreseeable processing improvements. In view of the very favorable fuel balance for sugar cane, a decision to employ it as a renewable source of ethanol depends wholly on economic and political factors, which in turn are highly location-dependent.

  13. Lagrangian particle model for multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ferris, Kim F.; Meakin, Paul

    2009-10-01

    A Lagrangian particle model for multiphase multicomponent fluid flow, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), was developed and used to simulate the flow of an emulsion consisting of bubbles of a non-wetting liquid surrounded by a wetting liquid. In SPH simulations, fluids are represented by sets of particles that are used as discretization points to solve the Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics equations. In the multiphase multicomponent SPH model, a modified van der Waals equation of state is used to close the system of flow equations. The combination of the momentum conservation equation with the van der Waals equation of state results in a particle equation of motion in which the total force acting on each particle consists of many-body repulsive and viscous forces, two-body (particle-particle) attractive forces, and body forces such as gravitational forces. Similarly to molecular dynamics, for a given fluid component the combination of repulsive and attractive forces causes a phase separation. The surface tension at liquid-liquid interfaces is imposed through component dependent attractive forces. The wetting behavior of the fluids is controlled by phase dependent attractive interactions between the fluid particles and stationary particles that represent the solid phase. The dynamics of fluids away from interface is governed by purely hydrodynamic forces. Comparison with analytical solutions for static conditions and relatively simple flows demonstrates the accuracy of the SPH model.

  14. Observations and Modeling of Geospace Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlin

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive measurements of energetic particles and electric and magnetic fields from state-of-art instruments onboard Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of the energetic particles and the fields in the inner magnetosphere and impose new challenges to any quantitative modeling of the physical processes responsible for these observations. Concurrent measurements of energetic particles by satellites in highly inclined low Earth orbits and plasma and fields by satellites in farther distances in the magnetospheres and in the up stream solar wind are the critically needed information for quantitative modeling and for leading to eventual accurate forecast of the variations of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere. In this presentation, emphasis will be on the most recent advance in our understanding of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere and the missing links for significantly advance in our modeling and forecasting capabilities.

  15. Polarizable water model for Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peter, Emanuel

    2015-11-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is an efficient particle-based method for modeling mesoscopic behavior of fluid systems. DPD forces conserve the momentum resulting in a correct description of hydrodynamic interactions. Polarizability has been introduced into some coarse-grained particle-based simulation methods; however it has not been done with DPD before. We developed a new polarizable coarse-grained water model for DPD, which employs long-range electrostatics and Drude oscillators. In this talk, we will present the model and its applications in simulations of membrane systems, where polarization effects play an essential role.

  16. Modelling of pyrolysis of large wood particles.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Anup Kumar; Gupta, Parthapratim; Saha, Ranajit Kumar

    2009-06-01

    A fully transient mathematical model has been developed to describe the pyrolysis of large biomass particles. The kinetic model consists of both primary and secondary reactions. The heat transfer model includes conductive and internal convection within the particle and convective and radiative heat transfer between the external surface and the bulk. An implicit Finite Volume Method (FVM) with Tridiagonal Matrix Algorithm (TDMA) is employed to solve the energy conservation equation. Experimental investigations are carried out for wood fines and large wood cylinder and sphere in an electrically heated furnace under inert atmosphere. The model predictions for temperature and mass loss histories are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The effect of internal convection and particle shrinkage on pyrolysis behaviour is investigated and found to be significant. Finally, simulation studies are carried out to analyze the effect of bulk temperature and particle size on total pyrolysis time and the final yield of char. PMID:19231172

  17. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-01

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  18. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-07

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  19. a Conduction Model Describing Particle-Particle Interaction in the Case of Surface Conducting Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Foulc, J.-N.; Atten, P.

    We propose an analytical conduction model describing particle-particle interactions for the case of electrorheological fluids based on surface conducting particles. The system consisting of two contacting spheres immersed in a dielectric liquid is modeled by a distributed impedances network, from which we derive analytical expressions for the potential at the spheres surface, for the electric field in the liquid phase, and finally for the interaction force. The theoretical interaction force is compared with experimental results obtained on insulating spheres coated with a thin conducting polyaniline film. A good agreement is found between the theory and experiment.

  20. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  1. Probabilistic Solar Energetic Particle Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Dietrich, William F.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    To plan and design safe and reliable space missions, it is necessary to take into account the effects of the space radiation environment. This is done by setting the goal of achieving safety and reliability with some desired level of confidence. To achieve this goal, a worst-case space radiation environment at the required confidence level must be obtained. Planning and designing then proceeds, taking into account the effects of this worst-case environment. The result will be a mission that is reliable against the effects of the space radiation environment at the desired confidence level. In this paper we will describe progress toward developing a model that provides worst-case space radiation environments at user-specified confidence levels. We will present a model for worst-case event-integrated solar proton environments that provide the worst-case differential proton spectrum. This model is based on data from IMP-8 and GOES spacecraft that provide a data base extending from 1974 to the present. We will discuss extending this work to create worst-case models for peak flux and mission-integrated fluence for protons. We will also describe plans for similar models for helium and heavier ions.

  2. Polarizable protein model for Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Emanuel; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we present a novel polarizable protein model for the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation technique, a coarse-grained particle-based method widely used in modeling of fluid systems at the mesoscale. We employ long-range electrostatics and Drude oscillators in combination with a newly developed polarizable water model. The protein in our model is resembled by a polarizable backbone and a simplified representation of the sidechains. We define the model parameters using the experimental structures of 2 proteins: TrpZip2 and TrpCage. We validate the model on folding of five other proteins and demonstrate that it successfully predicts folding of these proteins into their native conformations. As a perspective of this model, we will give a short outlook on simulations of protein aggregation in the bulk and near a model membrane, a relevant process in several Amyloid diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's and Diabetes II.

  3. Model of resonance scattering of composite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperin, Yu.A.; Makarov, K.A.; Pavlov, B.S.

    1987-04-01

    A model of binary reactions in a system of particles having a nontrivial internal structure is constructed by the theory of extensions of a nonrelativistic Hamiltonian with the addition of a space of internal degrees of freedom. The model is used to describe hadron-hadron scattering at low and intermediate energies.

  4. Particle-Based Multidimensional Multispecies Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Picioreanu, Cristian; Kreft, Jan-Ulrich; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe a spatially multidimensional (two-dimensional [2-D] and three-dimensional [3-D]) particle-based approach for modeling the dynamics of multispecies biofilms growing on multiple substrates. The model is based on diffusion-reaction mass balances for chemical species coupled with microbial growth and spreading of biomass represented by hard spherical particles. Effectively, this is a scaled-up version of a previously proposed individual-based biofilm model. Predictions of this new particle-based model were quantitatively compared with those obtained with an established one-dimensional (1-D) multispecies model for equivalent problems. A nitrifying biofilm containing aerobic ammonium and nitrite oxidizers, anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, and inert biomass was chosen as an example. The 2-D and 3-D models generally gave the same results. If only the average flux of nutrients needs to be known, 2-D and 1-D models are very similar. However, the behavior of intermediates, which are produced and consumed in different locations within the biofilm, is better described in 2-D and 3-D models because of the multidirectional concentration gradients. The predictions of 2-D or 3-D models are also different from those of 1-D models for slowly growing or minority species in the biofilm. This aspect is related to the mechanism of biomass spreading or advection implemented in the models and should receive more attention in future experimental studies. PMID:15128564

  5. Modeling pollutant transport using a meshless-lagrangian particle model

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, D. B.; Pepper, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    A combined meshless-Lagrangian particle transport model is used to predict pollutant transport over irregular terrain. The numerical model for initializing the velocity field is based on a meshless approach utilizing multiquadrics established by Kansa. The Lagrangian particle transport technique uses a random walk procedure to depict the advection and dispersion of pollutants over any type of surface, including street and city canyons

  6. Interspecies modeling of inhaled particle deposition patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martonen, T.B.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxic effects of ambient contaminants or therapeutic effects of airborne drugs, inhalation exposure experiments can be performed with surrogate laboratory animals. Herein, an interspecies particle deposition theory is presented for physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. It is derived to improve animal testing protocols. The computer code describes the behavior and fate of particles in the lungs of human subjects and a selected surrogate, the laboratory rat. In the simulations CO2 is integrated with exposure chamber atmospheres, and its concentrations regulated to produce rat breathing profiles corresponding to selected levels of human physical activity. The dosimetric model is used to calculate total, compartmental (i.e., tracheobronchial and pulmonary), and localized distribution patterns of inhaled particles in rats and humans for comparable ventilatory conditions. It is demonstrated that the model can be used to predetermine the exposure conditions necessary to produce deposition patterns in rats that are equivalent to those in humans at prescribed physical activities.

  7. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  8. Particle production beyond the thermal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolschin, Georg

    2016-07-01

    The sources of particle production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are investigated from RHIC to LHC energies. Whereas charged-hadron production in the fragmentation sources follows a ln(sNN/s0) law, particle production in the mid-rapidity low-x gluon-gluon source exhibits a much stronger dependence ∝ ln3(sNN/s0), and becomes dominant between RHIC and LHC energies. The equilibration of the three sources is investigated in a relativistic diffusion model (RDM). It agrees with the thermal model only for t → ∞.

  9. Computer Models Simulate Fine Particle Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Through a NASA Seed Fund partnership with DEM Solutions Inc., of Lebanon, New Hampshire, scientists at Kennedy Space Center refined existing software to study the electrostatic phenomena of granular and bulk materials as they apply to planetary surfaces. The software, EDEM, allows users to import particles and obtain accurate representations of their shapes for modeling purposes, such as simulating bulk solids behavior, and was enhanced to be able to more accurately model fine, abrasive, cohesive particles. These new EDEM capabilities can be applied in many industries unrelated to space exploration and have been adopted by several prominent U.S. companies, including John Deere, Pfizer, and Procter & Gamble.

  10. Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling of Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo landing videos shot from inside the right LEM window, provide a quantitative measure of the characteristics and dynamics of the ejecta spray of lunar regolith particles beneath the Lander during the final 10 [m] or so of descent. Photogrammetry analysis gives an estimate of the thickness of the dust layer and angle of trajectory. In addition, Apollo landing video analysis divulges valuable information on the regolith ejecta interactions with lunar surface topography. For example, dense dust streaks are seen to originate at the outer rims of craters within a critical radius of the Lander during descent. The primary intent of this work was to develop a mathematical model and software implementation for the trajectory simulation of lunar dust particles acted on by gas jets originating from the nozzle of a lunar Lander, where the particle sizes typically range from 10 micron to 500 micron. The high temperature, supersonic jet of gas that is exhausted from a rocket engine can propel dust, soil, gravel, as well as small rocks to high velocities. The lunar vacuum allows ejected particles to travel great distances unimpeded, and in the case of smaller particles, escape velocities may be reached. The particle size distributions and kinetic energies of ejected particles can lead to damage to the landing spacecraft or to other hardware that has previously been deployed in the vicinity. Thus the primary motivation behind this work is to seek a better understanding for the purpose of modeling and predicting the behavior of regolith dust particle trajectories during powered rocket descent and ascent.

  11. Modeling light scattering from diesel soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Patricia; Shepherd, Ian; Hunt, Arlon

    2002-07-16

    The Mie model is widely used to analyze light scattering from particulate aerosols. The Diesel Particle Scatterometer (DPS), for example, determines the size and optical properties of diesel exhaust particles that are characterized by measuring three angle-dependent elements of the Mueller scattering matrix. These elements are then fitted using Mie calculations with a Levenburg-Marquardt optimization program. This approach has achieved good fits for most experimental data. However, in many cases, the predicted real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction were less than that for solid carbon. To understand this result and explain the experimental data, we present an assessment of the Mie model by use of a light scattering model based on the coupled dipole approximation. The results indicate that the Mie calculation can be used to determine the largest dimension of irregularly shaped particles at sizes characteristic of Diesel soot and, for particles of known refractive index, tables can be constructed to determine the average porosity of the particles from the predicted index of refraction.

  12. Bonded-cell model for particle fracture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc-Hanh; Azéma, Emilien; Sornay, Philippe; Radjai, Farhang

    2015-02-01

    Particle degradation and fracture play an important role in natural granular flows and in many applications of granular materials. We analyze the fracture properties of two-dimensional disklike particles modeled as aggregates of rigid cells bonded along their sides by a cohesive Mohr-Coulomb law and simulated by the contact dynamics method. We show that the compressive strength scales with tensile strength between cells but depends also on the friction coefficient and a parameter describing cell shape distribution. The statistical scatter of compressive strength is well described by the Weibull distribution function with a shape parameter varying from 6 to 10 depending on cell shape distribution. We show that this distribution may be understood in terms of percolating critical intercellular contacts. We propose a random-walk model of critical contacts that leads to particle size dependence of the compressive strength in good agreement with our simulation data. PMID:25768494

  13. Bonded-cell model for particle fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc-Hanh; Azéma, Emilien; Sornay, Philippe; Radjai, Farhang

    2015-02-01

    Particle degradation and fracture play an important role in natural granular flows and in many applications of granular materials. We analyze the fracture properties of two-dimensional disklike particles modeled as aggregates of rigid cells bonded along their sides by a cohesive Mohr-Coulomb law and simulated by the contact dynamics method. We show that the compressive strength scales with tensile strength between cells but depends also on the friction coefficient and a parameter describing cell shape distribution. The statistical scatter of compressive strength is well described by the Weibull distribution function with a shape parameter varying from 6 to 10 depending on cell shape distribution. We show that this distribution may be understood in terms of percolating critical intercellular contacts. We propose a random-walk model of critical contacts that leads to particle size dependence of the compressive strength in good agreement with our simulation data.

  14. Modeling of Particle Agglomeration in Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagala, Hari Krishna

    Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of nano sized particles (<100nm in diameter) in dispersion mediums. They are of great interest in industrial applications as heat transfer fluids owing to their enhanced thermal conductivities. Stability of nanofluids is a major problem hindering their industrial application. Agglomeration and then sedimentation are some reasons, which drastically decrease the shelf life of these nanofluids. Current research addresses the agglomeration effect and how it can affect the shelf life of a nanofluid. The reasons for agglomeration in nanofluids are attributable to the interparticle interactions which are quantified by the various theories. By altering the governing properties like volume fraction, pH and electrolyte concentration different nanofluids with instant agglomeration, slow agglomeration and no agglomeration can be produced. A numerical model is created based on the discretized population balance equations which analyses the particle size distribution at different times. Agglomeration effects have been analyzed for alumina nanoparticles with average particle size of 150nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the particle size distribution became broader and moved to bigger sizes rapidly with time. Particle size distributions became broader and moved to bigger sizes more quickly with time with increase in the electrolyte concentration. The two effects together can be used to create different temporal trends in the particle size distributions. Faster agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces which is due to decrease in the induced charge and the double layer thickness around the particle. Bigger particle clusters show lesser agglomeration due to reaching the equilibrium size. The procedures and processes described in this work can be used to generate more stable nanofluids.

  15. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  16. Validation of a Lagrangian particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowska, Lucyna

    2013-05-01

    In this paper a custom-developed model of dispersion of pollutants is presented. The proposed approach is based on both a Lagrangian particle model and an urban-scale diagnostic model of the air velocity field. Both models constitute a part of an operational air quality assessment system. The proposed model is validated by comparing its computed results with the results of measurements obtained in a wind tunnel reflecting conditions of the Mock Urban Setting Test (MUST) experiment. Commonly used measures of errors and model concordance are employed and the results obtained are additionally compared with those obtained by other authors for CFD and non-CFD class models. The obtained results indicate that the validity of the model presented in this paper is acceptable.

  17. Beyond the standard model of particle physics.

    PubMed

    Virdee, T S

    2016-08-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its experiments were conceived to tackle open questions in particle physics. The mechanism of the generation of mass of fundamental particles has been elucidated with the discovery of the Higgs boson. It is clear that the standard model is not the final theory. The open questions still awaiting clues or answers, from the LHC and other experiments, include: What is the composition of dark matter and of dark energy? Why is there more matter than anti-matter? Are there more space dimensions than the familiar three? What is the path to the unification of all the fundamental forces? This talk will discuss the status of, and prospects for, the search for new particles, symmetries and forces in order to address the open questions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'. PMID:27458261

  18. Particle Image Velocimetry in Lung Bifurcation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theunissen, Raf; Riethmuller, Michel L.

    To better understand the human pulmonary system and governing aerosol deposition mechanisms within the lung, an accurate description of the airflow in the conductive and respiratory pulmonary airways is considered to be essential. In-vivo measurements are deemed impossible due to the small scales in the lung structure. Though numerical simulations can improve the insight, validation of the results is mostly lacking, especially in the extraction of particle trajectories. Numerical and experimental studies have been performed at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics on single and multiple bifurcation models representing simplifications of the lung system. Both steady and oscillating flows have been studied for the upper lung airways, while steady flow conditions were imposed in the modeling of the alveolar zones. Further experiments consisted in the extraction of particle trajectories in the models of the respiratory airways. This chapter presents an overview of the conducted measurement campaigns complemented with the main observations and results.

  19. Probabilistic Models for Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Dietrich, W. F.; Xapsos, M. A.; Welton, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Probabilistic Models of Solar Particle Events (SPEs) are used in space mission design studies to provide a description of the worst-case radiation environment that the mission must be designed to tolerate.The models determine the worst-case environment using a description of the mission and a user-specified confidence level that the provided environment will not be exceeded. This poster will focus on completing the existing suite of models by developing models for peak flux and event-integrated fluence elemental spectra for the Z>2 elements. It will also discuss methods to take into account uncertainties in the data base and the uncertainties resulting from the limited number of solar particle events in the database. These new probabilistic models are based on an extensive survey of SPE measurements of peak and event-integrated elemental differential energy spectra. Attempts are made to fit the measured spectra with eight different published models. The model giving the best fit to each spectrum is chosen and used to represent that spectrum for any energy in the energy range covered by the measurements. The set of all such spectral representations for each element is then used to determine the worst case spectrum as a function of confidence level. The spectral representation that best fits these worst case spectra is found and its dependence on confidence level is parameterized. This procedure creates probabilistic models for the peak and event-integrated spectra.

  20. Modelling the motion of particles around choanoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, Belinda; Pettitt, Michala; Otto, Steve; Blake, John

    2001-11-01

    The three-dimensional particle paths due to a helical beat pattern of the flagellum of a sessile choanoflagellate, Salpingoeca Amphoridium (SA), are modelled and compared against experimental observations. The organism's main components are a flagellum and cell body which are situated above a substrate such that the interaction between these entities is crucial in determining the fluid flow around the choanoflagellate. The flow of fluid in the organism's environment can be characterised as Stokes flow and a flow field analogous to one created by the flagellum is generated by a distribution of stokeslets and dipoles along a helical curve. The model describing the flow considers interactions between a slender flagellum, an infinite flat plane (modelling the substrate) and a sphere (modelling the cell body). The use of image systems appropriate to Green's functions for a sphere and plane boundary are described. The computations depict particle paths representing passive tracers from experiments and their motion illustrates overall flow patterns. Figures are presented comparing recorded experimental data with numerically generated results for a number of particle paths. The principal results show good agreement between the experiments and theory.

  1. Online maintaining appearance model using particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Siying; Lan, Tian; Wang, Jianyu; Ni, Guoqiang

    2008-03-01

    Tracking by foreground matching heavily depends on the appearance model to establish object correspondences among frames and essentially, the appearance model should encode both the difference part between the object and background to guarantee the robustness and the stable part to ensure tracking consistency. This paper provides a solution for online maintaining appearance models by adjusting features in the model. Object appearance is co-modeled by a subset of Haar features selected from the over-complete feature dictionary which encodes the discriminative part of object appearance and the color histogram which describes the stable appearance. During the particle filtering process, feature values both from background patches and object observations are sampled efficiently by the aid of "foreground" and "background" particles respectively. Based on these sampled values, top-ranked discriminative features are added and invalid features are removed out to ensure the object being distinguishable from current background according to the evolving appearance model. The tracker based on this online appearance model maintaining technique has been tested on people and car tracking tasks and promising experimental results are obtained.

  2. Modeling Deep Burn TRISO particle nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besmann, T. M.; Stoller, R. E.; Samolyuk, G.; Schuck, P. C.; Golubov, S. I.; Rudin, S. P.; Wills, J. M.; Coe, J. D.; Wirth, B. D.; Kim, S.; Morgan, D. D.; Szlufarska, I.

    2012-11-01

    Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel, the fission product's attack on the SiC coating layer, as well as fission product diffusion through an alternative coating layer, ZrC. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

  3. Potentiometric detection of model bioaerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Sarantaridis, Dimitris; Caruana, Daren J

    2010-09-15

    A new technique for the detection of bioaerosols is presented, utilizing particle combustion/ionization in a premixed hydrogen/oxygen/nitrogen flame plasma, followed by gas phase electrochemical detection. Bermuda grass pollen (Cynodon dactylon, one of the most common causes of pollen allergy) and black walnut pollen (Juglans nigra) were used as model bioaerosol particles. We demonstrate that single particle detection can be comfortably achieved by zero current potential measurements between two platinum electrodes, giving potential signals of over 800 mV and unique fragmentation features which may be used for differentiating between species. The high sensitivity is due to the inherent amplification through flame fragmentation, gasification and ionization; a single pollen grain of 25 μm diameter can give a plume of combustion products measuring 4 mm in diameter. The physical basis of the potential difference is a mixed interfacial potential with an additive diffusion/junction potential due to the increase in ionization from the pollen combustion. The results suggest this methodology may be applied to the detection of particulates composed of ionizable species (organic or inorganic) in gaseous environments, such as bacteria, viruses, pollen grains, and dust. Its effectiveness will depend on the propensity of the target particle to combust and generate voltages under specific flame and electrode conditions. PMID:20738107

  4. Modeling positronium beyond the single particle approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubiaga, A.; Ervasti, M. M.; Makkonen, I.; Harju, A.; Tuomisto, F.; Puska, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the properties of the positronium atom in matter is of interest for the interpretation of positron annihilation experiments. This technique has a unique capability for the investigation of nanometer sized voids and pores in soft molecular materials (polymers, liquids or biostructures) and porous materials. However, detailed interpretations of the experimental data rely on modeling of the annihilation properties of positronium in the host material. New applications of the technique are being developed but the computational models still are based on single particle approaches and there is no way to address the influence of the electronic properties of the host material. In this work we discuss new directions of research.

  5. Abnormal behaviors detection using particle motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yutao; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Feiyang; Yuan, Ding; You, Yuhu

    2015-03-01

    Human abnormal behaviors detection is one of the most challenging tasks in the video surveillance for the public security control. Interaction Energy Potential model is an effective and competitive method published recently to detect abnormal behaviors, but their model of abnormal behaviors is not accurate enough, so it has some limitations. In order to solve this problem, we propose a novel Particle Motion model. Firstly, we extract the foreground to improve the accuracy of interest points detection since the complex background usually degrade the effectiveness of interest points detection largely. Secondly, we detect the interest points using the graphics features. Here, the movement of each human target can be represented by the movements of detected interest points of the target. Then, we track these interest points in videos to record their positions and velocities. In this way, the velocity angles, position angles and distance between each two points can be calculated. Finally, we proposed a Particle Motion model to calculate the eigenvalue of each frame. An adaptive threshold method is proposed to detect abnormal behaviors. Experimental results on the BEHAVE dataset and online videos show that our method could detect fight and robbery events effectively and has a promising performance.

  6. Particle-based model for skiing traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleczek, Thomas; Tröster, Gerhard

    2012-05-01

    We develop and investigate a particle-based model for ski slope traffic. Skiers are modeled as particles with a mass that are exposed to social and physical forces, which define the riding behavior of skiers during their descents on ski slopes. We also report position and speed data of 21 skiers recorded with GPS-equipped cell phones on two ski slopes. A comparison of these data with the trajectories resulting from computer simulations of our model shows a good correspondence. A study of the relationship among the density, speed, and flow of skiers reveals that congestion does not occur even with arrival rates of skiers exceeding the maximum ski lift capacity. In a sensitivity analysis, we identify the kinetic friction coefficient of skis on snow, the skier mass, the range of repelling social forces, and the arrival rate of skiers as the crucial parameters influencing the simulation results. Our model allows for the prediction of speed zones and skier densities on ski slopes, which is important in the prevention of skiing accidents.

  7. A Classical Model for Virtual Particle Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Daniel; Bixler, David

    2008-10-01

    As raindrops splash on the surface of a parking lot, a bubble of air may form briefly in a puddle. Some bubbles are very small and others can be rather large. They also vary in how long they last before releasing the air trapped inside in a manner reminiscent of high-energy particle collisions. When a bubble is formed, it essentially draws energy from the ``vacuum'' or surrounding medium, and the energy must be deposited back into the medium within a predictable time. The lifetime of a bubble may follow an uncertainty principle that determines the size or energy of the bubble. This research project attempts to formulate the uncertainty in the energy and lifetime of these bubbles and model the four fundamental forces based on the range of interaction. Just as spandex has been used and disproved as a model for the ``fabric of space-time,'' this bubble model may provide some insight into how elementary particles make up the fundamental forces of nature. This model will also be tested against a change in interaction medium to better correlate the data with known uncertainties.

  8. Langangian Particle Model of Friction Stir Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2006-12-13

    Since its invention fifteen years ago, Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has found commercial application in the marine, aerospace, rail, and now automotive industries. Development of the FSW process for each new application, however, has remained largely empirical. Few detailed numerical modeling techniques have been developed that can explain and predict important features of the process physics. This is particularly true in the areas of material flow, mixing mechanisms, and void prediction. In this paper we present a novel modeling approach to simulate FSW processes that may have significant advantages over current traditional finite element or finite difference based methods. The proposed model is based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. Unlike traditional grid-based methods, Lagrangian particle methods such as SPH can simulate the dynamics of interfaces, large material deformations, void formations and the material's strain and temperature history without employing complex tracking schemes. Two- and three-dimensional FSW simulations for different tool designs are presented. Preliminary numerical results are in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Detailed comparisons between experimental measurements and larger scale FSW simulations are required to further validate and calibrate the SPH based FSW model.

  9. Particle-Surface Interaction Model and Method of Determining Particle-Surface Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method and model of predicting particle-surface interactions with a surface, such as the surface of a spacecraft. The method includes the steps of: determining a trajectory path of a plurality of moving particles; predicting whether any of the moving particles will intersect a surface; predicting whether any of the particles will be captured by the surface and/or; predicting a reflected trajectory and velocity of particles reflected from the surface.

  10. Trajectory Model of Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this work was to predict the trajectories of blowing lunar regolith (soil) particles when a spacecraft lands on or launches from the Moon. The blown regolith is known to travel at very high velocity and to damage any hardware located nearby on the Moon. It is important to understand the trajectories so we can develop technologies to mitigate the blast effects for the launch and landing zones at a lunar outpost. A mathematical model was implemented in software to predict the trajectory of a single spherical mass acted on by the gas jet from the nozzle of a lunar lander.

  11. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme for uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.

  12. Geometrical Scaling of Hall Thruster Particle Model

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Longo, Savino; Capitelli, Mario; Schneider, Ralf

    2005-05-16

    Non-Maxwellian behaviour and plasma-wall interaction are key processes in the physics of Hall thrusters. For this purpose, a 2D{l_brace}r,z{r_brace}-3V axisymmetric fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell/Monte Carlo Collision (PIC-MCC) model of the acceleration channel including the process of secondary electron emission (SEE) from the dielectric walls has been developed. In order to make the simulation possible with regard to the computational time, a reduction of the thruster dimension was done. This was derived from a new physics-based scaling law. This model has demonstrated its outstanding capability in improving the physics insight into the processes in Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT) and in reproducing accurately well experimental data.

  13. Toward a descriptive model of solar particles in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Chenette, D.; Feynman, Joan; Hamilton, Douglas C.; Heckman, G. R.; Konradi, A.; Lee, Martin A.; Nachtwey, D. S.

    1988-01-01

    During a workshop on the interplanetary charged particle environment held in 1987, a descriptive model of solar particles in the heliosphere was assembled. This model includes the fluence, composition, energy spectra, and spatial and temporal variations of solar particles both within and beyong 1 AU. The ability to predict solar particle fluences was also discussed. Suggestions for specific studies designed to improve the basic model were also made.

  14. Multiscale modeling with smoothed dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Pandurang M; Fu, Chia-Chun; Shell, M Scott; Leal, L Gary

    2013-06-21

    In this work, we consider two issues related to the use of Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics (SDPD) as an intermediate mesoscale model in a multiscale scheme for solution of flow problems when there are local parts of a macroscopic domain that require molecular resolution. The first is to demonstrate that SDPD with different levels of resolution can accurately represent the fluid properties from the continuum scale all the way to the molecular scale. Specifically, while the thermodynamic quantities such as temperature, pressure, and average density remain scale-invariant, we demonstrate that the dynamic properties are quantitatively consistent with an all-atom Lennard-Jones reference system when the SDPD resolution approaches the atomistic scale. This supports the idea that SDPD can serve as a natural bridge between molecular and continuum descriptions. In the second part, a simple multiscale methodology is proposed within the SDPD framework that allows several levels of resolution within a single domain. Each particle is characterized by a unique physical length scale called the smoothing length, which is inversely related to the local number density and can change on-the-fly. This multiscale methodology is shown to accurately reproduce fluid properties for the simple problem of steady and transient shear flow. PMID:23802949

  15. Microscale Simulations of Shock Interaction with Large Assembly of Particles for Developing Point-Particle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Siddharth; Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Sridharan, Prashanth; Jackson, Tom; Balachandar, S.; University of Florida Team

    2015-06-01

    Micrsoscale simulations are being conducted for developing point-particle models that are needed for macroscale simulations of explosive dispersal of particles. These particle models are required to compute instantaneous force and heat transfer between particles and surroundings. A strategy for a sequence of microscale simulations has been devised for systematic development of hybrid surrogate models that are applicable at conditions representative of explosive dispersal. The microscale simulations examine particle force dependence on: Mach number, Reynolds number, and volume fraction (particle arrangements such as cubic, face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic and random). Future plans include investigation of sequences of fully-resolved microscale simulations consisting of an array of particles subjected to more realistic time-dependent flows that progressively better approximate the problem of explosive dispersal. Additionally, effects of particle shape, size, and number as well as the transient particle deformation dependence on parameters including: (a) particle material, (b) medium material, (c) multiple particles, (d) incoming shock pressure and speed, (e) medium to particle impedance ratio, (f) particle shape and orientation to shock, etc. are being investigated.

  16. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme formore » uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.« less

  17. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  18. Shock interaction with a deformable particle: Direct numerical simulation and point-particle modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Y.; Haselbacher, A.; Balachandar, S.; Najjar, F. M.; Stewart, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of shock waves with deformable particles is an important fundamental problem. In some applications, e.g., the detonation of explosives loaded with metal particles, the pressure behind the shock wave can be significantly larger than the yield strength of the particle material. This means that particles can deform severely during their interaction with the shock wave. The experimental and theoretical studies of shock interaction with deformable particles (SIDP) are extremely challenging because of its highly transient nature. As a result, no accurate model exists yet that can be used in simulations. The objective of this paper is to develop a simple point-particle model that accurately captures the unsteady force and heat-transfer in SIDP. In the development of this model, we build on earlier models by Ling et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow 37, 1026-1044 (2011)) for the unsteady force and heat-transfer contributions for rigid particles. Insights gained from direct numerical simulations (DNS) guide the extension of these models to deforming particles. Results obtained with the extended model for the interaction of a deforming particle with a shock wave and a Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave compare well with DNS results and therefore offer significant improvements over standard models.

  19. Modeling Particle Acceleration and Transport at CIRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zhao, L.; Ebert, R. W.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Mason, G. M.; Chen, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    CIRs are a major site for particle acceleration during solar minimum. Earlier Ulysses observations have found that particles can be accelerated at both the forward and the reverse shocks that often form at a few AUs. The accelerated particles then propagate back to the Earth along Parker's field line. Theoretical calculations predicted a modulation of the spectrum at low energies, qualitatively agreed with obsevations at 1 AU. However, this picture was recently challenged by STEREO observations, where local accelerations near 1 AU were inferred in many events. In this work, we perform a detailed numerical calculation to study particle acceleration and transport in one CIR event which was observed by both ACE and STEREO spacecraft. We obtain particle currents at different heliocentric distances and different longitudes, as well as particle anisotropy. These values are compared with observations and the implication on the acceleration site and the interplanetary turbulence spectrum is discussed.

  20. Modeling Particle Exposure in US Trucking Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Davis, ME; Smith, TJ; Laden, F; Hart, JE; Ryan, LM; Garshick, E

    2007-01-01

    Multi-tiered sampling approaches are common in environmental and occupational exposure assessment, where exposures for a given individual are often modeled based on simultaneous measurements taken at multiple indoor and outdoor sites. The monitoring data from such studies is hierarchical by design, imposing a complex covariance structure that must be accounted for in order to obtain unbiased estimates of exposure. Statistical methods such as structural equation modeling (SEM) represent a useful alternative to simple linear regression in these cases, providing simultaneous and unbiased predictions of each level of exposure based on a set of covariates specific to the exposure setting. We test the SEM approach using data from a large exposure assessment of diesel and combustion particles in the US trucking industry. The exposure assessment includes data from 36 different trucking terminals across the United States sampled between 2001 and 2005, measuring PM2.5 and its elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) components, by personal monitoring, and sampling at two indoor work locations and an outdoor “background” location. Using the SEM method, we predict: 1) personal exposures as a function of work related exposure and smoking status; 2) work related exposure as a function of terminal characteristics, indoor ventilation, job location, and background exposure conditions; and 3) background exposure conditions as a function of weather, nearby source pollution, and other regional differences across terminal sites. The primary advantage of SEMs in this setting is the ability to simultaneously predict exposures at each of the sampling locations, while accounting for the complex covariance structure among the measurements and descriptive variables. The statistically significant results and high R2 values observed from the trucking industry application supports the broader use of this approach in exposure assessment modeling. PMID:16856739

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Metallic Materials Containing Embedded Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Iesulauro, Erin; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2004-01-01

    Multiscale modeling at small length scales (10(exp -9) to 10(exp -3) m) is discussed for aluminum matrices with embedded particles. A configuration containing one particle surrounded by about 50 grains and subjected to uniform tension and lateral constraint is considered. The analyses are performed to better understand the effects of material configuration on the initiation and progression of debonding of the particles from the surrounding aluminum matrix. Configurational parameters considered include particle aspect ratio and orientation within the surrounding matrix. Both configurational parameters are shown to have a significant effect on the behavior of the materials as a whole. For elliptical particles with the major axis perpendicular to the direction of loading, a particle with a 1:1 aspect ratio completely debonds from the surrounding matrix at higher loads than particles with higher aspect ratios. As the particle major axis is aligned with the direction of the applied load, increasing amounts of load are required to completely debond the particles.

  2. Cluster kinetics model of particle separation in vibrated granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Benjamin J.; Madras, Giridhar

    2006-01-01

    We model the Brazil-nut effect (BNE) by hypothesizing that granules form clusters that fragment and aggregate. This provides a heterogeneous medium in which the immersed intruder particle rises (BNE) or sinks (reverse BNE) according to relative convection currents and buoyant and drag forces. A simple relationship proposed for viscous drag in terms of the vibrational intensity and the particle to grain density ratio allows simulation of published experimental data for rise and sink times as functions of particle radius, initial depth of the particle, and particle-grain density ratio. The proposed model correctly describes the experimentally observed maximum in risetime.

  3. Cluster kinetics model of particle separation in vibrated granular media.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Benjamin J; Madras, Giridhar

    2006-01-01

    We model the Brazil-nut effect (BNE) by hypothesizing that granules form clusters that fragment and aggregate. This provides a heterogeneous medium in which the immersed intruder particle rises (BNE) or sinks (reverse BNE) according to relative convection currents and buoyant and drag forces. A simple relationship proposed for viscous drag in terms of the vibrational intensity and the particle to grain density ratio allows simulation of published experimental data for rise and sink times as functions of particle radius, initial depth of the particle, and particle-grain density ratio. The proposed model correctly describes the experimentally observed maximum in risetime. PMID:16486131

  4. Continuum modeling of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ley, Mikkel W H; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-03-23

    A continuum model is established for numerical studies of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions. A suspension of microparticles placed in a microfluidic channel and influenced by an external force, is described by a continuous particle-concentration field coupled to the continuity and Navier-Stokes equation for the solution. The hydrodynamic interactions are accounted for through the concentration dependence of the suspension viscosity, of the single-particle mobility, and of the momentum transfer from the particles to the suspension. The model is applied on a magnetophoretic and an acoustophoretic system, respectively, and based on the results, we illustrate three main points: (1) for relative particle-to-fluid volume fractions greater than 0.01, the hydrodynamic interaction effects become important through a decreased particle mobility and an increased suspension viscosity. (2) At these high particle concentrations, particle-induced flow rolls occur, which can lead to significant deviations of the advective particle transport relative to that of dilute suspensions. (3) Which interaction mechanism that dominates, depends on the specific flow geometry and the specific external force acting on the particles. PMID:26948344

  5. Experimental and Modeling Studies of Particles in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, John Edward

    Particles that are generated during plasma processing are an important source of contamination in microelectronic device fabrication. In this work we investigate the transport of plasma-generated particles in a radiofrequency (rf) diode plasma reactor, and we characterize this transport in terms of the forces that act on particles in the plasma environment. In this way we determine the mechanisms by which particles transport to critical processing surfaces. Aluminum and copper particles are formed in a radiofrequency argon sputtering system. The spatial distribution of these particles is observed with elastic laser light scattering. The distribution of particles in the discharge is found to depend most strongly on discharge power and particle size. Large particles and particles in high power discharges tend to segregate near the plasma sheath boundary. Small particles and particles in very low power discharges tend to accumulate in the center of the discharge. The spatial distributions that are observed experimentally are consistent with a model of the forces on particles in a plasma environment. The model includes the electrostatic force, the thermophoretic force, gravity, and momentum transfer from drifting plasma ions and from drifting neutral gas. In addition, the charging of small particles is investigated. We find that the particle charge can usually be predicted using simplified theory rather than the full plasma kinetic theory. Also, the electrostatic potential distribution in the vicinity of a charged particle is found to resemble a Debye-Huckel potential profile. Particles are observed to affect the discharge structure. Spatially- and temporally-resolved optical emission intensities take on characteristics that are associated with discharges in electronegative gases. We take this as evidence that the particles act as heavy, multiply charged negative ions. Plasmas with particles have a smaller self bias, and they are more resistive than discharges in pure

  6. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  7. Saturn's rings - Particle size distributions for thin layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Marouf, E. A.; Tyler, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    A model incorporating limited interaction between the incident energy and particles in the ring is considered which appears to be consistent with the multiple scattering process in Saturn's rings. The model allows for the small physical thickness of the rings and can be used to relate Voyager 1 observations of 3.6- and 13-cm wavelength microwave scatter from the rings to the ring particle size distribution function for particles with radii ranging from 0.001 to 20 m. This limited-scatter model yields solutions for particle size distribution functions for eight regions in the rings, which exhibit approximately inverse-cubic power-law behavior.

  8. INTERSPECIES MODELING OF INHALED PARTICLE DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the potential toxic effects of ambient contaminants or therapeutic effects of airborne drugs, inhalation exposure experiments can be performed with surrogate laboratory animals. erein, an interspecies particle deposition theory is presented for physiologically based p...

  9. Experimental validation of different modeling approaches for solid particle receivers.

    SciTech Connect

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib S.; Amsbeck, Lars , Spain and Stuttgart, Germany); Roger, Marc , Spain and Stuttgart, Germany); Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Buck, Reiner , Spain and Stuttgart, Germany); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2009-07-01

    Solid particle receivers have the potential to provide high-temperature heat for advanced power cycles, thermochemical processes, and thermal storage via direct particle absorption of concentrated solar energy. This paper presents two different models to evaluate the performance of these systems. One model is a detailed computational fluid dynamics model using FLUENT that includes irradiation from the concentrated solar flux, two-band re-radiation and emission within the cavity, discrete-phase particle transport and heat transfer, gas-phase convection, wall conduction, and radiative and convective heat losses. The second model is an easy-to-use and fast simulation code using Matlab that includes solar and thermal radiation exchange between the particle curtain, cavity walls, and aperture, but neglects convection. Both models were compared to unheated particle flow tests and to on-sun heating tests. Comparisons between measured and simulated particle velocities, opacity, particle volume fractions, particle temperatures, and thermal efficiencies were found to be in good agreement. Sensitivity studies were also performed with the models to identify parameters and modifications to improve the performance of the solid particle receiver.

  10. White dwarfs constraints on dark sector models with light particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ubaldi, Lorenzo

    2014-06-24

    The white dwarf luminosity function is well understood in terms of standard model physics and leaves little room for exotic cooling mechanisms related to the possible existence of new weakly interacting light particles. This puts significant constraints on the parameter space of models that contain a massive dark photon and light dark sector particles.

  11. An incompressible two-dimensional multiphase particle-in-cell model for dense particle flows

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, D.M.; O`Rourke, P.J.; Andrews, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    A two-dimensional, incompressible, multiphase particle-in-cell (MP-PIC) method is presented for dense particle flows. The numerical technique solves the governing equations of the fluid phase using a continuum model and those of the particle phase using a Lagrangian model. Difficulties associated with calculating interparticle interactions for dense particle flows with volume fractions above 5% have been eliminated by mapping particle properties to a Eulerian grid and then mapping back computed stress tensors to particle positions. This approach utilizes the best of Eulerian/Eulerian continuum models and Eulerian/Lagrangian discrete models. The solution scheme allows for distributions of types, sizes, and density of particles, with no numerical diffusion from the Lagrangian particle calculations. The computational method is implicit with respect to pressure, velocity, and volume fraction in the continuum solution thus avoiding courant limits on computational time advancement. MP-PIC simulations are compared with one-dimensional problems that have analytical solutions and with two-dimensional problems for which there are experimental data.

  12. Dirac equation for electrodynamic model particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng-Johansson, J. X.

    2008-08-01

    We set up the Maxwell's equations and subsequently the classical wave equations for the electromagnetic waves which together with their generating source, an oscillatory charge of zero rest mass in general travelling, make up a particle travelling similarly as the source at velocity ν in the field of an external scalar and vector potentials. The direct solutions in constant external field are Doppler-displaced plane waves propagating at the velocity of light c; at the de Broglie wavelength scale and expressed in terms of the dynamically equivalent and appropriate geometric mean wave variables, these render as functions identical to the space-time functions of a corresponding Dirac spinor, and in turn identical to de Broglie phase waves previously obtained from explicit superposition. For two spin-half particles of a common set of space-time functions constrained with antisymmetric spin functions as follows the Pauli principle for same charges and as separately indirectly induced based on experiment for opposite charges, the complete wave functions are identical to the Dirac spinor. The back-substitution of the so explicitly determined complete wave functions in the corresponding classical wave equations of the two particles, subjected further to reductions appropriate for the stationary-state particle motion and to rotation invariance when in three dimensions, give a Dirac equation set; the procedure and conclusion are directly extendible to arbitrarily varying potentials by use of the Furious theorem and to particle motions in three dimensions by virtue of the characteristics of de Broglie particle motion. Through the derivation of the Dirac equation, the study hopes to lend insight into the connections between the Dirac wave functions and the electrodynamic components of simple particles under the government by the well established basic laws of electrodynamics.

  13. Particle Physics Primer: Explaining the Standard Model of Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vondracek, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Standard Model, a basic model of the universe that describes electromagnetic force, weak nuclear force radioactivity, and the strong nuclear force responsible for holding particles within the nucleus together. (YDS)

  14. Modeling of Oxidation of Molybdenum Particles during Plasma Spray Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, James Russell; Wan, Y. P.; Jiang, X. Y.; Sampath, S.; Prasad, V.; Herman, H.

    2001-06-01

    An oxidation model for molybdenum particles during the plasma spray deposition process is presented. Based on a well-verified model for plasma chemistry and the heating and phase change of particles in a plasma plume, this model accounts for the oxidant diffusion around the surface of particles or splats, oxidation on the surface, as well as oxygen diffusion in molten molybdenum. Calculations are performed for a single molybdenum particle sprayed under Metco-9MB spraying conditions. The oxidation features of particles during the flight are compared with those during the deposition. The result shows the dominance of oxidation of a molybdenum particle during the flight, as well as during deposition when the substrate temperature is high (above 400 °C).

  15. Predictive modeling of particle-laden turbulent flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, F.; Bolio, E.J.; Hrenya, C.M.

    1993-12-31

    Earlier work of Sinclair and Jackson which treats the laminar flow of gas-solid suspensions is extended to model dilute turbulent flow. The random particle motion, often exceeding the turbulent fluctuations in the gas, is obtained using a model based on kinetic theory of granular materials. A two-equation low Reynolds number turbulence model is, modified to account for the presence of the dilute particle phase. Comparisons of the model predictions with available experimental data for the mean and fluctuating velocity profiles for both phases indicate that the resulting theory captures many of the flow features observed in the pneumatic transport of large particles. The model predictions did not manifest an extreme sensitivity to the degree of inelasticity in the particle-particle collisions for the range of solid loading ratios investigated.

  16. Investigation of particles size effects in Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) modelling of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai-Duy, N.; Phan-Thien, N.; Khoo, B. C.

    2015-04-01

    In the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation of suspension, the fluid (solvent) and colloidal particles are replaced by a set of DPD particles and therefore their relative sizes (as measured by their exclusion zones) can affect the maximal packing fraction of the colloidal particles. In this study, we investigate roles of the conservative, dissipative and random forces in this relative size ratio (colloidal/solvent). We propose a mechanism of adjusting the DPD parameters to properly model the solvent phase (the solvent here is supposed to have the same isothermal compressibility to that of water).

  17. Particle Modelling of Fluid Phenomena in Three -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Mohsen

    A new, numerical approach is developed to simulate fluid phenomena by means of molecular type behavior. First, consider the large number of molecules to be approximated by a smaller number of aggregates called particles. Then, let the particles interact with each other according to a classical molecular type force vec F whose magnitude F is given (Hirchfelder, Curtiss and Bird (1954)) by: F = rm -{Gover r^{p}} + {Hover r^{q}}, in which G, H, p, q, are positive constants and r is the distance between two particles. The acceleration of each particle is related to the force by the Newtonian dynamical equations vec F = m vec a. Displacement, velocity, and acceleration of each particle are then approximated by the "Leap Frog" formulas. The CRAY X-MP/24 is used to solve numerically the resulting large system of nonlinear, ordinary differential equations. We then study fluid phenomena in the following order. Part 1. Generation of particle fluids in a cylindrical region. Part 2. Verification of basic fluid properties. Part 3. Simulation of surface motion. In this part, we simulate three phenomena, which can be observed physically, by dropping a small object into a container filled with liquid. First, there is a backdrop. Then, a wave will be generated and going outward from the point of entry of the object into the container. Last, a reaction which can be recorded only with a high speed camera (Trefethen (1972)) is that very small drops of the container fluid may actually pinch off from the backdrop. Part 4. Simulation of surface tension. This phenomena can be observed by performing the following experiment. A small needle placed gently upon a water surface will not be sunk but will be supported by the molecular forces in the liquid surface. The molecules in the surface are depressed slightly in the process.

  18. Hydrodynamic model for particle size segregation in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Leonardo; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2003-12-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theoretical model for “Brazil nut” size segregation in granular materials. We give analytical solutions for the rise velocity of a large intruder particle immersed in a medium of monodisperse fluidized small particles. We propose a new mechanism for this particle size-segregation due to buoyant forces caused by density variations which come from differences in the local “granular temperature”. The mobility of the particles is modified by the energy dissipation due to inelastic collisions and this leads to a different behavior from what one would expect for an elastic system. Using our model we can explain the size ratio dependence of the upward velocity.

  19. Confined turbulent fluid-particle flow modeling using multiple-realization particle trajectory schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeniji-Fashola, A. A.

    1988-07-01

    A multiple-realization particle trajectory scheme has been developed and applied to the numerical prediction of confined turbulent fluid-particle flows. The example flows investigated include the vertical pipe upflow experimental data of Tsuji et al. and the experimental data of Leavitt for a coaxial jet flow, comprising a particle-laden central jet and a clean annular jet, into a large recirculation chamber. The results obtained from the numerical scheme agree well with the experimental data, lending confidence to the modeling approach. The multiple-realization particle trajectory turbulent flow modeling scheme is believed to be a more elegant and accurate approach to the extension of single-particle hydrodynamics to dilute multi-particle systems than the more commonly employed two-fluid modeling approach. It is also better able to incorporate additional force items such as lift, virtual mass and Bassett history terms directly into the particle equation of motion as appropriate. This makes it a suitable candidate for particle migration studies and an extension to situations involving liquid particulate phases with possible propulsion applications, such as in spray combustion, follows naturally.

  20. Confined turbulent fluid-particle flow modeling using multiple-realization particle trajectory schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeniji-Fashola, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    A multiple-realization particle trajectory scheme has been developed and applied to the numerical prediction of confined turbulent fluid-particle flows. The example flows investigated include the vertical pipe upflow experimental data of Tsuji et al. and the experimental data of Leavitt for a coaxial jet flow, comprising a particle-laden central jet and a clean annular jet, into a large recirculation chamber. The results obtained from the numerical scheme agree well with the experimental data, lending confidence to the modeling approach. The multiple-realization particle trajectory turbulent flow modeling scheme is believed to be a more elegant and accurate approach to the extension of single-particle hydrodynamics to dilute multi-particle systems than the more commonly employed two-fluid modeling approach. It is also better able to incorporate additional force items such as lift, virtual mass and Bassett history terms directly into the particle equation of motion as appropriate. This makes it a suitable candidate for particle migration studies and an extension to situations involving liquid particulate phases with possible propulsion applications, such as in spray combustion, follows naturally.

  1. Merging for Particle-Mesh Complex Particle Kinetic Modeling of the Multiple Plasma Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a merging procedure for the Particle-Mesh Complex Particle Kinetic (PMCPK) method in case of inter-penetrating flow (multiple plasma beams). We examine the standard particle-in-cell (PIC) and the PMCPK methods in the case of particle acceleration by shock surfing for a wide range of the control numerical parameters. The plasma dynamics is described by a hybrid (particle-ion-fluid-electron) model. Note that one may need a mesh if modeling with the computation of an electromagnetic field. Our calculations use specified, time-independent electromagnetic fields for the shock, rather than self-consistently generated fields. While a particle-mesh method is a well-verified approach, the CPK method seems to be a good approach for multiscale modeling that includes multiple regions with various particle/fluid plasma behavior. However, the CPK method is still in need of a verification for studying the basic plasma phenomena: particle heating and acceleration by collisionless shocks, magnetic field reconnection, beam dynamics, etc.

  2. Application of The Stochastic Particle Tracking Model To Evaluate Particle Movement Uncertainty in Extreme Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Lin, E.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, modeling of suspended sediment particle movement in extreme flows is proposed by stochastic particle tracking modeling approaches. The proposed stochastic model is governed by a stochastic differential equation (SDE) composed of two random processes (a Wiener process and a Poisson process), and a random variable (i.e., flow magnitude) simulated by the extreme value Type I distribution. An extreme flow is defined as a hydrologic flow event (such as a flash flood) or a large flow perturbation with a low probability of occurrence and a high impact on its ambient flow environment. In the proposed particle tracking model, a random term mainly caused by fluid eddy motions is modeled as a Wiener process, while the random occurrences of a sequence of extreme flows can be modeled as a Poisson process. Following previous work by Oh and Tsai (2010)[1] and Tsai et al. (2014)[2], this study is intended to modify the jump term, which models the abrupt changes of particle position in the extreme flow environments. It is proposed that the probabilistic magnitude of extreme events can be simulated by the extreme value type I (EV I) distribution. The ensemble mean and variance of particle trajectory can be obtained from the proposed stochastic models via simulations. Our findings suggest that the ability to consider the probabilistic magnitude of extreme events can provide a more comprehensive and realistic estimate of the uncertainty of particle movement when extreme flow events occur. It is also found that the variance of particle position may be attributed to both the random magnitudes and occurrences of particle jumps in the presence of extreme flow events. It is demonstrated from this study that the proposed model can more explicitly quantify the uncertainty of particle movement by taking into considerations both the random arrival process of extreme flows and the variability of the extreme flow magnitude. [1] Oh, J. S., and Tsai, C.W.(2010). "A stochastic jump

  3. A Particle-based model for water simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N., LLNL

    1998-01-01

    The Smooth-Particle Applied Mechanics (SPAM) model is a relatively recent physical modeling technique It can model both fluids and solids using free-moving particles An implemented SPAM model is described that solved the compressible Navier-Stokes equations to produce animations of splashing and pooling water Because the particle positions are known explicitly each timestep, the SPAM technique produces data amenable to visualization A ray-tracing renderer is also described It samples the underwater light-field distribution and stores tbe information into a Light Accumulation Lattice which is used for scattered light calculations and caustics.

  4. Viscous FRW Models with Particle Creation in Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, C. P.

    2012-05-01

    We discuss the dynamical effects of bulk viscosity and particle creation on the early evolution of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model in the framework of open thermodynamical systems. We consider bulk viscosity and particle creation as separate irreversible processes. Exact solutions of the Einstein field equations are obtained by using the "gamma-law" equation of state p = (γ-1)ρ, where the adiabatic parameter γ varies with scale factor of the metric. We consider the cosmological model to study the early phases of the evolution of the universe as it goes from an inflationary phase to a radiation-dominated era in the presence of bulk viscosity and particle creation. Analytical solutions are obtained for particle number density and entropy for all models. It is found that, by choosing appropriate functions for particle creation rate and bulk viscous coefficient, the models exhibit singular and non-singular beginnings.

  5. Dirac Equation for Electrodynamic Model Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng-Johansson, J. X.

    2008-03-01

    We set up the Maxwell's equations and subsequently the classical wave equations for the electromagnetic waves which together with their generating source, an oscillatory charge of zero rest mass, make up a particle travelling at velocity v as with the charge in the fields of an external scalar and vector potentials. The direct solutions in constant external field are Doppler-displaced plane waves propagating at the velocity of light c; at the de Broglie wavelength scale and expressed in terms of the dynamically equivalent and appropriate geometric mean wave variables, these render as functons identical to the space-time functions of the Dirac spinor, and these are identical to the de Broglie phase waves given previously from explicit superposition. For two spin-half particles of a common set of space-time functions constrained with antisymmetric spin functions as follows the Pauli principle for same charges and as separately indirectly induced based on experiment for opposite charges, the complete wave functions are identical to a Dirac spinor. The back-substitution of the so explicitly determined complete wave functions in the corresponding classical wave equations of the two particles, subjected further to reductions appropriate for the stationary- state particle motion and to rotation invariance when in three dimensions, give a Dirac equation set; the procedure and conclusion are directly extendible to arbitrarily varying potentials by use of the Furious theorem and to three dimensions (full paper: QTS5).

  6. Fractal Rings and Composite Elementary Particles (FRACEP): A Picture of Composite Standard Model Fundamental Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, Judith

    2016-03-01

    The object of this work was to study the feasibility of identifying a minimum set of fundamental particles that could be used to build up composite fermions and bosons that exhibit the same properties and behavior as the Standard Model (SM) fundamental particles. The spontaneous decay of most of the SM fermions suggests the possibility that they are composite in nature. The results of this arithmetically-based conceptual model identify a minimum set of only two fundamental particles (with equal and opposite mass) that combine in fractal-like configurations to form Intermediate Building Blocks (IMB). The IMBs then combine to form all of the SM fundamental particles and their anti-counterparts. These composite (bright universe) particles agree with the SM particles in mass, spin, electric charge, decay products and maximum classical radius (indicated by the scattering cross-section). Further, FRACEP identifies an equal set of dark universe particles, based primarily on its negative fundamental particle, which could represent the dark matter and energy understood to be the cause of the expansion of our (bright) universe.

  7. Conduction Modelling Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    1999-01-01

    Heat transfer is very important in many industrial and geophysical problems. Because these problems often have complicated fluid dynamics, there are advantages in solving them using Lagrangian methods like smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). Since SPH particles become disordered, the second derivative terms may be estimated poorly, especially when materials with different properties are adjacent. In this paper we show how a simple alteration to the standard SPH formulation ensures continuity of heat flux across discontinuities in material properties. A set of rules is formulated for the construction of isothermal boundaries leading to accurate conduction solutions. A method for accurate prediction of heat fluxes through isothermal boundaries is also given. The accuracy of the SPH conduction solutions is demonstrated through a sequence of test problems of increasing complexity.

  8. Hysteresis modeling and measurement for two-dimensional particle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, H.; Fulmek, P. L.; Grössinger, R.

    2002-04-01

    The increasing accuracy of circuit data storage simulations demands reliable models for the magnetic behaviour of the magnetic storage material. This paper introduces and compares the results of measurements and the results of model calculations by applying the Jiles-Atherton model, and the energetic model of ferromagnetic hysteresis by Hauser. The results show good agreement for uniaxial particle assemblies.

  9. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  10. Optical properties of soot particles: measurement - model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, S.; Lambe, A. T.; Lack, D.; Massoli, P.; Cross, E. S.; Dubey, M.; Mazzoleni, C.; Olfert, J.; Freedman, A.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Cappa, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In order to accurately model the direct radiative impact of black carbon (BC), the refractive index and shape dependent scattering and absorption characteristics must be known. At present, the assumed shape remains highly uncertain because BC particles are fractal-like, being agglomerates of smaller (20-40 nm) spherules, yet traditional optical models such as Mie theory typically assume a spherical particle morphology. To investigate the ability of various optical models to reproduce observed BC optical properties, we measured light absorption and extinction coefficients of methane and ethylene flame soot particles. Optical properties were measured by multiple instruments: absorption by a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS), absorption and scattering by a 3-wavelength photoacoustic/nephelometer spectrometer (PASS-3) and extinction and scattering by a cavity attenuated phase shift spectrometer (CAPS). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) and mobility size was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Measurements were made for nascent soot particles and for collapsed soot particles following coating with dioctyl sebacate or sulfuric acid and thermal denuding to remove the coating. Wavelength-dependent refractive indices for the sampled particles were derived by fitting the observed absorption and extinction cross-sections to spherical particle Mie theory and Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory. The Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation assumes that the absorption properties of soot are dictated by the individual spherules and neglects interaction between them. In general, Mie theory reproduces the observed absorption and extinction cross-sections for particles with volume equivalent diameters (VED) < ~160 nm, but systematically predicts lower

  11. Calibration of TSI model 3025 ultrafine condensation particle counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kesten, J.; Reineking, A.; Porstendoerfer, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The registration efficiency of the TSI model 3025 ultrafine condensation particle counter for Ag and NaCl particles of between 2 and 20 nm in diameter was determined. Taking into account the different shapes of the input aerosol size distributions entering the differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and the transfer function of the DMA, the counting efficiencies of condensation nucleus counters (CNC) for monodisperse Ag and NaCl particles were estimated. In addition, the dependence of the CNC registration efficiency on the particle concentration was investigated.

  12. Lagrangian modeling of large volcanic particles: Application to Vulcanian explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Neri, A.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Lo Savio, S.; Boschi, E.

    2010-08-01

    A new 2D/3D Lagrangian particle model (named LPAC) for the dynamics of clasts ejected during explosive eruptions is presented. The novelty of the model lies in the one-way coupling of the carrier flow field, given by a Eulerian multiphase flow code, and the particles. The model is based on a simplification of the Basset-Boussinesq-Oseen equation, expressing the Lagrangian equation of a particle as the sum of the forces exerted on it along its trajectory. It is assumed that particles are non-interacting and do not affect the background carrier flow and that the drag coefficient is constant. The model was applied to large clasts produced by Vulcanian explosions, in particular those occurring in August 1997 at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat (West Indies, UK). Simulation results allowed parametric studies as well as semi-quantitative comparisons between modeling results and field evidence. Major results include (1) the carrier flow was found to play a fundamental role even for meter-sized particles—a 1 m diameter block is predicted to reach a distance that is about 70% greater than that predicted without the effect of the carrier flow (assuming the same initial velocity), (2) assumption of the initial velocity of the particle was dropped thanks to the description of both the acceleration and deceleration phases along the particle trajectory, (3) by adopting experimentally based drag coefficients, large particles were able to reach greater distances with respect to smaller particles consistently with field observations and (4) the initial depth of the particle in the conduit was found to mainly influence the ejection velocity while the initial radial position with respect to the conduit axis was found to play a major role on the distance reached by the particle.

  13. Quasilinear Model for Energetic Particles Interacting with TAE Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2010-11-01

    TAE instabilities are thought to be a major source of Energetic Particle transport which could set limits on operational scenarios, especially for burning plasmas, and causes damage to the first wall. The quasilinear model proposed by Berk et al.ootnotetextH. L. Berk et al, Nucl. Fusion, 35:1661, 1995. relies on diffusion mechanisms for particle dynamics to captures the evolution of the energetic particle distribution function and the associated mode amplitude. Using the bump-on-tail as a paradigm, we analyze the dynamics near the resonances for accurate diffusion coefficient representation. We verify the model to get the predicted single mode saturation levels and benchmark the case of multimode overlap against particle codes. Using the TAE mode structures computed by the ideal MHD code NOVA, we generalize this method to relax energetic particles' profiles in the full 3D phase space.

  14. Derivation of manifestly covariant quantum models for spinning relativistic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnelius, Robert; Mårtensson, Ulf

    1990-05-01

    A method to construct manifestly covariant models for relativistic spinning particles is given. The models involve manifestly covariant internal variables leading to discrete state spaces apart from the coordinate and momentum variables. The precise form of the models are extracted from the Bargmann-Wigner conditions on the Pauli-Lubanski operator, together with some consistency conditions. Several simple models are derived and analysed, some of which are new. Also manifestly conformally invariant models for particles with arbitrary spins are derived using a condition of Bracken and Jessup.

  15. Modelling of externally mixed particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZHU, Shupeng; Sartelet, Karine; Seigneur, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Particles present in the atmosphere have significant impacts on climate as well as on human health. Thus, it is important to accurately simulate and forecast their concentrations. Most commonly used air quality models assume that particles are internally mixed, largely for computational reasons. However, this assumption is disproved by measurements, especially close to sources. In fact, the externally-mixed properties of particles are important for aerosol source identification, radiative effects and particle evolution. In this study, a new size-composition resolved aerosol model is developed. It can solve the aerosol dynamic evolution for external mixtures taking into account the processes of coagulation, condensation and nucleation. Both the size of particles and the mass fraction of each chemical compound are discretized. For a given particle size, particles of different chemical composition may co-exist. Aerosol dynamics is solved in each grid cell by splitting coagulation and condensation/evaporation-nucleation processes. For the condensation/evaporation, surface equilibrium between gas and aerosol is calculated based on ISORROPIA and the newly developed H2O (Hydrophilic/Hydrophobic Organic) Model. Because size and chemical composition sections evolve during condensation/evaporation, concentrations need to be redistributed on fixed sections after condensation/evaporation to be able to use the model in 3 dimensions. This is done based on the numerical scheme HEMEN, which was initially developed for size redistribution. Chemical components can be grouped into several aggregates to reduce computational cost. The 0D model is validated by comparison to results obtained for internally mixed particles and the effect of mixing is investigated for up to 31 species and 4 aggregates. The model will be integrated into the air quality modeling platform POLYPHEMUS to investigate its performance in modeling air quality by comparing with observations during the MEGAPOLI

  16. Model independence of constraints on particle dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K.; Sadoulet, B.

    1989-03-01

    The connection between the annihilation, elastic, and production cross sections is reviewed, showing how a general lower limit on the interaction rate in a detector is obtained from the requirement that a particle be the dark matter. High energy production experiments further constrain models, making very light dark matter particles unlikely. Special attention is paid to the uncertainties, loopholes and model dependencies that go into the arguments and several examples are given. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  17. The ESyS_Particle: A New 3-D Discrete Element Model with Single Particle Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yucang; Mora, Peter

    In this paper, the Discrete Element Model (DEM) is reviewed, and the ESyS_Particle, our new version of DEM, is introduced. We particularly highlight some of the major physical concerns about DEMs and major differences between our model and most current DEMs. In the new model, single particle rotation is introduced and represented by a unit quaternion. For each 3-D particle, six degrees of freedom are employed: three for translational motion, and three for orientation. Six kinds of relative motions are permitted between two neighboring particles, and six interactions are transferred, i.e., radial, two shearing forces, twisting and two bending torques. The relative rotation between two particles is decomposed into two sequence-independent rotations such that all interactions due to the relative motions between interactive rigid bodies can be uniquely determined. This algorithm can give more accurate results because physical principles are obeyed. A theoretical analysis about how to choose the model parameters is presented. Several numerical tests have been carried out, the results indicate that most laboratory tests can be well reproduced using our model.

  18. A hybrid mathematical model for controlling particle size, particle size distribution, and color properties of toner particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataeefard, Maryam; Shadman, Alireza; Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Mohammadi, Yousef

    2016-08-01

    A mathematical modeling approach was proposed combining the capabilities of response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF) and implemented successfully in production of printing toner particles. Toner powders were systematically synthesized through suspension copolymerization process. Applying RSM, a series of experiments were designed and toner particles were prepared and the effects of monomer ratio, colorant and surfactant content on the particle size (PS), particle size distribution (PSD), thermal and colorimetric properties (∆ E) of the resulting toner were monitored and discussed. The second-order models corresponding to each target characteristic, i.e., PS, PSD, and ∆ E of different types of toner powders, were obtained by individual optimization to express variation of each property in terms of polymerization parameters. Applying statistical calculations, the best reduced models were identified to be fed in the second step of optimization. Since toners with appropriate PS, PSD, and CP were needed, we applied multi-objective optimization based on DF approach. The results show that exact tuning of toner properties is closely possible with the aid of hybrid mathematical model developed in this work. Noticeably, desirabilities are very close to 100 %.

  19. Relativistic models in nuclear and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative overview is presented of different approaches to the construction of phenomenological dynamical models that respect basic principles of quantum theory and relativity. Wave functions defined as matrix elements of products of field operators on one hand and wave functions that are defined as representatives of state vectors in model Hilbert spaces are related differently to observables and dynamical models for these wave functions have each distinct advantages and disadvantages 34 refs.

  20. Constant Energy of Time Involute Particles of Biharmonic Particles in Bianchi Type-I Cosmological Model Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körpinar, Talat; Turhan, Essin

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we study energy of time involute particles of biharmonic particles in Bianchi type-I (B-I) cosmological model spacetime. We give a geometrical description of energy for a Frenet vector fields of timelike biharmonic particle. Finally, using the Frenet frame of the given particle, we obtain different cases for this particles and give important characterizations about them in Bianchi type-I (B-I) cosmological model spacetime.

  1. Surface tension models for particle laden thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jeffrey; Wang, Li; Bertozzi, Andrea

    We study viscous slurries on an incline, for which particles migrate in a fluid due to a combination of gravity-induced settling and shear-induced migration. The lubrication model for the bulk of the fluid is a hyperbolic system of conservation laws for the film height and particle concentration which exhibits in interesting behavior, including singular shock solutions corresponding to accumulation of particles at the front. The addition of surface tension to the model produces a a capillary ridge that is affected by the particle accumulation and in two dimensions leads to fingering instabilities. We compare this model to experimental results. This work is supported by NSF Grants DMS-1312543 and DMS-1045536.

  2. Statistical modeling for particle impact noise detection testing

    SciTech Connect

    Prairie, R.R. ); Zimmer, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Particle Impact Noise Detection (PIND) testing is widely used to test electronic devices for the presence of conductive particles which can cause catastrophic failure. This paper develops a statistical model based on the rate of particles contaminating the part, the rate of particles induced by the test vibration, the escape rate, and the false alarm rate. Based on data from a large number of PIND tests for a canned transistor, the model is shown to fit the observed results closely. Knowledge of the parameters for which this fit is made is important in evaluating the effectiveness of the PIND test procedure and for developing background judgment about the performance of the PIND test. Furthermore, by varying the input parameters to the model, the resulting yield, failure rate and percent fallout can be examined and used to plan and implement PIND test programs.

  3. A particle-grid air quality modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chock, D.P.; Winkler, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    A particle-grid air quality modeling approach that can incorporate chemistry is proposed as an alternative to the conventional PDF-grid air quality modeling. The particle trajectory model can accurately describe advection of air pollutants without introducing artificial diffusion, generating negative concentrations or distorting the concentration distributions. It also accurately describes the dispersion of emissions from point sources and is capable of retaining subgrid-scale information. Inhomogeneous turbulence necessitates use of a small timestep, say, 10 s to describe vertical dispersion of particles in convective conditions. A timestep as large as 200 s can be used to simulate horizontal dispersion. A time-splitting scheme can be used to couple the horizontal and vertical dispersion in a 3D simulation, and about 2000-3000 particles per cell of size 5 km x 5 km X 50 m is sufficient to yield a highly accurate simulation of 3D dispersion. Use of an hourly-averaged concentration further reduces the demand of particle per cell to 500. The particle-grid method is applied to a system of ten reacting chemical species in a two-dimensional rotating flow field with and without diffusion. A chemistry grid within which reactions are assumed to take place can be decoupled from the grid describing the flow field. Two types of chemistry grids are used to describe the chemical reactions: a fixed coarse grid and a moving (the advection case) or stationary (the advection plus diffusion case) fine grid. Two particle-number densities are also used: 256 and 576 particles per fixed coarse grid cell. The species mass redistributed back to the particle after each reaction step is assumed to be proportional to the species mass in the particle before the reaction. The simulation results are very accurate, especially in the advection-chemistry case. Accuracy improves with the use of a fine grid.

  4. Mesoscopic dynamics of colloids simulated with dissipative particle dynamics and fluid particle model.

    PubMed

    Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A; Boryczko, Krzysztof

    2002-01-01

    We report results of numerical simulations of complex fluids, using a combination of discrete-particle methods. Our molecular modeling repertoire comprises three simulation techniques: molecular dynamics (MD), dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), and the fluid particle model (FPM). This type of model can depict multi-resolution molecular structures found in complex fluids ranging from single micelle, colloidal crystals, large-scale colloidal aggregates up to the mesoscale processes of hydrodynamical instabilities in the bulk of colloidal suspensions. We can simulate different colloidal structures in which the colloidal beds are of comparable size to the solvent particles. This undertaking is accomplished with a two-level discrete particle model consisting of the MD paradigm with a Lennard-Jones (L-J) type potential for defining the colloidal particle system and DPD or FPM for modeling the solvent. We observe the spontaneous emergence of spherical or rod-like micelles and their crystallization in stable hexagonal or worm-like structures, respectively. The ordered arrays obtained by using the particle model are similar to the 2D colloidal crystals observed in laboratory experiments. The micelle shape and its hydrophobic or hydrophilic character depend on the ratio between the scaling factors of the interactions between colloid-colloid to colloid-solvent. Unlike the miscellar arrays, the colloidal aggregates involve the colloid-solvent interactions prescribed by the DPD forces. Different from the assumption of equilibrium growth, the two-level particle model can display much more realistic molecular physics, which allows for the simulation of aggregation for various types of colloids and solvent liquids over a very broad range of conditions. We discuss the potential prospects of combining MD, DPD, and FPM techniques in a single three-level model. Finally, we present results from large-scale simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and dispersion of colloidal slab

  5. A micromechanical modelling approach for predicting particle dislodgement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, W.; Diplas, P.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the impulse and energy concepts have been proposed as a means of improving the prediction of sediment particle entrainment. Because they account for temporal aspects of the applied hydrodynamic forces, impulse-based or energy-based approaches provide a better representation of a highly fluctuating phenomenon compared to the more traditional time-averaged Shields parameter or constant force magnitude-based model. In the present paper, we elaborate further on the simulation of particle migration by applying a theoretical model based on hydrodynamic pressure data. Three common movement scenarios and the dynamic critical drag force, allowed to vary during particle motion, are qualitatively discussed here. Also, the possible inaccuracy in entrainment prediction of three different models is addressed with reference to our simulation results. It is demonstrated that the multi-parcel impulse model has the best performance when compared to the single-parcel impulse and force magnitude-based models.

  6. Particle-Turbulence Interaction Model for Aluminum Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Neeraj; Calhoon, William; Tomes, Jeremy

    2011-06-01

    Particle-turbulence interactions will have a substantial impact on the performance of thermobaric explosives that rely on the particle combustion for secondary heat release. Modeling these interactions from a fundamental perspective is very difficult and intractable for large-scale problems of practical interest. Alternatively, these interactions may be modeled from a macroscopic perspective that seeks to account for the probability distribution function (PDF) of variables within the modeled laminar burning rate for the particulates. Such a formulation would account for the first order effect of turbulent fluctuations on the burning rate within a computationally affordable model. This paper will describe the development of such a model for aluminum particle combustion in both the diffusion and kinetic burning regimes. This formulation is based on an assumed PDF method that may be parameterized into a database that may be deployed within a flow solver. As a result, the formulation is computational efficient and affordable for large-scale simulations.

  7. One-dimensional particle models for heat transfer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Ghendrih, Ph; Tamain, P.; Bagnoli, F.; Lepri, S.; Livi, R.

    2010-11-01

    For a better understanding of Spitzer-Härm closure restrictions and for estimating the relevancy of this expression when collisionnality decreases, an effort is done in developing simple models that aim at catching the physics of the transition from conductive to free-streaming heat flux. In that perspective, one-dimensional particle models are developed to study heat transfer properties in the direction parallel to the magnetic field in tokamaks. These models are based on particles that carry energy at a specific velocity and that can interact with each other or with heat sources. By adjusting the particle dynamics and particle interaction properties, it is possible to generate a broad range of models of growing complexity. The simplest models can be solved analytically and are used to link particle behavior to general macroscopic heat transfer properties. In particular, some configurations recover Fourier's law and make possible to investigate the dependance of thermal conductivity on temperature. Besides, some configurations where local balance is lost require defining non local expression for heat flux. These different classes of models could then be linked to different plasma configurations and used to study transition from collisional to non-collisional plasma.

  8. ANFIS modeling for prediction of particle motions in fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdari, Arman; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2015-11-01

    Accurate dynamic analysis of parcel of solid particles driven in fluid flow system is of interest for many natural and industrial applications such as sedimentation process, study of cloud particles in atmosphere, etc. In this paper, numerical modeling of solid particles in incompressible flow using Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of particles in different flow conditions; channel and cavity flow. Although modern computers have been well developed, the high computational time and costs for this kind of problems are still demanded. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is used to simulate fluid flows and combined with the Lagrangian approach to predict the motion of particles in the range of masses. Some particles are selected, and subjected to Adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict the trajectory of moving solid particles. Using a hybrid learning procedure from computational particle movement, the ANFIS can construct an input-output mapping based on fuzzy if-then rules and stipulated computational fluid dynamics prediction pairs. The obtained results from ANFIS algorithm is validated and compared with the set of benchmark data provided based on point-like approach coupled with the LBM method.

  9. The Modeling of Pickup Ion or Energetic Particle Mediated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Mostafavi, P.; Hunana, P.

    2016-05-01

    Suprathermal energetic particles, such as solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere and pickup ions (PUIs) in the outer heliosphere and the very local interstellar medium, often form a thermodynamically dominant component in their various environments. In the supersonic solar wind beyond > 10 AU, in the inner heliosheath (IHS), and in the very local interstellar medium (VLISM), PUIs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background plasma. Similarly, SEPs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background solar wind in the inner heliosphere. In the absence of equilibration between plasma components, a separate coupled plasma description for the energetic particles is necessary. Using a collisionless Chapman-Enskog expansion, we derive a closed system of multi-component equations for a plasma comprised of thermal protons and electrons, and suprathermal particles (SEPs, PUIs). The energetic particles contribute an isotropic scalar pressure to leading order, a collisionless heat flux at the next order, and a collisionless stress tensor at the second-order. The collisionless heat conduction and viscosity in the multi-fluid description results from a nonisotropic energetic particle distribution. A simpler single-fluid MHD-like system of equations with distinct equations of state for both the background plasma and the suprathermal particles is derived. We note briefly potential pitfalls that can emerge in the numerical modeling of collisionless plasma flows that contain a dynamically important energetic particle component.

  10. Dissipative particle dynamics model for colloid transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We present that the transport of colloidal particles in porous media can be effectively modeled with a new formulation of dissipative particle dynamics, which augments standard DPD with non-central dissipative shear forces between particles while preserving angular momentum. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the new formulation is able to capture accurately the drag forces as well as the drag torques on colloidal particles that result from the hydrodynamic retardation effect. In the present work, we use the new formulation to study the contact efficiency in colloid filtration in saturated porous media. Note that the present model include all transport mechanisms simultaneously, including gravitational sedimentation, interception and Brownian diffusion. Our results of contact efficiency show a good agreement with the predictions of the correlation equation proposed by Tufenkji and EliMelech, which also incorporate all transport mechanisms simultaneously without the additivity assumption.

  11. Multi-particle FEM modeling on microscopic behavior of 2D particle compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; An, X. Z.; Zhang, Y. L.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the discrete random packing and various ordered packings such as tetragonal and hexagonal close packed structures generated by discrete element method and honeycomb, which is manually generated were input as the initial packing structures into the multi-particle finite element model (FEM) to study their densification during compaction, where each particle is discretized as a FEM mesh. The macro-property such as relative density and micro-properties such as local morphology, stress, coordination number and densification mechanism obtained from various initial packings are characterized and analyzed. The results show that the coupling of discrete feature in particle scale with the continuous FEM in macro-scale can effectively conquer the difficulties in traditional FEM modeling, which provides a reasonable way to reproduce the compaction process and identify the densification mechanism more accurately and realistically.

  12. Space Charge Models for Particle Tracking on Long Time Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Shishlo, Andrei P; Potts III, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    In order to efficiently track charged particles over long times, most tracking codes use either analytic charge distributions or particle-in-cell (PIC) methods based on fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). While useful for theoretical studies, analytic distribution models do not allow accurate simulation of real machines. PIC calculations can utilize realistic space charge distributions, but these methods suffer from the presence of discretization errors. We examine the situation for particle tracking with space charge over long times, and consider possible ideas to improve the accuracy of such calculations.

  13. Particle production within the quark meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.

    2009-07-15

    Quark-meson coupling (QMC) models can be successfully applied to the description of compact star properties in nuclear astrophysics as well as to nuclear matter. In the regime of hot hadronic matter very few calculations exist using the QMC model, in particular when applied to particle yields in heavy ion collisions. In the present work, we identify the free energy of the bag with the effective mass of the baryons and we calculate the particle production yields on a Au+Au collision at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with the QMC model and compare them with results obtained previously with other relativistic models. A smaller temperature for the fireball, T=132 MeV, is obtained because of the smaller effective baryon masses predicted by QMC. QMC was also applied to the description of particle yields at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in Pb+Pb collisions.

  14. Isotopic overabundances and the energetic particle model of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Enriquez, R.; Bravo, S.

    1985-01-01

    According to the energetic particle model of solar flares particles are efficiently accelerated in the magnetic field loop of an active region (AR) by hydromagnetic turbulence. It is demonstrated that the isotopic overabundances observed in some flares are not a consequence of the flare itself but are characteristic of the plasma in the AR. Only when a flare releases the plasma into the interplanetary space it is possible to observe this anomalous composition at spacecraft locations.

  15. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Reactive Transport and Mineral Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Redden, George; Meakin, Paul; Fang, Yilin

    2006-06-30

    A new Lagrangian particle model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics was used to simulate pore scale precipitation reactions. The side-by-side injection of reacting solutions into two halves of a two-dimensional granular porous medium was simulated. Precipitation on grain surfaces occurred along a narrow zone in the middle of the domain, where the reacting solutes mixed to generate a supersaturated reaction product. The numerical simulations qualitatively reproduced the behavior observed in related laboratory experiments.

  16. THEORETICAL MODEL OF SOILING OF SURFACES BY AIRBORNE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model is developed which can be used to predict the change in reflectance from a surface as a function of time. Reflectance change is a measure of soiling caused by the deposition of particles on a surface. The major inputs to the model are the parameters to a bimodal distribut...

  17. Modeling of Fine-Particle Formation in Turbulent Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Venkat; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of nanostructured particles in high-temperature flames is important both for the control of emissions from combustion devices and for the synthesis of high-value chemicals for a variety of applications. The physiochemical processes that lead to the production of fine particles in turbulent flames are highly sensitive to the flow physics and, in particular, the history of thermochemical compositions and turbulent features they encounter. Consequently, it is possible to change the characteristic size, structure, composition, and yield of the fine particles by altering the flow configuration. This review describes the complex multiscale interactions among turbulent fluid flow, gas-phase chemical reactions, and solid-phase particle evolution. The focus is on modeling the generation of soot particles, an unwanted pollutant from automobile and aircraft engines, as well as metal oxides, a class of high-value chemicals sought for specialized applications, including emissions control. Issues arising due to the numerical methods used to approximate the particle number density function, the modeling of turbulence-chemistry interactions, and model validation are also discussed.

  18. Effect of Particle Shape on Mechanical Behaviors of Rocks: A Numerical Study Using Clumped Particle Model

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Guan; Liu, Guang; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2013-01-01

    Since rocks are aggregates of mineral particles, the effect of mineral microstructure on macroscopic mechanical behaviors of rocks is inneglectable. Rock samples of four different particle shapes are established in this study based on clumped particle model, and a sphericity index is used to quantify particle shape. Model parameters for simulation in PFC are obtained by triaxial compression test of quartz sandstone, and simulation of triaxial compression test is then conducted on four rock samples with different particle shapes. It is seen from the results that stress thresholds of rock samples such as crack initiation stress, crack damage stress, and peak stress decrease with the increasing of the sphericity index. The increase of sphericity leads to a drop of elastic modulus and a rise in Poisson ratio, while the decreasing sphericity usually results in the increase of cohesion and internal friction angle. Based on volume change of rock samples during simulation of triaxial compression test, variation of dilation angle with plastic strain is also studied. PMID:23997677

  19. Sticky Particles: Modeling Rigid Aggregates in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, D. C.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2008-09-01

    We present progress on our study of planetary ring dynamics. We use local N-body simulations to examine small patches of dense rings in which self-gravity and mutual collisions dominate the dynamics of the ring material. We use the numerical code pkdgrav to model the motions of 105-7 ring particles, using a sliding patch model with modified periodic boundary conditions. The exact nature of planetary ring particles is not well understood. If covered in a frost-like layer, such irregular surfaces may allow for weak cohesion between colliding particles. Thus we have recently added new functionality to our model, allowing "sticky particles” to lock into rigid aggregates while in a rotating reference frame. This capability allows particles to adhere to one another, forming irregularly shaped aggregates that move as rigid bodies. (The bonds between particles can subsequently break, given sufficient stress.) These aggregates have greater strength than gravitationally bound "rubble piles,” and are thus able to grow larger and survive longer under similar stresses. This new functionality allows us to explore planetary ring properties and dynamics in a new way, by self-consistently forming (and destroying) non-spherical aggregates and moonlets via cohesive forces, while in a rotating frame, subjected to planetary tides. (We are not aware of any similar implementations in other existing models.) These improvements allow us to study the many effects that particle aggregation may have on the rings, such as overall ring structure; wake formation; equilibrium properties of non-spherical particles, like pitch angle, orientation, shape, size distribution, and spin; and the surface properties of the ring material. We present test cases and the latest results from this new model. This work is supported by a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  20. Modelling new particle formation events in the South African savannah

    SciTech Connect

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Buekes, Johan P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-05-28

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction of these systems with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scales, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study, measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There already are some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first detailed simulation that includes all the main processes relevant to particle formation. The results show that both of the particle formation mechanisms investigated overestimated the dependency of the formation rates on sulphuric acid. From the two particle formation mechanisms tested in this work, the approach that included low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events than the approach that did not. To obtain a reliable estimate of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa. This work is the first step in developing a more comprehensive new particle formation model applicable to the unique environment in southern Africa. Such a model will assist in better understanding and predicting new particle formation – knowledge which could ultimately be used to mitigate impacts of climate change and air quality.

  1. A contoured continuum surface force model for particle methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Guangtao; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Chen, Bin

    2015-10-01

    A surface tension model is essential to simulate multiphase flows with deformed interfaces. This study develops a contoured continuum surface force (CCSF) model for particle methods. A color function that varies sharply across the interface to mark different fluid phases is smoothed in the transition region, where the local contour curvature can be regarded as the interface curvature. The local contour passing through each reference particle in the transition region is extracted from the local profile of the smoothed color function. The local contour curvature is calculated based on the Taylor series expansion of the smoothed color function, whose derivatives are calculated accurately according to the definition of the smoothed color function. Two schemes are proposed to specify the smooth radius: fixed scheme, where 2 ×re (re = particle interaction radius) is assigned to all particles in the transition region; and varied scheme, where re and 2 ×re are assigned to the central and edged particles in the transition region respectively. Numerical examples, including curvature calculation for static circle and ellipse interfaces, deformation of square droplet to a circle (2D and 3D), droplet deformation in shear flow, and droplet coalescence, are simulated to verify the CCSF model and compare its performance with those of other methods. The CCSF model with the fixed scheme is proven to produce the most accurate curvature and lowest parasitic currents among the tested methods.

  2. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we use a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture the void probability and solvation free energy of nonpolar hard particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for an understanding of emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  3. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2015-05-21

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we develop a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena of associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture of the void probability and solvation free energy of apolar particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for a understanding emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  4. Hybrid Modeling Method for a DEP Based Particle Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Miled, Mohamed Amine; Gagne, Antoine; Sawan, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a new modeling approach for Dielectrophoresis (DEP) based particle manipulation is presented. The proposed method fulfills missing links in finite element modeling between the multiphysic simulation and the biological behavior. This technique is amongst the first steps to develop a more complex platform covering several types of manipulations such as magnetophoresis and optics. The modeling approach is based on a hybrid interface using both ANSYS and MATLAB to link the propagation of the electrical field in the micro-channel to the particle motion. ANSYS is used to simulate the electrical propagation while MATLAB interprets the results to calculate cell displacement and send the new information to ANSYS for another turn. The beta version of the proposed technique takes into account particle shape, weight and its electrical properties. First obtained results are coherent with experimental results. PMID:23364197

  5. Modeling reactive transport with particle tracking and kernel estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater reactive transport models are useful to assess and quantify the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface media and are an essential tool for the analysis of coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes in Earth Systems. Particle Tracking Method (PTM) provides a computationally efficient and adaptable approach to solve the solute transport partial differential equation. On a molecular level, chemical reactions are the result of collisions, combinations, and/or decay of different species. For a well-mixed system, the chem- ical reactions are controlled by the classical thermodynamic rate coefficient. Each of these actions occurs with some probability that is a function of solute concentrations. PTM is based on considering that each particle actually represents a group of molecules. To properly simulate this system, an infinite number of particles is required, which is computationally unfeasible. On the other hand, a finite number of particles lead to a poor-mixed system which is limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect to actually model incomplete mix- ing in naturally occurring porous media. In this work, we demonstrate that this effect in most cases should be attributed to a defficient estimation of the concentrations and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing processes in porous media. To illustrate this, we show that a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations can approach the well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. KDEs provide weighting functions of each particle mass that expands its region of influence, hence providing a wider region for chemical reactions with time. Simulation results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve state-of-the-art simulations of chemical reactions and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative conceptual models and not on a limited number of particles.

  6. Modeling oceanic multiphase flow by using Lagrangian particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    While the density of seawater is basically determined by its temperature, salinity and pressure, the effective density becomes higher when the water mass contains suspended sediment. On the other hands, effective density declines when water mass contains fine scale materials of lower density such as bubbles and ice crystals. Such density anomaly induced by small scale materials suspended in water masses sometimes plays important roles in the sub-mesoscale ocean physics. To simulate these small scale oceanic multiphase flow, a new modeling framework using an online Lagrangian particle tracking method is developed. A Lagrangian particle tracking method has substantial advantages such as an explicit treatment of buoyancy force acting on each individual particle, no numerical diffusion and dissipation, high dynamic range and an ability to track the history and each individual particle. However, its numerical cost causes difficulty when we try to simulate a large number of particles. In the present study we implement a numerically efficient particle tracking scheme using linked-list data structure, which is coupled with a nonhydrostatic dynamical core. This newly developed model successfully reproduces characteristics of some interesting small scale multiphase processes, for example hyperpycnal flow (a sediment-rich river water plume trapped at ocean floor) and grease ice cover (a slurry mixture of frazil ice crystals and seawater).

  7. Model Adaptation for Prognostics in a Particle Filtering Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2011-01-01

    One of the key motivating factors for using particle filters for prognostics is the ability to include model parameters as part of the state vector to be estimated. This performs model adaptation in conjunction with state tracking, and thus, produces a tuned model that can used for long term predictions. This feature of particle filters works in most part due to the fact that they are not subject to the "curse of dimensionality", i.e. the exponential growth of computational complexity with state dimension. However, in practice, this property holds for "well-designed" particle filters only as dimensionality increases. This paper explores the notion of wellness of design in the context of predicting remaining useful life for individual discharge cycles of Li-ion batteries. Prognostic metrics are used to analyze the tradeoff between different model designs and prediction performance. Results demonstrate how sensitivity analysis may be used to arrive at a well-designed prognostic model that can take advantage of the model adaptation properties of a particle filter.

  8. Simple model for fine particle (dust) clouds in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuji, Hiroo

    2016-04-01

    In the cloud of fine particles (dusts) in plasmas, the charge neutrality can be much enhanced due to large charge numbers of fine particles. The required condition is not difficult to satisfy even when their charge density is substantially smaller than electrons or ions. Based on this fact, a simple model of fine particle clouds is proposed and the cloud radius is related to the half-width, the radius where the density of surrounding plasmas drops by half, in cylindrically and spherically symmetric cases under microgravity. When fine particles are gradually introduced with parameters of surrounding plasma especially the half-width being fixed, the size of clouds first increases and then saturates at the value determined by the plasma half-width, giving a possibility to control the size and density of clouds independently.

  9. Investigation of self-oscillation using particle balance model

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Inshik; Na, Byungkeun Chang, Hongyoung

    2015-08-15

    Self-oscillation obtained using a DC-only power supply under specific anode voltage conditions is investigated in a cylindrical system with thermal electrons using tungsten filaments. Analysis of the obtained oscillation profiles reveals that the experimental data are consistent with a model derived from the particle balance model. The self-oscillation period characteristics with respect to the pressure and gas species are also analyzed. As the physics and particle motion of self-oscillation near the plasma transition region are analyzed from different perspectives, this paper may advance the study of this phenomenon.

  10. Investigation of Self-Oscillation using Particle Balance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Inshik; Na, Byungkeun; Chang, Hongyoung

    2015-09-01

    Self-oscillation, which is obtained by using a DC-only power supply with specific anode voltage conditions, is investigated in a cylindrical system with thermal electrons using tungsten filaments. From analysis of the obtained oscillation profiles, the experimental data is consistent with the model derived from the particle balance model. The self-oscillation period characteristics with respect to the pressure and gas species are also analyzed. As the physics and particle motion of self-oscillation near the electron avalanche is analyzed in different perspective, this study may advance the understanding of this phenomenon. This research was supported by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy (MKE) of Korea (Grant No. 10041681).

  11. Kinetic model of particle-inhibited grain growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary Scott

    The effects of second phase particles on matrix grain growth kinetics were investigated using Al2O3-SiC as a model system. In particular, the validity of the conclusion drawn from a previous kinetic analysis that the kinetics of particle-inhibited grain growth in Al2 O3-SiC samples with an intermediate volume fraction of second phase could be well quantified by a modified-Zener model was investigated. A critical analysis of assumptions made during the previous kinetic analysis revealed oversimplifications which affect the validity of the conclusion. Specifically, the degree of interaction between particles and grain boundaries was assumed to be independent of the mean second phase particle size and size distribution. In contrast, current measurements indicate that the degree of interaction in Al2O3-SiC is dependent on these parameters. An improved kinetic model for particle-inhibited grain growth in Al 2O3-SiC was developed using a modified-Zener approach. The comparison of model predictions with experimental grain growth data indicated that significant discrepancies (as much as 4--5 orders of magnitude) existed. Based on this, it was concluded that particles had a much more significant effect on grain growth kinetics than that caused by a simple reduction of the boundary driving force due to the removal of boundary area. Consequently, it was also concluded that the conclusion drawn from the earlier kinetic analysis regarding the validity of a modified-Zener model was incorrect. Discrepancies between model and experiment were found to be the result of a significant decrease in experimental growth rate constant not predicted by the model. Possible physical mechanisms for such a decrease were investigated. The investigation of a small amount of SiO2 on grain growth in Al2O3 indicated that the decrease was not the result of a decrease in grain boundary mobility due to impurity contamination by particles. By process of elimination and based on previous observations

  12. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water. PMID:26933908

  13. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossuin, Y.; Orlando, T.; Basini, M.; Henrard, D.; Lascialfari, A.; Mattea, C.; Stapf, S.; Vuong, Q. L.

    2016-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  14. Charged Particle Environment Definition for NGST: Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Evans, Steven W.; Hardage, Donna M.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    NGST will operate in a halo orbit about the L2 point, 1.5 million km from the Earth, where the spacecraft will periodically travel through the magnetotail region. There are a number of tools available to calculate the high energy, ionizing radiation particle environment from galactic cosmic rays and from solar disturbances. However, space environment tools are not generally available to provide assessments of charged particle environment and its variations in the solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail at L2 distances. An engineering-level phenomenology code (LRAD) was therefore developed to facilitate the definition of charged particle environments in the vicinity of the L2 point in support of the NGST program. LRAD contains models tied to satellite measurement data of the solar wind and magnetotail regions. The model provides particle flux and fluence calculations necessary to predict spacecraft charging conditions and the degradation of materials used in the construction of NGST. This paper describes the LRAD environment models for the deep magnetotail (XGSE < -100 Re) and solar wind, and presents predictions of the charged particle environment for NGST.

  15. Generalized slave-particle method for extended Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a set of generalized slave-particle models for extended Hubbard models that treat localized electronic correlations using slave-boson decompositions. Our models automatically include two slave-particle methods of recent interest, the slave-rotor and slave-spin methods, as well as a ladder of new intermediate models where one can choose which of the electronic degrees of freedom (e.g., spin or orbital labels) are treated as correlated degrees of freedom by the slave bosons. In addition, our method removes the aberrant behavior of the slave-rotor model, where it systematically overestimates the importance of electronic correlation effects for weak interaction strength, by removing the contribution of unphysical states from the bosonic Hilbert space. The flexibility of our formalism permits one to separate and isolate the effect of correlations on the key degrees of freedom.

  16. Quasilinear Line Broadened Model for Energetic Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2011-10-01

    We present a self-consistent quasi-linear model that describes wave-particle interaction in toroidal geometry and computes fast ion transport during TAE mode evolution. The model bridges the gap between single mode resonances, where it predicts the analytically expected saturation levels, and the case of multiple modes overlapping, where particles diffuse across phase space. Results are presented in the large aspect ratio limit where analytic expressions are used for Fourier harmonics of the power exchange between waves and particles, . Implemention of a more realistic mode structure calculated by NOVAK code are also presented. This work is funded by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. A description of rotations for DEM models of particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campello, Eduardo M. B.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we show how a vector parameterization of rotations can be adopted to describe the rotational motion of particles within the framework of the discrete element method (DEM). It is based on the use of a special rotation vector, called Rodrigues rotation vector, and accounts for finite rotations in a fully exact manner. The use of fictitious entities such as quaternions or complicated structures such as Euler angles is thereby circumvented. As an additional advantage, stick-slip friction models with inter-particle rolling motion are made possible in a consistent and elegant way. A few examples are provided to illustrate the applicability of the scheme. We believe that simple vector descriptions of rotations are very useful for DEM models of particle systems.

  18. Modeling Correlation Effects in Nickelates with Slave Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Alexandru Bogdan; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    Nickelate interfaces display interesting electronic properties including orbital ordering similar to that of cuprate superconductors and thickness dependent metal-insulator transitions. One-particle band theory calculations do not include dynamic localized correlation effects on the nickel sites and thus often incorrectly predict metallic systems or incorrect ARPES spectra. Building on two previous successful slave-particle treatments of local correlations, we present a generalized slave-particle method that includes prior models and allows us to produce new intermediate models. The computational efficiency of these slave-boson methods means that one can readily study correlation effects in complex heterostructures. We show some predictions of these methods for the electronic structure of bulk and thin film nickelates. Work supported by NSF Grant MRSEC DMR-1119826.

  19. Explicit particle-dynamics model for granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.

    1982-05-01

    Discrete-particle simulation of granular-material motion is developing into a viable method for studying how various interparticulate forces affect the bulk behavior of granular solids. A two-dimensional, polygonal-particle computer model, developed from the ideas of Cundall (1976), and incorporating other techniques from molecular dynamics, is being used in a study of the flow behavior of rubblized oil shale. Direct comparison with physical tests involving multiblock systems have verified the model's ability to predict the motion of real materials. Computer generated movies and high-speed motion pictures of physical tests involving gravity flow of 2-dimensional polygonal particles show formation of temporary arches followed by dynamic rupture and reformation of new arches. Direct shear tests on oil-shale rubble involving very large displacements indicate significant circulatory motion in the rubble. Computer simulation of the direct shear tests show similar behavior.

  20. Modeling of long range frequency sweeping for energetic particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nyqvist, R. M.; Breizman, B. N.

    2013-04-15

    Long range frequency sweeping events are simulated numerically within a one-dimensional, electrostatic bump-on-tail model with fast particle sources and collisions. The numerical solution accounts for fast particle trapping and detrapping in an evolving wave field with a fixed wavelength, and it includes three distinct collisions operators: Drag (dynamical friction on the background electrons), Krook-type collisions, and velocity space diffusion. The effects of particle trapping and diffusion on the evolution of holes and clumps are investigated, and the occurrence of non-monotonic (hooked) frequency sweeping and asymptotically steady holes is discussed. The presented solution constitutes a step towards predictive modeling of frequency sweeping events in more realistic geometries.

  1. Advances in Bayesian Model Based Clustering Using Particle Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Merl, D M

    2009-11-19

    Recent work by Carvalho, Johannes, Lopes and Polson and Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy introduced a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) alternative to traditional iterative Monte Carlo strategies (e.g. MCMC and EM) for Bayesian inference for a large class of dynamic models. The basis of SMC techniques involves representing the underlying inference problem as one of state space estimation, thus giving way to inference via particle filtering. The key insight of Carvalho et al was to construct the sequence of filtering distributions so as to make use of the posterior predictive distribution of the observable, a distribution usually only accessible in certain Bayesian settings. Access to this distribution allows a reversal of the usual propagate and resample steps characteristic of many SMC methods, thereby alleviating to a large extent many problems associated with particle degeneration. Furthermore, Carvalho et al point out that for many conjugate models the posterior distribution of the static variables can be parametrized in terms of [recursively defined] sufficient statistics of the previously observed data. For models where such sufficient statistics exist, particle learning as it is being called, is especially well suited for the analysis of streaming data do to the relative invariance of its algorithmic complexity with the number of data observations. Through a particle learning approach, a statistical model can be fit to data as the data is arriving, allowing at any instant during the observation process direct quantification of uncertainty surrounding underlying model parameters. Here we describe the use of a particle learning approach for fitting a standard Bayesian semiparametric mixture model as described in Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy. In Section 2 we briefly review the previously presented particle learning algorithm for the case of a Dirichlet process mixture of multivariate normals. In Section 3 we describe several novel extensions to the original

  2. Applying dispersive changes to Lagrangian particles in groundwater transport models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative.

  3. Applying Dispersive Changes to Lagrangian Particles in Groundwater Transport Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative. ?? US Government 2010.

  4. A note on the multispecies model for identical particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M. Y.; Luo Huaqiang

    2008-02-15

    It is pointed out that the multispecies model for identical particles is in general not suitable for considering quasistationary nonlinear plasma structures. For phenomena on long time scales, the a priori partitioning of electrons into hot and cold species is often unrealistic unless the latter are actually separated in the phase space by external or self-consistent fields.

  5. Thermodynamic model for bouncing charged particles inside a capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeizadeh, Amin; Mameghani, Pooya

    2013-08-01

    We introduce an equation of state for a conducting particle inside a charged parallel-plate capacitor and show that it is similar to the equation of state for an ideal gas undergoing an adiabatic process. We describe a simple experiment that shows reasonable agreement with the theoretical model.

  6. MODELING OF PARTICLE FORMATION AND DYNAMICS IN A FLAME INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model has been developed to predict the formation and growth of metallic particles in a flame incinerator system. Flow fields and temperature profiles in a cylindrical laminar jet flame have been used to determine the position and physical conditions of the species along the fl...

  7. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  8. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics modelling for failure in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Russell K.

    It is generally regarded to be a difficult task to model multiple fractures leading to fragmentation in metals subjected to high strain rates using numerical methods. Meshless methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) are well suited to the application of fracture mechanics, since they are not prone to the problems associated with mesh tangling. This research demonstrates and validates a numerical inter-particle fracture model for the initiation, growth and subsequent failure in metals at high strain rate, applicable within a Total Lagrangian SPH scheme. Total Lagrangian SPH performs calculations in the reference state of a material and therefore the neighbourhoods remain fixed throughout the computation; this allows the inter-particle bonds to be stored and tracked as material history parameters. Swegle (2000) showed that the SPH momentum equation can be rearranged in terms of a particle-particle interaction area. By reducing this area to zero via an inter-particle damage parameter, the principles of continuum damage mechanics can be observed without the need for an effective stress term, held at the individual particles.. This research makes use of the Cochran-Banner damage growth model which has been updated for 3D damage and makes the appropriate modifications for inter-particle damage growth. The fracture model was tested on simulations of a 1D flyer plate impact test and the results were compared to experimental data. Some limited modelling was also conducted in 2 and 3 dimensions and promising results were observed. Research was also performed into the mesh sensitivity of the explosively driven Mock- Holt experiment. 3D simulations using the Eulerian SPH formulation were conducted and the best results were observed with a radial packing arrangement. An in-depth assessment of the Monaghan repulsive force correction was also conducted in attempt to eliminate the presence of the SPH tensile instability and stabilise the available Eulerian SPH code

  9. Micromechanical Modeling of Storage Particles in Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purkayastha, Rajlakshmi Tarun

    The effect of stress on storage particles within a lithium ion battery, while acknowledged, is not understood very well. In this work three non-dimensional parameters were identified which govern the stress response within a spherical storage particle. These parameters are developed using material properties such as the diffusion coefficient, particle radius, partial molar volume and Young's modulus. Stress maps are then generated for various values of these parameters for fixed rates of insertion, applying boundary conditions similar to those found in a battery. Stress and concentration profiles for various values of these parameters show the coupling between stress and concentration is magnified depending on the values of the parameters. These maps can be used for different materials, depending on the value of the dimensionless parameters. The value of maximum stress generated is calculated for extraction as well as insertion of lithium into the particle. The model was then used to study to ellipsoidal particles in order to ascertain the effect of geometry on the maximum stress within the particle. By performing a parameter study, we can identify those materials for which particular aspect ratios of ellipsoids are more beneficial, in terms of reducing stress. We find that the stress peaks at certain aspect ratios, mostly at 2 and 1/ 2 . A parameter study was also performed on cubic particle. The values of maximum stresses for both insertion and extraction of lithium were plotted as contour plots. It was seen that the material parameters influenced the location of the maximum stress, with the maximum stress occurring either at the center of the edge between two faces or the point at the center of a face. Newer materials such as silicon are being touted as new lithium storage materials for batteries due to their higher capacity. Their tendency to rapidly loose capacity in a short period of time has led to a variety designs such are the use of carbon nanotubes or

  10. Constants of motion of the four-particle Calogero model

    SciTech Connect

    Saghatelian, A.

    2012-10-15

    We present the explicit expressions of the complete set of constants of motion of four-particle Calogero model with excluded center of mass, i.e. of the A{sub 3} rational Calogero model. Then we find the constants of motion of its spherical part, defining two-dimensional 12-center spherical oscillator, with the force centers located at the vertexes of cuboctahedron.

  11. Modelling of critical phenomena for ignition of metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepakina, E.; Sobolev, V.

    2008-11-01

    The singularly perturbed system of differential equations describing metal particle ignition is analyzed. Two general types of combustion reactions are recognized, namely subcritical and supercritical. It is shown that there exists a so-called critical regime, which separates domains of subcritical and supercritical regimes. The critical regime is modelled by the special phase trajectory of the system, which includes the repulsive part with slow variation of the temperature of a metal particle and the thickness of the oxide film. The asymptotic formulae for the calculation of critical values of the modified Semenov number are obtained in the cases of parabolic and cubic laws of oxidation kinetics.

  12. Discrete element method modeling of the triboelectric charging of polyethylene particles: Can particle size distribution and segregation reduce the charging?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopka, Ladislav; Kosek, Juraj

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene particles of various sizes are present in industrial gas-dispersion reactors and downstream processing units. The contact of the particles with a device wall as well as the mutual particle collisions cause electrons on the particle surface to redistribute in the system. The undesirable triboelectric charging results in several operational problems and safety risks in industrial systems, for example in the fluidized-bed polymerization reactor. We studied the charging of polyethylene particles caused by the particle-particle interactions in gas. Our model employs the Discrete Element Method (DEM) describing the particle dynamics and incorporates the ‘Trapped Electron Approach’ as the physical basis for the considered charging mechanism. The model predicts the particle charge distribution for systems with various particle size distributions and various level of segregation. Simulation results are in a qualitative agreement with experimental observations of similar particulate systems specifically in two aspects: 1) Big particles tend to gain positive charge and small particles the negative one. 2) The wider the particle size distribution is, the more pronounced is the charging process. Our results suggest that not only the size distribution, but also the effect of the spatial segregation of the polyethylene particles significantly influence the resulting charge distribution ‘generated’ in the system. The level of particle segregation as well as the particle size distribution of polyethylene particles can be in practice adjusted by the choice of supported catalysts, by the conditions in the fluidized-bed polymerization reactor and by the fluid dynamics. We also attempt to predict how the reactor temperature affects the triboelectric charging of particles.

  13. The 5th Generation model of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2009-05-01

    The Standard model of Particle Physics is able to account for all known HEP phenomenon, yet it is not able to predict the masses of the quarks or leptons nor can it explain why they have their respective values. The Checker Board Model (CBM) predicts that there are 5 generation of quarks and leptons and shows a pattern to those masses, namely each three quarks or leptons (within adjacent generations or within a generation) are related to each other by a geometric mean relationship. A 2D structure of the nucleus can be imaged as 2D plate spinning on its axis, it would for all practical circumstances appear to be a 3D object. The masses of the hypothesized ``up'' and ``dn'' quarks determined by the CBM are 237.31 MeV and 42.392 MeV respectively. These new quarks in addition to a lepton of 7.4 MeV make up one of the missing generations. The details of this new particle physics model can be found at the web site: checkerboard.dnsalias.net. The only areas were this theory conflicts with existing dogma is in the value of the mass of the Top quark. The particle found at Fermi Lab must be some sort of composite particle containing Top quarks.

  14. Cirrus cloud model parameterizations: Incorporating realistic ice particle generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Dodd, G. C.; Starr, David OC.

    1990-01-01

    Recent cirrus cloud modeling studies have involved the application of a time-dependent, two dimensional Eulerian model, with generalized cloud microphysical parameterizations drawn from experimental findings. For computing the ice versus vapor phase changes, the ice mass content is linked to the maintenance of a relative humidity with respect to ice (RHI) of 105 percent; ice growth occurs both with regard to the introduction of new particles and the growth of existing particles. In a simplified cloud model designed to investigate the basic role of various physical processes in the growth and maintenance of cirrus clouds, these parametric relations are justifiable. In comparison, the one dimensional cloud microphysical model recently applied to evaluating the nucleation and growth of ice crystals in cirrus clouds explicitly treated populations of haze and cloud droplets, and ice crystals. Although these two modeling approaches are clearly incompatible, the goal of the present numerical study is to develop a parametric treatment of new ice particle generation, on the basis of detailed microphysical model findings, for incorporation into improved cirrus growth models. For example, the relation between temperature and the relative humidity required to generate ice crystals from ammonium sulfate haze droplets, whose probability of freezing through the homogeneous nucleation mode are a combined function of time and droplet molality, volume, and temperature. As an example of this approach, the results of cloud microphysical simulations are presented showing the rather narrow domain in the temperature/humidity field where new ice crystals can be generated. The microphysical simulations point out the need for detailed CCN studies at cirrus altitudes and haze droplet measurements within cirrus clouds, but also suggest that a relatively simple treatment of ice particle generation, which includes cloud chemistry, can be incorporated into cirrus cloud growth.

  15. Noise, Bifurcations, and Modeling of Interacting Particle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mier-y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Forgoston, Eric; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the stochastic patterns of a system of communicating, or coupled, self-propelled particles in the presence of noise and communication time delay. For sufficiently large environmental noise, there exists a transition between a translating state and a rotating state with stationary center of mass. Time delayed communication creates a bifurcation pattern dependent on the coupling amplitude between particles. Using a mean field model in the large number limit, we show how the complete bifurcation unfolds in the presence of communication delay and coupling amplitude. Relative to the center of mass, the patterns can then be described as transitions between translation, rotation about a stationary point, or a rotating swarm, where the center of mass undergoes a Hopf bifurcation from steady state to a limit cycle. Examples of some of the stochastic patterns will be given for large numbers of particles. PMID:22124204

  16. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  17. Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory is participating in an Innovative Partnership Program (IPP) project with an industry partner to modify a commercial off-the-shelf simulation software product to treat the electrodynamics of particulate systems. Discrete element modeling (DEM) is a numerical technique that can track the dynamics of particle systems. This technique, which was introduced in 1979 for analysis of rock mechanics, was recently refined to include the contact force interaction of particles with arbitrary surfaces and moving machinery. In our work, we endeavor to incorporate electrostatic forces into the DEM calculations to enhance the fidelity of the software and its applicability to (1) particle processes, such as electrophotography, that are greatly affected by electrostatic forces, (2) grain and dust transport, and (3) the study of lunar and Martian regoliths.

  18. Particle systems for adaptive, isotropic meshing of CAD models

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Joshua A.; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2012-01-01

    We present a particle-based approach for generating adaptive triangular surface and tetrahedral volume meshes from computer-aided design models. Input shapes are treated as a collection of smooth, parametric surface patches that can meet non-smoothly on boundaries. Our approach uses a hierarchical sampling scheme that places particles on features in order of increasing dimensionality. These particles reach a good distribution by minimizing an energy computed in 3D world space, with movements occurring in the parametric space of each surface patch. Rather than using a pre-computed measure of feature size, our system automatically adapts to both curvature as well as a notion of topological separation. It also enforces a measure of smoothness on these constraints to construct a sizing field that acts as a proxy to piecewise-smooth feature size. We evaluate our technique with comparisons against other popular triangular meshing techniques for this domain. PMID:23162181

  19. An asymptotic model of particle deposition at an airway bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.; Halpern, David; Filoche, Marcel; Sapoval, Bernard; Grotberg, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Particle transport and deposition associated with flow over a wedge is investigated as a model for particle transport and flow at the carina of an airway bifurcation during inspiration. Using matched asymptotics, a uniformly valid solution is obtained to represent the high Reynolds number flow over a wedge that considers the viscous boundary layer near the wedge and the outer inviscid region and is then used to solve the particle transport equations. Sometimes particle impaction on the wedge is prevented due to the boundary layer. We call this boundary layer shielding (BLS). This effect can be broken down into different types: rejection, trapping and deflection that are described by what happens to the particle’s initial negative velocity normal to the wall either changing sign, reaching zero, or remaining negative in the boundary layer region. The deposition efficiency depends on the critical Stokes number but exhibits a weak dependence on Reynolds number. Deposition efficiency for Sc in the range 0 < Sc < 0.4 yields the following relationship De ≈ (1.867 Sc1.78− 0.016) sin(βπ/2) at large Reynolds numbers, where βπ is the wedge angle. For a specific deposition efficiency, Sc decreases as βπ increases. The distribution of impacted particles was also computed and revealed that particles primarily impact within one airway diameter of the carina, consistent with computational fluid dynamics approaches. This work provides a new insight that the BLS inherent to the wedge component of the structure is the dominant reason for the particle distribution. This finding is important in linking aerosol deposition to the location of airway disease as well as target sites for therapeutic deposition. PMID:22378463

  20. Physics of Hall-effect thruster by particle model

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Minelli, Pierpaolo; Capitelli, Mario; Longo, Savino

    2012-11-27

    A realistic three-dimensional fully kinetic particle simulation of a Hall-effect thruster discharge has been developed. The model consists of a Particle-in-Cell methodology tracking electrons, Xe{sup +} and Xe{sup ++} ions in their selfconsistent electric field. A detailed secondary electron emission from lateral walls is also implemented in addition with electron-atom and electron-ion volume collisions. The model is able to capture the most relevant features of axial, radial and azimuthal behaviors of the start-up transient and steady state phases detecting inverted sheaths and azimuthal modulation in the acceleration region. The model has the potentiality to investigate the driving mechanisms at the origin of the electron anomalous cross-field transport.

  1. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  2. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  3. Nonlinear EEG Decoding Based on a Particle Filter Model

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jun

    2014-01-01

    While the world is stepping into the aging society, rehabilitation robots play a more and more important role in terms of both rehabilitation treatment and nursing of the patients with neurological diseases. Benefiting from the abundant contents of movement information, electroencephalography (EEG) has become a promising information source for rehabilitation robots control. Although the multiple linear regression model was used as the decoding model of EEG signals in some researches, it has been considered that it cannot reflect the nonlinear components of EEG signals. In order to overcome this shortcoming, we propose a nonlinear decoding model, the particle filter model. Two- and three-dimensional decoding experiments were performed to test the validity of this model. In decoding accuracy, the results are comparable to those of the multiple linear regression model and previous EEG studies. In addition, the particle filter model uses less training data and more frequency information than the multiple linear regression model, which shows the potential of nonlinear decoding models. Overall, the findings hold promise for the furtherance of EEG-based rehabilitation robots. PMID:24949420

  4. Particle-hole duality, integrability, and Russian doll BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, L. V.; Pogosov, W. V.

    2015-08-01

    We address a generalized Richardson model (Russian doll BCS model), which is characterized by the breaking of time-reversal symmetry. This model is known to be exactly solvable and integrable. We point out that the Russian doll BCS model, on the level of Hamiltonian, is also particle-hole symmetric. This implies that the same state can be expressed both in the particle and hole representations with two different sets of Bethe roots. We then derive exact relations between Bethe roots in the two representations, which can hardly be obtained staying on the level of Bethe equations. In a quasi-classical limit, similar identities for usual Richardson model, known from literature, are recovered from our results. We also show that these relations for Richardson roots take a remarkably simple form at half-filling and for a symmetric with respect to the middle of the interaction band distribution of one-body energy levels, since, in this special case, the rapidities in the particle and hole representations up to the translation satisfy the same system of equations.

  5. Modelling New Particle Formation Events in the South African Savannah

    SciTech Connect

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Beukes, J. P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, aka aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scale, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There are already some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first time detailed simulations, that include all the main processes relevant to particle formation, were done. The results show that both investigated particle formation mechanisms overestimated the formation rates dependency on sulphuric acid. The approach including low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events. To get reliable estimation of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa.

  6. Theory and modeling of particles with DNA-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years significant attention has been attracted to proposals which utilize DNA for nanotechnological applications. Potential applications of these ideas range from the programmable self-assembly of colloidal crystals, to biosensors and nanoparticle based drug delivery platforms. In Chapter I we introduce the system, which generically consists of colloidal particles functionalized with specially designed DNA markers. The sequence of bases on the DNA markers determines the particle type. Due to the hybridization between complementary single-stranded DNA, specific, type-dependent interactions can be introduced between particles by choosing the appropriate DNA marker sequences. In Chapter II we develop a statistical mechanical description of the aggregation and melting behavior of particles with DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter III a model is proposed to describe the dynamical departure and diffusion of particles which form reversible key-lock connections. In Chapter IV we propose a method to self-assemble nanoparticle clusters using DNA scaffolds. A natural extension is discussed in Chapter V, the programmable self-assembly of nanoparticle clusters where the desired cluster geometry is encoded using DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter VI we consider a nanoparticle based drug delivery platform for targeted, cell specific chemotherapy. In Chapter VII we present prospects for future research: the connection between DNA-mediated colloidal crystallization and jamming, and the inverse problem in self-assembly.

  7. Particle-based ablation model for faint meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2014-07-01

    Modeling the ablation of meteoroids as they enter the atmosphere is a way of determining their physical structure and elemental composition. This can provide insight into the structure of parent bodies when combined with an orbit computed from observations. The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO) is a source of new, high-resolution observations of faint meteors [1]. These faint objects tend to have pre-atmospheric masses around 10^{-5} kg, corresponding to a radius of 1 mm. A wide-field camera with a 28° field of view provides guidance to a high-resolution camera that tracks meteors in flight with 1.5° field of view. Meteors are recorded with a scale of 4 m per pixel at a range of 135 km, at 110 frames per second, allowing us to investigate detailed meteor morphology. This serves as an important new constraint for ablation models, in addition to meteor brightness (lightcurves) and meteoroid deceleration. High-resolution observations of faint meteors have revealed that contemporary ablation models are not able to predict meteor morphology, even while matching the observed lightcurve and meteoroid deceleration [2]. This implies that other physical processes, in addition to fragmentation, must be considered for faint meteor ablation. We present a new, particle-based approach to modeling the ablation of small meteoroids. In this model, we simulate the collisions between atmospheric particles and the meteoroid to determine the rate of evaporation and deceleration. Subsequent collisions simulated between evaporated meteoroid particles and ambient atmospheric particles then produce light that would be observed by high-resolution cameras. Preliminary results show simultaneous agreement with meteor morphology, lightcurves, and decelerations recorded with CAMO. A sample comparison of simulated and observed meteor morphology is given in the attached figure. Several meteoroids are well-represented as solid, stony bodies, but some require modeling as a dustball [3

  8. A theoretical model for the Lorentz force particle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, René; Tao, Zhen; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-07-01

    In a previous paper [X. Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 120, 014903 (2016)], several experimental devices have been presented, which demonstrate the efficiency of electromagnetic techniques for detecting and sizing electrically insulating particles entrained in the flow of a molten metal. In each case, a non-uniform magnetic field is applied across the flow of the electrically conducting liquid, thereby generating a braking Lorentz force on this moving medium and a reaction force on the magnet, which tends to be entrained in the flow direction. The purpose of this letter is to derive scaling laws for this Lorentz force from an elementary theoretical model. For simplicity, as in the experiments, the flowing liquid is modeled as a solid body moving with a uniform velocity U. The eddy currents in the moving domain are derived from the classic induction equation and Ohm's law, and expressions for the Lorentz force density j ×B and for its integral over the entire moving domain follow. The insulating particles that are eventually present and entrained with this body are then treated as small disturbances in a classic perturbation analysis, thereby leading to scaling laws for the pulses they generate in the Lorentz force. The purpose of this letter is both to illustrate the eddy currents without and with insulating particles in the electrically conducting liquid and to derive a key relation between the pulses in the Lorentz force and the main parameters (particle volume and dimensions of the region subjected to the magnetic field).

  9. Tabletop Traffic Jams: Modeling Traffic Jams using Self Propelled Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vikrant; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2015-03-01

    We model behavior of traffic using Self Propelled Particles (SPPs). Granular rods with asymmetric mass distribution confined to move in a circular channel on a vibrated substrate and interact with each other through inelastic collision serve as our model vehicle. Motion of a single vehicle is observed to be composed of 2 parts, a linear velocity in the direction of lighter end of particle and a non-Gaussian random velocity. We find that the collective mean speed of the SPPs is constant over a wide range of line densities before decreasing rapidly as the maximum packing is approached indicating the spontaneous formation of Phantom jams. This decrease in speed is observed to be far greater than any small differences in the mean drift speed of individual SPPs , and occurs as the collision frequency between SPPs increase exponentially with line density. However the random velocity component of SPPs remain super-diffusive over entire range of line densities. While the collective motion at low densities is characterized by caravan following behind the slowest particle leading to clustering, at higher densities we see formation of jamming waves travelling in direction opposite to that of motion of particles.

  10. Dissipative-particle-dynamics model of biofilm growth

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-06-13

    A dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for the quantitative simulation of biofilm growth controlled by substrate (nutrient) consumption, advective and diffusive substrate transport, and hydrodynamic interactions with fluid flow (including fragmentation and reattachment) is described. The model was used to simulate biomass growth, decay, and spreading. It predicts how the biofilm morphology depends on flow conditions, biofilm growth kinetics, the rheomechanical properties of the biofilm and adhesion to solid surfaces. The morphology of the model biofilm depends strongly on its rigidity and the magnitude of the body force that drives the fluid over the biofilm.

  11. Modeling convection onset in colloidal suspensions of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadji, Layachi

    2011-09-01

    A particulate medium model is used to investigate the onset of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a colloidal suspension of inert solid particles. The model accounts for the effects of thermophoresis, sedimentation and Brownian diffusion. Depending on the size of the particles, the problem has up to four time scales. These are due to thermal diffusion, particle diffusion, particle migration due to thermophoresis and particle sedimentation. The ratios of these time scales lead to the emergence of three parameters, one of which is the Lewis number τ. The smallness of the latter makes the differential eigenvalue system governing convection onset singular. The other two are the density number Γ and the dimensionless migration velocity β. For a given experimental set-up, β has a quadratic functional dependence on the particles radius. A combination of asymptotics and numerical computation is used to capture the effect of the resulting thin particle concentration boundary layers on the leading order instability thresholds. Results, which are depicted as function of Γ and β, reveal a non-monotonic dependence of the critical Rayleigh number ℛ c on β. The curve ℛ c (β) is bimodal and it exhibits a maximum , the value of which increases very sharply with |Γ| while the critical wavelength decreases. Experimental conditions can be fixed so that occurs at β values that correspond to nanoparticles. Therefore, experimental parameters can be controlled so that the mixing of a small amount of nano-size particles has a substantial stabilizing effect. An investigation of the flow patterns in the range of parameters associated with this sharp increase in ℛ c reveals a decrease in the effective

  12. Particle dispersion models and drag coefficients for particles in turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, C. T.; Chung, J. N.; Troutt, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the concepts underlying particle dispersion due to turbulence are reviewed. The traditional approaches to particle dispersion in homogeneous, stationary turbulent fields are addressed, and recent work on particle dispersion in large scale turbulent structures is reviewed. The state of knowledge of particle drag coefficients in turbulent gas-particle flows is also reviewed.

  13. 3D flare particle model for ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Srinivasan; Vaitekunas, David A.

    2016-05-01

    A key component in any soft-kill response to an incoming guided missile is the flare /chaff decoy used to distract or seduce the seeker homing system away from the naval platform. This paper describes a new 3D flare particle model in the naval threat countermeasure simulator (NTCS) of the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR), which provides independent control over the size and radial distribution of its signature. The 3D particles of each flare sub-munition are modelled stochastically and rendered using OpenGL z-buffering, 2D projection, and alpha-blending to produce a unique and time varying signature. A sensitivity analysis on each input parameter provides the data and methods needed to synthesize a model from an IR measurement of a decoy. The new model also eliminated artifacts and deficiencies in our previous model which prevented reliable tracks from the adaptive track gate algorithm already presented by Ramaswamy and Vaitekunas (2015). A sequence of scenarios are used to test and demonstrate the new flare model during a missile engagement.

  14. Multi-point Observations and Modeling of Particle Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, M. G.; Morley, S.; Reeves, G. D.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Spence, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    Dispersionless and dispersed particle injections associated with substorms have been studied for many years based on observations acquired primarily at geosynchronous orbit. A general picture that has emerged is that particles are energized and rapidly transported/organized behind an "injection boundary" that penetrates closer to Earth in some magnetic local time sector (e.g. the so-called double-spiral injection boundary model). While this picture provides a very good description of injections at geosynchronous orbit, with the recent launchof the Van Allen Probes mission, we are now able to explore the evolution of injection signatures well inside of geosynchronous orbit at multiple locations as well. Here we report initial results of injection boundary modeling based on simultaneous multi-point measurements at both geosynchronous orbit (from the LANL/GEO spacecraft) and inside (from Van Allen Probes spacecraft). It is shown that many of the complex dispersion features observed in Van Allen Probes particle data are reproduced by the injection boundary model.

  15. Modelling the dispersion of particle numbers in five European cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkonen, J.; Karl, M.; Keuken, M. P.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Denby, B. R.; Singh, V.; Douros, J.; Manders, A.; Samaras, Z.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Jonkers, S.; Aarnio, M.; Karppinen, A.; Kangas, L.; Lützenkirchen, S.; Petäjä, T.; Vouitsis, I.; Sokhi, R. S.

    2016-02-01

    We present an overview of the modelling of particle number concentrations (PNCs) in five major European cities, namely Helsinki, Oslo, London, Rotterdam, and Athens, in 2008. Novel emission inventories of particle numbers have been compiled both on urban and European scales. We used atmospheric dispersion modelling for PNCs in the five target cities and on a European scale, and evaluated the predicted results against available measured concentrations. In all the target cities, the concentrations of particle numbers (PNs) were mostly influenced by the emissions originating from local vehicular traffic. The influence of shipping and harbours was also significant for Helsinki, Oslo, Rotterdam, and Athens, but not for London. The influence of the aviation emissions in Athens was also notable. The regional background concentrations were clearly lower than the contributions originating from urban sources in Helsinki, Oslo, and Athens. The regional background was also lower than urban contributions in traffic environments in London, but higher or approximately equal to urban contributions in Rotterdam. It was numerically evaluated that the influence of coagulation and dry deposition on the predicted PNCs was substantial for the urban background in Oslo. The predicted and measured annual average PNCs in four cities agreed within approximately ≤ 26 % (measured as fractional biases), except for one traffic station in London. This study indicates that it is feasible to model PNCs in major cities within a reasonable accuracy, although major challenges remain in the evaluation of both the emissions and atmospheric transformation of PNCs.

  16. Modelling of strongly coupled particle growth and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruy, F.; Touboul, E.

    2013-02-01

    The mathematical modelling of the dynamics of particle suspension is based on the population balance equation (PBE). PBE is an integro-differential equation for the population density that is a function of time t, space coordinates and internal parameters. Usually, the particle is characterized by a unique parameter, e.g. the matter volume v. PBE consists of several terms: for instance, the growth rate and the aggregation rate. So, the growth rate is a function of v and t. In classical modelling, the growth and the aggregation are independently considered, i.e. they are not coupled. However, current applications occur where the growth and the aggregation are coupled, i.e. the change of the particle volume with time is depending on its initial value v0, that in turn is related to an aggregation event. As a consequence, the dynamics of the suspension does not obey the classical Von Smoluchowski equation. This paper revisits this problem by proposing a new modelling by using a bivariate PBE (with two internal variables: v and v0) and by solving the PBE by means of a numerical method and Monte Carlo simulations. This is applied to a physicochemical system with a simple growth law and a constant aggregation kernel.

  17. Modeling of Solar Energetic Particles in Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami; Agueda, Neus; Aran, Angels; Lario, David

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the interplanetary (IP) medium are transported under the influence of electromagnetic fields of the solar wind. These fields consists of the smooth background fields, which can be modeled by the MHD equations governing the expansion of the solar wind, and of the small-scale fluctuations (waves or turbulence) that scatter the particles in pitch angle and act as agents enabling their acceleration at IP shock waves. We review theoretical models of SEP transport and acceleration in the IP medium. We start from the simple analytical approaches (diffusion models), which assume quasi-isotropic particle distributions, and then continue to the more accurate numerical approaches based on the focused transport equation, not making this simplifying assumption. A careful analysis of two SEP events, an impulsive and a gradual one, is presented and the spatial scaling of their peak intensities, differential fluences and time-integrated net fluxes is discussed. We conclude that rather simple scaling laws for these quantities can be obtained for impulsive events but no simple scaling laws can be expected to govern the gradual SEP events

  18. Object Oriented Design and the Standard Model of particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovaca, Samir

    2007-04-01

    Inspired by the computer as both tool and metaphor, a new path emerges toward understanding life, physics, and existence. The path leads throughout all of nature, from the interior of cells to inside black holes. This view of science is based on the idea that information is the ultimate ``substance'' from which all things are made. Exploring this view, we will focus on Object - Oriented (OO) design as one of the most important designs in software development. The OO design views the world as composed of objects with well defined properties. The dynamics is pictured as interactions among objects. Interactions are mediated by messages that objects exchange with each other. This description closely resembles the view of the elementary particles world created by the Standard Model of particle physics. The object model (OM) provides a theoretical foundation upon which the OO design is built. The OM is based on the principles of abstraction, encapsulation, modularity and hierarchy. We will show that the Standard Model of particle physics follows the OM principles.

  19. Receptor modeling application framework for particle source apportionment.

    PubMed

    Watson, John G; Zhu, Tan; Chow, Judith C; Engelbrecht, Johann; Fujita, Eric M; Wilson, William E

    2002-12-01

    Receptor models infer contributions from particulate matter (PM) source types using multivariate measurements of particle chemical and physical properties. Receptor models complement source models that estimate concentrations from emissions inventories and transport meteorology. Enrichment factor, chemical mass balance, multiple linear regression, eigenvector. edge detection, neural network, aerosol evolution, and aerosol equilibrium models have all been used to solve particulate air quality problems, and more than 500 citations of their theory and application document these uses. While elements, ions, and carbons were often used to apportion TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 among many source types, many of these components have been reduced in source emissions such that more complex measurements of carbon fractions, specific organic compounds, single particle characteristics, and isotopic abundances now need to be measured in source and receptor samples. Compliance monitoring networks are not usually designed to obtain data for the observables, locations, and time periods that allow receptor models to be applied. Measurements from existing networks can be used to form conceptual models that allow the needed monitoring network to be optimized. The framework for using receptor models to solve air quality problems consists of: (1) formulating a conceptual model; (2) identifying potential sources; (3) characterizing source emissions; (4) obtaining and analyzing ambient PM samples for major components and source markers; (5) confirming source types with multivariate receptor models; (6) quantifying source contributions with the chemical mass balance; (7) estimating profile changes and the limiting precursor gases for secondary aerosols; and (8) reconciling receptor modeling results with source models, emissions inventories, and receptor data analyses. PMID:12492167

  20. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    B. Robinson

    2000-04-07

    The purpose of the transport methodology and component analysis is to provide the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport and model setup for transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale model. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated into the FEHM computer code and the resulting changes in the FEHM code are to be submitted to the software configuration management system. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining colloid-facilitated transport parameters are outlined for use in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses. Concurrently, process-level flow model calculations are being carrier out in a PMR for the unsaturated zone. The computer code TOUGH2 is being used to generate three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields, that are supplied to the Performance Assessment group for subsequent transport simulations. These flow fields are converted to input files compatible with the FEHM code, which for this application simulates radionuclide transport using the particle-tracking algorithm outlined in this AMR. Therefore, this AMR establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model, but the specific breakthrough curves presented do not necessarily represent the behavior of the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone.

  1. Current models of the intensely ionizing particle environment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Effects on MicroElectronics (CREME) model that is currently in use to estimate single event effect rates in spacecraft is described. The CREME model provides a description of the radiation environment in interplanetary space near the orbit of the earth that contains no major deficiencies. The accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray model is limited by the uncertainties in solar modulation. The model for solar energetic particles could be improved by making use of all the data that has been collected on solar energetic particle events. There remain major uncertainties about the environment within the earth's magnetosphere, because of the uncertainties over the charge states of the heavy ions in the anomalous component and solar flares, and because of trapped heavy ions. The present CREME model is valid only at 1 AU, but it could be extended to other parts of the heliosphere. There is considerable data on the radiation environment from 0.2 to 35 AU in the ecliptic plane. This data could be used to extend the CREME model.

  2. Generation of Random Particle Packings for Discrete Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Weatherley, D.; Ayton, T.

    2012-04-01

    An important step in the setup process of Discrete Element Model (DEM) simulations is the generation of a suitable particle packing. There are quite a number of properties such a granular material specimen should ideally have, such as high coordination number, isotropy, the ability to fill arbitrary bounding volumes and the absence of locked-in stresses. An algorithm which is able to produce specimens fulfilling these requirements is the insertion based sphere packing algorithm originally proposed by Place and Mora, 2001 [2] and extended in this work. The algorithm works in two stages. First a number of "seed" spheres are inserted into the bounding volume. In the second stage the gaps between the "seed" spheres are filled by inserting new spheres in a way so they have D+1 (i.e. 3 in 2D, 4 in 3D) touching contacts with either other spheres or the boundaries of the enclosing volume. Here we present an implementation of the algorithm and a systematic statistical analysis of the generated sphere packings. The analysis of the particle radius distribution shows that they follow a power-law with an exponent ≈ D (i.e. ≈3 for a 3D packing and ≈2 for 2D). Although the algorithm intrinsically guarantees coordination numbers of at least 4 in 3D and 3 in 2D, the coordination numbers realized in the generated packings can be significantly higher, reaching beyond 50 if the range of particle radii is sufficiently large. Even for relatively small ranges of particle sizes (e.g. Rmin = 0.5Rmax) the maximum coordination number may exceed 10. The degree of isotropy of the generated sphere packing is also analysed in both 2D and 3D, by measuring the distribution of orientations of vectors joining the centres of adjacent particles. If the range of particle sizes is small, the packing algorithm yields moderate anisotropy approaching that expected for a face-centred cubic packing of equal-sized particles. However, once Rmin < 0.3Rmax a very high degree of isotropy is demonstrated in

  3. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: implications for ash dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Scarlato, P.; Andronico, D.; Scollo, S.; Kueppers, U.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first report of experimental measurements of the enhanced settling velocity of volcanic particles as function of particle volume fraction. In order to investigate the differences in the aerodynamic behavior of ash particles when settling individually or in mass, we performed systematic large-scale ash settling experiments using natural basaltic and phonolitic ash. By releasing ash particles at different, controlled volumetric flow rates, in an unconstrained open space and at minimal air movement, we measured their terminal velocity, size, and particle volume fraction with a high-speed camera at 2000 fps. Enhanced settling velocities of individual particles increase with increasing particle volume fraction. This suggests that particle clustering during fallout may be one reason explaining larger than theoretical depletion rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. We provide a quantitative empirical model that allows to calculate, from a given particle size and density, the enhanced velocity resulting from a given particle volume fraction. The proposed model has the potential to serve as a simple tool for the prediction of the terminal velocity of ash of an hypothetical distribution of ash of known particle size and volume fraction. This is of particular importance for advection-diffusion transport model of ash where generally a one-way coupling is adopted, considering only the flow effects on particles. To better quantify the importance of the enhanced settling velocity in ash dispersal, we finally introduced the new formulation in a Lagrangian model calculating for realistic eruptive conditions the resulting ash concentration in the atmosphere and on the ground.

  4. Force models for particle-dynamics simulations of granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.

    1994-12-01

    Engineering-mechanics contact models are utilized to describe the inelastic, frictional interparticle forces acting in dry granular systems. Simple analyses based on one-dimensional chains are utilized to illustrate wave propagation phenomena in dense and dilute discrete particulates. The variation of restitution coefficient with impact velocity is illustrated for a variety of viscous and hysteretic normal force models. The effects of interparticle friction on material strength in discrete-particle simulations are much closer to measured values than are theories that do not allow article rotations.

  5. Modelling the internal structure of nascent soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    Totton, Tim S.; Sander, Markus; Kraft, Markus; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Wales, David J.; Misquitta, Alston J.

    2010-05-15

    In this paper we present studies of clusters assembled from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules similar in size to small soot particles. The clusters studied were comprised of coronene (C{sub 24}H{sub 12}) or pyrene (C{sub 16}H{sub 10}) molecules and represent the types of soot precursor molecule typically found in flame environments. A stochastic 'basin-hopping' global optimisation scheme was used to locate low-lying local minima on the potential energy surface of the molecular clusters. TEM-style projections of the resulting geometries show similarities with those observed experimentally in TEM images of soot particles. The mass densities of these clusters have also been calculated and are lower than bulk values of the pure crystalline PAH structures. They are also significantly lower than the standard value of 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} used in our soot models. Consequently we have varied the mass density between 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} to examine the effects of varying soot density on our soot model and observed how the shape of the particle size distribution changes. Based on similarities between nascent soot particles and PAH clusters a more accurate soot density is likely to be significantly lower than 1.8 g/cm{sup 3}. As such, for modelling purposes, we recommend that the density of nascent soot should be taken to be the value obtained for our coronene cluster of 1.12 g/cm{sup 3}. (author)

  6. Theory and modeling of particles with DNA-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.

    In recent years significant attention has been attracted to proposals which utilize DNA for nanotechnological applications. Potential applications of these ideas range from the programmable self-assembly of colloidal crystals, to biosensors and nanoparticle based drug delivery platforms. In Chapter I we introduce the system, which generically consists of colloidal particles functionalized with specially designed DNA markers. The sequence of bases on the DNA markers determines the particle type. Due to the hybridization between complementary single-stranded DNA, specific, type-dependent interactions can be introduced between particles by choosing the appropriate DNA marker sequences. In Chapter II we develop a statistical mechanical description of the aggregation and melting behavior of particles with DNA-mediated interactions. A quantitative comparison between the theory and experiments is made by calculating the experimentally observed melting profile. In Chapter III a model is proposed to describe the dynamical departure and diffusion of particles which form reversible key-lock connections. The model predicts a crossover from localized to diffusive behavior. The random walk statistics for the particles' in plane diffusion is discussed. The lateral motion is analogous to dispersive transport in disordered semiconductors, ranging from standard diffusion with a renormalized diffusion coefficient to anomalous, subdiffusive behavior. In Chapter IV we propose a method to self-assemble nanoparticle clusters using DNA scaffolds. An optimal concentration ratio is determined for the experimental implementation of our self-assembly proposal. A natural extension is discussed in Chapter V, the programmable self-assembly of nanoparticle clusters where the desired cluster geometry is encoded using DNA-mediated interactions. We determine the probability that the system self-assembles the desired cluster geometry, and discuss the connections to jamming in granular and colloidal

  7. Precision Modeling of Solar Energetic Particle Intensity and Anisotropy Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Bieber, J. W.; Evenson, P.; Pyle, R.; Rujiwarodom, M.; Tooprakai, P.; Wechakama, M.; Khumlumlert, T.

    2006-12-01

    A focused transport equation for solar energetic particles is sufficiently complex that simple analytic approximations are generally inadequate, but the physics is sufficiently well established to permit precise numerical modeling of high energy particle observations at various distances from the Sun. We demonstrate how observed profiles of intensity and anisotropy vs. time can be quantitatively fit to determine an optimal injection profile at the Sun, scattering mean free path λ, and magnetic configuration. For several ground level enhancements (GLE) of solar energetic particles at energies ~ 1 GeV, the start time of injection has been determined to 1 or 2 minutes. In each case this start time coincides, within that precision, to the soft X-ray peak time, when the flare's primary energy release has ended. This is not inconsistent with acceleration at a coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shock, though the rapid timescale is challenging to understand. For the GLE of 2005 January 20, λ decreases substantially over ~ 10 minutes, which is consistent with concepts of proton-amplified waves. The GLE of 2000 July 14 is properly fit only when a magnetic bottleneck beyond Earth is taken into account, a feature later confirmed by NEAR observations. The long-standing puzzle of the 1989 October 22 event can now be explained by simultaneous injection of relativistic solar particles along both legs of a closed interplanetary magnetic loop, while other reasonable explanations fail the test of quantitative fitting. The unusually long λ (confirming many previous reports) and a low turbulent spectral index hint at unusual properties of turbulence in the loop. While the early GLE peak on 2003 October 28 remains a mystery, the main peak's strong anisotropy is inconsistent with a suggestion of injection along the far leg of a magnetic loop; quantitative fitting fails because of reverse focusing during Sunward motion. With these modeling capabilities, one is poised to take full

  8. Modelling of aircrew radiation exposure during solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Anid, Hani Khaled

    show a very different response during anisotropic events, leading to variations in aircrew radiation doses that may be significant for dose assessment. To estimate the additional exposure due to solar flares, a model was developed using a Monte-Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX. The model transports an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere using the MCNPX analysis. This code produces the estimated flux at a specific altitude where radiation dose conversion coefficients are applied to convert the particle flux into effective and ambient dose-equivalent rates. A cut-off rigidity model accounts for the shielding effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during Ground Level Enhancements 60 and 65. An anisotropy analysis that uses neutron monitor responses and the pitch angle distribution of energetic solar particles was used to identify particle anisotropy for a solar event in December 2006. In anticipation of future commercial use, a computer code has been developed to implement the radiation dose assessment model for routine analysis. Keywords: Radiation Dosimetry, Radiation Protection, Space Physics.

  9. Entrainment of coarse grains using a discrete particle model

    SciTech Connect

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Arnold, Roger B. Jr.

    2014-10-06

    Conventional bedload transport models and incipient motion theories relying on a time-averaged boundary shear stress are incapable of accounting for the effects of fluctuating near-bed velocity in turbulent flow and are therefore prone to significant errors. Impulse, the product of an instantaneous force magnitude and its duration, has been recently proposed as an appropriate criterion for quantifying the effects of flow turbulence in removing coarse grains from the bed surface. Here, a discrete particle model (DPM) is used to examine the effects of impulse, representing a single idealized turbulent event, on particle entrainment. The results are classified according to the degree of grain movement into the following categories: motion prior to entrainment, initial dislodgement, and energetic displacement. The results indicate that in all three cases the degree of particle motion depends on both the force magnitude and the duration of its application and suggest that the effects of turbulence must be adequately accounted for in order to develop a more accurate method of determining incipient motion. DPM is capable of simulating the dynamics of grain entrainment and is an appropriate tool for further study of the fundamental mechanisms of sediment transport.

  10. Comprehensive computer model for magnetron sputtering. II. Charged particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Francisco J. Dew, Steven K.; Field, David J.

    2014-11-01

    Discharges for magnetron sputter thin film deposition systems involve complex plasmas that are sensitively dependent on magnetic field configuration and strength, working gas species and pressure, chamber geometry, and discharge power. The authors present a numerical formulation for the general solution of these plasmas as a component of a comprehensive simulation capability for planar magnetron sputtering. This is an extensible, fully three-dimensional model supporting realistic magnetic fields and is self-consistently solvable on a desktop computer. The plasma model features a hybrid approach involving a Monte Carlo treatment of energetic electrons and ions, along with a coupled fluid model for thermalized particles. Validation against a well-known one-dimensional system is presented. Various strategies for improving numerical stability are investigated as is the sensitivity of the solution to various model and process parameters. In particular, the effect of magnetic field, argon gas pressure, and discharge power are studied.

  11. A Refined Model for Solid Particle Rock Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momber, A. W.

    2016-02-01

    A procedure for the estimation of distribution parameters of a Weibull distribution model K 1 = f( K Ic 12/4 / σ C 23/4 ) for solid particle erosion, as recently suggested in Rock Mech Rock Eng, doi: 10.1007/s00603-014-0658-x, 2014, is derived. The procedure is based on examinations of elastic-plastically responding rocks (rhyolite, granite) and plastically responding rocks (limestone, schist). The types of response are quantified through SEM inspections of eroded surfaces. Quantitative numbers for the distribution parameter K 1 are calculated for 30 rock materials, which cover a wide range of mechanical properties. The ranking according to the parameter K 1 is related to qualitative rock classification schemes. A modified proposal for the erosion of schist due to solid particle impingement at normal incidence is introduced.

  12. A Generalized Brownian Motion Model for Turbulent Relative Particle Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen

    2015-11-01

    A generalized Brownian motion model has been applied to the turbulent relative particle dispersion problem (Shivamoggi). The fluctuating pressure forces acting on a fluid particle are taken to follow an Uhlenbeck-Ornstein process while it appears plausible to take their correlation time to have a power-law dependence on the flow Reynolds number Re. This ansatz provides an insight into the result that the Richardson-Obukhov scaling holds only in the infinite-Re limit and disappears otherwise. It provides a determination of the Richardson-Obukhov constant g as a function of Re, with an asymptotic constant value in the infinite-Re limit. This ansatz is further shown to be in quantitative agreement, in the small-Re limit, with the Batchelor-Townsend ansatz for the rate of change of the mean square interparticle separation in 3D FDT. My thanks to The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research for Support.

  13. From flow and particle transport modeling to vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Joseph Fabian

    2001-08-01

    This thesis is composed of two parts. Part I is devoted to the analysis of particle transport and deposition. In this part, flow and particle transport and deposition in a furnace and under microgravity conditions are analyzed. In the first study of Part I, fluid flow, combustion, heat and mass transfer involved in a methane/air furnace were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in the flow field and thermal conditions in the furnace and to develop methods for improving its efficiency. The analysis of the combustor model was performed using an unstructured grid model developed with the Gambit grid generator of FLUENT version 5. In the second study of Part I, particle dispersion in a liquid filled box under orbital g-jitter excitation is analyzed. The study investigated particle motion experiments that were performed aboard the orbiting shuttle. The experiments have provided confusing data as to the nature of particle dispersion in the orbital environment. To obtain a better understanding of the dynamics involved, a series of numerical simulations are performed to study the dispersion of suspended particles subject to g-jitter excitations. Part II of the thesis is devoted to the analysis of vibration and vibration isolation problems. Following along the lines of vibration effecting system performance, a study of vibration isolation used to protect avionics equipment from adverse aircraft vibration environments was conducted. Passive isolation is the simplest means to achieve this goal. The system used here consisted of a circular steel ring with a lump mass on top and exposed to base excitation. Sinusoidal and filtered zero-mean Gaussian white noise were used to excite the structure and the acceleration response spectra at the top of the ring were computed. An experiment was performed to identify the natural frequencies and modal damping of the circular ring. The polished homogeneity measurement of large optics mounted in a vertical ring

  14. A particle based simulation model for glacier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Riikilä, T. I.; Tallinen, T.; Zwinger, T.; Benn, D.; Moore, J. C.; Timonen, J.

    2013-10-01

    A particle-based computer simulation model was developed for investigating the dynamics of glaciers. In the model, large ice bodies are made of discrete elastic particles which are bound together by massless elastic beams. These beams can break, which induces brittle behaviour. At loads below fracture, beams may also break and reform with small probabilities to incorporate slowly deforming viscous behaviour in the model. This model has the advantage that it can simulate important physical processes such as ice calving and fracturing in a more realistic way than traditional continuum models. For benchmarking purposes the deformation of an ice block on a slip-free surface was compared to that of a similar block simulated with a Finite Element full-Stokes continuum model. Two simulations were performed: (1) calving of an ice block partially supported in water, similar to a grounded marine glacier terminus, and (2) fracturing of an ice block on an inclined plane of varying basal friction, which could represent transition to fast flow or surging. Despite several approximations, including restriction to two-dimensions and simplified water-ice interaction, the model was able to reproduce the size distributions of the debris observed in calving, which may be approximated by universal scaling laws. On a moderate slope, a large ice block was stable and quiescent as long as there was enough of friction against the substrate. For a critical length of frictional contact, global sliding began, and the model block disintegrated in a manner suggestive of a surging glacier. In this case the fragment size distribution produced was typical of a grinding process.

  15. Reduced quasilinear models for energetic particles interaction with Alfvenic eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) and the 1.5D reduced models are able to predict the effect of Alfvenic eigenmodes' interaction with energetic particles in burning plasmas. This interaction can result in energetic-particle losses that can damage the first wall, deteriorate the plasma performance, and even prevent ignition. The 1.5D model assumes a broad spectrum of overlapping modes and, based on analytic expressions for the growth and damping rates, calculates the pressure profiles that the energetic particles relax to upon interacting with the modes. 1.5D is validated with DIII-D experiments and predicted neutron losses consistent with observation. The model is employed to predict alpha-particle fusion-product losses in a large-scale operational parameter-space for burning plasmas. The LBQ model captures the interaction both in the regime of isolated modes as well as in the conventional regime of overlapping modes. Rules were established that allow quasilinear equations to replicate the expected steady-state saturation levels of isolated modes. The fitting formula is improved and the model is benchmarked with a Vlasov code, BOT. The saturation levels are accurately predicted and the mode evolution is well-replicated in the case of steady-state evolution where the collisions are high enough that coherent structures do not form. When the collisionality is low, oscillatory behavior can occur. LBQ can also exhibit non-steady behavior, but the onset of oscillations occurs for much higher collisional rates in BOT than in LBQ. For certain parameters of low collisionality, hole-clump creation and frequency chirping can occur which are not captured by the LBQ model. Also, there are cases of non-steady evolution without chirping which is possible for LBQ to study. However the results are inconclusive since the periods and amplitudes of the oscillations in the mode evolution are not well-replicated. If multiple modes exist, they can grow to the point of overlap which

  16. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles.

    PubMed

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams' deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young's moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams' survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  17. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams’ deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young’s moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams’ survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  18. Closure Models for Turbulent Particle-laden Flows from Particle-resolved Direct Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Tenneti, Sudheer; Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Garg, Rahul

    2012-11-01

    Gas-phase velocity fluctuations in fixed particle beds and freely evolving suspensions are quantified using a particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS). The flow regime corresponds to gas-solid systems typically encountered in fluidized bed risers, with high solid to gas density ratio and particle diameter being greater than the dissipative length scales. The kinetic energy associated with gas-phase velocity fluctuations in homogeneous monodisperse fixed beds is characterized as a function of solid volume fraction φ and the Reynolds number based on the mean slip velocity Re. A simple scaling analysis is used to explain the dependence of k on ɛ and Re. The steady value of k results from the balance between the source of k due to interphase transfer of kinetic energy, and the dissipation rate (ɛ) of k in the gas-phase. It is found that the dissipation rate of k in gas-solid flows can be modeled using a length scale that is analogous to the Taylor microscale used in single-phase turbulence. Using the PR-DNS data for k and ɛ we also infer an eddy viscosity for gas-solid flow. For the parameter values considered here, the level of gas-phase velocity fluctuations in freely evolving suspensions differs by only 10% from the value for the corresponding fixed beds. Funded in part by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory Grant DE-FC26-07NT43098 (Advanced Research) and the National Science Foundation's grant CBET 1134500.

  19. Dynamics of magnetic particles near a surface: model and experiments on field-induced disaggregation.

    PubMed

    van Reenen, A; Gao, Y; de Jong, A M; Hulsen, M A; den Toonder, J M J; Prins, M W J

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic particles are widely used in biological research and bioanalytical applications. As the corresponding tools are progressively being miniaturized and integrated, the understanding of particle dynamics and the control of particles down to the level of single particles become important. Here, we describe a numerical model to simulate the dynamic behavior of ensembles of magnetic particles, taking account of magnetic interparticle interactions, interactions with the liquid medium and solid surfaces, as well as thermal diffusive motion of the particles. The model is verified using experimental data of magnetic field-induced disaggregation of magnetic particle clusters near a physical surface, wherein the magnetic field properties, particle size, cluster size, and cluster geometry were varied. Furthermore, the model clarifies how the cluster configuration, cluster alignment, magnitude of the field gradient, and the field repetition rate play a role in the particle disaggregation process. The simulation model will be very useful for further in silico studies on magnetic particle dynamics in biotechnological tools. PMID:24827250

  20. Modeling crowd turbulence by many-particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenjian; Johansson, Anders

    2007-10-01

    A recent study [D. Helbing, A. Johansson, and H. Z. Al-Abideen, Phys. Rev. E 75, 046109 (2007)] has revealed a “turbulent” state of pedestrian flows, which is characterized by sudden displacements and causes the falling and trampling of people. However, turbulent crowd motion is not reproduced well by current many-particle models due to their insufficient representation of the local interactions in areas of extreme densities. In this contribution, we extend the repulsive force term of the social force model to reproduce crowd turbulence. We perform numerical simulations of pedestrians moving through a bottleneck area with this model. The transitions from laminar to stop-and-go and turbulent flows are observed. The empirical features characterizing crowd turbulence, such as the structure function and the probability density function of velocity increments, are reproduced well; i.e., they are well compatible with an analysis of video data during the annual Muslim pilgrimage.

  1. Statistical thermal model analysis of particle production at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasu Uysal, A.; Vardar, N.

    2016-04-01

    A successful description of the particle ratios measured in heavy-ion collisions has been achieved in the framework of thermal models. In such a way, a large number of observables can be reproduced with a small number of parameters, namely the temperature, baryo-chemical potential and a factor measuring the degree of strangeness saturation. The comparison of experimental data at and the model estimations has made possible to define the thermodynamic parameters of strongly interacting matter at chemical freeze-out temperature. The detailed study of hadron and meson production including resonances using the statistical-thermal model is discussed. Their ratios are compared with the existing experimental data and predictions are made for pp and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  2. Unsteady Free-Wake Vortex Particle Model for HAWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogateanu, R.; Frunzulicǎ, F.; Cardos, V.

    2010-09-01

    In the design of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) one problem is to determine the aeroelastic behaviour of the rotor blades for the various wind inflow conditions. A step in this process is to predict with accuracy the aerodynamic loads on the blades. The Vortex Lattice Method (VLM) provides a transparent investigation concerning the role of various physical parameters which influence the aerodynamic problem. In this paper we present a method for the calculation of the non-uniform induced downwash of a HAWT rotor using the vortex ring model for the lifting surface coupled with an unsteady free-wake vortex particle model. Comparative studies between results obtained with different models of wake for a generic HAWT are presented.

  3. Density-independent model of self-propelled particles.

    PubMed

    Schubring, Daniel; Ohmann, Paul R

    2013-09-01

    We examine a density-independent modification of the Vicsek model in which a particle interacts with neighbors defined by Delaunay triangulation. To feasibly simulate the model, an algorithm for repairing the triangulation over time was developed. This algorithm may also be applied to any time varying two-dimensional Delaunay triangulation. This model exhibits a continuous phase transition with noise, and a distinct set of critical exponents were measured which satisfy a hyperscaling relationship. The critical exponents are found to vary between a low and high velocity regime, but they are robust under the inclusion of a repulsive interaction. We present evidence that the correlation length approximately scales with the size of the system even in the ordered phase. PMID:24125215

  4. Emergent smectic order in simple active particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Chaté, Hugues; Chen, Leiming; Ngo, Sandrine; Toner, John

    2016-06-01

    Novel ‘smectic-P’ behavior, in which self-propelled particles form rows and move on average along them, occurs generically within the orientationally ordered phase of simple models that we simulate. Both apolar (head–tail symmetric) and polar (head–tail asymmetric) models with aligning and repulsive interactions exhibit slow algebraic decay of smectic order with system size up to some finite length scale, after which faster decay occurs. In the apolar case, this scale is that of an undulation instability of the rows. In the polar case, this instability is absent, but traveling fluctuations disrupt the rows in large systems and motion and smectic order may spontaneously globally rotate. These observations agree with a new hydrodynamic theory which we present here. Variants of our models also exhibit active smectic ‘A’ and ‘C’ order, with motion orthogonal and oblique to the layers respectively.

  5. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Watanabe, Takehito; Chadwick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Modeling of mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena using charged dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Mingge; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we propose a charged dissipative particle dynamics (cDPD) model for investigation of mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena. In particular, this particle-based method was designed to simulate micro- or nano- flows which governing by Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equation coupled with Navier-Stokes (NS) equation. For cDPD simulations of wall-bounded fluid systems, a methodology for imposing correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions for both PNP and NS equations is developed. To validate the present cDPD model and the corresponding boundary method, we perform cDPD simulations of electrostatic double layer (EDL) in the vicinity of a charged wall, and the results show good agreement with the mean-field theoretical solutions. The capacity density of a parallel plate capacitor in salt solution is also investigated with different salt concentration. Moreover, we utilize the proposed methodology to study the electroosmotic and electroosmotic/pressure-driven flow in a micro-channel. In the last, we simulate the dilute polyelectrolyte solution both in bulk and micro-channel, which show the flexibility and capability of this method in studying complex fluids. This work was sponsored by the Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) supported by DOE.

  7. Efficiency of a statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-05-01

    In developing its theory for turbulent dispersion transport, the Litchford and Jeng (1991) statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion took a generalized approach in which the perturbing influence of each turbulent eddy on consequent interactions was transported through all subsequent eddies. Nevertheless, examinations of this transport relation shows it to be able to decay rapidly: this implies that additional computational efficiency may be obtained via truncation of unneccessary transport terms. Attention is here given to the criterion for truncation, as well as to expected efficiency gains.

  8. Efficiency of a statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Litchford, R.J.; Jeng, San-Mou )

    1992-05-01

    In developing its theory for turbulent dispersion transport, the Litchford and Jeng (1991) statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion took a generalized approach in which the perturbing influence of each turbulent eddy on consequent interactions was transported through all subsequent eddies. Nevertheless, examinations of this transport relation shows it to be able to decay rapidly: this implies that additional computational efficiency may be obtained via truncation of unneccessary transport terms. Attention is here given to the criterion for truncation, as well as to expected efficiency gains. 2 refs.

  9. Efficiency of a statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    In developing its theory for turbulent dispersion transport, the Litchford and Jeng (1991) statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion took a generalized approach in which the perturbing influence of each turbulent eddy on consequent interactions was transported through all subsequent eddies. Nevertheless, examinations of this transport relation shows it to be able to decay rapidly: this implies that additional computational efficiency may be obtained via truncation of unneccessary transport terms. Attention is here given to the criterion for truncation, as well as to expected efficiency gains.

  10. How to model the interaction of charged Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieronimus, Reint; Raschke, Simon; Heuer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the interaction of charged Janus particles including screening effects. The explicit interaction is mapped via a least square method on a variable number n of systematically generated tensors that reflect the angular dependence of the potential. For n = 2 we show that the interaction is equivalent to a model previously described by Erdmann, Kröger, and Hess (EKH). Interestingly, this mapping is for n = 2 not able to capture the subtleties of the interaction for small screening lengths. Rather, a larger number of tensors has to be used. We find that the characteristics of the Janus type interaction plays an important role for the aggregation behavior. We obtained cluster structures up to the size of 13 particles for n = 2 and 36 and screening lengths κ-1 = 0.1 and 1.0 via Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of the screening length is analyzed and the structures are compared to results for an electrostatic-type potential and for the multipole-expanded Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We find that a dipole-like potential (EKH or dipole DLVO approximation) is not able to sufficiently reproduce the anisotropy effects of the potential. Instead, a higher order expansion has to be used to obtain cluster structures that are compatible with experimental observations. The resulting minimum-energy clusters are compared to those of sticky hard sphere systems. Janus particles with a short-range screened interaction resemble sticky hard sphere clusters for all considered particle numbers, whereas for long-range screening even very small clusters are structurally different.

  11. Event-based total suspended sediment particle size distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jennifer; Sattar, Ahmed M. A.; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Warner, Richard C.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most challenging modelling tasks in hydrology is prediction of the total suspended sediment particle size distribution (TSS-PSD) in stormwater runoff generated from exposed soil surfaces at active construction sites and surface mining operations. The main objective of this study is to employ gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) to develop a new model with the ability to more accurately predict the TSS-PSD by taking advantage of both event-specific and site-specific factors in the model. To compile the data for this study, laboratory scale experiments using rainfall simulators were conducted on fourteen different soils to obtain TSS-PSD. This data is supplemented with field data from three construction sites in Ontario over a period of two years to capture the effect of transport and deposition within the site. The combined data sets provide a wide range of key overlooked site-specific and storm event-specific factors. Both parent soil and TSS-PSD in runoff are quantified by fitting each to a lognormal distribution. Compared to existing regression models, the developed model more accurately predicted the TSS-PSD using a more comprehensive list of key model input parameters. Employment of the new model will increase the efficiency of deployment of required best management practices, designed based on TSS-PSD, to minimize potential adverse effects of construction site runoff on aquatic life in the receiving watercourses.

  12. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    B. Robinson

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to document the abstraction model being used in total system performance assessment (TSPA) model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ). The UZ transport abstraction model uses the particle-tracking method that is incorporated into the finite element heat and mass model (FEHM) computer code (Zyvoloski et al. 1997 [DIRS 100615]) to simulate radionuclide transport in the UZ. This report outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining and inputting transport parameters are outlined for use in the TSPA for license application (LA) analyses. Process-level transport model calculations are documented in another report for the UZ (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). Three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields generated to characterize UZ flow (documented by BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]; DTN: LB03023DSSCP9I.001 [DIRS 163044]) are converted to make them compatible with the FEHM code for use in this abstraction model. This report establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model that is intended to represent UZ transport in the TSPA-LA. Capability of the UZ barrier for retarding the transport is demonstrated in this report, and by the underlying process model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). The technical scope, content, and management of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Transport Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171282]). Deviations from the technical work plan (TWP) are noted within the text of this report, as appropriate. The latest version of this document is being prepared principally to correct parameter values found to be in error due to transcription errors, changes in source data that were not captured in the report, calculation errors, and errors in interpretation of source data.

  13. Dissipative particle dynamics modeling of blood flow in arterial bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejin; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-11-01

    The motion of a suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing in bifurcations is investigated using both low-dimensional RBC (LD-RBC) and multiscale RBC (MS-RBC) models based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The blood flow is first simulated in a symmetric geometry between the diverging and converging channels to satisfy the periodic flow assumption along the flow direction. The results show that the flowrate ratio of the daughter channels and the feed hematocrit level has considerable influence on blood-plasma separation. We also propose a new method to model the inflow and outflow boundaries for the blood flow simulations: the inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated by DPD fluid with periodic boundary conditions; the outflow in two adjacent regions near the outlet is controlled by adaptive forces to keep the flowrate and velocity gradient equal, while the particles leaving the microfluidic channel at the outlet at each time step are removed from the system. The simulation results of the developing flow match analytical solutions from continuum theory. Plasma skimming and the all-or-nothing phenomenon of RBCs in bifurcation have been investigated in the simulations. The simulation results are consistent with previous experimental results and theoretical predictions. This work is supported by the NIH Grant R01HL094270.

  14. Sterile Neutrinos in Non-Standard Cosmologies and Particle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osoba, Efunwande

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of neutrino masses suggests that the Standard Model should be supplemented with new gauge-singlet fermions, often called sterile neutrinos. These sterile neutrinos can shed new light on open questions in cosmology. I will highlight some interesting contributions that sterile neutrinos bring to the understanding of cosmology. In this dissertation, I will show a novel way in which sterile neutrinos could be a dark matter candidate in the form of "Inert-Sterile" neutrinos. In usual particle models, sterile neutrinos can account for the dark matter of the Universe only if they have niasses in the keV range and are warm dark matter. Stringent cosmological and astrophysical bounds, in particular imposed by X-ray observations, apply to them. I will point out that in a particular variation of the Inert Doublet Model, sterile neutrinos can account for the dark matter in the Universe and may be either cold or warm dark matter candidates, even for masses much larger than the keV range. These "Inert-Sterile" neutrinos, produced non-thermally in the early Universe, would be stable and have very small couplings to Standard Model particles, rendering very difficult their detection in either direct or indirect dark matter searches. They could be, in principle, revealed in colliders by discovering other particles in the model. I also show how the existence of the sterile neutrino may force us to rethink the standard cosmology. It is commonly assumed that the cosmological and astrophysical bounds on the mixings of sterile with active neutrinos are much more stringent than those obtained from laboratory measurements. In this dissertation, I show that in scenarios with a very low reheating temperature at the end of (the last episode of) inflation or entropy creation, the abundance of heavy (> 1 MeV) sterile neutrinos becomes largely suppressed with respect to that obtained within the standard framework. Thus, in this case cosmological bounds become much less stringent

  15. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling Between 3D Magnetohydrodynamic and Energetic Particle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Lee, M. A.; Booth, A. C.; Spence, H.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Kozarev, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between 3D energetic particle models (e.g., the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Model, EPREM) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs, e.g., the PSI MAS model) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions in front of fast CMEs for particle acceleration from remarkably low in the corona (3-6 solar radii). Typically particle acceleration becomes rapid beyond 3Rs and often in regions where compression regions have not yet formed active shocks. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. Simulations show rapid particle acceleration in the range of 3-8 Rs over a broad longitudinal region (80°) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression and the subsequent expansion of these fields. These results have important implications for multi-instrument observations that will allow Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter to test the developing paradigm of SEP acceleration and transport from coronal compressions. We present here recent coupled simulations for SEP acceleration and transport, including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles. The broadness of the longitudinal profile from such events may be a key observational test of compression acceleration in the low corona.

  16. A computer model of particle balance in ECR ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkov, G. D.; Philippov, A. V.

    2008-12-01

    The investigation of the widespread model of particle balance and energy transport [1-5] for calculating the ion charge state distribution (CSD) in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source [6] is given. The modification of this model that makes it possible to describe the confinement and accumulation processes of highly charged ions in ECR plasma for the case of gas mixing is more precisely discussed. The discussion of the new technique for calculating the time confinement of ions and electrons, which is based on the Pastukhov theory [7, 8], is given: calculation of confinement times during two step minimization of special type functionals. The preliminary results obtained with this approach have been compared with available experimental data.

  17. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension. PMID:26781204

  18. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  19. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model.

    PubMed

    Nicolás-Carlock, J R; Carrillo-Estrada, J L; Dossetti, V

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters' fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension. PMID:26781204

  20. Model of cosmology and particle physics at an intermediate scale

    SciTech Connect

    Bastero-Gil, M.; Di Clemente, V.; King, S. F.

    2005-05-15

    We propose a model of cosmology and particle physics in which all relevant scales arise in a natural way from an intermediate string scale. We are led to assign the string scale to the intermediate scale M{sub *}{approx}10{sup 13} GeV by four independent pieces of physics: electroweak symmetry breaking; the {mu} parameter; the axion scale; and the neutrino mass scale. The model involves hybrid inflation with the waterfall field N being responsible for generating the {mu} term, the right-handed neutrino mass scale, and the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale. The large scale structure of the Universe is generated by the lightest right-handed sneutrino playing the role of a coupled curvaton. We show that the correct curvature perturbations may be successfully generated providing the lightest right-handed neutrino is weakly coupled in the seesaw mechanism, consistent with sequential dominance.

  1. Particle-based simulation of ellipse-shaped particle aggregation as a model for vascular network formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palachanis, Dimitrios; Szabó, András; Merks, Roeland M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Computational modeling is helpful for elucidating the cellular mechanisms driving biological morphogenesis. Previous simulation studies of blood vessel growth based on the cellular Potts model proposed that elongated, adhesive or mutually attractive endothelial cells suffice for the formation of blood vessel sprouts and vascular networks. Because each mathematical representation of a model introduces potential artifacts, it is important that model results are reproduced using alternative modeling paradigms. Here, we present a lattice-free, particle-based simulation of the cell elongation model of vasculogenesis. The new, particle-based simulations confirm the results obtained from the previous cellular Potts simulations. Furthermore, our current findings suggest that the emergence of order is possible with the application of a high enough attractive force or, alternatively, a longer attraction radius. The methodology will be applicable to a range of problems in morphogenesis and noisy particle aggregation in which cell shape is a key determining factor.

  2. A new coincidence model for single particle counters, Part I: Theory and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Knapp, J Z; Abramson, L R

    1994-01-01

    The prerequisites for estimating the effect of signal coincidence on both particle undercounting and the injection of false counts in the implementation of U.S.P. 788 contaminating particle assays by light extinction particle counters are defined. These include a particle concentration measure that varies with particle size and a new model of the counting process. Both prerequisites have been verified empirically: a single normalized equation describes the coincidence effect in all single particle counters. The single parameter of the normalized equation is the number of effective detector volumes per milliliter. A maximum undercount limit of 5% is proposed based on adequately suspended particles. Using the SVP U.S.P. XXII acceptance limits of 10,000 particles per container or the PMA propose 6,000 particles per container maximum for particles > 10 microns in U.S.P. XXIII, undercount errors are estimated for the smallest container sizes. The large concentration of particles below the controlled 10 microns particle size, that has been documented in injectable solutions, can pose an additional 788 measurement hazard. A Poisson model is used to estimate and control the injection of false particle counts into the mandated measurement through particle coincidence. Acceptable counting accuracy limits with present particle counting systems can be achieved by understanding the capabilities of the particle counter measurement system and using a dilution technique when appropriate. The new model of the counting process and the new particle concentration measures can result in standard, conservative, instrument specifications for use in Pharmacopeial contamination testing and in GLP user evaluation tests. Part I of this paper includes the theory of the coincidence effect on particle counting and the particle size distribution measured. A summary of the experimental verification employed to determine coincidence count loss as a function of particle concentration for single

  3. Predictive modeling of particle-laden, turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The successful prediction of particle-laden, turbulent flows relies heavily on the representation of turbulence in the gas phase. Several types of turbulence models for single-phase gas flow have been developed which compare reasonably well with experimental data. In the present work, a low-Reynolds'' k-[epsilon], closure model is chosen to describe the Reynolds stresses associated with gas-phase turbulence. This closure scheme, which involves transport equations for the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, is valid in the turbulent core as well as the viscous sublayer. Several versions of the low-Reynolds k-[epsilon] closure are documented in the literature. However, even those models which are similar in theory often differ considerably in their quantitative and qualitative predictions, making the selection of such a model a difficult task. The purpose of this progress report is to document our findings on the performance of ten different versions of the low-Reynolds k-[epsilon] model on predicting fully developed pipe flow. The predictions are compared with the experimental data of Schildknecht, et al. (1979). With the exception of the model put forth by Hoffman (1975), the predictions of all the closures show reasonable agreement for the mean velocity profile. However, important quantitative differences exist for the turbulent kinetic energy profile. In addition, the predicted eddy viscosity profile and the wall-region profile of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate exhibit both quantitative and qualitative differences. An effort to extend the present comparisons to include experimental measurements of other researchers is recommended in order to further evaluate the performance of the models.

  4. Model for boiling and dryout in particle beds. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R. J.

    1982-06-01

    Over the last ten years experiments and modeling of dryout in particle beds have produced over fifty papers. Considering only volume-heated beds, over 250 dryout measurements have been made, and are listed in this work. In addition, fifteen models to predict dryout have been produced and are discussed. A model is developed in this report for one-dimensional boiling and dryout in a porous medium. It is based on conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy. The initial coupled differential equations are reduced to a single first-order differential equation with an algebraic equation for the upper boundary condition. The model includes the effects of both laminar and turbulent flow, two-phase friction, and capillary force. The boundary condition at the bed bottom includes the possibility of inflowing liquid and either an adiabatic or a bottom-cooled support structure. The top of the bed may be either channeled or subcooled. In the first case the channel length and the saturation at the base of the channels are predicted. In the latter case, a criterion for penetration of the subcooled zone by channels is obtained.

  5. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  6. Modeling Proton Dissociation and Transfer Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2015-09-01

    We suggest a coarse-grained model for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations of solutions with dissociated protons. The model uses standard short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials between the beads, representing solution components. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable bonds with proton receptor base beads, such as water or deprotonated acid anions. The proton-base bonds are described by Morse potentials. When the proton establishes the Morse bonds with two bases, they form an intermediate complex, and the proton is able to "hop" between the bases artificially mimicking the Grotthuss diffusion mechanism. By adjusting the Morse potential parameters, one can regulate the potential barrier associated with intermediate complex formation and breakup and control the hopping frequency. This makes the proposed model applicable to simulations of proton mobility and reaction equilibria between protonated and deprotonated acid forms in aqueous solutions. The proposed model provides quantitative agreement with experiments for the proton self-diffusion coefficient and hopping frequency, as well as for the degree of dissociation of benzenesulfonic acid. PMID:26575931

  7. Validation of chemistry models employed in a particle simulation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.; Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.

    1991-01-01

    The chemistry models employed in a statistical particle simulation method, as implemented in the Intel iPSC/860 multiprocessor computer, are validated and applied. Chemical relaxation of five-species air in these reservoirs involves 34 simultaneous dissociation, recombination, and atomic-exchange reactions. The reaction rates employed in the analytic solutions are obtained from Arrhenius experimental correlations as functions of temperature for adiabatic gas reservoirs in thermal equilibrium. Favorable agreement with the analytic solutions validates the simulation when applied to relaxation of O2 toward equilibrium in reservoirs dominated by dissociation and recombination, respectively, and when applied to relaxation of air in the temperature range 5000 to 30,000 K. A flow of O2 over a circular cylinder at high Mach number is simulated to demonstrate application of the method to multidimensional reactive flows.

  8. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions withmore » cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.« less

  9. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions with cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.

  10. Modeling of cast systems using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul; Prakash, Mahesh; Ha, Joseph; Sinnott, Matthew; Nguyen, Thang; Grandfield, John

    2004-03-01

    To understand and control the filling process for metals in high-pressure die casting and ingot casting, researchers have used new flow-simulation software for the modeling of mold filling. Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a non-conventional computational fluid dynamics method that has been successfully applied to these problems. Due to its mesh-free nature, it can handle complex splashing free surface flows and the differential motion of multiple solid-casting equipment components relatively easily. The ability of SPH to predict the detailed filling patterns of real large-scale automotive die castings is demonstrated in this study, and the use of SPH simulation for wheel shape optimization in ingot casting based on minimizing oxide generation while increasing the throughput is also presented.

  11. A Simple Mathematical Model for Standard Model of Elementary Particles and Extension Thereof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    An algebraically (and geometrically) simple model representing the masses of the elementary particles in terms of the interaction (strong, weak, electromagnetic) constants is developed, including the Higgs bosons. The predicted Higgs boson mass is identical to that discovered by LHC experimental programs; while possibility of additional Higgs bosons (and their masses) is indicated. The model can be analyzed to explain and resolve many puzzles of particle physics and cosmology including the neutrino masses and mixing; origin of the proton mass and the mass-difference between the proton and the neutron; the big bang and cosmological Inflation; the Hubble expansion; etc. A novel interpretation of the model in terms of quaternion and rotation in the six-dimensional space of the elementary particle interaction-space - or, equivalently, in six-dimensional spacetime - is presented. Interrelations among particle masses are derived theoretically. A new approach for defining the interaction parameters leading to an elegant and symmetrical diagram is delineated. Generalization of the model to include supersymmetry is illustrated without recourse to complex mathematical formulation and free from any ambiguity. This Abstract represents some results of the Author's Independent Theoretical Research in Particle Physics, with possible connection to the Superstring Theory. However, only very elementary mathematics and physics is used in my presentation.

  12. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  13. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guangyuan Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-15

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. Here, we present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. The particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β{sub p}, and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. These results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  14. A generalized Brownian motion model for turbulent relative particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, B. K.

    2016-08-01

    There is speculation that the difficulty in obtaining an extended range with Richardson-Obukhov scaling in both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations is due to the finiteness of the flow Reynolds number Re in these situations. In this paper, a generalized Brownian motion model has been applied to describe the relative particle dispersion problem in more realistic turbulent flows and to shed some light on this issue. The fluctuating pressure forces acting on a fluid particle are taken to be a colored noise and follow a stationary process and are described by the Uhlenbeck-Ornstein model while it appears plausible to take their correlation time to have a power-law dependence on Re, thus introducing a bridge between the Lagrangian quantities and the Eulerian parameters for this problem. This ansatz is in qualitative agreement with the possibility of a connection speculated earlier by Corrsin [26] between the white-noise representation for the fluctuating pressure forces and the large-Re assumption in the Kolmogorov [4] theory for the 3D fully developed turbulence (FDT) as well as a similar argument of Monin and Yaglom [23] and a similar result of Sawford [13] and Borgas and Sawford [24]. It also provides an insight into the result that the Richardson-Obukhov scaling holds only in the infinite-Re limit and disappears otherwise. This ansatz further provides a determination of the Richardson-Obukhov constant g as a function of Re, with an asymptotic constant value in the infinite-Re limit. It is shown to lead to full agreement, in the small-Re limit as well, with the Batchelor-Townsend [27] scaling for the rate of change of the mean square interparticle separation in 3D FDT, hence validating its soundness further.

  15. GRAVITATIONAL LENS MODELING WITH GENETIC ALGORITHMS AND PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZERS

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D.

    2011-02-01

    Strong gravitational lensing of an extended object is described by a mapping from source to image coordinates that is nonlinear and cannot generally be inverted analytically. Determining the structure of the source intensity distribution also requires a description of the blurring effect due to a point-spread function. This initial study uses an iterative gravitational lens modeling scheme based on the semilinear method to determine the linear parameters (source intensity profile) of a strongly lensed system. Our 'matrix-free' approach avoids construction of the lens and blurring operators while retaining the least-squares formulation of the problem. The parameters of an analytical lens model are found through nonlinear optimization by an advanced genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimizer (PSO). These global optimization routines are designed to explore the parameter space thoroughly, mapping model degeneracies in detail. We develop a novel method that determines the L-curve for each solution automatically, which represents the trade-off between the image {chi}{sup 2} and regularization effects, and allows an estimate of the optimally regularized solution for each lens parameter set. In the final step of the optimization procedure, the lens model with the lowest {chi}{sup 2} is used while the global optimizer solves for the source intensity distribution directly. This allows us to accurately determine the number of degrees of freedom in the problem to facilitate comparison between lens models and enforce positivity on the source profile. In practice, we find that the GA conducts a more thorough search of the parameter space than the PSO.

  16. Aspects of Particle Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochuan

    This dissertation describes a few aspects of particles beyond the Standard Model, with a focus on the remaining questions after the discovery of a Standard Model-like Higgs boson. In specific, three topics are discussed in sequence: neutrino mass and baryon asymmetry, naturalness problem of Higgs mass, and placing constraints on theoretical models from precision measurements. First, the consequence of the neutrino mass anarchy on cosmology is studied. Attentions are paid in particular to the total mass of neutrinos and baryon asymmetry through leptogenesis. With the assumption of independence among mass matrix entries in addition to the basis independence, Gaussian measure is the only choice. On top of Gaussian measure, a simple approximate U(1) flavor symmetry makes leptogenesis highly successful. Correlations between the baryon asymmetry and the light-neutrino quantities are investigated. Also discussed are possible implications of recently suggested large total mass of neutrinos by the SDSS/BOSS data. Second, the Higgs mass implies fine-tuning for minimal theories of weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). Non-decoupling effects can boost the Higgs mass when new states interact with the Higgs, but new sources of SUSY breaking that accompany such extensions threaten naturalness. I will show that two singlets with a Dirac mass can increase the Higgs mass while maintaining naturalness in the presence of large SUSY breaking in the singlet sector. The modified Higgs phenomenology of this scenario, termed "Dirac NMSSM", is also studied. Finally, the sensitivities of future precision measurements in probing physics beyond the Standard Model are studied. A practical three-step procedure is presented for using the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT) to connect ultraviolet (UV) models of new physics with weak scale precision observables. With this procedure, one can interpret precision measurements as constraints on the UV model concerned. A detailed explanation is

  17. Modeling of hydrogen production methods: Single particle model and kinetics assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J.

    1996-10-01

    The investigation carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is devoted to the modeling of biomass pyrolysis reactors producing an oil vapor (tar) which is a precursor to hydrogen. This is an informal collaboration with NREL whereby JPL uses the experimentally-generated NREL data both as initial and boundary conditions for the calculations, and as a benchmark for model validation. The goal of this investigation is to find drivers of biomass fast-pyrolysis in the low temperature regime. The rationale is that experimental observations produce sparse discrete conditions for model validation, and that numerical simulations produced with a validated model are an economic way to find control parameters and an optimal operation regime, thereby circumventing costly changes in hardware and tests. During this first year of the investigation, a detailed mathematical model has been formulated for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in biomass particles. These are porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas phase flow. The methodology has been applied to the pyrolysis of spherically symmetric biomass particles by considering previously published kinetics schemes for both cellulose and wood. The results show that models which neglect the thermal and species boundary layers exterior to the particle will generally over predict both the pyrolysis rates and experimentally obtainable tar yields. An evaluation of the simulation results through comparisons with experimental data indicates that while the cellulose kinetics is reasonably accurate, the wood pyrolysis kinetics is not accurate; particularly at high reactor temperatures. Current effort in collaboration with NREL is aimed at finding accurate wood kinetics.

  18. Supports and modified nano-particles for designing model catalysts.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, C P; Dostert, K-H; Hollerer, M; Stiehler, C; Calaza, F; Schauermann, S; Shaikhutdinov, S; Sterrer, M; Freund, H-J

    2016-07-01

    In order to design catalytic materials, we need to understand the essential causes for material properties resulting from its composite nature. In this paper we discuss two, at first sight, diverse aspects: (a) the effect of the oxide-metal interface on metal nanoparticle properties and (b) the consequences of metal particle modification after activation on the selectivity of hydrogenation reactions. However, these two aspects are intimately linked. The metal nanoparticle's electronic structure changes at the interface as a catalyst is brought to different reaction temperatures due to morphological modifications in the metal and, as we will discuss, these changes in the chemistry lead to changes in the reaction path. As the morphology of the particle varies, facets of different orientations and sizes are exposed, which may lead to a change in the surface chemistry as well. We use two specific reactions to address these issues in some detail. To the best of our knowledge, the present paper reports the first observations of this kind for well-defined model systems. The changes in the electronic structure of Au nanoparticles due to their size and interaction with a supporting oxide are revealed as a function of temperature using CO2 activation as a probe. The presence of spectator species (oxopropyl), formed during an activation step of acrolein hydrogenation, strongly controls the selectivity of the reaction towards hydrogenation of the unsaturated C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond vs. the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond on Pd(111) when compared with oxide-supported Pd nanoparticles. PMID:27064816

  19. A cyclic model for particle motion in the pulmonary acinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, S.; Tsuda, A.

    2006-11-01

    A simplified model for the pulmonary alveolus that imitates the rhythmical expansion of the alveolus and the periodic shear flow in the adjacent airway is explored. The model consists of two eccentric cylinders and incompressible fluid that occupies the gap between them. The two cylinders undergo a simultaneous rhythmical expansion and contraction (mimicking the alveolus expansion) while the inner cylinder performs a periodic rotation about its axis (inducing shear flow mimicking airway ductal flow). An analytical solution is obtained for the creeping flow induced by the simultaneously expanding cylinders. It is shown that above a certain critical value of rotation to expansion velocity ratio, the flow exhibits characteristic features such as a saddle point and closed streamlines about a centre, similar to those existing inside a single alveolus during inhalation and exhalation. Poincaré maps of the trajectories of fluid particles demonstrate that, under various flow conditions, chaotic trajectories may exist, provided that expansion and rotation are slightly out of phase. This is similar to normal breathing conditions where the periodic expansion of the alveolus and the tidal flow (i.e. shear flow above the mouth of the alveolus) may be slightly out of phase. A novel definition of overall convective mixing efficiency is also suggested that inherently discounts reversible processes that do not contribute to mixing. It is demonstrated that two different convective mechanisms, related to the irreversibility of exhalation and inhalation and the onset of chaos, govern mixing efficiency in lung alveoli.

  20. Treating asphericity in fuel particle pressure vessel modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Gregory K.; Wadsworth, Derek C.

    1994-07-01

    The prototypical nuclear fuel of the New Production Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (NP-MHTGR) consists of spherical TRISO-coated particles suspended in graphite cylinders. The coating layers surrounding the fuel kernels in these particles consist of pyrolytic carbon layers and a silicon carbide layer. These coating layers act as a pressure vessel which retains fission product gases. In the operating conditions of the NP-MHTGR, a small percentage of these particles (pressure vessels) are expected to fail due to the pressure loading. The fuel particles of the NP-MHTGR deviate to some degree from a true spherical shape, which may have some effect on the failure percentages. A method is presented that treats the asphericity of the particles in predicting failure probabilities for particle samples. It utilizes a combination of finite element analysis and Monte Carlo sampling and is based on the Weibull statistical theory. The method is used here to assess the effects of asphericity in particles of two common geometric shapes, i.e. faceted particles and ellipsoidal particles. The method presented could be used to treat particle anomalies other than asphericity.

  1. Implicit frictional-contact model for soft particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezamabadi, Saeid; Radjai, Farhang; Averseng, Julien; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a novel numerical approach for the simulation of soft particles interacting via frictional contacts. This approach is based on an implicit formulation of the Material Point Method, allowing for large particle deformations, combined with the Contact Dynamics method for the treatment of unilateral frictional contacts between particles. This approach is both precise due to the treatment of contacts with no regularization and artificial damping parameters, and robust due to implicit time integration of both bulk degrees of freedom and relative contact velocities at the nodes representing the contact points. By construction, our algorithm is capable of handling arbitrary particle shapes and deformations. We illustrate this approach by two simple 2D examples: a Hertz contact and a rolling particle on an inclined plane. We also investigate the compaction of a packing of circular particles up to a solid fraction well above the jamming limit of hard particles. We find that, for the same level of deformation, the solid fraction in a packing of frictional particles is above that of a packing of frictionless particles as a result of larger particle shape change.

  2. Effect of Microstructural Geometry for Computing Closure Models in Multiscale Modeling of Shocked Particle Laden Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Oishik; Udaykumar, H. S.; Jacobs, Gustaaf

    Interaction of a shock wave with dust particles is a complex physical phenomenon. A computational model for studying this two-phase system is the Particle-Source in Cell (PSIC) approach. In this method, the dust particles are tracked as point particles in a Lagrangian frame of reference immersed in a compressible fluid. Two-way interaction between the carrier and the dispersed phases is ensured by coupling the momentum and energy transfer between the two phases as source terms in the respective governing equations. These source terms (e.g. drag force on particles) may be computed from resolved numerical simulations by treating each macroscopic point particle as an ensemble of cylinders immersed in a compressed fluid. However the drag so computed must be independent of the geometry of the mesoscale. In this work, the effect of the stochasticity of the microstructural geometry in construction of drag laws from resolved mesoscale computations is studied. Several different arrangement of cylinders are considered and the mean drag law as a function of Mach Number and Volume Fraction for each arrangement is computed using the Dynamic Kriging Method. The uncertainty in the drag forces arising because of the arrangement of the cylinders for a given volume fraction is quantified as 90% credible sets and the effect of the uncertainty on PSIC computations is studied.

  3. Particle models for discrete element modeling of bulk grain properties of wheat kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research has shown the potential of discrete element method (DEM) in simulating grain flow in bulk handling systems. Research has also revealed that simulation of grain flow with DEM requires establishment of appropriate particle models for each grain type. This research completes the three-p...

  4. Coupled Particle Transport and Pattern Formation in a Nonlinear Leaky-Box Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; El-Nemr, K. W.; Baird, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of particle-particle coupling on particle characteristics in nonlinear leaky-box type descriptions of the acceleration and transport of energetic particles in space plasmas are examined in the framework of a simple two-particle model based on the Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. In this model, the two particles are assumed coupled via a common nonlinear source term. In analogy with a prototypical mathematical system of diffusion-driven instability, this work demonstrates that steady-state patterns with strong dependence on the magnetic turbulence but a rather weak one on the coupled particles attributes can emerge in solutions of a nonlinearly coupled leaky-box model. The insight gained from this simple model may be of wider use and significance to nonlinearly coupled leaky-box type descriptions in general.

  5. Critical Examination of the Colloidal Particle Model of Globular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sarangapani, Prasad S.; Hudson, Steven D.; Jones, Ronald L.; Douglas, Jack F.; Pathak, Jai A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of globular protein solutions have uniformly adopted a colloidal view of proteins as particles, a perspective that neglects the polymeric primary structure of these biological macromolecules, their intrinsic flexibility, and their ability to sample a large configurational space. While the colloidal perspective often serves as a useful idealization in many cases, the macromolecular identity of proteins must reveal itself under thermodynamic conditions in which the native state is no longer stable, such as denaturing solvents and high protein concentrations where macromolecules tend to have screened excluded volume, charge, and hydrodynamic interactions. Under extreme pH conditions, charge repulsion interactions within the protein chain can overcome the attractive hydrogen-bonding interactions, holding it in its native globular state. Conformational changes can therefore be expected to have great significance on the shear viscosity and other rheological properties of protein solutions. These changes are not envisioned in conventional colloidal protein models and we have initiated an investigation of the scattering and rheological properties of model proteins. We initiate this effort by considering bovine serum albumin because it is a globular protein whose solution properties have also been extensively investigated as a function of pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration. As we anticipated, near-ultraviolet circular dichroism measurements and intrinsic viscosity measurements clearly indicate that the bovine serum albumin tertiary structure changes as protein concentration and pH are varied. Our findings point to limited validity of the colloidal protein model and to the need for further consideration and quantification of the effects of conformational changes on protein solution viscosity, protein association, and the phase behavior. Small-angle Neutron Scattering measurements have allowed us to assess how these conformational changes

  6. Modelling the surface deposition of meteoric smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, James S. A.; Feng, Wuhu; Mann, Graham W.; Dhomse, Sandip S.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    The flux of meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) in Greenland and Antarctica has been measured using Ir and Pt observations in ice cores, by Gabrielli et al. [1,2]. They obtained MSP deposition fluxes of 1.5 ± 0.45 × 10‑4 g m‑2 yr‑1 (209 ± 63 t d‑1) in Greenland and 3.9 ± 1.4 × 10‑5 g m‑2 yr‑1 (55 ± 19 t d‑1) in Antarctica, where the values in parentheses are total atmospheric inputs, assuming a uniform global deposition rate. These results show reasonable agreement with those of Lanci et al. [3], who used ice core magnetisation measurements, resulting in MSP fluxes of 1.7 ± 0.23 × 10‑4 g m‑2 yr‑1 (236 ± 50 t d‑1) (Greenland) and 2.0 ± 0.52 × 10‑5 g m‑2 yr‑1 (29 ± 5.0 t d‑1) (Antarctica). Atmospheric modelling studies have been performed to assess the transport and deposition of MSPs, using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model), and the CARMA (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model) aerosol microphysics package. An MSP input function totalling 44 t d‑1 was added between about 80 and 105 km. Several model runs have been performed in which the aerosol scavenging by precipitation was varied. Wet deposition is expected (and calculated here) to be the main deposition process; however, rain and snow aerosol scavenging coefficients have uncertainties spanning up to two and three orders of magnitude, respectively [4]. The model experiments that we have carried out include simple adjustments of the scavenging coefficients, full inclusion of a parametrisation reported by Wang et al. [4], and a scheme based on aerosol removal where relative humidity > 100 %. The MSP fluxes obtained vary between 1.4 × 10‑5 and 2.6 × 10‑5 g m‑2 yr‑1 for Greenland, and 5.1 × 10‑6 and 1.7 × 10‑5 g m‑2 yr‑1 for Antarctica. These values are about an order of magnitude lower than the Greenland observations, but show reasonable agreement for Antarctica. The UM (Unified Model), UKCA (United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols Model

  7. Particle methods to solve modelling problems in wound healing and tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermolen, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    The paper deals with a compilation of several of our modelling studies on particle methods used for simulation of wound healing and tumor growth processes. The paper serves as an introduction of our modelling approaches to researchers with interest in biological cell-based models that use particle-based modelling approaches. The particles that we consider in the present models mimic either cells or points on cell boundaries that are allowed to migrate as a result of several chemical and mechanical factors. A distinct feature of our modelling frameworks with respect to conventional particle models, is that cells, mimicked by particles, are allowed to divide, differentiate and to die as a result of apoptosis or any causes for cell death. The paper is merely descriptive, rather than written in full mathematical rigor, and will show some of the potentials of the applied modelling.

  8. Microbial interactions lead to rapid micro-scale successions on model marine particles.

    PubMed

    Datta, Manoshi S; Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Gore, Jeff; Polz, Martin F; Cordero, Otto X

    2016-01-01

    In the ocean, organic particles harbour diverse bacterial communities, which collectively digest and recycle essential nutrients. Traits like motility and exo-enzyme production allow individual taxa to colonize and exploit particle resources, but it remains unclear how community dynamics emerge from these individual traits. Here we track the taxon and trait dynamics of bacteria attached to model marine particles and demonstrate that particle-attached communities undergo rapid, reproducible successions driven by ecological interactions. Motile, particle-degrading taxa are selected for during early successional stages. However, this selective pressure is later relaxed when secondary consumers invade, which are unable to use the particle resource but, instead, rely on carbon from primary degraders. This creates a trophic chain that shifts community metabolism away from the particle substrate. These results suggest that primary successions may shape particle-attached bacterial communities in the ocean and that rapid community-wide metabolic shifts could limit rates of marine particle degradation. PMID:27311813

  9. Simulation and Modeling of Explosive Dispersal of Compressed Gas-Particle Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yue; Haselbacher, Andreas; Balachandar, S.

    2008-11-01

    Some effects of a detonating particle-laden explosive can be modeled through the explosion of a compressed gas-particle suspension. The suspension can be considered to be located in a spherical container and released through the instantaneous removal of the container similar to a shock tube. The transient flow generated by the removal of the container is well understood in the case without particles. Comparatively little is known about the dispersal of the particles and the unsteady interactions between the various waves and the particles. The objective of this work is to use Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations to improve our understanding of the dispersal of particles. Particular attention is focused on the interactions of the particles with the expansion fan and their effect on the flow behavior at large times. Parametric studies are carried out to systematically investigate the effects of particle size, particle density, and mass fraction.

  10. Microbial interactions lead to rapid micro-scale successions on model marine particles

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Manoshi S.; Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Gore, Jeff; Polz, Martin F.; Cordero, Otto X.

    2016-01-01

    In the ocean, organic particles harbour diverse bacterial communities, which collectively digest and recycle essential nutrients. Traits like motility and exo-enzyme production allow individual taxa to colonize and exploit particle resources, but it remains unclear how community dynamics emerge from these individual traits. Here we track the taxon and trait dynamics of bacteria attached to model marine particles and demonstrate that particle-attached communities undergo rapid, reproducible successions driven by ecological interactions. Motile, particle-degrading taxa are selected for during early successional stages. However, this selective pressure is later relaxed when secondary consumers invade, which are unable to use the particle resource but, instead, rely on carbon from primary degraders. This creates a trophic chain that shifts community metabolism away from the particle substrate. These results suggest that primary successions may shape particle-attached bacterial communities in the ocean and that rapid community-wide metabolic shifts could limit rates of marine particle degradation. PMID:27311813

  11. Modeling the effect of humidity on the threshold friction velocity of coal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Chen, Weiping; Ma, Chun; Zhan, Shuifen

    2012-09-01

    Coal particles emission could cause serious air pollution in coal production region and transport region. In coal mining industry, large amounts of water are regularly spayed to coal piles to prevent dust emission from the coal particles. The mechanism behind this measure is to manage the threshold friction velocity, which is an important parameter in controlling wind erosion and dust emission. Bagnold has developed a threshold friction velocity model for soil particles. However, the Bagnold model cannot be applied directly to coal particles as coal particles are quite different from soils in physical and chemical properties. We studied and modeled threshold friction velocity of coal particles under different humidities by using a wind tunnel. Results showed that the effects of humidity on coal particles' threshold friction velocity are related to the hydrophilic effect and adhesive effect. Bagnold model can be corrected by two new parameter items which explained the two effects. The new model, agreed well with wind tunnel measurements for coal particles with different size categories. Despite the fact the new model was developed for coal particles, its physical basis may allow the model application to other wind susceptible particles.

  12. Lower Bound on the Mean Square Displacement of Particles in the Hard Disk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richthammer, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The hard disk model is a 2D Gibbsian process of particles interacting via pure hard core repulsion. At high particle density the model is believed to show orientational order, however, it is known not to exhibit positional order. Here we investigate to what extent particle positions may fluctuate. We consider a finite volume version of the model in a box of dimensions 2 n × 2 n with arbitrary boundary configuration, and we show that the mean square displacement of particles near the center of the box is bounded from below by c log n. The result generalizes to a large class of models with fairly arbitrary interaction.

  13. Reinterpretation of Students' Ideas When Reasoning about Particle Model Illustrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langbeheim, Elon

    2015-01-01

    The article, "Using Animations in Identifying General Chemistry Students' Misconceptions and Evaluating Their Knowledge Transfer Relating to Particle Position in Physical Changes" (Smith and Villarreal, 2015), reports that a substantial proportion of undergraduate students expressed misconceived ideas regarding the motion of particles in…

  14. a Stochastic Model of the Dispersion of Solid Particles in a Turbulent Gaseous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightstone, Marilyn Frances

    This thesis is concerned with the development of a model to predict the dispersion of solid particles in a turbulent gaseous environment. The motion of particles in a turbulent flow is relevant to a number of areas of engineering including, for example, combustion where the motion of liquid fuel droplets in a combustion chamber is of interest, and atmospheric lows where one may be interested in calculating the dispersion of pollutants leaving a smokestack. The challenge in this work is to properly account for the effect of the turbulence on the momentum of the particle: the fluctuating turbulent gas-phase velocities impose a random force on the particle hence changing the particle equation of motion from an ordinary differential equation to a random or stochastic differential equation. The approach taken here is to approximate the random force acting on the particle as a Gaussian white noise random process such that the particle equation of motion is treated as a stochastic differential equation with a white noise forcing function. By applying the theories of stochastic mathematics, information on the particle velocities is obtained hence allowing for particle position and concentrations to be determined. The validity of the model was examined by comparing model predictions to analytical or experimental results for particles released into a number of fundamental flows including laminar, uniform flows of homogeneous isotropic and grid-generated turbulence, and round jets. In addition, a number of particle sites were considered ranging from very light 'fluid' particles, which essentially follow the gas-phase turbulence, to heavy particles which have a limited response to the turbulence. Predictions from the model were found to compare favourably with analytical and experimental results for the flows considered. Further, the new model was compared to one which models the effect of the gas-phase turbulence on the particle concentration as a gradient diffusion process

  15. Factorization method in the model of unstable particles with a smeared mass

    SciTech Connect

    Kuksa, V. I.

    2009-06-15

    The method of factorization, based on the model of unstable particles with a smeared mass, is applied to the processes with an unstable particle in the intermediate state. It was shown, that in the framework of the method suggested, the decay rate and cross section can be represented in the universal factorized form for an arbitrary set of particles. An exact factorization is caused by the specific structure of unstable particles propagators. We performed the phenomenological analysis of the factorization effect.

  16. Waste Slurry Particle Properties for Use in Slurry Flow Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jewett, J. R.; Conrads, T. J.; Julyk, L. J.; Reynolds, D. A.; Jensen, L.; Kirch, N. W.; Estey, S. D.; Bechtold, D. B.; Callaway III, W. S.; Cooke, G. A.; Herting, D. L.; Person, J. C.; Duncan, J. B.; Onishi, Y.; Tingey, J. M.

    2003-02-26

    Hanford's tank farm piping system must be substantially modified to deliver high-level wastes from the underground storage tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant now under construction. Improved knowledge of the physical properties of the solids was required to support the design of the modified system. To provide this additional knowledge, particle size distributions for composite samples from seven high-level waste feed tanks were measured using two different laser lightscattering particle size analyzers. These measurements were made under a variety of instrumental conditions, including various flow rates through the sample loop, various stirring rates in the sample reservoir, and before and after subjecting the particles to ultrasonic energy. A mean value over all the tanks of 4.2 {micro}m was obtained for the volume-based median particle size. Additional particle size information was obtained from sieving tests, settling tests and microscopic observations.

  17. Modelling self-assembling of colloid particles in multilayered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł; Barbasz, Jakub; Kolasińska, Marta

    2007-04-01

    Simulations of particle multilayer build-up in the layer by layer (LbL) self-assembling processes have been performed according to the generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) scheme. The first (precursor) layer having an arbitrary coverage of adsorption centers was generated using the standard RSA scheme pertinent to homogeneous surface. Formation of the consecutive layers (up to 20) was simulated by assuming short-range interaction potentials for two kinds of particles of equal size. Interaction of two particles of different kind resulted in irreversible and localized adsorption upon their contact, whereas particles of the same kind were assumed to interact via the hard potential (no adsorption possible). Using this algorithm theoretical simulations were performed aimed at determining the particle volume fraction as a function of the distance from the interface, as well as the multilayer film roughness and thickness as a function of the number of layers. The simulations revealed that particle concentration distribution in the film was more uniform for low precursor layer density than for higher density, where well-defined layers of closely packed particles appeared. On the other hand, the roughness of the film was the lowest at the highest precursor layer density. It was also predicted theoretically that for low precursor layer density the film thickness increased with the number of layers in a non-linear way. However, for high precursor layer density, the film thickness increased linearly with the number of layers and the average layer thickness was equal to 1.58 of the particle radius, which is close to the closely packed hexagonal layer thickness equal to 1.73. It was concluded by analysing the existing data for colloid particles and polyelectrolytes that the theoretical results can be effectively exploited for interpretation of the LbL processes involving colloid particles and molecular species like polymers or proteins.

  18. Consistent model reduction of polymer chains in solution in dissipative particle dynamics: Model description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Nicolas; Nunes, Suzana P.; Calo, Victor M.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a framework for model reduction of polymer chain models for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, where the properties governing the phase equilibria such as the characteristic size of the chain, compressibility, density, and temperature are preserved. The proposed methodology reduces the number of degrees of freedom required in traditional DPD representations to model equilibrium properties of systems with complex molecules (e.g., linear polymers). Based on geometrical considerations we explicitly account for the correlation between beads in fine-grained DPD models and consistently represent the effect of these correlations in a reduced model, in a practical and simple fashion via power laws and the consistent scaling of the simulation parameters. In order to satisfy the geometrical constraints in the reduced model we introduce bond-angle potentials that account for the changes in the chain free energy after the model reduction. Following this coarse-graining process we represent high molecular weight DPD chains (i.e.,  ≥ 200 beads per chain) with a significant reduction in the number of particles required (i.e.,  ≥ 20 times the original system). We show that our methodology has potential applications modeling systems of high molecular weight molecules at large scales, such as diblock copolymer and DNA.

  19. PAH bombardment by energetic particles: models and astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, E.; Jones, A.; Tielens, A.

    2011-05-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important and ubiquitous component of the Interstellar Medium (ISM) of galaxies. Interstellar PAHs are apparently able to withstand the rigors of the harsh environment of the ISM for some some 100 million years and thus are resilient against processing by UV and X-ray photons and supernova shock waves. PAHs in space are mainly studied through their characteristic emission bands, due to infrared fluorescence following the absorption of UV photons. This is the reason why the photophysics of PAHs in space has been extensively investigated. On the other hand, PAHs are also strongly affected by collisional processes, i.e. bombardment by high-velocity ions and electrons, arising from interstellar shocks, hot gas and cosmic rays. However, very little was known about the physics of the interaction between PAHs and high energy particles, especially in terms of PAH damage and destruction. This lack of information had made the interpretation of PAH observations difficult in regions subjected to such processes. Our research aims to fill this key gap in our understanding of the physics behind collisional processing of PAHs and to clarify how this affects the PAH evolution in the astrophysical context. We first describe the models we have developed, that take into account the molecular nature of the target PAH and allow for the first time a quantitative description of the collisional processing of PAH molecules by ions and electrons with energies between 10 eV and 10 keV (in shocks and hot gas) and between 5 MeV and 10 GeV (in cosmic rays). Specific models were needed because PAHs are molecules and not small solid fragments, thus the classical approach from solid state physics cannot be applied. We then show the applications of our models to observations, estimating the lifetime of PAHs against collisional processing in specific objects. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our findings on the considered sample, which

  20. Modeling the Collective Strategic Searching of Artificial Insurgent Groups: A Particle Swarm Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E

    2007-01-01

    A swarm based social adaptive model is proposed to model multiple insurgent groups?strategy searching in a dynamic changed environment. This report presents a pilot study on using the particle swarm modeling, a widely used non-linear optimal tool, to model the emergence of insurgency campaign. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of insurgent social adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of insurgent group strategic adaptation.

  1. Multiscale models of colloidal dispersion of particles in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Bennett, T P; D'Alessandro, G; Daly, K R

    2014-12-01

    We use homogenization theory to develop a multiscale model of colloidal dispersion of particles in nematic liquid crystals under weak-anchoring conditions. We validate the model by comparing it with simulations by using the Landau-de Gennes free energy and show that the agreement is excellent. We then use the multiscale model to study the effect that particle anisotropy has on the liquid crystal: spherically symmetric particles always reduce the effective elastic constant. Asymmetric particles introduce an effective alignment field that can increase the Fredericks threshold and decrease the switch-off time. PMID:25615117

  2. Dispersion modelling of a tall stack plume in the spanish mediterranean coast by a particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, J. F.; Cremades, L.; Baldasano, J. M.

    A Lagrangian particle model has been used to simulate the dispersion of a tall stack plume of a power plant located in a complex coastal site at the Spanish Mediterranean coast, under summer meteorological conditions: land and sea breezes and thermal low effects. These are responsible for a particular behavior of plume (rotations greater than 90°). The model is based on the numerical solution of Langevin's equation (Sawford, 1984; Thomson, 1984, 1987; de Baas et al., 1986) by following the trajectories of many particles. The displacement of these particles is governed by meteorological parameters resulting from Eulerian wind data adjusted by an objective analysis model based on variational calculus. The adjusted values should satisfy continuity as a strong constraint (Sherman, 1978; Mathur and Peters, 1990). The model allows to simulate the atmospheric dispersion both in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous turbulence according to de Baas et al. (1986) and Zannetti (1990) schemes. The numerical results obtained by the dispersion model are compared with experimental data from a measurement campaign developed at the surroundings of Castellon power plant. The model is applied to the problem of predicting the ground level concentration (GLC) (3 m, above ground level) of the SO 2 emitted by the power plant. Model behavior was evaluated through several statistical indices: relative mean bias, normalized mean square error and the cumulative frequency distribution of the point-by-point ratio between observed and predicted concentrations. Both models were developed at the Instituto de Tecnología y Modelización Ambiental (ITEMA) of the Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña (UPC).

  3. A unified model for ultrafine aircraft particle emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, B.; Turco, R. P.; Yu, F.; Danilin, M. Y.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Busen, R.

    2000-12-01

    To predict the environmental impacts of commercial aviation, intensive studies have been launched to measure the properties and effects of aircraft emissions. These observations have revealed an extremely wide variance with respect to the number and sizes of the particles produced in the exhaust plumes. An analytic parameterization is presented that explains most of the observational variance. It is shown that the observed scatter in emission indices of volatile particles is due mainly to variations of plume age, the detection threshold size of the particle counters, and condensable organic emissions. The principle trend of the volatile particle concentrations with fuel sulfur content can be explained with conversion fractions of sulfur into particulate sulfuric acid at emission within the range 0.5 to 5%. A novel assessment of the perturbation of the stratospheric aerosol layer by a future supersonic aircraft fleet confirms previous estimates and puts these simulations on a sounder physical basis.

  4. Distributed soft-data-constrained multi-model particle filter.

    PubMed

    Seifzadeh, Sepideh; Khaleghi, Bahador; Karray, Fakhri

    2015-03-01

    A distributed nonlinear estimation method based on soft-data-constrained multimodel particle filtering and applicable to a number of distributed state estimation problems is proposed. This method needs only local data exchange among neighboring sensor nodes and thus provides enhanced reliability, scalability, and ease of deployment. To make the multimodel particle filtering work in a distributed manner, a Gaussian approximation of the particle cloud obtained at each sensor node and a consensus propagation-based distributed data aggregation scheme are used to dynamically reweight the particles' weights. The proposed method can recover from failure situations and is robust to noise, since it keeps the same population of particles and uses the aggregated global Gaussian to infer constraints. The constraints are enforced by adjusting particles' weights and assigning a higher mass to those closer to the global estimate represented by the nodes in the entire sensor network after each communication step. Each sensor node experiences gradual change; i.e., if a noise occurs in the system, the node, its neighbors, and consequently the overall network are less affected than with other approaches, and thus recover faster. The efficiency of the proposed method is verified through extensive simulations for a target tracking system which can process both soft and hard data in sensor networks. PMID:24956539

  5. A mathematical model of particle retention in the air-spaces of human lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrity, T R; Garrard, C S; Yeates, D B

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the total and regional lung retention of particles inhaled continuously by man over long periods can be useful in understanding the potential role of inhaled particles in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. Owing to practical and ethical considerations, however, little or no experimental information exists. A mathematical model of particle retention simulating environmental and occupational exposures has therefore been developed that takes into account particle deposition, tracheobronchial clearance, and two phases of alveolar clearance in the Weibel A anatomical lung model. The derived equations of retention kinetics predict retention of particles as a function of exposure time. For a continuous exposure (simulating environmental conditions) to 4 microns particles, the model predicts that retained particles approach an equilibrium between deposited and cleared particles with the 95% level being reached in 293 days. For an intermittent exposure (simulating occupational conditions) equilibrium is approached in five years. The whole lung burden of particles is predicted to be 9% of the total mass that entered the lung after a one-year environmental exposure and 1.5% after a 25-year occupational exposure. The equilibrium surface concentration and integrated dose of particles per airway generation predict enhanced risk to the pathogenic effects of inhaled particles in the large airways and respiratory bronchioles. PMID:6830707

  6. Adaptation of multidimensional group particle tracking and particle wall-boundary condition model to the FDNS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A particulate two-phase flow CFD model was developed based on the FDNS code which is a pressure based predictor plus multi-corrector Navier-Stokes flow solver. Turbulence models with compressibility correction and the wall function models were employed as submodels. A finite-rate chemistry model was used for reacting flow simulation. For particulate two-phase flow simulations, a Eulerian-Lagrangian solution method using an efficient implicit particle trajectory integration scheme was developed in this study. Effects of particle-gas reaction and particle size change to agglomeration or fragmentation were not considered in this investigation. At the onset of the present study, a two-dimensional version of FDNS which had been modified to treat Lagrangian tracking of particles (FDNS-2DEL) had already been written and was operational. The FDNS-2DEL code was too slow for practical use, mainly because it had not been written in a form amenable to vectorization on the Cray, nor was the full three-dimensional form of FDNS utilized. The specific objective of this study was to reorder to calculations into long single arrays for automatic vectorization on the Cray and to implement the full three-dimensional version of FDNS to produce the FDNS-3DEL code. Since the FDNS-2DEL code was slow, a very limited number of test cases had been run with it. This study was also intended to increase the number of cases simulated to verify and improve, as necessary, the particle tracking methodology coded in FDNS.

  7. Adaptation of multidimensional group particle tracking and particle wall-boundary condition model to the FDNS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-04-01

    A particulate two-phase flow CFD model was developed based on the FDNS code which is a pressure based predictor plus multi-corrector Navier-Stokes flow solver. Turbulence models with compressibility correction and the wall function models were employed as submodels. A finite-rate chemistry model was used for reacting flow simulation. For particulate two-phase flow simulations, a Eulerian-Lagrangian solution method using an efficient implicit particle trajectory integration scheme was developed in this study. Effects of particle-gas reaction and particle size change to agglomeration or fragmentation were not considered in this investigation. At the onset of the present study, a two-dimensional version of FDNS which had been modified to treat Lagrangian tracking of particles (FDNS-2DEL) had already been written and was operational. The FDNS-2DEL code was too slow for practical use, mainly because it had not been written in a form amenable to vectorization on the Cray, nor was the full three-dimensional form of FDNS utilized. The specific objective of this study was to reorder to calculations into long single arrays for automatic vectorization on the Cray and to implement the full three-dimensional version of FDNS to produce the FDNS-3DEL code. Since the FDNS-2DEL code was slow, a very limited number of test cases had been run with it. This study was also intended to increase the number of cases simulated to verify and improve, as necessary, the particle tracking methodology coded in FDNS.

  8. A MODEL FOR FINE PARTICLE AGGLOMERATION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for fine particle agglomeration in circulating fluidized bed absorbers (CFBAS) has been developed. It can model the influence of different factors on agglomeration, such as the geometry of CFBAs, superficial gas velocity, initial particle size distribution, and type of ag...

  9. Conceptual Change Texts in Chemistry Teaching: A Study on the Particle Model of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beerenwinkel, Anne; Parchmann, Ilka; Grasel, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the effect of a conceptual change text on students' awareness of common misconceptions on the particle model of matter. The conceptual change text was designed based on principles of text comprehensibility, of conceptual change instruction and of instructional approaches how to introduce the particle model. It was evaluated in…

  10. Sand Production Modeling Using Superquadric Discrete Elements and Coupling of Fluid Flow and Particle Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S. Perkins, E.D.

    1999-02-10

    Techniques for modeling oil well sand production have been developed using the formulations for superquadric discrete elements and Darcy fluid flow. Discrete element models are generated using the new technique of particle cloning. Discrete element sources and sinks allow simulation of sand production from the initial state through the transition to an equilibrium state where particles are created and removed at the same rate.

  11. Modelling neutral beams in fusion devices: Beamlet-based model for fast particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asunta, O.; Govenius, J.; Budny, R.; Gorelenkova, M.; Tardini, G.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Salmi, A.; Sipilä, S.

    2015-03-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) will be one of the main sources of heating and non-inductive current drive in ITER. Due to high level of injected power the beam induced heat loads present a potential threat to the integrity of the first wall of the device, particularly in the presence of non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field. Neutral beam injection can also destabilize Alfvén eigenmodes and energetic particle modes, and act as a source of plasma rotation. Therefore, reliable and accurate simulation of NBI is important for making predictions for ITER, as well as for any other current or future fusion device. This paper introduces a new beamlet-based neutral beam ionization model called BBNBI. It takes into account the fine structure of the injector, follows the injected neutrals until ionization, and generates a source ensemble of ionized NBI test particles for slowing down calculations. BBNBI can be used as a stand-alone model but together with the particle following code ASCOT it forms a complete and sophisticated tool for simulating neutral beam injection. The test particle ensembles from BBNBI are found to agree well with those produced by PENCIL for JET, and those produced by NUBEAM both for JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas. The first comprehensive comparisons of beam slowing down profiles of interest from BBNBI + ASCOT with results from PENCIL and NUBEAM/TRANSP, for both JET and AUG, are presented. It is shown that, for an axisymmetric plasma, BBNBI + ASCOT and NUBEAM agree remarkably well. Together with earlier 3D studies, these results further validate using BBNBI + ASCOT also for studying phenomena that require particle following in a truly three-dimensional geometry.

  12. A-DROP: A predictive model for the formation of oil particle aggregates (OPAs).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C; Geng, Xiaolong; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Fitzpatrick, Faith

    2016-05-15

    Oil-particle interactions play a major role in removal of free oil from the water column. We present a new conceptual-numerical model, A-DROP, to predict oil amount trapped in oil-particle aggregates. A new conceptual formulation of oil-particle coagulation efficiency is introduced to account for the effects of oil stabilization by particles, particle hydrophobicity, and oil-particle size ratio on OPA formation. A-DROP was able to closely reproduce the oil trapping efficiency reported in experimental studies. The model was then used to simulate the OPA formation in a typical nearshore environment. Modeling results indicate that the increase of particle concentration in the swash zone would speed up the oil-particle interaction process; but the oil amount trapped in OPAs did not correspond to the increase of particle concentration. The developed A-DROP model could become an important tool in understanding the natural removal of oil and developing oil spill countermeasures by means of oil-particle aggregation. PMID:26992749

  13. Multiscale Particle-Based Modeling of Flowing Platelets in Blood Plasma Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Na; Slepian, Marvin J.; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multiscale particle-based model of platelets, to study the transport dynamics of shear stresses between the surrounding fluid and the platelet membrane. This model facilitates a more accurate prediction of the activation potential of platelets by viscous shear stresses - one of the major mechanisms leading to thrombus formation in cardiovascular diseases and in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. The interface of the model couples coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The CGMD handles individual platelets while the DPD models the macroscopic transport of blood plasma in vessels. A hybrid force field is formulated for establishing a functional interface between the platelet membrane and the surrounding fluid, in which the microstructural changes of platelets may respond to the extracellular viscous shear stresses transferred to them. The interaction between the two systems preserves dynamic properties of the flowing platelets, such as the flipping motion. Using this multiscale particle-based approach, we have further studied the effects of the platelet elastic modulus by comparing the action of the flow-induced shear stresses on rigid and deformable platelet models. The results indicate that neglecting the platelet deformability may overestimate the stress on the platelet membrane, which in turn may lead to erroneous predictions of the platelet activation under viscous shear flow conditions. This particle-based fluid-structure interaction multiscale model offers for the first time a computationally feasible approach for simulating deformable platelets interacting with viscous blood flow, aimed at predicting flow induced platelet activation by using a highly resolved mapping of the stress distribution on the platelet membrane under dynamic flow conditions. PMID:25530818

  14. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  15. A model for electrophoretic transport of charged particles through membrane before steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Tatiana Miranda; Fragoso, Viviane Muniz da Silva; Cruz, Frederico Alan de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we are presenting a model for electrophoretic motion of a charged particle through the membrane before it reaches the steady state, based on concepts of Physics. Some results from analysis of the model are discussed.

  16. Assessment of Drag Models for Geldart A Particles in Bubbling Fluidized Beds

    SciTech Connect

    Estejab, Bahareh; Battaglia, Francine

    2015-10-08

    In order to accurately predict the hydrodynamic behavior of gas and solid phases using an Eulerian–Eulerian approach, it is crucial to use appropriate drag models to capture the correct physics. In this study, the performance of seven drag models for fluidization of Geldart A particles of coal, poplar wood, and their mixtures was assessed. In spite of the previous findings that bode badly for using predominately Geldart B drag models for fine particles, the results of our study revealed that if static regions of mass in the fluidized beds are considered, these drag models work well with Geldart A particles. It was found that drag models derived from empirical relationships adopt better with Geldart A particles compared to drag models that were numerically developed. Overall, the Huilin–Gidaspow drag model showed the best performance for both single solid phases and binary mixtures, however, for binary mixtures, Wen–Yu model predictions were also accurate.

  17. Flow instability originating from particle configurations using the two-dimensional optimal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwata, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuki

    2015-12-01

    The two-dimensional optimal velocity model has potential applications to pedestrian dynamics and the collective motion of animals. In this paper, we extend the linear stability analysis presented in a previous paper [A Nakayama et al., Phys. Rev. E. 77, 016105 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.016105] and investigate the effects of particle configuration on the stability of several wave modes of collective oscillations of moving particles. We find that, when a particle moves without interacting with particles that are positioned in a diagonally forward or backward direction, the stable region of the particle flow is completely removed by the elliptically polarized mode.

  18. Landau Zener scenario in a trapped atomic gas: multi-level multi-particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fai, Lukong Cornelius; Tchoffo, Martin; Jipdi, Michael Nana

    2015-07-01

    The paper investigates multi-level and multi-particle Landau-Zener problem applying the dynamic matrix approach. The Landau Zener transitions are observed to depend sensitively on the frequency, phase of interaction and number of levels and particles. The dynamic behaviour of atomic trapped gas is solved for one particle model that permits to deduce different probabilities for particular initial conditions. The generalization of the probabilities permits to solve any multi-level system with an arbitrary number of particles and controlled particle transitions.

  19. Single fiber model of particle retention in an acoustically driven porous mesh.

    PubMed

    Grossner, Michael T; Penrod, Alan E; Belovich, Joanne M; Feke, Donald L

    2003-03-01

    A method for the capture of small particles (tens of microns in diameter) from a continuously flowing suspension has recently been reported. This technique relies on a standing acoustic wave resonating in a rectangular chamber filled with a high-porosity mesh. Particles are retained in this chamber via a complex interaction between the acoustic field and the porous mesh. Although the mesh has a pore size two orders of magnitude larger than the particle diameter, collection efficiencies of 90% have been measured. A mathematical model has been developed to understand the experimentally observed phenomena and to be able to predict filtration performance. By examining a small region (a single fiber) of the porous mesh, the model has duplicated several experimental events such as the focusing of particles near an element of the mesh and the levitation of particles within pores. The single-fiber analysis forms the basis of modeling the overall performance of the particle filtration system. PMID:12565069

  20. Reduced model for combustion of a small biomass particle at high operating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Haseli, Y; van Oijen, J A; de Goey, L P H

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate a model for a spherical biomass particle combusting at high temperatures with reduced number of variables. The model is based on the observation that combustion of a small particle includes three main phases: heating up, pyrolysis, and char conversion. It is assumed that the pyrolysis begins as soon as the particle surface attains a pyrolysis temperature, yielding a char front, moving towards the center of particle as time passes. The formulation of the heating up and pyrolysis phases is based on an integral method which allows describing the energy conservation with an ordinary differential equation. The char combustion model is according to the shrinking core approximation. Model validation is carried out by comparing the predictions with experiments of sawdust particles taken from the literature, and with computations of partial differential equation-based models. Satisfactory agreement is achieved between the predictions and experimental data. PMID:23376204

  1. A New Multiphase Model for Simulating Energetically Driven Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D E; Murphy, M J

    2010-02-02

    The proper representation of particulate phenomena is important for the simulation of many non-ideal particle loaded explosives. These explosives present severe numerical difficulties to simulate because numerical approaches for packed particle beds often behave poorly for the dilute regime and the reverse is often true for methods developed for the dilute regime. This paper presents a multiphase framework for the simulation of these non-ideal explosives that accurately accounts for the particulate behavior in both of these regimes. The capability of this framework is enhanced by the use of prescribed PDF methods for both particle size distributions and the representation of chemical processes. We have validated this framework using several experimental methods that accommodate the separation of momentum flux measurements in two-phase blast flows.

  2. A stochastic model of particle dispersion in turbulent reacting gaseous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David; Hewson, John

    2012-11-01

    We are performing fundamental studies of dispersive transport and time-temperature histories of Lagrangian particles in turbulent reacting flows. The particle-flow statistics including the full particle temperature PDF are of interest. A challenge in modeling particle motions is the accurate prediction of fine-scale aerosol-fluid interactions. A computationally affordable stochastic modeling approach, one-dimensional turbulence (ODT), is a proven method that captures the full range of length and time scales, and provides detailed statistics of fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport. Limited results of particle transport in ODT have been reported in non-reacting flow. Here, we extend ODT to particle transport in reacting flow. The results of particle transport in three flow configurations are presented: channel flow, homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and jet flames. We investigate the functional dependence of the statistics of particle-flow interactions including (1) parametric study with varying temperatures, Reynolds numbers, and particle Stokes numbers; (2) particle temperature histories and PDFs; (3) time scale and the sensitivity of initial and boundary conditions. Flow statistics are compared to both experimental measurements and DNS data.

  3. A review of dispersion modelling and its application to the dispersion of particles: An overview of different dispersion models available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, N. S.; Morawska, L.

    This paper provides the first review of the application of atmospheric models for particle dispersion. The different types of dispersion models available, from simple box type models to complex fluid dynamics models are outlined and the suitability of the different approaches to dispersion modelling within different environments, in regards to scale, complexity of the environment and concentration parameters is assessed. Finally, several major commercial and non-commercial particle dispersion packages are reviewed, detailing which processes are included and advantages and limitations of their use to modelling particle dispersion. The models reviewed included: Box models (AURORA, CPB and PBM), Gaussian models (CALINE4, HIWAY2, CAR-FMI, OSPM, CALPUFF, AEROPOL, AERMOD, UK-ADMS and SCREEN3), Lagrangian/Eulerian Models (GRAL, TAPM, ARIA Regional), CFD models (ARIA Local, MISKAM, MICRO-CALGRID) and models which include aerosol dynamics (GATOR, MONO32, UHMA, CIT, AERO, RPM, AEROFOR2, URM-1ATM, MADRID, CALGRID and UNI-AERO).

  4. Preliminary discrete element modeling of a falling particle curtain for CSP central tower receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanino, R.; Ho, C. K.; Romano, D.; Savoldi, L.

    2016-05-01

    Current methods used to simulate the curtain thickness in a falling particle receiver lead to a poor agreement with the experiments. Here the Discrete Element Method (DEM) is proposed to address the problem, including both the top hopper and the interactions between particles in the model. Some first promising results are presented, showing an acceptable agreement between simulation and experiment for an ad-hoc set of input parameters. A sensitivity study provides a first assessment of the effects of the main input parameters of the model (boundary conditions at the release, particle Young's modulus, restitution coefficients and effective particle diameter) on the predicted curtain thickness.

  5. Propagation of Source Grain-size Distribution Uncertainty by Using a Lagrangian Volcanic Particle Dispersal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, A.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Pardini, F.; Salvetti, M. V.; Spanu, A.

    2014-12-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersal models are commonly used for tracking ash particles emitted from volcanic plumes and transported under the action of atmospheric wind fields. In this work, we adopted a Lagrangian particle model to carry out an uncertainty quantification analysis of volcanic ash dispersal in the atmosphere focused on the uncertainties affecting particle source conditions. To this aim the Eulerian fully compressible mesoscale non-hydrostatic model WRF was used to generate the driving wind field. The Lagrangian particle model LPAC (de'Michieli Vitturi et al., JGR 2010) was then used to simulate the transport of mass particles under the action of atmospheric conditions. The particle motion equations were derived by expressing the Lagrangian particle acceleration as the sum of the forces acting along its trajectory, with drag forces calculated as a function of particle diameter, density, shape and Reynolds number. The simulations were representative of weak plume events of Mt. Etna and aimed to quantify the effect on the dispersal process of the uncertainty in the mean and variance of a Gaussian density function describing the grain-size distribution of the mixture and in the particle sphericity. In order to analyze the sensitivity of particle dispersal to these uncertain parameters with a reasonable number of simulations, and therefore with affordable computational costs, response surfaces in the parameter space were built by using the generalized polynomial chaos technique. The uncertainty analysis allowed to quantify the most probable values, as well as their pdf, of the number of particles as well as of the mean and variance of the grain size distribution at various distances from the source, both in air and on the ground. In particular, results highlighted the strong reduction of the uncertainty ranges of the mean and variance of the grain-size distribution with increasing distance from source and the significant control of particle sphericity on the

  6. Physical Models for Particle Tracking Simulations in the RF Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    This document describes the algorithms that are used in the PyORBIT code to track the particles accelerated in the Radio-Frequency cavities. It gives the mathematical description of the algorithms and the assumptions made in each case. The derived formulas have been implemented in the PyORBIT code. The necessary data for each algorithm are described in detail.

  7. Radiation pressure cross sections of model fluffy interstellar particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saija, R.; Iatì, M. A.; Giusto, A.; Denti, P.; Borghese, F.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Aiello, S.; Barsella, B.

    Radiation presssure forces affect the dynamical behaviour of dust particles in several astrophysical environments. For a given grain mass and composition, the optical response and the radiation pressure cross sections are critically dependent on morphology. It is likely that interstellar grains take their origin from aggregation of small particles thus resulting in more or less fluffy aggregates. These kind of structures have been widely exploited in the literature by the use of approximate methods (effective medium theories). In this work we computed the radiation pressure cross sections of composite fluffy grains through the transition matrix method considering silicates aggregates made up of a large number of spherical subunits (up to 200). The results obtained, without resorting to any approximation, show that radiation pressure cross sections decrease with increasing particles fluffiness in the near UV-visible range of the spectrum. This is due to the decrease of the corresponding strenght of the multiple scattering processes that couple the aggregated spheres to each other. As a result, the inertial response to radiation forces of highly porous aggregates tends to become similar to that of the constituents particles. These conclusions are in substantial agreement with the results obtained by Mukai et al.(Astron. Astrophys. 262, 315 (1992)). For an analysis of the dynamical behaviour (expulsion from galaxies) of small aggregates see the results presented in this meeting by S. Aiello et al..

  8. Modeling Particle-Laden Compressible Flows Using Lattice-Boltzmann Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Orlando; Thomas, John; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2012-11-01

    Combing the three-dimensional compressible Lattice-Boltzmann model with a fluid-particle interaction model, a robust computational framework for predicting fluid/solid momentum transfer within a particle-laden compressible flow field is developed. This tool is used to examine the effects of a moving shock front on the time-evolution of the displacement, velocity, and acceleration vectors of a single spherical particle initially at rest. These results are compared to analytical solutions obtained from the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flows and a relationship between Mach number and drag coefficient is developed. Next, momentum transport through a system of particles is examined and the effects of particle-particle interactions on shock front propagation/attenuation are discussed. These results are used to understand fluid/solid momentum transfer within detonation shock waves.

  9. A model of coal particle drying in fluidized bed combustion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Komatina, M.; Manovic, V.; Saljnikov, A.

    2007-02-15

    Experimental and theoretical investigation on drying of a single coal particle in fluidized bed combustor is presented. Coal particle drying was considered via the moist shrinking core mechanism. The results of the drying test runs of low-rank Serbian coals were used for experimental verification of the model. The temperature of the coal particle center was measured, assuming that drying was completed when the temperature equalled 100{sup o}C. The influence of different parameters (thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of coal, fluidized bed temperature, moisture content and superheating of steam) on drying time and temperature profile within the coal particle was analyzed by a parametric analysis. The experimentally obtained results confirmed that the moist shrinking core mechanism can be applied for the mathematical description of a coal particle drying, while dependence between drying time and coal particle radius, a square law relationship, implicates heat transfer control of the process and confirms the validity of assumptions used in modeling.

  10. A model of the interaction of bubbles and solid particles under acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Todd Allen

    The Lagrangian formalism utilized by Ilinskii, Hamilton and Zabolotskaya [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 786-795 (2007)] to derive equations for the radial and translational motion of interacting bubbles is extended here to obtain a model for the dynamics of interacting bubbles and elastic particles. The bubbles and particles are assumed to be spherical but are otherwise free to pulsate and translate. The model is accurate to fifth order in terms of a nondimensional expansion parameter R/d, where R is a characteristic radius and d is a characteristic distance between neighboring bubbles or particles. The bubbles and particles may be of nonuniform size, the particles elastic or rigid, and external acoustic sources are included to an order consistent with the accuracy of the model. Although the liquid is assumed initially to be incompressible, corrections accounting for finite liquid compressibility are developed to first order in the acoustic Mach number for a cluster of bubbles and particles, and to second order in the acoustic Mach number for a single bubble. For a bubble-particle pair consideration is also given to truncation of the model at fifth order in R/d via automated derivation of the model equations to arbitrary order. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effects of key parameters such as particle density and size, liquid compressibility, particle elasticity and model order on the dynamics of single bubbles, pairs of bubbles, bubble-particle pairs and clusters of bubbles and particles under both free response conditions and sinusoidal or shock wave excitation.

  11. Collision model for fully resolved simulations of flows laden with finite-size particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro; Boersma, Bendiks Jan; Westerweel, Jerry; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present a collision model for particle-particle and particle-wall interactions in interface-resolved simulations of particle-laden flows. Three types of interparticle interactions are taken into account: (1) long- and (2) short-range hydrodynamic interactions, and (3) solid-solid contact. Long-range interactions are incorporated through an efficient and second-order-accurate immersed boundary method (IBM). Short-range interactions are also partly reproduced by the IBM. However, since the IBM uses a fixed grid, a lubrication model is needed for an interparticle gap width smaller than the grid spacing. The lubrication model is based on asymptotic expansions of analytical solutions for canonical lubrication interactions between spheres in the Stokes regime. Roughness effects are incorporated by making the lubrication correction independent of the gap width for gap widths smaller than ˜1 % of the particle radius. This correction is applied until the particles reach solid-solid contact. To model solid-solid contact we use a variant of a linear soft-sphere collision model capable of stretching the collision time. This choice is computationally attractive because it allows us to reduce the number of time steps required for integrating the collision force accurately and is physically realistic, provided that the prescribed collision time is much smaller than the characteristic time scale of particle motion. We verified the numerical implementation of our collision model and validated it against several benchmark cases for immersed head-on particle-wall and particle-particle collisions, and oblique particle-wall collisions. The results show good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Nonisothermal particle modeling of municipal solid waste combustion with heavy metal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Mazza, G.; Falcoz, Q.; Gauthier, D.; Flamant, G.; Soria, J.

    2010-12-15

    A particulate model was developed for municipal solid-waste incineration in a fluidized bed combining solid-waste-particle combustion and heavy metal vaporization from the burning particles. Based on a simpler, isothermal version presented previously, this model combines an asymptotic-combustion model for carbonaceous-solid combustion and a shrinking-core model to describe the heavy metal vaporization phenomenon, in which the particle is now considered nonisothermal. A parametric study is presented that shows the influence of temperature on the global metal-vaporization process. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator and to the results of the simpler isothermal model. It is shown that conduction in the particle strongly affects the variation of the vaporization rate with time and that the present version of the model well fits both the shape of the plots and the maximum heavy metal vaporization rates for all bed temperatures. (author)

  13. Light scattering model for individual sub-100-nm particle size determination in an evanescent field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajornrungruang, Panart; Korkmaz, Sevim; Angshuman, Pal; Suzuki, Keisuke; Kimura, Keiichi; Babu, Suryadevara V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an optical method for observation and determination of individual nanosized particles that adhere to an interface by applying an evanescent field. Subsequently, we developed a portable (∼350 mm in length) experimental apparatus equipped with an optical microscopy system for particle observation. The observed intensity is consistent with that calculated using a light scattering model of sub-100-nm particles in the evanescent field.

  14. Predictive models for deposition of inhaled diesel exhaust particles in humans and laboratory species

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.P.; Xu, G.B. )

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical and computer models of the respiratory tracts of human beings and of laboratory animals (rats, hamsters, guinea pigs) were used to estimate the deposition patterns of inhaled diesel exhaust particles from automobile emissions. Our goal was to be able to predict the relation between exposure to diesel exhaust particles and the deposition of these particles in the lungs of humans of various ages. Diesel exhaust particles are aggregates with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of approximately 0.2 micron. Their actual size depends on the conditions under which they are generated. Using an appropriate particle model, we derived mathematical expressions that describe the effects of diffusion, sedimentation, impaction, and interception on the deposition of these particles. Because of their small size, we found that most diesel exhaust particles deposited through diffusion, and that the role of the other mechanisms was minor. Anatomical models of the human lung from birth to adulthood, as well as models of the lungs of laboratory species were formulated mathematically using available morphometric data. We used these lung models, together with the corresponding ventilation conditions of each species, to calculate deposition of diesel exhaust particles in the lungs. Under normal breathing conditions, we calculated that 7 to 13 percent (depending on particle size) of inhaled diesel exhaust particles deposit in the alveolar region of the adult human lung. Although the breathing mode (nose or mouth breathing) did not appear to affect alveolar deposition, increasing the minute ventilation increased alveolar deposition significantly. The calculated deposition patterns for diesel exhaust particles in younger humans (under age 25) were similar.

  15. Mass bounds for baryogenesis from particle decays and the inert doublet model

    SciTech Connect

    Racker, J.

    2014-03-01

    In models for thermal baryogenesis from particle decays, the mass of the decaying particle is typically many orders of magnitude above the TeV scale. We will discuss different ways to lower the energy scale of baryogenesis and present the corresponding lower bounds on the particle's mass. This is done specifically for the inert doublet model with heavy Majorana neutrinos and then we indicate how to extrapolate the results to other scenarios. We also revisit the question of whether or not dark matter, neutrino masses, and the cosmic baryon asymmetry can be explained simultaneously at low energies in the inert doublet model.

  16. Modeling of solid-side mass transfer in desiccant particle beds

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Mills, A.F.

    1984-02-01

    A model is proposed for heat and mass transfer in a packed bed of desiccant particles and accounts for both Knudsen and surface diffusion within the particles. Using the model, predictions are made for the response of thin beds of silica gel particles to a step change in air inlet conditions compared to mental results. The predictions are found to be satisfactory and, in general, superior to those of pseudogas-side controlled models commonly used for the design of desiccant dehumidifiers for solar air conditioning application.

  17. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introducesmore » a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.« less

  18. Numerical modeling of particle generation from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aakash C.; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2015-02-01

    Ozone-terpene reactions are important sources of indoor ultrafine particles (UFPs), a potential health hazard for human beings. Humans themselves act as possible sites for ozone-initiated particle generation through reactions with squalene (a terpene) that is present in their skin, hair, and clothing. This investigation developed a numerical model to probe particle generation from ozone reactions with clothing worn by humans. The model was based on particle generation measured in an environmental chamber as well as physical formulations of particle nucleation, condensational growth, and deposition. In five out of the six test cases, the model was able to predict particle size distributions reasonably well. The failure in the remaining case demonstrated the fundamental limitations of nucleation models. The model that was developed was used to predict particle generation under various building and airliner cabin conditions. These predictions indicate that ozone reactions with human-worn clothing could be an important source of UFPs in densely occupied classrooms and airliner cabins. Those reactions could account for about 40% of the total UFPs measured on a Boeing 737-700 flight. The model predictions at this stage are indicative and should be improved further.

  19. Probability density function shape sensitivity in the statistical modeling of turbulent particle dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    The performance of a recently introduced statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion is studied here for rigid particles injected into a round turbulent jet. Both uniform and isosceles triangle pdfs are used. The statistical sensitivity to parcel pdf shape is demonstrated.

  20. Concurrent Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Interaction Forces Improves Particle Deposition Predictions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Ren, Carolyn L; Emelko, Monica B

    2016-04-19

    It is widely believed that media surface roughness enhances particle deposition-numerous, but inconsistent, examples of this effect have been reported. Here, a new mathematical framework describing the effects of hydrodynamics and interaction forces on particle deposition on rough spherical collectors in absence of an energy barrier was developed and validated. In addition to quantifying DLVO force, the model includes improved descriptions of flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation functions. This work demonstrates that hydrodynamic effects can significantly alter particle deposition relative to expectations when only the DLVO force is considered. Moreover, the combined effects of hydrodynamics and interaction forces on particle deposition on rough, spherical media are not additive, but synergistic. Notably, the developed model's particle deposition predictions are in closer agreement with experimental observations than those from current models, demonstrating the importance of inclusion of roughness impacts in particle deposition description/simulation. Consideration of hydrodynamic contributions to particle deposition may help to explain discrepancies between model-based expectations and experimental outcomes and improve descriptions of particle deposition during physicochemical filtration in systems with nonsmooth collector surfaces. PMID:27007293

  1. Mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles during infiltration: A core-scale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdalani, Samer; Michel, Eric; di Pietro, Liliana; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Rousseau, Marine

    2007-05-01

    Understanding particle movement in soils is a major concern for both geotechnics and soil physics with regard to environmental protection and water resources management. This paper describes a model for mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles through structured soils. The approach combines a kinematic-dispersive wave model for preferential water flow with a convective-dispersive equation subject to a source/sink term for particle transport and mobilization. Particle detachment from macropore walls is considered during both the steady and transient water flow regimes. It is assumed to follow first-order kinetics with a varying detachment efficiency, which depends on the history of the detachment process. Estimates of model parameters are obtained by comparing simulations with experimental particle breakthrough curves obtained during infiltrations through undisturbed soil columns. Both water flux and particle concentrations are satisfactorily simulated by the model. Particle mobilization parameters favoring both attachment and detachment of particles are related to the incoming solution ionic strength by a Fermi-type function.

  2. DNS with Discrete Element Modeling of Suspended Sediment Particles in an Open Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paksereht, Pedram; Apte, Sourabh; Finn, Justin

    2015-11-01

    Interactions of glass particles in water in a turbulent open channel flow over a smooth bed with gravity perpendicular to the mean flow is examined using direct numerical simulation (DNS) together with Lagrangian Discrete-Element-Model (DEM) for particles. The turbulent Reynolds number (Reτ) is 710 corresponding to the experimental observations of Righetti & Romano (JFM, 2004). Particles of size 200 microns with volume loading on the order of 10-3 are simulated using four-way coupling with standard models for drag, added mass, lift, pressure, and inter-particle collision forces. The presence of particles affect the outer as well as inner region of the wall layer where particle inertia and concentration are higher. The DNS-DEM is able to capture the fluid-particle interactions in the outer layer accurately. However, in the inner layer, an increase in mean as well as rms fluid velocity, as observed in the experiments, is not predicted by the DNS-DEM model. It is conjectured that particles slide and roll on the bottom wall, creating slip-like condition. Predictions using different models for drag and lift forces, as well as strong torque coupling are explored and compared with experimental data. Funding: NSF project #1133363, Sediment-Bed-Turbulence Coupling in Oscillatory Flows.

  3. Lieb-Thirring inequality for a model of particles with point interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Rupert L.; Seiringer, Robert

    2012-09-15

    We consider a model of quantum-mechanical particles interacting via point interactions of infinite scattering length. In the case of fermions we prove a Lieb-Thirring inequality for the energy, i.e., we show that the energy is bounded from below by a constant times the integral of the particle density to the power (5/3).

  4. Parameter estimation approach for particle flow model of rockfill materials using response surface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouju; Li, De; Cao, Lijuan; Shangguan, Zichang

    2015-02-01

    Particle flow code (PFC) is widely used to model deformation and stress states of rockfill materials. The accuracy of numerical modeling with PFC is dependent upon the model parameter values. How to accurately determine model parameters remains one of the main challenges. In order to determine model parameters of particle flow model of rockfill materials, some triaxial compression experiments are performed, and the inversion procedure of model parameters based on response surface method is proposed. Parameters of particle flow model of rockfill materials are determined according to the observed data in triaxial compression tests for rockfill materials. The investigation shows that the normal stiffness, tangent stiffness and friction coefficient of rockfill materials will slightly increase with increase of confining pressure in triaxial compression tests. The experiments in laboratory show that the proposed inversion procedure behaves higher computing efficiency and the forecasted stress-strain relations agree well with observed values.

  5. Modeled deposition of fine particles in human airway in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoying; Yan, Caiqing; Patterson, Regan F.; Zhu, Yujiao; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhu, Yifang; Ma, Shexia; Qiu, Xinghua; Zhu, Tong; Zheng, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to simulate depositions of size-segregated particles in human airway in Beijing, China during seasons when fine particulate matter concentrations are high (December 2011 and April 2012). Particle size distributions (5.6-560 nm, electrical mobility diameter) near a major road in Beijing were measured by the TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). The information of size distributions provided by FMPS was applied in the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry model (MPPD) to quantify number and mass depositions of particles in human airway including extrathoracic (ET), tracheobronchial (TB), and pulmonary (PUL) regions of exposed Chinese in Beijing. Our results show that under ambient conditions, particle number concentration (NC) deposition in PUL is the highest in the three major regions of human airway. The total particle NC deposition in human airway in winter is higher than that in spring, especially for ultrafine particles (1.8 times higher) while particle mass concentration (MC) deposition is higher in spring. Although particle MC in clean days are much lower than that in heavily polluted days, total particle NC deposition in human airway in clean days is comparable to that in heavily polluted days. NC deposition for nucleation mode particles (10-20 nm, aerodynamic diameter) in clean days is higher than that in heavily polluted days. MC deposition for accumulation mode particles (100-641 nm, aerodynamic diameter) in heavily polluted days is much higher than that in clean days, while that of nucleation mode is negligible. The temporal variation shows that the arithmetic mean and the median values of particle NC and MC depositions in the evening are both the highest, followed by morning and noon, and it is most likely due to increased contribution from traffic emissions.

  6. Computational Modeling of Nanoscale and Microscale Particle Deposition, Retention and Dosimetry in the Mouse Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Asgharian, B.; Price, O.T.; Oldham, M.; Chen, L.C.; Saunders, E.L.; Gordon, T.; Mikheev, V.B.; Minard, K.R.; Teeguarden, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Comparing effects of inhaled particles across rodent test systems and between rodent test systems and humans is a key obstacle to the interpretation of common toxicological test systems for human risk assessment. These comparisons, correlation with effects and prediction of effects, are best conducted using measures of tissue dose in the respiratory tract. Differences in lung geometry, physiology and the characteristics of ventilation can give rise to differences in the regional deposition of particles in the lung in these species. Differences in regional lung tissue doses cannot currently be measured experimentally. Regional lung tissue dosimetry can however be predicted using models developed for rats, monkeys, and humans. A computational model of particle respiratory tract deposition and clearance was developed for BALB/c and B6C3F1 mice, creating a cross species suite of available models for particle dosimetry in the lung. Airflow and particle transport equations were solved throughout the respiratory tract of these mice strains to obtain temporal and spatial concentration of inhaled particles from which deposition fractions were determined. Particle inhalability (Inhalable fraction, IF) and upper respiratory tract (URT) deposition were directly related to particle diffusive and inertial properties. Measurements of the retained mass at several post-exposure times following exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles, micro and nanoscale C60 fullerene, and nanoscale silver particles were used to calibrate and verify model predictions of total lung dose. Interstrain (mice) and interspecies (mouse, rat, human) differences in particle inhalability, fractional deposition and tissue dosimetry are described for ultrafine, fine and coarse particles. PMID:25373829

  7. Component-specific, cigarette particle deposition modeling in the human respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Price, Owen T.; Yurteri, Caner U.; Dickens, Colin; McAughey, John

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of cigarette smoke particles (CSP) leads to adverse health effects in smokers. Determination of the localized dose to the lung of the inhaled smoke aids in determining vulnerable sites, and identifying components of the smoke that may be responsible for the adverse effects; thus providing a roadmap for harm reduction of cigarette smoking. A particle deposition model specific to CSP was developed for the oral cavity and the lung by accounting for cigarette particle size growth by hygroscopicity, phase change and coagulation. In addition, since the cigarette puff enters the respiratory tract as a dense cloud, the cloud effect on particle drag and deposition was accounted for in the deposition model. Models of particle losses in the oral cavities were developed during puff drawing and subsequent mouth-hold. Cigarette particles were found to grow by hygroscopicity and coagulation, but to shrink as a result of nicotine evaporation. The particle size reached a plateau beyond which any disturbances in the environmental conditions caused the various mechanisms to balance each other out and the particle size remain stable. Predicted particle deposition considering the cloud effects was greater than when treated as a collection of non-interacting particles (i.e. no cloud effects). Accounting for cloud movement provided the necessary physical mechanism to explain the greater than expected, experimentally observed and particle deposition. The deposition model for CSP can provide the necessary input to determine the fate of inhaled CSP in the lung. The knowledge of deposition will be helpful for health assessment and identification and reduction of harmful components of CSP. PMID:24354791

  8. Component-specific, cigarette particle deposition modeling in the human respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen T; Yurteri, Caner U; Dickens, Colin; McAughey, John

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of cigarette smoke particles (CSP) leads to adverse health effects in smokers. Determination of the localized dose to the lung of the inhaled smoke aids in determining vulnerable sites, and identifying components of the smoke that may be responsible for the adverse effects; thus providing a roadmap for harm reduction of cigarette smoking. A particle deposition model specific to CSP was developed for the oral cavity and the lung by accounting for cigarette particle size growth by hygroscopicity, phase change and coagulation. In addition, since the cigarette puff enters the respiratory tract as a dense cloud, the cloud effect on particle drag and deposition was accounted for in the deposition model. Models of particle losses in the oral cavities were developed during puff drawing and subsequent mouth-hold. Cigarette particles were found to grow by hygroscopicity and coagulation, but to shrink as a result of nicotine evaporation. The particle size reached a plateau beyond which any disturbances in the environmental conditions caused the various mechanisms to balance each other out and the particle size remain stable. Predicted particle deposition considering the cloud effects was greater than when treated as a collection of non-interacting particles (i.e. no cloud effects). Accounting for cloud movement provided the necessary physical mechanism to explain the greater than expected, experimentally observed and particle deposition. The deposition model for CSP can provide the necessary input to determine the fate of inhaled CSP in the lung. The knowledge of deposition will be helpful for health assessment and identification and reduction of harmful components of CSP. PMID:24354791

  9. Computational modeling of nanoscale and microscale particle deposition, retention and dosimetry in the mouse respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Asgharian, B; Price, O T; Oldham, M; Chen, Lung-Chi; Saunders, E L; Gordon, T; Mikheev, V B; Minard, K R; Teeguarden, J G

    2014-12-01

    Comparing effects of inhaled particles across rodent test systems and between rodent test systems and humans is a key obstacle to the interpretation of common toxicological test systems for human risk assessment. These comparisons, correlation with effects and prediction of effects, are best conducted using measures of tissue dose in the respiratory tract. Differences in lung geometry, physiology and the characteristics of ventilation can give rise to differences in the regional deposition of particles in the lung in these species. Differences in regional lung tissue doses cannot currently be measured experimentally. Regional lung tissue dosimetry can however be predicted using models developed for rats, monkeys, and humans. A computational model of particle respiratory tract deposition and clearance was developed for BALB/c and B6C3F1 mice, creating a cross-species suite of available models for particle dosimetry in the lung. Airflow and particle transport equations were solved throughout the respiratory tract of these mice strains to obtain temporal and spatial concentration of inhaled particles from which deposition fractions were determined. Particle inhalability (Inhalable fraction, IF) and upper respiratory tract (URT) deposition were directly related to particle diffusive and inertial properties. Measurements of the retained mass at several post-exposure times following exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles, micro- and nanoscale C60 fullerene, and nanoscale silver particles were used to calibrate and verify model predictions of total lung dose. Interstrain (mice) and interspecies (mouse, rat and human) differences in particle inhalability, fractional deposition and tissue dosimetry are described for ultrafine, fine and coarse particles. PMID:25373829

  10. Quench field sensitivity of two-particle correlation in a Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Z.; Lin, S.; Song, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Short-range interaction can give rise to particle pairing with a short-range correlation, which may be destroyed in the presence of an external field. We study the transition between correlated and uncorrelated particle states in the framework of one- dimensional Hubbard model driven by a field. We show that the long time-scale transfer rate from an initial correlated state to final uncorrelated particle states is sensitive to the quench field strength and exhibits a periodic behavior. This process involves an irreversible energy transfer from the field to particles, leading to a quantum electrothermal effect.

  11. Emergence of Collective Motion in a Model of Interacting Brownian Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossetti, Victor; Sevilla, Francisco J.

    2015-07-01

    By studying a system of Brownian particles that interact among themselves only through a local velocity-alignment force that does not affect their speed, we show that self-propulsion is not a necessary feature for the flocking transition to take place as long as underdamped particle dynamics can be guaranteed. Moreover, the system transits from stationary phases close to thermal equilibrium, with no net flux of particles, to far-from-equilibrium ones exhibiting collective motion, phase coexistence, long-range order, and giant number fluctuations, features typically associated with ordered phases of models where self-propelled particles with overdamped dynamics are considered.

  12. Emergence of Collective Motion in a Model of Interacting Brownian Particles.

    PubMed

    Dossetti, Victor; Sevilla, Francisco J

    2015-07-31

    By studying a system of Brownian particles that interact among themselves only through a local velocity-alignment force that does not affect their speed, we show that self-propulsion is not a necessary feature for the flocking transition to take place as long as underdamped particle dynamics can be guaranteed. Moreover, the system transits from stationary phases close to thermal equilibrium, with no net flux of particles, to far-from-equilibrium ones exhibiting collective motion, phase coexistence, long-range order, and giant number fluctuations, features typically associated with ordered phases of models where self-propelled particles with overdamped dynamics are considered. PMID:26274444

  13. Quench field sensitivity of two-particle correlation in a Hubbard model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X. Z.; Lin, S.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Short-range interaction can give rise to particle pairing with a short-range correlation, which may be destroyed in the presence of an external field. We study the transition between correlated and uncorrelated particle states in the framework of one- dimensional Hubbard model driven by a field. We show that the long time-scale transfer rate from an initial correlated state to final uncorrelated particle states is sensitive to the quench field strength and exhibits a periodic behavior. This process involves an irreversible energy transfer from the field to particles, leading to a quantum electrothermal effect. PMID:27250080

  14. Simulation of charged-particle beam transport in a gas using a hybrid particle-fluid plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, D. R.; Olson, C. L.; Sanford, T. W. L.

    1994-03-01

    The simulation of charged-particle beam transport in a ˜1 Torr gas requires accurate plasma-electron modeling. A simple resistive model, which assumes local energy deposition and a thermal plasma-electron distribution, is inadequate. A hybrid model has been implemented into the particle-in-cell simulation code, iprop (The iprop Three-Dimensional Beam Propagation Code, AMRC-R-966, available from D. Welch, Mission Research Corporation, 1720 Randolph Road SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, September 1987), in which plasma electrons are divided into high-energy macroparticle and thermal-fluid components. This model, which includes ``knock-on'' bound-electron collision and runaway sources for high-energy electrons, is then used in the simulation of relativistic electron-beam and ion-beam experiments. Results are found to be in agreement with HERMES III [Performance of the HERMES III Gamma Ray Simulator, in Digest of Technical Papers, 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Monterey, CA, 11 June 1989 (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, New York, 1989), pp. 26-31] and GAMBLE II [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 2573 (1993)] experimental observables.

  15. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Olvera, Hector A.; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 103 particles/cc and 1.3 × 105 particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 104 particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 1014 particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available. PMID:25313294

  16. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Hector A; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-12-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 10(3) particles/cc and 1.3 × 10(5) particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 10(4) particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 10(14) particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available. PMID:25313294

  17. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera, Hector A.; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-12-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 103 particles/cc and 1.3 × 105 particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 104 particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 1014 particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available.

  18. Velocity and displacement statistics in a stochastic model of nonlinear friction showing bounded particle speed.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas M

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion of colloidal particles in a complex environment such as polymer networks or biological cells is a topic of high complexity with significant biological and medical relevance. In such situations, the interaction between the surroundings and the particle motion has to be taken into account. We analyze a simplified diffusion model that includes some aspects of a complex environment in the framework of a nonlinear friction process: at low particle speeds, friction grows linearly with the particle velocity as for regular viscous friction; it grows more than linearly at higher particle speeds; finally, at a maximum of the possible particle speed, the friction diverges. In addition to bare diffusion, we study the influence of a constant drift force acting on the diffusing particle. While the corresponding stationary velocity distributions can be derived analytically, the displacement statistics generally must be determined numerically. However, as a benefit of our model, analytical progress can be made in one case of a special maximum particle speed. The effect of a drift force in this case is analytically determined by perturbation theory. It will be interesting in the future to compare our results to real experimental systems. One realization could be magnetic colloidal particles diffusing through a shear-thickening environment such as starch suspensions, possibly exposed to an external magnetic field gradient. PMID:26651690

  19. Monitoring acoustic emission (AE) energy in slurry impingement using a new model for particle impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droubi, M. G.; Reuben, R. L.; White, G.

    2015-10-01

    A series of systematic impact tests have been carried out to investigate the influence of particle size, free stream velocity, particle impact angle, and nominal particle concentration on the amount of energy dissipated in a carbon steel target using a slurry impingement erosion test rig, as indicated by the acoustic emission (AE) recorded by a sensor mounted on the back of the target. Silica sand particles of mean particle size 152.5, 231, and 362.5 μm were used for impingement on the target at angles varying between 30° and 90° while the free stream velocity was changed between 4.2 and 12.7 m/s. In previous work by the authors, it was demonstrated that the AE time series associated with particle-laden air striking a carbon steel target could be described as the cumulation of individual particle arrival events each drawn from a statistical distribution model. The high arrival rate involved in a slurry jet poses challenges in resolving individual particle impact signatures in the AE record, and so the model has been extended in this paper to account for different particle carrier-fluids and to situations where arrivals cannot necessarily be resolved.

  20. Velocity and displacement statistics in a stochastic model of nonlinear friction showing bounded particle speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion of colloidal particles in a complex environment such as polymer networks or biological cells is a topic of high complexity with significant biological and medical relevance. In such situations, the interaction between the surroundings and the particle motion has to be taken into account. We analyze a simplified diffusion model that includes some aspects of a complex environment in the framework of a nonlinear friction process: at low particle speeds, friction grows linearly with the particle velocity as for regular viscous friction; it grows more than linearly at higher particle speeds; finally, at a maximum of the possible particle speed, the friction diverges. In addition to bare diffusion, we study the influence of a constant drift force acting on the diffusing particle. While the corresponding stationary velocity distributions can be derived analytically, the displacement statistics generally must be determined numerically. However, as a benefit of our model, analytical progress can be made in one case of a special maximum particle speed. The effect of a drift force in this case is analytically determined by perturbation theory. It will be interesting in the future to compare our results to real experimental systems. One realization could be magnetic colloidal particles diffusing through a shear-thickening environment such as starch suspensions, possibly exposed to an external magnetic field gradient.

  1. ASPEN: A Fully Kinetic, Reduced-Description Particle-in-Cell Model for Modeling Parametric Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.; Bezzerides, B.; Dubois, D. F.

    1998-11-01

    A fully kinetic, reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) model is presented in which deviations from quasineutrality, electron and ion kinetic effects, and nonlinear interactions between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities are modeled correctly. The model is based on a reduced description where the electromagnetic field is represented by three separate temporal WKB envelopes in order to model low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities. Because temporal WKB approximations are invoked, the simulation can be performed on the electron time scale instead of the time scale of the light waves. The electrons and ions are represented by discrete finite-size particles, permitting electron and ion kinetic effects to be modeled properly. The Poisson equation is utilized to ensure that space-charge effects are included. Although RPIC is fully three dimensional, it has been implemented in only two dimensions on a CRAY-T3D with 512 processors and on the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) parallel computer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the resulting simulation code has been named ASPEN. Given the current computers available to the authors, one and two dimensional simulations are feasible to, and have been, performed. Three dimensional simulations are much more expensive, and are not feasible at this time. However, with rapidly advancing computer technologies, three dimensional simulations may be feasible in the near future. We believe this code is the first PIC code capable of simulating the interaction between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilites in multiple dimensions. Test simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), and Langmuir decay instability (LDI), are presented.

  2. Evaluation of statistical models for predicting Escherichia coli particle attachment in fluvial systems.

    PubMed

    Piorkowski, Gregory; Jamieson, Rob; Bezanson, Greg; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Yost, Chris

    2013-11-01

    Modeling surface water Escherichia coli fate and transport requires partitioning E. coli into particle-attached and unattached fractions. Attachment is often assumed to be a constant fraction or is estimated using simple linear models. The objectives of this study were to: (i) develop statistical models for predicting E. coli attachment and virulence marker presence in fluvial systems, and (ii) relate E. coli attachment to a variety of environmental parameters. Stream water samples (n = 60) were collected at four locations in a rural, mixed-use watershed between June and October 2012, with four storm events (>20 mm rainfall) being captured. The percentage of E. coli attached to particles (>5 μm) and the occurrences of virulence markers were modeled using water quality, particle concentration, particle size distribution, hydrology and land use factors as explanatory variables. Three types of statistical models appropriate for highly collinear, multidimensional data were compared: least angle shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), classification and regression trees using the general, unbiased, interaction detection and estimation (GUIDE) algorithm, and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS). All models showed that E. coli particle attachment and the presence of E. coli virulence markers in the attached and unattached states were influenced by a combination of water quality, hydrology, land-use and particle properties. Model performance statistics indicate that MARS models outperform LASSO and GUIDE models for predicting E. coli particle attachment and virulence marker occurrence. Validating the MARS modeling approach in multiple watersheds may allow for the development of a parameterizing model to be included in watershed simulation models. PMID:24075474

  3. CFD modeling of PEPT results of particle motion trajectories in a pipe over an obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Maryam; Chang, Yu-Fen; Balakin, Boris; Hoffmann, Alex C.

    2012-09-01

    This paper aims to study the flow of a solid particle over a deposit in transport and processing equipment. Tracking particles and fluid elements moving through single- and multi-phase systems is very useful for studying numerous flow processes and identifying anomalies happening in the processes. Using Positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission particle tracking (PEPT), that are relatively new techniques, it has become possible to visualize the movement of single particles in process equipment. The results from PEPT are here compared with particle-coupled Large Eddy Simulation numerical results. In the initial stages of the numerical modelling, results were validated using the PEPT experimental data in terms of its ability to correctly predict the flow and deposition of particles in a fluid flowing at a moderately low Reynolds number.

  4. Particle capture efficiency in a multi-wire model for high gradient magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenträger, Almut; Vella, Dominic; Griffiths, Ian M.

    2014-07-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is an efficient way to remove magnetic and paramagnetic particles, such as heavy metals, from waste water. As the suspension flows through a magnetized filter mesh, high magnetic gradients around the wires attract and capture the particles removing them from the fluid. We model such a system by considering the motion of a paramagnetic tracer particle through a periodic array of magnetized cylinders. We show that there is a critical Mason number (ratio of viscous to magnetic forces) below which the particle is captured irrespective of its initial position in the array. Above this threshold, particle capture is only partially successful and depends on the particle's entry position. We determine the relationship between the critical Mason number and the system geometry using numerical and asymptotic calculations. If a capture efficiency below 100% is sufficient, our results demonstrate how operating the HGMS system above the critical Mason number but with multiple separation cycles may increase efficiency.

  5. Chaotic delocalization of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-06-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model in the regime when one-particle motion is absolutely bounded inside one cell of periodic potential. The interaction between particles breaks integrability of classical motion leading to emergence of Hamiltonian dynamical chaos. At moderate interactions and certain energies above the mobility edge this chaos leads to a chaotic propulsion of two particles with their diffusive spreading over the whole space both in one and two dimensions. At the same time the distance between particles remains bounded by one or two periodic cells demonstrating appearance of new composite quasi-particles called chaons. The effect of chaotic delocalization of chaons is shown to be rather general being present for Coulomb and short range interactions. It is argued that such delocalized chaons can be observed in experiments with cold atoms and ions in optical lattices.

  6. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler

    2005-06-09

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

  7. TOTAL HUMAN EXPOSURE MODEL (THEM) FOR RESPIRABLE SUSPENDED PARTICLES (RSP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Total Human Exposure Model (THEM) has been developed that calculates 24-hour profiles using real human activity patterns and indoor air models derived from actual measurements of pollutants. HEM was designed for implementation on personal computers. urrently, the model uses the...

  8. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  9. A core-particle model for periodically focused ion beams withintense space-charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Barnard, John J.; Bukh, Boris; Chawla, SurgreevR.; Chilton, Sven H.

    2006-08-28

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam that has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section. The model can be applied to both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent flutter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  10. Application of stochastic weighted algorithms to a multidimensional silica particle model

    SciTech Connect

    Menz, William J.; Patterson, Robert I.A.; Wagner, Wolfgang; Kraft, Markus

    2013-09-01

    Highlights: •Stochastic weighted algorithms (SWAs) are developed for a detailed silica model. •An implementation of SWAs with the transition kernel is presented. •The SWAs’ solutions converge to the direct simulation algorithm’s (DSA) solution. •The efficiency of SWAs is evaluated for this multidimensional particle model. •It is shown that SWAs can be used for coagulation problems in industrial systems. -- Abstract: This paper presents a detailed study of the numerical behaviour of stochastic weighted algorithms (SWAs) using the transition regime coagulation kernel and a multidimensional silica particle model. The implementation in the SWAs of the transition regime coagulation kernel and associated majorant rates is described. The silica particle model of Shekar et al. [S. Shekar, A.J. Smith, W.J. Menz, M. Sander, M. Kraft, A multidimensional population balance model to describe the aerosol synthesis of silica nanoparticles, Journal of Aerosol Science 44 (2012) 83–98] was used in conjunction with this coagulation kernel to study the convergence properties of SWAs with a multidimensional particle model. High precision solutions were calculated with two SWAs and also with the established direct simulation algorithm. These solutions, which were generated using large number of computational particles, showed close agreement. It was thus demonstrated that SWAs can be successfully used with complex coagulation kernels and high dimensional particle models to simulate real-world systems.

  11. A mathematical model of turbulence modulation in particle-laden pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; Lightstone, M. F.; Wood, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation is concerned with developing a model of the processes involved in turbulence modulation by relatively large particles in dilute gas solid turbulent flows. The mathematical model, which focuses on two-way coupling, has been developed based on the work of Lightstone and Hodgson (Turbulence modulation in gas particle flows: a comparison of selected models, “Can. J. Chem. Eng.” 82, 2004, 209 219) to account for both enhancements and reductions in turbulent kinetic energy as well as the particle crossing trajectory effect. The underlying formulation scheme employs an Eulerian Lagrangian reference frame, i.e. the carrier phase is considered as a continuum system, while the trajectories of individual particles are calculated using a Lagrangian framework. A random walk model is used to solve the particle motion equation. The proposed model, along with turbulence modulation models from the literature, is used to simulate a particle-laden vertical pipe flow. The simulation results show that the new model provides improved predictions of the experimental data.

  12. Measurement and modeling the coefficient of restitution of char particles under simulated entrained flow gasifier conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, LaTosha M.

    Inefficiencies in plant operations due to carbon loss in flyash, necessitate control of ash deposition and the handling of the slag disposal. Excessive char/ash deposition in convective coolers causes reduction in the heat transfer, both in the radiative (slagging) section and in the low-temperature convective (fouling) heating section. This can lead to unplanned shutdowns and result in an increased cost of electricity generation. CFD models for entrained flow gasification have used the average bulk coal composition to simulate slagging and ash deposition with a narrow particle size distribution (PSD). However, the variations in mineral (inorganic) and macerals (organic) components in coal have led to particles with a variation in their inorganic and organic composition after grinding as governed by their Particle Size Distribution (PSD) and mineral liberation kinetics. As a result, each particle in a PSD of coal exhibits differences in its conversion, particle trajectory within the gasifier, fragmentation, swelling, and slagging probability depending on the gasifier conditions (such as the temperature, coal to oxygen ratio, and swirling capacity of the coal injector). Given the heterogeneous behavior of char particles within a gasifier, the main objective of this work was to determine boundary conditions of char particle adhering and/or rebounding from the refractory wall or a layer of previously adhered particles. In the past, viscosity models based on the influence of ash composition have been used as the method to characterize sticking. It is well documented that carbon contributes to the non-wettability of particles. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that viscosity models would not be adequate to accurately predict the adhesion behavior of char. Certain particle wall impact models have incorporated surface tension which can account the contributions of the carbon content to the adhesive properties of a char particle. These particle wall impact models also

  13. A self-consistent particle model for the simulation of RF glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Trombley, H.W.; Terry, F.L. Jr.; Elta, M.E. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on a self-consistent particle model of an argon RF glow discharge that has been developed. Electric field and charged-particle density profiles determined from simulations with the RF glow discharge model are consistent with results obtained from continuum models. The average ion energy is found to vary greatly between the bulk of the discharge and sheaths, contrary to the assumption that the ion energy is uniform, as is assumed in some continuum models. The accuracy of the particle cross sections and collision representation used in the model is verified with a simplified dc model which calculates swarm parameters. Electron swarm parameters determined with this model are in excellent agreement with experimental data taken from the literature.

  14. Modelling the nanomechanical response of a micro particle-matrix system for nanoindentation tests.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunyi; Duan, Pengfei; Chen, Jinju

    2016-05-13

    A lot of experimental, numerical simulation and analytical modelling work has been done on how the substrate affects the measured hardness and elastic modulus of the coating/substrate system for nanoindentation tests. Little work has been done on the elastic-plastic behaviour of micro particle-matrix systems. Clifford et al have proposed an empirical model to describe the spatially dependent composite modulus during nanoindentation tests for linear elastic particles embedded in a linear elastic matrix. However, no such models have been developed for elastic-plastic composites. In this study, finite element simulations were used to determine the elastic modulus and hardness of hard particles embedded in a soft matrix and vice versa. An extended Clifford model has been developed to determine the elastic modulus and hardness for elastic-plastic composites with various particle shapes and volume fractions. PMID:27041486

  15. Fokker–Planck kinetic modeling of suprathermal α-particles in a fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Peigney, B.E.

    2014-12-01

    We present an ion kinetic model describing the transport of suprathermal α-particles in inertial fusion targets. The analysis of the underlying physical model enables us to develop efficient numerical methods to simulate the creation, transport and collisional relaxation of fusion reaction products (α-particles) at a kinetic level. The model assumes spherical symmetry in configuration space and axial symmetry in velocity space around the mean flow velocity. A two-energy-scale approach leads to a self-consistent modeling of the coupling between suprathermal α-particles and the thermal bulk of the imploding plasma. This method provides an accurate numerical treatment of energy deposition and transport processes involving suprathermal particles. The numerical tools presented here are then validated against known analytical results. This enables us to investigate the potential role of ion kinetic effects on the physics of ignition and thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion schemes.

  16. Developing an Empirical Model for Predicting Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, R. A.; Winter, L. M.; Ledbetter, K.; Ashley, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are powerful enhancements in the particle flux received at Earth. These events, often related to coronal mass ejections, can be disruptive to ionospheric communications, destructive to satellites, and pose a health risk to astronauts. To develop a useful forecast for the onset time and peak flux of SEP events, we are examining the radio burst, proton, and electron properties associated with the SEPs of the current solar cycle. Using the Wind/WAVES radio observations from 2010-2013, we analyzed the 123 decametric-hectometric type II solar radio burst properties, the associated type III burst properties, and their correlation with SEP properties determined from analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. Through a principal component and logistic regression analyses, we find that the radio properties alone can be used to predict the occurrence of an SEP event with a false alarm rate of 17%, a probability of detection of 65%, and with 88% of the classifications correct. We also explore the use of the > 2 MeV electron flux to forecast proton peak flux and event onset time, with preliminary results suggesting a correlation between the peak electron and proton flux.

  17. Finite Element Modeling of Suspended Particle Migration in Non-Newtonian Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.; Baer, T.; Mondy, L.; Rao, R.; Stephens, T.

    1999-03-04

    Shear-induced migration of particles is studied during the slow flow of suspensions of spheres (particle volume fraction {phi} = 0.50) in an inelastic but shear-thinning, suspending fluid in flow between counterrotating concentric cylinders, The conditions are such that nonhydrodynamic effects are negligible. The movement of particles away from the high shear rate region is more pronounced than in a Newtonian suspending liquid. We test a continuum constitutive model for the evolution of particle concentration in a flowing suspension proposed by Phillips et al. (1992) by using shear-thinning, suspending fluids. The fluid constitutive equation is Carreau-like in its shear-thinning behavior but also varies with the local particle concentration. The model is compared with the experimental data gathered with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging.

  18. Soft particle analysis of electrokinetics of biological cells and their model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Kimiko; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-01

    In this article, we review the applications of a novel theory (Ohshima 2009 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 10 063001) to the analysis of electrokinetic data for various soft particles, that is, particles covered with an ion-permeable surface layer of polyelectrolytes. Soft particles discussed in this review include various biological cells and hydrogel-coated particles as a model of biological cells. Cellular transformations increase the concentration of sialic acid of glycoproteins and are associated with blocked biosynthesis of glycolipids and aberrant expression of the developmentally programmed biosynthetic pathway. The change in shape or biological function of cells may affect their surface properties and can be detected by electrokinetic measurements. The experimental results were analyzed with Ohshima's electrokinetic formula for soft particles and soft surfaces. As a model system, hydrogel surfaces that mimic biological surfaces were also prepared and their surface properties were studied.

  19. Numerical Model of a Spacecraft Shielding against High-Energy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Adrian; Batishchev, Oleg

    2007-11-01

    Galactic Cosmic Rays are composed of predominantly GeV protons and α-particles coming uniformly with ˜1 (m^2 sr sec MeV/nucleon)-1 flux. Despite very low particle & power fluxes delivered, they pose a major continuous hazard for subjects, biological materials and sensitive equipment in space. A self-consistent adaptive kinetic model is being developed to simulate different strong magnetic, electrostatic and hybrid shielding schemes. The model includes relativistic transport of particles, calculation of internal electromagnetic fields, ambient and incidental plasma responses to the applied strong fields. Numerical method uses unstructured adaptive grids in 3D, enabling automatic capturing of important physical details of the shield and plasma. The numerical method applications using shared and distributed architectures will be discussed. Results of the kinetic simulations of a spacecraft shielding against high-energy particles and possible macro-particles will be presented.

  20. A model for the prediction of droplet size in Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged particles.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Trivikram; Mani, Ethayaraja; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2014-08-12

    Colloidal particles irreversibly adsorb at fluid-fluid interfaces stabilizing what are commonly called "Pickering" emulsions and foams. A simple geometrical model, the limited coalescence model, was earlier proposed to estimate droplet sizes in emulsions. This model assumes that all of the particles are effective in stabilization. The model predicts that the average emulsion drop size scales inversely with the total number of particles, confirmed qualitatively with experimental data on Pickering emulsions. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in synthesizing emulsions with oppositely charged particles (OCPs). In our experimental study, we observed that the drop size varies nonmonotonically with the number ratio of oppositely charged colloids, even when a fixed total number concentration of colloids is used, showing a minimum. We develop a mathematical model to predict this dependence of drop size on number ratio in such a mixed particle system. The proposed model is based on the hypothesis that oppositely charged colloids form stable clusters due to the strong electrostatic attraction between them and that these clusters are the effective stabilizing agents. The proposed model is a two-parameter model, parameters being the ratio of effective charge of OCPs (denoted as k) and the size of the aggregate containing X particles formed due to aggregation of OCPs. Because the size of aggregates formed during emulsification is not directly measurable, we use suitable values of parameters k and X to best match the experimental observations. The model predictions are in qualitative agreement with experimentally observed nonmonotonic variation of droplet sizes. Using experiments and theory, we present a physical insight into the formation of OCP stabilized Pickering emulsions. Our model upgrades the existing Wiley's limited coalescence model as applied to emulsions containing a binary mixture of oppositely charged particles. PMID:25054284

  1. The application of single particle hydrodynamics in continuum models of multiphase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Rand

    1988-01-01

    A review of the application of single particle hydrodynamics in models for the exchange of interphase momentum in continuum models of multiphase flow is presented. Considered are the equations of motion for a laminar, mechanical two phase flow. Inherent to this theory is a model for the interphase exchange of momentum due to drag between the dispersed particulate and continuous fluid phases. In addition, applications of two phase flow theory to de-mixing flows require the modeling of interphase momentum exchange due to lift forces. The applications of single particle analysis in deriving models for drag and lift are examined.

  2. Particle Swarm Social Adaptive Model for Multi-Agent Based Insurgency Warfare Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E

    2009-12-01

    To better understand insurgent activities and asymmetric warfare, a social adaptive model for modeling multiple insurgent groups attacking multiple military and civilian targets is proposed and investigated. This report presents a pilot study using the particle swarm modeling, a widely used non-linear optimal tool to model the emergence of insurgency campaign. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of insurgent social adaptation for the dynamically changing environment and to provide insight and understanding of insurgency warfare. Our results show that unified leadership, strategic planning, and effective communication between insurgent groups are not the necessary requirements for insurgents to efficiently attain their objective.

  3. A SUNTANS-based unstructured grid local exact particle tracking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangliang; Chua, Vivien P.

    2016-07-01

    A parallel particle tracking model, which employs the local exact integration method to achieve high accuracy, has been developed and embedded in an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, Stanford Unstructured Nonhydrostatic Terrain-following Adaptive Navier-Stokes Simulator (SUNTANS). The particle tracking model is verified and compared with traditional numerical integration methods, such as Runge-Kutta fourth-order methods using several test cases. In two-dimensional linear steady rotating flow, the local exact particle tracking model is able to track particles along the circular streamline accurately, while Runge-Kutta fourth-order methods produce trajectories that deviate from the streamlines. In periodically varying double-gyre flow, the trajectories produced by local exact particle tracking model with time step of 1.0 × 10- 2 s are similar to those trajectories obtained from the numerical integration methods with reduced time steps of 1.0 × 10- 4 s. In three-dimensional steady Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) flow, the trajectories integrated with the local exact particle tracking model compares well with the approximated true path. The trajectories spiral upward and their projection on the x- y plane is a periodic ellipse. The trajectories derived with the Runge-Kutta fourth-order method deviate from the approximated true path, and their projections on the x- y plane are unclosed ellipses with growing long and short axes. The spatial temporal resolution needs to be carefully chosen before particle tracking models are applied. Our results show that the developed local exact particle tracking model is accurate and suitable for marine Lagrangian (trajectory-based)-related research.

  4. A SUNTANS-based unstructured grid local exact particle tracking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangliang; Chua, Vivien P.

    2016-04-01

    A parallel particle tracking model, which employs the local exact integration method to achieve high accuracy, has been developed and embedded in an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, Stanford Unstructured Nonhydrostatic Terrain-following Adaptive Navier-Stokes Simulator (SUNTANS). The particle tracking model is verified and compared with traditional numerical integration methods, such as Runge-Kutta fourth-order methods using several test cases. In two-dimensional linear steady rotating flow, the local exact particle tracking model is able to track particles along the circular streamline accurately, while Runge-Kutta fourth-order methods produce trajectories that deviate from the streamlines. In periodically varying double-gyre flow, the trajectories produced by local exact particle tracking model with time step of 1.0 × 10- 2 s are similar to those trajectories obtained from the numerical integration methods with reduced time steps of 1.0 × 10- 4 s. In three-dimensional steady Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) flow, the trajectories integrated with the local exact particle tracking model compares well with the approximated true path. The trajectories spiral upward and their projection on the x-y plane is a periodic ellipse. The trajectories derived with the Runge-Kutta fourth-order method deviate from the approximated true path, and their projections on the x-y plane are unclosed ellipses with growing long and short axes. The spatial temporal resolution needs to be carefully chosen before particle tracking models are applied. Our results show that the developed local exact particle tracking model is accurate and suitable for marine Lagrangian (trajectory-based)-related research.

  5. Atomic-scale modeling of particle size effects for the oxygen reduction reaction on Pt.

    SciTech Connect

    Tritsaris, G. A.; Greeley, J.; Rossmeisl, J.; Norskov, J. K.

    2011-07-01

    We estimate the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction on platinum nanoparticles of sizes of practical importance. The proposed model explicitly accounts for surface irregularities and their effect on the activity of neighboring sites. The model reproduces the experimentally observed trends in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component in understanding particle size effects on the activity of catalytic nanoparticles.

  6. Numerical modeling of pollutant transport using a Lagrangian marker particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, M.

    1976-01-01

    A derivation and code were developed for the three-dimensional mass transport equation, using a particle-in-cell solution technique, to solve coastal zone waste discharge problems where particles are a major component of the waste. Improvements in the particle movement techniques are suggested and typical examples illustrated. Preliminary model comparisons with analytic solutions for an instantaneous point release in a uniform flow show good results in resolving the waste motion. The findings to date indicate that this computational model will provide a useful technique to study the motion of sediment, dredged spoils, and other particulate waste commonly deposited in coastal waters.

  7. Simulating the Evolution of Soot Mixing State with a Particle-Resolved Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Nicole; West, Matt; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.

    2009-05-05

    The mixing state of soot particles in the atmosphere is of crucial importance for assessing their climatic impact, since it governs their chemical reactivity, cloud condensation nuclei activity and radiative properties. To improve the mixing state representation in models, we present a new approach, the stochastic particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC, which explicitly resolves the composition of individual particles in a given population of different types of aerosol particles. This approach accurately tracks the evolution of the mixing state of particles due to emission, dilution, condensation and coagulation. To make this direct stochastic particle-based method practical, we implemented a new multiscale stochastic coagulation method. With this method we achieved optimal efficiency for applications when the coagulation kernel is highly non-uniform, as is the case for many realistic applications. PartMC-MOSAIC was applied to an idealized urban plume case representative of a large urban area to simulate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types due to coagulation and condensation. For this urban plume scenario we quantified the individual processes that contribute to the aging of the aerosol distribution, illustrating the capabilities of our modeling approach. The results showed for the first time the multidimensional structure of particle composition, which is usually lost in internally-mixed sectional or modal aerosol models.

  8. Stochastic modeling of fine particle deposition, resuspension, and hyporheic exchange in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, Aaron; Drummond, Jennifer; Aubeneau, Antoine

    2013-04-01

    Fine suspended particles are responsible for substantial flux of organic matter and contaminants in rivers. Further, microorganisms delivered from the terrestrial system or resuspended from benthic and hyporheic biofilms also propagate downstream in rivers, providing connectivity in the river microbial community. Because fine particle concentrations are often similar along the length of rivers, there has been a tendency to think that their dynamics are simple. Historically, fine suspended particles have been considered to show little interaction with streambed sediments. This is a fallacy. Recent observations have demonstrated that fine particles show complex dynamics in rivers, including ongoing deposition and resuspension. This provides substantial opportunity for interaction with benthic and hyporheic sediments and biofilms, which can lead to enhanced processing of fine particulate organic carbon, accumulation of pathogens in riverbeds, and mixing of particle-bound contaminants into bed sediments. Here I will briefly review current understanding of fine particle deposition, resuspension, and hyporheic exchange processes, develop a conceptual model for fine particle dynamics in rivers, and present a stochastic modeling framework that can represent most of these processes. I will close by discussing the limits of current modeling capability and prospects for future development of more general models.

  9. A convergence: special relativity, zitterbewegung, and new models for the subcomponent structure of quantum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Hestenes has presented an integration of Schrödinger's zitterbewegung with the spin matrices of the Dirac equation, suggesting the electron can be modeled by a rapidly rotating dipole moment and a frequency related to the de Broglie frequency. He presents an elegant spacetime algebra that provides a reformulation of the Dirac equation that incorporates these real spin characteristics. A similar heuristic model for quantum particles has been derived by this author from a different, quasi-classical premise: That the most fundamental subcomponents of quantum particles all travel at a constant speed of light. Time is equated with the spatial displacement of these subcomponents - the speed of light is the speed of time. This approach suggests a means of integrating special relativity and quantum mechanics with the same concept of time. The relativistic transformation of spinning quantum particles create the appearance of additional, compactified spatial dimensions that can be correlated with the complex phase of the spin matrices as in the Dirac formalism. This paper further examines the convergence on such new models for quantum particles built on this rapid motion of particle subcomponents. The modeling leverages a string-like heuristic for particle subcomponents and a revised description for the wave-like properties of particles. This examination provides useful insights to the real spatial geometries and interactions of electrons and photons.

  10. Steady-state and dynamic models for particle engulfment during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yutao; Yeckel, Andrew; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2016-06-01

    Steady-state and dynamic models are developed to study the physical mechanisms that determine the pushing or engulfment of a solid particle at a moving solid-liquid interface. The mathematical model formulation rigorously accounts for energy and momentum conservation, while faithfully representing the interfacial phenomena affecting solidification phase change and particle motion. A numerical solution approach is developed using the Galerkin finite element method and elliptic mesh generation in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian implementation, thus allowing for a rigorous representation of forces and dynamics previously inaccessible by approaches using analytical approximations. We demonstrate that this model accurately computes the solidification interface shape while simultaneously resolving thin fluid layers around the particle that arise from premelting during particle engulfment. We reinterpret the significance of premelting via the definition an unambiguous critical velocity for engulfment from steady-state analysis and bifurcation theory. We also explore the complicated transient behaviors that underlie the steady states of this system and posit the significance of dynamical behavior on engulfment events for many systems. We critically examine the onset of engulfment by comparing our computational predictions to those obtained using the analytical model of Rempel and Worster [29]. We assert that, while the accurate calculation of van der Waals repulsive forces remains an open issue, the computational model developed here provides a clear benefit over prior models for computing particle drag forces and other phenomena needed for the faithful simulation of particle engulfment.

  11. Diffusion in pulsar wind nebulae: an investigation using magnetohydrodynamic and particle transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, O.; Vorster, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the transport of high-energy particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and test-particle simulations, as well as a Fokker-Planck particle transport model. The latter includes radiative and adiabatic losses, diffusion, and advection on the background flow of the simulated MHD nebula. By combining the models, the spatial evolution of flux and photon index of the X-ray synchrotron emission is modelled for the three nebulae G21.5-0.9, the inner regions of Vela, and 3C 58, thereby allowing us to derive governing parameters: the magnetic field strength, average flow velocity, and spatial diffusion coefficient. For comparison, the nebulae are also modelled with the semi-analytic Kennel & Coroniti model but the Porth et al. model generally yields better fits to the observational data. We find that high velocity fluctuations in the turbulent nebula (downstream of the termination shock) give rise to efficient diffusive transport of particles, with average Péclet number close to unity, indicating that both advection and diffusion play an important role in particle transport. We find that the diffusive transport coefficient of the order of ˜ 2 × 1027(Ls/0.42 Ly) cm2 s- 1 (Ls is the size of the termination shock) is independent of energy up to extreme particle Lorentz factors of γp ˜ 1010.

  12. Diffusion in pulsar wind nebulae: an investigation using magnetohydrodynamic and particle transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, O.; Vorster, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the transport of high-energy particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) using three-dimensional MHD (see Porth et al. (2014) for details) and test-particle simulations, as well as a Fokker-Planck particle transport model. The latter includes radiative and adiabatic losses, diffusion, and advection on the background flow of the simulated MHD nebula. By combining the models, the spatial evolution of flux and photon index of the X-ray synchrotron emission is modelled for the three nebulae G21.5-0.9, the inner regions of Vela, and 3C 58, thereby allowing us to derive governing parameters: the magnetic field strength, average flow velocity and spatial diffusion coefficient. For comparison, the nebulae are also modelled with the semi-analytic Kennel & Coroniti (1984) model but the Porth et al. (2014) model generally yields better fits to the observational data. We find that high velocity fluctuations in the turbulent nebula (downstream of the termination shock) give rise to efficient diffusive transport of particles, with average P\\'eclet number close to unity, indicating that both advection and diffusion play an important role in particle transport. We find that the diffusive transport coefficient of the order of $\\sim2\\times 10^{27} (L_{\\rm s}/0.42\\rm Ly) cm^{2}s^{-1}$ ($L_{\\rm s}$ is the size of the termination shock) is independent of energy up to extreme particle Lorentz factors of $\\gamma_{p}\\sim10^{10}$.

  13. A biomathematical model of particle clearance and retention in the lungs of coal miners.

    PubMed

    Kuempel, E D; O'Flaherty, E J; Stayner, L T; Smith, R J; Green, F H; Vallyathan, V

    2001-08-01

    To understand better the factors influencing the relationships among airborne particle exposure, lung burden, and fibrotic lung disease, we developed a biologically based kinetic model to predict the long-term retention of particles in the lungs of coal miners. This model includes alveolar, interstitial, and hilar lymph node compartments. The 131 miners in this study had worked in the Beckley, West Virginia, area and died during the 1960s. The data used to develop this model include exposure to respirable coal mine dust by intensity and duration within each job, lung and lymph node dust burdens at autopsy, pathological classification of fibrotic lung disease, and smoking history. Initial parameter estimates for this model were based on both human and animal data of particle deposition and clearance and on the biological and physical factors influencing these processes. Parameter estimation and model fit to the data were determined using least squares. Results show that the end-of-life lung dust burdens in these coal miners were substantially higher than expected from first-order clearance kinetics, yet lower than expected from the overloading of alveolar clearance predicted from rodent studies. The best-fitting and most parsimonious model includes processes for first-order alveolar-macrophage-mediated clearance and transfer of particles to the lung interstitium. These results are consistent with the particle retention patterns observed previously in the lungs of primates. The findings indicate that rodent models extrapolated to humans, without adjustment for the kinetic differences in particle clearance and retention, would be inadequate for predicting lung dust burdens in humans. Also, this human lung kinetic model predicts greater retained lung dust burdens from occupational exposure than predicted from current human models based on lower exposure data. This model is useful for risk assessment of particle-induced lung diseases, by estimating equivalent internal

  14. Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Monache, L D; Stull, R B

    2006-04-19

    An atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. Reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate. Urban air quality, and particularly airborne particles, is a major concern in terms of human health impacts. Sea-spray is known to be a major component of the particle ensemble at coastal sites yet relatively few air quality models include the interaction of gases with sea-spray and the fate of the particles produced. Sea-spray is not an inert addition to the particle ensemble because heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray droplets changes the droplets composition and the particle size distribution, which impacts deposition and the ion balance in different particle size fractions. It is shown that the ISOPART model is capable of simulating gas and particle concentrations in the coastal metropolis of Vancouver and the surrounding valley. It is also demonstrated that to accurately simulate ambient concentrations of particles and reactive/soluble gases in a coastal valley it is absolutely critical to include heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray. Partitioning of total particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} between sea-spray and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is highly sensitive to the amount of sea-spray present, and hence the initial vertical profile, sea-spray source functions [48] and the wind speed. When a fixed wind speed is used to initialize the sea-spray vertical profiles, as expected, the sea-spray concentration decays with distance inland, but the particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration decays more slowly because it is also a function of the uptake rate for HNO{sub 3}. The simulation results imply model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield highly misleading results in terms of emission sensitivities of the PM

  15. Modeling partially coupled objects with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    A very simple phenomenological model is presented to model objects that are partially coupled (i.e. welded or bonded) where usually the coupled interface is weaker than the bulk material. The model works by letting objects fully interact in compression and having the objects only partially interact in tension. A disconnect factor is provided to adjust the tensile interaction to simulate coupling strengths. Three cases of an example impact calculation are shown-no coupling, full coupling and partial coupling.

  16. Modelling of Coalescence of PMMA Particles/Farz Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzaneh, S.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2011-05-01

    In this study we are interested by sintering phenomenon during rotational molding of PMMA. It is well known that sintering begins by coalescence of grains and follows by powder densification. First we have followed the coalescence of two grains; then the coalescence of several grains is studied in order to see the effect of other grains on this phenomenon. In the basis of the Bellehumeur's model, a new model has been proposed to consider this effect. This model was validated by the experiments.

  17. Theory and modelling of ion cusp particle signatures at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, J. M.; Arridge, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Cassini observations of Saturn's polar magnetosphere have revealed a variety of cusp-like particle signatures suggesting the presence of magnetopause reconnection. Some of these signatures display evidence of bursty unsteady reconnection. The presence of rapid planetary rotation and large Parker-spiral IMF conditions lead to unique effects on cusp signatures and we explore these aspects in this presentation. We present theoretical considerations of the cusp. We pay particular attention to the structure of energy-time ion dispersions and their generation by poleward and azimuthal convection of newly opened flux tubes, and the effect of periodicities in the Saturn system. This study is relevant to ongoing data exploitation from Cassini and to future observations from Juno. Comparisons will be made to Cassini observations of Saturn's cusp. We also present predicted signatures along Juno's trajectory.

  18. Development of an Integrated Performance Model for TRISO-Coated Gas Reactor Particle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew; Miller, Gregory Kent; Martin, David George; Maki, John Thomas

    2005-05-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. The understanding and evaluation of this fuel requires development of an integrated mechanistic fuel performance model that fully describes the mechanical and physico-chemical behavior of the fuel particle under irradiation. Such a model, called PARFUME (PARticle Fuel ModEl), is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. PARFUME is based on multi-dimensional finite element modeling of TRISO-coated gas reactor fuel. The goal is to represent all potential failure mechanisms and to incorporate the statistical nature of the fuel. The model is currently focused on carbide, oxide nd oxycarbide uranium fuel kernels, while the coating layers are the classical IPyC/SiC/OPyC. This paper reviews the current status of the mechanical aspects of the model and presents results of calculations for irradiations from the New Production Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor program.

  19. Biomass particle models with realistic morphology and resolved microstructure for simulations of intraparticle transport phenomena

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ciesielski, Peter N.; Crowley, Michael F.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Sanders, Aric W.; Wiggins, Gavin M.; Robichaud, David; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Foust, Thomas D.

    2014-12-09

    Biomass exhibits a complex microstructure of directional pores that impact how heat and mass are transferred within biomass particles during conversion processes. However, models of biomass particles used in simulations of conversion processes typically employ oversimplified geometries such as spheres and cylinders and neglect intraparticle microstructure. In this study, we develop 3D models of biomass particles with size, morphology, and microstructure based on parameters obtained from quantitative image analysis. We obtain measurements of particle size and morphology by analyzing large ensembles of particles that result from typical size reduction methods, and we delineate several representative size classes. Microstructural parameters, includingmore » cell wall thickness and cell lumen dimensions, are measured directly from micrographs of sectioned biomass. A general constructive solid geometry algorithm is presented that produces models of biomass particles based on these measurements. Next, we employ the parameters obtained from image analysis to construct models of three different particle size classes from two different feedstocks representing a hardwood poplar species (Populus tremuloides, quaking aspen) and a softwood pine (Pinus taeda, loblolly pine). Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the models and the effects explicit microstructure by performing finite-element simulations of intraparticle heat and mass transfer, and the results are compared to similar simulations using traditional simplified geometries. In conclusion, we show how the behavior of particle models with more realistic morphology and explicit microstructure departs from that of spherical models in simulations of transport phenomena and that species-dependent differences in microstructure impact simulation results in some cases.« less

  20. Biomass particle models with realistic morphology and resolved microstructure for simulations of intraparticle transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesielski, Peter N.; Crowley, Michael F.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Sanders, Aric W.; Wiggins, Gavin M.; Robichaud, David; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Foust, Thomas D.

    2014-12-09

    Biomass exhibits a complex microstructure of directional pores that impact how heat and mass are transferred within biomass particles during conversion processes. However, models of biomass particles used in simulations of conversion processes typically employ oversimplified geometries such as spheres and cylinders and neglect intraparticle microstructure. In this study, we develop 3D models of biomass particles with size, morphology, and microstructure based on parameters obtained from quantitative image analysis. We obtain measurements of particle size and morphology by analyzing large ensembles of particles that result from typical size reduction methods, and we delineate several representative size classes. Microstructural parameters, including cell wall thickness and cell lumen dimensions, are measured directly from micrographs of sectioned biomass. A general constructive solid geometry algorithm is presented that produces models of biomass particles based on these measurements. Next, we employ the parameters obtained from image analysis to construct models of three different particle size classes from two different feedstocks representing a hardwood poplar species (Populus tremuloides, quaking aspen) and a softwood pine (Pinus taeda, loblolly pine). Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the models and the effects explicit microstructure by performing finite-element simulations of intraparticle heat and mass transfer, and the results are compared to similar simulations using traditional simplified geometries. In conclusion, we show how the behavior of particle models with more realistic morphology and explicit microstructure departs from that of spherical models in simulations of transport phenomena and that species-dependent differences in microstructure impact simulation results in some cases.

  1. Euler-Lagrange Modeling of Vortex Interaction with a Particle-Laden Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Fernando

    Rotorcraft operation in austere environments can result in difficult operating conditions, particularly in the vicinity of sandy areas. The uplift of sediment by rotorcraft downwash, a phenomenon known as brownout, hinders pilot visual cues and may result in a potentially dangerous situation. Brownout is a complex multiphase flow problem that is not unique and depends on both the characteristics of the rotorcraft and the sediment. The lack of fundamental understanding constrains models and limits development of technologies that could mitigate the adverse effects of brownout. This provides the over-arching motivation of the current work focusing on models of particle-laden sediment beds. The particular focus of the current investigations is numerical modeling of near-surface fluid-particle interactions in turbulent boundary layers with and without coherent vortices superimposed on the background flow, that model rotorcraft downwash. The simulations are performed with two groups of particles having different densities both of which display strong vortex-particle interaction close to the source location. The simulations include cases with inter-particle collisions and gravitational settling. Particle effects on the fluid are ignored. The numerical simulations are performed using an Euler- Lagrange method in which a fractional-step approach is used for the fluid and with the particulate phase advanced using Discrete Particle Simulation. The objectives are to gain insight into the fluid-particle dynamics that influence transport near the bed by analyzing the competing effects of the vortices, inter-particle collisions, and gravity. Following the introduction of coherent vortices into the domain, the structures convect downstream, dissipate, and then recover to an equilibrium state with the boundary layer. The particle phase displays an analogous return to an equilibrium state as the vortices dissipate and the boundary layer recovers, though this recovery is slower than

  2. ANATOMICAL MODELING OF MICRODOSIMETRY OF INHALED PARTICLES IN THE LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining the dose delivered to specific sites in the lungs is a critical first step in modeling the potential toxic effects of airborne pollutants. n important recent development in estimating site specific dosimetry has been combining sophisticated analytical models to determ...

  3. Calcination of kaolinite clay particles for cement production: A modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Teklay, Abraham; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Bøjer, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Kaolinite rich clay particles calcined under certain conditions can attain favorable pozzolanic properties and can be used to substitute part of the CO{sub 2} intensive clinker in cement production. To better guide calcination of a clay material, a transient one-dimensional single particle model is developed, which fully addresses the conversion process of raw kaolinite particles suspended in hot gas. Particles are discretized into a number of spherical cells, on each of which mass, momentum, energy and species conservation equations are numerically solved by using the finite volume method. Reactions considered in the model include dehydration, dehydroxylation and various phase transformations. Thermogravimetric analysis is used to determine reaction kinetic data required as inputs in the model and to validate the model. Finally, model-based sensitivity analysis is performed, from which quantitative guidelines for calcination condition optimization are derived. - Highlights: • A general 1D mathematical model for single clay particle calcination is developed. • The model fully addresses momentum, heat and mass transfer and all the reactions. • Experiments are performed to determine kinetic data of the key reactions. • The model is verified by different means, including experimental results. • Sensitivity study is done to address key assumptions and derive useful guidelines.

  4. Modeling of a-particle redistribution by sawteeth in TFTR using FPPT code

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Budny, R.V.; Duong, H.H.

    1996-06-01

    Results from recent DT experiments on TFTR to measure the radial density profiles of fast confined well trapped {alpha}-particles using the Pellet Charge eXchange (PCX) diagnostic [PETROV M. P., et. al. Nucl. Fusion, 35 (1995) 1437] indicate that sawtooth oscillations produce a significant broadening of the trapped alpha radial density profiles. ` Conventional models consistent with measured sawtooth effects on passing particles do not provide satisfactory simulations of the trapped particle mixing measured by PCX diagnostic. We propose a different mechanism for fast particle mixing during the sawtooth crash to explain the trapped {alpha}-particle density profile broadening after the crash. The model is based on the fast particle orbit averaged toroidal drift in a perturbed helical electric field with an adjustable absolute value. Such a drift of the fast particles results in a change of their energy and a redistribution in phase space. The energy redistribution is shown to obey the diffusion equation, while the redistribution in toroidal momentum P{var_phi} (or in minor radius) is assumed stochastic with large diffusion coefficient and was taken flat. The distribution function in a pre- sawtooth plasma and its evolution in a post-sawtooth crash plasma is simulated using the Fokker-Planck Post-TRANSP (FPPT) processor code. It is shown that FPPT calculated {alpha}-particle distributions are consistent with TRANSP Monte-Carlo calculations. Comparison of FPPT results with Pellet Char eXchange (PCX) measurements shows good agreement for 9 both sawtooth free and sawtoothing plasmas.

  5. Mathematical model for the continuous combustion of char particles in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, S.C.; Rehmat, A.

    1980-12-01

    Recently, we have developed the direct oxidation model for the combustion of a batch of char in a fluidized bed. This analysis is extended for the continuous combustion of char, and a system of general equations has been derived to relate the feed rate of char to the amount of char particles present in the fluidized bed and in the overflow stream. The size distribution of char particles and their number in the bed are also predicted. The analysis indicates that the amount of carbon present in the bed is independent of the feed particle size at fixed values of the char feed rate and fluidizing-gas velocity although the number of char bed particles depends upon the feed particle size. Further, the carbon content of the bed and the number of char particles in the bed are found to depend heavily on the char feed rate and the fluidizing-gas velocity. A discrete cut method is described whereby the particle size distribution and the number of particles present in the bed are calculated. The method provides a simplified trial-and-error procedure for those cases in which the rate of change in particle size is a complex nonintegrable function of the particle size. The discrete cut method is found to yield results which are in good agreement with the exact solutions of the integrals defining the number of particles and their size distribution. The model provides a simple base for the scale-up and design work related to fluidized-bed coal combustors.

  6. A model for inertial particle trapping locations in hydrodynamic tweezers arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Tyler A.; Lieu, Valerie H.; Schwartz, Daniel T.

    2014-04-01

    We present a model for the trapping of particles with finite inertia in the microscale viscous steady streaming flow of hydrodynamic tweezers. Devices containing a square array and an offset array of cylindrical posts of radius 25 µm were fabricated. As water is oscillated at small amplitude (s < 5 µm) and audible frequency (5000 Hz), highly symmetric microeddies form causing the fluid and particles suspended in the fluid to transport through the device. We image the flows by using 0.5 µm radius fluorescent polystyrene particles, and demonstrate trapping with larger 5 µm radius polystyrene particles. The streaming flow fields are simulated numerically using a fast analytic-numeric approach, and inertial particle motion is determined using the well-known Maxey-Riley equation for small Stokes number (St) particle motion. The St-dependent period-averaged particle velocity is used to describe the effects of inertia on particle trapping locations. We find the St-dependence of trapping location depends on the underlying symmetry of the flow. Only traps located near eddy centers are affected by particle inertia.

  7. Particle dynamics and deposition in true-scale pulmonary acinar models

    PubMed Central

    Fishler, Rami; Hofemeier, Philipp; Etzion, Yael; Dubowski, Yael; Sznitman, Josué

    2015-01-01

    Particle transport phenomena in the deep alveolated airways of the lungs (i.e. pulmonary acinus) govern deposition outcomes following inhalation of hazardous or pharmaceutical aerosols. Yet, there is still a dearth of experimental tools for resolving acinar particle dynamics and validating numerical simulations. Here, we present a true-scale experimental model of acinar structures consisting of bifurcating alveolated ducts that capture breathing-like wall motion and ensuing respiratory acinar flows. We study experimentally captured trajectories of inhaled polydispersed smoke particles (0.2 to 1 μm in diameter), demonstrating how intrinsic particle motion, i.e. gravity and diffusion, is crucial in determining dispersion and deposition of aerosols through a streamline crossing mechanism, a phenomenon paramount during flow reversal and locally within alveolar cavities. A simple conceptual framework is constructed for predicting the fate of inhaled particles near an alveolus by identifying capture and escape zones and considering how streamline crossing may shift particles between them. In addition, we examine the effect of particle size on detailed deposition patterns of monodispersed microspheres between 0.1–2 μm. Our experiments underline local modifications in the deposition patterns due to gravity for particles ≥0.5 μm compared to smaller particles, and show good agreement with corresponding numerical simulations. PMID:26358580

  8. Modelling of ceramic matrix composite microstructure using a two-dimensional fractal spatial particle distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottet, Arnaud J.

    Particulate composite reinforcements are good candidates for the fracture toughness of ceramics. In order to predict mechanical response of ceramic matrix composites, an efficient method capable of modelling their complex microstructure is needed. The purpose of this research is the development of such a model using fractal spatial particle distribution. A review of different toughness mechanisms for particulate composites and associated models for deriving their constitutive relationships is presented in chapter 2. These different toughening mechanisms as well constitutive properties depend on particle shape, size and spatial distribution, which lend themselves to a self-similar fractal based modelling approach. A self-similar distribution of particles linked to the fractal geometry is proposed. Fractal geometry provides an ideal tool for describing the randomness and disorder of the system. Its foundations are reviewed in chapter three with emphasis on iterated function systems that are subsequently used to obtain the particle configurations in the proposed model. For the sake of completeness, a review of fractal structure in science is given to illustrate possible applications. Derivation of the volume fraction associated with self similar distributions is provided in chapter 4. This is followed by a description of the numerical model and the boundary conditions. A Finite Element simulation is performed for different volume fractions, generators and number of particles for different displacements (two uniaxial and biaxial cases) and 2-D stress state cases. From these simulations the inverse distribution of the maximum principal stress is computed. Then the self similar models are compared with the model obtained by the Yang Teriari Gokhale (Y.T.G.) method and model obtained by only one iteration. Fractal dimension for real microstructure are computed and microstructure based on the fractal dimension and number of particle is simulated. It can be derived that the

  9. A distribution model for the aerial application of granular agricultural particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandes, S. T.; Ormsbee, A. I.

    1978-01-01

    A model is developed to predict the shape of the distribution of granular agricultural particles applied by aircraft. The particle is assumed to have a random size and shape and the model includes the effect of air resistance, distributor geometry and aircraft wake. General requirements for the maintenance of similarity of the distribution for scale model tests are derived and are addressed to the problem of a nongeneral drag law. It is shown that if the mean and variance of the particle diameter and density are scaled according to the scaling laws governing the system, the shape of the distribution will be preserved. Distributions are calculated numerically and show the effect of a random initial lateral position, particle size and drag coefficient. A listing of the computer code is included.

  10. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeks, Michael; Jin, Chunyu; Potts, Ian

    2015-11-01

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. Deposition rates for a range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition deposition rates are compared with those obtained continuous random walk (CRW) models including those based on the Langevin equation for the turbulent fluctuations. In addition, various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented.

  11. Model solution for volume reflection of relativistic particles in a bent crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenco, M. V.

    2010-10-15

    For volume reflection process in a bent crystal, exact analytic expressions for positively- and negatively-charged particle trajectories are obtained within a model of parabolic continuous potential in each interplanar interval, with the neglect of incoherent multiple scattering. In the limit of the crystal bending radius greatly exceeding the critical value, asymptotic formulas are obtained for the particle mean deflection angle in units of Lindhard's critical angle, and for the final beam profile. Volume reflection of negatively charged particles is shown to contain effects of rainbow scattering and orbiting, whereas with positively charged particles none of these effects arise within the given model. The model predictions are compared with experimental results and numerical simulations. Estimates of the volume reflection mean angle and the final beam profile robustness under multiple scattering are performed.

  12. Investigating motion and stability of particles in flows using numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Nidhi

    The phenomenon of transport of particles in a fluid is ubiquitous in nature and a detailed understanding of its mechanism continues to remain a fundamental question for physicists. In this thesis, we use numerical methods to study the dynamics and stability of particles advected in flows. First, we investigate the dynamics of a single, motile particle advected in a two-dimensional chaotic flow. The particle can be either spherical or ellipsoidal. Particle activity is modeled as a constant intrinsic swimming velocity and stochastic fluctuations in both the translational and rotational motions are also taken into account. Our results indicate that interaction of swimming with flow structures causes a reduction in long-term transport at low speeds. Swimmers can get trapped at the transport barriers of the flow. We show that elongated swimmers respond more strongly to the dynamical structures of the flow field. At low speeds, their macroscopic transport is reduced even further than in the case of spherical swimmers. However, at high speeds these elongated swimmers tend to get attracted to the stable manifolds of hyperbolic fixed points, leading to increased transport. We then investigate the collective dynamics of a system of particles. The particles may interact both with each other and with the background flow. We focus on two different cases. In the fist case, we examine the stability of aggregation models in a turbulent-like flow. We use a simple aggregation model in which a point-like particle moves with a constant intrinsic speed while its velocity vector is reoriented according to the average direction of motion of its neighbors. We generate a strongly fluctuating, spatially correlated background flow using Kinematic Simulation, and show that flocks are highly sensitive to this background flow and break into smaller clusters. Our results indicate that such environmental perturbations must be taken into account for models which aim to capture the collective

  13. Particle release transport in Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal ocean: a modeling assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Kimura, Nobuaki; Hsu, Ming-Hsi

    2010-09-01

    A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was created to study the Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal ocean in Taiwan. The model was verified using measurements of the time-series water surface elevation, tidal current, and salinity from 1999. We conclude that our model is consistent with these observations. Our particle-tracking model was also used to explore the transport of particles released from the Hsin-Hai Bridge, an area that is heavily polluted. The results suggest that it takes a much longer time for the estuary to be flushed out under low freshwater discharge conditions than with high freshwater discharge. We conclude that the northeast and southwest winds minimally impact particle dispersion in the estuary. The particles fail to settle to the bottom in the absence of density-induced circulation. Our model was also used to simulate the ocean outfall at the Bali. Our experimental results suggest that the tidal current dominates the particle trajectories and influences the transport properties in the absence of a wind stress condition. The particles tend to move northeast or southwest along the coast when northeast or southwest winds prevail. Our data suggest that wind-driven currents and tidal currents play important roles in water movement as linked with ocean outfall in the context of the Danshuei River. PMID:19680754

  14. Empirical modeling of the fine particle fraction for carrier-based pulmonary delivery formulations

    PubMed Central

    Pacławski, Adam; Szlęk, Jakub; Lau, Raymond; Jachowicz, Renata; Mendyk, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    In vitro study of the deposition of drug particles is commonly used during development of formulations for pulmonary delivery. The assay is demanding, complex, and depends on: properties of the drug and carrier particles, including size, surface characteristics, and shape; interactions between the drug and carrier particles and assay conditions, including flow rate, type of inhaler, and impactor. The aerodynamic properties of an aerosol are measured in vitro using impactors and in most cases are presented as the fine particle fraction, which is a mass percentage of drug particles with an aerodynamic diameter below 5 μm. In the present study, a model in the form of a mathematical equation was developed for prediction of the fine particle fraction. The feature selection was performed using the R-environment package “fscaret”. The input vector was reduced from a total of 135 independent variables to 28. During the modeling stage, techniques like artificial neural networks, genetic programming, rule-based systems, and fuzzy logic systems were used. The 10-fold cross-validation technique was used to assess the generalization ability of the models created. The model obtained had good predictive ability, which was confirmed by a root-mean-square error and normalized root-mean-square error of 4.9 and 11%, respectively. Moreover, validation of the model using external experimental data was performed, and resulted in a root-mean-square error and normalized root-mean-square error of 3.8 and 8.6%, respectively. PMID:25653522

  15. A versatile model for soft patchy particles with various patch arrangements.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Wei; Zhu, You-Liang; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2016-01-21

    We propose a simple and general mesoscale soft patchy particle model, which can felicitously describe the deformable and surface-anisotropic characteristics of soft patchy particles. This model can be used in dynamics simulations to investigate the aggregation behavior and mechanism of various types of soft patchy particles with tunable number, size, direction, and geometrical arrangement of the patches. To improve the computational efficiency of this mesoscale model in dynamics simulations, we give the simulation algorithm that fits the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) framework of NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs). The validation of the model and the performance of the simulations using GPUs are demonstrated by simulating several benchmark systems of soft patchy particles with 1 to 4 patches in a regular geometrical arrangement. Because of its simplicity and computational efficiency, the soft patchy particle model will provide a powerful tool to investigate the aggregation behavior of soft patchy particles, such as patchy micelles, patchy microgels, and patchy dendrimers, over larger spatial and temporal scales. PMID:26510795

  16. Prediction of particle deposition in the lungs based on simple modeling of alveolar mixing.

    PubMed

    Georgakakou, S; Gourgoulianis, K; Daniil, Z; Bontozoglou, V

    2016-05-01

    A simplified model of particle deposition in the lungs has been developed and implemented, based on the hypothesis that perfect mixing takes place in the alveolar volume of each airway generation. This key idea is combined with purely convective transport along airways, driven by steady alveolar expansion and contraction, and results in an analytically tractable model. Predictions of the model, and in particular pulmonary deposition, are found in very good agreement with detailed benchmark data in the literature for particle diameters d≥0.1μm. The success of this simple model provides indirect evidence in favor of the role of alveolar mixing in the deposition process. PMID:26790361

  17. Positive-energy D-bar method for acoustic tomography: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Hoop, M. V.; Lassas, M.; Santacesaria, M.; Siltanen, S.; Tamminen, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    A new computational method for reconstructing a potential from the Dirichlet-to-Neumann (DN) map at positive energy is developed. The method is based on D-bar techniques and it works in absence of exceptional points—in particular, if the potential is small enough compared to the energy. Numerical tests reveal exceptional points for perturbed, radial potentials. Reconstructions for several potentials are computed using simulated DN maps with and without added noise. The new reconstruction method is shown to work well for energy values between 10-5 and 5, smaller values giving better results.

  18. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box. We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E(sub max)) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  19. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks Via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L. N.; Zank, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models (Protheroe and Stanev, 1998; Moraal and Axford, 1983; Ball and Kirk, 1992; Drury et al., 1999) in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box (Melrose and Pope, 1993; Zank et al., 2000). We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (Emax) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks (Zank et al., 2000, 2006; Dosch and Shalchi, 2010) and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  20. Discrete Particle Model for Deformation of Assemblies of Steel Balls Under Extension: Application to Sandbox Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibee, M. A.; Calantoni, J.; Sclater, J. G.

    2005-05-01

    Experiments on sandboxes provide a useful tool for understanding the deformation of both sedimentary sequences and the continental crust. Boerner and Sclater (1992) have shown that the deformation under extension of assemblies of steel balls can reproduce many of the basic features of these experiments. We use a discrete particle model (DPM) to simulate previously performed physical experiments, which consisted of extending close-packed assemblies of steel balls placed on a rubber sheet attached to moveable boundaries. Steel balls are modeled with spherical elements in the DPM where normal and tangential forces generated at contact points are modeled with springs and friction, respectively. The simulations allow for a quantitative examination of the displacement and rotation of each steel ball as well as provide estimates of the contact forces between them. We perform a suite of simulations to explore the behavior of the model due to variations in the material properties of the balls and rate of extension of the assembly. Qualitative visual analysis shows that the simulations reproduce the qualitative features from the physical experiments such as dilation, rotation, and fault formation. Our success in matching most of the major features of the experiment indicates that the DPM may have a real future in improving our understanding of the deformation of both sedimentary sequences and the continental crust.

  1. Geometrical Standard Model Enhancements to the Standard Model of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Ken; Duvernois, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The Standard Model (SM) is the triumph of our age. As experimentation at the LHC tracks particles for the Higgs phenomena, theoreticians and experimentalist struggle to close in on a cohesive theory. Both suffer greatly as expectation waivers those who seek to move beyond the SM and those who cannot do without. When it seems like there are no more good ideas enter Rate Change Graph Technology (RCGT). From the science of the rate change graph, a Geometrical Standard Model (GSM) is available for comprehensive modeling, giving rich new sources of data and pathways to those ultimate answers we punish ourselves to achieve. As a new addition to science, GSM is a tool that provides a structured discovery and analysis environment. By eliminating value and size, RCGT operates with the rules of RCGT mechanics creating solutions derived from geometry. The GSM rate change graph could be the ultimate validation of the Standard Model yet. In its own right, GSM is created from geometrical intersections and comes with RCGT mechanics, yet parallels the SM to offer critical enhancements. The Higgs Objects along with a host of new objects are introduced to the SM and their positions revealed in this proposed modification to the SM.

  2. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, G. A.; Trapp, J. A.

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles, thus, avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  3. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A. ); Trapp, J.A. Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  4. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A.; Trapp, J.A. |

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  5. N-Body Model of High-Energy Collisions with Inter-Particle Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Kevin J.; Michel, P.; Richardson, D. C.; Schwartz, S. R.

    2009-09-01

    We present a study of high-speed collisions with an N-body particle representation of targets and impactors. The targets are constructed of hard spherical particles where collisions between particles are modeled and energy dissipation during collisions is regulated by a coefficient of restitution. The targets also incorporate a simple model of cohesion based on a spring-like restoring force between adjacent particles. The "springs" are parameterized by the Young's modulus (which determines spring strength) and stress limit (maximum distension before breaking). Once a spring breaks, it remains broken and, in this work, each spring has identical parameters. To explore this model's behavior in high-energy impacts in the strength regime (negligible gravity), the primary simulations presented are designed to calibrate our model against the laboratory experiments of Nakamura and Fujiwara (1991) [Nakamura and Fujiwara, Icarus, 92, 132 (1991)] who characterized the velocity distribution of fragments following a 3.3 km/s collision of a 7 mm diameter nylon sphere into a 6 cm basalt sphere. The target bodies are constructed of 1000, 2000 or 5000 particles with each individual particle having 10 - 107 Pascal bonding with, on average, 10 nearby particles. Values of coefficient of restitution, target particle packing and impactor structure (single particle or rubble pile) are also explored. The simulations are compared to the results of the laboratory experiments in remnant size distribution and morphology. KJW is supported by the Henri Poincaré fellowship at the Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Nice, France. PM had the support of the French Programme National de Planetologie. DCR and SRS acknowledge support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX08AM39G issued through the Office of Space Science and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST0708110. We acknowledge the use of the Mesocentre de Calcul-SIGAMM at the Observatoire de la

  6. Confronting AeroCom models with particle size distribution data from surface in situ stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Stephen; Fiebig, Markus; Mann, Graham; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The size distribution is the most important property for describing any interaction of an aerosol particle population with its surroundings. In first order, it determines both, the aerosol optical properties quantifying the direct aerosol climate effect, and the fraction of aerosol particles acting as cloud condensation nuclei quantifying the indirect aerosol climate effect. Aerosol schemes of modern climate models resolve the aerosol particle size distribution (APSD) explicitly. In improving the skill of climate models, it is therefore highly useful to confront these models with precision APSD data observed at surface stations. Corresponding previous work focussed on comparing size integrated, seasonal particle concentrations at selected sites with ensemble model averages to assess overall model skill. Building on this work, this project intends to refine the approach by comparing median particle size and integral concentration of fitted modal size distributions. It will also look at skill differences between models in order to find reasons for matches and discrepancies. The presentation will outline the project, and will elaborate on input requested from modelling groups to participate in the exercise.

  7. A core-particle model for periodically focused ion beams with intense space-charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Steven M.; Barnard, John J.; Bukh, Boris; Chawla, Sugreev R.; Chilton, Sven H.

    2007-07-01

    A core-particle (CP) model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test-particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam that has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section. The model can be applied to both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image-charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image-charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed in diagnostics to remove coherent flutter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied-focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincaré phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The CP model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms-envelope matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing-channel [S.M. Lund, S.R. Chawla, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 561 (2006) 203]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  8. Hydrophobic solvation of Gay-Berne particles in modified water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head-Gordon, Teresa; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M.

    2008-03-01

    The solvation of large hydrophobic solutes, modeled as repulsive and attractive Gay-Berne oblate ellipsoids, is characterized in several modified water liquids using the SPC/E model as the reference water fluid. We find that small amounts of attraction between the Gay-Berne particle and any model fluid result in wetting of the hydrophobic surface. However, significant differences are found among the modified and SPC/E water models and the critical distances in which they dewet the hydrophobic surfaces of pairs of repulsive Gay-Berne particles. We find that the dewetting trends for repulsive Gay-Berne particles in the various model liquids correlate directly with their surface tensions, the widths of the interfaces they form, and the openness of their network structure. The largest critical separations are found in liquids with the smallest surface tensions and the broadest interfaces as measured by the Egelstaff-Widom length.

  9. Hydrophobic solvation of Gay-Berne particles in modified water models.

    PubMed

    Head-Gordon, Teresa; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M

    2008-03-14

    The solvation of large hydrophobic solutes, modeled as repulsive and attractive Gay-Berne oblate ellipsoids, is characterized in several modified water liquids using the SPC/E model as the reference water fluid. We find that small amounts of attraction between the Gay-Berne particle and any model fluid result in wetting of the hydrophobic surface. However, significant differences are found among the modified and SPC/E water models and the critical distances in which they dewet the hydrophobic surfaces of pairs of repulsive Gay-Berne particles. We find that the dewetting trends for repulsive Gay-Berne particles in the various model liquids correlate directly with their surface tensions, the widths of the interfaces they form, and the openness of their network structure. The largest critical separations are found in liquids with the smallest surface tensions and the broadest interfaces as measured by the Egelstaff-Widom length. PMID:18345905

  10. Back-trajectory model of the Saharan dust flux and particle mass distribution in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, Albert; Resch, Francois; Afeti, George

    2013-06-01

    A back trajectory model of the Sahara dust flux toward the Gulf of Guinea has been studied. First, the atmospheric circulation over North and West Africa in winter is obtained by the backward trajectory plots with NOAA HYSPLIT to establish the winds responsible for the dust transport. The 'box' model derived by Resch et al. (2007) is used to develop the back trajectory model equations. The dust particle mass distributions at various locations traced back from Kumasi and Tamale to the Harmattan dust origin in the Chad basin can be obtained. The model is first tested with the particle mass concentrations at Tamale in Harmattan 2002 and 2005, which are easily deduced. Sample calculations are shown to illustrate the use of the model to estimate the particle mass concentration distributions at Kano and Maiduguri in Nigeria during the Harmattan 2002 and 2005.

  11. Particle capture by aquatic vegetation modeled in flume experiments: the effects of particle size, stem density, biofilm, and flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerwin, R.; Fauria, K.; Nover, D.; Schladow, G.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetated floodplains and wetlands can trap and remove particles from suspension thereby affecting water quality, land accretion, and wetland functioning. However, the rate of particle removal by vegetation remains poorly characterized, especially for fine particles. In this study, we monitored particle concentration and size distribution (1.25 - 250 µm diameter suspended road dust) in a laboratory flume as flow velocity, plant stem density, initial particle concentration, and the presence of biofilm on vegetation were varied. We characterized change in particle concentration through time by calculating decay constants, termed capture rates. Based on our experiments, we found that suspended particle concentration decayed more rapidly in the presence, rather than in the absence, of vegetation. Additionally, particle capture rates increased with stem density, particle size, and the presence of biofilm, while decreasing with flow velocity. These results demonstrate that low flow velocities and the presence of biofilm optimize particle capture by vegetation. Our results are relevant to floodplain and wetland restoration efforts.

  12. Experimental investigation of particle deposition mechanisms in the lung acinus using microfluidic models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishler, Rami; Mulligan, Molly; Dubowski, Yael; Sznitman, Josue; Sznitman Lab-department of Biomedical Engineering Team; Dubowski Lab-faculty of Civil; Environmental Engineering Team

    2014-11-01

    In order to experimentally investigate particle deposition mechanisms in the deep alveolated regions of the lungs, we have developed a novel microfluidic device mimicking breathing acinar flow conditions directly at the physiological scale. The model features an anatomically-inspired acinar geometry with five dichotomously branching airway generations lined with periodically expanding and contracting alveoli. Deposition patterns of airborne polystyrene microspheres (spanning 0.1 μm to 2 μm in diameter) inside the airway tree network compare well with CFD simulations and reveal the roles of gravity and Brownian motion on particle deposition sites. Furthermore, measured trajectories of incense particles (0.1-1 μm) inside the breathing device show a critical role for Brownian diffusion in determining the fate of inhaled sub-micron particles by enabling particles to cross from the acinar ducts into alveolar cavities, especially during the short time lag between inhalation and exhalation phases.

  13. Low-order modeling of internal heat transfer in biomass particle pyrolysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wiggins, Gavin M.; Daw, C. Stuart; Ciesielski, Peter N.

    2016-05-11

    We present a computationally efficient, one-dimensional simulation methodology for biomass particle heating under conditions typical of fast pyrolysis. Our methodology is based on identifying the rate limiting geometric and structural factors for conductive heat transport in biomass particle models with realistic morphology to develop low-order approximations that behave appropriately. Comparisons of transient temperature trends predicted by our one-dimensional method with three-dimensional simulations of woody biomass particles reveal good agreement, if the appropriate equivalent spherical diameter and bulk thermal properties are used. Here, we conclude that, for particle sizes and heating regimes typical of fast pyrolysis, it is possible to simulatemore » biomass particle heating with reasonable accuracy and minimal computational overhead, even when variable size, aspherical shape, anisotropic conductivity, and complex, species-specific internal pore geometry are incorporated.« less

  14. Mathematical modeling of quartz particle melting process in plasma-chemical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, Oleg; Vlasov, Viktor; Volokitin, Gennady; Skripnikova, Nelli; Shekhovtsov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Among silica-based materials vitreous silica has a special place. The paper presents the melting process of a quartz particle under conditions of low-temperature plasma. A mathematical model is designed for stages of melting in the experimental plasma-chemical reactor. As calculation data show, quartz particles having the radius of 0.21≤ rp ≤0.64 mm completely melt at W = 0.65 l/s particle feed rate depending on the Nusselt number, while 0.14≤ rp ≤0.44 mm particles melt at W = 1.4 l/s. Calculation data showed that 2 mm and 0.4 mm quartz particles completely melted during and 0.1 s respectively. Thus, phase transformations occurred in silicon dioxide play the important part in its heating up to the melting temperature.

  15. A Comparison between High-Energy Radiation Background Models and SPENVIS Trapped-Particle Radiation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krizmanic, John F.

    2013-01-01

    We have been assessing the effects of background radiation in low-Earth orbit for the next generation of X-ray and Cosmic-ray experiments, in particular for International Space Station orbit. Outside the areas of high fluxes of trapped radiation, we have been using parameterizations developed by the Fermi team to quantify the high-energy induced background. For the low-energy background, we have been using the AE8 and AP8 SPENVIS models to determine the orbit fractions where the fluxes of trapped particles are too high to allow for useful operation of the experiment. One area we are investigating is how the fluxes of SPENVIS predictions at higher energies match the fluxes at the low-energy end of our parameterizations. I will summarize our methodology for background determination from the various sources of cosmogenic and terrestrial radiation and how these compare to SPENVIS predictions in overlapping energy ranges.

  16. Strategies for testing the irritation-signaling model for chronic lung effects of fine acid particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hattis, D.; Abdollahzadeh, S.; Franklin, C.A. )

    1990-03-01

    The irritation signaling model proposed that a long term contribution to chronic bronchitis might result from the repeated delivery of signals resulting from temporary localized acidification of the bronchial epithelium by the action of individual particles. This led to a prediction that the effectiveness of particles in inducing changes in mucus secreting cell numbers/types should depend on the number of particles deposited that contained a particular amount of acid--implying that particles below a certain size cutoff (and therefore lacking a minimum amount of acid) should be ineffective; and that particle potency per unit weight should be greatest at the cutoff and decline strongly above the cutoff. Since the development of this hypothesis both epidemiological observations and some experimental studies have tended to reinforce the notion that acid particles can make a contribution to relatively long lasting bronchitic-like changes, and enhance the desirability of more direct testing of the model. In this paper we develop a general theoretical framework for the contributions of environmental agents to chronic obstructive lung disease, and a series of alternative hypotheses against which the predictions of the irritant signaling model can be compared. Based on this, we suggest a research program that could be used to further develop and test the model and reasonable alternatives. 82 references.

  17. Development of an ash particle deposition model considering build-up and removal mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kjell Strandstroem; Christian Muellera; Mikko Hupa

    2007-12-15

    Slagging and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in power boilers fired with fossil fuels and fuel mixtures has a significant influence on boiler efficiency and availability. Mathematical modelling has long been considered a suitable method to assist boiler operators to determine optimized operating conditions for an existing furnace. The ultimate goal in ash deposition prediction is hereby the determination of the total amount of material deposited and hence the determination of the total reduction in efficiency. Depending on the fuels fired the total deposited mass is a combination of ash particle deposition and ash particle erosion due to non-sticky particles. The novel ash particle deposition model presented in this work considers deposition of sticky ash particles, cleansing of deposit by non-sticky sand particles and sticking of sand due to contact with sticky ash. The steady-state modelling results for the total amount of ash deposited on the deposition probe of an entrained flow reactor presented in this work agree well with the experimental data. Only at very high fractions of sand added as non-sticky material, a significant influence of the sand on the overall mass deposited was found. Since the model considers sticking of non-sticking sand due to contact with sticky ash, the fraction of sand deposited on the probe was especially studied. Using a correction factor to consider the influence of operating time on the steady-state simulations led to good agreement between simulations and experimental data. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Dissipative Particle Dynamics modeling of nanorod-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khani, Shaghayegh; Maia, Joao

    2014-11-01

    Recent years have seen a plethora of experimental methods for fabricating nanorod-polymer composites with enhanced physical and mechanical properties. The macroscopic properties of the composites are directly related to the dispersion and organization of the nanoparticles in the matrix. For instance, a significant improvement in the properties of the nanorod-polymer composites is observed upon formation of a percolating network. Thus, controlling the structure of the nanoparticles in the matrix will advance the technology in the field. One way of doing this is by adjusting the chemical interactions which is done through grafting polymer chains on the surface of the rods. Although the enthalpic interactions play the major role in such systems other entropic variables such as the dimension of the rods, density of grafting and etc. may influence the final morphology of the system. The recent developments in the computational techniques have paved the road for further understanding of the controlled assembly of nanorods in polymer matrices. In this study, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is employed in order to investigate the effect of enthalpic and entopic variables on the phase behavior of the nanorod-polymer composites. DPD is a coarse-grained mesoscale method which has been found very promising in simulating multi component systems. The interaction parameter between the components of the systems can be mapped onto the Flory-Huggins χ-parameter via well-known Groot-Warren expression. The main goal of this work is to provide a phase diagram that can be used to guide the experiments in designing new materials.

  19. Fluid particle diffusion in a semidilute suspension of model micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Locsei, J. T.; Pedley, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate non-Brownian fluid particle diffusion in a semidilute suspension of swimming micro-organisms. Each micro-organism is modeled as a spherical squirmer, and their motions in an infinite suspension otherwise at rest are computed by the Stokesian-dynamics method. In calculating the fluid particle motions, we propose a numerical method based on a combination of the boundary element technique and Stokesian dynamics. We present details of the numerical method and examine its accuracy. The limitation of semidiluteness is required to ensure accuracy of the fluid particle velocity calculation. In the case of a suspension of non-bottom-heavy squirmers the spreading of fluid particles becomes diffusive in a shorter time than that of the squirmers, and the diffusivity of fluid particles is smaller than that of squirmers. It is confirmed that the probability density distribution of fluid particles also shows diffusive properties. The effect of tracer particle size is investigated by inserting some inert spheres of the same radius as the squirmers, instead of fluid particles, into the suspension. The diffusivity for inert spheres is not less than one tenth of that for fluid particles, even though the particle size is totally different. Scaling analysis indicates that the diffusivity of fluid particles and inert spheres becomes proportional to the volume fraction of squirmers in the semidilute regime provided that there is no more than a small recirculation region around a squirmer, which is confirmed numerically. In the case of a suspension of bottom-heavy squirmers, horizontal diffusivity decreases considerably even with small values of the bottom heaviness, which indicates the importance of bottom heaviness in the diffusion phenomena. We believe that these fundamental findings will enhance our understanding of the basic mechanics of a suspension of swimming micro-organisms.

  20. Initial conditions for radiation analysis: models of galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, R. A.

    During interplanetary missions the radiation conditions are determined by fluxes of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) particles and Solar Energetic Particles (SEP). The particle fluxes of these two high-energy radiation components differ fundamentally in energy spectra and have the opposite dependence on solar activity level. One of the key issues, associated with estimating flight conditions for missions to the Moon, various asteroids and Mars, is the relative balance between GCR and SCR, depending on the level of solar activity and the distance to the Sun for both open space conditions and conditions inside the spacecraft. This task can be solved with sufficient accuracy only when using such particle flux models (of the above mentioned radiation sources), which are based on unified parameters, describing the current solar activity level. Such models, employing smoothed Wolf numbers as the initial parameter, were developed at SINP MSU. These models are - the semi-empirical model of GCR fluxes, which has currently been approved as an international standard (ISO 15390), and the probabilistic model of SEP particle fluxes, which is currently under discussion as a draft international standard (ISO DRAFT 15391). The report presents a survey of experimental data on GCR and SEP fluxes in interplanetary space at various solar activity levels, and an analysis of the reliability and completeness of data on these fluxes, provided by various calculation models.

  1. PAM: Particle automata model in simulation of Fusarium graminearum pathogen expansion.

    PubMed

    Wcisło, Rafał; Miller, S Shea; Dzwinel, Witold

    2016-01-21

    The multi-scale nature and inherent complexity of biological systems are a great challenge for computer modeling and classical modeling paradigms. We present a novel particle automata modeling metaphor in the context of developing a 3D model of Fusarium graminearum infection in wheat. The system consisting of the host plant and Fusarium pathogen cells can be represented by an ensemble of discrete particles defined by a set of attributes. The cells-particles can interact with each other mimicking mechanical resistance of the cell walls and cell coalescence. The particles can move, while some of their attributes can be changed according to prescribed rules. The rules can represent cellular scales of a complex system, while the integrated particle automata model (PAM) simulates its overall multi-scale behavior. We show that due to the ability of mimicking mechanical interactions of Fusarium tip cells with the host tissue, the model is able to simulate realistic penetration properties of the colonization process reproducing both vertical and lateral Fusarium invasion scenarios. The comparison of simulation results with micrographs from laboratory experiments shows encouraging qualitative agreement between the two. PMID:26549468

  2. A hybrid stochastic-deconvolution model for large-eddy simulation of particle-laden flow

    SciTech Connect

    Michałek, W. R.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Zeegers, J. C. H.; Liew, R.; Pozorski, J.; Geurts, B. J.

    2013-12-15

    We develop a hybrid model for large-eddy simulation of particle-laden turbulent flow, which is a combination of the approximate deconvolution model for the resolved scales and a stochastic model for the sub-grid scales. The stochastic model incorporates a priori results of direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow, which showed that the parameters in the stochastic model are quite independent of Reynolds and Stokes number. In order to correctly predict the flux of particles towards the walls an extra term should be included in the stochastic model, which corresponds to the term related to the well-mixed condition in Langevin models for particle dispersion in inhomogeneous turbulent flow. The model predictions are compared with results of direct numerical simulation of channel flow at a frictional Reynolds number of 950. The inclusion of the stochastic forcing is shown to yield a significant improvement over the approximate deconvolution model for the particles alone when combined with a Stokes dependent weight-factor for the well-mixed term.

  3. Physical Scalar Mass Particles in the 331 Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ravinez, O.; Diaz, H.; Romero, D.

    2007-10-26

    We get to diagonalize the mass matrix considering all terms in the scalar lagrangian sector, given in the SU(3)xSU(3)xU(1) model cited below. This will let us in the future realize the phenomenological consequences.

  4. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-08-01

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semianalytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface.

  5. A Field and Modeling Study of Windblown Particles from a Uranium Mill Tailings Pile

    SciTech Connect

    Schwendiman, L. C.; Sehmel, G. A.; Horst, T. W.; Thomas, C. W.; Perkins, R. W.

    1980-06-01

    An extensive field study whose primary objective was to obtain knowledge and understanding of the nature and quantity of windblown particles from uranium mill tailings piles was conducted in the Ambrosia Lake District of New Mexico. The following major field tasks were undertaken: determination of physical, chemical, and radioactivity characteristics of mill tailings particles; an investigation of the nature and quantity of tailings particles in soil in the vicinity of tailings piles; and the determination of the nature and flux of particles being transported by wind as a function of wind speed and height. Results of the field study are presented. Particle size distributions and associated radioactivity were measured. Radioactivity relationships showed uranium daughters in mill tailings to be in essential radioactive equilibrium for the carbonate leach process but thorium-230 tends to be leached into the slurry water for the acid process mill tailings. One objective of the study was to relate windblown particle concentrations, fluxes, and particle sizes to wind speed. Hundreds of samples were taken and analyses were performed, but relationships between wind speed, airborne particle sizes and concentrations were found to be vague and inconclusive. A resuspension, deposition, and transport model was developed and applied using site meteorology. Ground deposition patterns predicted were similar to those found.

  6. Receptor modeling of globally circulating airborne particles collected at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Weekly airborne particle samples were collected at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), Hawaii from February 1979 through May 1985. Receptor models were used to identify sources of airborne particles at MLO, determine compositions of particles from these sources, and assess the relative impacts of them. Major sources of ambient particles at MLO include Asian continental material, oceanic biological production of Se and SO{sub 4} species, marine particles, Asian anthropogenic material, local volcanic emissions, and basalt. Source composition profiles were developed for each component. The Asian continental component represents particles transported from Eastern Asia to the North Pacific, and the component consists of crustal material contaminated by anthropogenic emissions. To account for variations in the relative strengths of anthropogenic and crustal sources, a separate Asian anthropogenic component was also developed. During the dust season, Asian continental material accounts for 80% of total suspended particulate material (TSP) at MLO, oceanic productions of Se and SO{sub 4} 11%, marine particles 2.8%, basalt 1.9%, volcanic emissions 1.7%, and Asian anthropogenic material in excess of Asian continental material 3.2%. During the clean season, the oceanic biological production of Se and SO{sub 4} contributes 62% of TSP at MLO. Continental material contributes 22%, marine particles 6.4%, basalt 2.7%, volcanic emissions 2.4%, and anthropogenic materials in excess of continental material 4.3%.

  7. Model predictions and visualization of the particle flux on the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Saganti, Premkumar B.; Wilson, John W.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    2002-01-01

    Model calculations of the particle flux on the surface of Mars due to the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) can provide guidance on radiobiological research and shielding design studies in support of Mars exploration science objectives. Particle flux calculations for protons, helium ions, and heavy ions are reported for solar minimum and solar maximum conditions. These flux calculations include a description of the altitude variations on the Martian surface using the data obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission with its Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument. These particle flux calculations are then used to estimate the average particle hits per cell at various organ depths of a human body in a conceptual shelter vehicle. The estimated particle hits by protons for an average location at skin depth on the Martian surface are about 10 to 100 particle-hits/cell/year and the particle hits by heavy ions are estimated to be 0.001 to 0.01 particle-hits/cell/year.

  8. Electrostatic Interactions in Dissipative Particle Dynamics: Toward a Mesoscale Modeling of the Polyelectrolyte Brushes.

    PubMed

    Ibergay, Cyrille; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2009-12-01

    We report mesoscopic simulations of bulk electrolytes and polyelectrolyte brushes using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. The calculation of the electrostatic interactions is carried out using both the Ewald summation method and the particle-particle particle-mesh technique with charges distributed over the particles. The local components of the pressure tensor are calculated using the Irving and Kirkwood, and the method of planes and mechanical equilibrium is demonstrated. The profiles of the normal component of the pressure tensor are shown to be similar for both the Ewald and particle-particle particle-mesh methods for a single polyelectrolyte brush. We show that the PPPM method with the MOP technique is the appropriate choice for simulations of this type. The mesoscale modeling of a strongly stretched polylectrolyte brush formed by strong charged polymer chains at a high grafting density shows that the polyelectrolyte follows the nonlinear osmotic regime, as expected from the calculation of the Gouy-Chapman length and the dimensionless Manning ratio. PMID:26602508

  9. Model predictions and visualization of the particle flux on the surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Saganti, Premkumar B; Wilson, John W; Simonsen, Lisa C

    2002-12-01

    Model calculations of the particle flux on the surface of Mars due to the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) can provide guidance on radiobiological research and shielding design studies in support of Mars exploration science objectives. Particle flux calculations for protons, helium ions, and heavy ions are reported for solar minimum and solar maximum conditions. These flux calculations include a description of the altitude variations on the Martian surface using the data obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission with its Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument. These particle flux calculations are then used to estimate the average particle hits per cell at various organ depths of a human body in a conceptual shelter vehicle. The estimated particle hits by protons for an average location at skin depth on the Martian surface are about 10 to 100 particle-hits/cell/year and the particle hits by heavy ions are estimated to be 0.001 to 0.01 particle-hits/cell/year. PMID:12793727

  10. Use of mucolytics to enhance magnetic particle retention at a model airway surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ally, Javed; Roa, Wilson; Amirfazli, A.

    A previous study has shown that retention of magnetic particles at a model airway surface requires prohibitively strong magnetic fields. As mucus viscoelasticity is the most significant factor contributing to clearance of magnetic particles from the airway surface, mucolytics are considered in this study to reduce mucus viscoelasticity and enable particle retention with moderate strength magnetic fields. The excised frog palate model was used to simulate the airway surface. Two mucolytics, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and dextran sulfate (DS) were tested. NAC was found to enable retention at moderate field values (148 mT with a gradient of 10.2 T/m), whereas DS was found to be effective only for sufficiently large particle concentrations at the airway surface. The possible mechanisms for the observed behavior with different mucolytics are also discussed based on aggregate formation and the loading of cilia.

  11. Characterization of particle deposition in a lung model using an individual path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tena, A. M.; Casan, P.; Fernández, J.; Ferrera, C.; Marcos, A.

    2013-04-01

    Suspended particles can cause a wide range of chronic respiratory illnesses such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, as well as worsening heart conditions and other conditions. To know the particle depositions in realistic models of the human respiratory system is fundamental to prevent these diseases. The main objective of this work is to study the lung deposition of inhaled particles through a numerical model using UDF (User Defined Function) to impose the boundary conditions in the truncated airways. For each generation, this UDF puts the values of velocity profile of the flow path to symmetrical truncated outlet. The flow rates tested were 10, 30 and 60 ℓ/min, with a range of particles between 0.1 µm and 20 µm.

  12. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of the adsorption isotherms of water molecules on model soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, F.; Picaud, S.; Hoang, P. N. M.; Jedlovszky, P.

    2007-10-01

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the adsorption isotherms of water molecules on different types of model soot particles. The soot particles are modeled by graphite-type layers arranged in an onionlike structure that contains randomly distributed hydrophilic sites, such as OH and COOH groups. The calculated water adsorption isotherm at 298K exhibits different characteristic shapes depending both on the type and the location of the hydrophilic sites and also on the size of the pores inside the soot particle. The different shapes of the adsorption isotherms result from different ways of water aggregation in or/and around the soot particle. The present results show the very weak influence of the OH sites on the water adsorption process when compared to the COOH sites. The results of these simulations can help in interpreting the experimental isotherms of water adsorbed on aircraft soot.

  13. Thermal fluctuations of red blood cell membrane via a constant-area particle-dynamics model.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, Gianluca; Parker, Kim H; Winlove, C Peter

    2005-10-01

    We describe a model of the mechanical properties of the cell plasma membrane using a finite-temperature particle-dynamics simulation of the whole cell, in which a two-dimensional network of virtual particles embedded in a three-dimensional closed surface represents the membrane. The particles interact via harmonic potential and dihedral angle potential and are subject to a constant area constraint. The evolution of the positions of the particles yields the equilibrium state of the membrane and allows determination of the membrane thermal fluctuations and the elastic moduli. We show that time-averaging of the cell-model configurations allows quantitative comparison with experimental data on membrane fluctuations and elastic moduli of the red blood cell. PMID:16055528

  14. Modelling NPA measurements of alpha-particle distributions in JET and TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClements, K. G.; Dendy, R. O.; Gondhalekar, A.

    1997-11-01

    Neutral particle analyser (NPA) measurements of the DT fusion alpha-particle energy distribution function are simulated by geometrically weighted spatial line integrals of the time-evolving population. The latter is modelled semi-analytically using a simplified Fokker-Planck equation, where the alpha-particle source term is derived from measured fusion reactivity, and plasma collisionality from measured electron density and temperature profiles. This model [1] is benchmarked by zero-free-parameters agreement with TFTR tritium beam blip results [2]. We can thus quantify the differences between the measured NPA spectrum and the local alpha-particle distribution in the plasma core. [1] K G McClements et al, JET Report JET-R(97)02. [2] S S Medley et al, Plasma Phys Contr Fusion 38, 1779 (1996). This work was supported in part by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and Euratom

  15. Modeling particle transport by bubbles for performance guidelines in airlift fermentors.

    PubMed

    Snape, J B; Thomas, N H

    1992-07-01

    A calculation method has been developed to model the statistical transport of biological particles in bubble-driven flows, with special reference to the biokinetics of environmental excursions experienced by individual cells, aggregated cells, or immobilization beads in airlift bioreactors. Interim developments on modeling the transport of such particles in concentric tube devices are reported. The calculation is driven by user-prescribed global parameters for the bioreactor geometry, bulk air flow rate, and particle parameters (size and slip speed). The algorithm calls on empirical data correlations for void fraction, bulk liquid flow rate, and bubble sizes and slip speeds, optimally selected from a large bibliographic database. The Monte Carlo algorithm concentrates on simulating particle transport in the bubbly riser flows.The packaged family of correlations and calculations represents, in effect, an expert system augmented by a transport simulation suited to characterizing the biokinetic response of cells cultured in airlift bioreactors. PMID:18601123

  16. Simulation of the dynamic packing behavior of preparative chromatography columns via discrete particle modeling.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Martin; Hekmat, Dariusch

    2016-03-01

    Preparative packed-bed chromatography using polymer-based, compressible, porous resins is a powerful method for purification of macromolecular bioproducts. During operation, a complex, hysteretic, thus, history-dependent packed bed behavior is often observed but theoretical understanding of the causes is limited. Therefore, a rigorous modeling approach of the chromatography column on the particle scale has been made which takes into account interparticle micromechanics and fluid-particle interactions for the first time. A three-dimensional deterministic model was created by applying Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupled with the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The column packing behavior during either flow or mechanical compression was investigated in-silico and in laboratory experiments. A pronounced axial compression-relaxation profile was identified that differed for both compression strategies. Void spaces were clearly visible in the packed bed after compression. It was assumed that the observed bed inhomogeneity was because of a force-chain network at the particle scale. The simulation satisfactorily reproduced the measured behavior regarding packing compression as well as pressure-flow dependency. Furthermore, the particle Young's modulus and particle-wall friction as well as interparticle friction were identified as crucial parameters affecting packing dynamics. It was concluded that compaction of the chromatographic bed is rather because of particle rearrangement than particle deformation. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:363-371, 2016. PMID:26588806

  17. Particles deposition induced by the magnetic field in the coronary bypass graft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, Sandor I.; Totorean, Alin F.; Vekas, Ladislau

    2016-03-01

    Bypass graft failures is a complex process starting with intimal hyperplasia development which involve many hemodynamic and biological factors. This work presents experimental results regarding the possibility to use magnetic drug delivery to prevent the development of the intimal hyperplasia using a simplified but intuitive model. The primary goal is to understand the magnetic particle deposition in the anastomosis region of the bypass graft taking into account the complex flow field created in this area which involves recirculation region, flow mixing and presence of particles with high residence time. The three-dimensional geometry model was used to simulate the motion and accumulation of the particles under the magnetic field influence in anastomotic region of the coronary bypass graft. The flow patterns are evaluated both numerically and experimentally and show a good correlation in term of flow parameters like vortex length and flow stagnation point positions. Particle depositions are strongly dependent on the magnet position and consequently of the magnetic field intensity and field gradient. Increased magnetic field controlled by the magnet position induces increased particle depositions in the bypass graft anastomosis. The result shows that particle depositions depend on the bypass graft angle, and the deposition shape and particle accumulation respectively, depend by the flow pattern in the anastomosis region.

  18. Distribution of Organophosphate Esters between the Gas and Particle Phase-Model Predictions vs Measured Data.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Wolschke, Hendrik; Diamond, Miriam L; Jantunen, Liisa M; Scheringer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Gas-particle partitioning is one of the key factors that affect the environmental fate of semivolatile organic chemicals. Many organophosphate esters (OPEs) have been reported to primarily partition to particles in the atmosphere. However, because of the wide range of their physicochemical properties, it is unlikely that OPEs are mainly in the particle phase "as a class". We compared gas-particle partitioning predictions for 32 OPEs made by the commonly used OECD POV and LRTP Screening Tool ("the Tool") with the partitioning models of Junge-Pankow (J-P) and Harner-Bidleman (H-B), as well as recently measured data on OPE gas-particle partitioning. The results indicate that half of the tested OPEs partition into the gas phase. Partitioning into the gas phase seems to be determined by an octanol-air partition coefficient (log KOA) < 10 and a subcooled liquid vapor pressure (log PL) > -5 (PL in Pa), as well as the total suspended particle concentration (TSP) in the sampling area. The uncertainty of the physicochemical property data of the OPEs did not change this estimate. Furthermore, the predictions by the Tool, J-P- and H-B-models agreed with recently measured OPE gas-particle partitioning. PMID:27144674

  19. Modeling of liquid-vapor phase change using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. K.; Das, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    A model has been proposed based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics to describe gas liquid phase change. Pseudo particles of zero mass are initially placed to locate the interface. Mass generated due to phase change is assigned to the pseudo particles and their positions are updated at intervals to track the mobility of the interface. The developed algorithm has been used to simulate vapor formation around solid spheres both in the absence of gravity and in the normal gravitational field. Finally, bubble growth over a hot horizontal surface due to boiling has been simulated. Simulated results showed good matching with the reported literature.

  20. Numerical modeling of laser tunneling ionization in explicit particle-in-cell codes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Yu, L.L.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2013-03-01

    Methods for the calculation of laser tunneling ionization in explicit particle-in-cell codes used for modeling laser–plasma interactions are compared and validated against theoretical predictions. Improved accuracy is obtained by using the direct current form for the ionization rate. Multi level ionization in a single time step and energy conservation have been considered during the ionization process. The effects of grid resolution and number of macro-particles per cell are examined. Implementation of the ionization algorithm in two different particle-in-cell codes is compared for the case of ionization-based electron injection in a laser–plasma accelerator.

  1. Combined CFD/Population Balance Model for Gas Hydrate Particle Size Prediction in Turbulent Pipeline Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, Boris V.; Hoffmann, Alex C.; Kosinski, Pawel; Istomin, Vladimir A.; Chuvilin, Evgeny M.

    2010-09-01

    A combined computational fluid dynamics/population balance model (CFD-PBM) is developed for gas hydrate particle size prediction in turbulent pipeline flow. The model is based on a one-moment population balance technique, which is coupled with flow field parameters computed using commercial CFD software. The model is calibrated with a five-moment, off-line population balance model and validated with experimental data produced in a low-pressure multiphase flow loop.

  2. Plasma injection and atomic physics models for use in particle simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Electronics Research Lab.)

    1991-06-12

    Models of plasma injection (creation) and charged/neutral atomic physics which are suitable for incorporation into particle simulation codes are described. Both planar and distributed source injection models are considered. Results obtained from planar injection into a collisionless plasma-sheath region are presented. The atomic physics package simulates the charge exchange and impact ionization interactions which occur between charged particles and neutral atoms in a partially-ionized plasma. These models are applicable to a wide range of problems, from plasma processing of materials to transport in the edge region of a tokamak plasma. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Modeling of confined turbulent fluid-particle flows using Eulerian and Lagrangian schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeniji-Fashola, A.; Chen, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    Two important aspects of fluid-particulate interaction in dilute gas-particle turbulent flows (the turbulent particle dispersion and the turbulence modulation effects) are addressed, using the Eulerian and Lagrangian modeling approaches to describe the particulate phase. Gradient-diffusion approximations are employed in the Eulerian formulation, while a stochastic procedure is utilized to simulate turbulent dispersion in the Lagrangina formulation. The k-epsilon turbulence model is used to characterize the time and length scales of the continuous phase turbulence. Models proposed for both schemes are used to predict turbulent fully-developed gas-solid vertical pipe flow with reasonable accuracy.

  4. A Modification and Analysis of Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling and Granular Dynamics of Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Jason M.; Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.

    2008-01-01

    A previously developed mathematical model is amended to more accurately incorporate the effects of lift and drag on single dust particles in order to predict their behavior in the wake of high velocity gas flow. The model utilizes output from a CFD or DSMC simulation of exhaust from a rocket nozzle hot gas jet. An extension of the Saffman equation for lift based on the research of McLaughlin (1991) and Mei (1992) is used, while an equation for the Magnus force modeled after the work of Oesterle (1994) and Tsuji et al (1985) is applied. A relationship for drag utilizing a particle shape factor (phi = 0.8) is taken from the work of Haider and Levenspiel (1989) for application to non-spherical particle dynamics. The drag equation is further adjusted to account for rarefaction and compressibility effects in rarefied and high Mach number flows according to the work of Davies (1945) and Loth (2007) respectively. Simulations using a more accurate model with the correction factor (Epsilon = 0.8 in a 20% particle concentration gas flow) given by Richardson and Zaki (1954) and Rowe (1961) show that particles have lower ejection angles than those that were previously calculated. This is more prevalent in smaller particles, which are shown through velocity and trajectory comparison to be more influenced by the flow of the surrounding gas. It is shown that particles are more affected by minor changes to drag forces than larger adjustments to lift forces, demanding a closer analysis of the shape and behavior of lunar dust particles and the composition of the surrounding gas flow.

  5. Mathematical modeling of thermal processing of individual solid-fuel particles

    SciTech Connect

    Patskov, V.P.; Dudnik, A.N.; Anishchenko, A.A.

    1995-08-01

    A mathematical model, an algorithm, and a program for calculating the thermal processing of individual solid-fuel particles are developed with account for moisture evaporation, escape of volatiles, and burn-out of the carbon residue. Numerical calculations of the influence of regime conditions on the gasification-combustion of individual particles of Chelyabinsk brown coal are performed. A comparison with experiment is made.

  6. A phase-field approach to no-slip boundary conditions in dissipative particle dynamics and other particle models for fluid flow in geometrically complex confined systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2009-06-21

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is an effective mesoscopic particle model with a lower computational cost than molecular dynamics because of the soft potentials that it employs. However, the soft potential is not strong enough to prevent the DPD particles that are used to represent the fluid from penetrating solid boundaries represented by stationary DPD particles. A phase-field variable, phi(x,t), is used to indicate the phase at point x and time t, with a smooth transition from -1 (phase 1) to +1 (phase 2) across the interface. We describe an efficient implementation of no-slip boundary conditions in DPD models that combines solid-liquid particle-particle interactions with reflection at a sharp boundary located with subgrid scale accuracy using the phase field. This approach can be used for arbitrarily complex flow geometries and other similar particle models (such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics), and the validity of the model is demonstrated by DPD simulations of flow in confined systems with various geometries. PMID:19548707

  7. 1-D Modeling of Massive Particle Injection (MPI) in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Parks, P. B.; Izzo, V. A.

    2008-11-01

    A 1-D Fast Current Quench (FCQ) model is developed to study current evolution and runaway electron suppression under massive density increase. The model consists of coupled toroidal electric field and energy equations, and it is solved numerically for DIII-D and ITER operating conditions. Simulation results suggest that fast shutdown by D2 liquid jet/pellet injection is in principle achievable for the desired plasma cooling time (˜15 ms for DIII-D and ˜50 ms for ITER) under ˜150x or higher densification. The current density and pressure profile are practically unaltered during the initial phase of jet propagation when dilution cooling dominates. With subsequent radiation cooling, the densified discharge enters the strongly collisional regime where Pfirsch-Schluter thermal diffusion can inhibit current contraction on the magnetic axis. Often the 1/1 kink instability, addressed by Kadomtsev's magnetic reconnection model, can be prevented. Our results are compared with NIMROD simulations in which the plasma is suddenly densified by ˜100x and experiences instantaneous dilution cooling, allowing for use of actual (lower) Lundquist numbers.

  8. METHODS FOR MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION AS A FUNCTION OF AGE. (R827352C004)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this paper is to review the application of mathematical models of inhaled particle deposition to people of various ages. The basic considerations of aerosol physics, biological characteristics and model structure are presented along with limitations inherent in ...

  9. A transport model for the diffusion of particle shots through matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, V.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M.; Teodori, F.

    2004-01-01

    Starting from the Boltzmann equation, a new model that describes effectively the diffusion of particle packets through matter has been developed. The model is exhaustively analyzed and all hypotheses, made in its derivation, are discussed. An interesting application to the field of the BNCT is explained in the second half of the paper.

  10. Assessment of Drag Models for Geldart A Particles in Bubbling Fluidized Beds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Estejab, Bahareh; Battaglia, Francine

    2015-10-08

    In order to accurately predict the hydrodynamic behavior of gas and solid phases using an Eulerian–Eulerian approach, it is crucial to use appropriate drag models to capture the correct physics. In this study, the performance of seven drag models for fluidization of Geldart A particles of coal, poplar wood, and their mixtures was assessed. In spite of the previous findings that bode badly for using predominately Geldart B drag models for fine particles, the results of our study revealed that if static regions of mass in the fluidized beds are considered, these drag models work well with Geldart A particles.more » It was found that drag models derived from empirical relationships adopt better with Geldart A particles compared to drag models that were numerically developed. Overall, the Huilin–Gidaspow drag model showed the best performance for both single solid phases and binary mixtures, however, for binary mixtures, Wen–Yu model predictions were also accurate.« less

  11. Fitting complex population models by combining particle filters with Markov chain Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Knape, Jonas; de Valpine, Perry

    2012-02-01

    We show how a recent framework combining Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) with particle filters (PFMCMC) may be used to estimate population state-space models. With the purpose of utilizing the strengths of each method, PFMCMC explores hidden states by particle filters, while process and observation parameters are estimated using an MCMC algorithm. PFMCMC is exemplified by analyzing time series data on a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) population in New South Wales, Australia, using MCMC over model parameters based on an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. We fit three population models to these data; a density-dependent logistic diffusion model with environmental variance, an unregulated stochastic exponential growth model, and a random-walk model. Bayes factors and posterior model probabilities show that there is little support for density dependence and that the random-walk model is the most parsimonious model. The particle filter Metropolis-Hastings algorithm is a brute-force method that may be used to fit a range of complex population models. Implementation is straightforward and less involved than standard MCMC for many models, and marginal densities for model selection can be obtained with little additional effort. The cost is mainly computational, resulting in long running times that may be improved by parallelizing the algorithm. PMID:22624307

  12. Analysis of shape memory alloy sensory particles for damage detection via substructure and continuum damage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielefeldt, Brent R.; Benzerga, A. Amine; Hartl, Darren J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to monitor and predict the structural health of an aircraft is of growing importance to the aerospace industry. Currently, structural inspections and maintenance are based upon experiences with similar aircraft operating in similar conditions. While effective, these methods are time-intensive and unnecessary if the aircraft is not in danger of structural failure. It is imagined that future aircraft will utilize non-destructive evaluation methods, allowing for the near real-time monitoring of structural health. A particularly interesting method involves utilizing the unique transformation response of shape memory alloy (SMA) particles embedded in an aircraft structure. By detecting changes in the mechanical and/or electromagnetic responses of embedded particles, operators could detect the formation or propagation of fatigue cracks in the vicinity of these particles. This work focuses on a finite element model of SMA particles embedded in an aircraft wing using a substructure modeling approach in which degrees of freedom are retained only at specified points of connection to other parts or the application of boundary conditions, greatly reducing computational cost. Previous work evaluated isolated particle response to a static crack to numerically demonstrate and validate this damage detection method. This paper presents the implementation of a damage model to account for crack propagation and examine for the first time the effect of particle configuration and/or relative placement with respect to the ability to detect damage.

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Particle Segregation During Centrifugal Casting of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balout, B.; Litwin, J.

    2012-04-01

    When a metal matrix composite undergoes centrifugal casting, the velocity, deceleration, displacement, and segregation of its particles are modeled according to changes in the centrifugal radius, as well as by variations in the molten metal viscosity as the temperature decreases during the cooling process. A cast aluminum alloy A356 reinforced by 10 V% of silicon carbide particles (SiC), with a median diameter of 12 μm, was used to conduct the experiments, and a mathematical modeling showed that the particles' volume fraction on the outer casting face varied according to whether the viscosity of the liquid metal used was constant or variable. If variations in viscosity during the cooling process are taken into account, then the volume fraction of the particles for a given time of centrifugation changes on the outer casting face, while it increases if the viscosity was constant. Modeling the particle segregation with variable viscosity produces results that are closer to those obtained with experiments than is the case when a constant viscosity is used. In fact, the higher the initial pouring and mold temperatures, the higher the effect of the viscosity variation on particle segregation.

  14. Effective rates from thermodynamically consistent coarse-graining of models for molecular motors with probe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Eva; Seifert, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Many single-molecule experiments for molecular motors comprise not only the motor but also large probe particles coupled to it. The theoretical analysis of these assays, however, often takes into account only the degrees of freedom representing the motor. We present a coarse-graining method that maps a model comprising two coupled degrees of freedom which represent motor and probe particle to such an effective one-particle model by eliminating the dynamics of the probe particle in a thermodynamically and dynamically consistent way. The coarse-grained rates obey a local detailed balance condition and reproduce the net currents. Moreover, the average entropy production as well as the thermodynamic efficiency is invariant under this coarse-graining procedure. Our analysis reveals that only by assuming unrealistically fast probe particles, the coarse-grained transition rates coincide with the transition rates of the traditionally used one-particle motor models. Additionally, we find that for multicyclic motors the stall force can depend on the probe size. We apply this coarse-graining method to specific case studies of the F1-ATPase and the kinesin motor.

  15. A particle grid air quality modeling approach. 1: The dispersion aspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chock, D.P.; Winkler, S.L. )

    1994-01-01

    A particle grid air quality modeling approach that can incorporate chemistry is proposed an an alternative to the conventional partial differential equation (PDE) grid air quality modeling approach. In this approach, each particle is tagged with different species masses and particles in the same grid participate in chemical reactions. The approach is flexible and removes the advection and point source problems encountered in the PDE approach. For a typical grid size of 5 km x 5 km x 50 m used in the lowest layer of an urban air quality model, use of 2000-3000 particles of unequal masses per grid cell will yield a highly accurate grid-averaged instantaneous concentration field that undergoes eddy diffusion for a period of about 1 day. Use of an hourly averaged concentration reduces the demand of particle per cell to about 500. Increasing the grid size also reduces the demand on the number of particles per cell. For the choice of our Lagrangian integral time scales, the time step must be small (10 s) for vertical dispersion simulation but can be large (200 s) for horizontal dispersion simulation. To reduce computation time, a time-splitting scheme is proposed to simulate the horizontal and vertical dispersion simulations in an alternating sequence. The present study also shows that the oft-used second-order-accurate finite difference scheme for solving the diffusion equation tends to overpredict the peak of a sharply peaked concentration.

  16. Numerical Modeling of an RF Argon-Silane Plasma with Dust Particle Nucleation and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girshick, Steven; Agarwal, Pulkit

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a 1-D numerical model of an RF argon-silane plasma in which dust particles nucleate and grow. This model self-consistently couples a plasma module, a chemistry module and an aerosol module. The plasma module solves population balance equations for electrons and ions, the electron energy equation under the assumption of a Maxwellian velocity distribution, and Poisson's equation for the electric field. The chemistry module treats silane dissociation and reactions of silicon hydrides containing up to two silicon atoms. The aerosol module uses a sectional method to model particle size and charge distributions. The nucleation rate is equated to the rates of formation of anions containing two Si atoms, and a heterogeneous reaction model is used to model particle surface growth. Aerosol effects considered include particle charging, coagulation, and particle transport by neutral drag, ion drag, electric force, gravity and Brownian diffusion. Simulation results are shown for the case of a 13.56 MHz plasma at a pressure of 13 Pa and applied RF voltage of 100 V (amplitude), with flow through a showerhead electrode. These results show the strong coupling between the plasma and the spatiotemporal evolution of the nanoparticle cloud.

  17. Conceptual Foundations of Soliton Versus Particle Dualities Toward a Topological Model for Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouneiher, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The idea that fermions could be solitons was actually confirmed in theoretical models in 1975 in the case when the space-time is two-dimensional and with the sine-Gordon model. More precisely S. Coleman showed that two different classical models end up describing the same fermions particle, when the quantum theory is constructed. But in one model the fermion is a quantum excitation of the field and in the other model the particle is a soliton. Hence both points of view can be reconciliated.The principal aim in this paper is to exhibit a solutions of topological type for the fermions in the wave zone, where the equations of motion are non-linear field equations, i.e. using a model generalizing sine- Gordon model to four dimensions, and describe the solutions for linear and circular polarized waves. In other words, the paper treat fermions as topological excitations of a bosonic field.

  18. Fine particle receptor modeling in the atmosphere of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Vega, Elizabeth; Lowenthal, Douglas; Ruiz, Hugo; Reyes, Elizabeth; Watson, John G; Chow, Judith C; Viana, Mar; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés

    2009-12-01

    Source apportionment analyses were carried out by means of receptor modeling techniques to determine the contribution of major fine particulate matter (PM2.5) sources found at six sites in Mexico City. Thirty-six source profiles were determined within Mexico City to establish the fingerprints of particulate matter sources. Additionally, the profiles under the same source category were averaged using cluster analysis and the fingerprints of 10 sources were included. Before application of the chemical mass balance (CMB), several tests were carried out to determine the best combination of source profiles and species used for the fitting. CMB results showed significant spatial variations in source contributions among the six sites that are influenced by local soil types and land use. On average, 24-hr PM2.5 concentrations were dominated by mobile source emissions (45%), followed by secondary inorganic aerosols (16%) and geological material (17%). Industrial emissions representing oil combustion and incineration contributed less than 5%, and their contribution was higher at the industrial areas of Tlalnepantla (11%) and Xalostoc (8%). Other sources such as cooking, biomass burning, and oil fuel combustion were identified at lower levels. A second receptor model (principal component analysis, [PCA]) was subsequently applied to three of the monitoring sites for comparison purposes. Although differences were obtained between source contributions, results evidence the advantages of the combined use of different receptor modeling techniques for source apportionment, given the complementary nature of their results. Further research is needed in this direction to reach a better agreement between the estimated source contributions to the particulate matter mass. PMID:20066907

  19. Discrete Element Modeling (DEM) of Triboelectrically Charged Particles: Revised Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Curry, D. R.; Weitzman, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    In a previous work, the addition of basic screened Coulombic electrostatic forces to an existing commercial discrete element modeling (DEM) software was reported. Triboelectric experiments were performed to charge glass spheres rolling on inclined planes of various materials. Charge generation constants and the Q/m ratios for the test materials were calculated from the experimental data and compared to the simulation output of the DEM software. In this paper, we will discuss new values of the charge generation constants calculated from improved experimental procedures and data. Also, planned work to include dielectrophoretic, Van der Waals forces, and advanced mechanical forces into the software will be discussed.

  20. Modeling nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers using a particle-tracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhengtao; Welty, Claire; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    We have integrated multispecies biodegradation and geochemical reactions into an existing particle-tracking code to simulate reactive transport in three-dimensional variably saturated media, with a focus on nitrification and denitrification processes. This new numerical model includes reactive air-phase transport so that gases such as N2 and CO2 can be tracked. Although nitrogen biodegradation is the primary problem addressed here, the method presented is also applicable to other reactive multispecies transport problems. We verified the model by comparison with (1) analytical solutions for saturated one- and two-dimensional cases; (2) a finite element model for a one-dimensional unsaturated case; and (3) laboratory observations for a one-dimensional saturated case. Good agreement between the new code and the verification problems is demonstrated. The new model can simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in a heterogeneous permeability field where sharp concentration gradients are present. An example application to nitrogen species biodegradation and transport of a plume emanating from a leaking sewer in a heterogeneous, variably saturated aquifer is presented to illustrate this capability. This example is a novel application of coupling unsaturated/saturated zone transport with nitrogen species biodegradation. The code has the computational advantages of particle-tracking algorithms, including local and global mass conservation and minimal numerical dispersion. We also present new methods for improving particle code efficiency by implementing the concept of tracking surplus/deficit particles and particle recycling in order to control the growth of particle numbers. The new model retains the advantages of the particle tracking approach such as allowing relatively low spatial and temporal resolutions to be used, while incorporating the robustness of grid-based Monod kinetics to simulate biogeochemical reactions.

  1. Global Modeling of Nebulae with Particle Growth, Drift, and Evaporation Fronts. I. Methodology and Typical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Paul R.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Morgan, Demitri A.

    2016-02-01

    We model particle growth in a turbulent, viscously evolving protoplanetary nebula, incorporating sticking, bouncing, fragmentation, and mass transfer at high speeds. We treat small particles using a moments method and large particles using a traditional histogram binning, including a probability distribution function of collisional velocities. The fragmentation strength of the particles depends on their composition (icy aggregates are stronger than silicate aggregates). The particle opacity, which controls the nebula thermal structure, evolves as particles grow and mass redistributes. While growing, particles drift radially due to nebula headwind drag. Particles of different compositions evaporate at “evaporation fronts” (EFs) where the midplane temperature exceeds their respective evaporation temperatures. We track the vapor and solid phases of each component, accounting for advection and radial and vertical diffusion. We present characteristic results in evolutions lasting 2 × 105 years. In general, (1) mass is transferred from the outer to the inner nebula in significant amounts, creating radial concentrations of solids at EFs; (2) particle sizes are limited by a combination of fragmentation, bouncing, and drift; (3) “lucky” large particles never represent a significant amount of mass; and (4) restricted radial zones just outside each EF become compositionally enriched in the associated volatiles. We point out implications for millimeter to submillimeter SEDs and the inference of nebula mass, radial banding, the role of opacity on new mechanisms for generating turbulence, the enrichment of meteorites in heavy oxygen isotopes, variable and nonsolar redox conditions, the primary accretion of silicate and icy planetesimals, and the makeup of Jupiter’s core.

  2. Ice formation on nitric acid coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-08-16

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles due to nitric acid coating are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coating on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated ice nucleation ability of Arizona test dust, illite, K-feldspar and quartz as a function of temperature (-25 to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75 to 110%). Particles were size selected at 250 nm and transported (bare or coated) to the ice nucleation chamber to determine the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and water saturation conditions. All dust nucleated ice at water-subsaturated conditions, but the coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability compared to bare particles. However, at water-supersaturated conditions, we observed that bare and coated particles had nearly similar ice nucleation characteristics. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that structural properties of bare dust particles modified after acid treatment. We found that lattice parameters were slightly different, but crystallite sizes of the coated particles were reduced compared to bare particles. Next, single-column model results show that simulated ice crystal number concentrations mostly depends upon fraction of particles that are coated, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and the competition between ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, we observed that coating modify the ice-cloud properties and the picture of ice and mixed-phase cloud evolution is complex when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms are competing for fixed water vapor mass.

  3. Modeling bimolecular reactions and transport in porous media via particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong; Benson, David A.; Paster, Amir; Bolster, Diogo

    2013-03-01

    . The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle model simulates more accurately than the ADRE.

  4. Effect of Model Scale and Particle Size Distribution on PFC3D Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiaobin; Zhang, Lianyang; Zhu, Hehua; Zhang, Qi

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the effect of model scale and particle size distribution on the simulated macroscopic mechanical properties, unconfined compressive strength (UCS), Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, using the three-dimensional particle flow code (PFC3D). Four different maximum to minimum particle size ( d max/ d min) ratios, all having a continuous uniform size distribution, were considered and seven model (specimen) diameter to median particle size ratios ( L/ d) were studied for each d max/ d min ratio. The results indicate that the coefficients of variation (COVs) of the simulated macroscopic mechanical properties using PFC3D decrease significantly as L/ d increases. The results also indicate that the simulated mechanical properties using PFC3D show much lower COVs than those in PFC2D at all model scales. The average simulated UCS and Young's modulus using the default PFC3D procedure keep increasing with larger L/ d, although the rate of increase decreases with larger L/ d. This is mainly caused by the decrease of model porosity with larger L/ d associated with the default PFC3D method and the better balanced contact force chains at larger L/ d. After the effect of model porosity is eliminated, the results on the net model scale effect indicate that the average simulated UCS still increases with larger L/ d but the rate is much smaller, the average simulated Young's modulus decreases with larger L/ d instead, and the average simulated Poisson's ratio versus L/ d relationship remains about the same. Particle size distribution also affects the simulated macroscopic mechanical properties, larger d max/ d min leading to greater average simulated UCS and Young's modulus and smaller average simulated Poisson's ratio, and the changing rates become smaller at larger d max/ d min. This study shows that it is important to properly consider the effect of model scale and particle size distribution in PFC3D simulations.

  5. Modeling of combustion processes in a solid fuel particle

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    During the production of granules or uranium oxide, granules of ion-exchange resin, loaded with uranium ions, are burned to remove the resin matrix and leave a uranium oxide ''ash''. Under some conditions of combustion, the oxide granules are produced in a highly fractured, porous state, while other conditions result in hard, dense, solid granules. ABAQUS was used to model the physical processes occurring during combustion: heat transfer with a very non-linear temperature dependent rate of heat generation, diffusion of reactants and products, and stress/strain resulting from the differential temperatures and from the phase changes during the combustion. The ABAQUS simulation was very successful in explaining the differences in morphology of the granules under different conditions, and in leading to control strategies to produce the desired morphology. However, some of the limitations of ABAQUS prevented obtaining as accurate a simulation as desired. 10 figs.

  6. Multi-Tethered Space-Based Interferometers: Particle System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Stephen S.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics models are presented for a class of space-based interferometers comprised of multiple component bodies, interconnected in various arrangements, by low-mass flexible tethers of variable length. The tethered constellations are to perform coordinated rotational scanning accompanied by baseline dimensional changes, as well as spin axis realignments and spin-up/spin-down maneuvers. The mechanical idealization is a system of N point masses interconnected by massless tethers of variable length. Both extensible and inextensible tethers are considered. Expressions for system angular and linear momenta are developed. The unrestricted nonlinear motion equations are derived via Lagranges equations. Rheonomic constraints are introduced to allow prescribed motion of any degrees of freedom, and the associated physical forces are determined. The linearized equations of motion are obtained for the steady rotation of a system with extensible tethers of constant unstrained length.

  7. Modeling of combustion processes in a solid fuel particle

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    During the production of granules of uranium oxide, granules of ion exchange resin, loaded with uranium ions, are burned to remove the resin matrix and leave a uranium oxide ash''. Under some conditions of combustion, the oxide granules are produced in a highly fractured, porous state, while other conditions result in hard, dense, solid granules. ABAQUS, a commercial finite-element code, run on an IBM 3090, was used to model the physical processes occurring during combustion: heat transfer with a very nonlinear temperature-dependent rate of heat generation, diffusion of reactants and products, and stress/strain resulting from the differential temperatures and from the phase changes during the combustion. The ABAQUS simulation successfully explained the differences in morphology of the granules under different conditions, and lead to control strategies to produce the desired morphology. 10 figs.

  8. Why Do We Believe that an Atom Is Colourless? Reflections about the Teaching of the Particle Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Alessandro; Vicentini, Matilde

    1997-01-01

    Highlights students' ideas about the particle model of matter and its use. Discusses the atomic model in teaching and the rules of the particle modeling game. Demonstrates how a complete understanding of the rules of the model construction yields guidelines for didactic practice. Focuses on problems connected with visual communication through…

  9. Comparisons Between Model Predictions and Spectral Measurements of Charged and Neutral Particles on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Boettcher, Stephan; Boehm, Eckart; Guo, Jingnan; Koehler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Posner, Arik

    2014-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012. RAD is a particle detector that measures the energy spectrum of charged particles (10 to approx. 200 MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (approx 8 to 200 MeV). The data obtained on the surface of Mars for 300 sols are compared to the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used. For describing the daily column depth of atmosphere, daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) are implemented into transport calculations. Particle flux at RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere depends on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD "E" dosimetry detector by the rest of the instrument. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and suggest that future radiation environments on Mars can be predicted accurately. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to astronauts for the planning of various mission scenarios

  10. Model simulations of particle aggregation effect on colloid exchange between streams and streambeds.

    PubMed

    Areepitak, Trachu; Ren, Jianhong

    2011-07-01

    Colloids found in natural streams have large reactive surface areas, which makes them significant absorbents and carriers for pollutants. Stream-subsurface exchange plays a critical role in regulating the transport of colloids and contaminants in natural streams. Previous process-based multiphase exchange models were developed without consideration of colloid-colloid interaction. However, many studies have indicated that aggregation is a significant process and needs to be considered in stream process analysis. Herein, a new colloid exchange model was developed by including particle aggregation in addition to colloid settling and filtration. Self-preserving size distribution concepts and classical aggregation theory were employed to model the aggregation process. Model simulations indicate that under conditions of low filtration and high degree of particle-particle interaction, aggregation could either decrease or increase the amount of colloids retained in streambeds, depending on the initial particle size. Thus, two possible cases may occur including enhanced colloid deposition and facilitated colloid transport. Also, when the aggregation rate is high and filtration increases, more particles are retained by bed sediments due to filtration, and fewer are aggregated, which reduces the extent of aggregation effect on colloid deposition. The work presented here will contribute to a better understanding and prediction of colloid transport phenomena in natural streams. PMID:21627165

  11. A new approach for fluid dynamics simulation: The Short-lived Water Cuboid Particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Changjian; Li, Jiansong; Tian, Zongshun

    2016-09-01

    There are many researches to simulate the fluid which adopt the traditional particle-based approach and the grid-based approach. However, it needs massive storage in the traditional particle-based approach and it is very complicated to design the grid-based approach with the Navier-Stokes Equations or the Shallow Water Equations (SWEs) because of the difficulty of solving equations. This paper presents a new model called the Short-lived Water Cuboid Particle model. It updates the fluid properties (mass and momentum) recorded in the fixed Cartesian grids by computing the weighted sum of the water cuboid particles with a time step life. Thus it is a two-type-based approach essentially, which not only owns efficient computation and manageable memory like the grid-based approach, but also deals with the discontinuous water surface (wet/dry fronts, boundary conditions, etc.) with high accuracy as well as the particle-based approach. The proposed model has been found capable to simulate the fluid excellently for three laboratory experimental cases and for the field case study of the Malpasset dam-break event occurred in France in 1959. The obtained results show that the model is proved to be an alternative approach to simulate the fluid dynamics with a fair accuracy.

  12. An accurate and efficient Lagrangian sub-grid model for multi-particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Federico; Mazzitelli, Irene; Lanotte, Alessandra S.

    2014-11-01

    Many natural and industrial processes involve the dispersion of particle in turbulent flows. Despite recent theoretical progresses in the understanding of particle dynamics in simple turbulent flows, complex geometries often call for numerical approaches based on eulerian Large Eddy Simulation (LES). One important issue related to the Lagrangian integration of tracers in under-resolved velocity fields is connected to the lack of spatial correlations at unresolved scales. Here we propose a computationally efficient Lagrangian model for the sub-grid velocity of tracers dispersed in statistically homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows. The model incorporates the multi-scale nature of turbulent temporal and spatial correlations that are essential to correctly reproduce the dynamics of multi-particle dispersion. The new model is able to describe the Lagrangian temporal and spatial correlations in clouds of particles. In particular we show that pairs and tetrads dispersion compare well with results from Direct Numerical Simulations of statistically isotropic and homogeneous 3d turbulence. This model may offer an accurate and efficient way to describe multi-particle dispersion in under resolved turbulent velocity fields such as the one employed in eulerian LES. This work is part of the research programmes FP112 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). We acknowledge support from the EU COST Action MP0806.

  13. Modeling magnetospheric energetic particle escape across Earth's magnetopause as observed by the MMS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Barry H.; Cohen, Ian J.; Westlake, Joseph H.; Anderson, Brian J.

    2016-05-01

    A longstanding puzzle is that the escape of magnetospheric energetic particles (greater than tens of keV) across Earth's magnetopause into the magnetosheath is common irrespective of conditions thought to engender magnetic reconnection and boundary normal magnetic fields. Multiple causes for escape have been invoked, including interactions with strong gradients, wave scattering, boundary dynamics, and boundary normal fields. Here we tackle only part of the problem by developing a relatively simple kinetic model including critical features not utilized in previous models. We find that particles can often completely escape without invoking waves or unmodeled magnetosheath structures for both northwardly and southwardly magnetosheath fields. Because multiple means of escape are found to be available, the particles are hard to completely contain, consistent with observations. The model also predicts specific pitch angle evolution signatures that uniquely identify boundary normal field-enabled escape, now reported in a companion paper as observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission.

  14. Fluid bed porosity mathematical model for an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with particles growing biofilm.

    PubMed

    Campos-Díaz, K E; Bandala-González, E R; Limas-Ballesteros, R

    2012-08-15

    A new mathematic model to estimate bed porosity as a function of Reynolds and Archimedes numbers was developed based in experimental data. Experiments were performed using an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor filled with polypropylene particles, Lactobacillus acidophillus as the immobilized strain and fluidized with a Man-Rogosa-Sharpe culture medium under controlled temperature and pH conditions. Bed porosity was measured at different flow rates, starting from 0.95 to 9.5 LPM. The new model has several advantages when compared with previously reported. Among them, advantages such as standard deviation values ≤ 1% between experimental and calculated bed porosity, its applicability in traditional and inverse fluidization, wall effects do not take account, it gives excellent agreement with spherical particles with or without biofilm, and inertial drag coefficient allow extend the new model a non-spherical particles. PMID:22484706

  15. The flow structure of pyroclastic density currents: evidence from particle models and large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico Maria; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows. They represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Pompeii (AD 79) at Vesuvius. Much of our knowledge on the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, i.e. the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but they are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. In this paper, by means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. It allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. We show that our model results in likely values of dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration, and allows quantifying the hazard potential of pyroclastic flows.

  16. Modeling and Simulation of Cardiogenic Embolic Particle Transport to the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Jani, Neel; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-11-01

    Emboli are aggregates of cells, proteins, or fatty material, which travel along arteries distal to the point of their origin, and can potentially block blood flow to the brain, causing stroke. This is a prominent mechanism of stroke, accounting for about a third of all cases, with the heart being a prominent source of these emboli. This work presents our investigations towards developing numerical simulation frameworks for modeling the transport of embolic particles originating from the heart along the major arteries supplying the brain. The simulations are based on combining discrete particle method with image based computational fluid dynamics. Simulations of unsteady, pulsatile hemodynamics, and embolic particle transport within patient-specific geometries, with physiological boundary conditions, are presented. The analysis is focused on elucidating the distribution of particles, transport of particles in the head across the major cerebral arteries connected at the Circle of Willis, the role of hemodynamic variables on the particle trajectories, and the effect of considering one-way vs. two-way coupling methods for the particle-fluid momentum exchange. These investigations are aimed at advancing our understanding of embolic stroke using computational fluid dynamics techniques. This research was supported by the American Heart Association grant titled ``Embolic Stroke: Anatomic and Physiologic Insights from Image-Based CFD.''

  17. Intersecting dilated convex polyhedra method for modeling complex particles in discrete element method

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Ben; Kulchitsky, Anton V; Johnson, Jerome B

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for representing concave polyhedral particles in a discrete element method as unions of convex dilated polyhedra. This method offers an efficient way to simulate systems with a large number of (generally concave) polyhedral particles. The method also allows spheres, capsules, and dilated triangles to be combined with polyhedra using the same approach. The computational efficiency of the method is tested in two different simulation setups using different efficiency metrics for seven particle types: spheres, clusters of three spheres, clusters of four spheres, tetrahedra, cubes, unions of two octahedra (concave), and a model of a computer tomography scan of a lunar simulant GRC-3 particle. It is shown that the computational efficiency of the simulations degrades much slower than the increase in complexity of the particles in the system. The efficiency of the method is based on the time coherence of the system, and an efficient and robust distance computation method between polyhedra as particles never intersect for dilated particles. PMID:26300584

  18. Ice formation on nitric acid-coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome; Berg, Larry

    2015-08-01

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles caused by a coating of nitric acid are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coatings on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated the ice nucleation ability of Arizona Test Dust, illite, K-feldspar, and quartz as a function of temperature (-25°C to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75% to 110%). The particles (bare or nitric acid coated) were size selected at 250 nm, and the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and saturation conditions was determined. All of the dust species nucleated ice at subsaturated conditions, although the coated particles (except quartz) showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability relative to bare particles. However, at supersaturated conditions, bare and coated particles had nearly equivalent ice nucleation characteristics. The results of a single-column model showed that simulated ice crystal number concentrations are mostly dependent upon the coated particle fraction, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and competition among ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, coatings were observed to modify ice-cloud properties, and the complexity of ice-cloud and mixed-phase-cloud evolution when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms compete for fixed water vapor budgets was supported.

  19. Modeling Gas-Particle Partitioning of SOA: Effects of Aerosol Physical State and RH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    Aged tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. In liquid aerosol particles non-ideal mixing of all species determines whether the condensed phase undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation or whether it is stable in a single mixed phase, and whether it contains solid salts in equilibrium with their saturated solution. The extended thermodynamic model AIOMFAC is able to predict such phase states by representing the variety of organic components using functional groups within a group-contribution concept. The number and composition of different condensed phases impacts the diversity of reaction media for multiphase chemistry and the gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile species. Recent studies show that under certain conditions biogenic and other organic-rich particles can be present in a highly viscous, semisolid or amorphous solid physical state, with consequences regarding reaction kinetics and mass transfer limitations. We present results of new gas-particle partitioning computations for aerosol chamber data using a model based on AIOMFAC activity coefficients and state-of-the-art vapor pressure estimation methods. Different environmental conditions in terms of temperature, relative humidity (RH), salt content, amount of precursor VOCs, and physical state of the particles are considered. We show how modifications of absorptive and adsorptive gas-particle mass transfer affects the total aerosol mass in the calculations and how the results of these modeling approaches compare to data of aerosol chamber experiments, such as alpha-pinene oxidation SOA. For a condensed phase in a mixed liquid state containing ammonium sulfate, the model predicts liquid-liquid phase separation up to high RH in case of, on average, moderately hydrophilic organic compounds, such as first generation oxidation products of alpha-pinene. The computations also reveal that treating liquid phases as ideal

  20. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of particle deposition in large-scale, multigenerational lung models.

    PubMed

    Walters, D Keith; Luke, William H

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has emerged as a useful tool for the prediction of airflow and particle transport within the human lung airway. Several published studies have demonstrated the use of Eulerian finite-volume CFD simulations coupled with Lagrangian particle tracking methods to determine local and regional particle deposition rates in small subsections of the bronchopulmonary tree. However, the simulation of particle transport and deposition in large-scale models encompassing more than a few generations is less common, due in part to the sheer size and complexity of the human lung airway. Highly resolved, fully coupled flowfield solution and particle tracking in the entire lung, for example, is currently an intractable problem and will remain so for the foreseeable future. This paper adopts a previously reported methodology for simulating large-scale regions of the lung airway (Walters, D. K., and Luke, W. H., 2010, "A Method for Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Simulations of Large-Scale Regions of the Human Lung Airway," ASME J. Fluids Eng., 132(5), p. 051101), which was shown to produce results similar to fully resolved geometries using approximate, reduced geometry models. The methodology is extended here to particle transport and deposition simulations. Lagrangian particle tracking simulations are performed in combination with Eulerian simulations of the airflow in an idealized representation of the human lung airway tree. Results using the reduced models are compared with those using the fully resolved models for an eight-generation region of the conducting zone. The agreement between fully resolved and reduced geometry simulations indicates that the new method can provide an accurate alternative for large-scale CFD simulations while potentially reducing the computational cost of these simulations by several orders of magnitude. PMID:21186893

  1. Diphoton excess at 750 GeV and LHC constraints in models with vectorlike particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Junichiro; Omura, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations report excesses around 750 GeV in the diphoton channels. This might be the evidence which reveals new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this paper, we consider models with a 750 GeV scalar and vectorlike particles, which couple each other through Yukawa couplings. The decay of the scalar to diphoton is given by the loop diagrams involving the extra colored particles. We investigate not only the setup required by the excesses, but also the LHC constraints, especially concerned with the vectorlike particles. In our scenario, the extra colored particles decay to quarks and a dark matter (DM) via Yukawa couplings. Then, the signals from the vectorlike particles are dijet, b b ¯ and/or t t ¯ with large missing energy. We discuss two possibilities for the setups: One is a model with vectorlike fermions and a scalar DM, and the other is a model with vectorlike scalars and a fermionic DM. We suggest the parameter region favored by the excess in each case, and study the constraints based on the latest LHC results at √{s }=8 TeV and 13 TeV. We conclude that the favored region is almost excluded by the LHC bounds, especially when the 750 GeV scalar dominantly decays to DMs. The mass differences between the vectorlike particles and the DM should be less than O (100 ) GeV [O (10 ) GeV ] to realize the large diphoton signal and the large decay width, if the extra colored particle only decays to a top (bottom) quark and a dark matter. Otherwise, these scenarios are already excluded by the latest LHC results.

  2. 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Models of Betelgeuse's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Mackey, J.; Langer, N.

    2013-05-01

    Betelgeuse, the bright red supergiant (RSG) in Orion, is a runaway star. Its supersonic motion through the interstellar medium has resulted in the formation of a bow shock, a cometary structure pointing in the direction of motion. We present the first 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the formation and evolution of Betelgeuse's bow shock. We show that the bow shock morphology depends substantially on the growth timescale for Rayleigh-Taylor versus Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We discuss our models in light of the recent Herschel, GALEX and VLA observations. If the mass in the bow shock shell is low (~few × 10-3 M⊙), as seems to be implied by the AKARI and Herschel observations, then Betelgeuse's bow shock is very young and is unlikely to have reached a steady state. The circular, smooth bow shock shell is consistent with this conclusion. We further discuss the implications of our results, in particular, the possibility that Betelgeuse may have only recently entered the RSG phase.

  3. Investigation of lanthanide-based starch particles as a model system for liver contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Fossheim, S L; Kellar, K E; Mansson, S; Colet, J M; Rongved, P; Fahlvik, A K; Klaveness, J

    1999-02-01

    Gadolinium and dysprosium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-labeled starch microparticles (Gd-DTPA-SP and Dy-DTPA-SP) were investigated as model liver contrast agents. The liver contrast efficacy of particles with low and high metal contents was compared in two imaging models: in vivo rat liver and ex vivo perfused rat liver. The biodistribution of intravenously injected particles was also assessed by ex vivo relaxometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry of tissues. All particles reduced the liver signal intensity on T2-weighted spin-echo and gradient-recalled echo images as a result of susceptibility effects. Because of their higher magnetic susceptibility, the Dy-DTPA-SP were more effective negative contrast enhancers than the Gd-DTPA-SP. On T1-weighted spin-echo images, only the Gd-DTPA-SP with low metal content significantly increased the liver signal intensity. In addition, these low-loading Gd-DTPA-SP markedly reduced the blood T1. The two latter observations were not consistent with the anticipated blood circulation time of microparticles, but were a result of the lower stability of these particles in blood compared with Gd-DTPA-SP, which has a high metal content. Regardless of stability or imaging conditions, the paramagnetic starch particles investigated showed potential as negative liver contrast enhancers. However, the observed accumulation of particles in the lungs represented a biological limitation for their use as contrast agents. PMID:10077028

  4. Modeling dry deposition of total particle mass in trafficked and rural sites of central Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, G.C.; Wu, Y.S.

    1999-07-01

    Dry deposition plates, PS-1, micro orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI), Noll rotary impactor (NRI), and Universal samplers were used to measure dry deposition fluxes and ambient air particle concentrations during day and night periods at a trafficked and a rural sampling site in central Taiwan. The results indicate that dry deposition fluxes of total particle mass at the trafficked site are about 100 times higher than at the rural sampling site. Statistical results also proved that there are no significant differences for the coarse particle concentrations in the trafficked and rural sampling sites. MOUDI, NRI, and Universal samplers were used to estimate the dry deposition flux. The ratios of estimated/measured dry deposition flux of total particle mass in the trafficked area are better than for the rural sampling site. This is because the NRI sampler was applied in the trafficked area. The Noll and Fang model-predicted dry deposition flux is more accurate than that predicted by the Sehmel and Hodgson model in both the traffic and rural sampling sites. The Universal sampler was applied in predicting dry deposition flux in the rural site. The results show that the Universal sampler is not a suitable device in predicting dry deposition because it can only collect particle sizes less than 10 {micro}m. However, this study indicates that NRI combined with the Universal sampler is useful in predicting particle mass dry deposition.

  5. Modeling Extreme Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration with Self-Consistent Wave Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, A. D.; le Roux, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) events associated with coronal mass ejection driven shocks have detected particle energies up to a few GeV at 1 AU within the first ~10 minutes to 1 hour of shock acceleration. Whether or not acceleration by a single shock is sufficient in these events or if some combination of multiple shocks or solar flares is required is currently not well understood. Furthermore, the observed onset times of the extreme SEP events place the shock in the corona when the particles escape upstream. We have updated our focused transport theory model that has successfully been applied to the termination shock and traveling interplanetary shocks in the past to investigate extreme SEP acceleration in the solar corona. This model solves the time-dependent Focused Transport Equation including particle preheating due to the cross shock electric field and the divergence, adiabatic compression, and acceleration of the solar wind flow. Diffusive shock acceleration of SEPs is included via the first-order Fermi mechanism for parallel shocks. To investigate the effects of the solar corona on the acceleration of SEPs, we have included an empirical model for the plasma number density, temperature, and velocity. The shock acceleration process becomes highly time-dependent due to the rapid variation of these coronal properties with heliocentric distance. Additionally, particle interaction with MHD wave turbulence is modeled in terms of gyroresonant interactions with parallel propagating Alfven waves. However, previous modeling efforts suggest that the background amplitude of the solar wind turbulence is not sufficient to accelerate SEPs to extreme energies over the short time scales observed. To account for this, we have included the transport and self-consistent amplification of MHD waves by the SEPs through wave-particle gyroresonance. We will present the results of this extended model for a single fast quasi-parallel CME driven shock in the

  6. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, C.; Potts, I.; Reeks, M. W.

    2015-05-15

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. In this way, we are able to account directly for the influence of ejection and sweeping events as others have done but without resorting to the use of adjustable parameters. Deposition rate predictions for a wide range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition, deposition rates are compared with those obtained from continuous random walk models and Langevin equation based ejection and sweep models which noticeably give significantly lower deposition rates. Various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented. Finally, we consider the model limitations in using the model to calculate deposition in more complex flows where the near wall turbulence may be significantly different.

  7. Physical characterization and in silico modeling of inulin polymer conformation during vaccine adjuvant particle formation.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Thomas G; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Thilagam, Alagu; Qian, Gujie; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Cooper, Peter D; Gerson, Andrea; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-06-01

    This study combined physical data from synchrotron SAXS, FTIR and microscopy with in-silico molecular structure predictions and mathematical modeling to examine inulin adjuvant particle formation and structure. The results show that inulin polymer chains adopt swollen random coil in solution. As precipitation occurs from solution, interactions between the glucose end group of one chain and a fructose group of an adjacent chain help drive organized assembly, initially forming inulin ribbons with helical organization of the chains orthogonal to the long-axis of the ribbon. Subsequent aggregation of the ribbons results in the layered semicrystalline particles previously shown to act as potent vaccine adjuvants. γ-Inulin adjuvant particles consist of crystalline layers 8.5nm thick comprising helically organized inulin chains orthogonal to the plane of the layer. These crystalline layers alternate with amorphous layers 2.4nm thick, to give overall particle crystallinity of 78%. PMID:27083349

  8. Regression modeling of particle size distributions in urban storm water: advancements through improved sample collection methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Selbig, William R.

    2012-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment entrained in urban storm water by integrating water quality samples from the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of suspended-sediment concentration and particle size distribution at three independent study locations. Use of the DISA decreased variability, which improved statistical regression to predict particle size distribution using surrogate environmental parameters, such as precipitation depth and intensity. The performance of this statistical modeling technique was compared to results using traditional fixed-point sampling methods and was found to perform better. When environmental parameters can be used to predict particle size distributions, environmental managers have more options when characterizing concentrations, loads, and particle size distributions in urban runoff.

  9. Hydrodynamic modeling of targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huei Chu

    2013-03-01

    Since the flow of a magnetic fluid could easily be influenced by an external magnetic field, its hydrodynamic modeling promises to be useful for magnetically controllable delivery systems. It is desirable to understand the flow fields and characteristics before targeted magnetic particles arrive at their destination. In this study, we perform an analysis for the effects of particles and a magnetic field on biomedical magnetic fluid flow to study the targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel. The fully developed solutions of velocity, flow rate, and flow drag are derived analytically and presented for blood with magnetite nanoparticles at body temperature. Results reveal that in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles, a minimum magnetic field gradient (yield gradient) is required to initiate the delivery. A magnetic driving force leads to the increase in velocity and has enhancing effects on flow rate and flow drag. Such a magnetic driving effect can be magnified by increasing the particle volume fraction. PMID:24231820

  10. Efficient Localization Bounds in a Continuous N-Particle Anderson Model with Long-Range Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2016-04-01

    We establish strong dynamical and exponential spectral localization for a class of multi-particle Anderson models in a Euclidean space with an alloy-type random potential and a sub-exponentially decaying interaction of infinite range. For the first time in the mathematical literature, the uniform decay bounds on the eigenfunction correlators (EFCs) at low energies are proved, in the multi-particle continuous configuration space, in the (symmetrized) norm-distance, which is a natural distance in the multi-particle configuration space, and not in the Hausdorff distance. This results in uniform bounds on the EFCs in arbitrarily large but bounded domains in the physical configuration space, and not only in the actually infinite space, as in prior works on multi-particle localization in Euclidean spaces.

  11. GRAVITATIONAL MODEL OF HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES IN A COLLIMATED JET

    SciTech Connect

    De Freitas Pacheco, J. A.; Gariel, J.; Marcilhacy, G.; Santos, N. O. E-mail: jerome.gariel@upmc.fr E-mail: nilton.santos@upmc.fr

    2012-11-10

    Observations suggest that relativistic particles play a fundamental role in the dynamics of jets emerging from active galactic nuclei as well as in their interaction with the intracluster medium. However, no general consensus exists concerning the acceleration mechanism of those high-energy particles. A gravitational acceleration mechanism is proposed here in which particles leaving precise regions within the ergosphere of a rotating supermassive black hole (BH) produce a highly collimated flow. These particles follow unbound geodesics which are asymptotically parallel to the spin axis of the BH and are characterized by the energy E, the Carter constant Q, and zero angular momentum of the component L{sub z} . If environmental effects are neglected, the present model predicts the presence of electrons with energies around 9.4 GeV at distances of about 140 kpc from the ergosphere. The present mechanism can also accelerate protons up to the highest energies observed in cosmic rays by the present experiments.

  12. Gravitational Model of High-energy Particles in a Collimated Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.; Gariel, J.; Marcilhacy, G.; Santos, N. O.

    2012-11-01

    Observations suggest that relativistic particles play a fundamental role in the dynamics of jets emerging from active galactic nuclei as well as in their interaction with the intracluster medium. However, no general consensus exists concerning the acceleration mechanism of those high-energy particles. A gravitational acceleration mechanism is proposed here in which particles leaving precise regions within the ergosphere of a rotating supermassive black hole (BH) produce a highly collimated flow. These particles follow unbound geodesics which are asymptotically parallel to the spin axis of the BH and are characterized by the energy E, the Carter constant {\\cal Q}, and zero angular momentum of the component Lz . If environmental effects are neglected, the present model predicts the presence of electrons with energies around 9.4 GeV at distances of about 140 kpc from the ergosphere. The present mechanism can also accelerate protons up to the highest energies observed in cosmic rays by the present experiments.

  13. Ion-acoustic shocks with reflected ions: modelling and particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseykina, T. V.; Dudnikova, G. I.; Vshivkov, V. A.; Malkov, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    > Non-relativistic collisionless shock waves are widespread in space and astrophysical plasmas and are known as efficient particle accelerators. However, our understanding of collisionless shocks, including their structure and the mechanisms whereby they accelerate particles, remains incomplete. We present here the results of numerical modelling of an ion-acoustic collisionless shock based on the one-dimensional kinetic approximation for both electrons and ions with a real mass ratio. Special emphasis is paid to the shock-reflected ions as the main driver of shock dissipation. The reflection efficiency, the velocity distribution of reflected particles and the shock electrostatic structure are studied in terms of the shock parameters. Applications to particle acceleration in geophysical and astrophysical shocks are discussed.

  14. Radioactive Pollution Estimate for Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant by a Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Keisuke; Ogawa, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    On Mar 12, 2011, very wide radioactive pollution occurred by a hydrogen explosion in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. A large amount of radioisotopes started with four times of explosions. With traditional atmospheric diffusion models could not reconstruct radioactive pollution in Fukushima. Then, with a particle model, this accident was reconstructed from meteorological archive and Radar- AMeDAS. Calculations with the particle model were carried out for Mar 12, 15, 18 and 20 when east southeast winds blew for five hours continuously. Meteorological archive is expressed by wind speeds and directions in five-km grid every hour with eight classes of height till 3000 m. Radar- AMeDAS is precipitation data in one-km grid every thirty minutes. Particles are ten scales of 0.01 to 0.1 mm in diameter with specific weight of 2.65 and vertical speeds given by Stokes equation. But, on Mar 15, it rained from 16:30 and then the particles fell down at a moment as wet deposit in calculation. On the other hand, the altitudes on the ground were given by DEM with 1 km-grid. The spatial dose by emitted radioisotopes was referred to the observation data at monitoring posts of Tokyo Electric Power Company. The falling points of radioisotopes were expressed on the map using the particle model. As a result, the same distributions were obtained as the surface spatial dose of radioisotopes in aero-monitoring by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. Especially, on Mar 15, the simulated pollution fitted to the observation, which extended to the northwest of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused mainly sever pollution. By the particle model, the falling positions on the ground were estimated each particle size. Particles with more than 0.05 mm of size were affected by the topography and blocked by the mountains with the altitudes of more than 700 m. The particle model does not include the atmospheric stability, the source height, and deposit speeds. The

  15. MODELING OF FRICTION STIR WELDING (FSW) PROCESS USING SMOOTH PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS (SPH)

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Grant, Glenn J.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2006-06-14

    We present a novel modeling approach to simulate FSW process that may have significant advantages over current traditional finite element or finite difference based methods. The proposed model is based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, a fully Lagrangian particle method that can simulate the dynamics of interfaces, large material deformations, void formations and material's strain and temperature history without employing complex tracking schemes. Two- and three-dimensional simulations for different tool designs are presented. Preliminary numerical results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Particle Swarm Social Model for Group Social Learning in Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N; Patton, Robert M; Pullum, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a study of integrating particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the social learning of self-organized groups and their collective searching behavior in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social learning for a dynamic environment. The research provides a platform for understanding and insights into knowledge discovery and strategic search in human self-organized social groups, such as insurgents or online communities.

  17. Modeling Mission-Specific Worst-Case Solar Energetic Particle Reference Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, James; Michael, Michael; Dietrich, William F.

    2012-07-01

    To plan and design safe and reliable space missions, it is necessary to take into account the effects of the space radiation environment. Solar energetic particle events can dramatically increase the intensity of the space radiation environment. The enhanced radiation levels during episodes of solar activity must be considered by spacecraft designers and mission planners. This is done by using a reference environment obtained from a solar particle model. Ongoing work will be presented on a model to provide mission specific reference environments at user-specified confidence levels.

  18. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  19. Model studies of volatile diesel exhaust particle formation: are organic vapours involved in nucleation and growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirjola, L.; Karl, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Arnold, F.

    2015-09-01

    A high concentration of volatile nucleation mode particles (NUP) formed in the atmosphere when the exhaust cools and dilutes has hazardous health effects and it impairs the visibility in urban areas. Nucleation mechanisms in diesel exhaust are only poorly understood. We performed model studies using two sectional aerosol dynamics process models AEROFOR and MAFOR on the formation of particles in the exhaust of a diesel engine, equipped with an oxidative after-treatment system and running with low fuel sulfur content (FSC) fuel, under laboratory sampling conditions where the dilution system mimics real-world conditions. Different nucleation mechanisms were tested. Based on the measured gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) and non-volatile core and soot particle number concentrations of the raw exhaust, the model simulations showed that the best agreement between model predictions and measurements in terms of particle number size distribution was obtained by barrier-free heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation between the GSA and a semi-volatile organic vapour combined with the homogeneous nucleation of GSA alone. Major growth of the particles was predicted to occur due to the similar organic vapour at concentrations of (1-2) × 1012 cm-3. The pre-existing core and soot mode concentrations had an opposite trend on the NUP formation, and the maximum NUP formation was predicted if a diesel particle filter (DPF) was used. On the other hand, the model predicted that the NUP formation ceased if the GSA concentration in the raw exhaust was less than 1010 cm-3, which was the case when biofuel was used.

  20. Aerosol-CFD modelling of ultrafine and black carbon particle emission, dilution, and growth near roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Gong, S. L.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Stroud, C. A.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J. R.; Jia, C. Q.

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have shown that on-road vehicle emissions are the dominant source of ultrafine particles (UFP; diameter < 100 nm) in urban areas and near-roadway environments. In order to advance our knowledge on the complex interactions and competition among atmospheric dilution, dispersion and dynamics of UFPs, an aerosol dynamics-CFD coupled model is developed and validated against field measurements. A unique approach of applying periodic boundary conditions is proposed to model pollutant dispersion and dynamics in one unified domain from the tailpipe level to the ambient near-road environment. This approach significantly reduces the size of the computational domain, and therefore, allows fast simulation of multiple scenarios. The model is validated against measured turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and pollution gradients near a major highway. Through a model sensitivity analysis, the relative importance of individual aerosol dynamical processes on the total particle number concentration (N) and particle number-size distribution (PSD) near a highway is investigated. The results demonstrate that (1) coagulation has a negligible effect on N and particle growth, (2) binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN) of H2SO4-H2O is likely responsible for elevated N closest to the road, (3) N and particle growth are very sensitive to the condensation of semi-volatile organics (SVOCs), particle dry deposition, and the interaction between these processes. The results also indicate that, without the proper treatment of atmospheric boundary layer (i.e. its wind profile and turbulence quantities), the nucleation rate would be underestimated by a factor of 5 in the vehicle wake region due to overestimated mixing. Therefore, introducing ABL conditions to activity-based emission models may potentially improve their performance in estimating UFP traffic emissions.

  1. Momentum and Heat Transfer Models for Detonation in Nitromethane with Metal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, R. C.; Zhang, F.; Lien, F.-S.

    2009-12-01

    Models for momentum and heat exchange have been derived from the results of previous 3D mesoscale simulations of detonation in packed aluminum particles saturated with nitromethane, where the shock interaction timescale was resolved. In these models, particle acceleration and heating within the shock and detonation zone are expressed in terms of velocity and temperature transmission factors, which are a function of the metal to explosive density ratio, solid volume fraction and ratio of particle size to detonation zone thickness. These models are incorporated as source terms in the governing equations for continuum dense two-phase flow, and then applied to macroscopic simulation of detonation of nitromethane/aluminum in lightly-cased cylinders. Heterogeneous detonation features such as velocity deficit, enhanced pressure, and critical diameter effects are demonstrated. Various spherical particle diameters from 3-350 μm are utilized where most of the particles react in the expanding detonation products. Results for detonation velocity, pressure history, failure and U-shaped critical diameter behavior are compared to existing experiments.

  2. Momentum and Heat Transfer Models for Detonation in Nitromethane with Metal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, Robert; Zhang, Fan; Lien, Fue-Sang

    2009-06-01

    Models for momentum and heat exchange have been derived from the results of previous 3D mesoscale simulations of detonation in packed aluminum particles saturated with nitromethane, where the shock interaction timescale was resolved. In these models, particle acceleration and heating within the shock and detonation zone have been expressed in terms of velocity and temperature transmission factors, which are a function of metal to explosive density ratio, metal volume fraction and ratio of particle size to detonation zone thickness. These models are incorporated as source terms in the governing equations for continuum dense two-phase flow and macroscopic simulation is then applied to detonation of nitromethane/aluminum in lightly-cased cylinders. Heterogeneous detonation features such as velocity deficit, enhanced pressure, and critical diameter effects are reproduced. Various spherical particle diameters from 3 -- 30 μm are utilized where most of the particles react in the expanding detonation products. Results for detonation velocity, pressure history, failure and U-shaped critical diameter behavior are compared to the existing experiments.

  3. Statistical model for collisions and recollisions of inertial particles in mixing flows.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, K; Mehlig, B

    2016-05-01

    Finding a quantitative description of the rate of collisions between small particles suspended in mixing flows is a long-standing problem. Here we investigate the validity of a parameterisation of the collision rate for identical particles subject to Stokes force, based on results for relative velocities of heavy particles that were recently obtained within a statistical model for the dynamics of turbulent aerosols. This model represents the turbulent velocity fluctuations by Gaussian random functions. We find that the parameterisation gives quantitatively good results in the limit where the "ghost-particle approximation" applies. The collision rate is a sum of two contributions due to "caustics" and to "clustering". Within the statistical model we compare the relative importance of these two collision mechanisms. The caustic formation rate is high when the particle inertia becomes large, and we find that caustics dominate the collision rate as soon as they form frequently. We compare the magnitude of the caustic contribution to the collision rate to the formation rate of caustics. PMID:27225619

  4. Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city.

    PubMed

    Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Delle Monache, L; Stull, R

    2008-02-25

    With the worlds population becoming increasingly focused on coastal locations there is a need to better understand the interactions between anthropogenic emissions and marine atmospheres. Herein an atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. It is shown that the model can reasonably represent the average features of the gas phase and particle climate relative to in situ measurements. It is further demonstrated that reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate, but that the importance of these heterogeneous reactions is critically dependent on both the initial vertical profile of sea spray and the sea-spray source functions. The results emphasize the need for improved understanding of sea spray production and dispersion and further that model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield mis-leading results in terms of emission sensitivities of particle composition and concentrations. PMID:18061242

  5. A Modelling Approach on Fine Particle Spatial Distribution for Street Canyons in Asian Residential Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hong; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Uhrner, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Rapidly increasing urban pollution poses severe health risks.Especially fine particles pollution is considered to be closely related to respiratory and cardiovascular disease. In this work, ambient fine particles are studied in street canyons of a typical Asian residential community using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) dispersion modelling approach. The community is characterised by an artery road with a busy traffic flow of about 4000 light vehicles (mainly cars and motorcycles) per hour at rush hours, three streets with hundreds light vehicles per hour at rush hours and several small lanes with less traffic. The objective is to study the spatial distribution of the ambient fine particle concentrations within micro-environments, in order to assess fine particle exposure of the people living in the community. The GRAL modelling system is used to simulate and assess the emission and dispersion of the traffic-related fine particles within the community. Traffic emission factors and traffic situation is assigned using both field observation and local emissions inventory data. High resolution digital elevation data (DEM) and building height data are used to resolve the topographical features. Air quality monitoring and mobile monitoring within the community is used to validate the simulation results. By using this modelling approach, the dispersion of fine particles in street canyons is simulated; the impact of wind condition and street orientation are investigated; the contributions of car and motorcycle emissions are quantified respectively; the residents' exposure level of fine particles is assessed. The study is funded by "Taiwan Megacity Environmental Research (II)-chemistry and environmental impacts of boundary layer aerosols (Year 2-3) (103-2111-M-001-001-); Spatial variability and organic markers of aerosols (Year 3)(104-2111-M-001 -005 -)"

  6. A MODEL FOR THE ESCAPE OF SOLAR-FLARE-ACCELERATED PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, S.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2013-07-10

    We address the problem of how particles are accelerated by solar flares can escape into the heliosphere on timescales of an hour or less. Impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) bursts are generally observed in association with so-called eruptive flares consisting of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and a flare. These fast SEPs are believed to be accelerated directly by the flare, rather than by the CME shock. However, the precise mechanism by which the particles are accelerated remains controversial. Regardless of the origin of the acceleration, the particles should remain trapped in the closed magnetic fields of the coronal flare loops and the ejected flux rope, given the magnetic geometry of the standard eruptive-flare model. In this case, the particles would reach the Earth only after a delay of many hours to a few days (coincident with the bulk ejecta arriving at Earth). We propose that the external magnetic reconnection intrinsic to the breakout model for CME initiation can naturally account for the prompt escape of flare-accelerated energetic particles onto open interplanetary magnetic flux tubes. We present detailed 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a breakout CME/flare event with a background isothermal solar wind. Our calculations demonstrate that if the event occurs sufficiently near a coronal-hole boundary, interchange reconnection between open and closed fields can occur. This process allows particles from deep inside the ejected flux rope to access solar wind field lines soon after eruption. We compare these results to standard observations of impulsive SEPs and discuss the implications of the model on further observations and calculations.

  7. Real-Time Flood Forecasting System Using Channel Flow Routing Model with Updating by Particle Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, R.; Chikamori, H.; Nagai, A.

    2008-12-01

    A real-time flood forecasting system using channel flow routing model was developed for runoff forecasting at water gauged and ungaged points along river channels. The system is based on a flood runoff model composed of upstream part models, tributary part models and downstream part models. The upstream part models and tributary part models are lumped rainfall-runoff models, and the downstream part models consist of a lumped rainfall-runoff model for hillslopes adjacent to a river channel and a kinematic flow routing model for a river channel. The flow forecast of this model is updated by Particle filtering of the downstream part model as well as by the extended Kalman filtering of the upstream part model and the tributary part models. The Particle filtering is a simple and powerful updating algorithm for non-linear and non-gaussian system, so that it can be easily applied to the downstream part model without complicated linearization. The presented flood runoff model has an advantage in simlecity of updating procedure to the grid-based distributed models, which is because of less number of state variables. This system was applied to the Gono-kawa River Basin in Japan, and flood forecasting accuracy of the system with both Particle filtering and extended Kalman filtering and that of the system with only extended Kalman filtering were compared. In this study, water gauging stations in the objective basin were divided into two types of stations, that is, reference stations and verification stations. Reference stations ware regarded as ordinary water gauging stations and observed data at these stations are used for calibration and updating of the model. Verification stations ware considered as ungaged or arbitrary points and observed data at these stations are used not for calibration nor updating but for only evaluation of forecasting accuracy. The result confirms that Particle filtering of the downstream part model improves forecasting accuracy of runoff at

  8. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Mourant, Judith R.; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides. PMID:27231642

  9. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mourant, Judith R; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides. PMID:27231642

  10. A polarizable coarse-grained protein model for dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Peter, Emanuel K; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor V

    2015-10-01

    We present a new coarse-grained polarizable protein model for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. This method allows large timesteps in particle-based systems and speeds up sampling by many orders of magnitude. Our new model is based on the electrostatic polarization of the protein backbone and a detailed representation of the sidechains in combination with a polarizable water model. We define our model parameters using the experimental structures of two proteins, TrpZip2 and TrpCage. Backmapping and subsequent short replica-exchange molecular dynamics runs verify our approach and show convergence to the experimental structures on the atomistic level. We validate our model on five different proteins: GB1, the WW-domain, the B-domain of Protein A, the peripheral binding subunit and villin headpiece. PMID:26339692

  11. SEPEM: A tool for statistical modeling the solar energetic particle environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Norma; Heynderickx, Daniel; Jiggens, Piers; Aran, Angels; Sanahuja, Blai; Truscott, Pete; Lei, Fan; Jacobs, Carla; Poedts, Stefaan; Gabriel, Stephen; Sandberg, Ingmar; Glover, Alexi; Hilgers, Alain

    2015-07-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are a serious radiation hazard for spacecraft as well as a severe health risk to humans traveling in space. Indeed, accurate modeling of the SEP environment constitutes a priority requirement for astrophysics and solar system missions and for human exploration in space. The European Space Agency's Solar Energetic Particle Environment Modelling (SEPEM) application server is a World Wide Web interface to a complete set of cross-calibrated data ranging from 1973 to 2013 as well as new SEP engineering models and tools. Both statistical and physical modeling techniques have been included, in order to cover the environment not only at 1 AU but also in the inner heliosphere ranging from 0.2 AU to 1.6 AU using a newly developed physics-based shock-and-particle model to simulate particle flux profiles of gradual SEP events. With SEPEM, SEP peak flux and integrated fluence statistics can be studied, as well as durations of high SEP flux periods. Furthermore, effects tools are also included to allow calculation of single event upset rate and radiation doses for a variety of engineering scenarios.

  12. [Particle trajectory model desulfurization spray tower used in numerical simulation of flue gas].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhe; Tian, He-zhong; Hao, Ji-ming; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Han-qiang

    2005-11-01

    The commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT is used to predict the two-phase flow in a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) spray tower. The Euler-Lagrange method is used, in which the gas flow is described with standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and the motion of the liquid droplets is described with the particle trajectory model. The procedure of model definition, including force analysis of liquid particle, gas turbulent dispersion and the gas-liquid coupling method, is presented. The results show that the uniformity of axial gas velocity in the spray tower is satisfactory, and the hollow spray nozzle used in the tower can efficiently prevent short-circuiting of the flue gas. The concentration of liquid droplets in the central region is higher than near the wall, and this problem can be solved by optimizing the arrangement of the spray nozzles near the wall. Model predictions for particle trajectory are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results, and the particle trajectory model can predict the two-phase flow in the spray tower successfully. PMID:16447425

  13. Improving particle filters in rainfall-runoff models: application of the resample-move step and development of the ensemble Gaussian particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza Guingla, D. A.; Pauwels, V. R.; De Lannoy, G. J.; Matgen, P.; Giustarini, L.; De Keyser, R.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work is to analyze the improvement in the performance of the particle filter by including a resample-move step or by using a modified Gaussian particle filter. Specifically, the standard particle filter structure is altered by the inclusion of the Markov chain Monte Carlo move step. The second choice adopted in this study uses the moments of an ensemble Kalman filter analysis to define the importance density function within the Gaussian particle filter structure. Both variants of the standard particle filter are used in the assimilation of densely sampled discharge records into a conceptual rainfall-runoff model. In order to quantify the obtained improvement, discharge root mean square errors are compared for different particle filters, as well as for the ensemble Kalman filter. First, a synthetic experiment is carried out. The results indicate that the performance of the standard particle filter can be improved by the inclusion of the resample-move step, but its effectiveness is limited to situations with limited particle impoverishment. The results also show that the modified Gaussian particle filter outperforms the rest of the filters. Second, a real experiment is carried out in order to validate the findings from the synthetic experiment. The addition of the resample-move step does not show a considerable improvement due to performance limitations in the standard particle filter with real data. On the other hand, when an optimal importance density function is used in the Gaussian particle filter, the results show a considerably improved performance of the particle filter.

  14. A velocity-dissipation stochastic trajectory model for dispersal of heavy particles inside canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duman, T.; Trakhtenbrot, A.; Poggi, D.; Cassiani, M.; Katul, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    While the importance of dispersal of windborne heavy particles such as seeds or pollen inside canopies is rarely disputed, the details needed to describe turbulent fluctuations in such applications continue to draw significant research attention. Turbulence and heavy-particle dispersal within canopies are sensitive to interactions between meteorological conditions and canopy structure as well as on particle shape and mass. In many applications, dispersal of heavy particles is required over a broad range of time scales ranging from hours to several decades thereby frustrating any attempt to resolve all aspects of turbulence. In recent years, Lagrangian stochastic trajectory models have been favored for predicting seed dispersal and are viewed as an acceptable compromise between empirical models with their ad-hoc parameterizations and computationally intensive Large Eddy Simulations. Here, an important feature of turbulence, namely the intermittency in dissipation rate, is incorporated into such trajectory models. Adding this effect has been recently shown to alter scalar dispersion patterns, especially in the far field. This method is applied here to heavy particles, where the long distance dispersal is deemed significant for many applications. This modeling approach was first evaluated using controlled laboratory experiments, where uniform-sized spheres were released within a canopy comprised of uniform cylinders inside a flume (see figure). The extended model that includes intermittency effects, as well as inertial drag forces on the particles, was shown to provide superior fit with the measured dispersal kernel than simpler models that add a constant settling velocity for each particle and/or do not include intermittency. The extended model results captured short distance dispersal and the heavy tails. Next the extended model was evaluated against a field experiment, where plant seeds were manually released inside a hardwood forest canopy (see figure). This

  15. The Effects of Including Non-Thermal Particles in Flare Loop Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, K. K.; Winter, H. D.; Larson, N. L.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we use HyLoop (Winter et al. 2011), a loop model that can incorporate the effects of both MHD and non-thermal particle populations, to simulate soft X-ray emissions in various situations. First of all, we test the effect of acceleration location on the emission in several XRT filters by simulating a series of post flare loops with different injection points for the non-thermal particle beams. We use an injection distribution peaked at the loop apex to represent a direct acceleration model, and an injection distribution peaked at the footpoints to represent the Alfvén wave interaction model. We find that footpoint injection leads to several early peaks in the apex-to-footpoint emission ratio. Second, we model a loop with cusp-shaped geometry based on the eruption model developed byLin & Forbes (2000) and Reeves & Forbes (2005a), and find that early in the flare, emission in the loop footpoints is much brighter in the XRT filters if non-thermal particles are included in the calculation. Finally, we employ a multi-loop flare model to simulate thermal emission and compare with a previous model where a semi-circular geometry was used (Reeves et al. 2007). We compare the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) emission from the two models and find that the cusp-shaped geometry leads to a smaller GOES class flare.

  16. Simulation of mixture microstructures via particle packing models and their direct comparison with real mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliver, Eric A.

    The objective of this thesis to identify and develop techniques providing direct comparison between simulated and real packed particle mixture microstructures containing submicron-sized particles. This entailed devising techniques for simulating powder mixtures, producing real mixtures with known powder characteristics, sectioning real mixtures, interrogating mixture cross-sections, evaluating and quantifying the mixture interrogation process and for comparing interrogation results between mixtures. A drop and roll-type particle-packing model was used to generate simulations of random mixtures. The simulated mixtures were then evaluated to establish that they were not segregated and free from gross defects. A powder processing protocol was established to provide real mixtures for direct comparison and for use in evaluating the simulation. The powder processing protocol was designed to minimize differences between measured particle size distributions and the particle size distributions in the mixture. A sectioning technique was developed that was capable of producing distortion free cross-sections of fine scale particulate mixtures. Tessellation analysis was used to interrogate mixture cross sections and statistical quality control charts were used to evaluate different types of tessellation analysis and to establish the importance of differences between simulated and real mixtures. The particle-packing program generated crescent shaped pores below large particles but realistic looking mixture microstructures otherwise. Focused ion beam milling was the only technique capable of sectioning particle compacts in a manner suitable for stereological analysis. Johnson-Mehl and Voronoi tessellation of the same cross-sections produced tessellation tiles with different the-area populations. Control charts analysis showed Johnson-Mehl tessellation measurements are superior to Voronoi tessellation measurements for detecting variations in mixture microstructure, such as altered

  17. A Lagrangian particle model to predict the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Reiczigel, J.; Rubel, F.

    Airborne spread of bioaerosols in the boundary layer over a complex terrain is simulated using a Lagrangian particle model, and applied to modelling the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus. Two case studies are made with study domains located in a hilly region in the northwest of the Styrian capital Graz, the second largest town in Austria. Mountainous terrain as well as inhomogeneous and time varying meteorological conditions prevent from application of so far used Gaussian dispersion models, while the proposed model can handle these realistically. In the model, trajectories of several thousands of particles are computed and the distribution of virus concentration near the ground is calculated. This allows to assess risk of infection areas with respect to animal species of interest, such as cattle, swine or sheep. Meteorological input data like wind field and other variables necessary to compute turbulence were taken from the new pre-operational version of the non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model LMK ( Lokal-Modell-Kürzestfrist) running at the German weather service DWD ( Deutscher Wetterdienst). The LMK model provides meteorological parameters with a spatial resolution of about 2.8 km. To account for the spatial resolution of 400 m used by the Lagrangian particle model, the initial wind field is interpolated upon the finer grid by a mass consistent interpolation method. Case studies depict a significant influence of local wind systems on the spread of virus. Higher virus concentrations at the upwind side of the hills and marginal concentrations in the lee are well observable, as well as canalization effects by valleys. The study demonstrates that the Lagrangian particle model is an appropriate tool for risk assessment of airborne spread of virus by taking into account the realistic orographic and meteorological conditions.

  18. Modeling the effect of outdoor particle concentrations on indoor concentrations in a heated environment

    SciTech Connect

    Pandian, M.D. )

    1988-01-01

    Exposure to suspended particulate mater in the home or workplace can produce adverse human health effects. Sources of suspended particulate matter include cigarette smoke, consumer spray products, and dust from cement manufacture, metal processing, and coal-fired power generation. The particle concentrations in these indoor environments can be determined from experimental studies or modeling techniques. Many experimental studies have been conducted to determine the mass concentration of total suspended particulate matter, usually expressed in {mu}g/m{sup 3}, and the elemental composition of particulate matter in these environments. However, there is not much reported data on particle size distributions in indoor environments. One of the early indoor modeling efforts was undertaken by Shair and Heitner, who conducted a theoretical analysis for relating indoor pollutant concentrations to those outdoors. The author describes the theoretical analysis and compared it to results obtained from experiments on conditioned cigarette smoke particle concentrations in a room at 20{degrees}C and 60 {percent}.

  19. A comprehensive viscosity model for micro magnetic particle dispersed in silicone oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Im Doo; Kim, Moobum; Park, Seong Jin

    2016-04-01

    Magnetorheological behavior of micro magnetic particle dispersed in silicone oil has been characterized by a multiplied form of phenomenological models taking the effect of shear rate, powder volume fraction, temperature and magnetic flux density. Magnetorheological fluid samples with seven different particle volume fraction were prepared by adding ferrite particles in silicone base oil and their shear viscosity of fluid samples were measured under three different temperatures (40 °C, 70 °C, and 110 °C) and ten different magnetic flux density (0-100 mT). The fluid had an upper limit to the increase of viscosity under the effect of external magnetic field and the saturation values were dependent on the operating temperature, shear rate and volume fraction of magnetic powder. The rheological behaviors have been characterized by our developed model which can be very useful for the precise control of the magnetorheological fluid.

  20. Improved modeling of relativistic collisions and collisional ionization in particle-in-cell codes

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, F.; Gremillet, L.; Decoster, A.; Drouin, M.; Lefebvre, E.

    2012-08-15

    An improved Monte Carlo collisional scheme modeling both elastic and inelastic interactions has been implemented into the particle-in-cell code CALDER[E. Lefebvre et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 629 (2003)]. Based on the technique proposed by Nanbu and Yonemura [J. Comput. Phys. 145, 639 (1998)] allowing to handle arbitrarily weighted macro-particles, this binary collision scheme uses a more compact and accurate relativistic formulation than the algorithm recently worked out by Sentoku and Kemp [J. Comput. Phys. 227, 6846 (2008)]. Our scheme is validated through several test cases, demonstrating, in particular, its capability of modeling the electrical resistivity and stopping power of a solid-density plasma over a broad parameter range. A relativistic collisional ionization scheme is developed within the same framework, and tested in several physical scenarios. Finally, our scheme is applied in a set of integrated particle-in-cell simulations of laser-driven fast electron transport.