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Sample records for positron lifetime measurements

  1. Positron lifetime measurements in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Parmar, Devendra S.

    1991-01-01

    Positron lifetimes in the isotropic phases of chiral nematic liquid crystal formulations and their mixtures up to the racemic level were measured. The lifetime spectra for all liquid crystal systems were analyzed into three components. Although the individual spectra in the left- and right-handed components are identical, their racemic mixtures exhibit much larger orthopositronium lifetimes; these larger lifetimes indicate the presence of larger microvoids. This result is consistent with the reportedly higher thermodynamic stability and color play range in the racemic mixtures of chiral nematic liquid crystals.

  2. Positron lifetime measurements of hydrogen passivation of cation vacancies in yttrium aluminum oxide garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, F. A.; Varney, C. R.; Tarun, M. C.; Rowe, M. C.; Collins, G. S.; McCluskey, M. D.

    2013-11-01

    A charge compensation mechanism is proposed for cation vacancy defects in complex oxides based on positron lifetime measurements, infrared spectroscopy, and composition analysis. Defects were characterized in samples of yttrium aluminum garnet grown in O2 or Ar. However, no positron trapping was detected in samples grown in H2. This is attributed to decoration of cation vacancies with hydrogen, thereby passivating charges of vacancies that otherwise function as positron traps. Infrared spectroscopy gave direct evidence of the presence of hydrogen. Passivation of cation vacancies with hydrogen is proposed as an important mechanism for charge compensation in the defect physics of oxides.

  3. Tomographic Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Butterling, M.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2014-04-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy serves as a perfect tool for studies of open-volume defects in solid materials such as vacancies, vacancy agglomerates, and dislocations. Moreover, structures in porous media can be investigated ranging from 0.3 nm to 30 nm employing the variation of the Positronium lifetime with the pore size. While lifetime measurements close to the material's surface can be performed at positron-beam installations bulk materials, fluids, bio-materials or composite structures cannot or only destructively accessed by positron beams. Targeting those problems, a new method of non-destructive positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy has been developed which features even a 3-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of the spatial lifetime distribution. A beam of intense bremsstrahlung is provided by the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear Accelerator with high Brilliance and low Emittance) at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. Since the generation of bremsstrahlung and the transport to the sample preserves the sharp timing of the electron beam, positrons generated inside the entire sample volume by pair production feature a sharp start time stamp for lifetime studies. In addition to the existing technique of in-situ production of positrons inside large (cm3) bulk samples using high-energy photons up to 16 MeV from bremsstrahlung production, granular position-sensitive photon detectors have been employed. The detector system will be described and results for experiments using samples with increasing complexity will be presented. The Lu2SiO5:Ce scintillation crystals allow resolving the total energy to 5.1 % (root-mean-square, RMS) and the annihilation lifetime to 225 ps (RMS). 3-dimensional annihilation lifetime maps have been created in an offline-analysis employing well-known techniques from PET.

  4. Positron Lifetime Measurements of Subsurface Region in Aluminium Alloy and Aluminium Alloy Composite after Dry Sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryzek, E.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents positron lifetime studies of the subsurface region of AK12 aluminium alloy and Al2O3-particle-reinforced AK12 aluminium alloy composite after sliding against steel in the pin-on-disc machine. The defect depth profile detected in the AK12 alloy extended up to 300?m but for the composite AK12 the range of this profile was significantly shortened to less than˜90?m. The positron lifetime dependence on depth evidences a steep gradient of defect concentration near the surface. The subsurface zones have been also examined using scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Low-temperature positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements for single-crystal nickel oxide containing cation vacancies

    SciTech Connect

    Waber, J.T.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Lynn, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements for positron annihilation in substoichiometric nickelous oxide have been made concomitantly from liquid-helium to room temperature. The concentration of cation vacancies is readily controlled by altering the ambient oxygen pressure while annealing the crystals at 1673/sup 0/K. It was found that neither of the three lifetimes observed or their relative intensities varied significantly with the oxygen pressure, and the bulk rate only increased slightly when the specimen was cooled from room to liquid-helium temperatures. These results are interpreted as indicating that some of the positrons are trapped by the existing cation vacancies and a smaller fraction by vacancy clusters.

  6. Vacancy profile in reverse osmosis membranes studied by positron annihilation lifetime measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, A.; Goto, H.; Shintani, T.; Hirose, M.; Suzuki, R.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The positron annihilation technique using a slow positron beam can be used for the study of the vacancy profiles in typical reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. In this study, the vacancy profile in the polyamide membrane that exhibits a high permselectivity between ions and water was studied using the positron annihilation technique and molecular dynamics simulations. Ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetimes in the surface region of the membranes were evaluated by using a slow positron beam. The diffusion behavior of Na+ and water in the polyamides was simulated by molecular dynamics (MD) methods using the TSUBAME2 supercomputer at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and discussed with the vacancy profile probed by the o-Ps. The results suggested that the large hydration size of Na+ compared to the vacancy size in the polyamides contributes to the increased diffusivity selectivity of water/Na+ that is related to the NaCl desalination performance of the membrane. Both the hydration size of the ions and the vacancy size appeared to be significant parameters to discuss the diffusivity selectivity of water/ions in typical polyamide membranes.

  7. Positron annihilation lifetime measurement and X-ray analysis on 120 MeV Au+7 irradiated polycrystalline tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Charu Lata; Kulriya, Pawan Kumar; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Pujari, Pradeep K.; Patil, Yashashri; Mehta, Mayur; Patel, Priyanka; Khirwadkar, Samir S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to simulate radiation damages in tungsten, potential plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors, surrogate approach of heavy ion irradiation on polycrystalline tungsten is employed. Tungsten specimen is irradiated with gold heavy ions of energy 120 MeV at different fluences. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements are carried out on pristine and ion beam irradiated tungsten specimens. The variation in positron annihilation lifetime in ion irradiated specimens confirms evolution of vacancy clusters under heavy ion irradiation. The pristine and irradiated tungsten specimens have also been characterized for their microstructural, structural, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. X-ray diffractograms of irradiated tungsten specimens show structural integrity of polycrystalline tungsten even after irradiation. Nevertheless, the increase in microstrain, electrical resistivity and microhardness on irradiation indicates creation of lattice damages inside polycrystalline tungsten specimen. On the other hand, the thermal diffusivity has not change much on heavy ion irradiation. The induction of damages in metallic tungsten is mainly attributed to high electronic energy loss, which is 40 keV/nm in present case as obtained from SRIM program. Although, concomitant effect of nuclear losses on damage creation cannot be ignored. It is believed that the energy received by the electronic system is being transferred to the atomic system by electron-phonon coupling. Eventually, elastic nuclear collisions and the transfer of energy from electronic to atomic system via inelastic collision is leading to significant defect generation in tungsten lattice.

  8. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 174102 (2013) Positron lifetime measurements of hydrogen passivation of cation vacancies

    E-print Network

    McCluskey, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    as device materials and for fundamental studies of underlying defect physics.1,2 Garnets in particular have luminescence and scintillation properties.6,8,9 Positron annihilation spectroscopy has particular sensitivity

  9. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  10. Microstructural Characterization of Thin Polyimide Films by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftekhari, A.; St.Clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Singh, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    Positron lifetimes have been measured in a series of thin aromatic polyimide films. No evidence of positronium formation was observed in any of the films investigated. All test films exhibited only two positron lifetime components, the longer component corresponding to the positrons annihilating at shallow traps. Based on these trapped positron lifetimes, free volume fractions have been calculated for all the films tested. A free volume model has been developed to calculate the dielectric constants of thin polyimide films. The experimental and the calculated values for the dielectric constants of the films tested are in reasonably good agreement. It has been further noted that the presence of bulky CF(sub 3) groups and meta linkages in the polyimide structure results in higher free volume fraction and, consequently, lower dielectric constant values for the films studied.

  11. Moisture dependence of positron lifetime in Kevlar-49

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Holt, William H.; Mock, Willis, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Because of filamentary character of Kevlar-49 aramid fibers, there is some concern about the moisture uptake and its effect on plastic composites reinforced with Kevlar-49 fibers. As part of continuing studies of positron lifetime in polymers, we have measured positron lifetime spectra in Kevlar-49 fibers as a function of their moisture content. The long lifetime component intensities are rather low, being only of the order of 2-3 percent. The measured values of long component lifetimes at various moisture levels in the specimens are as follows: 2072 +/- 173 ps (dry); 2013 +/- 193 ps (20.7 percent saturation); 1665 +/- 85 ps (25.7 percent saturation); 1745 +/- 257 ps (32.1 percent saturation); and 1772 +/- 217 ps (100 percent saturation). It is apparent that the long component lifetime at first decreases and then increases as the specimen moisture content increases. These results have been compared with those inferred from Epon-815 and Epon-815/K-49 composite data.

  12. Positron-Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy using Electron Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Butterling, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    2015-06-01

    A new type of an intense source of positrons for materials research has been set up at the superconducting electron linear. The source employs hard X-rays from electron- bremsstrahlung production generating energetic electron-positron pairs inside the sample under investigation. CW-operation allows performing experiments with significantly reduced pile-up artefacts in the detectors compared to pulsed mode operation in conventional accelerators. The high-resolution timing of the accelerator with bunch lengths below 10 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) allows positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) measurements with high time resolution. A single-component annihilation lifetime of Kaptonhas been measured as (381.3 ± 0.3) ps. Employing segmented detectors for the detection of both annihilation photons allows for the first time to perform a 4D tomographic reconstruction of the annihilation sites including the annihilation lifetime.

  13. Positron beam lifetime spectroscopy of atomic scale defect distributions in bulk and microscopic volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.; Sterne, P.; Brown, B.

    1996-05-01

    We are developing a defect analysis capability based on two positron beam lifetime spectrometers: the first is based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator and the second on our high current linac beam. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational and positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick samples. It is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for {ital in}{ital situ} measurements. A second, low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopies is under development at the LLNL high current positron source. This beam will enable defect specific, 3-D maps of defect concentration with sub-micron location resolution and when coupled with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes it will enable new levels of defect concentration mapping and defect identification.

  14. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using an S-band compact electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Kuroda, R.; Tanaka, M.; Kumaki, M.; Oshima, N.; O'Rourke, B. E.; Suzuki, R.; Toyokawa, H.

    2014-02-01

    A new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed using an S-band compact electron linac at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). The high energy (<42MeV), intense (105 photons pulse-1), and ultra-short pulse (3 ps pulse width) photon beam creates positrons throughout an entire sample via pair production. A positron lifetime spectrum can be obtained by measuring the time difference between the accelerator's RF frequency and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. The positron lifetimes for lead and yttria-stabilized zirconia samples have been successfully measured.

  15. Effect of magnetic field on positron lifetimes of Fe, Co and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Tanimura, N.

    2015-06-01

    Positron lifetime spectra of Fe, Co and Ni were measured under magnetic field using a 22Na source. Very small but distinguishable difference of positron lifetime upon magnetic field reversal was observed suggesting the existence of two bulk lifetimes associated with majority and minority spin electrons. Using two spin-dependent Fe bulk lifetimes, the difference Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation spectra between majority and minority spin electrons were also examined. Agreement between experiment and theory indicates that spin-polarized positron annihilation spectroscopy may have potential in investigation of spin-aligned electron momentum distribution.

  16. Moisture determination in composite materials using positron lifetime techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. R.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A technique was developed which has the potential of providing information on the moisture content as well as its depth in the specimen. This technique was based on the dependence of positron lifetime on the moisture content of the composite specimen. The positron lifetime technique of moisture determination and the results of the initial studies are described.

  17. Positron lifetime calculation for possible defects in nanocrystalline copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kai; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Zhu

    2015-10-01

    Structural models for dislocation, vacancy clusters, twin boundary, stacking fault and nanocrystalline sample are constructed using copper as a model material. Positron lifetimes and momentum distributions of annihilating electron-positron pairs are calculated for these structural models. The calculated results indicate that the dislocation, twin boundary and stacking fault are shallow traps to positrons. The dislocation associated with monovacancies gives rise to a positron lifetime similar to that of monovacancies. The calculated positron lifetimes of the nanocrystalline copper show no dependence on the mean grain size. The as-constructed nanocrystalline samples contain vacancy clusters in grain boundaries, and positrons are localized by the vacancy clusters. However after relaxation the samples show only other two kinds of free volumes: one is the interatomic space in grain boundaries which is a shallow trap to positrons; the other is similar to a monovacancy. The latter contributes a positron lifetime of about 163 ps. This kind of free volume is not only observed in grain boundaries but also in the regions near grain boundaries. Positron lifetime calculation combined with the momentum distribution calculation is useful to identify the defect in the nanocrystalline Cu.

  18. Positron lifetimes in solids from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sterne, P.A.; O'Brien, J.C.; Howell, R.H. ); Kaiser, J.H. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-08-07

    We present a first principles method for calculating positron lifetimes in solids, based on self-consistent calculations using the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital method. Local density approximations are used for both electron-electron and electron-positron interactions. Results are presented for a variety of elemental metals and vacancies to demonstrate the reliability of this approach. Theoretical calculations of positron lifetimes can be used to interpret experimental data. As an examples of this, we interpret our experimental lifetime data for the oxide superconductor Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}BiO{sub 3} using calculations based on this method. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Digitized detection of gamma-ray signals concentrated in narrow time windows for transient positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinomura, A. Suzuki, R.; Oshima, N.; O’Rourke, B. E.; Nishijima, T.; Ogawa, H.

    2014-12-15

    A pulsed slow-positron beam generated by an electron linear accelerator was directly used for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy without any positron storage devices. A waveform digitizer was introduced to simultaneously capture multiple gamma-ray signals originating from positron annihilation events during a single accelerator pulse. The positron pulse was chopped and bunched with the chopper signals also sent to the waveform digitizer. Time differences between the annihilation gamma-ray and chopper peaks were calculated and accumulated as lifetime spectra in a computer. The developed technique indicated that positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be performed in a 20 ?s time window at a pulse repetition rate synchronous with the linear accelerator. Lifetime spectra of a Kapton sheet and a thermally grown SiO{sub 2} layer on Si were successfully measured. Synchronization of positron lifetime measurements with pulsed ion irradiation was demonstrated by this technique.

  20. Measurements of defect structures by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of the tellurite glass TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 doped with ions of rare earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golis, E.; Yousef, El. S.; Reben, M.; Kotynia, K.; Filipecki, J.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was the structural analysis of the TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 tellurite glasses doped with ions of the rare-earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+ based on the PALS (Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy) method of measuring positron lifetimes. Values of positron lifetimes and the corresponding intensities may be connected with the sizes and number of structural defects, such as vacancies, mono-vacancies, dislocations or pores, the sizes of which range from a few angstroms to a few dozen nanometres. Experimental positron lifetime spectrum revealed existence of two positron lifetime components ?1 and ?2. Their interpretation was based on two-state positron trapping model where the physical parameters are the annihilation velocity and positron trapping rate.

  1. Positron annihilation lifetime study of polyvinylpyrrolidone for nanoparticle-stabilizing pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Shpotyuk, O; Buj?áková, Z; Baláž, P; Ingram, A; Shpotyuk, Y

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied to characterize free-volume structure of polyvinylpyrrolidone used as nonionic stabilizer in the production of many nanocomposite pharmaceuticals. The polymer samples with an average molecular weight of 40,000gmol(-1) were pelletized in a single-punch tableting machine under an applied pressure of 0.7GPa. Strong mixing in channels of positron and positronium trapping were revealed in the polyvinylpyrrolidone pellets. The positron lifetime spectra accumulated under normal measuring statistics were analysed in terms of unconstrained three- and four-term decomposition, the latter being also realized under fixed 0.125ns lifetime proper to para-positronium self-annihilation in a vacuum. It was shown that average positron lifetime extracted from each decomposition was primary defined by long-lived ortho-positronium component. The positron lifetime spectra treated within unconstrained three-term fitting were in obvious preference, giving third positron lifetime dominated by ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation in a polymer matrix. This fitting procedure was most meaningful, when analysing expected positron trapping sites in polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized nanocomposite pharmaceuticals. PMID:26444751

  2. A modified positron lifetime spectrometer as method of non-destructive testing in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Q.; Shi, J. J.; Jiang, J.; Liu, X. B.; Wang, R. S.; Wu, Y. C.

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims to develop a new non-destructive testing (NDT) method using positron annihilation spectroscopy, a powerful tool to detect vacancy-type defects and defect's chemical environment. A positron NDT system was designed and constructed by modifying the "sandwich" structure of sample-source-sample in the conventional positron lifetime spectrometer. The positron lifetime spectra of one single sample can be measured and analyzed by subtracting the contribution of a reference sample. The feasibility and reliability of the positron NDT system have been tested by analyzing nondestructively deformation damage caused by mechanical treatment in metals and steels. This system can be used for detecting defects and damage in thick or large-size samples without cutting off the sample materials, as well as for detecting two-dimensional distribution of defects.

  3. Defect study of Zn-doped p-type gallium antimonide using positron lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, C. C.; Fung, S.; Beling, C. D.; Huimin, Weng

    2001-08-15

    Defects in p-type Zn-doped liquid-encapsulated Czochralski--grown GaSb were studied by the positron lifetime technique. The lifetime measurements were performed on the as-grown sample at temperature varying from 15 K to 297 K. A positron trapping center having a characteristic lifetime of 317 ps was identified as the neutral V{sub Ga}-related defect. Its concentration in the as-grown sample was found to be in the range of 10{sup 17}--10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. At an annealing temperature of 300{sup o}C, the V{sub Ga}-related defect began annealing out and a new defect capable of trapping positrons was formed. This newly formed defect, having a lifetime value of 379 ps, is attributed to a vacancy--Zn-defect complex. This defect started annealing out at a temperature of 580{sup o}C. A positron shallow trap having binding energy and concentration of 75 meV and 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, respectively, was also observed in the as-grown sample. This shallow trap is attributed to positrons forming hydrogenlike Rydberg states with the ionized dopant acceptor Zn.

  4. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  5. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. Study of Chemical Carcinogens by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.; Karasev, A. O.

    2013-11-01

    We have used positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to study the carcinogens C21H20BrN3, C4H7Cl2O4P, CCl4, CHCl3, AlF3, C8H12N4O, C6H4Cl2 and the non-carcinogens H2O, AlCl3, CH2Cl2, C2H6OS. We have established a correlation between the annihilation characteristics of the studied compounds and their degree of carcinogenicity.

  7. Voids in mixed-cation silicate glasses: Studies by positron annihilation lifetime and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Reben, M; Golis, E; Filipecki, J; Sitarz, M; Kotynia, K; Jele?, P; Grelowska, I

    2014-08-14

    PALS in comparison with FTIR studies have been applied to investigate the structure of different oxide glasses. Three components of the positron lifetime ? (?1 para- and ?3 ortho-positronium and ?2 intermediate lifetime component) and their intensities were obtained. The results of the calculation of mean values of positron lifetimes for the investigated glasses showed the existence of a long-living component on the positron annihilation lifetime spectra. From the Tao-Eldrup formula we can estimate the size of free volume. On the basis of the measurements we can conclude that the size and fraction of free volume reaches the biggest value for the fused silica glass. The degree of network polymerisation increases void size. PMID:24815814

  8. Measurement of charm meson lifetimes

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhao, L.

    1999-06-01

    We report measurements of the D-0, D-,(+) and D-s(+) meson lifetimes using 3.7 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) annihilation data collected near the Y(4S) resonance with the CLEO detector. The measured lifetimes of the D-0, D+, and D-s(+) mesons are 408.5 +/- 4.1...

  9. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  10. Investigation of free volume changes in the structure of the polymer bifocal contact lenses using positron lifetime spectroscopy PALS.

    PubMed

    Filipecki, Jacek; Kocela, Agnieszka; Korzekwa, Piotr; Filipecka, Katarzyna; Golis, Edmund; Korzekwa, Witold

    2011-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy PALS has been applied of free volume properties in bifocal contact lenses. The measurements have been made on new lenses and then after one, two, three and four weeks wear. The longest lifetime, obtained via three-component analyses of the spectra, was associated with the pick-off annihilation of ortho-positronium trapped in the free volume. After wear of the lenses changes in the ortho-positronium lifetimes and the relative intensity of the longest component were observed. These results are discussed on the basis of a free volume model. PMID:21866793

  11. Development of a compact and fast response detector using an Yb:Lu2O3 scintillator for lifetime sensitive positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Kuroda, R.; Tanaka, M.; Oshima, N.; O'Rourke, B. E.; Suzuki, R.; Toyokawa, H.; Watanabe, K.; Yanagida, T.; Yagi, H.; Yanagitani, T.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a method for obtaining three-dimensional imaging measurements of the defect distribution inside industrial materials by measuring positron lifetimes, in addition to using the imaging technique of positron emission tomography. A compact and fast response detector that uses an Yb3+-doped Lu2O3 scintillator and a photomultiplier tube was developed and tested. Yb3+ charge transfer luminescence exhibits a fast response in the ultraviolet and visible regions. The first measurement of the positron lifetime for a bulk material using an Yb:Lu2O3 scintillator was carried out. The lifetime of positrons created inside an yttria-stabilized zirconia block via pair production produced by ultrashort photon pulses was successfully measured.

  12. Analytical evidence for quantum states in aqueous vanadium pentoxide with positron lifetime spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    L. V. Elnikova

    2010-04-26

    The possibility of registration of quantum states, such as the coalescence of droplets (tactoids) in the sol phase of aqueous vanadium pentoxide V$_2$O$_5$, with positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy is discussed. The decrease of the long-living positronium (Ps) lifetime term in the result of the coalescence of V$_2$O$_5$ tactoids is predicted.

  13. Analytical evidence for quantum states in aqueous vanadium pentoxide with positron lifetime spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Elnikova, L V

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of registration of quantum states, such as the coalescence of droplets in the sol phase of aqueous vanadium pentoxide V$_2$O$_5$, with positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy is discussed. The decrease of positronium lifetime in the result of the coalescence is explaned.

  14. Muon lifetime measurements at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, David M.

    2009-12-01

    The Fermi constant, GF, is most precisely determined by the muon lifetime, ??. Calculations of the two-loop terms in the extraction of GF from ?? in the late 1990's and early 2000's reduced the theoretical uncertainty on the extraction by two orders of magnitude and motivated a new generation of muon lifetime experiments. The FAST and MuLan experiments have the most ambitious precision goals, and take place at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Both have released intermediate results, and have compatible final precision goals of 2 ppm and 1 ppm respectively. Their intermediate measurements have improved the world average muon lifetime to ?? = 2.197035 ?s is (8 ppm), and new results at the precision goals are expected in 2010. Although the goals are similar, the experiments have different systematic uncertainties and provide an excellent cross-check on each other.

  15. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  16. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  17. Characterization of interfaces in Binary and Ternary Polymer Blends by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    A miscible blend is a single-phase system with compact packing of the polymeric chains/segments due configuration/conformational changes upon blending. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) is the most employed method to ascertain whether the blend is miscible or immiscible. Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS) has been employed in recent times to study miscibility properties of polymer blends by monitoring the ortho-Positronium annihilation lifetimes as function of composition. However, just free volume monitoring and the DSC methods fail to provide the composition dependent miscibility of blends. To overcome this limitation, an alternative approach based on hydrodynamic interactions has been developed to derive this information using the same o-Ps lifetime measurements. This has led to the development of a new method of measuring composition dependent miscibility level in binary and ternary polymer blends. Further, the new method also provides interface characteristics for immiscible blends. The interactions between the blend components has a direct bearing on the strength of adhesion at the interface and hence the hydrodynamic interaction. Understanding the characteristic of interfaces which decides the miscibility level of the blend and their end applications is made easy by the present method. The efficacy of the present method is demonstrated for few binary and ternary blends.

  18. Free volume structure of realgar ?-As4S4 by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Ingram, A.; Demchenko, P.

    2015-04-01

    Atomic-deficient free volume structure of realgar ?-As4S4, the low-temperature modification, of tetraarsenic tetrasulfide polymorphs, is studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Eventual channels of positron annihilation in this molecular crystal are shown to be connected with low electron density entities around cage As4S4 molecules composing realgar-type structure of monoclinic P21/n space group. The overlapped spaces of bond-free solid angles around S atoms forming self-closed As4S4 molecules contribute preferentially to positron trapping modes, while a competitive influence of bound positron-electron states (positronium) stabilized in intermolecular spaces occurs also to be essential in the decomposed lifetime spectra too.

  19. [Positron annihilation lifetime spectrometry (PALS) and its pharmaceutical applications].

    PubMed

    Sebe, István; Szabó, Barnabás; Zelkó, Romána

    2012-01-01

    PALS is one of the most widely used "nuclear probe" techniques for the tracking of the structural characteristics of materials. The method is based on the matter-energy equivalence principle recognized by Einstein: the electrons and positrons as particle-antiparticle pairs disappear in mutual destruction of particles, they annihilate with high-energy gamma-radiation, thus "particle-energy transition" occurs. The properties of the resulting radiation exactly correspond to the relevant properties of the electron and positron preceding the annihilation. Since electrons occur in all types of materials, the phenomenon of positron annihilation can play in any environment; consequently the method can be used for the analysis of each type of materials (crystalline and amorphous, organic and inorganic, biotic and abiotic). The present paper provides an overview of the theoretical physical background, the practical realization and evaluation of methods, their limitations, and summarizes the pharmaceutical applications published in recent years. PMID:22570984

  20. Positron annihilation spectroscopy with magnetically analyzed beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Lifetime measurements with magnetically analyzed positron beams were made in condensed media with uniform and non-uniform properties. As expected, the lifetime values with magnetically analyzed positron beams in uniform targets are similar to those obtained with conventional positron sources. The lifetime values with magnetically analyzed beams in targets which have non-uniform properties vary with positron energy and are different from the conventional positron source derived lifetime values in these targets.

  1. The study of synthetic food dyes by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    By method of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), substances are food dyes were studied: E-102 (Tartrazine), E-124 (Ponso 4R), E 132 (Indigo carmine), E-133 (Brilliant Blue), E-151 (Black Shiny). They are examined for the presence of carcinogenic properties. The difference between dyes having explicit carcinogenic properties and mutagenic properties (non-explicit carcinogens) is established.

  2. Measurement of the ?-lepton lifetime at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Belous, K.; Shapkin, M.; Sokolov, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, Anu; Bhuyan, Bipul; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dutta, Deepanwita; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, Takanori; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, Igal; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, Jean; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlova, Galina; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, Todd; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ritter, M.; Rohrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Yoshihide; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santel, Daniel; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Stanic, S.; Stanic, M.; Steder, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Tatishvili, Gocha; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Vahsen, Sven E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Youngmin; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-01-23

    The lifetime of the Tau-lepton is measured using the process , where both leptons decay to . The result for the mean lifetime, based on of data collected with the Belle detector at the resonance and below, is . The first measurement of the lifetime difference between and is performed. The upper limit on the relative lifetime difference between positive and negative leptons is at 90% C.L. (That would make sense if ERICA could take RTF....)

  3. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)–Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    PubMed Central

    Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model. PMID:24957061

  4. Lifetime measurements and tau physics at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Gladney, L.D.

    1984-05-01

    Recent updates on the measurements of the tau and D/sup 0/ lifetimes by the Mark II Collaboration and on measurements of the tau and B-hadron lifetimes by the MAC Collaboration are presented. A new determination of an upper limit for the tau neutrino mass by the Mark II Collaboration and a recent measurement of Cabibbo-suppressed tau decay branching ratios from the DELCO Collaboration are also presented. 18 references.

  5. Dark matter annihilations and decays after the AMS-02 positron measurements

    E-print Network

    Alejandro Ibarra; Anna S. Lamperstorfer; Joseph Silk

    2014-03-27

    The AMS-02 collaboration has recently presented measurements of excellent quality of the cosmic electron and positron fluxes as well as the positron fraction. We use the measurements of the positron flux to derive, for the first time, limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section and lifetime for various final states. Working under the well-motivated assumption that a background positron flux exists from spallations of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium and from astrophysical sources, we find strong limits on the dark matter properties which are competitive, although slightly weaker, than those derived from the positron fraction. Specifically, for dark matter particles annihilating only into e+ e- or into mu+ mu-, our limits on the annihilation cross section are stronger than the thermal value when the dark matter mass is smaller than 100 GeV or 60 GeV, respectively.

  6. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau ..-->.. nu/sub tau/W and b ..-->.. cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  7. Photo-degradation of Lexan polycarbonate studied using positron lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hareesh, K.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Pandey, A. K.; Meghala, D.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2013-02-05

    The free volume properties of pristine and UV irradiated Lexan polycarbonate have been investigated using Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS). The decrease in o-Ps life time and free volume size of irradiated sample is attributed to free volume modification and formation of more stable free radicals. These free radicals are formed due to the breakage of C-O bonds in Lexan polycarbonate after irradiation. This is also supported by the decrease in the intensity of C-O bond after exposure to UV-radiation as studied from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and it also shows that benzene ring does not undergo any changes after irradiation.

  8. Axial Nanometer Distances Measured by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    E-print Network

    Enderlein, Jörg

    Axial Nanometer Distances Measured by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy Michael Berndt, Mike with nanometer precision. KEYWORDS Absolute distance measurement, fluorescence lifetime, FLIM, microtubules¨ttingen, Germany ABSTRACT We present a novel fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy technique to measure absolute

  9. A positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopic study of the corrosion protective properties of epoxy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to measure the free volume cavity sizes and free volume fractions of crosslinked epoxy coatings on steel before and after saturation with liquid water at 23[degrees]C. A direct linear relationship between the equilibrium volume fraction of water absorbed and the dry relative free volume fraction of bisphenol A epoxy coatings was found. The free volume cavity sizes and the number of free volume cavities per unit volume of these epoxies were found to decrease after water saturation. These decreases are ascribed to the occupation of 13-17% of the free volume cavities by 2-4 water molecules per cavity. The free volume cavity size of polyglycol diepoxides was found to increase after water saturation. This increase is ascribed to the expansion of the free volume cavities by water, which is substantiated by the macroscopic swelling observed in these coatings. An inverse, linear relationship between the equilibrium water uptake and the relative free volume fraction of these coatings were observed. This result coupled with the fact that less than one molecule of nitrobenzene was determined to fit into an epoxy free volume cavity, and that nitrobenzene is quite soluble in most of the epoxides, indicates that other factors besides the magnitude of the free volume fraction affect the amount of solvent absorbed by epoxy coatings. The small percentage of free volume occupied by water and the small number of water molecules capable of filling each void of the bisphenol A epoxies after water saturation correlate to the high impedance values and the good corrosion protection of these coatings, suggesting that water passes through these coatings by slow diffusion through the connected free volume cavities in the coating. Increases in the free volume cavity sizes of the polyglycol diepoxides after water saturation correlate to the low impedance and the poor corrosion protection of these coatings.

  10. Lifetime measurement in ^170Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Krücken, R.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Cooper, J. R.; Cederkäll, J.; Caprio, M.; Novak, J. R.; Zamfir, N. V.; Barton, C.

    1999-10-01

    The nature of the low lying K^?=0^+ excitations in deformed nuclei have recently been subject of intense discussion. In this context we present results from a Coulomb excitation experiment on ^170Yb using a 70MeV ^16O beam on a gold backed, 1.5 mg/cm^2 thick ^170Yb target. The beam was delivered by the ESTU tandem accelerator of WNSL at Yale University. Gamma rays were detected by the YRAST Ball array in coincidence with back-scattered ^16O particles, which were detected in an array of 8 solar cells. Lineshapes were observed for several transitions from collective states in ^170Yb and the lifetimes for those states were extracted using a standard DSAM analysis. The results will be presented together with a short introduction to the solar cell array at Yale (SCARY) that was used to make angular selection of the excited ^170Yb nuclei. This work is supported by the US-DOE under grant numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  11. A Measurement of the Ds+ Lifetime

    E-print Network

    Stenson, K; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Castromonte, C; Göbel, C; Machado, A A; Magnin, J; Massafferri, A; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; Dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Stenson, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Pacetti, S; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Hernández, H; López, A M; Méndez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Ramírez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Luiggi, E; Moore, J E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Vaandering, E W; Link, M; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2005-01-01

    A high statistics measurement of the Ds+ lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. We describe the analysis of the two decay modes, Ds+ -> phi(1020)pi+ and Ds+ -> \\bar{K}*(892)0K+, used for the measurement. The measured lifetime is 507.4 +/- 5.5 (stat.) +/- 5.1 (syst.) fs using 8961 +/- 105 Ds+ -> phi(1020)pi+ and 4680 +/- 90 Ds+ -> \\bar{K}*(892)0K+ decays. This is a significant improvement over the present world average.

  12. Studies of unicellular micro-organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae by means of Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Kubicz, E; Zgardzi?ska, B; Bednarski, T; Bia?as, P; Czerwi?ski, E; Gajos, A; Gorgol, M; Kami?ska, D; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemie?, W; Nied?wiecki, S; Pa?ka, M; Raczy?ski, L; Rajfur, Z; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wi?licki, W; Zieli?ski, M; Moskal, P

    2015-01-01

    Results of Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and microscopic studies on simple microorganisms: brewing yeasts are presented. Lifetime of ortho - positronium (o-Ps) were found to change from 2.4 to 2.9 ns (longer lived component) for lyophilised and aqueous yeasts, respectively. Also hygroscopicity of yeasts in time was examined, allowing to check how water - the main component of the cell - affects PALS parameters, thus lifetime of o-Ps were found to change from 1.2 to 1.4 ns (shorter lived component) for the dried yeasts. The time sufficient to hydrate the cells was found below 10 hours. In the presence of liquid water an indication of reorganization of yeast in the molecular scale was observed. Microscopic images of the lyophilised, dried and wet yeasts with best possible resolution were obtained using Inverted Microscopy (IM) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) methods. As a result visible changes to the surface of the cell membrane were observed in ESEM images.

  13. Per-fluorinated sulfonic acid/PTFE copolymer studied by positron annihilation lifetime and gas permeation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Hamdy F. M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.; Ohira, A.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism of gas permeation in per-fluorinated sulfonic acid/PTFE copolymer Fumapem® membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells has been investigated from the viewpoint of free volume. Three different samples, Fumapem® F-950, F-1050 and F-14100 membranes with ion exchange capacity (IEC) = 1.05, 0.95 and 0.71 meq/g, respectively were used after drying. Free volume was quantified using the positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) technique and gas permeabilities were measured for O2 and H2 as function of temperature. Good linear correlation between the logarithm of the permeabilities at different temperatures and reciprocal free volume indicate that gas permeation in dry Fumapem® is governed by the free volume. Nevertheless permeabilities are much smaller than the corresponding flexible chain polymer with a similar free volume size due to stiff chains of the perfluoroethylene backbone.

  14. Confined water in controlled pore glass CPG-10-120 studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šauša, O.; Mat'ko, I.; Illeková, E.; Macová, E.; Berek, D.

    2015-06-01

    The solidification and melting of water confined in the controlled pore glass (CPG) with average pore size 12.6 nm has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The fully-filled sample of CPG by water as well as the samples of CPG with different content of water were used. The measurements show the presence of amorphous and crystalline phases of water in this type and size of pores, freezing point depression of a confined liquid and presence of certain transitions at lower temperatures, which could be detected only for cooling regime. The localization of confined water in the partially filled pores of CPG at room temperature was studied.

  15. Lifetime measurements in {sup 178}Hf

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, R.C. de; Aprahamian, A.; Boerner, H.G.; Doll, C.; Jentschel, M.; Bruce, A.M.; Lesher, S.R.

    2000-02-01

    Lifetimes of levels from K{sup {pi}} = 2{sup +}, K{sup {pi}} = 4{sup +} and several K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup +} bands have been measured in the {sup 178}Hf nucleus using the GRID technique. Lifetimes of the 2{sup +} and 3{sup +} levels were measured within the K{sup {pi}} = 2{sup +} {gamma} band. A lower limit was established for the lifetime of the 4{sup +} level of the K{sup {pi}} = 4{sup +} band. The resulting upper limits for the absolute B(E2) values exclude collective transitions from the K{sup {pi}} = 4{sup +} to the ground state band but not to the K{sup {pi}} = 2{sup +} {gamma} band. Level lifetimes were also measured for several states within three separate K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup +} bands. Evidence is presented for a previously unobserved case of two excited K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup +} bands being connected via collective E2 transitions.

  16. Free volume of mixed cation borosilicate glass sealants elucidated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and its correlation with glass properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Prasanta K.; Rath, Sangram K.; Sharma, Sandeep K.; Sudarshan, Kathi; Pujari, Pradeep K.; Chongdar, Tapas K.; Gokhale, Nitin M.

    2015-01-01

    The role of La+3/Sr+2 ratios, which is varied from 0.08 to 5.09, on density, molar volume, packing fraction, free volume, thermal and electrical properties in strontium lanthanum aluminoborosilicate based glass sealants intended for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications is evaluated. The studies reveal expansion of the glass network evident from increasing molar volume and decreasing packing fraction of glasses with progressive La+3 substitutions. The molecular origin of these macroscopic structural features can be accounted for by the free volume parameters measured from positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The La+3 induced expanded glass networks show increased number of subnanoscopic voids with larger sizes, as revealed from the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime and its intensity. A remarkably direct correspondence between the molar volume and fractional free volume trend is established with progressive La2O3 substitution in the glasses. The effect of these structural changes on the glass transition temperature, softening temperature, coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal stability as well as electrical conductivity has been studied.

  17. Effect of water on glass transition in starch/sucrose matrices investigated through positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep Kumar; Zaydouri, Abdelhadi; Roudaut, Gaëlle; Duplâtre, Gilles

    2011-11-21

    Glass transition is studied through positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) in maize starch matrices containing 10 (batch STS10) and 20 (STS20) w/w% sucrose, as a function of temperature (T) and water content (c(w)). To circumvent important losses of water upon heating while recording the PALS spectra, a new method is developed: instead of a series of measurements of ?(3), the triplet positronium lifetime, at different T, the latter is kept constant and the series relates to c(w), which is left to decrease at a constant rate. Similarly to the changes in ?(3) with T, the ?(3)vs. c(w) plots obtained show a smooth linear increase until a break, denoting the occurrence of glass transition, followed by a sharper increase. The gradients appear to be independent of T. The variation of the glass transition temperature, T(g), with c(w) shows a broad sigmoid with a large linear central part; as expected from the plasticising effect of sucrose, the plot for STS20 lies some 10 K below that for STS10. Results from differential scanning calorimetry for STS20 yield T(g) values some 15 K higher than from PALS. On the basis of the general shape of the ?(3)vs. T variations, a general equation is set for ?(3)(T, c(w)), leading one to expect a similar shape for ?(3)vs. c(w), as experimentally observed. PMID:21956245

  18. Physical Selectivity of Molecularly Imprinted polymers evaluated through free volume size distributions derived from Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasang, T.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    The technique of imprinting molecules of various sizes in a stable structure of polymer matrix has derived multitudes of applications. Once the template molecule is extracted from the polymer matrix, it leaves behind a cavity which is physically (size and shape) and chemically (functional binding site) compatible to the particular template molecule. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) is a well known technique to measure cavity sizes precisely in the nanoscale and is not being used in the field of MIPs effectively. This method is capable of measuring nanopores and hence suitable to understand the physical selectivity of the MIPs better. With this idea in mind, we have prepared molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with methacrylicacid (MAA) as monomer and EGDMA as cross linker in different molar ratio for three different size template molecules, viz. 4-Chlorophenol (4CP)(2.29 Å), 2-Nephthol (2NP) (3.36 Å) and Phenolphthalein (PP) (4.47Å). FTIR and the dye chemical reactions are used to confirm the complete extraction of the template molecules from the polymer matrix. The free volume size and its distribution have been derived from the measured o-Ps lifetime spectra. Based on the free volume distribution analysis, the percentage of functional cavities for the three template molecules are determined. Percentage of functional binding cavities for 4-CP molecules has been found out to be 70.2% and the rest are native cavities. Similarly for 2NP it is 81.5% and nearly 100% for PP. Therefore, PALS method proves to be very precise and accurate for determining the physical selectivity of MIPs.

  19. Pore size determination of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibril films by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Hayaka; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Iwamoto, Shinichiro; Kumamoto, Yoshiaki; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Isogai, Akira

    2011-11-14

    Wood cellulose nanofibril films with sodium carboxylate groups prepared from a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized pulp exhibited an extremely low oxygen permeability of 0.0008 mL ?m m(-2) day(-1) kPa(-1) at 0% relative humidity (RH). Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to determine the pore sizes in wood and tunicate TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibril (TOCN-COONa) films in a vacuum (i.e., at 0% RH). PALS analysis revealed that the pore size of the wood TOCN-COONa films remained nearly at 0.47 nm from the film surface to the interior of the film. This is probably the cause of this high oxygen-barrier properties at 0% RH. The crystalline structure of TOCN-COONa also contributes to the high oxygen-barrier properties of the wood TOCN-COONa films. However, the oxygen permeability of the wood TOCN-COONa films increased to 0.17 mL ?m m(-2) day(-1) kPa(-1) at 50% RH, which is one of the shortcomings of hydrophilic TOCN-COONa films. PMID:21995723

  20. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS): a probe for molecular organisation in self-assembled biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Fong, Celesta; Dong, Aurelia W; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-07-21

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been shown to be highly sensitive to conformational, structural and microenvironmental transformations arising from subtle geometric changes in molecular geometry in self-assembling biomimetic systems. The ortho-positronium (oPs) may be considered an active probe that can provide information on intrinsic packing and mobility within low molecular weight solids, viscous liquids, and soft matter systems. In this perspective we provide a critical overview of the literature in this field, including the evolution of analysis software and experimental protocols with commentary upon the practical utility of PALS. In particular, we discuss how PALS can provide unique insight into the macroscopic transport properties of several porous biomembrane-like nanostructures and suggest how this insight may provide information on the release of drugs from these matrices to aid in developing therapeutic interventions. We discuss the potentially exciting and fruitful application of this technique to membrane dynamics, diffusion and permeability. We propose that PALS can provide novel molecular level information that is complementary to conventional characterisation techniques. PMID:25948334

  1. Detection of Atomic Scale Changes in the Free Volume Void Size of Three-Dimensional Colorectal Cancer Cell Culture Using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Plaza-Izurieta, Leticia; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Plazaola, Fernando; Bilbao, Jose Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides a direct measurement of the free volume void sizes in polymers and biological systems. This free volume is critical in explaining and understanding physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Moreover, PALS has been recently proposed as a potential tool in detecting cancer at early stages, probing the differences in the subnanometer scale free volume voids between cancerous/healthy skin samples of the same patient. Despite several investigations on free volume in complex cancerous tissues, no positron annihilation studies of living cancer cell cultures have been reported. We demonstrate that PALS can be applied to the study in human living 3D cell cultures. The technique is also capable to detect atomic scale changes in the size of the free volume voids due to the biological responses to TGF-?. PALS may be developed to characterize the effect of different culture conditions in the free volume voids of cells grown in vitro. PMID:24392097

  2. A measurement of the ?(b)^0 lifetime

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; OPAL Collaboration; Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Altekamp, N.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.

    1995-06-29

    s __ __ @ 29June1995 PHYSICS LETTERS B ELSEVIER Physics Letters B 353 (1995) 402-412 A measurement of the AZ lifetime OPAL Collaboration R. Akers p, G. Alexander w, J. Allison P, N. Altekamp e, K. Ametewee Y, K.J. Anderson i, S. Anderson e, S. Arcelli b..., S. Asai ‘, D. Axen ac, G. Azuelos r,i, A.H. Ball 9, E. Barberio z, R.J. Barlow p, R. Bartoldus ‘, J.R. Batley e, G. Beaudoin r, S. Bethke n, A. Beck w, G.A. Beck m, C. Beeston p, T. Behnke aa, K.W. Bell t, G. Bella w, S. Bentvelsen h, P. Berlichj...

  3. Level Lifetime Measurements in ^150Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C. J.; Krücken, R.; Beausang, C. W.; Caprio, M. A.; Casten, R. F.; Cooper, J. R.; Hecht, A. A.; Newman, H.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Wolf, A.; Zyromski, K. E.; Zamfir, N. V.; Börner, H. G.

    2000-10-01

    Shape/phase coexistence and the evolution of structure in the region around ^152Sm have recently been of great interest. Experiments performed at WNSL, Yale University, measured the lifetime of low spin states in a target of ^150Sm with the recoil distance method (RDM) and the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM). The low spin states, both yrast and non-yrast, were populated via Coulomb excitation with a beam of ^16O. The experiments were performed with the NYPD plunger in conjunction with the SPEEDY ?-ray array. The SCARY array of solar cells was used to detect backward scattered projectiles, selecting forward flying Coulomb excited target nuclei. The measured lifetimes yield, for example, B(E2) values for transitions such as the 2^+2 arrow 2^+1 and the 2^+3 arrow 0^+_1. Data from the RDM measurment and the DSAM experiment will be presented. This work was supported by the US DOE under grants DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  4. Effect of interfacial interaction on free volumes in phenol-formaldehyde resin-carbon nanotube composites: positron annihilation lifetime and age momentum correlation studies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S K; Prakash, J; Sudarshan, K; Maheshwari, P; Sathiyamoorthy, D; Pujari, P K

    2012-08-21

    The phenol-formaldehyde-carbon nanotube composites were characterized for their free volume properties and interfacial interactions between nanotubes and the polymer matrix. The base polymeric material was a novolac type phenol-formaldehyde (PF) condensation resin cross-linked with para-toluene sulfonic acid. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using a catalytical chemical vapor deposition method and characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The PF resin-carbon nanotubes composites having 2, 5, 10 and 20% (w/w%) MWCNTs were prepared. The crystallinity and morphology of the samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The free volume size in the polymer nanocomposites was observed to increase with the increase in nanotube content. Positron age momentum correlation (AMOC) studies revealed the electronic environment around different positron annihilation sites. The studies showed that ortho-positronium principally annihilates from interfacial regions of polymer and nanotubes in the nanocomposite. The positron lifetime studies together with AMOC measurements indicate an increase in the free volumes at the interface of polymer and MWCNTs in the composite. The free positron intensities showed that the polymer and nanotubes are weakly interacting in this system. PMID:22688656

  5. Photoluminescence lifetime measurements in InP wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip; Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    A simple apparatus to measure the minority carrier lifetime in InP has been developed. The technique stimulates the sample with a short pulse of light from a diode laser and measures the photoluminescence decay to extract the minority carrier lifetime. The photoluminescence lifetime in InP as a function of doping on both n- and p-type material is examined. The results also show a marked difference in the lifetime of n-type InP and p-type InP of similar doping levels. N-type InP shows a lifetime considerably longer than the expected radiative limited lifetime.

  6. MuLan, a part-per-million measurement of the positive muon lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorringe, Tim

    2010-11-01

    We report the results from a part-per-million measurement of the positive muon lifetime ??, and a commensurate determination of the Fermi constant GF, by the MuLan Collaboration. The Fermi constant governs the rates of all weak interaction processes and, together with the fine structure constant ? and the Z-boson mass MZ, fixes the electroweak sector of the Standard Model. Additionally, precise knowledge of the free muon lifetime ?? is necessary for interpreting the results from ongoing lifetime measurements of muonic hydrogen and deuterium atoms. The MuLan experiment was conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland using a pulsed surface muon beam, in-vacuum muon-stopping targets, and a large acceptance, finely segmented, fast timing, scintillator array. The scintillator pulses were recorded by 500 MHz, 8-bit waveform digitizers and stored by a high-speed data acquisition system. A total of ˜10^12 decay positrons from muon stops in both a magnetized iron alloy target and a crystal quartz target were recorded. Thorough studies were conducted of systematic effects from positron pulse pileup, muon spin rotation, and other sources. The measured lifetimes from the two different targets are in excellent agreement and together yield a measurement of ?? to better than 1.3 ppm and a determination of GF to better than 0.8 ppm.

  7. Measurement of Beam Lifetime and Applications for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    Beam lifetime studies for the SPEAR3 storage ring are presented. The three lifetime components are separated with lifetime measurements under various combinations of beam currents and fill patterns and vertical scraper scans. Touschek lifetime is studied with rf voltage scans and with the horizontal or vertical scrapers inserted. The measurements are explained with calculations based on the calibrated lattice model. Quantum lifetime measurements are performed with reduced longitudinal and horizontal apertures, respectively, from which we deduce the radiation energy loss down to a few keV per revolution and the horizontal beam size.

  8. Positron annihilation lifetime studies of changes in free volume on some biorelevant nitrogen heterocyclic compounds and their S-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, K R; Khodair, A I; Shaban, S Y

    2015-11-01

    A series of N-heterocyclic compounds was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy as well as Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) at room temperature. The results showed that the formation probability and life time of ortho-positronium in this series are structure and electron-donation character dependent, and can give more information about the structure. The DBAR provides direct information about the change of core and valance electrons as well as the number of defect types present in these compounds. PMID:26272166

  9. Time Stability in Detectors for a 1 ppm Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Brett

    2007-10-01

    The MuLan experiment aims to obtain a 1 ppm measurement of the positive muon lifetime. In a 22 ?s measurement period for the muon lifetime there are considerably more muon decays at the start of the time and less near the end. We will determine if this bombardment of positrons will create a time delay within the detectors. A laser pulse is sent to 24 of the 340 detectors used to make the positive muon lifetime fit. The same pulse is also sent to a reference detector that does not go into the lifetime fit. The laser pulses are used to measure the time difference between the reference detector and the 24 detectors used to make the lifetime fit. If the muon bombardment does make a considerable difference, then graphing the mean time difference for a specific detector vs the time in the measurement period will show a slope. For a 1 ppm measurement, we need to make sure the time difference at the beginning of the period is within 2.2 x 10-13 s from the end of the period.

  10. Z .Applied Surface Science 149 1999 97102 Unfolding positron lifetime spectra with neural networks

    E-print Network

    Pázsit, Imre

    is based on the use of artificial neural networks ANNs . By using data from simulated positron spectra: Artificial neural networks ANNs ; Amplitudes; Simulation model 1. Introduction Determination of mean

  11. Application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) to study the nanostructure in amphiphile self-assembly materials: phytantriol cubosomes and hexosomes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aurelia W; Fong, Celesta; Waddington, Lynne J; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-01-21

    Self-assembled amphiphile nanostructures of colloidal dimensions such as cubosomes and hexosomes are of interest as delivery vectors in pharmaceutical and nanomedicine applications. Translation would be assisted through a better of understanding of the effects of drug loading on the internal nanostructure, and the relationship between this nanostructure and drug release profile. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is sensitive to local microviscosity and is used as an in situ molecular probe to examine the Q2 (cubosome) ? H2 (hexosome) ? L2 phase transitions of the pharmaceutically relevant phytantriol-water system in the presence of a model hydrophobic drug, vitamin E acetate (VitEA). It is shown that the ortho-positronium lifetime (?) is sensitive to molecular packing and mobility and this has been correlated with the rheological properties of individual lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases. Characteristic PALS lifetimes for L2 (?4? 4 ns) ? H2 (?4? 4 ns) > Q(2?Pn3m) (?4? 2.2 ns) are observed for the phytantriol-water system, with the addition of VitEA yielding a gradual increase in ? from ?? 2.2 ns for cubosomes to ?? 3.5 ns for hexosomes. The dynamic chain packing at higher temperatures and in the L2 and H2 phases is qualitatively less "viscous", consistent with rheological measurements. This information offers increased understanding of the relationship between internal nanostructure and species permeability. PMID:25459998

  12. Free volume and phase transitions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids from positron lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Beichel, Witali; Dlubek, Günter; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Paluch, Marian; Pionteck, Jürgen; Pfefferkorn, Dirk; Bulut, Safak; Friedrich, Christian; Pogodina, Natalia; Krossing, Ingo

    2012-05-21

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to study a series of ionic liquids (ILs) with the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation ([C4MIM](+)) but different anions [Cl](-), [BF4](-), [PF6](-), [OTf](-), [NTf2](-), and [B(hfip)4](-) with increasing anion volumes. Changes of the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime parameters with temperature were observed for crystalline and amorphous (glass, supercooled, and normal liquid) states. Evidence for distinct phase transitions, e.g. melting, crystallization and solid-solid transitions, was observed in several PALS experiments. The o-Ps mean lifetime ?3 showed smaller values in the crystalline phase due to dense packing of the material compared to the amorphous phase. The o-Ps lifetime intensity I3 in the liquid state is clearly smaller than in the crystallized state. This behaviour can be attributed to a solvation of e(+) by the anions, which reduces the Ps formation probability in the normal and supercooled liquid. These phenomena were observed for the first time when applying the PALS technique to ionic liquids by us in one preliminary and in this work. Four of the ionic liquids investigated in this work ([BF4](-), [NTf2](-), [PF6](-) and [Cl](-) ILs) exhibit supercooled phases. The specific hole densities and occupied volumes of those ILs were obtained by comparing the local free volume with the specific volume from pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) experiments. From the o-Ps lifetime, the mean size vh of free volume holes of the four samples was calculated and compared with that calculated according to Fürth's hole theory. The hole volumes from both methods agree well. From the Cohen-Turnbull fitting of viscosity and conductivity against PALS/PVT results, the influence of the free volume on molecular transport properties was investigated. PMID:22472912

  13. Measurement of Lifetimes in 23Mg

    E-print Network

    Kirsebom, O S; Cheeseman, A; Christian, G; Churchman, R; Cross, D S; Davids, B; Evitts, L J; Fallis, J; Galinski, N; Garnsworthy, A B; Hackman, G; Lighthall, J; Ketelhut, S; Machule, P; Miller, D; Nobs, C R; Pearson, C J; Rajabali, M M; Radich, A J; Rojas, A; Ruiz, C; Sanetullaev, A; Unsworth, C D; Wrede, C

    2015-01-01

    Several lifetimes in 23Mg have been determined for the first time using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. A Monte Carlo simulation code has been written to model the gamma-ray line shape. An upper limit of 12 fs at the 95% C.L. has been obtained for the astrophysically important 7787 keV state.

  14. Measurement of Lifetimes in 23Mg

    E-print Network

    O. S. Kirsebom; P. Bender; A. Cheeseman; G. Christian; R. Churchman; D. S. Cross; B. Davids; L. J. Evitts; J. Fallis; N. Galinski; A. B. Garnsworthy; G. Hackman; J. Lighthall; S. Ketelhut; P. Machule; D. Miller; C. R. Nobs; C. J. Pearson; M. M. Rajabali; A. J. Radich; A. Rojas; C. Ruiz; A. Sanetullaev; C. D. Unsworth; C. Wrede

    2015-08-28

    Several lifetimes in 23Mg have been determined for the first time using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. A Monte Carlo simulation code has been written to model the gamma-ray line shape. An upper limit of 12 fs at the 95% C.L. has been obtained for the astrophysically important 7787 keV state.

  15. Measurement of the Lifetime of Predissociative Diatomic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Buijsse, B.; van der Zande, W.J.

    1997-12-01

    We present a new application of the well-known Hanle effect: the determination of predissociation lifetimes of nonradiating states. A magnetic field depolarizes the angular distribution of the fragments; the degree of depolarization at a fixed field depends on the lifetime of the predissociating state. A semiclassical model is presented to derive lifetimes of predissociative diatomic molecules from the measured angular distributions. This application can be used for lifetime determination of a new class of excited states, predissociative states, in this study represented by the e{sup 1}{Pi}{sub u} (v=0) Rydberg state of N{sub 2} . {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime by the MuLan collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, V.; MuLan Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    We report the result of a measurement of the positive muon lifetime ?? to one part-per-million (ppm) by the MuLan collaboration using a low-energy pulsed muon beam and a segmented array of plastic scintillators to record over 2×1012 decay positrons. Two different in-vacuum muon-stopping targets were used in separate data-taking periods. The combined result gives ? (MuLan)=2196980.3(2.2) ps (1 ppm). This measurement of the muon lifetime provides the most precise determination of the Fermi constant, GF (MuLan)=1.1663788(7)×10-5 GeV(0.6 ppm), and will be used to extract the capture rates of the negative muon on the proton and the deuteron in the ongoing MuCap and MuSun experiments.

  17. Measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime using semileptonic decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M

    2006-12-15

    We report a measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel Bs(0) --> Ds- mu+ nuX (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2004. Using 5176 reconstructed Ds- mu+ signal events, we have measured the Bs(0) lifetime to be tau(Bs(0))=1.398+/-0.044(stat)(-0.025)(+0.028)(syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime to date. PMID:17280267

  18. Relative Defect Density Measurements of Laser Shock Peened 316L Stainless Steel Using Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus A. Gagliardi; Bulent H. Sencer; A. W. Hunt; Stuart A. Maloy; George T. Gray III

    2011-12-01

    The surface of an annealed 316L stainless steel coupon was laser shock peened and Vickers hardness measurements were subsequently taken of its surface. This Vickers hardness data was compared with measurements taken using the technique of positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy. When compared, a correlation was found between the Vickers hardness data measurements and those made using Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Although materials with a high defect density can cause the S-parameter measurements to saturate, variations in the Sparameter measurements suggest that through further research the Doppler broadening technique could be used as a viable alternative to measuring a material's hardness. In turn, this technique, could be useful in industrial settings where surface hardness and surface defects are used to predict lifetime of components.

  19. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section B; Microstructural Characterization of Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Pater, Ruth H.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1998-01-01

    Thermoset and thermoplastic polyimides have complementary physical/mechanical properties. Whereas thermoset polyimides are brittle and generally easier to process, thermoplastic polyimides are tough but harder to process. It is expected that a combination of these two types of polyimides may help produce polymers more suitable for aerospace applications. Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (S-IPNs) of thermoset LaRC(Trademark)-RP46 and thermoplastic LARC(Trademark)-IA polyimides were prepared in weight percent ratios ranging from 100:0 to 0: 100. Positron lifetime measurements were made in these samples to correlate their free volume features with physical/mechanical properties. As expected, positronium atoms are not formed in these samples. The second life time component has been used to infer the positron trap dimensions. The "free volume" goes through a minimum at about 50:50 ratio, suggesting that S-IPN samples are not merely solid solutions of the two polymers. These data and related structural properties of the S-IPN samples have been discussed in this paper.

  20. Measurement of the lifetimes of B meson mass eigenstates

    E-print Network

    Anikeev, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present the results of the average lifetime measurements in ..., ..., and ... decays, as well as the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of ... and ... decays. The time-dependent angular ...

  1. Measurement of the ?b- and ?b- baryon lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.

    2014-09-01

    Using a data sample of pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1, the ?b- and ?b- baryons are reconstructed in the ?b-?J/??- and ?b-?J/??- decay modes and their lifetimes measured to be

  2. Improved measurement of the lifetime of the ? lepton

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; OPAL Collaboration; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Altekamp, N.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.

    1996-05-09

    A new measurement of the ? lifetime is presented. It uses data collected with the Opal detector during 1994, which almost doubles the size of the Opal ? sample. Two statistically independent techniques are used: an impact parameter analysis of one...

  3. Lifetime measurement of the 9s level of atomic francium.

    PubMed

    Aubin, S; Gomez, E; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D

    2003-11-01

    We use two-photon resonant excitation and time-correlated single-photon counting techniques on a sample of 210Fr atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optical trap to measure the lifetime of the 9s excited level. Direct measurement of the decay through the 7P(3/2) level at 851 nm yields a lifetime of 107.53 +/- 0.80 ns. PMID:14587813

  4. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gamal, S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (Vf) in DAM-ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime ?3 and Vf increases while I3 slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of ?3, Vf and I3 are higher in CR-39 than DAM-ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently Vf increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and Vf in the polymer. A relationship between Vf and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  5. Precision measurement of the ?b(0) baryon lifetime.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I

    2013-09-01

    The ratio of the ?b(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0??fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The ?b(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode ?b(0)?J/?pK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)?J/??+ K- mode, where the ?+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the ?b(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012??ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. PMID:25166658

  6. Direct Measurements of the Lifetime of Heavy Hypernuclei

    E-print Network

    X. Qiu; L. Tang; A. Margaryan; P. Achenbach; A. Ahmidouch; I. Albayrak; D. Androic; A. Asaturyan; R. Asaturyan; O. Ates; R. Badui; P. Baturin; W. Boeglin; J. Bono; E. Brash; P. Carter; C. Chen; X. Chen; A. Chiba; E. Christy; M. M. Dalton; S. Danagoulian; R. De Leo; D. Doi; M. Elaasar; R. Ent; H. Fenker; Y. Fujii; M. Furic; M. Gabrielyan; L. Gan; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; A. Gasparian; T. Gogami; O. Hashimoto; T. Horn; B. Hu; E. V. Hungerford; M. Jones; H. Kanda; M. Kaneta; M. Kawai; D. Kawama; H. Khanal; M. Kohl; A. Liyanage; W. Luo; K. Maeda; P. Markowitz; T. Maruta; A. Matsumura; V. Maxwell; A. Mkrtchyan; H. Mkrtchyan; S. Nagao; S. N. Nakamura; A. Narayan; C. Neville; G. Niculescu; M. I. Niculescu; A. Nunez; Nuruzzaman; Y. Okayasu; T. Petkovic; J. Pochodzalla; J. Reinhold; V. M. Rodriguez; C. Samanta; B. Sawatzky; T. Seva; A. Shichijo; V. Tadevosyan; N. Taniya; K. Tsukada; M. Veilleux; W. Vulcan; F. R. Wesselmann; S. A. Wood; L. Ya; T. Yamamoto; Z. Ye; K. Yokota; L. Yuan; S. Zhamkochyan; L. Zhu

    2013-01-16

    The lifetime of a Lambda particle embedded in a nucleus (hypernucleus) decreases from that of free Lambda decay due to the opening of the Lambda N to NN weak decay channel. However, it is generally believed that the lifetime of a hypernucleus attains a constant value (saturation) for medium to heavy hypernuclear masses, yet this hypothesis has been difficult to verify. The present paper reports a direct measurement of the lifetime of medium-heavy hypernuclei produced with a photon-beam from Fe, Cu, Ag, and Bi targets. The recoiling hypernuclei were detected by a fission fragment detector using low-pressure multi-wire proportional chambers. The experiment agrees remarkably well with the only previously-measured single-species heavy-hypernucleus lifetime, that of Fe56_Lambda at KEK, and has significantly higher precision. The experiment disagrees with the measured lifetime of an unknown combination of heavy hypernuclei with 180lifetime decrease.

  7. A New Measurement of the Muon Lifetime with the MuLan Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkle, Josh

    2006-10-01

    Following recent theoretical calculations, the uncertainty on the Fermi coupling constant is now limited by the precision with which the muon lifetime is measured. The current world average uncertainty on the lifetime is 17 ppm. The MuLan experiment is designed to measure the muon lifetime to 1 ppm. To supply muons, a periodic, pulsed muon beam is created. During a 5 ?s ``fill period'', muons are directed to a thin stopping target. A 22 ?s ``measurement period'' follows with the beam ``off'' while the stopped muons decay. A spherical detector surrounding the target detects the decay positrons. A wire chamber with a 10 x10 cm window is used during beam tuning and for regular measurements during data production. An FPGA is used to enable fast readout of the wire chamber. The firmware that controls the FPGA allows for prescaling during the fill period to reduce the data rate. A number of scalar signals are produced that reflect the flux of muons in specific areas of the chamber. This firmware is currently being used in the 2006 data production run. I have been responsible for the FPGA firmware, as well as various analysis studies.

  8. Temperature dependence of the free volume from positron lifetime experiments and its relation to structural dynamics: Phenylphthalein-dimethylether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlubek, Günter; Shaikh, Muhammad Qasim; Rätzke, Klaus; Faupel, Franz; Paluch, Marian

    2008-11-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to study the microstructure of the free volume in the temperature range between 103K and 393K in phenylphthalein-dimethylether (PDE), a low-molecular-weight glass former. Using the routine LIFETIME9.0, the ortho-positronium ( o -Ps) lifetime distribution was analyzed, and from this, the volume distribution gn(vh) of subnanometer-size holes was calculated. From a comparison of PALS and specific volume data, the number density and the volume fraction of holes were estimated. These free-volume data, as a function of temperature, were used to test the validity of the Cohen-Turnbull (CT) free-volume theory. It was found that the structural relaxation from dielectric spectroscopy can be described by the CT theory after introducing a corrected free volume (Vf-?V) , where ?V=0.014cm3/g . The extended free-volume theory of Cohen and Grest can be fitted to the dielectric-relaxation and free-volume data, but the parameters of both fits are not consistent. PDE shows some peculiar features. The “knee” in the o -Ps lifetime expansion and crossover in temperature dependence of the frequency of the primary dielectric relaxation process occur at different temperatures. In addition, the change in the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann parameters at TB/Tg=1.1 has no observable effect on the mean free volume ?vh? (or Vf ). The size of the smallest representative freely fluctuating subsystem, ?VSV? estimated from the standard deviation ?h of gn(vh) , decreases from 4.1nm3to2.6nm3 when the temperature increases from T/Tg=1.0 to 1.15. Correspondingly, the length of dynamic heterogeneity, ?=?VVS?1/3 , decreases from 1.6nmto1.4nm . It is concluded that at T/Tg?1.10=TB/Tg the system transforms from a heterogeneous to a homogeneous (true) liquid.

  9. Structure of Dipole Bands in 112In: Through Lifetime Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, T.; Palit, R.; Sethi, J.; Saha, S.; Kumar, S.; Naik, Z.; Parkar, V. V.; Naidu, B. S.; Deo, A. Y.; Raghav, A.; Joshi, P. K.; Jain, H. C.; Sihotra, S.; Mehta, D.; Jain, A. K.; Choudhury, D.; Negi, D.; Roy, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, P.; Biswas, D. C.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Kumar, R.; Rani, K.

    2012-09-01

    High-spin states of the 112In nucleus have been populated via 100Mo(16O, p3n) reaction at 80 MeV beam energy. Lifetimes of excited states of dipole bands have been measured using Doppler-shift attenuation method. The B(M1) transition rates deduced from the measured lifetimes show a rapid decrease with increasing angular momentum. The decrease in B(M1) values are well accounted by the prediction of tilted axis cranking calculations. These measurements confirm the presence of shears mechanism in this nuclei.

  10. Recent positron-atom cross section measurements and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Luca; Zecca, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We review recent cross section results for low-energy positron scattering from atomic targets. A comparison of the latest measurements and calculations for positron collisions with the noble gases and a brief update of the newest studies on other atoms is presented. In particular, we provide an overview of the cross sections for elastic scattering, positronium formation, direct and total ionisation, as well as total scattering, at energies typically between about 0.1 and a few hundred eV. We discuss the differences in the current experimental data sets and compare those results to the available theoretical models. Recommended data sets for the total cross section are also reported for each noble gas. A summary of the recent developments in the scattering from other atoms, such as atomic hydrogen, the alkali and alkaline-earth metals, and two-electron systems is finally provided.

  11. Microwave irradiation induced modifications on the interfaces in SAN/EVA/PVC and PVAc/BPA/PVP ternary polymer blends: Positron lifetime study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinesh, Meghala; Chikkakuntappa, Ranganathaiah

    2013-09-01

    Ternary polymer blends of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate)/poly(vinyl chloride) (SAN/EVA/PVC) and poly(vinyl acetate)/bisphenol A/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVAc/BPA/PVP) with different compositions have been prepared by solvent casting method and characterized by positron lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry DSC. Phase modifications have been induced by irradiating the blends with microwave radiation. These changes have been monitored by measuring the free-volume content in the blends. The results clearly show improved interactions between the constituent polymers of the blends upon microwave irradiation. However, the free-volume data and DSC measurements are found to be inadequate to reveal the changes at the interfaces and the interfaces determine the final properties of the blend. For this we have used hydrodynamic interaction (?ij) approach developed by us to measure strength of hydrodynamic interaction at the interfaces. These results show that microwave irradiation stabilizes the interfaces if the blend contains strong polar groups. SAN/EVA/PVC blend shows an increased effective hydrodynamic interaction from -3.18 to -4.85 at composition 50/35/15 upon microwave irradiation and PVAc/BPA/PVP blend shows an increased effective hydrodynamic interaction from -3.81 to -7.57 at composition 20/50/30 after irradiation.

  12. Fluorescence lifetime as a new parameter in analytical cytology measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Deka, Chiranjit; Lehnert, Bruce E.; Crissman, Harry A.

    1996-05-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to quantify fluorescence decay lifetimes on fluorochrome-labeled cells/particles. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved lifetime measurements, while preserving conventional FCM capabilities. Cells are analyzed as they intersect a high-frequency, intensity-modulated (sine wave) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence signals are processed by conventional and phase-sensitive signal detection electronics and displayed as frequency distribution histograms. In this study we describe results of fluorescence intensity and lifetime measurements on fluorescently labeled particles, cells, and chromosomes. Examples of measurements on intrinsic cellular autofluorescence, cells labeled with immunofluorescence markers for cell- surface antigens, mitochondria stains, and on cellular DNA and protein binding fluorochromes will be presented to illustrate unique differences in measured lifetimes and changes caused by fluorescence quenching. This innovative technology will be used to probe fluorochrome/molecular interactions in the microenvironment of cells/chromosomes as a new parameter and thus expand the researchers' understanding of biochemical processes and structural features at the cellular and molecular level.

  13. MuLan: Towards a 1 ppm muon lifetime measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Kevin R.

    2006-11-01

    The MuLan experiment will measure the lifetime of the positive muon to 1 ppm. Within the Standard Model framework, this will permit a determination of the Fermi Constant to 0.5 ppm. I present an update on our progress and achievements to date.

  14. K.K. Gan 1 Measurement of VCSEL Lifetime

    E-print Network

    Gan, K. K.

    VCSEL Priority of various tests is to measure lifetime of installed VCSELs understanding failure ~50 VCSEL arrays from original production 400 channels will be monitored represents during first month VCSEL Study Group Meeting #12;VCSEL Study Group Meeting 5 Test Setup Design

  15. Measuring Luminescence Lifetime With Help of a DSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, J. D. S.

    2009-01-01

    An instrument for measuring the lifetime of luminescence (fluorescence or phosphorescence) includes a digital signal processor (DSP) as the primary means of control, generation of excitation signals, and analysis of response signals. The DSP hardware in the present instrument makes it possible to switch among a variety of operating modes by making changes in software only.

  16. A measurement of the tau lepton lifetime at ARGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saull, Patrick Richard Behrendt

    Data taken with the ARGUS detector at DESY, Hamburg, specifically toverlinetoverline pairs produced from e+e - collisions in the energy range (10.4-10.6)GeV, are used to make a precision measurement of the tau lifetime. A new method is introduced which is independent of the beam position and envelope, and applicable to tau events having one-three topology. Applied to ARGUS data the method yields a value for the tau lifetime of tt=287+/-11(st atistical)+/-8(systemat ic)fs.

  17. Lifetime measurement of the 8s level in francium

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Sprouse, G.D.; Orozco, L.A.; Galvan, A. Perez

    2005-06-15

    We measure the lifetime of the 8s level of {sup 210}Fr atoms on a magneto-optically trapped sample with time-correlated single-photon counting. The 7P{sub 1/2} state serves as the resonant intermediate level for two-step excitation of the 8s level completed with a 1.3-{mu}m laser. Analysis of the fluorescence decay through the 7P{sub 3/2} level gives 53.30{+-}0.44 ns for the 8s level lifetime.

  18. Lifetime Measurement of the 8s Level in Francium

    E-print Network

    Gómez, E; Galvan, A P; Sprouse, G D

    2004-01-01

    We measure the lifetime of the 8s level on a magneto-optically trapped sample of ^{210}Fr atoms with time-correlated single-photon counting. The 7P_{1/2} state serves as the resonant intermediate level for two-photon excitation of the 8s level completed with a 1300 nm laser. Analysis of the fluorescence decay through the the 7P_{3/2} level gives 53.30 +- 0.44 ns for the 8s level lifetime.

  19. Measurement of the effective Bs0?K+K- lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adametz, A.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, P.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Hoballah, M.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.

    2012-10-01

    A precise determination of the effective Bs0?K+K- lifetime can be used to constrain contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model in the Bs0 meson system. Conventional approaches select B meson decay products that are significantly displaced from the B meson production vertex. As a consequence, B mesons with low decay times are suppressed, introducing a bias to the decay time spectrum which must be corrected. This analysis uses a technique that explicitly avoids a lifetime bias by using a neural network based trigger and event selection. Using 1.0 fb of data recorded by the LHCb experiment, the effective Bs0?K+K- lifetime is measured as 1.455±0.046(stat.)±0.006(syst.)ps.

  20. Inhomogeneous dephasing masks coherence lifetimes in ensemble measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Griffin, Graham B.; Engel, Gregory S.; Gray, Stephen K.

    2012-04-28

    An open question at the forefront of modern physical sciences is what role, if any, quantum effects may play in biological sensing and energy transport mechanisms. One area of such research concerns the possibility of coherent energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Spectroscopic evidence of long-lived quantum coherence in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment protein complexes (PPCs), along with theoretical modeling of PPCs, has indicated that coherent energy transport might boost efficiency of energy transport in photosynthesis. Accurate assessment of coherence lifetimes is crucial for modeling the extent to which quantum effects participate in this energy transfer, because such quantum effects can only contribute to mechanisms proceeding on timescales over which the coherences persist. While spectroscopy is a useful way to measure coherence lifetimes, inhomogeneity in the transition energies across the measured ensemble may lead to underestimation of coherence lifetimes from spectroscopic experiments. Theoretical models of antenna complexes generally model a single system, and direct comparison of single system models to ensemble averaged experimental data may lead to systematic underestimation of coherence lifetimes, distorting much of the current discussion. In this study, we use simulations of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex to model single complexes as well as averaged ensembles to demonstrate and roughly quantify the effect of averaging over an inhomogeneous ensemble on measured coherence lifetimes. We choose to model the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex because that system has been a focus for much of the recent discussion of quantum effects in biology, and use an early version of the well known environment-assisted quantum transport model to facilitate straightforward comparison between the current model and past work. Although ensemble inhomogeneity is known to lead to shorter lifetimes of observed oscillations (simply inhomogeneous spectral broadening in the time domain), this important fact has been left out of recent discussions of spectroscopic measurements of energy transport in photosynthesis. In general, these discussions have compared single-system theoretical models to whole-ensemble laboratory measurements without addressing the effect of inhomogeneous dephasing. Our work addresses this distinction between single system and ensemble averaged observations, and shows that the ensemble averaging inherent in many experiments leads to an underestimation of coherence lifetimes in individual systems.

  1. Detailed report of the MuLan measurement of the positive muon lifetime and determination of the Fermi constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, V.; Battu, S.; Carey, R. M.; Chitwood, D. B.; Crnkovic, J.; Debevec, P. T.; Dhamija, S.; Earle, W.; Gafarov, A.; Giovanetti, K.; Gorringe, T. P.; Gray, F. E.; Hartwig, Z.; Hertzog, D. W.; Johnson, B.; Kammel, P.; Kiburg, B.; Kizilgul, S.; Kunkle, J.; Lauss, B.; Logashenko, I.; Lynch, K. R.; McNabb, R.; Miller, J. P.; Mulhauser, F.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Peng, Q.; Phillips, J.; Rath, S.; Roberts, B. L.; Webber, D. M.; Winter, P.; Wolfe, B.

    2013-03-01

    We present a detailed report of the method, setup, analysis, and results of a precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime. The experiment was conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute using a time-structured, nearly 100% polarized surface muon beam and a segmented, fast-timing plastic scintillator array. The measurement employed two target arrangements: a magnetized ferromagnetic target with a ˜4kG internal magnetic field and a crystal quartz target in a 130 G external magnetic field. Approximately 1.6×1012 positrons were accumulated and together the data yield a muon lifetime of ??(MuLan)=2196980.3(2.2)ps (1.0 ppm), 30 times more precise than previous generations of lifetime experiments. The lifetime measurement yields the most accurate value of the Fermi constant GF(MuLan)=1.1663787(6)×10-5GeV-2 (0.5 ppm). It also enables new precision studies of weak interactions via lifetime measurements of muonic atoms.

  2. Precision measurement of the Lambda_b baryon lifetime

    E-print Network

    LHCb collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; S. Amerio; Y. Amhis; L. Anderlini; J. Anderson; R. Andreassen; J. E. Andrews; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; M. Baalouch; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; C. Baesso; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; J. Beddow; F. Bedeschi; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; A. Berezhnoy; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bj\\ornstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; E. Bowen; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; G. Busetto; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; D. Campora Perez; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; H. Carranza-Mejia; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; L. Castillo Garcia; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; R. Cenci; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; P. Chen; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; S. Coquereau; G. Corti; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; D. C. Craik; S. Cunliffe; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; A. Davis; I. De Bonis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; W. De Silva; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; L. Del Buono; N. Déléage; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; A. Di Canto; H. Dijkstra; M. Dogaru; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; P. Durante; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; S. Eisenhardt; U. Eitschberger; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; I. El Rifai; Ch. Elsasser; A. Falabella; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; D. Ferguson; V. Fernandez Albor; F. Ferreira Rodrigues; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; M. Fiore; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; E. Furfaro; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J. Garofoli; P. Garosi; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; E. Gersabeck; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; L. Giubega; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; P. Gorbounov; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; P. Griffith; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; S. Hall; B. Hamilton; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; S. T. Harnew; J. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; T. Head; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; A. Hicheur; E. Hicks; D. Hill; M. Hoballah; C. Hombach; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; N. Hussain; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; M. Idzik; P. Ilten; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; E. Jans; P. Jaton; A. Jawahery; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; C. Joram; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; W. Kanso; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; I. R. Kenyon; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; O. Kochebina; I. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; M. Kucharczyk; V. Kudryavtsev; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefèvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; S. Leo; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; B. Leverington; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; S. Lohn; I. Longstaff; J. H. Lopes; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; D. Lucchesi; J. Luisier; H. Luo; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; S. Malde; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; J. Maratas; U. Marconi; P. Marino; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; A. Martín Sánchez; M. Martinelli; D. Martinez Santos; D. Martins Tostes; A. Massafferri; R. Matev; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; E. Maurice; A. Mazurov; B. Mc Skelly; J. McCarthy; A. McNab; R. McNulty; B. Meadows; F. Meier; M. Meissner; M. Merk; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; A. Mordà; M. J. Morello; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan

    2013-07-31

    The ratio of the \\Lambda b baryon lifetime to that of the B0 meson is measured using 1.0/fb of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The \\Lambda b baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode \\Lambda b -> J/\\psi pK-, while the B0 meson decay used is the well known B0 -> J/\\psi pi+K- mode, where the pi+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K*0(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976 +/- 0.012 +/- 0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B0 meson lifetime, the \\Lambda b lifetime is found to be 1.482 +/- 0.018 +/- 0.012 ps. In both cases the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  3. A Measurement of the Bs Lifetime at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, Sinead

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the proper lifetime of the B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF experiment at Fermilab. The B{sub s}{sup 0} meson lifetime is measured in its semileptonic decay mode, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}D{sub s}{sup -}. The D{sub s}{sup -} meson candidates are reconstructed in the decay mode D{sub s}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}, with {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}, in a trigger sample which requires a muon or an electron and another track which has a large impact parameters. The large impact parameter track is required by the silicon vertex trigger which is an innovative triggering device which has not previously been used in lifetime measurements. A total of 905 {+-} B{sub s}{sup 0} candidates are reconstructed in a sample which has an integrated luminosity of 140 pb{sup -1} using data gathered between February 2002 and August 2003. The pseudo-proper lifetime distribution of these candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit. This fit takes into account the missing momentum carried by the neutrino and the bias caused by requiring a track with large impact parameter by modeling these effects in simulations. The fit yields the result for the B{sub s}{sup 0} proper lifetime: c{tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 419 {+-} 28{sub -13}{sup +16} {micro}m and {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 1.397 {+-} 0.093{sub -0.043}{sup +0.053} ps where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  4. Measurement of the Lambdab0 lifetime using semileptonic decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewin, M; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y

    2007-11-01

    We report a measurement of the Lambda(b)(0) lifetime using a sample corresponding to 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 experiment in 2002-2006 during run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The Lambda(b)(0) baryon is reconstructed via the decay Lambda(b)(0)-->micronuLambda(c)(+)X. Using 4437+/-329 signal candidates, we measure the Lambda(b)(0) lifetime to be tau(Lambda(b)(0))=1.290(-0.110)(+0.119)(stat)(-0.091)(+0.087)(syst) ps, which is among the most precise measurements in semileptonic Lambda(b)(0) decays. This result is in good agreement with the world average value. PMID:17995396

  5. A Measurement of the D+(s) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferi, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P. /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-04-01

    A high statistics measurement of the D{sub s}{sup +} lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. They describe the analysis of the two decay modes, D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){sup 0}K{sup +}, used for the measurement. The measured lifetime is 507.4 {+-} 5.5(stat.) {+-} 5.1(syst.) is using 8961 {+-} 105 D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +} and 4680 {+-} 90 D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){sup 0} K{sup +} decays. This is a significant improvement over the present world average.

  6. Measuring the muon lifetime with the MuLan experiment at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitwood, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    The Muon Lifetime Analysis (MuLan) Collaboration's goal is to produce a measurement of the positive muon lifetime with a precision of 1 ppm. This measurement, along with recent developments in theory, will lead to a twenty-fold improvement in the determination of the Fermi coupling constant, G_F. A novel kicking system is being developed to create a pulsed beam of surface muons in the ?E3 area at the Paul Scherrer Institut. The kicker will allow approximately 20 muons to be stopped in a thin depolarizing target during a 5 ?s accumulation phase. This is followed by a 22 ?s measuring phase where the decay positrons are detected by a segmented scintillator detector. The detector forms a truncated icosahedron surrounding the target region, and is composed of 340 independent scintillators forming 170 individual coincident tiles. Each scintillator is to be readout by separate 500 MHz waveform digitizers, allowing the precise determination of decay times. Much of the system has been tested during a Fall 2003 commissioning run. We will discuss the status of the experiment and the preliminary results from the analysis of the data to date.

  7. Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tattersall, Wade; Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, 4810 Queensland ; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P.; White, Ron D.; Brunger, M. J.; Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur ; Buckman, Stephen J.; Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur ; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco

    2014-01-28

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

  8. Lifetime Measurements of Tagged Exotic- and Unbound Nuclear States

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.

    2011-11-30

    A new Differential Plunger device for measuring pico-second lifetimes of Unbound Nuclear States (DPUNS) is being built at The University of Manchester. DPUNS has been designed to work with alpha-, beta- and isomer-tagging methods using the existing JUROGAM II--RITU--GREAT infrastructure at the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland. The importance of proton emission from nuclei is that it provides valuable nuclear-structure information as direct input to nuclear models beyond the drip line. New experimental data beyond the drip line can provide new extensions to these models especially with the possible coupling of weakly bound and unbound states to the continuum. The results of the first experiments to measure lifetimes of unbound nuclear states with this method was discussed along with possible future experiments which can be addressed with DPUNS using proton-, isomer- and alpha-tagging.

  9. Free volume in imidazolium triflimide ([C3MIM][NTf2]) ionic liquid from positron lifetime: Amorphous, crystalline, and liquid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlubek, G.; Yu, Yang; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Beichel, W.; Bulut, S.; Pogodina, N.; Krossing, I.; Friedrich, Ch.

    2010-09-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is used to study the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C3MIM][NTf2] in the temperature range between 150 and 320 K. The positron decay spectra are analyzed using the routine LifeTime-9.0 and the size distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer-size holes) is calculated. This distribution is in good agreement with Fürth's classical hole theory of liquids when taking into account Fürth's hole coalescence hypothesis. During cooling, the liquid sample remains in a supercooled, amorphous state and shows the glass transition in the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime at 187 K. The mean hole volume varies between 70 Å3 at 150 K and 250 Å3 at 265-300 K. From a comparison with the macroscopic volume, the hole density is estimated to be constant at 0.20×1021 g-1 corresponding to 0.30 nm-3 at 265 K. The hole free volume fraction varies from 0.023 at 185 K to 0.073 at Tm+12 K=265 K and can be estimated to be 0.17 at 430 K. It is shown that the viscosity follows perfectly the Cohen-Turnbull free volume theory when using the free volume determined here. The heating run clearly shows crystallization at 200 K by an abrupt decrease in the mean ??3? and standard deviation ?3 of the o-Ps lifetime distribution and an increase in the o-Ps intensity I3. The parameters of the second lifetime component ??2? and ?2 behave parallel to the o-Ps parameters, which also shows the positron's (e+) response to structural changes. During melting at 253 K, all lifetime parameters recover to the initial values of the liquid. An abrupt decrease in I3 is attributed to the solvation of e- and e+ particles. Different possible interpretations of the o-Ps lifetime in the crystalline state are briefly discussed.

  10. Free volume in imidazolium triflimide ([C3MIM][NTf2]) ionic liquid from positron lifetime: amorphous, crystalline, and liquid states.

    PubMed

    Dlubek, G; Yu, Yang; Krause-Rehberg, R; Beichel, W; Bulut, S; Pogodina, N; Krossing, I; Friedrich, Ch

    2010-09-28

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is used to study the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C(3)MIM][NTf(2)] in the temperature range between 150 and 320 K. The positron decay spectra are analyzed using the routine LifeTime-9.0 and the size distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer-size holes) is calculated. This distribution is in good agreement with Fürth's classical hole theory of liquids when taking into account Fürth's hole coalescence hypothesis. During cooling, the liquid sample remains in a supercooled, amorphous state and shows the glass transition in the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime at 187 K. The mean hole volume varies between 70 Å(3) at 150 K and 250 Å(3) at 265-300 K. From a comparison with the macroscopic volume, the hole density is estimated to be constant at 0.20×10(21) g(-1) corresponding to 0.30 nm(-3) at 265 K. The hole free volume fraction varies from 0.023 at 185 K to 0.073 at T(m)+12 K=265 K and can be estimated to be 0.17 at 430 K. It is shown that the viscosity follows perfectly the Cohen-Turnbull free volume theory when using the free volume determined here. The heating run clearly shows crystallization at 200 K by an abrupt decrease in the mean and standard deviation ?(3) of the o-Ps lifetime distribution and an increase in the o-Ps intensity I(3). The parameters of the second lifetime component and ?(2) behave parallel to the o-Ps parameters, which also shows the positron's (e(+)) response to structural changes. During melting at 253 K, all lifetime parameters recover to the initial values of the liquid. An abrupt decrease in I(3) is attributed to the solvation of e(-) and e(+) particles. Different possible interpretations of the o-Ps lifetime in the crystalline state are briefly discussed. PMID:20886945

  11. Measurement of the effective Bs0?KK lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Brisbane, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Caicedo Carvajal, J. M.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Conti, G.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G. A.; Currie, R.; D'Almagne, B.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; De Bonis, I.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Deissenroth, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; d'Enterria, D. G.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Estève, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Koblitz, S.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kumar, R.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Luisier, J.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Mclean, C.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.

    2012-02-01

    A measurement of the effective Bs0?KK lifetime is presented using approximately 37 pb of data collected by LHCb during 2010. This quantity can be used to put constraints on contributions from processes beyond the Standard Model in the Bs0 meson system and is determined by two complementary approaches as?=1.440±0.096 (stat)±0.008 (syst)±0.003 (model) ps.

  12. Determination of $??$ scattering lengths from measurement of $?^+?^-$ atom lifetime

    E-print Network

    B. Adeva; L. Afanasyev; M. Benayoun; A. Benelli; Z. Berka; V. Brekhovskikh; G. Caragheorgheopol; T. Cechak; M. Chiba; P. V. Chliapnikov; C. Ciocarlan; S. Constantinescu; S. Costantini; C. Curceanu; P. Doskarova; D. Dreossi; D. Drijard; A. Dudarev; M. Ferro-Luzzi; J. L. Fungueiriño Pazos; M. Gallas Torreira; J. Gerndt; P. Gianotti; D. Goldin; F. Gomez; A. Gorin; O. Gorchakov; C. Guaraldo; M. Gugiu; M. Hansroul; Z. Hons; R. Hosek; M. Iliescu; V. Karpukhin; J. Kluson; M. Kobayashi; P. Kokkas; V. Komarov; V. Kruglov; L. Kruglova; A. Kulikov; A. Kuptsov; K. I. Kuroda; A. Lamberto; A. Lanaro; V. Lapshin; R. Lednicky; P. Leruste; P. Levi Sandri; A. Lopez Aguera; V. Lucherini; T. Maki; I. Manuilov; J. Marin; J. L. Narjoux; L. Nemenov; M. Nikitin; T. Nunez Pardo; K. Okada; V. Olchevskii; A. Pazos; M. Pentia; A. Penzo; J. M. Perreau; M. Plo; T. Ponta; G. F. Rappazzo; A. Riazantsev; J. M. Rodriguez; A. Rodriguez Fernandez; A. Romero Vidal; V. M. Ronjin; V. Rykalin; J. Saborido; C. Santamarina; J. Schacher; C. Schuetz; A. Sidorov; J. Smolik; F. Takeutchi; A. Tarasov; L. Tauscher; M. J. Tobar; T. Trojek; S. Trusov; V. Utkin; O. Vázquez Doce; S. Vlachos; O. Voskresenskaya; T. Vrba; C. Willmott; V. Yazkov; Y. Yoshimura; M. Zhabitsky; P. Zrelov

    2011-10-03

    The DIRAC experiment at CERN has achieved a sizeable production of $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atoms and has significantly improved the precision on its lifetime determination. From a sample of 21227 atomic pairs, a 4% measurement of the S-wave $\\pi\\pi$ scattering length difference $|a_0-a_2| = (.0.2533^{+0.0080}_{-0.0078}|_\\mathrm{stat}.{}^{+0.0078}_{-0.0073}|_\\mathrm{syst})M_{\\pi^+}^{-1}$ has been attained, providing an important test of Chiral Perturbation Theory.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9-(Methylaminomethyl)-anthracene (MAMA), and N-benzyl-N-methyl-N-methyl anthracene (AB-B). Fluorescence lifetime measurements confirmed the two species of AB, with and without PET. Fluorescence lifetimes were approximately 11 nsec without PET and 3 nsec with PET. The degree of the interaction between the N and the B atoms was also determined by fluorescence lifetime measurements. Electron transfer rates of AB were measured to be on the order of 10{sup 8} sec{sup -1}. Analysis of AB as a glucose sensor shows it has the potential for measuring glucose concentrations in solution with less than 5% error. Two novel glucose sensing molecules, Chloro-oxazone boronate (COB) and Napthyl-imide boronate (NIB), were synthesized. Both molecules have a N{yields}B dative bond similar to AB, but with longer wavelength fluorophores. COB and NIB were found to be unacceptable for use as glucose sensor molecules due to the small changes in average fluorescence lifetime.

  14. Lifetime measurements and shape coexistence in {sup 144}Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Procter, M. G.; Cullen, D. M.; Niclasen, B.; Mason, P. J. R.; Rigby, S. V.; Dare, J. A.; Lumley, N. M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Puurunen, A.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Saren, J.

    2010-05-15

    The known level scheme of {sup 144}Dy has been extended and lifetime measurements have been made with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. Reduced transition probabilities and deformations have been determined for four low-lying transitions. These states form part of the first observed band crossing, giving information on the change in nuclear deformation resulting from the rearrangement of h{sub 11/2} protons in the nucleus. Two bands built upon excited 10{sup +} states have been assigned pi(h{sub 11/2}){sup 2} prolate and nu(h{sub 11/2}){sup -2} oblate configurations with tau=12(2)ps and 0.01lifetimes are reasoned to be a result of shape coexistence at low energy and moderate spin. A known four-quasiparticle dipole band has been extended to higher spin and lifetime measurements suggest a long-lived bandhead state. In this case, the excited states in the band may be consistent with a shears model interpretation of a magnetic dipole rotor. However, the measured B(M1)/B(E2) branching ratios reveal a larger than expected deformed rotational component compared with that in the analogous band in the lower mass isotone {sup 142}Gd.

  15. SCATHA measurements of electron lifetimes at 5 < L < 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Ginet, G. P.; Starks, M. J.; O'Brien, T. P.; Roth, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that the outer radiation belt is highly dynamic due to an imbalance between acceleration and loss processes, particularly during enhanced magnetic activity. Many loss mechanisms have been suggested since the beginning of space age, such as Coulomb collisions with atmospheric constituents, lightning generated whistler waves, man-made VLF transmitter signals, plasmaspheric hiss, chorus waves, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and magnetopause shadowing. The electron lifetime is associated with loss processes, and is important in determination of pitch angle diffusion rates. Electron lifetimes have been studied by many satellites, such as SAMPEX, HEO, GOES, POLAR, Akebono, CRRES, SAC-C, DEMETER, and etc. We will reanalyze an old dataset from Spacecraft Charging AT High Altitudes (SCATHA) to determine the electron lifetime at 5 < L < 8. SCATHA was a NASA/Air Force satellite launched in early 1979 and the mission lasted approximately 10 year. It was placed in a near-synchronous, near-equatorial earth orbit with an inclination of 8.5 degree. The SC3 spectrometer measured the fluxes and pitch-angle distributions of the energetic electrons in the energy range 50 keV to 5 MeV. Although only a small fraction of data were fully analyzed, we take advantage of a relatively large dataset to systematically determine the decay timescales as function of L-shell, electron energy, and pitch angle during magnetically disturbed periods. Initial results indicate that the electron lifetime decrease with increasing L. In addition, the lifetime increases with increasing electron energy at L < 6.5, especially for low energy channels (0.06-0.45 MeV). We will also compare our results with previous publications.

  16. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, D. Abi; Leh, B.; Zanello, M.; Siebert, R.

    2015-01-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumor margins is difficult because the infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. We use a fiber-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements to assist surgeon in differentiating the healthy and the infiltrated tissues. First study was performed on rats that were previously injected with tumorous cells. Measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumor brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analyzed. The study aimed at defining an optical index that can act as an indicator for discriminating healthy from tumorous tissue. PMID:25909006

  17. Free volume from positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature experiments in relation to structural relaxation of van der Waals molecular glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlubek, G.; Shaikh, M. Q.; Rätzke, K.; Paluch, M.; Faupel, F.

    2010-06-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is employed to characterize the temperature dependence of the free volume in two van der Waals liquids: 1, 1'-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexane (BMPC) and 1, 1'-di(4-methoxy-5-methylphenyl)cyclohexane (BMMPC). From the PALS spectra analysed with the routine LifeTime9.0, the size (volume) distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer size holes), its mean, langvhrang, and mean dispersion, ?h, were calculated. A comparison with the macroscopic volume from pressure-volume-temperature (PV T) experiments delivered the hole density and the specific hole free volume and a complete characterization of the free volume microstructure in that sense. These data are used in correlation with structural (?) relaxation data from broad-band dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) in terms of the Cohen-Grest and Cohen-Turnbull free volume models. An extension of the latter model allows us to quantify deviations between experiments and theory and an attempt to systematize these in terms of Tg or of the fragility. The experimental data for several fragile and less fragile glass formers are involved in the final discussion. It was concluded that, for large differences in the fragility of different glass formers, the positron lifetime mirrors clearly the different character of these materials. For small differences in the fragility, additional properties like the character of bonds and chemical structure of the material may affect size, distribution and thermal behaviour of the free volume.

  18. CMS HF calorimeter PMTs and Xi(c)+ lifetime measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, Ugur; /Iowa U.

    2003-12-01

    This thesis consists of two parts: In the first part we describe the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) selection and testing processes for the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS, a Large Hadron Collier (LHC) experiment at CERN. We report the evaluation process of the candidate PMTs from three different manufacturers, the complete tests performed on the 2300 Hamamatsu PMTs which will be used in the HF calorimeter, and the details of the PMT Test Station that is in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. In the second part we report the {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} lifetime measurement from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment at Fermilab. Based upon 301 {+-} 31 events from three di.erent decay channels, by using the binned maximum likelihood technique, we observe the lifetime of {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} as 427 {+-} 31 {+-} 13 fs.

  19. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  20. Updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-23

    We present an updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD. 4316 {tau}-pair events, selected from a 150k Z{sup 0} data sample, are analyzed using three techniques: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The measurement benefits from the small and stable interaction region at the SLC and the precision CCD pixel vertex detector of the SLD. The combined result is: {tau}{sub {tau}} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) fs.

  1. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  2. Drug release profiles and microstructural characterization of cast and freeze dried vitamin B12 buccal films by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Barnabás; Kállai, Nikolett; Tóth, Gerg?; Hetényi, Gergely; Zelkó, Romána

    2014-02-01

    Solvent cast and freeze dried films, containing the water-soluble vitamin B12 as model drug were prepared from two polymers, sodium alginate (SA), and Carbopol 71G (CP). The proportion of the CP was changed in the films. The microstructural characterization of various samples was carried out by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The drug release kinetics of untreated and stored samples was evaluated by the conventionally applied semi-empirical power law. Correlation was found between the changes of the characteristic parameters of the drug release and the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime values of polymer samples. The results indicated that the increase of CP concentration, the freeze-drying process and the storage at 75% R.H. decreased the rate of drug release. The PALS method enabled the distinction between the micro- and macrostructural factors influencing the drug release profile of polymer films. PMID:24269613

  3. The “accumulation effect” of positrons in the stack of foils, detected by measurements of the positron implantation profile

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2013-12-14

    The profiles of positrons implanted from the radioactive source {sup 22}Na into a stack of foils and plates are the subject of our experimental and theoretical studies. The measurements were performed using the depth scanning of positron implantation profile method, and the theoretical calculations using the phenomenological multi-scattering model (MSM). Several stacks consisting of silver, gold and aluminum foils, and titanium and germanium plates were investigated. We notice that the MSM describes well the experimental profiles; however when the stack consisting of silver and gold foils, the backscattering and linear absorption coefficients differ significantly from those reported in the literature. We suggest the energy dependency of the backscattering coefficient for silver and gold. In the stacks which comprise titanium and germanium plates, there were observed the features, which indicate the presence of the “accumulation effect” in the experimental implantation profile. This effect was previously detected in implantation profiles in Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 tool kit, and it consists in higher localization of positrons close the interface. We suppose that this effect can be essential for positron annihilation in any heterogeneous materials.

  4. The ``accumulation effect'' of positrons in the stack of foils, detected by measurements of the positron implantation profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2013-12-01

    The profiles of positrons implanted from the radioactive source 22Na into a stack of foils and plates are the subject of our experimental and theoretical studies. The measurements were performed using the depth scanning of positron implantation profile method, and the theoretical calculations using the phenomenological multi-scattering model (MSM). Several stacks consisting of silver, gold and aluminum foils, and titanium and germanium plates were investigated. We notice that the MSM describes well the experimental profiles; however when the stack consisting of silver and gold foils, the backscattering and linear absorption coefficients differ significantly from those reported in the literature. We suggest the energy dependency of the backscattering coefficient for silver and gold. In the stacks which comprise titanium and germanium plates, there were observed the features, which indicate the presence of the "accumulation effect" in the experimental implantation profile. This effect was previously detected in implantation profiles in Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 tool kit, and it consists in higher localization of positrons close the interface. We suppose that this effect can be essential for positron annihilation in any heterogeneous materials.

  5. The Lifetime of a beautiful and charming meson: B_c lifetime measured using the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; /Indiana U.

    2008-09-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the lifetime of the B{sub c}{sup {+-}} meson is studied in the B{sub c}{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{mu}{sup {+-}} + X final state. Using an unbinned likelihood simultaneous fit to J/{psi} + {mu} invariant mass and lifetime distributions, a signal of 810 {+-} 80(stat.) candidates is estimated and a lifetime measurement made of: {tau}(B{sub c}{sup {+-}}) = 0.448{sub -0.036}{sup +0.038}(stat) {+-} 0.032(sys) ps.

  6. Direct lifetime measurement of excited states in 72Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolos, Karolina; Miller, David; Grzywacz, Robert; Iwasaki, Hironori; Al-Shudifat, Mohammad; Bazin, Daniel; Bingham, Caroll; Braunroth, Thomas; Cerizza, Giordano; Gade, Alexandra; Lemasson, Antoine; Madurga, Miguel; Morse, Chris; Rajabali, Mustafa; Recchia, Francesco; Riedinger, Lee; Voss, Phillip; Weisshaar, Dirk; Wimmer, Kathrin

    2013-10-01

    The long isotopic chain of nickel contains three doubly-magic isotopes 48Ni, 56Ni and 78Ni. The nuclei close to doubly magic systems with small number of valence nucleons can help in the understanding of shell closure effects, isomerism, and single particle states. The recent B(E2; 2+ --> 0+) measurements at GANIL, and the 2+ inelastic scattering cross-section measurements at NSCL, reveal unexpected collectivity in 70Ni and 74Ni. We measured electromagnetic transition rates in 72Ni using the recoil distance technique coupled with the improved gamma-ray detection array GRETINA with the NSCL/Koln plunger at the NSCL. The excited 21+and 41+in 72Ni states were populated by a one-proton knockout reaction of a 73Cu secondary beam on beryllium target. Lifetimes were obtained by comparing the measured spectra to simulated ones based on an existing code which utilizes GEANT4 with the geometry of the present setup.

  7. An improved measurement of the B(S)^0 lifetime

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; OPAL Collaboration; Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.

    1995-05-11

    PHYSICS LETTERS B Physics Letters B 350 (1995) 273-282 An improved measurement of the Bf lifetime OPAL Collaboration R. Akers O, G. Alexander “, J. Allison O, K. Ametewee x, K.J. Anderson i, S. Arcelli b, S. Asai w, D. Axenab, G. Azuelos qvl A....H. Ballp, E. Barberio Y, R.J. Barlow O, R. BartoldusC, J.R. Batley e, G. Beaudoin 4, A. Beck “, G.A. Beck m, C. Beeston O, T. Behnke ‘, K.W. Bell ‘, G. Bella’, S. Bentvelsen h, P. Berlichj, S. Bethke”, 0. Biebelae, I.J. Bloodwortha, P. Bockk, H.M. Bosch...

  8. Point defect characterization in CoAl using positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Puff, W.; Logar, B.; Balogh, A.G.

    1999-07-01

    Vacancy-like defects in CoAl in the composition range 48.5 at.% {lt} C{sub Co} {lt} 53 at.% are investigated by means of positron lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler-broadening measurements. The observed lifetimes in the annealed samples confirm that defects are quenched-in during the production of the samples. The values of the positron lifetime and the S-parameter decrease with increasing Co concentration. After quenching from 1,400 C or 1,600 C an increase in the positron parameters is observed. Long-time annealing of the Co-rich sample shows a dramatic decrease of the positron lifetime to the expected bulk lifetime.

  9. Measurements of ultracold neutron lifetimes in solid deuterium

    E-print Network

    C. L. Morris; J. M. Anaya; T. J. Bowles; B. W. Filippone; P. Geltenbort; R. E. Hill; M. Hino; S. Hoedl; G. E. Hogan; T. M. Ito; T. Kawai; K. Kirch; S. K. Lamoreaux; C. -Y. Liu; M. Makela; L. J. Marek; J. W. Martin; R. N. Mortensen; A. Pichlmaier; A. Saunders; S. J. Seestrom; D. Smith; W. Teasdale; B. Tipton; M. Utsuro; A. R. Young; J. Yuan

    2001-09-28

    We present the first measurements of the survival time of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in solid deuterium SD2. This critical parameter provides a fundamental limitation to the effectiveness of superthermal UCN sources that utilize solid ortho-deuterium as the source material. Superthermal UCN sources offer orders of magnitude improvement in the available densities of UCNs, and are of great importance to fundamental particle-physics experiments such as searches for a static electric dipole moment and lifetime measurements of the free neutron. These measurements are performed utilizing a SD2 source coupled to a spallation source of neutrons, providing a demonstration of UCN production in this geometry and permitting systematic studies of the influence of thermal up-scatter and contamination with para-deuterium on the UCN survival time.

  10. Secondary cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from 1 to 100 GeV in the upper atmosphere and interstellar space, and interpretation of a recent positron flux measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, C. D.; Buffington, A.

    1976-01-01

    Secondary electron and positron fluxes generated in interstellar space and in the atmosphere from the decays of pions and kaons in inelastic nuclear interactions are calculated by Monte Carlo techniques for lepton energies in the range from 1 to 100 GeV and an assumed thickness of 10 g/sq cm or less for the interstellar or atmospheric material. A simple and accurate analytical model which summarizes the Monte Carlo results and identifies the essential parameters involved is developed and used to interpret a previous positron measurement. It is found that the thickness of interstellar and source material is about 4.3 g/sq cm for cosmic-ray positrons with energies exceeding 4 GeV, a result that is difficult to reconcile with recently proposed two-containment-volume propagation models which predict a thickness of 1.8 g/sq cm for the same energies on the basis of the energy dependence of the measured (Li+Be+B)/(C+O) ratio. It is shown that single-containment-volume (galactic) models invoking an energy-dependent leakage lifetime are compatible with the positron data, but lack a mechanism to explain the energy dependence.

  11. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample. 17 figs.

  12. Probing diffusion barrier integrity on porous silica low-k thin films using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Gidley, David

    13 November 2000; accepted for publication 6 February 2001 The technique of positron annihilation to replace aluminum as interconnect lines since it can lower the resistance and improve the elec investigated as in- terlayer dielectric ILD to reduce the capacitance. Lowering the density by increasing

  13. Positron interactions with water-total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Wade; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J R; Anderson, Emma; White, Ron D; Brunger, M J; Buckman, Stephen J; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco; Sullivan, James P

    2014-01-28

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions. PMID:25669536

  14. Lifetime measurements of nuclei in few-electron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faestermann, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In this review lifetime measurements of ions with at most two electrons are summarized. Such highly ionized systems have been studied—until now—only in the experimental storage ring of the GSI in Darmstadt. Emphasis is put on decays via the weak interaction. The first observations of beta-decay into bound atomic states are described as well as its time mirrored counterpart, the electron-capture decay. In the latter case the decays of hydrogen- and helium-like ions are compared with a surprising result. Further on, the observation of sinusoidal modulations of the decay rate in two-body decays is summarized. As a possible cause an interference due to the emission of neutrinos with different rest mass is discussed.

  15. First $?K$ atom lifetime and $?K$ scattering length measurements

    E-print Network

    B. Adeva; L. Afanasyev; Y. Allkofer; C. Amsler; A. Anania; S. Aogaki; A. Benelli; V. Brekhovskikh; T. Cechak; M. Chiba; P. Chliapnikov; C. Ciocarlan; S. Constantinescu; P. Doskarova; D. Drijard; A. Dudarev; M. Duma; D. Dumitriu; D. Fluerasu; A. Gorin; O. Gorchakov; K. Gritsay; C. Guaraldo; M. Gugiu; M. Hansroul; Z. Hons; S. Horikawa; Y. Iwashita; V. Karpukhin; J. Kluson; M. Kobayashi; V. Kruglov; L. Kruglova; A. Kulikov; E. Kulish; A. Kuptsov; A. Lamberto; A. Lanaro; R. Lednicky; C. Mariñas; J. Martincik; L. Nemenov; M. Nikitin; K. Okada; V. Olchevskii; M. Pentia; A. Penzo; M. Plo; T. Ponta; P. Prusa; G. Rappazzo; A. Romero Vidal; A. Ryazantsev; V. Rykalin; J. Schacher; A. Sidorov; J. Smolik; S. Sugimoto; F. Takeutchi; L. Tauscher; T. Trojek; S. Trusov; T. Urban; T. Vrba; V. Yazkov; Y. Yoshimura; M. Zhabitsky; P. Zrelov

    2014-03-04

    The results of a search for hydrogen-like atoms consisting of $\\pi^{\\mp}K^{\\pm}$ mesons are presented. Evidence for $\\pi K$ atom production by 24 GeV/c protons from CERN PS interacting with a nickel target has been seen in terms of characteristic $\\pi K$ pairs from their breakup in the same target ($178 \\pm 49$) and from Coulomb final state interaction ($653 \\pm 42$). Using these results the analysis yields a first value for the $\\pi K$ atom lifetime of $\\tau=(2.5_{-1.8}^{+3.0})$ fs and a first model-independent measurement of the S-wave isospin-odd $\\pi K$ scattering length $\\left|a_0^-\\right|=\\frac{1}{3}\\left|a_{1/2}-a_{3/2}\\right|= \\left(0.11_{-0.04}^{+0.09} \\right)M_{\\pi}^{-1}$ ($a_I$ for isospin $I$).

  16. Lifetime measurements of nuclei in few-electron ions

    E-print Network

    Faestermann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this review lifetime measurements of ions with at most two electrons are summarized. Such highly ionized systems have been studied - until now - only in the Experimental Storage Ring of the GSI in Darmstadt. Emphasis is put on decays via the weak interaction. The first observations of beta-decay into bound atomic states are described as well as its time mirrored counterpart, the electron-capture decay. In the latter case the decays of hydrogen- and helium-like ions are compared with a surprising result. Further on, the observation of sinusoidal modulations of the decay rate in two-body decays is summarized. As a possible cause an interference due to the emission of neutrinos with different rest mass is discussed.

  17. Lifetime and hyperfine splitting measurements on the 7s and 6p levels in rubidium

    E-print Network

    Orozco, Luis A.

    on the possibility of extracting weak interaction constants from a parity nonconservation mea- surement. © 2004 functions of an atom. The lifetime, through the matrix elements of allowed transitions, probes the wave MEASUREMENTS A. Lifetime and Matrix Elements The lifetime of a quantum mechanical system depends on the initial

  18. A Dynamic Programming Approach to Maximizing a Statistical Measure of the Lifetime of Sensor Networks

    E-print Network

    Radha, Hayder

    18 A Dynamic Programming Approach to Maximizing a Statistical Measure of the Lifetime of Sensor perform complexity analysis, statistical evaluation of changes in power consump- tion rates effected and Phrases: Dynamic programming, network lifetime, rate distortion theory, wireless sensor networks, lifetime

  19. Positron studies in catalysis research. Final report, September 1993-- May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    During the past 20 months, we have completed our positron microscope and performed several studies in our nonmicroscopic depth-profiling positron spectrometer which should ultimately be applicable to catalysis. These studies involve using depth-profiled positron spectrometers to observe the growth dynamics of metal silicides on silicon substrates and to observe defects in glassy polymer surfaces and thin films, and the use of bulk positron lifetime measurements to observe pore-size variations in zeolites.

  20. Lifetime Measurement of Nickel-58 Using RDM with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loelius, Charles

    2014-09-01

    The structure of nuclei near the doubly magic 56Ni has provided a sensitive probe of configuration mixing across the N=Z=28 shell gap. The shell model description of nuclei in this region is well established, with the gxpf1 interaction accurately reproducing the energy levels and transition strengths of Nuclei in the vicinity of 56Ni. However, there remain open questions as to the effects of higher lying orbitals beyond the pf shell. These can be addressed by a study of the B(E2)'s of nuclei in near the shell gap, particularly the B(E2;4+ -->2+) where effects of high l orbitals may be enhanced. 58Ni provides a strong candidate for study, as the only previous B(E2;4+ -->2+) measurement using the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method resulted in a B(E2) three times larger than that predicted by theory. In order to determine the possible effects of higher lying orbitals, a second measurement of the lifetime of 58Ni was undertaken at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the the Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking in Beam Nuclear Array (GRETINA) and the Recoil Distance Method (RDM). Preliminary results of this measurement will be presented.

  1. Packing and mobility of hydrocarbon chains in phospholipid lyotropic liquid crystalline lamellar phases and liposomes: characterisation by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS).

    PubMed

    Dong, Aurelia W; Fong, Celesta; Waddington, Lynne J; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-01-01

    Lipid lamellar mesophases and their colloidal dispersions (liposomes) are increasingly being deployed in vivo as drug delivery vehicles, and also as models of biological membranes in fundamental biophysics studies. The permeability and diffusion of small molecules such as drugs is accommodated by a change in local curvature and molecular packing (mesophase behaviour) of the bilayer membrane molecules. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is capable of providing in situ molecular level information on changes in free volume and void space arising from such changes in a non-perturbative manner. In this work PALS was used to systematically characterise the temperature-induced melting transitions (Tm) of saturated and unsaturated phospholipid-water systems while systematically varying lipid chain length, as both bulk lamellar mesophase and as aqueous colloidal dispersions (liposomes). A four-component fit of the data was used that provides separate PALS lifetimes for the aqueous (?3) and organic domains (?4). The oPs lifetime (?4), for the lamellar phases of DSPC (C18:0), DPPC (C16:0), DMPC (C14:0) and DLPC (C12:0) was found to be independent of chain length, with characteristic lifetime value ?4 ? 3.4 ns. ?4 is consistently larger in the dispersed liposomes compared to the bulk mesophases, suggesting that the hydrocarbon chains are more mobile. The use of contemporary and consistent analytical approaches as described in this study is the key to future deployment of PALS to interrogate the in situ influence of drugs on membrane and cellular microenvironments. PMID:25412405

  2. Two-component density functional theory within the projector augmented-wave approach: Accurate and self-consistent computations of positron lifetimes and momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktor, Julia; Jomard, Gérald; Torrent, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Many techniques have been developed in the past in order to compute positron lifetimes in materials from first principles. However, there is still a lack of a fast and accurate self-consistent scheme that could handle accurately the forces acting on the ions induced by the presence of the positron. We will show in this paper that we have reached this goal by developing the two-component density functional theory within the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method in the open-source code abinit. This tool offers the accuracy of the all-electron methods with the computational efficiency of the plane-wave ones. We can thus deal with supercells that contain few hundreds to thousands of atoms to study point defects as well as more extended defects clusters. Moreover, using the PAW basis set allows us to use techniques able to, for instance, treat strongly correlated systems or spin-orbit coupling, which are necessary to study heavy elements, such as the actinides or their compounds.

  3. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  4. Accurate Alternative Measurements for Female Lifetime Reproductive Success in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trinh T. X.; Moehring, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Fitness is an individual’s ability to survive and reproduce, and is an important concept in evolutionary biology. However, accurately measuring fitness is often difficult, and appropriate fitness surrogates need to be identified. Lifetime reproductive success, the total progeny an organism can produce in their lifetime, is thought to be a suitable proxy for fitness, but the measure of an organism’s reproductive output across a lifetime can be difficult or impossible to obtain. Here we demonstrate that the short-term measure of reproductive success across five days provides a reasonable prediction of an individual's total lifetime reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lifetime reproductive success of a female that has only mated once is not correlated to the lifetime reproductive success of a female that is allowed to mate multiple times, demonstrating that these measures should not serve as surrogates nor be used to make inferences about one another. PMID:26125633

  5. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  6. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  7. Prospects for Measuring the Positron Excess with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-print Network

    Vandenbroucke, Justin; Wood, Matthew; Colin, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The excess of positrons in cosmic rays above $\\sim$10 GeV has been a puzzle since it was discovered. Possible interpretations of the excess have been suggested, including acceleration in a local supernova remnant or annihilation of dark matter particles. To discriminate between these scenarios, the positron fraction must be measured at higher energies. One technique to perform this measurement is using the Earth-Moon spectrometer: observing the deflection of positron and electron moon shadows by the Earth's magnetic field. The measurement has been attempted by previous imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes without success. The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will have unprecedented sensitivity and background rejection that could make this measurement successful for the first time. In addition, the possibility of using silicon photomultipliers in some of the CTA telescopes could greatly increase the feasibility of making observations near the moon. Estimates of the capabilities of CTA to measure the positro...

  8. Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othmer, S.; Chen, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plate arrays. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results are compared with those obtained using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

  9. Systematics associated with positronium fractions as measured with variable-energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Jorch, H.H.

    1984-11-01

    Positronium fraction measurements using positron beams have been utilized to extract information about the diffusion properties of positrons as well as defect concentrations in the near surface region of materials under a variety of experimental conditions. Owing to this recent interest we have undertaken to study some of the systematics and uncertainties associated with measurements of the positronium fraction, f. We restrict our discussion to determinations of f based on the peak:total ratio of counting rates for a single detector, only briefly considering alternate ways of obtaining f. We conclude with several recommendations that should be of particular interest to practitioners in the field.

  10. Characterization of a sucrose/starch matrix through positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy: unravelling the decomposition and glass transition processes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep Kumar; Roudaut, Gaëlle; Fabing, Isabelle; Duplâtre, Gilles

    2010-11-14

    The triplet state of positronium, o-Ps, is used as a probe to characterize a starch-20% w/w sucrose matrix as a function of temperature (T). A two-step decomposition (of sucrose, and then starch) starts at 440 K as shown by a decrease in the o-Ps intensity (I(3)) and lifetime (?(3)), the latter also disclosing the occurrence of a glass transition. Upon sucrose decomposition, the matrix acquires properties (reduced size and density of nanoholes) that are different from those of pure starch. A model is successfully established, describing the variations of both I(3) and ?(3) with T and yields a glass transition temperature, T(g) = (446 ± 2) K, in spite of the concomitant sucrose decomposition. Unexpectedly, the starch volume fraction (as probed through thermal gravimetry) decreases with T at a higher rate than the free volume fraction (as probed through PALS). PMID:20882224

  11. A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, Keung L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers is described. This method consists of a wet chemical treatment (surface cleaning, oxidation in solution, and measurement in HF solution) to passivate the silicon surfaces, a laser diode array for carrier excitation, and a microwave bridge measuring system which is more sensitive than the microwave systems used previously for lifetime measurement. Representative experimental data are presented to demonstrate this technique. The result reveals that this method is useful for the determination of bulk lifetime of commercial silicon wafers.

  12. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity.

    PubMed

    Levitt, James A; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ? , is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. PMID:26334975

  13. Radiative lifetimes, branching ratios and absolute transition probabilities of atomic uranium by delayed photoionization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, P. K.; Das, R. C.; Seema, A. U.; Sahoo, A. C.; Shah, M. L.; Pulhani, A. K.; Manohar, K. G.; Dev, Vas

    2014-08-01

    Radiative lifetimes of ten even-parity energy levels of atomic uranium in the 15,500-19,000 cm-1 region and branching ratios of six transitions originating either from ground level (5L{6/o}) or from lowest metastable level (5K{5/o}) at 620.32 cm-1 are measured employing three-step delayed photoionization technique. The lifetimes of five energy levels and branching ratios of five transitions are measured for the first time. By combining the experimentally measured values of radiative lifetimes and branching ratios, we have determined the absolute transition probabilities of six transitions of uranium and compared with those previously reported in the literature.

  14. Measurement of the B-cmeson lifetime in the decay B-c?J/???

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2013-01-02

    The lifetime of the B-c meson is measured using 272 exclusive B-c?J/?(?????)?? decays reconstructed in data from proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb?¹ recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The lifetime of the B-cmeson is measured to be ?(B-c)=0.452±0.048(stat)±0.027(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the B-c meson lifetime in a fully reconstructed hadronic channel, and it agrees with previous results and has comparable precision.

  15. Measurement of the positron diffusion constants in polycrystalline molybdenum by the observation of positronium negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takuji; Iida, Simpei; Yamashita, Takashi; Nagashima, Yasuyuki

    2015-06-01

    We have measured the positron diffusion constants in polycrystalline molybdenum by the observation of positronium negative ions (Ps-). The Ps- ions emitted from the sample surface coated with Na were accelerated. The ?-rays from the accelerated Ps- ions were Doppler- shifted and thus the signals of self-annihilation of the Ps- ions were isolated from those of self-annihilation of para-positronium (p-Ps) or pair-annihilation of positrons in the bulk. Clear and reliable values of the diffusion constants have been obtained.

  16. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Brogland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting the Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to the Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 GeV and 200 GeV, We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 GeV range and determine for the first time that it continues to rise between 100 and 200 GeV,

  17. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Ackemann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting Earth's shadow, which, is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 and 200 Ge V. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 Ge V range. The three new spectral points between 100 and 200 GeV are consistent with a fraction that is continuing to rise with energy.

  18. Measuring and Sorting Cell Populations Expressing Isospectral Fluorescent Proteins with Different Fluorescence Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Naivar, Mark; Houston, Jessica P.; Brent, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs) fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP) and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ?1.5 ns vs ?3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a “pseudophasor” that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation. PMID:25302964

  19. Transcutaneous measurement of the arterial input function in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Litton, J.E.; Eriksson, L. )

    1990-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a powerful tool in medical research. Biochemical function can be both precisely localized and quantitatively measured. To achieve reliable quantitation it is necessary to know the time course of activity concentration in the arterial blood during the measurement. In this study the arterial blood curve from the brachial artery is compared to the activity measured in the internal carotid artery with a new transcutaneous detector.

  20. Electron Beam Polarization Measurement Using Touschek Lifetime Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Changchun; Li, Jingyi; Mikhailov, Stepan; Popov, Victor; Wu, Wenzhong; Wu, Ying; Chao, Alex; Xu, Hong-liang; Zhang, Jian-feng; /Hefei, NSRL

    2012-08-24

    Electron beam loss due to intra-beam scattering, the Touschek effect, in a storage ring depends on the electron beam polarization. The polarization of an electron beam can be determined from the difference in the Touschek lifetime compared with an unpolarized beam. In this paper, we report on a systematic experimental procedure recently developed at Duke FEL laboratory to study the radiative polarization of a stored electron beam. Using this technique, we have successfully observed the radiative polarization build-up of an electron beam in the Duke storage ring, and determined the equilibrium degree of polarization and the time constant of the polarization build-up process.

  1. Measurement of the ?[superscript 0 over subscript b] lifetime and mass in the ATLAS experiment

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A measurement of the ?[superscript 0 over subscript b] lifetime and mass in the decay channel ?[superscript 0 over subscript b]?J/?(?[superscript +]?[superscript -])?[superscript 0](p?[superscript -]) is presented. The ...

  2. Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in {sup 69}As

    SciTech Connect

    Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemala, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczynski, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Angelis, G. de; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Lifetimes of high-spin states in {sup 69}As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

  3. Measurement of the Bs(0) ? Ds-Ds+ and Bs(0) ? D-Ds+ effective lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P

    2014-03-21

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the B(s)(0) meson in the decay B(s)(0) ? Ds-Ds+ is reported using a proton-proton collision data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the B(s)(0) ? Ds-Ds+ effective lifetime is 1.379 ± 0.026 ± 0.017 ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light B(s)(0) mass eigenstate of ?L = 0.725 ± 0.014 ± 0.009 ps(-1). The B(s)(0) lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific B(s)(0)? D-Ds+ decay to be 1.52 ± 0.15 ± 0.01 ps. PMID:24702350

  4. Spectroscopy and lifetime measurements in 66Ge,69Se, and 65Ga using fragmentation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. J.; Wadsworth, R.; Bentley, M. A.; Davies, P. J.; Henderson, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Paterson, I.; Iwasaki, H.; Lemasson, A.; Bader, V. M.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Gade, A.; Morse, C.; Stroberg, S. R.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.; de Angelis, G.; Dewald, A.; Braunroth, T.; Fransen, C.; Hackstein, M.; Miller, D.

    2015-01-01

    Lifetimes of low-lying excited states have been measured in 66Ge,69Se, and 65Ga using a ? -ray lineshape method. The results confirm the previously reported 71- state lifetime in 66Ge. The lifetime of the yrast 5 /2- state in 65Ga is measured for the first time. Lifetime measurements of two excited 3 /2- states in 69Se are also reported. Two previously unobserved ? rays have been identified in 69Se. ? -? coincidence measurements have been used to place one of these in the level scheme. 69Se excited state populations are compared to shell-model calculations using the GXPF1A interaction in the fp model space. Theoretical spectroscopic factors to excited states in 69Se have identified three candidate levels for the origin of one of the new transitions.

  5. Measurement of the lifetime of the Bc+/- meson in the semileptonic decay channel.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G

    2009-03-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, we measure the lifetime of the Bc+/- meson in the Bc-/+-->J/psimicro+/-+X final state. A simultaneous unbinned likelihood fit to the J/psi+micro invariant mass and lifetime distributions yields a signal of 881+/-80(stat) candidates and a lifetime measurement of tau(Bc+/-)=0.448(-0.036)(+0.038)(stat)+/-0.032(syst) ps. PMID:19392512

  6. A New Measurement of the Muon Lifetime and the Determination of the Fermi Coupling Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanetti, Kevin

    2007-04-01

    A new measurement of the muon lifetime, ??, at the 11 ppm level will be reported. This is the first result from the MuLan experiment, which is pursuing the ambitious goal of a 1 ppm determination of the muon lifetime---a 20-fold improvement. The experiment is motivated by recent theoretical improvements in extracting the Fermi coupling constant GF, from the measured lifetime; the theoretical uncertainty is now less than 1 ppm. The coupling constant GF is an essential parameter of the standard model and represents the strength of the weak interaction. Progress, highlights and future plans for this experiment will also be discussed.

  7. Measurement of the lifetime in pp collisions at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Dildick, S.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Selvaggi, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins, M.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Tikvica, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.

    2013-07-01

    A measurement of the lifetime using the decay in protonproton collisions at TeV is presented. The data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 5 fb-1, was recorded with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider using triggers that selected dimuon events in the J/ ? mass region. The lifetime is measured to be 1.503 ± 0.052 (stat.) ± 0.031 (syst.) ps. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Measuring the lifetime of trapped sleptons using the general purpose LHC detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pinfold, James L.; Sibley, Logan

    2011-02-01

    In supergravity where the gravitino is the lightest supersymmetric particle, the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle decays to the gravitino with a naturally long lifetime (10{sup 4}-10{sup 8} s). However, cosmological constraints favor charged slepton next-to-lightest supersymmetric particles with lifetimes below a year as the natural next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle candidate. For this scenario we report a method to accurately determine the slepton lifetime and supersymmetry cross section from observation of the decays of sleptons trapped in the material comprising the main detector (ATLAS, CMS). A measurement of the lifetime to 5% is possible after 3 yr at nominal luminosity and running conditions. This method is sensitive to the cosmologically preferred stau lifetime of {approx}37 days and does not require the use of ancillary trapping volumes or special LHC experiment initiated beam dump requirements.

  9. Measurement of the Lambda b lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panikashvili, N; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y

    2007-10-01

    We have measured the Lambda b lifetime using the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda, based on 1.2 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed Lambda b decays, where the J/psi and Lambda are identified via the decays J/psi --> mu+ mu- and Lambda --> ppi, we measured the Lambda b lifetime to be tau(Lambda b)=1.218 (+0.130)/(-0.115) (stat) +/- 0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B0 lifetime in the decay B0 --> J/psi(mu+ mu-)K(0)/(S)(pi+ pi-) to be tau(B0)=1.501 (+0.078)/(-0.074) (stat) +/- 0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of tau(Lambda b)/tau(B0)=0.811 (+0.096)/(-0.087) (stat) +/- 0.034(syst). PMID:17930660

  10. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo. PMID:26644023

  11. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo. PMID:26644023

  12. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  13. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D.; Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J.; Chemical Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003

    2014-05-15

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 ?M. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  14. Simulation free measurement of the B+ lifetime using decays selected using displaced tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Malde, Sneha; /Oxford U.

    2009-03-01

    The lifetime of the B{sup {+-}} meson is measured using the decay channel B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}. The measurement is made using approximately 1.0 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron proton-anti-proton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF detector. The data were collected using impact parameter based triggers that were designed to select events with a secondary vertex. The trigger selection criteria result in data rich in a variety of B hadron decays, but intrinsically bias the lifetime distribution of the collected signal events. The traditional way to compensate for the bias is to use information from simulation. Presented here is a new method for correction of the lifetime bias using an analytical technique that uses information from the data only. This eliminates measurement uncertainty due to data and simulation agreement, ultimately resulting in a smaller systematic measurement uncertainty. The B{sup {+-}} lifetime measurement is the first measurement using this new technique and demonstrates its potential for use in future measurements. The B{sup {+-}} lifetime is measured to be {tau}(B{sup {+-}}) = 1.662 {+-} 0.023(stat) {+-} 0.015(syst)ps.

  15. Measuring the free neutron lifetime to <= 0.3s via the beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia; Mulholland, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Neutron beta decay is an archetype for all semi-leptonic charged-current weak processes. A precise value for the neutron lifetime is required for consistency tests of the Standard Model and is needed to predict the primordial 4 He abundance from the theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. An effort has begun for an in-beam measurement of the neutron lifetime with an projected <=0.3s uncertainty. This effort is part of a phased campaign of neutron lifetime measurements based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the Sussex-ILL-NIST technique. Recent advances in neutron fluence measurement techniques as well as new large area silicon detector technology address the two largest sources of uncertainty of in-beam measurements, paving the way for a new measurement. The experimental design and projected uncertainties for the 0.3s measurement will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE office of Science, NIST and NSF.

  16. Simultaneous one-dimensional fluorescence lifetime measurements of OH and CO in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Malin; Ehn, Andreas; Christensen, Moah; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-04-01

    A method for simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of two species along a line is described. The experimental setup is based on picosecond laser pulses from two tunable optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier systems together with a streak camera. With an appropriate optical time delay between the two laser pulses, whose wavelengths are tuned to excite two different species, laser-induced fluorescence can be both detected temporally and spatially resolved by the streak camera. Hence, our method enables one-dimensional imaging of fluorescence lifetimes of two species in the same streak camera recording. The concept is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime measurements of CO and OH in a laminar methane/air flame on a Bunsen-type burner. Measurements were taken in flames with four different equivalence ratios, namely ? = 0.9, 1.0, 1.15, and 1.25. The measured one-dimensional lifetime profiles generally agree well with lifetimes calculated from quenching cross sections found in the literature and quencher concentrations predicted by the GRI 3.0 mechanism. For OH, there is a systematic deviation of approximately 30 % between calculated and measured lifetimes. It is found that this is mainly due to the adiabatic assumption regarding the flame and uncertainty in H2O quenching cross section. This emphasizes the strength of measuring the quenching rates rather than relying on models. The measurement concept might be useful for single-shot measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of several species pairs of vital importance in combustion processes, hence allowing fluorescence signals to be corrected for quenching and ultimately yield quantitative concentration profiles.

  17. Detecting and Quantifying Biomolecular Interactions of a Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Nanoparticle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Boreham, Alexander; Pikkemaat, Jens; Volz, Pierre; Brodwolf, Robert; Kuehne, Christian; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Dernedde, Jens; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of nanoparticles with biomaterials determine the biological activity that is key for the physiological response. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS) were found recently to act as an inhibitor of inflammation by blocking selectins. Systemic application of dPGS would present this nanoparticle to various biological molecules that rapidly adsorb to the nanoparticle surface or lead to adsorption of the nanoparticle to cellular structures such as lipid membranes. In the past, fluorescence lifetime measurements of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles at a molecular and cellular/tissue level have been proven to reveal valuable information on the local nanoparticle environment via characteristic fluorescent lifetime signatures of the nanoparticle bound dye. Here, we established fluorescence lifetime measurements as a tool to determine the binding affinity to fluorescently tagged dPGS (dPGS-ICC; ICC: indocarbocyanine). The binding to a cell adhesion molecule (L-selectin) and a human complement protein (C1q) to dPGS-ICC was evaluated by the concentration dependent change in the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC. The apparent binding affinity was found to be in the nanomolar range for both proteins (L-selectin: 87 ± 4 nM and C1q: 42 ± 12 nM). Furthermore, the effect of human serum on the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC was measured and found to be different from the interactions with the two proteins and lipid membranes. A comparison between the unique lifetime signatures of dPGS-ICC in different biological environments shows that fluorescence lifetime measurements of unique dPGS-ICC fluorescence lifetime signatures are a versatile tool to probe the microenvironment of dPGS in cells and tissue. PMID:26712722

  18. Lifetime measurements in the neutral thulium spectrum using a pulsed dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki Ewiss, M. A.; Buurman, E. P.; Snoek, C.; Donszelmann, A.

    1984-04-01

    Natural radiative lifetimes have been measured at 10 levels of the Tm I spectrum, using a 3 nsec-pulse duration dye laser. Results are presented in tabular form together with corresponding data from the literature, and agreement is noted. The statistical error is in most cases 2.5 percent. Line intensities are very sensitive to the configuration interaction phenomenon, which also affects the lifetimes.

  19. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  20. Identifying vacancy complexes in compound semiconductors with positron annihilation spectroscopy: a case study of InN

    E-print Network

    Rauch, Christian; Tuomisto, Filip

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of vacancy and vacancy-impurity complexes in InN combining positron annihilation spectroscopy and ab-initio calculations. Positron densities and annihilation characteristics of common vacancy-type defects are calculated using density functional theory and the feasibility of their experimental detection and distinction with positron annihilation methods is discussed. The computational results are compared to positron lifetime and conventional as well as coincidence Doppler broadening measurements of several representative InN samples. The particular dominant vacancy-type positron traps are identified and their characteristic positron lifetimes, Doppler ratio curves and lineshape parameters determined. We find that In vacancies and their complexes with N vacancies or impurities act as efficient positron traps, inducing distinct changes in the annihilation parameters compared to the InN lattice. Neutral or positively charged N vacancies and pure N vacancy complexes on the other h...

  1. Measurements of radiative lifetime of high-lying odd parity energy levels of U I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, R. C.; Mandal, P. K.; Shah, M. L.; Seema, A. U.; Rathod, D. R.; Dev, Vas; Manohar, K. G.; Suri, B. M.

    2012-03-01

    We have measured the radiative lifetimes of nine odd-parity high-lying energy levels of atomic uranium (U I) using pump probe techniques. These measurements were carried out by employing a resonance ionisation mass spectrometry (RIMS) setup consisting of three dye lasers and a Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TOF-MS). In most of the cases, our measurement values match reasonably well with those reported in the literature; however, large deviations were also observed in two long-lived cases, which we have tried to explain. The lifetimes of three odd parity energy levels of U I were measured for the first time.

  2. Carrier lifetime measurements in InAs/GaSb strained layer superlattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Stefan P.; Donetsky, Dmitry; Wang, Ding; Maloney, Patrick; Belenky, Gregory

    2010-04-01

    Minority carrier lifetime, photoluminescence (PL), and interband absorption in midinfrared range of spectra were measured in InAs/GaSb strained-layer superlattices (SLS) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaSb substrates. The carrier lifetime was determined by time-resolved PL (TRPL) and from analysis of PL response to sine-wavemodulated excitation. Studies of the PL kinetics in the frequency domain allowed for direct lifetime measurements in SLS structures with an excess carrier concentration level of 3.5×1015 cm-3. The minority carrier lifetime at T = 77 K was obtained from the dependence of the carrier lifetime on excitation power. SLS structures with similar absorption wavelengths but with different InAs and GaSb layer thicknesses and with different amounts of strain were investigated and compared with mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) samples. No apparent trend was seen in structures with different number of interfaces per unit length. All SLS lifetime values measured so far are more than an order of magnitude lower than those of MCT.

  3. Measurement of Cu K-shell and Ag L-shell ionization cross sections by low-energy positron impact.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Saito, Fuminori; Itoh, Yoshiko; Goto, Akira; Hyodo, Toshio

    2004-06-01

    Inner shell ionization cross sections by low-energy positron impact have been measured. Development of an x-ray detector with thin Si(Li) crystals has enabled the first measurements of the absolute cross sections for the positron impacts in the energy range below 30 keV. Threshold behavior of the measured cross sections for the Cu K shell and Ag L shell are compared with the theoretical results of Gryzinski and Kowalski [Phys. Lett. A 183, 196 (1993)

  4. Polymeric membrane studied using slow positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Wei-Song; Lo, Chia-Hao; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Chen, Hongmin; Liu, Guang; Chakka, Lakshmi; Nanda, D.; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Huang, Shu-Hsien; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Lai, Juin-Yih; Sun, Yi-Ming; Yu, Chang-Cheng; Zhang, Renwu; Jean, Y. C.

    2008-10-01

    A radioisotope slow positron beam has been built at the Chung Yuan Christian University in Taiwan for the research and development in membrane science and technology. Doppler broadening energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime have been measured as a function of positron energy up to 30 keV in a polyamide membrane prepared by the interfacial polymerization between triethylenetetraamine (TETA) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC) on modified porous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) asymmetric membrane. The multilayer structures and free-volume depth profile for this asymmetric membrane system are obtained. Positron annihilation spectroscopy coupled with a slow beam could provide new information about size selectivity of transporting molecules and guidance for molecular designs in polymeric membranes.

  5. Frequency domain instrument for measuring phosphorescence lifetime distributions in heterogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Fernandez-Searra, Maria A.; Dugan, Benjamin W.; Wilson, David F.

    2001-08-01

    The luminescence lifetime distribution can be used to determine the distribution of quencher concentrations in a heterogeneous sample. We describe a frequency domain instrument for real-time measurements of phosphorescence lifetime distributions in microheterogeneous objects. In this system (1) an array of harmonics (typically 100-200 frequencies) is used to modulate the excitation source, a light emitting diode. Due to the relatively long triplet state lifetimes, the frequencies required for the modulation are typically below 40 000 kHz, which allows direct digitization of both excitation and emission signals. (2) The dependence of the phase/amplitude factor on the modulation frequency is determined by linear least-squares analysis of the emission signal, which is sampled and summed over the multiple excitation cycles. (3) The phase/amplitude relationship obtained is analyzed in real time using a "light" version of the maximum entropy algorithm, which provides a complete phosphorescence lifetime distribution. (4) The lifetime distribution is converted into the distribution of quencher concentrations using an appropriate model of quenching. The instrument is also capable of measuring phosphorescence in "single-frequency" mode, which is useful for rapid evaluation of apparent luminescence lifetimes. In this mode, a correction for an in-phase signal, which is due to backscattering and fluorescence, is applied to improve the accuracy of lifetime measurements. The instruments were tested in Stern-Volmer calibrations of Pd-porphyrin based phosphors for oxygen measurements and used for preliminary evaluation of oxygen distributions in rat tumor tissues. The instruments were found to be capable of accurate determination of lifetimes in the range of 10-3000 ?s. The average duration of a single lifetime distribution measurement was about 15 s, depending on the sample and on the density of the lifetime grid in the maximum entropy method analysis. In the single-frequency mode, the measurement time was reduced to about 0.2-0.5 s. The instruments provide complete correction for the in-phase signal of up to 40% of the total emission intensity.

  6. Precision measurement of the ratio of the ?b0 to B lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Caponio, F.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.

    2014-06-01

    The LHCb measurement of the lifetime ratio of the ?b0 baryon to the B meson is updated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 collected using 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The decay modes used are ?b0?J/?pK- and B?J/??+K-, where the ?+K- mass is consistent with that of the K(892) meson. The lifetime ratio is determined with unprecedented precision to be 0.974±0.006±0.004, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with original theoretical predictions based on the heavy quark expansion. Using the current world average of the B lifetime, the ?b0 lifetime is found to be 1.479±0.009±0.010 ps.

  7. Precision Measurement of the Mass and Lifetime of the ?b- Baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gian?, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.

    2014-12-01

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the ?b- baryon using about 1800 ?b- decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the ?b-??c0?-, ?c0?p K-K-?+ channel and the mass and lifetime are measured using the ?b0??c+?- mode as a reference. We measure M (?b-)-M (?b0)=178.36 ±0.46 ±0.16 MeV /c2 , (??b-/??b0)=1.089 ±0.026 ±0.011 , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results lead to a factor of 2 better precision on the ?b- mass and lifetime compared to previous best measurements, and are consistent with theoretical expectations.

  8. Measurement of the B¯s 0 Meson Lifetime in Ds+?- Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the B¯s 0 meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to Ds+?-, to that of the B¯ 0 meson. The p p collision data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1 , collected with the LHCb detector, at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Combining our measured value of 1.010 ±0.010 ±0.008 for this ratio with the known B¯ 0 lifetime, we determine the flavor-specific B¯s 0 lifetime to be ? (B¯s 0)=1.535 ±0.015 ±0.014 ps , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This is the most precise measurement to date, and is consistent with previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  9. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the ?b? baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A

    2014-12-12

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the ?(b)? baryon using about 1800 ?(b)? decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0??fb?¹ collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the ?(b)???(c)???, ?(c)??pK?K??? channel and the mass and lifetime are measured using the ?(b)???(c)??? mode as a reference. We measure M(?(b)?)-M(?(b)?)=178.36±0.46±0.16??MeV/c², (?(?(b)?)/?(?(b)?)=1.089±0.026±0.011, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results lead to a factor of 2 better precision on the ?(b)? mass and lifetime compared to previous best measurements, and are consistent with theoretical expectations. PMID:25541768

  10. Measurement of the B¯s? meson lifetime in Ds??? decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M

    2014-10-24

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the B¯s? meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to Ds???, to that of the B¯? meson. The pp collision data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1??fb(-1), collected with the LHCb detector, at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Combining our measured value of 1.010±0.010±0.008 for this ratio with the known B¯? lifetime, we determine the flavor-specific B¯s? lifetime to be ?(B¯s? )=1.535±0.015±0.014??ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This is the most precise measurement to date, and is consistent with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. PMID:25379914

  11. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türko?lu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ?30??GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. PMID:25279617

  12. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    E-print Network

    Aguilar, M; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türko?lu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ?30??GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  13. Measuring electron-positron annihilation radiation from laser plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Tommasini, R.; Seely, J.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Pereira, N.; Gregori, G.; Falk, K.; Mithen, J.; Murphy, C. D.

    2012-10-15

    We investigated various diagnostic techniques to measure the 511 keV annihilation radiations. These include step-wedge filters, transmission crystal spectroscopy, single-hit CCD detectors, and streaked scintillating detection. While none of the diagnostics recorded conclusive results, the step-wedge filter that is sensitive to the energy range between 100 keV and 700 keV shows a signal around 500 keV that is clearly departing from a pure Bremsstrahlung spectrum and that we ascribe to annihilation radiation.

  14. A measurement of lifetime differences in the neutral D-meson system

    E-print Network

    Link, J M; Reyes, M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Magnin, J; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Dos Reis, A C; Simão, F R A; Do Vale, M A B; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Méndez, H; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; Ramírez, J E; O'Reilly, B; Vaandering, E W; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E E; Gourlay, S A; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Sarwar, S; Zallo, A; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Park, K S; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Myung, S S; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Boschini, M; Brambilla, D; Caccianiga, B; Calandrino, A; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Giammarchi, M G; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, A; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Merlo, M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Viola, L; Vitulo, P; Hernández, H; López, A M; Méndez, L; Mirles, M A; Montiel, E; Olaya, D; Quinones, J; Rivera, C; Zhang, Y; Copty, N K; Purohit, M; Wilson, J R; Cho, K; Handler, T; Engh, D; Johns, W E; Hosack, M; Nehring, M S; Sales, M; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Webster, M S; Sheaff, M; Kwon, Y J

    2000-01-01

    Using a high statistics sample of photoproduced charm particles from the FOCUS experiment at Fermilab, we compare the lifetimes of neutral D mesons decaying via D0 to K- pi+ and K- K+ to measure the lifetime differences between CP even and CP odd final states. These measurements bear on the phenomenology of D0 - D0bar mixing. If the D0 to K-pi+ is an equal mixture of CP even and CP odd eigenstates, we measure yCP = 0.0342 \\pm 0.0139 \\pm 0.0074.

  15. A Measurement of Lifetime Differences in the Neutral D-Meson System

    E-print Network

    Link, J M; Reyes, M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Magnin, J; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Dos Reis, A C; Simão, F R A; Do Vale, M A B; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Méndez, H; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; Ramírez, J E; O'Reilly, B; Vaandering, E W; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E E; Gourlay, S A; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Sarwar, S; Zallo, A; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Park, K S; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Myung, S S; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Boschini, M; Brambilla, D; Caccianiga, B; Calandrino, A; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Giammarchi, M G; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, A; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Merlo, M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Viola, L; Vitulo, P; Hernández, H; López, A M; Méndez, L; Mirles, M A; Montiel, E; Olaya, D; Quinones, J; Rivera, C; Zhang, Y; Copty, N K; Purohit, M; Wilson, J R; Cho, K; Handler, T; Engh, D; Johns, W E; Hosack, M; Nehring, M S; Sales, M; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Webster, M S; Sheaff, M; Kwon, Y J

    2000-01-01

    Using a high statistics sample of photoproduced charm particles from the FOCUS experiment at Fermilab, we compare the lifetimes of neutral D mesons decaying via D0 to K- pi+ and K- K+ to measure the lifetime differences between CP even and CP odd final states. These measurements bear on the phenomenology of D0 - D0bar mixing. If the D0 to K-pi+ is an equal mixture of CP even and CP odd eigenstates, we measure yCP = 0.0342 \\pm 0.0139 \\pm 0.0074.

  16. Evolution of nuclear shapes at high spins as determined by lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.

    1986-01-01

    Lifetime measurements of high spin states are obtained by the Doppler-shift recoil-distance method. Transition quadrupole moments are extracted from these data. Expanding on earlier experimental work, lifetime and moment of inertia measurements were made for /sup 172/W. The data for transition quadrupole moments for the yrast states reveals an unexpected drop at high spin which can be explained by the simultaneous alignment of h/sub 9/2/ protons and i/sub 13/2/ neutrons. This conclusion is supported by moment of inertia measurements which show evidence of a 3-band crossing. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs. (DWL)

  17. Quantum efficiency and metastable lifetime measurements in solid state laser materials via

    E-print Network

    Mandelis, Andreas

    ) was utilized early in the study of nonradiative processes in luminescent systems ex- hibiting metastable to measure the absolute nonradiative quantum efficiency flNR This, in turn, can be readily used to determine for the com- bined measurement of metastable lifetime and nonradiative energy con- version efficiency in laser

  18. Fabrication of 94Zr thin target for recoil distance doppler shift method of lifetime measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, C. K.; Rohilla, Aman; Abhilash, S. R.; Kabiraj, D.; Singh, R. P.; Mehta, D.; Chamoli, S. K.

    2014-11-01

    A thin isotopic 94Zr target of thickness 520 ?g /cm2 has been prepared for recoil distance Doppler shift method (RDM) lifetime measurement by using an electron beam deposition method on tantalum backing of 3.5 mg/cm2 thickness at Inter University Accelerator Center (IUAC), New Delhi. To meet the special requirement of smoothness of surface for RDM lifetime measurement and also to protect the outer layer of 94Zr from peeling off, a very thin layer of gold has been evaporated on a 94Zr target on a specially designed substrate holder. In all, 143 mg of 99.6% enriched 94Zr target material was utilized for the fabrication of 94Zr targets. The target has been successfully used in a recent RDM lifetime measurement experiment at IUAC.

  19. Brain energy metabolism and dopaminergic function in Huntington's disease measured in vivo using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Leenders, K.L.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Quinn, N.; Marsden, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with typical Huntington's disease was investigated with computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography. Regional cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction, oxygen and glucose utilization, L-Dopa uptake, and dopamine (D2) receptor binding were measured using several positron-labelled tracers. CT showed slight atrophy of the head of caudate but no cortical atrophy, although distinct frontal lobe dysfunction was present on psychometric testing. Oxygen and glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow were decreased in the striata and to a lesser extent in frontal cortex. Cerebral blood flow was in the low normal range throughout the remainder of the brain. A normal metabolic ratio was found in all regions, since the changes in glucose utilization paralleled those in oxygen consumption. The capacity of the striatum to store dopamine as assessed by L-( YF)-fluorodopa uptake was normal, but dopamine (D2) receptor binding was decreased when compared to normal subjects.

  20. Measurement of the hadronic cross section in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-11-01

    This thesis describes the most precise measurement to date of the ratio R, the hadronic cross section in lowest order electron-positron annihilation to the cross section for muon pair production in lowest order electron-positron annihilation. This experiment is of interest because R is a fundamental parameter that tests in a model independent way the basic assumptions of strong interaction theories. According to the assumptions of one of these theories the value of R is determined simply from the electric charges, spin, and color assignments of the produced quark-pairs. The experiment was carried out with the MAgnetic Calorimeter using collisions of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons at the 2200m circumference PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector is one of the best-suited collider detectors for measuring R due to its nearly complete coverage of the full angular range. The data for this experiment were accumulated between February 1982 and April 1983 corresponding to a total event sample of about 40,000 hadronic events. About 5% of the data were taken with 14 GeV beams and the rest of the data were taken with 14.5 GeV beams. A description of particle interactions and experimental considerations is given.

  1. Extended lifetime MCP-PMTs: Characterisation and lifetime measurements of ALD coated microchannel plates, in a sealed photomultiplier tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conneely, Thomas M.; Milnes, James S.; Howorth, Jon

    2013-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of microchannel plates (MCP) has been shown to offer significant performance advantages in MCP-PMTs (MCP Photomultiplier Tube). ALD is a chemical vapour process used to deposit atomic mono-layers on a substrate. A process has been developed to deposit a surface with improved secondary emission yield (SEY) on to an MCP substrate. The principal advantage of a higher SEY is the ability to achieve significantly higher gain at the same operating voltage across a single MCP. Further to this, it is suspected the atomic mono-layers deposited by ALD coating prevent desorption of gaseous contaminants in the MCP glass. The ions produced during desorption are widely believed to be a direct cause of photocathode ageing in MCP-PMTs, leading to the hope that ALD coating can improve the MCP-PMT lifetime. To fully characterise the performance of ALD coated MCPs, two MCP-PMTs were manufactured, one ALD coated and the other uncoated to be used as a reference. Each detector's gain, DQE, pulse shape and timing jitter were measured followed by a life test of the tubes. The ALD coated tube was found to have a higher gain at the same operating voltage, whilst being equivalent to a standard MCP in other performance characteristics. ALD coating gave a dramatically improved life time, after 5.16 C cm-2 total charge extracted, there was no measurable effect on the photocathode QE, although the MCP gain dropped by approximately 35%.

  2. A new plunger device to measure lifetimes of unbound states in tagged exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Procter, M. G.; Smith, A. J.; Twist, V.; Jones, P. M.; Nieminen, P.; Grahn, T.; Butler, P. A.; Scheck, M.

    2012-09-01

    A new plunger device has been designed and is being built at the University of Manchester to measure lifetimes of unbound states in exotic nuclei approaching the proton drip-line. The device is designed to work in both vacuum and gas environments and will be used in conjunction with the gas filled separator RITU and the vacuum-mode separator MARA at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. This will enable the accurate measurement of excited state lifetimes identified via isomer and charged-particle tagging. The plunger will be used to address many key facets of nuclear structure physics with particular emphasis on the effect of deformation on proton emission rates.

  3. Measurement of the ?0b Lifetime Using ?0b-->?+cl-?¯

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.; Akimoto, H.; Akopian, A.; Albrow, M. G.; Amendolia, S. R.; Amidei, D.; Antos, J.; Anway-Wiese, C.; Aota, S.; Apollinari, G.; Asakawa, T.; Ashmanskas, W.; Atac, M.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Bagdasarov, S.; Bailey, M. W.; Bao, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barzi, E.; Bauer, G.; Baumann, T.; Bedeschi, F.; Behrends, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Benlloch, J.; Bensinger, J.; Benton, D.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J. P.; Berryhill, J.; Bertolucci, S.; Bhatti, A.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Bodek, A.; Bokhari, W.; Bolognesi, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Breccia, L.; Bromberg, C.; Bruner, N.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cammerata, J.; Campagnari, C.; Campbell, M.; Caner, A.; Carithers, W.; Carlsmith, D.; Castro, A.; Cauz, D.; Cen, Y.; Cervelli, F.; Chang, P. S.; Chang, P. T.; Chao, H. Y.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, M.-T.; Chiarelli, G.; Chikamatsu, T.; Chiou, C. N.; Christofek, L.; Cihangir, S.; Clark, A. G.; Cobal, M.; Contreras, M.; Conway, J.; Cooper, J.; Cordelli, M.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Crane, D.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Culbertson, R.; Cunningham, J. D.; Daniels, T.; Dejongh, F.; Delchamps, S.; dell'Agnello, S.; dell'Orso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Denby, B.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; Devlin, T.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; Done, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dunn, A.; Eddy, N.; Einsweiler, K.; Elias, J. E.; Ely, R.; Engels, E., Jr.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Fan, Q.; Fiori, I.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G. W.; Franklin, M.; Frautschi, M.; Freeman, J.; Friedman, J.; Fuess, T. A.; Fukui, Y.; Funaki, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Galeotti, S.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gay, C.; Geer, S.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannetti, P.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Gladney, L.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Gordon, A.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grassmann, H.; Groer, L.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guillian, G.; Guo, R. S.; Haber, C.; Hafen, E.; Hahn, S. R.; Hamilton, R.; Handler, R.; Hans, R. M.; Hara, K.; Hardman, A. D.; Harral, B.; Harris, R. M.; Hauger, S. A.; Hauser, J.; Hawk, C.; Hayashi, E.; Heinrich, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hohlmann, M.; Holck, C.; Hollebeek, R.; Holloway, L.; Hölscher, A.; Hong, S.; Houk, G.; Hu, P.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Hylen, J.; Ikeda, H.; Incagli, M.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iwai, J.; Iwata, Y.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kadel, R. W.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambara, H.; Kamon, T.; Kaneko, T.; Karr, K.; Kasha, H.; Kato, Y.; Keaffaber, T. A.; Keeble, L.; Kelley, K.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kephart, R.; Kesten, P.; Kestenbaum, D.; Keup, R. M.; Keutelian, H.; Keyvan, F.; Kharadia, B.; Kim, B. J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kirsch, L.; Koehn, P.; Kondo, K.; Konigsberg, J.; Kopp, S.; Kordas, K.; Koska, W.; Kovacs, E.; Kowald, W.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuwabara, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuns, E.; Laasanen, A. T.; Labanca, N.; Lammel, S.; Lamoureux, J. I.; Lecompte, T.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limon, P.; Lindgren, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lockyer, N.; Long, O.; Loomis, C.; Loreti, M.; Lu, J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lukens, P.; Lusin, S.; Lys, J.; Maeshima, K.; Maghakian, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Mangano, M.; Mansour, J.; Mariotti, M.; Marriner, J. P.; Martin, A.; Matthews, J. A.; Mattingly, R.; McIntyre, P.; Melese, P.; Menzione, A.; Meschi, E.; Metzler, S.; Miao, C.; Miao, T.; Michail, G.; Miller, R.; Minato, H.; Miscetti, S.; Mishina, M.; Mitsushio, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Miyashita, S.; Moggi, N.; Morita, Y.; Mueller, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, T.; Murat, P.; Nakada, H.; Nakano, I.; Nelson, C.; Neuberger, D.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Ninomiya, M.; Nodulman, L.; Oh, S. H.; Ohl, K. E.; Ohmoto, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Oishi, R.; Okabe, M.; Okusawa, T.; Oliveira, R.; Olsen, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Paoletti, R.; Papadimitriou, V.; Pappas, S. P.; Park, S.; Parri, A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Perazzo, A.; Pescara, L.; Peters, M. D.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pillai, M.; Pitts, K. T.; Plunkett, R.; Pondrom, L.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ragan, K.; Ribon, A.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robertson, W. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rolli, S.; Romano, J.; Rosenson, L.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltzberg, D.; Sansoni, A.; Santi, L.; Sato, H.; Scarpine, V.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Scribano, A.; Segler, S.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sganos, G.; Shapiro, M.; Shaw, N. M.; Shen, Q.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sill, A.; Sinervo, P.; Singh, P.; Skarha, J.; Sliwa, K.; Snider, F. D.; Song, T.; Spalding, J.; Speer, T.; Sphicas, P.; Spinella, F.; Spiropulu, M.; Spiegel, L.; Stanco, L.; Steele, J.; Stefanini, A.; Strahl, K.; Strait, J.; Ströhmer, R.; Stuart, D.

    1996-08-01

    The lifetime of ?0b is measured using the semileptonic decay ?0b-->?+cl-?¯, where the ?+c is reconstructed through its decay ?+c-->pK-?+. The data were collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron Collider during 1992-1995 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 110 pb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV. From a fit to the decay length distribution of the ?c-lepton system from 197+/-25 signal events, the lifetime of ?0b is measured to be 1.32+/-0.15+/-0.07 ps.

  4. Variations in the electrical short-circuit current decay for recombination lifetime and velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Tae-Won; Lindholm, Fredrik A.; Neugroschel, Arnost

    1987-01-01

    An improved measurement system for electrical short-circuit current decay is presented that extends applicability of the method to silicon solar cells having an effective lifetime as low as 1 microsec. The system uses metal/oxide/semiconductor transistors as voltage-controlled switches. Advances in theory developed here increase precision and sensitivity in the determination of the minority-carrier recombination lifetime and recombination velocity. A variation of the method, which exploits measurements made on related back-surface field and back-ohmic contact devices, further improves precision and sensitivity. The improvements are illustrated by application to 15 different silicon solar cells.

  5. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  6. Measurement of the B- and B¯ 0 Meson Lifetimes Using Semileptonic Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.; Akimoto, H.; Akopian, A.; Albrow, M. G.; Amendolia, S. R.; Amidei, D.; Antos, J.; Anway-Wiese, C.; Aota, S.; Apollinari, G.; Asakawa, T.; Ashmanskas, W.; Atac, M.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Bagdasarov, S.; Bailey, M. W.; Bao, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barzi, E.; Bauer, G.; Baumann, T.; Bedeschi, F.; Behrends, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Benlloch, J.; Bensinger, J.; Benton, D.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J. P.; Berryhill, J.; Bertolucci, S.; Bhatti, A.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Bodek, A.; Bokhari, W.; Bolognesi, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Breccia, L.; Bromberg, C.; Bruner, N.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cammerata, J.; Campagnari, C.; Campbell, M.; Caner, A.; Carithers, W.; Carlsmith, D.; Castro, A.; Cauz, D.; Cen, Y.; Cervelli, F.; Auchincloss, P.; Chao, H. Y.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, M.-T.; Chiarelli, G.; Chikamatsu, T.; Chiou, C. N.; Christofek, L.; Cihangir, S.; Clark, A. G.; Cobal, M.; Contreras, M.; Conway, J.; Cooper, J.; Cordelli, M.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Crane, D.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Culbertson, R.; Cunningham, J. D.; Daniels, T.; Dejongh, F.; Delchamps, S.; dell'Agnello, S.; dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Denby, B.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; Devlin, T.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; Done, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dunn, A.; Eddy, N.; Einsweiler, K.; Elias, J. E.; Ely, R.; Engels, E., Jr.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Fan, Q.; Fiori, I.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G. W.; Franklin, M.; Frautschi, M.; Freeman, J.; Friedman, J.; Fuess, T. A.; Fukui, Y.; Funaki, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Galeotti, S.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gay, C.; Geer, S.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannetti, P.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Gladney, L.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Gordon, A.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grassmann, H.; Groer, L.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guillian, G.; Guo, R. S.; Haber, C.; Hafen, E.; Hahn, S. R.; Hamilton, R.; Handler, R.; Hans, R. M.; Hara, K.; Hardman, A. D.; Harral, B.; Harris, R. M.; Hauger, S. A.; Hauser, J.; Hawk, C.; Hayashi, E.; Heinrich, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hohlmann, M.; Holck, C.; Hollebeek, R.; Holloway, L.; Hölscher, A.; Hong, S.; Houk, G.; Hu, P.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Hylen, J.; Ikeda, H.; Incagli, M.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iwai, J.; Iwata, Y.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kadel, R. W.; Kajfasz, E.; Kamon, T.; Kaneko, T.; Karr, K.; Kasha, H.; Kato, Y.; Keaffaber, T. A.; Keeble, L.; Kelley, K.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kephart, R.; Kesten, P.; Kestenbaum, D.; Keup, R. M.; Keutelian, H.; Keyvan, F.; Kharadia, B.; Kim, B. J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kirsch, L.; Koehn, P.; Kondo, K.; Konigsberg, J.; Kopp, S.; Kordas, K.; Koska, W.; Kovacs, E.; Kowald, W.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuwabara, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuns, E.; Laasanen, A. T.; Labanca, N.; Lammel, S.; Lamoureux, J. I.; Lecompte, T.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limon, P.; Lindgren, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lockyer, N.; Long, O.; Loomis, C.; Loreti, M.; Lu, J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lukens, P.; Lusin, S.; Lys, J.; Maeshima, K.; Maghakian, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Mangano, M.; Mansour, J.; Mariotti, M.; Marriner, J. P.; Martin, A.; Matthews, J. A.; Mattingly, R.; McIntyre, P.; Melese, P.; Menzione, A.; Meschi, E.; Metzler, S.; Miao, C.; Michail, G.; Miller, R.; Minato, H.; Miscetti, S.; Mishina, M.; Mitsushio, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Miyashita, S.; Morita, Y.; Mueller, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, T.; Murat, P.; Nakada, H.; Nakano, I.; Nelson, C.; Neuberger, D.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Ninomiya, M.; Nodulman, L.; Oh, S. H.; Ohl, K. E.; Ohmoto, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Oishi, R.; Okabe, M.; Okusawa, T.; Oliver, R.; Olsen, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Paoletti, R.; Papadimitriou, V.; Pappas, S. P.; Park, S.; Parri, A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Perazzo, A.; Pescara, L.; Peters, M. D.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pillai, M.; Pitts, K. T.; Plunkett, R.; Pondrom, L.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ragan, K.; Ribon, A.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robertson, W. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rolli, S.; Romano, J.; Rosenson, L.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltzberg, D.; Sansoni, A.; Santi, L.; Sato, H.; Scarpine, V.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Scribano, A.; Segler, S.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sganos, G.; Sgolacchia, A.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shaw, N. M.; Shen, Q.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sill, A.; Sinervo, P.; Singh, P.; Skarha, J.; Sliwa, K.; Snider, F. D.; Song, T.; Spalding, J.; Sphicas, P.; Spinella, F.; Spiropulu, M.; Spiegel, L.; Stanco, L.; Steele, J.; Stefanini, A.; Strahl, K.; Strait, J.; Ströhmer, R.; Stuart, D.; Sullivan, G.; Soumarokov, A.; Sumorok, K.

    1996-06-01

    The lifetimes of the B- and B¯ 0 mesons are measured using the partially reconstructed semileptonic decays B¯-->Dl-?¯X, where D is either a D0 or D*+ meson. The data were collected by the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider during 1992-1993 and correspond to 19.3 pb-1 of p¯p collisions at s = 1.8 TeV. We measure the decay length distributions and find the lifetimes to be ?\\(B-\\) = 1.56+/-0.13+/-0.06 ps and ?\\(B¯ 0\\) = 1.54+/-0.08+/-0.06 ps, and the ratio of lifetimes to be ?\\(B-\\)/?\\(B¯ 0\\) = 1.01+/-0.11+/-0.02, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic.

  7. Measuring Lifetimes of Long-Lived Charged Massive Particles Stopped in LHC Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Shoji; Shirai, Satoshi; Hamaguchi, Koichi

    2009-10-02

    Long-lived charged massive particles (CHAMPs) appear in various particle physics models beyond the standard model. In this Letter, we discuss the prospects for studying the stopping and decaying events of such long-lived CHAMPs at the LHC detectors, and show that the lifetime measurement (and the study of decay products) is possible with the LHC detectors for a wide range of the lifetime O(0.1)-O(10{sup 10}) sec, by using periods of no pp collision. Even a short lifetime of order 1 sec can be measured by (i) identifying the stopping event with the on-line event filter, (ii) immediately making a beam-dump signal which stops the pp collision of the LHC, and at the same time (iii) changing the trigger menu to optimize it for the detection of a CHAMP decay in the calorimeter. Other possibilities are also discussed.

  8. Measuring lifetimes of long-lived charged massive particles stopped in LHC detectors

    E-print Network

    Shoji Asai; Koichi Hamaguchi; Satoshi Shirai

    2009-09-28

    Long-lived charged massive particles (CHAMPs) appear in various particle physics models beyond the Standard Model. In this Letter, we discuss the prospects for studying the stopping and decaying events of such long-lived CHAMPs at the LHC detectors, and show that the lifetime measurement (and the study of decay products) is possible with the LHC detectors for a wide range of the lifetime O(0.1)-O(10^{10}) sec, by using periods of no $pp$ collision. Even a short lifetime of order one second can be measured by (i) identifying the stopping event with the online Event Filter, (ii) immediately making a beam-dump signal which stops the $pp$ collision of the LHC, and at the same time (iii) changing the trigger menu to optimize it for the detection of a CHAMP decay in the calorimeter. Other possibilities are also discussed.

  9. Lifetime measurement of excited low-spin states via the $(p,p^{\\prime}?$) reaction

    E-print Network

    A. Hennig; V. Derya; M. N. Mineva; P. Petkov; S. G. Pickstone; M. Spieker; A. Zilges

    2015-06-19

    In this article a method for lifetime measurements in the sub-picosecond regime via the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) following the inelastic proton scattering reaction is presented. In a pioneering experiment we extracted the lifetimes of 30 excited low-spin states of $^{96}$Ru, taking advantage of the coincident detection of scattered protons and de-exciting $\\gamma$-rays as well as the large number of particle and $\\gamma$-ray detectors provided by the SONIC@HORUS setup at the University of Cologne. The large amount of new experimental data shows that this technique is suited for the measurement of lifetimes of excited low-spin states, especially for isotopes with a low isotopic abundance, where $(n,n^{\\prime}\\gamma$) or - in case of investigating dipole excitations - ($\\gamma,\\gamma^{\\prime}$) experiments are not feasible due to the lack of sufficient isotopically enriched target material.

  10. New measurements of the lifetimes of excited states of {sup 55}Mn below 2.7 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Caggiano, J. A.; Warren, G. A.; Hasty, R. D.; Korbly, S. E.; Park, W. H.

    2009-09-15

    The lifetimes of the excited states of {sup 55}Mn between 1.5 and 2.7 MeV were measured using nuclear resonance fluorescence. The absolute lifetimes of the excited levels were determined from simultaneous measurements of manganese and aluminum. In this approach, the precisely known aluminum state serves as a means to normalize the results. Our findings differ from the evaluated level lifetimes in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), but agree with earlier nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements.

  11. Measurement of the B/s0 lifetime in B/s0 --> K+ K- decays

    SciTech Connect

    Pounder, Nicola Louise; /Oxford U.

    2009-02-01

    A method is presented to simultaneously separate the contributions to a sample of B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup {prime}-} decays, where h = {pi} or K, and measure the B meson lifetimes in the sample while correcting for the bias in the lifetime distributions due to the hadronic trigger at the CDF experiment. Using 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at CDF the B{sup 0} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = 1.558{sub -0.047}{sup +0.050}{sub stat} {+-} 0.028{sub syst} ps, in agreement with the world average measurement. The B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime in the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} decay is measured as {tau}{sub B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}} = 1.51{sub -0.11}{sup +0.13}{sub stat} {+-} 0.04{sub syst} ps. No difference is observed between the lifetime and other measurements of the average B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime or the lifetime of the light B{sub s}{sup 0} mass eigenstate determined from B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decays. With the assumptions that B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} is 100% CP-even and that {tau}{sub B{sub s}{sup 0}} = {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} the width difference in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system is determined as {Delta}{Lambda}{sup CP}/{Lambda} = 0.03{sub -0.15}{sup +0.17}{sub stat} {+-} 0.05{sub syst} using the current world average B{sup 0} lifetime. This is consistent with zero and with the current world average measurement.

  12. Perspectives for TeV positron measurements with the PEBS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schael, Stefan

    Numerous astrophysical observations have produced an overwhelming evidence for the existence of dark matter in the universe. But till today, we have not understood its nature. Precision mea-surements of primary cosmic rays could provide crucial information to answer this fundamental question and could establish the missing link between collider experiments and cosmology. Pre-vious experiments reported tantalizing features in both the electron and positron spectrum but were not optimized for those measurements. This Positron-Electron-Balloon born Spectrometer (PEBS) therefore seeks to establish a new suborbital program with a goal to provide essentially background-free measurements of primary electrons and positrons in cosmic rays up to TeV energies. The PEBS detector would consist of a magnet, a transition radiation detector, a time of flight system, a novel high resolution scintillating fiber tracker and an electromagnetic calorimeter. The magnetic spectrometer has a geometrical acceptance for electrons of 1300 cm2 sr. One key element for a new generation of large area balloon experiments to measure charged cosmic rays is the capability of precision tracking of charged particles over large areas. We have therefore developed a novel modular high-resolution charged-particle tracking detector using round, scintillating fibers of 0.250 mm diameter and linear silicon photomultiplier arrays for readout. In a CERN beam line we have measured in 2009 a single point resolution of 0.05 mm for these devices. Different to space based experiments, balloon born experiments are more flexible as they can be realized on much shorter time scales and with less than 1 percent of the cost. The PEBS spectrometer is based on a modular detector concept such that it can be reused for several flights with continuous optimization of the scientific program. Detector concepts, test beam results and the scientific program will be presented.

  13. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  14. New levels and a lifetime measurement in {sup 204}Tl

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiades, N.; Nelson, R. O.; Devlin, M.; Becker, J. A.

    2008-02-15

    The {sup 205}Tl(n,2n{gamma}) reaction was used to populate excited states in {sup 204}Tl. The {gamma}-ray detection was accomplished with the GEANIE spectrometer, a Compton suppressed array of 26 Ge detectors. An energetic beam of neutrons was provided by the pulsed neutron source of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's WNR facility. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the incident neutron energies. {gamma}-ray excitation functions were determined from incident neutron energy of 1 MeV up to E{sub n}=25 MeV. The level scheme of {sup 204}Tl was enriched and the partial level scheme and nuclear structure above the previously known 7{sup +} isomer at 1104-keV excitation energy were established for the first time up to E{sub x}{approx}2.3 MeV. The high-spin part of the level scheme exhibits striking similarities to that of the neighboring {sup 202}Tl isotope, suggesting similarities in the underlying nuclear structure. The half-life of the 7{sup +} isomer was measured with a more precise result (T{sub 1/2}=60.7{+-}1.2 {mu}s), in agreement with literature values. A lower limit for the excitation energy of the {pi}h{sub 11/2}{nu}i{sub 13/2} structure with J{sup {pi}}=12{sup -} is proposed.

  15. Measured lifetimes of metastable levels of Mn X, Mn XI, Mn XII, and Mn XIII ions 

    E-print Network

    Moehs, D. P.; Church, David A.

    1999-01-01

    An ion storage technique, based on the capture of metastable multiply charged ions from an external ion source into a Kingdon ion trap, has been used to measure the lifetimes of eight metastable levels of Mn ions with 3s(2)3p(k) configurations, k...

  16. Lifetime Assessment for Thermal Barrier Coatings: Tests for Measuring Mixed Mode Delamination Toughness

    E-print Network

    Hutchinson, John W.

    the thermally grown oxide (TGO), and a porous ceramic topcoat which serves as the thermal insulation. DetailsLifetime Assessment for Thermal Barrier Coatings: Tests for Measuring Mixed Mode Delamination Mechanisms leading to degradation of the adherence of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) used in aircraft

  17. Iron detection in crystalline silicon by carrier lifetime measurements for arbitrary injection and doping

    E-print Network

    Iron detection in crystalline silicon by carrier lifetime measurements for arbitrary injection of iron in silicon, which was previously restricted to low injection and a narrow doping range, has been to be used for very sensitive and rapid iron detection under a wide range of conditions. In addition

  18. Measurement of the Masses and Lifetimes of B Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Catastini, Pierluigi; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-05-01

    The latest results for the B Hadron sector at the Tevatron Collider are summarized. The properties of B hadrons can be precisely measured at the Tevatron. In particularly they will focus on the masses and lifetimes. The new Tevatron results for the CP violation in B Hadrons are also discussed.

  19. An Undergraduate Experiment on Nuclear Lifetime Measurement Using the Doppler Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. L.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    While designed for a senior undergraduate laboratory, the experiment illustrates the principles involved in the various Doppler techniques currently used in nuclear lifetime studies and demonstrates the versatility of the Ge(Li) detector in applications other than direct energy or intensity measurement. (Author/TS)

  20. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  1. Measurement of the lifetime of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakova, O I; Yakovlev, A V; Chapovskii, P L

    2008-09-30

    The lifetimes of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap are measured at different populations of the 'bright' and 'dark' hyperfine states of captured atoms. It is found that the lifetime of atoms in the trap decreases if they spend more time in the bright state. A simple explanation of this effect is proposed which is based on the increase in the transport cross section for collisions of thermal rubidium atoms surrounding the trap with cold rubidium atoms upon their electronic excitation. (laser cooling)

  2. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochomes in the sample.

  3. A method for measuring picosecond phenomena in photolabile species: the emission lifetime of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, M D; Marcus, M A; Lewis, A; Mahr, H; Frigo, N

    1976-01-01

    We have measured the emission lifetime of bacteriorhodopsin at physiological temperatures to be 15 +/- 3 ps using a technique which employs a mode-locked dye laser, a sum frequency light gate, and a continuous flow system. We observe no concentration dependence of the lifetime over the range of 1.1 X 10(-4) M to 1.0 X 10(-5) M. We conclude that the emission which we observe comes from bacteriorhodopsin and not one of its photochemically produced intermediates, and that the emission cannot originate from the state into which light is absorbed. PMID:990393

  4. Measuring long-lived 13C2 state lifetimes at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Claytor, Kevin; Theis, Thomas; Feng, Yesu; Warren, Warren

    2014-02-01

    Long-lived disconnected eigenstates (for example, the singlet state in a system with two nearly equivalent carbons, or the singlet-singlet state in a system with two chemically equivalent carbons and two chemically equivalent hydrogens) hold the potential to drastically extend the lifetime of hyperpolarization in molecular tracers for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, a first-principles calculation of the expected lifetime (and thus selection of potential imaging agents) is made very difficult because of the large variety of relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation mechanisms. As a result, all previous measurements relied on costly and time consuming syntheses of (13)C labeled compounds. Here we show that it is possible to determine (13)C singlet state lifetimes by detecting the naturally abundant doubly-labeled species. This approach allows for rapid and low cost screening of potential molecular biomarkers bearing long-lived states. PMID:24457544

  5. Nuclear structure of proton-rich intermediate mass nuclei studied with advanced lifetime measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Christopher Scott

    The transition matrix elements between excited nuclear states provide valuable information about the structure of exotic nuclei. Lifetime measurements are a model-independent way to deduce these matrix elements from experimental data. Two studies of proton-rich nuclei near mass 70 are presented herein using advanced lifetime measurement techniques. The first study is a measurement of the 81+ and 91+ states in the odd-N, odd-Z nucleus 70As. The lifetimes of these states were determined by the application of the gamma-ray lineshape method to gamma-gamma coincidence data. The states were populated using with the 9Be(78Rb,70As) reaction and gamma rays were detected with the Segmented Germanium Array in coincidence with reaction products detected in the focal plane of the S800 Spectrograph. The B(E1;8+ ?7 -) and B(M1;9+?8 +) transition strengths were deduced and were found to support the assignment of these states to a coupling of the odd proton and neutron in the g9/2 orbital. The second study is a measurement of the 21+ state lifetime in the N=Z nucleus 74Rb. A novel technique called the Differential Recoil Distance Method was used to extract the lifetime from the gamma-ray spectra. The next-generation gamma-ray detector array GRETINA was used in the experiment, again coupled to the S800 Spectrograph to detect residues from 9Be(74Kr, 74Rb) charge exchange reactions. The B( E2;2+1?0+1) strength was calculated and is consistent with the measured strength of the transition between the isobaric analogue states in 74Kr, which may be a signature of shape coexistence in 74Rb.

  6. Precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei based on Doppler-shift techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Hironori

    2013-04-19

    A recent progress in precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University is presented. The Recoil Distance Doppler-shift (RDDS) technique has been applied to nuclear reactions involving intermediate-energy rare isotope (RI) beams, to determine absolute transition strengths between nuclear states model independently from level lifetimes of interest. As such an example, recent lifetime measurements of the first 2{sup +} states in the neutron-rich {sup 62,64,66}Fe isotopes at and around N=40 are introduced. The experiment was performed at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL using a unique combination of several experimental instruments; the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA), the plunger device, and the S800 spectrograph. The reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2) are determined directly from the measured lifetimes. The observed trend of B(E2) clearly demonstrates that an enhanced collectivity persists in {sup 66}Fe despite the harmonic-oscillator magic number N=40. The present results are also discussed in comparison with the large-scale shell model calculations, pointing to a possible extension of the deformation region beyond N=40.

  7. A magneto-gravitational neutron trap for the measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat, Daniel J.

    Neutron decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta-decay. The mean decay lifetime is a key input for predicting the abundance of light elements in the early universe. A precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, when combined with other neutron decay observables, can test for physics beyond the standard model in a way that is complimentary to, and potentially competitive with, results from high energy collider experiments. Many previous measurements of the neutron lifetime used ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in material bottles. In a material bottle experiment, UCN are loaded into the apparatus, stored for varying times, and the surviving UCN are emptied and counted. These measurements are in poor agreement with experiments that use neutron beams, and new experiments are needed to resolve the discrepancy and precisely determine the lifetime. Here we present an experiment that uses a bowl-shaped array of NdFeB magnets to confine neutrons without material wall interactions. The trap shape is designed to rapidly remove higher energy UCN that might slowly leak from the top of the trap, and can facilitate new techniques to count surviving UCN within the trap. We review the scientific motivation for a precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, and present the commissioning of the trap. Data are presented using a vanadium activation technique to count UCN within the trap, providing an alternative method to emptying neutrons from the trap and into a counter. Potential systematic effects in the experiment are then discussed and estimated using analytical and numerical techniques. We also investigate solid nitrogen-15 as a source of UCN using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy. We conclude with a discussion of forthcoming research and development for UCN detection and UCN sources.

  8. Application of Positron Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy to the Measurement of the Uniformity of Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, C. A.; Sheffield, Thomas; Stacy, Scott; Yang, Chun

    2009-03-10

    The uniformity of rubber-carbon black composite materials has been investigated with positron Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (DBS). The number of grams of carbon black (CB) mixed into one hundred grams of rubber, phr, is used to characterize a sample. A typical concentration for rubber in tires is 50 phr. The S parameter measured by DBS has been found to depend on the phr of the sample as well as the type of rubber and carbon black. The variation in carbon black concentration within a surface area of about 5 mm diameter can be measured by moving a standard Na-22 or Ge-68 positron source over an extended sample. The precision of the concentration measurement depends on the dwell time at a point on the sample. The time required to determine uniformity over an extended sample can be reduced by running with much higher counting rate than is typical in DBS and correcting for the systematic variation of S parameter with counting rate. Variation in CB concentration with mixing time at the level of about 0.5% has been observed.

  9. Electroweak Measurements in Electron-Positron Collisions at W-Boson-Pair Energies at LEP

    E-print Network

    Schael, S; Bruneliere, R; Buskulic, D; De Bonis, I; Decamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jezequel, S; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Trocme, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Fernandez, E; Fernandez-Bosman, M; Garrido, Ll; Grauges, E; Juste, A; Martinez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, Ll. M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Perlas, J; Riu, I; Ruiz, H; Sanchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Bazarko, A; Becker, U; Boix, G; Bird, F; Blucher, E; Bonvicini, B; Bright-Thomas, P; Barklow, T; Buchmuller, O; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Greening, T C; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Gianotti, F; Girone, M; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Kado, M; Lehraus, I; Lazeyras, P; Maley, P; Mato, P; May, J; Moutoussi, A; Pepe-Altarelli, M; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, L; Schlatter, D; Schmitt, B; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Veenhof, R; Valassi, A; Wiedenmann, W; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Z; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Bertelsen, H; Fernley, T; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Lindahl, A; Mollerud, R; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Waananen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, E; Siotis, I; Vayaki, A; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G; Brient, J C; Machefert, F; Rouge, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Verderi, M; Videau, H; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Picchi, P; Colrain, P; Have, I. ten; Hughes, I S; Kennedy, J; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Turnbull, R M; Wasserbaech, S; Buchmuller, O; Cavanaugh, R; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, W; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, D M; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Goodsir, S; Marinelli, N; Martin, E B; Nash, J; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R.W L; Keemer, N R; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Sloan, T; Smizanska, M; Snow, S W; Williams, M I; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaitre, V; Bauerdick, L.A T; Blumenschein, U; van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Holldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kasemann, M; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Muller, A S; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H; Wanke, R; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, J J; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Etienne, F; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Tilquin, A; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Buscher, V; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Huttmann, K; Lutjens, G; Mannert, C; Manner, W; Moser, H G; Settles, R; Seywerd, H; Stenzel, H; Villegas, M; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Azzurri, P; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, Ph; Jacholkowska, A; Le Diberder, F; Lefrancois, J; Mutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foa, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciaba, A; Sguazzoni, G; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, J; Tenchini, R; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; Garcia-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Botterill, D R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Edwards, M; Haywood, S J; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D; Colas, P; Emery, S; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, W; Lancon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Perez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S

    2013-01-01

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3~fb$^{-1}$ collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from $130~GeV$ to $209~GeV$. Combining the published results of the four LEP experiments, the measurements include total and differential cross-sections in photon-pair, fermion-pair and four-fermion production, the latter resulting from both double-resonant WW and ZZ production as well as singly resonant production. Total and differential cross-sections are measured precisely, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model at centre-of-mass energies never explored before in electron-positron collisions. Final-state interaction effects in four-fermion production, such as those arising from colour reconnection and Bose-Einstein correlations between the two W decay systems arising ...

  10. Noninvasive measurement of liver regeneration with positron emission tomography and (2-11C)thymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Borght, T.; Lambotte, L.; Pauwels, S.; Labar, D.; Beckers, C.; Dive, C. )

    1991-09-01

    The feasibility of liver regeneration determination with (2-11C)thymidine and positron emission tomography was investigated in partially hepatectomized rats. Serial tomographic scans were performed over a 120-minute period after injection of (2-11C)thymidine together with tritium-labeled thymidine. Within 10 minutes after injection, positron emission tomography scans showed a twofold higher hepatic uptake in regenerating than in nonregenerating livers. Time-activity curves over the liver area indicated that the maximal uptake was followed by a faster decrease of 11C radioactivity in controls than in regenerating animals, so that total 11C activity remaining in the liver at 120 minutes accounted for 68% of maximum in regenerating and only 38% in controls. Tissue distribution studies performed at 120 minutes showed that total 11C radioactivity, expressed in percent injected dose per gram, was six times higher in regenerating livers than in controls (0.62% {plus minus} 0.07% in regenerating livers and 0.10% {plus minus} 0.03% in nonregenerating livers; P less than 0.001) and correlated with 3H radioactivity measured in the nuclear fraction (r = 0.92; P less than 0.001). When the hepatic uptake was expressed in percent of dose per organ, the difference between both groups increased (2.31% {plus minus} 0.23% in regenerating livers and 0.29% {plus minus} 0.02% in nonregenerating livers; P less than 0.001) because of higher weight of regenerating livers than of nonregenerating livers (3.83 {plus minus} 0.11 g in regenerating livers and 2.96 {plus minus} 0.16 g in nonregenerating livers; P less than 0.001). In other organs examined, no difference in 11C radioactivity was found between the two groups of rats. These results indicated the potential usefulness of (2-11C)thymidine and positron emission tomography for noninvasive measurement of liver regeneration.

  11. Temperature dependent carrier lifetime measurements of InAs/InAsSb T2SLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytac, Y.; Olson, B. V.; Kim, J. K.; Shaner, E. A.; Hawkins, S. D.; Klem, J. F.; Flatté, M. E.; Boggess, T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature dependent measurements of carrier recombination rates using a time-resolved pump-probe technique are reported for mid-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb type-2 superlattices (T2SLs). By engineering the layer widths and alloy compositions a 16 K band-gap of ~235 +/- 10meV was achieved for four doped and five undoped T2SLs. Carrier lifetimes were determined by fitting lifetime models of Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH), radiative, and Auger recombination processes simultaneously to the temperature and excess carrier density dependent data. The contribution of each recombination process at a given temperature is identified and the total lifetime is determined over a range of excess carrier densities. The minority carrier and Auger lifetimes were observed to increase with increasing antimony content and decreasing layer thickness for the undoped T2SLs. It is hypothesized that a reduction in SRH recombination centers or a shift in the SRH defect energy relative to the T2SL band edges is the cause of this increase in the SRH minority carrier lifetime. The lower Auger coefficients are attributed to a reduced number of final Auger states in the SL samples with greater antimony content. An Auger limited minority carrier lifetime is observed for the doped T2SLs, and it is found to be a factor of ten shorter than for undoped T2SLs. The Auger rates for all the InAs/InAsSb T2SLs were significantly larger than those previously reported for InAs/GaSb T2SLs.

  12. Wafer Preparation and Iodine-Ethanol-Ethanol Passivation Procedure for Reproducible Minority-Carrier Lifetime Measurement: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Mehta, V.; Li, C.; Johnston, S.

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes reasons that lifetime measurments may be irreproducible using iodine-in-ethanol (I-E) passivation. Possible factors include the strength of the iodine in ethanol solution, wafer cleaning procedures, influence of wafer container during lifetime measurement, and stability of I-E.

  13. Lifetime measurements of the 5d states of rubidium D. Sheng, A. Prez Galvn, and L. A. Orozco

    E-print Network

    Orozco, Luis A.

    Lifetime measurements of the 5d states of rubidium D. Sheng, A. Pérez Galván, and L. A. Orozco 2008 We present lifetime measurements of the 5D3/2 and 5D5/2 states of rubidium using the time-information science as they are used for qubit manipulation in ion traps 6,7 . The d states of rubidium

  14. Atmospheric lifetime of caesium-137 as an estimate of aerosol lifetime -quantified from global measurements in the months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iren Kristiansen, Nina; Stohl, Andreas; Wotawa, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Radionuclides like caesium-137 (137Cs) can be emitted to the atmosphere in great quantities during nuclear accidents and are of significant health impact. A global set of radionuclide measurements collected over several months after the accidental release from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 has been used to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs. Lifetime is here defined as the e-folding time scale (the time interval in which the exponential decay of the 137Cs quantity has decreased by factor of e). The estimated atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs can also be used as an estimate of the lifetime of aerosols in the atmosphere. This is based on the fact that 137Cs attaches to the ambient accumulation-mode (AM) aerosols and trace their fate in the atmosphere. The 137Cs "tags" the AM aerosols and both the 137Cs and AM aerosols are removed simultaneously from the atmosphere by scavenging within clouds, precipitation and dry deposition. The 137Cs emitted from Fukushima attached mainly to sulphate aerosols in the size range 0.1-2 ?m diameter. Measured 137Cs activity concentrations from several stations spread mostly over the Northern Hemisphere were evaluated, and the decrease in activity concentrations over time (after correction for radioactive decay) reflects the removal of aerosols by wet and dry deposition. Corrections for air mass transport were made using measurements of the noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe) which was also released during the accident. This noble gas does not attach to the aerosols and was thus used as a passive tracer of air mass transport. The atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs was estimated to 10.0-13.9 days during April and May 2011. This represents the atmospheric lifetime of a "background" AM aerosol well mixed in the extratropical northern hemisphere troposphere. It is expected that the lifetime of this vertically mixed background aerosol is longer than the lifetime of fresh AM aerosols directly emitted from surface sources. Possible caveats like late emissions and resuspension were found not to significantly affect the results. The estimated lifetimes from this study are within the much larger and uncertain range of previously observation-based studies of aerosol lifetimes (less than 4 days to more than a month). However, modelled aerosol lifetimes from air quality and climate models typically range 3-7 days which is substantially lower than the mean AM lifetimes obtained from this study. The difference points towards a too quick removal of AM aerosol in the models and further research on the cause of this discrepancy is warranted. Too short modelled AM aerosol lifetimes would have serious implications for air quality and climate model predictions. By running several major climate and air quality models for the Fukushima case, an evaluation of the models performance compared to the measurements can be directly obtained.

  15. Lifetime measurement of a collision complex using ion cyclotron double resonance - H2C6N2(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, Vincent G.; Sen, Atish D.; Huntress, Wesley T., Jr.; Mcewan, Murray J.

    1991-01-01

    In the ion-molecule reaction between HC3N(+) and HC3N, the lifetime of the collision complex (H2C6N2+)-asterisk was long enough that ion cyclotron double-resonance techniques could be used to probe the distribution of the lifetimes of the collision complex. The mean lifetime of the collision complex at room temperature was measured as 180 microsec with a distribution ranging from 60 to 260 microsec as measured at the half-heights in the distribution. Lifetimes of this magnitude with respect to unimolecular dissociation allow for some stabilization of the collision complex by the slower process of infrared photon emission.

  16. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy Of High Performance Polymer Films Under CO{sub 2} Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, C. A.; Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Urban-Klaehn, Jagoda M.

    2011-06-01

    Positron annihilation Lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements are reported for six polymer films as a function of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) absolute pressure ranging from 0 to 45 psi. Since the polymer films were thin and did not absorb all positrons, corrections were made in the lifetime analysis for the absorption of positrons in the positron source and sample holder using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. The studied polymers are found to behave differently from each other. Some polymers form positronium and others, such as the polyimide structures, do not. For those polymers that form positronium an interpretation in terms of free volume is possible; for those that don't form positronium, further work is needed to determine how best to describe the behavior in terms of the bulk positron annihilation parameters. A few of the studied polymers exhibit changes in positron lifetime and intensity under CO{sub 2} pressure which may be described by the Henry or Langmuir sorption models, while the positron response of other polymers is rather insensitive to the CO{sub 2} pressure. The results demonstrate the usefulness of positron annihilation spectroscopy in investigating the sorption of CO{sub 2} into various polymers at pressures up to about 3 atm (45psi).

  17. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of High Performance Polymer Films under CO2 Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Quarles; John R. Klaehn; Eric S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2010-08-01

    Positron annihilation Lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements are reported for six polymer films as a function of carbon dioxide absolute pressure ranging from 0 to 45 psi. Since the polymer films were thin and did not absorb all positrons, corrections were made in the lifetime analysis for the absorption of positrons in the positron source and sample holder using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. Different polymers are found to behave differently. Some polymers studied form positronium and some, such as the polyimide structures, do not. For those samples that form positronium an interpretation in terms of free volume is possible; for those that don’t form positronium, further work is needed to determine how best to describe the behavior in terms of the bulk positron annihilation parameters. Some polymers exhibit changes in positron lifetime and intensity under CO2 pressure which may be described by the Henry or Langmuir sorption models, while the positron response of other polymers is rather insensitive to the CO2 pressure. The results demonstrate the usefulness of positron annihilation spectroscopy in investigating the sorption of CO2 into various polymers at pressures up to about 3 atm.

  18. Lifetime measurements using the CLARA-PRISMA setup around the {sup 48}Ca doubly-magic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Gadea, A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; Fioretto, E.; Grodner, E.; Mason, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Mengoni, D.; Farnea, E.; Bazzacco, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Ur, C. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Lunardi, S.; Scarlassara, F.; Dewald, A.

    2008-11-11

    The lifetimes of the first excited states of nuclei around the doubly-magic nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been determined using a novel method that combines the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) method with the CLARA-PRISMA spectrometers. This is the first time such a method is applied to measure lifetimes of neutron-rich nuclei populated via a multinucleon transfer reaction. This novel method and some preliminary results on lifetimes are presented.

  19. Precision Measurements of Atomic Lifetimes and Hyperfine Energies in Alkali Like Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2005-03-04

    Financial support of this research project has lead to advances in the study of atomic structure through precision measurements of atomic lifetimes, energy splittings, and transitions energies. The interpretation of data from many areas of physics and chemistry requires an accurate understanding of atomic structure. For example, scientists in the fields of astrophysics, geophysics, and plasma fusion depend on transition strengths to determine the relative abundances of elements. Assessing the operation of discharges and atomic resonance line filters also depends on accurate knowledge of transition strengths. Often relative transition strengths are measured precisely, but accurate atomic lifetimes are needed to obtain absolute values. Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes and energy splittings also provide fundamentally important atomic structure information. Lifetimes of allowed transitions depend most strongly on the electronic wave function far from the nucleus. Alternatively, hyperfine splittings give important information about the electronic wave function in the vicinity of the nucleus as well as the structure of the nucleus. Our main focus throughout this project has been the structure of atomic cesium because of its connection to the study of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC). The interpretation of atomic PNC experiments in terms of weak interaction coupling constants requires accurate knowledge of the electronic wave function near the nucleus as well as far from the nucleus. It is possible to address some of these needs theoretically with sophisticated many-electron atomic structure calculations. However, this program has been able to address these needs experimentally with a precision that surpasses current theoretical accuracy. Our measurements also play the important role of providing a means for testing the accuracy of many-electron calculations and guiding further theoretical development, Atomic systems such as cesium, with a single electron outside of a closed shell, provide the simplest open shell systems for detailed comparisons between experiment and theory. This program initially focused on measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes in alkali atomic systems. Our first measurements of atomic lifetimes in cesium surpassed the precision and accuracy of previous measurements and sparked renewed interest in the need for greater precision in lifetime measurements throughout the atomic physics community. After enhancing the capabilities of the laser systems built for these initial measurements, we began a study hyperfine energy splittings in cesium using a thermal atomic beam. The results surpassed previous measurements by more than an order of magnitude and lead to the first observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment in cesium demonstrating the inadequacy of the nuclear shell model for predicting high order nuclear moments. The laser system and atomic beam apparatus developed for these endeavors turned out to be perfectly suited for exploring the possibility of making absolute optical frequency measurements of atomic transitions. We initiated collaboration with researchers at NIST so that the desired optical frequencies could be reference with respect to the primary microwave frequency standard (Cs atomic fountain NIST-FI) via a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Our first absolute optical frequency measurement, of the cesium D2 line, surpassed the accuracy of a previous measurement by more than an order of magnitude. An absolute optical frequency measurement of the cesium D1 line, now near completion, also surpasses previous results and places us in a position to be able to report a new value for the fine structure constant which is the fundamental dimensionless constant that underlies all electromagnetic interactions.

  20. Rapid Evolution of Collectivity at N = Z — Recent Results from Level Lifetime Measurements with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Hironori

    Collective motions in atomic nuclei at low excitation energies such as rotation and vibration have been characterized by the ground-state shape as a single basis. This picture can be altered if the nuclear shape can change drastically at low spin. In this paper, I discuss the recent result on the self-conjugate 72Kr nucleus1) obtained from excited-state lifetime measurements with GRETINA. The new approach based on the multi-foil recoil-distance method was employed to measure the lifetimes of the yrast 2+ and 4+ states in 72,74Kr simultaneously. The strong enhancement of the B(E2) strength was found in 72Kr for the 4 + to 2 + transition relative to the B(E2) value for the 2 + to 0 + transition. A possible rapid shape transition between the ground and 2+ states in 72Kr is discussed.

  1. Line identification and lifetime measurements in the XUV and soft X-ray regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1979-01-01

    A summary of the data acquired concerning line identification and lifetime measurements in the xuv and soft X-ray regions for a variety of both resonance transitions and forbidden transitions in ions of astrophysical interest is provided. Particular attention is called to a few papers which appeared in the Astrophysical Journal. These are of special relevance to specific astrophysical data needs. The many experiments completed in areas related to but somewhat outside the confines of the project title are mentioned.

  2. Lifetime measurement of the 5d2 D 5/2 state in Ba+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Amita; Dijck, Elwin A.; Portela, Mayerlin Nuñez; Valappol, Nivedya; Grier, Andrew T.; Meijknecht, Thomas; Willmann, Lorenz; Jungmann, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    The lifetime of the metastable 5d2 D 5/2 state has been measured for a single trapped Ba+ ion in a Paul trap in Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) in the 10-10 mbar pressure range. A total of 5046 individual periods when the ion was shelved in this state have been recorded. A preliminary value s is obtained through extrapolation to zero residual gas pressure.

  3. Measurement of the $B^-$ lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.

    2010-04-01

    The collection of a large number of B hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper decay time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper they present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B{sup -} using the mode B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}. The B{sup -} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup -}} = 1.663 {+-} 0.023 {+-} 0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  4. Measurement of the neutron lifetime in a gravitational trap and analysis of experimental errors

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvizhevskii, V.V.; Serebrov, A.P.; Tal`daev, R.R.; Kharitonov, A.G.; Alfimenkov, V.P.; Strelkov, A.V.; Shvetsov, V.N.

    1992-09-01

    The authors present measurements of the neutron lifetime ({tau}{sub n}) carried out with a gravitational trap for ultracold neutrons. They show that statistical uncertainty in the measured storage time is the principal contributor to experimental error. Measurements using oxygen-coated traps yield {tau}{sub n} = 888.4 {+-} 3.1{sub stat} {+-} 1.1{sub syst}s. Since the systematic errors derive from a large number of independent factors, they quote a final value of {tau}{sub n} = 888.4 {+-} 3.3 s. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. On the Uncertainty in Single Molecule Fluorescent Lifetime and Energy Emission Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; McCollom, Alex D.

    1996-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least squares methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large, however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67 percent of those can be noise, and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous Poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probability density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. The ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background noise and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  6. On the uncertainty in single molecule fluorescent lifetime and energy emission measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; Mccollom, Alex D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least square methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67% of those can be noise and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probably density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. the ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background nose and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  7. Measurement of the metastable lifetime for the 2s^2 2p^2 ^1So level in O^2+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Cadez, I.; Chutjian, A.; Niimura, M.

    2004-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of the 1S0 level was found to be 540 +/- 27 ms. This is in good agreement with a previous measurement and with a number of theoretical calculations. Metastable lifetimes, when combined with collisional excitation rates, can provide a diagnostic for electron density Ne in a stellar or solar plasma.

  8. LIFETIME MEASUREMENT WITH PSEUDO MOVEABLE SEPTUM IN NSLS X-RAY RING

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.M.; Choi; J.; Kramer; S.; Shaftan; T.; Heese; R.; Yang; X.

    2011-03-28

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3 GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory and starts to commission in 2014. The beam injection works with two septa and four fast kicker magnets in an injection section. To improve the injection stability and reproducibility, we plan to implement a slow local bump on top of the fast bump so that the fast kicker strength is reduced. This bump works as a pseudo movable septum. We can also use this 'movable' septum to measure the storage ring beam partial lifetime resulting from the septum edge and possibly increasing the lifetime by moving the stored beam orbit away from the edge. We demonstrate the feasibility of this idea, by implementing DC bump in NSLS X-ray ring. We report the results of beam lifetime measurements as a function of the amplitude of this bumped orbit relative to the septum and the idea of a slow bump that could reduce the fast bump magnet strengths.

  9. Direct Measurement of the Radiative Lifetime of Vibrationally Excited OH Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y.T. van de; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meijer, Gerard; Loo, Mark P.J. van der; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2005-07-01

    Neutral molecules, isolated in the gas phase, can be prepared in a long-lived excited state and stored in a trap. The long observation time afforded by the trap can then be exploited to measure the radiative lifetime of this state by monitoring the temporal decay of the population in the trap. This method is demonstrated here and used to benchmark the Einstein A coefficients in the Meinel system of OH. A pulsed beam of vibrationally excited OH radicals is Stark decelerated and loaded into an electrostatic quadrupole trap. The radiative lifetime of the upper {lambda}-doublet component of the X {sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2}, v=1, J=3/2 level is determined as 59.0{+-}2.0 ms, in good agreement with the calculated value of 58.0{+-}1.0 ms.

  10. Investigation into the Effects of Deformation on Proton Emission Rates via Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Procter, M. G.; Smith, A. J.; McFarlane, A.; Twist, V.; Alharshan, G. A.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Auranen, K.; Hauschild, K.; Herzan, A.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Konki, J.; Leino, M.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Partanen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Uusitalo, J.; Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Butler, P. A.; Scheck, M.; Joss, D. T.; Sahgi, B.; McPeake, C.; Braunroth, T.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Ellinger, E.

    2015-11-01

    Excited states in the proton-unbound nucleus 151Lu have been established using ?-ray coincidence techniques. The lifetime of the first excited state above the proton-emitting ground state has been measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method combined with recoil-decay tagging. The experimental level scheme and extracted lifetime have been compared with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations based upon a non-adiabatic deformed Woods-Saxon potential. This comparison suggests that the proton-emitting ground state in 151Lu is mildly oblate with a deformation {? _2} = - 0.11_{ - 0.05}^{ + 0.02} and represents the best evidence to date for proton emission from an oblate nucleus.

  11. MuLan; a precision measurement of the muon lifetime and determination of the Fermi constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorringe, Tim

    2007-10-01

    The Fermi constant GF determines the rates of weak processes that range from nuclear beta-decay to stellar nucleo-synthesis. At Paul Scherrer Institute, the MuLan experiment is seeking to determine the Fermi Constant by measuring the positive muon lifetime to an unprecedented precision of about one part-per-million - a twenty-fold improvement over earlier experimental efforts. The experiment uses an intense, pulsed, muon beam and a finely-segmented, fast-timing, scintillator array to record the decays of more than 10^12 muons. In this talk we report the results for the positive muon lifetime from our 2004 production run, and describe our progress to reaching the final goal of one ppm. The implications - both as a determination of a fundamental constant of the electroweak interaction and for the precision testing of the standard model - are also discussed.

  12. Apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO); Johnston, Steven W. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearity for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  13. Calculations and measurements for the SLAC SLC positron return quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Early, R.A.; Cobb, J.K.

    1986-09-01

    The three-dimensional magnetostatic computer program TOSCA, running on the NMFECC CRAY X-MP computer, was used to compute the integral of gradient length for the SLC type QT4 positron return line quadrupole magnet. Since the bore diameter of the magnet is 12.7 centimeters, and the length is only 10.16 centimeters, three dimensional effects are important. POISSON calculations were done on a two-dimensional model to obtain magnetic shimming which assured enough positive twelve pole to offset end effects, while TOSCA was used to estimate the effective length of the quadrupole. No corrections were required on the magnet as built. Measurements showed that the required integrated gradient was achieved for the given current, and that integrated higher harmonics were generally less than 0.1% of the quadrupole component.

  14. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2000-10-01

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results.

  15. Genetic interactions found between calcium channel genes modulate amyloid load measured by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Koran, Mary Ellen I; Hohman, Timothy J; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) is known to have a complex, oligogenic etiology, with considerable genetic heterogeneity. We investigated the influence of genetic interactions between genes in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathway on amyloid-beta (A?) deposition as measured by PiB or AV-45 ligand positron emission tomography (PET) to aid in understanding LOAD's genetic etiology. Subsets of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohorts were used for discovery and for two independent validation analyses. A significant interaction between RYR3 and CACNA1C was confirmed in all three of the independent ADNI datasets. Both genes encode calcium channels expressed in the brain. The results shown here support previous animal studies implicating interactions between these calcium channels in amyloidogenesis and suggest that the pathological cascade of this disease may be modified by interactions in the amyloid-calcium axis. Future work focusing on the mechanisms of such relationships may inform targets for clinical intervention. PMID:24026422

  16. Measurement of the B-cmeson lifetime in the decay B-c?J/???

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.

    2013-01-02

    The lifetime of the B-c meson is measured using 272 exclusive B-c?J/?(?????)?? decays reconstructed in data from proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb?¹ recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The lifetime of the B-cmeson is measured to be ?(B-c)=0.452±0.048(stat)±0.027(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the B-c meson lifetime in a fully reconstructed hadronic channel, and it agrees with previous results and has comparable precision.

  17. Measurement of the neutron lifetime with ultra-cold neutrons stored in a magneto-gravitational trap

    E-print Network

    V. F. Ezhov; A. Z. Andreev; G. Ban; B. A. Bazarov; P. Geltenbort; A. G. Glushkov; V. A. Knyazkov; N. A. Kovrizhnykh; G. B. Krygin; O. Naviliat-Cuncic; V. L. Ryabov

    2014-12-23

    We report a new measurement of the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons stored in a magneto-gravitational trap made of permanent magnets. Neutrons surviving in the trap after fixed storage times have been counted and the trap losses have continuously been monitored during storage by detecting neutrons leaking from the trap. The value of the neutron lifetime resulting from this measurement is $\\tau_n=(878.3\\pm1.9)$s. It is the most precise measurement of the neutron lifetime obtained with magnetically stored neutrons.

  18. Measurement of the B hadron lifetime from Mark II at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Using data taken by the Mark II detector at PEP, the decays of B hadrons are tagged by identifying leptons at high transverse momentum. By means of a precision inner drift chamber, the impact parameters of these leptons are measured with respect to the B production point. From this impact parameter distribution, the B hadron lifetime is found to be 0.98 +- 0.12 +- 0.13 ps. This measurement can be used to place constraints models of quark mixing. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Probing the nature of the 2+ excited state in 72Ni with lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolos, Karolina; Miller, David; Grzywacz, Robert; Iwasaki, Hironori; Al-Shudifat, Mohammad; Bazin, Daniel; Bingham, Carol R.; Braunroth, Thomas; Cerizza, Giordano; Gade, Alexandra; Lemasson, Antoine; Liddick, Sean N.; Madurga, Miguel; Morse, Chris; Rajabali, Mostafa M.; Recchia, Francesco; Riedinger, Lee L.; Voss, Phillip; Walters, William B.; Weisshaar, Dirk; Whitmore, Kenneth; Wimmer, Kathrin

    2014-09-01

    We present the results of an experiment to measure the lifetimes of the 21+ excited state in 72Ni populated in a proton knockout reaction at intermediate energies using the recoil distance method. This experiment was performed at the NSCL during GRETINA campaign and the array was used for ?-ray detection. Measured ?-ray spectra were directly compared with GEANT4 simulations accounting for the geometry of the experiment. The new result does not indicate increased collectivity in nickel isotopes above N = 40 and is found to be in agreement with the recent MCSM calculations.

  20. Measurements of the masses, lifetimes and decay modes of hadrons at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2010-05-01

    The Tevatron provides 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions and allows for collection of rich b-hadron samples to the two experiments CDF and D0. The study of heavy flavor properties represents a fruitful opportunity to investigate the flavor sector of the Standard Model (SM) and to look for hints of New Physics (NP). Here we report the first measurement of polarization amplitudes in B{sub s}{sup 0} charmless decays, world leading results on b-hadron lifetimes, and measurements of several other properties of b-hadrons.

  1. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-print Network

    Y. Arimoto; N. Higashi; Y. Igarashi; Y. Iwashita; T. Ino; R. Katayama; R. Kitahara; M. Kitaguchi; H. Matsumura; K. Mishima; H. Oide; H. Otono; R. Sakakibara; T. Shima; H. M. Shimizu; T. Sugino; N. Sumi; H. Sumino; K. Taketani; G. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; K. Tauchi; A. Toyoda; T. Yamada; S. Yamashita; H. Yokoyama; T. Yoshioka

    2015-09-11

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  2. Absolute Neutron Flux Measurements for the NIST Penning Trap Neutron Lifetime Experiment using Neutron Calorimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhuri, Z.; Snow, W. M.; Jones, G. L.; Keith, C. D.; Adams, J. M.; Thompson, A. K.

    1998-10-01

    We describe a cryogenic neutron calorimeter for absolute neutron flux measurement^1,2,3. We will present preliminary results of measurements of the absolute efficiency of the beam monitor for the NIST Penning trap neutron lifetime experiment using this calorimeter. ^1 R. G. H. Robertson and P. E. Koehler, NIM A251, 307 (1986) ^2 J. M. Richardson, T. E. Chupp, R. G. H. Robertson, and J. F. Wilkerson, NIM A306, 291 (1991) ^3 J. M. Richardson, W. M. Snow, Z. Chowdhuri, and G. L. Greene, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci 45, 550 (1998)

  3. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Y.; Higashi, N.; Igarashi, Y.; Iwashita, Y.; Ino, T.; Katayama, R.; Kitaguchi, M.; Kitahara, R.; Matsumura, H.; Mishima, K.; Nagakura, N.; Oide, H.; Otono, H.; Sakakibara, R.; Shima, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Sugino, T.; Sumi, N.; Sumino, H.; Taketani, K.; Tanaka, G.; Tanaka, M.; Tauchi, K.; Toyoda, A.; Tomita, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamashita, S.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoshioka, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with 6Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  4. Surface recombination velocity and lifetime in InP measured by transient microwave reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothra, S.; Tyagi, S. D.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity are determined in organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)-grown InP by a contactless microwave technique. For lightly doped n-type InP, a surface recombination velocity of 5000 cm/s is measured. However, in solar cells with a heavily doped n-type emitter a surface recombination velocity of 1 x 10 to the 6th cm/s is observed. Possible reasons for this due to surface pinning are discussed. The effects of various chemical treatments and SiO on the surface recombination velocity are measured.

  5. Carrier lifetime measurements in short-period InAs/GaSb strained-layer superlattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donetsky, Dmitry; Svensson, Stefan P.; Vorobjev, Leonid E.; Belenky, Gregory

    2009-11-01

    Minority carrier lifetime and interband absorption in midinfrared range of spectra were measured in InAs/GaSb strained-layer superlattices (SLSs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaSb substrates. The carrier lifetime in 200-period undoped 7 ML InAs/8 ML GaSb SLS with AlSb carrier confinement layers was determined by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and from analysis of PL response to sinwave-modulated excitation. Study of PL kinetics in frequency domain allowed for direct lifetime measurements with the excess carrier concentration level of 3.5×1015 cm-3. The minority carrier lifetime of 80 ns at T=77 K was obtained from dependence of the carrier lifetime on excitation power.

  6. High-resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear-structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Avignone, F.T. III.

    1981-02-28

    Extensive data analysis and theoretical analysis has been done to complete the extensive decay scheme investigation of /sup 206/ /sup 208/Fr and the level structures of /sup 206/ /sup 208/Rn. A final version of a journal article is presented in preprint form. Extensive Monte Carlo calculations have been made to correct the end point energies of positron spectra taken with intrinsic Ge detectors for annihilation radiation interferences. These calculations were tested using the decay of /sup 82/Sr which has previously measured positron branches. This technique was applied to the positron spectra collected at the on-line UNISOR isotope separator. The reactions used were /sup 60/Ni(/sup 20/Ne;p2n)/sup 77/Rb and /sup 60/Ni(/sup 20/Ne;pn)/sup 78/Rb. Values for 5, ..gamma..-..beta../sup +/ coincidence positron end point energies are given for the decay of /sup 77/Rb. The implied Q-value is 5.075 +- 0.010 MeV. A complete paper on the calculated corrections is presented. A flow chart of a more complete program which accounts for positrons scattering out of the detector and for bremsstralung radiation is also presented. End-point energies of four ..beta../sup +/ branches in /sup 77/Rb are given as well as a proposed energy level scheme of /sup 75/Kr based on ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidence data taken at UNISOR.

  7. Interpretation of recent positron-electron measurements between 20 and 800 MeV. [interplanetary cosmic ray solar modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerin, C. J.; Hartman, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Recently measured positron and negatron spectra are discussed with regard to the problem of solar modulation. At energies above 180 MeV, the spherically symmetric Fokker-Planck equation with a diffusion coefficient proportional to particle rigidity provides reasonable fits to both the positron and total electron data. At energies below 180 MeV, the data are consistent with a continuation of the same diffusion coefficient and a local source of negatrons or with a change in the diffusion coefficient to a constant value.

  8. Study of mesoporous silica films by positron annihilation based on a slow positron beam: Effects of preparation conditions on pore size and open porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chunqing; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Oshima, Nagayasu; Kinomura, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Makoto; Kobayashi, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) based on an intense pulsed slow positron beam was applied to the study of mesoporous silica films, synthesized using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as the network precursor and a triblock copolymer (EO 106PO 70EO 106) as the structure-directing agent. With positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), pore sizes were obtained from ortho-positronium ( o-Ps) lifetimes of the films capped with a 20 nm thick SiO 2 layer. Influences of preparation conditions such as heating, TEOS vapor infiltration and precursor solution ageing on the pore size were studied. Moreover, the effect of ageing of the precursor solution on film pore interconnectivity/open porosity was investigated through lifetime-energy correlation measurements by observing intrinsic annihilation of o-Ps diffused out from the uncapped film surface.

  9. Measurement of effective carrier lifetime at the semiconductor-dielectric interface by Photoconductive Decay (PCD) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, P. J.; Bhatia, D.; Ruzyllo, J.

    2013-03-01

    The semiconductor-dielectric interface is of key importance to the performance of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor transistors (MOSFETs). The near-surface Photoconductance Decay (ns-PCD) method using probe contacts is shown in this study to be very useful in measuring effective carrier lifetime at the semiconductor-dielectric interface. By doing so, it provides direct information on the condition of the charge transport environment in the MOSFET channel without a need to fabricate a transistor. The way measurement is implemented depends on the thickness of dielectric. For dielectric layers thicker than about 5 nm, etched windows in the dielectric layer are necessary to achieve an ohmic contact with the semiconductor layer. For dielectric layers thinner than about 5 nm, however, the ohmic contact to the semiconductor substrate, essential to the performance of this measurement, is established using probes and electrical contact formation process. The measurements were performed on thermally oxidized Si-SiO2 structures as well as Si-Al2O3 (3 nm) and Si-Ta2O5 (3 nm) structures formed by means of Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). The results obtained demonstrate that the PCD method adapted as discussed in this work can be very useful in monitoring condition of semiconductor - ultra-thin (<5 nm) dielectric interface by measuring carrier lifetime in the as-processed samples, i.e. without subjecting it to any processing step beyond dielectric deposition.

  10. Predicted CALET measurements of electron and positron spectra from 3 to 20 GeV using the geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, B. F.

    2014-05-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is an imaging calorimeter under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014 for a planned 5 year mission. CALET consists of a charge detection module (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (X?) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) with 27 X? of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of the experiment are to measure the electron e+e energy spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1000 TeV. In this paper we describe how the geomagnetic field at the 51.6° inclination orbit of the ISS can be used to allow CALET to measure the distinct electron and positron fluxes. The positron fraction has been seen to rise above ˜10 GeV by previous experiments (HEAT, AMS-01), and more recently to continue to increase to higher energies (˜80 GeV for PAMELA, ˜200 GeV for Fermi and ˜350 GeV with the best statistics for AMS-02). Utilizing the geomagnetic cutoff, CALET will be able to distinguish electrons and positrons in the ˜3-20 GeV energy range where the positron fraction turns upward to complement existing high statistics measurements.

  11. Design and construction of a Vertex Chamber and measurement of the average B-Hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-10-01

    Four parameters describe the mixing of the three quark generations in the Standard Model of the weak charged current interaction. These four parameters are experimental inputs to the model. A measurement of the mean lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks, or B-Hadrons, constrains the magnitudes of two of these parameters. Measurement of the B-Hadron lifetime requires a device that can measure the locations of the stable particles that result from B-Hadron decay. This device must function reliably in an inaccessible location, and survive high radiation levels. We describe the design and construction of such a device, a gaseous drift chamber. Tubes of 6.9 mm diameter, having aluminized mylar walls of 100 ..mu..m thickness are utilized in this Vertex Chamber. It achieves a spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m, and a resolution in extrapolation to the B-Hadron decay location of 87 ..mu..m. Its inner layer is 4.6 cm from e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams. The Vertex Chamber is situated within the MAC detector at PEP. We have analyzed botht he 94 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity accumulated at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the Vertex Chamber in place as well as the 210 pb/sup -1/ accumulated previously. We require a lepton with large momentum transverse to the event thrust axis to obtain a sample of events enriched in B-Hadron decays. The distribution of signed impact parameters of all tracks in these events is used to measure the B-Hadron flight distance, and hence lifetime. 106 refs., 79 figs., 20 tabs.

  12. Measurement of the B[+ over c] meson lifetime using B[+ over c] ? J/? ?[superscript +] ? [subscript ?] X decays

    E-print Network

    Counts, Ian Thomas Hunt

    The lifetime of the B[+ over c] meson is measured using semileptonic decays having a J/? meson and a muon in the final state. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2 fb[superscript -1], are collected by ...

  13. Lifetime measurement of the 167.1 keV state in {sup 41}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    White, E. R.; Mach, H.; Fraile, L. M.; Koester, U.; Arndt, O.; Blazhev, A.; Braun, N.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Boelaert, N.; Borge, M. J. G.; Boutami, R.; Reillo, E.-M.; Tengblad, O.; Bradley, H.; Dlouhy, Z.; Ugryumov, V.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hinke, Ch.; Kroell, T.

    2007-11-15

    The Advanced-Time-Delayed method was used to measure lifetimes of the states in {sup 41}Ar populated in the {beta} decay of {sup 41}Cl. The nuclei {sup 41}Cl were produced at ISOLDE by 1.4-GeV proton bombardment of a thick UC{sub x} target and mass-separated as molecular ions, XeCl{sup +}. Our measured half-life of the 167.1-keV state, T{sub 1/2}=315(15) ps, is significantly lower than the previously measured value of 410(30) ps. We have also determined T{sub 1/2}=260(80) ps and T{sub 1/2}{<=}46 ps for the 515.9- and 1867.7-keV states, respectively. These are the shortest lifetimes measured so far with the ultrafast timing method using the new LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) crystals for {gamma}-ray detection.

  14. Measurement and verification of positron emitter nuclei generated at each treatment site by target nuclear fragment reactions in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi; Saijo, Nagahiro; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to verify the characteristics of the positron emitter nuclei generated at each treatment site by proton irradiation. Methods: Proton therapy using a beam on-line PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp), which the authors developed, is provided at the National Cancer Center Kashiwa, Japan. BOLPs-RGp is a monitoring system that can confirm the activity distribution of the proton irradiated volume by detection of a pair of annihilation gamma rays coincidentally from positron emitter nuclei generated by the target nuclear fragment reactions between irradiated proton nuclei and nuclei in the human body. Activity is measured from a start of proton irradiation to a period of 200 s after the end of the irradiation. The characteristics of the positron emitter nuclei generated in a patient's body were verified by the measurement of the activity distribution at each treatment site using BOLPs-RGp. Results: The decay curves for measured activity were able to be approximated using two or three half-life values regardless of the treatment site. The activity of half-life value of about 2 min was important for a confirmation of the proton irradiated volume. Conclusions: In each proton treatment site, verification of the characteristics of the generated positron emitter nuclei was performed by using BOLPs-RGp. For the monitoring of the proton irradiated volume, the detection of {sup 15}O generated in a human body was important.

  15. Measurement of diffusion length, lifetime, and surface recombination velocity in thin semiconductor layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, F. N.; Neugroschel, A.

    1984-04-01

    A small-signal admittance method is developed for the determination of two important parameters affecting the performance of several semiconductor devices with thin layers such as integrated-injection-logic and MOS transistors, OCHI-HLE, BSF and TJ solar cells. These parameters, the minority-carrier diffusion length (or the minority-carrier lifetime) and the surface recombination velocity, are found using a combination of low-frequency and high-frequency admittance measurements. The theoretical base of the method and experimental results showing its application and usefulness are presented.

  16. Measurement requirements and techniques for degradation studies and lifetime prediction testing of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Derringer, G. C.; Wood, V. E.; Wilkes, K. E.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Tests of weathering and aging behavior are being developed to characterize the degradation and predict the lifetimes of low-cost photovoltaic arrays. Environmental factors which affect array performance include UV radiation, thermal energy, water, oxygen (generally involved in synergistic effects with UV radiation or high temperatures), physical stress, pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and ozone), abrasives and dirt. A survey of photovoltaic array testing has shown the need to establish quantitative correlations between certain measurable properties (carbonyl formation, glass transition temperature, and molecular weight change) and modes of degradation and failure.

  17. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud density In the Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, Mauro T.F.; Krasnykh, Anatoly K.; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnaad, Kiran G.; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom

    2008-06-18

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electrons clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appears to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regionsif the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  18. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density In The Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Krasnykh, A.K; Byrd, J.; Santis, S.De; Sonnad, K.G.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; /CERN

    2008-07-03

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appear to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regions if the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  19. A measurement of the lambda_b lifetime at the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, Marcus Philip; /Lancaster U.

    2007-07-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon, performed using data from proton-antiproton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{ovr P{nu}}{sub {mu}}X was reconstructed in approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the D0 detector in 2002-2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A signal of 4437 {+-} 329 {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} pairs was obtained, and the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime was measured using a binned {chi}{sup 2} fit, which gives a value {tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 1.290{sub -0.110}{sup +0.119}(stat){sub -0.091}{sup +0.085}(syst) ps. This result is consistent with the world average and is one of the most precise measurements of this quantity.

  20. A Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Lifetime via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The neutral pion radiative width has been measured to 8.411 eV ± 1.8% + 1.13% - 1.70% (lifetime = 7.826 ± 0.14 + 0.088 - 0.133 x 10Z17 s) utilizing the Primakoff effect and roughly 4.9 to 5.5 GeV photons at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA. The Hall B Photon Tagger, the Hall B Pair Spectrometer, a state of the art Hybrid Calorimter enabled precision incident photon energy measurement, photon flux measurement, and neutral pion identification, respectively. With these and other hardware and software tools, elastic neutral pion yields were extracted from the data. A well developed and understood simulation calculated geometric and software cut efficiency curves. The simulation also provided photo-pion production response functions to fit the experimental cross sections and extract the Primakoff cross section and thus the neutral pion radiative width and lifetime. Future work includes improving understanding of the nuclear incoherent process and any ot

  1. Molecular motion and relaxation below glass transition temperature in poly (methyl methacrylate) studied by positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, N.; Chen, Z. Q.; Uedono, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present the study of local molecular motions in poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) below glass transition temperature by measuring the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) intensity. Two series of experiments were performed: (1) the PMMA sample was irradiated by 22Na positron source with elongated time at room temperature, 225 K and 16 K, respectively, and positron lifetime spectra were measured as a function of irradiation time and (2) Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectra were measured as a function of temperature from 16 to 350 K after positron irradiation at 16 K for more than 350 h. While the o-Ps lifetime always shows no change with elapsed time, decrease and increase of o-Ps intensity I3 are observed at 225 K and 16 K, which are interpreted as the result of positron irradiation-induced free radicals and trapped electrons, respectively. With temperature increasing from 16 K, there is a continuous drop of I3 beginning at around 100 K. This is due to some local group movements such as the ester and main chain methyl group rotations, which lead to the detrapping of accumulated electrons. These local motions do not need additional free volume, so we observed no change of the o-Ps lifetime. Some other structural relaxations such as ?-relaxation are also observed and discussed.

  2. Measurement of cosmic ray positron and negatron spectra between 50 and 800 MeV. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of cosmic ray positrons and negatrons at energies between 50 and 800 MeV. Comparisons of the separate positron and negatron spectra observed near the earth with their expected intensities in interstellar space can be used to investigate the complex (and variable) interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the expanding solar wind. The present measurements, which have established finite values or upper limits for the positron and negatron spectral between 50 and 800 MeV, have confirmed earlier evidence for the existence of a dominant component of negatrons from primary sources in the galaxy. The present results are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that the positron component is in fact mainly attributable to collisions between cosmic ray nuclei and the interstellar gas. The estimate of the absolute intensities confirm the indications from neutron monitors that in 1972 the interplanetary cosmic ray intensities were already recovering toward their high levels observed in 1965.

  3. Positron-rubidium scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    A 5-state close-coupling calculation (5s-5p-4d-6s-6p) was carried out for positron-Rb scattering in the energy range 3.7 to 28.0 eV. In contrast to the results of similar close-coupling calculations for positron-Na and positron-K scattering the (effective) total integrated cross section has an energy dependence which is contrary to recent experimental measurements.

  4. Precision Lifetime Measurements Using LaBr3 Detectors With Stable and Radioactive Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Zs.; Alharbi, T.; Mason, P. J. R.; Bruce, A. M.; Townsley, C.; Roberts, O. J.; M?rginean, N.; M?rginean, R.; Ghit?, D.; Mullholland, K.; Smith, J. F.; Britton, R.; Patel, Z.; Nakhostin, M.; Rice, S.; Wilson, E.; Alazemi, N.; Alkhomashi, N.; Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Deleanu, D.; Filipescu, D.; Glodariu, T.; Cata-Danil, I.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Nita, C. R.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Suliman, G.; Detistov, P.; Garg, U.; Bender, P. C.; Algora, A.; Liddick, S.; Cooper, N.; Werner, V.; Lalkovski, S.; Kisyov, S.; Browne, F.; Söderström, P.-A.; Watanabe, H.; Sumikama, T.

    2013-12-01

    A range of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements have been carried out using arrays which include a number of Cerium-doped Lanthanum-Tribromide (LrBr3(Ce)) scintillation detectors used in conjunction with high-resolution hyper-pure germanium detectors. Examples of the spectral and temporal responses of such set-ups, using both standard point radioactive sources 152Eu and 56Co, and in-beam fusionevaporation reaction experiments for precision measurements of nuclear excited states in 34P and 138Ce are presented. The current and future use of such arrays at existing (EURICA at RIKEN) and future (NUSTAR at FAIR) secondary radioactive beam facilities for precision measurements of excited nuclear state lifetimes in the 10 ps to 10 ns regime are also discussed.

  5. High resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Avignone, F.T. III

    1982-02-28

    Research progress in briefly described, and details are presented in the attached preprints and reprints: (1) precision mass differences in light rubidium and krypton isotopes utilizing beta endpoint measurements; (2) precision mass measurements utilizing beta endpoints; (3) Monte Carlo calculations predicting the response of intrinsic GE detectors to electrons and positrons; and (4) reactor antineutrino spectra and nuclear spectroscopy of isotopes far from beta stability. (WHK)

  6. A new differentially pumped plunger device to measure excited-state lifetimes in proton emitting nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Smith, A. J.; McFarlane, A.; Twist, V.; Alharshan, G. A.; Procter, M. G.; Braunroth, T.; Dewald, A.; Ellinger, E.; Fransen, C.; Butler, P. A.; Scheck, M.; Joss, D. T.; Saygi, B.; McPeake, C. G.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Uusitalo, J.

    2013-04-01

    A new plunger device has been designed and built to measure the lifetimes of unbound states in exotic nuclei beyond the proton drip-line. The device has been designed to work in both vacuum and dilute-gas environments made possible through the introduction of a low-voltage stepping motor. DPUNS will be used in conjunction with the gas-filled separator RITU and the vacuum separator MARA at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, to measure the lifetimes of excited states with low population cross-sections. This is achieved by eliminating the need for a carbon foil to isolate the helium gas of RITU from the beam line thus reducing the background from beam-foil reactions. The inclusion of a high-sampling rate data acquisition card increases further the sensitivity of the device. The plunger will be used to address many key facets of nuclear structure physics with particular emphasis on the effect of deformation on proton emission rates.

  7. Measurement of the B+- lifetime and top quark identification using secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, Ariel G

    2004-02-01

    This dissertation presents a preliminary measurement of the B{sup {+-}} lifetime through the full reconstruction of its decay chain, and the identification of top quark production in the electron plus jets channel using the displaced vertex b-tagging method. Its main contribution is the development, implementation and optimization of the Kalman filter algorithm for vertex reconstruction, and of the displaced vertex technique for tagging jets arising from b quark fragmentation, both of which have now become part of the standard D0 reconstruction package. These two algorithms fully exploit the new state-of-the-art tracking detectors, recently installed as part of the Run 2 D0 upgrade project. The analysis is based on data collected during Run 2a at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Hadron Collider up to April 2003, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 60 pb{sup -1}. The measured B meson lifetime of {tau} = 1.57 {+-} 0.18 ps is in agreement with the current world average, with a competitive level of precision expected when the full data sample becomes available.

  8. Singlet lifetime measurements in an all-proton chemically equivalent spin system by hyperpolarization and weak spin lock transfers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Basu, K; Canary, J W; Jerschow, A

    2015-10-01

    Hyperpolarized singlet states provide the opportunity for polarization storage over periods significantly longer than T1. Here, we show how the singlet state in a chemically equivalent proton spin system can be revealed by a weak power spin-lock. This procedure allowed the measurement of the lifetimes of the singlet state in protic solvents. The contributions of different intra- and intermolecular relaxation mechanisms to singlet lifetimes are investigated with this procedure. PMID:26330001

  9. Excited-Level Lifetimes and Hyperfine-Structure Measurements on Ions using Collinear Laser Ion-Beam Spectroscopy 

    E-print Network

    Jin, J.; Church, David A.

    1994-01-01

    The mean lifetimes tau of the Ca II 4p P-2(1/2) and 4p P-2(3/2) levels, and the Cl-35 II 4p' F-1(3) level, have been measured by a variant of the collinear laser-ion-beam lifetime technique applied previously to the Ar II 4p' F-2(7/2)o level [Jian...

  10. Carrier Lifetime Measurements in Long-Wave Infrared InAs/GaSb Superlattices Under Low Excitation Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ding; Donetsky, Dmitri; Jung, Seungyong; Belenky, Gregory

    2012-11-01

    Minority carrier lifetime in long-wave infrared (LWIR) type II InAs/GaSb superlattices was studied using the optical modulation response (OMR) technique in wide ranges of excitation and temperature. The measured carrier lifetime was found to increase superexponentially with decreasing excitation power density below the level of 1 mW/cm2 to 2 mW/cm2. The phenomenon was qualitatively explained by the presence of shallow trapping centers.

  11. Improved measurement of the positive-muon lifetime and determination of the Fermi constant.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, D B; Banks, T I; Barnes, M J; Battu, S; Carey, R M; Cheekatmalla, S; Clayton, S M; Crnkovic, J; Crowe, K M; Debevec, P T; Dhamija, S; Earle, W; Gafarov, A; Giovanetti, K; Gorringe, T P; Gray, F E; Hance, M; Hertzog, D W; Hare, M F; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Kunkle, J; Lauss, B; Logashenko, I; Lynch, K R; McNabb, R; Miller, J P; Mulhauser, F; Onderwater, C J G; Ozben, C S; Peng, Q; Polly, C C; Rath, S; Roberts, B L; Tishchenko, V; Wait, G D; Wasserman, J; Webber, D M; Winter, P; Zo?nierczuk, P A

    2007-07-20

    The mean life of the positive muon has been measured to a precision of 11 ppm using a low-energy, pulsed muon beam stopped in a ferromagnetic target, which was surrounded by a scintillator detector array. The result, tau(micro)=2.197 013(24) micros, is in excellent agreement with the previous world average. The new world average tau(micro)=2.197 019(21) micros determines the Fermi constant G(F)=1.166 371(6)x10(-5) GeV-2 (5 ppm). Additionally, the precision measurement of the positive-muon lifetime is needed to determine the nucleon pseudoscalar coupling g(P). PMID:17678280

  12. Counting rate measurements for lifetime experiments using the RDDS method with the new generation ?-ray array AGATA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goasduff, A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Lunardi, S.; Haas, F.; Gadea, A.; de Angelis, G.; Bazzacco, D.; Courtin, S.; Farnea, E.; Gottardo, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mengoni, D.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Ur, C. A.

    2014-09-01

    The differential Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) method after multinucleon transfer (MNT) reactions to measure lifetimes of excited states in neutron-rich nuclei requires the use of a thick energy degrader for the recoiling ejectiles that are then detected in a spectrometer. This type of measurements greatly benefits from the use of the new generation segmented ?-ray detectors, such as the AGATA demonstrator which offers unprecedented energy and angular resolutions. In order to make an optimized choice of the material and the thickness of the degrader for lifetime measurements using the RDDS method after MNT, an experiment has been performed with the AGATA demonstrator. Counting rate measurements for different degraders are presented.

  13. Genetic Interactions Found Between Calcium Channel Genes Modulate Amyloid Load Measured by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Hohman, Timothy J.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) is known to have a complex, oligogenic etiology, with considerable genetic heterogeneity. We investigated the influence of genetic interactions between genes in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathway on amyloid-beta (A?) deposition as measured by PiB or AV-45 ligand positron emission tomography (PET) to aid in understanding LOAD’s genetic etiology. Subsets of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohorts were used for discovery and for two independent validation analyses. A significant interaction between RYR3 and CACNA1C was confirmed in all three of the independent ADNI datasets. Both genes encode calcium channels expressed in the brain. The results shown here support previous animal studies implicating interactions between these calcium channels in amyloidigenesis and suggest that the pathological cascade of this disease may be modified by interactions in the amyloid-calcium axis. Future work focusing on the mechanisms of such relationships may inform targets for clinical intervention. PMID:24026422

  14. Test-Retest Repeatability of Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements using Rubidium-82 Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efseaff, Matthew

    Rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been proposed for routine myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification. Few studies have investigated the test-retest repeatability of this method. Same-day repeatability of rest MBF imaging was optimized with a highly automated analysis program using image-derived input functions and a dual spillover correction (SOC). The effects of heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and subject hemodynamics on test-retest repeatability were investigated at rest and during hyperemic stress. Factors affecting rest MBF repeatability included gender, suspected coronary artery disease, and dual SOC (p < 0.001). The best repeatability coefficient for same-day rest MBF was 0.20 mL/min/g using a six-minute scan-time, iterative reconstruction, dual SOC, resting rate-pressure-product (RPP) adjustment, and a left atrium image-derived input function. The serial study repeatabilities of the optimized protocol in subjects with homogeneous RPPs and tracer infusion profiles was 0.19 and 0.53 mL/min/g at rest and stress, and 0.95 for stress / rest myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Subjects with heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and hemodynamic conditions had significantly less repeatable MBF measurements at rest, stress, and stress/rest flow reserve (p < 0.05).

  15. Shot noise as a measure of the lifetime and energy splitting of Majorana bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Lü, Hai-Feng; Guo, Zhen; Ke, Sha-Sha; Zhang, Huai-Wu; Guo, Yong

    2015-04-28

    We propose a scheme to measure the lifetime and energy splitting of a pair of Majorana bound states at the ends of a superconducting nanowire by using the shot noise in a dynamical channel blockade system. A quantum dot is coupled to one end of the wire and connected with two electron reservoirs. It is found that a finite Majorana energy splitting tends to produce a super-Poissonian shot noise, while Majorana relaxation process relieves the dynamical channel blockade and suppresses the noise Fano factor. When the dot energy level locates in the middle of the gap of topological superconductor, the Fano factor is independent on Majorana lifetime and Majorana energy splitting is thus extracted. For a finite energy splitting, we could evaluate the Majorana relaxation rate from the suppression of Fano factor. Under a realistic condition, the expected resolution of Majorana energy splitting and its relaxation rate calculated from our model are about 1?eV and 0.01?1?eV, respectively.

  16. Positron annihilation study on hafnium metals given various treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Duck Ki; Kang, Myung Soo ); Yoon, Young Ku )

    1993-08-01

    The positron annihilation technique that enables measurements of positron lifetime, two-photon angular correlation and Doppler broadening due to annihilation radiation has been established for studies of the electronic configuration and defect properties in solids. In metals, positrons can be trapped at vacancies and their agglomerates as well as at dislocations, but not at interstitials. Because of these interactions, the positron annihilation method can be applied to studies of the behavior of dislocations during annealing of plastically deformed metals. Furthermore, it is possible by measurements of annihilation characteristics to identify defects such as vacancies, dislocations and vacancy-clusters, and to determine spatial dimensions of defects. In this work, positron annihilation measurements for annealed, cold worked, annealed and then quenched, and cold worked and then cathodically hydrogen charged hafnium specimens were made to obtain information on (a) positron annihilation characteristics of hafnium metal, (b) role of vacancy-type defects on hydrogen charging, (c) defects produced during hydrogen charging and (d) recovery of lattice defects in hafnium and effects of hydrogen on defects recovery upon annealing.

  17. Measurement of heritability of myocardial blood flow by positron emission tomography: the Twins Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shaoyong; Votaw, John; Faber, Tracy; Khan, Durreshahwar; Bremner, J Douglas; Goldberg, Jack; Nichols, Ken; Van Tosh, Andrew; Vaccarino, Viola

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the heritability of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) measured with positron emission tomography (PET). Design Cross-sectional twin study. Setting General clinical research centre of a university hospital at Atlanta, USA. Patients A sample of 180 middle-aged (mean±SD 55±2.9 years) male twins, including 107 monozygotic and 73 dizygotic twins. Main outcome measures All twins underwent imaging of MBF with PET 13NH3 at rest and after adenosine stress during a single imaging session. Structural equation modelling was used to estimate the heritability of MBF at rest and during adenosine stress, as well as of CFR. Results The basal MBF (mean±SD) was 0.69±0.20 ml/min/g, and the MBF during adenosine stress was 1.70±0.49 ml/min/g; the CFR was 2.62±0.99. There was substantial heritability for MBF both at rest (0.48, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.64) and during adenosine stress (0.51, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.68), as well as CFR (0.48, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.65). Conclusions For the first time, a substantial genetic contribution to the interindividual variation in MBF and CFR measured with PET in middle-aged men has been demonstrated. The data suggest that a fruitful direction for future work would be the identification of genetic variants for early atherosclerotic stages assessed by PET imaging. PMID:22323242

  18. An investigation of point defects in NiAl using positron annihilation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Puff, W.; Logar, B.; Balogh, A.G.

    1999-07-01

    Vacancy-like defects in NiAl in the composition range 47 at.% {lt} C{sub Ni} {lt} 53 at.% are investigated by means of positron lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler-broadening measurements. The observed lifetimes in the annealed samples confirm that defects are quenched-in during the production of the samples. Isochronal annealing of samples quenched at 1,600 C and after proton irradiation show that the induced defects are quite different.

  19. Measurement of high-Q deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Pavel, N.; Yagües Molina, A. G.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Bindi, M.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Jüngst, M.; Kind, O. M.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Samson, U.; Schönberg, V.; Wang, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Brook, N. H.; Heath, G. P.; Morris, J. D.; Namsoo, T.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Tassi, E.; Kim, J. Y.; Ma, K. J.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Kamaluddin, B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Ning, Y.; Ren, Z.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Gil, M.; Olkiewicz, K.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bo?d, T.; Grabowska-Bo?d, I.; Kisielewska, D.; ?ukasik, J.; Przybycie?, M.; Suszycki, L.; Kota?ski, A.; S?omi?ski, W.; Adler, V.; Behrens, U.; Bloch, I.; Bonato, A.; Borras, K.; Coppola, N.; Fourletova, J.; Geiser, A.; Gladkov, D.; Göttlicher, P.; Gregor, I.; Gutsche, O.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Horn, C.; Kahle, B.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lim, H.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Montanari, A.; Nguyen, C. N.; Notz, D.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Santamarta, R.; Schneekloth, U.; Stadie, H.; Stösslein, U.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Theedt, T.; Watt, G.; Wolf, G.; Wrona, K.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Dobur, D.; Karstens, F.; Vlasov, N. N.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Dunne, W.; Ferrando, J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Gosau, T.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Salehi, H.; Schleper, P.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Sztuk, J.; Wichmann, K.; Wick, K.; Foudas, C.; Fry, C.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Kataoka, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Dossanov, A.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Son, D.; de Favereau, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; Jimenez, M.; Labarga, L.; Del Peso, J.; Ron, E.; Terrón, J.; Zambrana, M.; Corriveau, F.; Liu, C.; Walsh, R.; Zhou, C.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Rubinsky, I.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zotkin, S. A.; Abt, I.; Büttner, C.; Caldwell, A.; Kollar, D.; Liu, X.; Sutiak, J.; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Tiecke, H.; Vázquez, M.; Wiggers, L.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Lee, A.; Ling, T. Y.; Allfrey, P. D.; Bell, M. A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cottrell, A.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Korcsak-Gorzo, K.; Patel, S.; Roberfroid, V.; Robertson, A.; Straub, P. B.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Walczak, R.; Bellan, P.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Ciesielski, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Oh, B. Y.; Raval, A.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cole, J. E.; Hart, J. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Kuze, M.; Hori, R.; Kagawa, S.; Shimizu, S.; Tawara, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Ota, O.; Ri, Y. D.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Fourletov, S.; Martin, J. F.; Butterworth, J. M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jones, T. W.; Loizides, J. H.; Sutton, M. R.; Targett-Adams, C.; Wing, M.; Brzozowska, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kulinski, P.; ?u?niak, P.; Malka, J.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Brownson, E.; Danielson, T.; Everett, A.; Kçira, D.; Reeder, D. D.; Rosin, M.; Ryan, P.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Wolfe, H.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Cui, Y.; Hartner, G.; Menary, S.; Noor, U.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.; Whyte, J.

    2006-06-01

    The cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in ep collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam have been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The results, based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 23.8 pb-1 at s=318 GeV, are given for both ep charged current and neutral current deep inelastic scattering for both positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beam. Single differential cross sections are presented for the kinematic region Q>200 GeV. The measured cross sections are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. A fit to the data yields ?(P=-1)=7.4±3.9(stat.)±1.2(syst.) pb, which is consistent within two standard deviations with the absence of right-handed charged currents in the Standard Model.

  20. Measurement of high-Q2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Pavel, N.; Yagües Molina, A. G.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Bindi, M.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Jüngst, M.; Kind, O. M.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Samson, U.; Schönberg, V.; Wang, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Brook, N. H.; Heath, G. P.; Morris, J. D.; Namsoo, T.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Tassi, E.; Kim, J. Y.; Ma, K. J.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Kamaluddin, B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Ning, Y.; Ren, Z.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Gil, M.; Olkiewicz, K.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bo?d, T.; Grabowska-Bo?d, I.; Kisielewska, D.; ?ukasik, J.; Przybycie?, M.; Suszycki, L.; Kota?ski, A.; S?omi?ski, W.; Adler, V.; Behrens, U.; Bloch, I.; Bonato, A.; Borras, K.; Coppola, N.; Fourletova, J.; Geiser, A.; Gladkov, D.; Göttlicher, P.; Gregor, I.; Gutsche, O.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Horn, C.; Kahle, B.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lim, H.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Montanari, A.; Nguyen, C. N.; Notz, D.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Santamarta, R.; Schneekloth, U.; Stadie, H.; Stösslein, U.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Theedt, T.; Watt, G.; Wolf, G.; Wrona, K.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Dobur, D.; Karstens, F.; Vlasov, N. N.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Dunne, W.; Ferrando, J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Gosau, T.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Salehi, H.; Schleper, P.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Sztuk, J.; Wichmann, K.; Wick, K.; Foudas, C.; Fry, C.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Kataoka, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Dossanov, A.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Son, D.; de Favereau, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; Jimenez, M.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Ron, E.; Terrón, J.; Zambrana, M.; Corriveau, F.; Liu, C.; Walsh, R.; Zhou, C.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Rubinsky, I.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zotkin, S. A.; Abt, I.; Büttner, C.; Caldwell, A.; Kollar, D.; Liu, X.; Sutiak, J.; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Tiecke, H.; Vázquez, M.; Wiggers, L.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Lee, A.; Ling, T. Y.; Allfrey, P. D.; Bell, M. A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cottrell, A.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Korcsak-Gorzo, K.; Patel, S.; Roberfroid, V.; Robertson, A.; Straub, P. B.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Walczak, R.; Bellan, P.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Ciesielski, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Oh, B. Y.; Raval, A.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cole, J. E.; Hart, J. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Kuze, M.; Hori, R.; Kagawa, S.; Shimizu, S.; Tawara, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Ota, O.; Ri, Y. D.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Fourletov, S.; Martin, J. F.; Butterworth, J. M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jones, T. W.; Loizides, J. H.; Sutton, M. R.; Targett-Adams, C.; Wing, M.; Brzozowska, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kulinski, P.; ?u?niak, P.; Malka, J.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Brownson, E.; Danielson, T.; Everett, A.; Kçira, D.; Reeder, D. D.; Rosin, M.; Ryan, P.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Wolfe, H.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Cui, Y.; Hartner, G.; Menary, S.; Noor, U.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.; Whyte, J.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2006-06-01

    The cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in e+ p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam have been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The results, based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 23.8 pb-1 at ?{ s} = 318 GeV, are given for both e+ p charged current and neutral current deep inelastic scattering for both positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beam. Single differential cross sections are presented for the kinematic region Q2 > 200 GeV2. The measured cross sections are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. A fit to the data yields ?CC (Pe = - 1) = 7.4 ± 3.9 (stat.) ± 1.2 (syst.) pb, which is consistent within two standard deviations with the absence of right-handed charged currents in the Standard Model.

  1. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D; Wilkinson, Martin G; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A E; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening. PMID:25798136

  2. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    PubMed Central

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D.; Wilkinson, Martin G.; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A. E.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening. PMID:25798136

  3. CFCl3 (CFC-11): UV absorption spectrum temperature dependence measurements and the impact on its atmospheric lifetime and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2013-09-01

    (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95-230 nm) and temperature (216-296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than that currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The calculated global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 ± 0.7 years (2? uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current UV spectrum recommendations.

  4. CFCI3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime and Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2014-01-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95 - 230 nm) and temperature (216 - 296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The obtained global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 +- 0.7 years (2 sigma uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current spectrum recommendations

  5. Lifetime Measurement of the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state in {sup 20}C

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Marina-Kalliopi; Fallon, Paul; Macchiavelli, Augusto; Paschalis, Stephanos; Starosta, Krzysztof; Baugher, Travis; Bazin, Daniel; Cartegni, Lucia; Clark, Roderick; Crawford, Heather; Cromaz, Mario; Dewald, Alfred; Gade, Alexandra; Grinyer, Geoff; Gros, Sebastian; Hackstein, Matthias; Jeppesen, Hendrick; Lee, I-Yang; McDaniel, Sean; Miller, Doug; Rajabali, Mustafa; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Rother, Wolfram; Voss, Phillip; Walsh, Kathleen Ann; Weisshaar, Dirk; Wiedeking, Mathis; Brown, Boyd Alex

    2011-06-28

    Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state in the near-dripline nucleus {sup 20}C. The deduced value of {tau}{sub #28;2{sup +}{sub 1}} = 9.8 ± 2.8(stat){sup +0.5}{sub ?1.1}(syst) ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2;2{sup +}{sub 1}{yields}0{sup +}{sub g.s.}) = 7.5{sup +3.0}{sub ?1.7}(stat){sup +1.0}{sub ?0.4}(syst) e{sup 2}fm{sup 4} in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges.

  6. Lifetime measurement of the 2(1)+ state in 20C.

    PubMed

    Petri, M; Fallon, P; Macchiavelli, A O; Paschalis, S; Starosta, K; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Cartegni, L; Clark, R M; Crawford, H L; Cromaz, M; Dewald, A; Gade, A; Grinyer, G F; Gros, S; Hackstein, M; Jeppesen, H B; Lee, I Y; McDaniel, S; Miller, D; Rajabali, M M; Ratkiewicz, A; Rother, W; Voss, P; Walsh, K A; Weisshaar, D; Wiedeking, M; Brown, B A

    2011-09-01

    Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2(1)+ state in the near-dripline nucleus 20C. The deduced value of ?(2(1)+)=9.8±2.8(stat)(-1.1)(+0.5)(syst)??ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2; 2(1)+?0(g.s.)+)=7.5(-1.7)(+3.0)(stat)(-0.4)(+1.0)(syst)??e2 ?fm4 in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges. PMID:21981497

  7. Positron trapping at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dupasquier, A. ); Romero, R.; Somoza, A. )

    1993-10-01

    The standard positron trapping model has often been applied, as a simple approximation, to the interpretation of positron lifetime spectra in situations of diffusion-controlled trapping. This paper shows that this approximation is not sufficiently accurate, and presents a model based on the correct solution of the diffusion equation, in the version appropriate for studying positron trapping at grain boundaries. The model is used for the analysis of new experimental data on positron lifetime spectra in a fine-grained Al-Ca-Zn alloy. Previous results on similar systems are also discussed and reinterpreted. The analysis yields effective diffusion coefficients not far from the values known for the base metals of the alloys.

  8. Measurement of the bottom hadron lifetime at the Z{sup 0} resonancce

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, D.H.

    1992-06-01

    We have measured the bottom hadron lifetime from b{bar b} events produced at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Using the precision vertex detectors of the Mark II detector at the Stanford Linear Collider, we developed an impact parameter tag to identify bottom hadrons. The vertex tracking system resolved impact parameters to 30 {mu}m for high momentum tracks, and 70 {mu}m for tracks with a momentum of 1 GeV. We selected B hadrons with an efficiency of 40% and a sample purity of 80%, by requiring there be at least two tracks in a single jet that significantly miss the Z{sup 0} decay vertex. From a total of 208 hadronic Z{sup 0} events collected by the Mark II detector in 1990, we tagged 53 jets, of which 22 came from 11 double-tagged events. The jets opposite the tagged ones, referred as the ``untagged`` sample, are rich in B hadrons and unbiased in B decay times. The variable {Sigma}{delta} is the sum of impact parameters from tracks in the jet, and contains vital information on the B decay time. We measured the B lifetime from a one-parameter likelihood fit to the untagged {Sigma}{delta} distribution, obtaining {tau}{sub b} = 1.53{sub {minus}0.45}{sup +0.55}{plus_minus}0.16 ps which agrees with the current world average. The first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error was dominated by uncertainties in the track resolution function. As a check, we also obtained consistent results using the {Sigma}{delta} distribution from the tagged jets and from the entire hadronic sample without any bottom enrichment.

  9. Measurement of the bottom hadron lifetime at the Z sup 0 resonancce

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, D.H.

    1992-06-01

    We have measured the bottom hadron lifetime from b{bar b} events produced at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Using the precision vertex detectors of the Mark II detector at the Stanford Linear Collider, we developed an impact parameter tag to identify bottom hadrons. The vertex tracking system resolved impact parameters to 30 {mu}m for high momentum tracks, and 70 {mu}m for tracks with a momentum of 1 GeV. We selected B hadrons with an efficiency of 40% and a sample purity of 80%, by requiring there be at least two tracks in a single jet that significantly miss the Z{sup 0} decay vertex. From a total of 208 hadronic Z{sup 0} events collected by the Mark II detector in 1990, we tagged 53 jets, of which 22 came from 11 double-tagged events. The jets opposite the tagged ones, referred as the untagged'' sample, are rich in B hadrons and unbiased in B decay times. The variable {Sigma}{delta} is the sum of impact parameters from tracks in the jet, and contains vital information on the B decay time. We measured the B lifetime from a one-parameter likelihood fit to the untagged {Sigma}{delta} distribution, obtaining {tau}{sub b} = 1.53{sub {minus}0.45}{sup +0.55}{plus minus}0.16 ps which agrees with the current world average. The first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error was dominated by uncertainties in the track resolution function. As a check, we also obtained consistent results using the {Sigma}{delta} distribution from the tagged jets and from the entire hadronic sample without any bottom enrichment.

  10. Measurement of the Bs0 Lifetime in the Flavor-Specific Decay Channel Bs0?Ds-?+? X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.

    2015-02-01

    We present an updated measurement of the Bs0 lifetime using the semileptonic decays Bs0?Ds-?+? X , with Ds-?? ?- and ? ?K+K- (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?{s }=1.96 TeV , comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb-1 . We find a flavor-specific lifetime ?fs(Bs0)=1.479 ±0.010 (stat)±0.021 (syst) ps . This technique is also used to determine the B0 lifetime using the analogous B0?D-?+? X decay with D-?? ?- and ? ?K+K-, yielding ? (B0)=1.534 ±0.019 (stat)±0.021 (syst) ps . Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the Bs0 lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio ?fs(Bs0)/? (B0)=0.964 ±0.013 (stat)±0.007 (syst) .

  11. Measurements and calculations of metastable level lifetimes in Fe X, Fe XI, Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XIV 

    E-print Network

    Moehs, D. P.; Bhatti, M. I.; Church, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Lifetimes of metastable levels in the ground term of Fe ions within the 3s(2)3p(k), k=1-5, isoelectronic sequences have been measured. These measurements were performed utilizing ions that were selected by mass to charge ratio while transported from...

  12. The TRIple PLunger for EXotic beams TRIPLEX for excited-state lifetime measurement studies on rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, H.; Dewald, A.; Braunroth, T.; Fransen, C.; Smalley, D.; Lemasson, A.; Morse, C.; Whitmore, K.; Loelius, C.

    2016-01-01

    A new device, the TRIple PLunger for EXotic beams (TRIPLEX), has been developed for lifetime measurement studies with rare isotope beams. This plunger device holds up to three metal foils in the beam path and facilitates the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique to measure lifetimes of nuclear excited states in the range of 1 ps to 1 ns. The unique design allows independent movement of the target and the second degrader with respect to a fixed first degrader in between, enabling advanced experimental approaches, such as the differential recoil distance method and the double recoil distance method. The design and control of the device are presented in this paper, together with simulated performances of the new applications. As an example of actual experiments, results from the lifetime measurement of the neutron-rich 17C isotope performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory are shown.

  13. Development of a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Seki, C.; Kashikura, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed and tested a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface of animals. The beta camera consists of a thin CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, a tapered fiber optics plate (taper fiber) and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The taper fiber is the key component of the camera. We have developed two types of beta cameras. One is 20mm diameter field of view camera for imaging brain surface of cats. The other is 10mm diameter camera for that of rats. Spatial resolutions of beta camera for cats and rats were 0.8mm FWHM and 0.5mm FWHM, respectively. We confirmed that developed beta cameras may overcome the limitation of the spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography (PET).

  14. On Possible Interpretations of the High Energy Electron-Positron Spectrum Measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.; Profumo, S.; Strong, A.W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bloom, E.D.; Bregeon, J.; Di Bernardo, G.; Gaggero, D.; Giglietto, N.; Kamae, T.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Moiseev, A.A.; Morselli, A.; Ormes, J.F.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pohl, M.; Razzano, M.; Sgro, C.

    2009-05-15

    The Fermi-LAT experiment recently reported high precision measurements of the spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons-plus-positrons (CRE) between 20 GeV and 1 TeV. The spectrum shows no prominent spectral features, and is significantly harder than that inferred from several previous experiments. Here we discuss several interpretations of the Fermi results based either on a single large scale Galactic CRE component or by invoking additional electron-positron primary sources, e.g. nearby pulsars or particle Dark Matter annihilation. We show that while the reported Fermi-LAT data alone can be interpreted in terms of a single component scenario, when combined with other complementary experimental results, specifically the CRE spectrum measured by H.E.S.S. and especially the positron fraction reported by PAMELA between 1 and 100 GeV, that class of models fails to provide a consistent interpretation. Rather, we find that several combinations of parameters, involving both the pulsar and dark matter scenarios, allow a consistent description of those results. We also briefly discuss the possibility of discriminating between the pulsar and dark matter interpretations by looking for a possible anisotropy in the CRE flux.

  15. Frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime measurements via frequency segmentation and recombination as applied to pyrene with dissolved humic materials.

    PubMed

    Marwani, Hadi M; Lowry, Mark; Xing, Baoshan; Warner, Isiah M; Cook, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the association behavior of pyrene with different dissolved humic materials (DHM) was investigated utilizing the recently developed segmented frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime method. The humic materials involved in this study consisted of three commercially available International Humic Substances Society standards (Suwannee River fulvic acid reference, SRFAR, Leonardite humic acid standard, LHAS, and Florida peat humic acid standard, FPHAS), the peat derived Amherst humic acid (AHA), and a chemically bleached Amherst humic acid (BAHA). It was found that the three commercial humic materials displayed three lifetime components, while both Amherst samples displayed only two lifetime components. In addition, it was found that the chemical bleaching procedure preferentially removed red wavelength emitting fluorophores from AHA. In regards to pyrene association with the DHM, different behavior was found for all commercially available humics, while AHA and BAHA, which displayed strikingly similar behavior in terms of fluorescence lifetimes. It was also found that there was an enhancement of pyrene's measured lifetime (combined with a decrease in pyrene emission) in the presence of FPHAS. The implications of this long lifetime are discussed in terms of (1) quenching mechanism and (2) use of the fluorescence quenching method used to determine the binding of compounds to DHM. PMID:18546063

  16. Radio frequency coupling apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Steven W. (Golden, CO); Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample using radio-frequency coupling. The measuring apparatus includes an antenna that is positioned a coupling distance from a semiconductor sample which is exposed to light pulses from a laser during sampling operations. A signal generator is included to generate high frequency, such as 900 MHz or higher, sinusoidal waveform signals that are split into a reference signal and a sample signal. The sample signal is transmitted into a sample branch circuit where it passes through a tuning capacitor and a coaxial cable prior to reaching the antenna. The antenna is radio-frequency coupled with the adjacent sample and transmits the sample signal, or electromagnetic radiation corresponding to the sample signal, to the sample and receives reflected power or a sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal back. To lower impedance and speed system response, the impedance is controlled by limiting impedance in the coaxial cable and the antenna reactance. In one embodiment, the antenna is a waveguide/aperture hybrid antenna having a central transmission line and an adjacent ground flange. The sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal is then transmitted to a mixer which also receives the reference signal. To enhance the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus, the mixer is operated to phase match the reference signal and the sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal.

  17. Measurement of the B meson Lifetimes with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Uozumi, Satoru; /Tsukuba U.

    2006-01-01

    The lifetimes of the B{sup -}, B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons are measured using partially reconstructed semileptonic decays. Following semileptonic decay processes and their charge conjugates are used for this analysis: B{sup -}/B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{nu}D{sup 0}X; B{sup -}/B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{nu}D*{sup +}X; B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{nu}D{sub s}{sup +}x, where {ell}{sup -} denotes either a muon or electron. The data are collected during 2002-2004 by the 8 GeV single lepton triggers in CDF Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Corresponding integrated luminosity is about 260 and 360 pb{sup -1} used for the B{sup -}/B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime analyses, respectively. With the single lepton triggers, events which contain a muon or electron with a transverse momentum greater than 8 GeV/c are selected. For these lepton candidates, further lepton identification cuts are applied to improve purity of the B semileptonic decay signal. After the lepton selection, three types of charm mesons associated with the lepton candidates are reconstructed. Following exclusive decay modes are used for the charm meson reconstruction: D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}; D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sub s}{sup +}, followed by D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}; D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup +}, followed by {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. Here {pi}{sub s}{sup +} denotes a slow pion from D*{sup +} decay. Species of the reconstructed charm meson identify the parent B meson species. However in the B{sup -}/B{sup 0} semileptonic decays, both mesons decay into the identical lepton + D{sup 0} final state. To solve this mixture of the B components in the D{sup 0} sample, they adopt the following method: First among the inclusive D{sup 0} sample, they look for the D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0} {pi}{sub s}{sup +} signal. The inclusive D{sup 0} sample is then split into the two samples of D{sup 0} mesons which are from the D*{sup +} meson and not from D*{sup +}. They use the fact that D*{sup +} sample is dominated by the B{sup 0} component, and the D{sup 0} sample after excluding the D*{sup +} events is dominated by the B{sup -} component. Fraction of remaining mixture of B{sup -}/B{sup 0} components in each sample is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation. From the lepton + charm meson pairs, they measure the B meson decay lengths to extract the lifetimes. Since the B meson momentum, necessary to calculate the B meson decay time, is not fully reconstructed in semileptonic decays, the missing momentum is corrected using a Monte Carlo simulation during lifetime fits. Also, contributions of various kinds of backgrounds are considered and subtracted. As a result of the fit, the B meson lifetimes are measured to be c{tau}(B{sup -}) = 495.6 {+-} 8.6 {sub -12.8}{sup +13.3} {micro}m; c{tau}(B{sup 0}) = 441.5 {+-} 10.9 {+-} 17.0 {micro}m; c{tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 414.0 {+-} 16.6 {sub -13.8}{sup +15.6} {micro}m or {tau}(B{sup 0}) = 1.653 {+-} 0.029 {sub -0.031}{sup +0.033} ps; {tau}(B{sup 0}) = 1.473 {+-} 0.036 {+-} 0.054 ps; {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 1.381 {+-} 0.055 {sub -0.046}{sup +0.052} ps, and the lifetime ratios to be {tau}(B{sup 0})/{tau}(B{sup 0}) = 1.123 {+-} 0.040 {sub -0.039}{sup +0.041}; {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0})/{tau}(B{sup 0}) = 0.938 {+-} 0.044 {sub -0.046}{sup +0.049} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  18. Measurement of the Lifetime of the Bs0 Meson Using the Exclusive Decay Mode Bs0 --> J/? ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.; Akimoto, H.; Akopian, A.; Albrow, M. G.; Amendolia, S. R.; Amidei, D.; Antos, J.; Anway-Wiese, C.; Aota, S.; Apollinari, G.; Asakawa, T.; Ashmanskas, W.; Atac, M.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Bagdasarov, S.; Bailey, M. W.; Bao, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barzi, E.; Bauer, G.; Baumann, T.; Bedeschi, F.; Behrends, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Benlloch, J.; Bensinger, J.; Benton, D.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J. P.; Berryhill, J.; Bertolucci, S.; Bhatti, A.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Bodek, A.; Bokhari, W.; Bolognesi, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Breccia, L.; Bromberg, C.; Bruner, N.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cammerata, J.; Campagnari, C.; Campbell, M.; Caner, A.; Carithers, W.; Carlsmith, D.; Castro, A.; Cauz, D.; Cen, Y.; Cervelli, F.; Chang, P. S.; Chang, P. T.; Chao, H. Y.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, M.-T.; Chiarelli, G.; Chikamatsu, T.; Chiou, C. N.; Christofek, L.; Cihangir, S.; Clark, A. G.; Cobal, M.; Contreras, M.; Conway, J.; Cooper, J.; Cordelli, M.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Crane, D.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Culbertson, R.; Cunningham, J. D.; Daniels, T.; Dejongh, F.; Delchamps, S.; dell'Agnello, S.; dell'Orso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Denby, B.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; Devlin, T.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; Done, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dunn, A.; Eddy, N.; Einsweiler, K.; Elias, J. E.; Ely, R.; Engels, E., Jr.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Fan, Q.; Fiori, I.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G. W.; Franklin, M.; Frautschi, M.; Freeman, J.; Friedman, J.; Fuess, T. A.; Fukui, Y.; Funaki, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Galeotti, S.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gay, C.; Geer, S.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannetti, P.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Gladney, L.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Gordon, A.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grassmann, H.; Groer, L.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guillian, G.; Guo, R. S.; Haber, C.; Hafen, E.; Hahn, S. R.; Hamilton, R.; Handler, R.; Hans, R. M.; Hara, K.; Hardman, A. D.; Harral, B.; Harris, R. M.; Hauger, S. A.; Hauser, J.; Hawk, C.; Hayashi, E.; Heinrich, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hohlmann, M.; Holck, C.; Hollebeek, R.; Holloway, L.; Hölscher, A.; Hong, S.; Houk, G.; Hu, P.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Hylen, J.; Ikeda, H.; Incagli, M.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iwai, J.; Iwata, Y.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kadel, R. W.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambara, H.; Kamon, T.; Kaneko, T.; Karr, K.; Kasha, H.; Kato, Y.; Keaffaber, T. A.; Keeble, L.; Kelley, K.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kephart, R.; Kesten, P.; Kestenbaum, D.; Keup, R. M.; Keutelian, H.; Keyvan, F.; Kharadia, B.; Kim, B. J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kirsch, L.; Koehn, P.; Kondo, K.; Konigsberg, J.; Kopp, S.; Kordas, K.; Korytov, A.; Koska, W.; Kovacs, E.; Kowald, W.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuwabara, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuns, E.; Laasanen, A. T.; Labanca, N.; Lammel, S.; Lamoureux, J. I.; Lecompte, T.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limon, P.; Lindgren, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lockyer, N.; Long, O.; Loomis, C.; Loreti, M.; Lu, J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lukens, P.; Lusin, S.; Lys, J.; Maeshima, K.; Maghakian, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Mangano, M.; Mansour, J.; Mariotti, M.; Marriner, J. P.; Martin, A.; Matthews, J. A.; Mattingly, R.; McIntyre, P.; Melese, P.; Menzione, A.; Meschi, E.; Metzler, S.; Miao, C.; Miao, T.; Michail, G.; Miller, R.; Minato, H.; Miscetti, S.; Mishina, M.; Mitsushio, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Miyashita, S.; Moggi, N.; Morita, Y.; Mueller, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, T.; Murat, P.; Nakada, H.; Nakano, I.; Nelson, C.; Neuberger, D.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Ninomiya, M.; Nodulman, L.; Oh, S. H.; Ohl, K. E.; Ohmoto, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Oishi, R.; Okabe, M.; Okusawa, T.; Oliveira, R.; Olsen, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Paoletti, R.; Papadimitriou, V.; Pappas, S. P.; Park, S.; Parri, A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Perazzo, A.; Pescara, L.; Peters, M. D.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pillai, M.; Pitts, K. T.; Plunkett, R.; Pondrom, L.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ragan, K.; Ribon, A.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robertson, W. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rolli, S.; Romano, J.; Rosenson, L.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltzberg, D.; Sansoni, A.; Santi, L.; Sato, H.; Scarpine, V.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Scribano, A.; Segler, S.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sganos, G.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shaw, N. M.; Shen, Q.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sill, A.; Sinervo, P.; Singh, P.; Skarha, J.; Sliwa, K.; Snider, F. D.; Song, T.; Spalding, J.; Speer, T.; Sphicas, P.; Spinella, F.; Spiropulu, M.; Spiegel, L.; Stanco, L.; Steele, J.; Stefanini, A.; Strahl, K.; Strait, J.

    1996-09-01

    The lifetime of the B0s meson is measured using the exclusive decay mode B0s-->J/? ?, where J/?-->?+?- and ?-->K+K-. The data sample consists of 110 pb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV, collected by the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider during 1992-1995. We find 58+/-12 signal events, and the B0s meson lifetime is determined to be ?B0s = 1.34+0.23-0.19\\(stat\\)+/-0.05\\(syst\\) ps. This result is consistent with previous measurements of the B0s, B+, and B0d meson lifetimes and with theoretical predictions.

  19. Effective lifetime measurements in the Bs0?K+K-, B0?K+?- and Bs0??+K- decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.

    2014-09-01

    Measurements of the effective lifetimes in the Bs0?K+K-, B0?K+?- and Bs0??+K- decays are presented using 1.0 fb of pp collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV by the LHCb experiment. The analysis uses a data-driven approach to correct for the decay time acceptance. The measured effective lifetimes are ?Bs0?K+K-=1.407±0.016 (stat)±0.007 (syst) ps, ?B0?K+?-=1.524±0.011 (stat)±0.004 (syst) ps, ?Bs0??+K-=1.60±0.06 (stat)±0.01 (syst) ps. This is the most precise determination to date of the effective lifetime in the Bs0?K+K- decay and provides constraints on contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model to the Bs0 mixing phase and the width difference ??s.

  20. Toward the measurement of multiple fluorescence lifetimes in flow cytometry: maximizing multi-harmonic content from cells and microspheres.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Patrick; Naivar, Mark A; Houston, Jessica P

    2015-11-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful means for in vitro cellular analyses where multi-fluorescence and multi-angle light scattering can indicate unique biochemical or morphological features of single cells. Yet, to date, flow cytometry systems have lacked the ability to capture complex fluorescence dynamics due to the transient nature of flowing cells. In this contribution we introduce a simple approach for measuring multiple fluorescence lifetimes from a single cytometric event. We leverage square wave modulation, Fourier analysis, and high frequency digitization and show the ability to resolve more than one fluorescence lifetime from fluorescently-labelled cells and microspheres. Illustration of a flow cytometer capable of capturing multiple fluorescence lifetime measurements; creating potential for multi-parametric, time-resolved signals to be captured for every color channel. PMID:25727072

  1. Measurement of the positive muon lifetime and determination of the Fermi constant to part-per-million precision.

    PubMed

    Webber, D M; Tishchenko, V; Peng, Q; Battu, S; Carey, R M; Chitwood, D B; Crnkovic, J; Debevec, P T; Dhamija, S; Earle, W; Gafarov, A; Giovanetti, K; Gorringe, T P; Gray, F E; Hartwig, Z; Hertzog, D W; Johnson, B; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Kizilgul, S; Kunkle, J; Lauss, B; Logashenko, I; Lynch, K R; McNabb, R; Miller, J P; Mulhauser, F; Onderwater, C J G; Phillips, J; Rath, S; Roberts, B L; Winter, P; Wolfe, B

    2011-01-28

    We report a measurement of the positive muon lifetime to a precision of 1.0 ppm; it is the most precise particle lifetime ever measured. The experiment used a time-structured, low-energy muon beam and a segmented plastic scintillator array to record more than 2×10(12) decays. Two different stopping target configurations were employed in independent data-taking periods. The combined results give ?(?(+)) (MuLan)=2?196?980.3(2.2)??ps, more than 15 times as precise as any previous experiment. The muon lifetime gives the most precise value for the Fermi constant: G(F) (MuLan)=1.166?378?8(7)×10(-5)??GeV(-2) (0.6 ppm). It is also used to extract the ?(-)p singlet capture rate, which determines the proton's weak induced pseudoscalar coupling g(P). PMID:21405320

  2. Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant to Part-per-Million Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, D. M.; Tishchenko, V.; Peng, Q.; Battu, S.; Carey, R. M.; Chitwood, D. B.; Crnkovic, J.; Debevec, P. T.; Dhamija, S.; Earle, W.; Gafarov, A.; Giovanetti, K.; Gorringe, T. P.; Gray, F. E.; Hartwig, Z.; Hertzog, D. W.; Johnson, B.; Kammel, P.; Kiburg, B.; Kizilgul, S.; Kunkle, J.; Lauss, B.; Logashenko, I.; Lynch, K. R.; McNabb, R.; Miller, J. P.; Mulhauser, F.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Phillips, J.; Rath, S.; Roberts, B. L.; Winter, P.; Wolfe, B.

    2011-01-01

    We report a measurement of the positive muon lifetime to a precision of 1.0 ppm; it is the most precise particle lifetime ever measured. The experiment used a time-structured, low-energy muon beam and a segmented plastic scintillator array to record more than 2×1012 decays. Two different stopping target configurations were employed in independent data-taking periods. The combined results give ??+(MuLan)=2196980.3(2.2)ps, more than 15 times as precise as any previous experiment. The muon lifetime gives the most precise value for the Fermi constant: GF(MuLan)=1.1663788(7)×10-5GeV-2 (0.6 ppm). It is also used to extract the ?-p singlet capture rate, which determines the proton’s weak induced pseudoscalar coupling gP.

  3. TR-LIF LIFETIME MEASUREMENTS AND HFR+CPOL CALCULATIONS OF RADIATIVE PARAMETERS IN VANADIUM ATOM (V I)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Jiang, L. Y.; Shang, X.; Tian, Y. S.; Dai, Z. W.; Quinet, P.; Palmeri, P.; Zhang, W. E-mail: Pascal.quinet@umons.ac.be

    2014-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 79 levels belonging to the 3d {sup 3}4s4p, 3d {sup 4}4p, 3d {sup 3}4s5p, 3d {sup 4}5p, and 3d {sup 3}4s4d configurations of V I with energy from 26,604.807 to 46,862.786 cm{sup –1} have been measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) spectroscopy in laser-produced plasma. The lifetime values reported in this paper are in the range of 3.3-494 ns, and the uncertainties of these measurements are within ±10%. A good agreement was obtained with previous data. HFR+CPOL calculations have been performed and used to combine the calculated branching fractions with the available experimental lifetimes to determine semi-empirical transition probabilities for 784 V I transitions.

  4. Measured dose rate constant from oncology patients administered 18F for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Brian; Holahan, Brian; Aime, Jean; Humm, John; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Patient exposure rate measurements verify published patient dose rate data and characterize dose rates near 2-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) patients. A specific dose rate constant based on patient exposure rate measurements is a convenient quantity that can be applied to the desired distance, injection activity, and time postinjection to obtain an accurate calculation of cumulative external radiation dose. This study reports exposure rates measured at various locations near positron emission tomography (PET) {sup 18}F-FDG patients prior to PET scanning. These measurements are normalized for the amount of administered activity, measurement distance, and time postinjection and are compared with other published data. Methods: Exposure rates were measured using a calibrated ionization chamber at various body locations from 152 adult oncology patients postvoid after a mean uptake time of 76 min following injection with a mean activity of 490 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Data were obtained at nine measurement locations for each patient: three near the head, four near the chest, and two near the feet. Results: On contact with, 30 cm superior to and 30 cm lateral to the head, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.482 (0.511), 0.135 (0.155), and 0.193 (0.223) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. On contact with, 30 cm anterior to, 30 cm lateral to and 1 m anterior to the chest, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.623 (0.709), 0.254 (0.283), 0.190 (0.218), and 0.067 (0.081) {mu}Sv/MBq h respectively. 30 cm inferior and 30 cm lateral to the feet, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.024 (0.022) and 0.039 (0.044) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. Conclusions: The measurements for this study support the use of 0.092 {mu}Sv m{sup 2}/MBq h as a reasonable representation of the dose rate anterior from the chest of patients immediately following injection. This value can then be reliably scaled to the desired time and distance for planning and staff dose evaluation purposes. At distances closer than 1 m, a distance-specific dose rate constant of 0.367 {mu}Sv/MBq h at 30 cm is recommended for accurate calculations. An accurate patient-specific dose rate constant that accounts for patient-specific variables (e.g., distribution and attenuation) will allow an accurate evaluation of the dose rate from a patient injected with an isotope rather than simply utilizing a physical constant.

  5. Orthopositronium: Annihilation of positron in gaseous neon

    E-print Network

    B. M. Levin

    2003-04-08

    On the basis of phenomenological model of the orthopositronium annihilation "isotope anomaly" in gaseous neon (lifetime spectra, positrons source Na-22) the realistic estimation of an additinal mode ~0.2%) of the orthopositronium annihilation is received.

  6. Comparison of Minority Carrier Lifetime Measurements in Superstrate and Substrate CdTe PV Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, T. A.; Dhere, R. G.; Duenow, J. N.; Kuciauskas, D.; Kanevce, A.; Bergeson, J. D.

    2011-07-01

    We discuss typical and alternative procedures to analyze time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements of minority carrier lifetime (MCL) with the hope of enhancing our understanding of how this technique may be used to better analyze CdTe photovoltaic (PV) device functionality. Historically, TRPL measurements of the fast recombination rate (t1) have provided insightful correlation with broad device functionality. However, we have more recently found that t1 does not correlate as well with smaller changes in device performance, nor does it correlate well with performance differences observed between superstrate and substrate CdTe PV devices. This study presents TRPL data for both superstrate and substrate CdTe devices where both t1 and the slower TRPL decay (t2) are analyzed. The study shows that changes in performance expected from small changes in device processing may correlate better with t2. Numerical modeling further suggests that, for devices that are expected to have similar drift field in the depletion region, effects of changes in bulk MCL and interface recombination should be more pronounced in t2. Although this technique may provide future guidance to improving CdS/CdTe device performance, it is often difficult to extract statistically precise values for t2, and therefore t2 data may demonstrate significant scatter when correlated with performance parameters.

  7. SU-E-T-230: Measurement of Proton-Activated Positron Emission with PRESAGE 3-D Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M; Mawlawi, O; Ibbott, G; Adamovics, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measurement of positron emission following proton beam irradiation of a target has been studied as a method of in-vivo dosimetry. Relative dosimetry studies between a phantom and treatment plan are susceptible to range uncertainties from material heterogeneities and setup error. By using the radiochromic polyurethane dosimeter PRESAGE, we can correlate the proton dose distribution to the PET activity measurement within a single detector. The PRESAGE formulation used was developed for high-LET proton radiotherapy, has similar density and RLSP to tissue, and consists of a greater carbon component, which gives it a higher positron signal than many other 3D detectors. Methods: Three cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters were irradiated semi-uniformly to 500 cGy with 180- MeV protons. The beam was directed along the dosimeter axis and delivered a 2-cm SOBP at the center of the dosimeter. The dosimeters were rushed to a nearby PET/CT where imaging began within 15 minutes, less than a single half-life of 11C. A 3-hr measurement captured the full activation decay. Afterwards, the dose profiles were measured by optical-CT. A direct comparison between the measured dose and the positron emission was performed using CERR software. Results: The correlations between dose distributions and PET activity were consistent with previous studies in that the proximal region of the SOBP displayed the highest activity. The spatial distributions between the dose and activity were similar. Along the central axis of the beam, we found a shift in the distal 80% of 1 cm. The lateral profile showed good agreement between dose and activity. PET imaging times between 30-min and 3-hrs showed <5% discrepancy. Conclusion: PRESAGE dosimeters offer a strong and unique potential to accurately correlate dosimetric and PET activation information. Implementation in an anthropomorphic phantom could be used to study representative treatment plans. NIH grant 5R01CA100835.

  8. Magnetic dipole transition rates from measured lifetimes of levels of Be-like and B-like argon ions 

    E-print Network

    Moehs, D. P.; Church, David A.

    1998-01-01

    The lifetimes of the 1s(2)2s2p P-3(2) level of Ar XV and 1s(2)2s(2)2p P-2(3/2) of Ar XIV have been measured using metastable Ar14+ and Ar13+ ions produced by an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, which were subsequently separately captured...

  9. Measurement of the [bar over B][0 over s] Meson Lifetime in D[+ over s]?[superscript ?] Decays

    E-print Network

    Aaij, R.

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the [bar over B][0 over s] meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to D[+ over s]?[superscript ?], to that of the [bar over B][superscript 0] meson. The pp collision data used ...

  10. Lifetime measurement of the 6s level of rubidium E. Gomez, F. Baumer, A. D. Lange, and G. D. Sprouse

    E-print Network

    Orozco, Luis A.

    in francium and ru- bidium only in a MOT 2­7 . We use the same apparatus except for the source of atoms so we in francium, the 8s level 7 . Measurements of excited-state atomic lifetimes in the low-lying states metals such as cesium or francium. This particular level 6s is of primary importance to the optical

  11. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  12. Precision Measurement of the Mass and Lifetime of the ?b0 Baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.

    2014-07-01

    Using a proton-proton collision data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected by LHCb at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, about 3800 ?b0??c+?-, ?c+?pK-?+ signal decays are reconstructed. From this sample, the first measurement of the ?b0 baryon lifetime is made, relative to that of the ?b0 baryon. The mass differences M(?b0)-M(?b0) and M(?c+)-M(?c+) are also measured with precision more than 4 times better than the current world averages. The resulting values are ?/?b0??b0=1.006±0.018±0.010,M(?b0)-M(?b0)=172.44±0.39±0.17 MeV /c2,M(?c+)-M(?c+)=181.51±0.14±0.10 MeV /c2,where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The relative rate of ?b0 to ?b0 baryon production is measured to be f/?b0f?b0B(?/b0??c+?-)B(?b0??c+?-)B(?/c+?pK-?+)B(?c+?pK-?+)=(1.88±0.04±0.03)×10-2,where the first factor is the ratio of fragmentation fractions, b??b0 relative to b??b0. Relative production rates as functions of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity are also presented.

  13. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the ?(b)(0) baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M

    2014-07-18

    Using a proton-proton collision data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1) collected by LHCb at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, about 3800 ?(b)(0) ? ?(c)(+)?(-), ?(c)(+)) ? pK(-)?(+) signal decays are reconstructed. From this sample, the first measurement of the ?(b)(0) baryon lifetime is made, relative to that of the ?(b)(0) baryon. The mass differences M(?(b)(0))-M(?(b)(0)) and M(?(c)(+))-M(?(c)(+)) are also measured with precision more than 4 times better than the current world averages. The resulting values are ?(?(b)(0))/?(?)(b)(0)) = 1.006 ± 0.018 ± 0.010,M(?(b)(0))-M(?(b)(0)) = 172.44 ± 0.39 ± 0.17 MeV/c(2),M(?(c)(+))-M(?(c)(+)) = 181.51 ± 0.14 ± 0.10 MeV/c(2),where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The relative rate of ?(b)(0) to ?(b)(0) baryon production is measured to be f(?)(b)(0))/f(?)(b)(0))B(?(b)(0) ? ?(c)(+)?(-))/B(?(b)(0) ? ?(c)(+)?(-))B(?(c)(+) ? pK(-)?(+))/B(?(c)(+) ? pK(-)}?(+)) = (1.88 ± 0.04 ± 0.03) × 10(-2),where the first factor is the ratio of fragmentation fractions, b ? ?(b)(0) relative to b ? ?(b)(0). Relative production rates as functions of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity are also presented. PMID:25083633

  14. Level Lifetimes in 94Zr from DSAM Measurements following Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. W.; Peters, E. E.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2014-03-01

    The lifetime of the second 2+ state in 94Zr was redetermined by the Doppler-shift attenuation method following inelastic neutron scattering (DSAM-INS) from metallic Zr and ZrO2 samples of natural isotopic abundance. The new value for the level lifetime differs significantly from the previously published value, with the new lifetime found to be roughly twice that value. A reanalysis of the original ?-ray data from the enriched 94ZrO2 sample failed to expose the source of this discrepancy; however, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy performed on each scattering sample, including the enriched sample used previously, provide clues to an explanation and reveal the role of the chemical properties of the sample material in DSAM-INS lifetime determinations.

  15. Picosecond planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of OH A 2 ( 2) lifetime and energy transfer in atmospheric pressure flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, Frank C.; Nielsen, Tim; Burrows, Michael; Andresen, Peter

    1997-08-01

    A picosecond, excimer-Raman laser (268 nm, 400 ps FWHM) was used for laser sheet excitation of OH in the (2, 0) band. The fluorescence was detected with a fast-gated, intensified camera (400-ps gate width). The effective collisional lifetime of the spectrally integrated fluorescence was measured in two dimensions by shifting the intensifier gate across the decay curve. The average lifetime is 2.0 ns for a stoichiometric methane air flame with spatial variations of 10 . Shorter collisional lifetimes were measured for rich flame conditions that are due to a higher number density of the quenchers. Vibrational energy transfer (VET) was observed in premixed methane air and methane oxygen flames by putting the fast-gated camera behind a spectrometer. The spectrum of the methane air flame shows strong VET in contrast with the methane oxygen flame. This is because N 2 is a weak electronic quencher but a strong VET agent. By fitting the measured time dependence of the different vibrational populations ( 2, 1, 0) to a four-level model, rate constants for quenching and VET were determined. For the lower states ( 0, 1) our results are in good agreement with literature values. For a prediction of a spectrally integrated, collisional lifetime in a known collisional environment it is important to consider not only the quenching but also the amount of energy transfer in the excited state as well as the spectral detection sensitivity.

  16. Measurement of the Lambda(b) lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda(b) ---> J / psi Lambda

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2007-04-01

    We have measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime using the exclusive decay {lambda}{sub b}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}, based on 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed {lambda}{sub b} decays, where the J/{psi} and {lambda} are identified via the decays J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {lambda}{yields}p{pi}, we measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime to be {tau}({lambda}{sub b})=1.218{sub -0.115}{sup +0.130}(stat){+-}0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B{sup 0} lifetime in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}({mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})K{sub S}{sup 0}({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) to be {tau}(B{sup 0})=1.501{sub -0.074}{sup +0.078}(stat){+-}0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of {tau}({lambda}{sub b})/{tau}(B{sup 0})=0.811{sub -0.087}{sup +0.096}(stat){+-}0.034(syst = )

  17. Measurement of the Inclusive B-Lifetime Using $\\rm {J/\\psi}$'s at the CDF Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Hans-Joachim; /RWTH Aachen U.

    1993-08-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the average B hadron lifetime using a high statistics sample of B {yields} J/{psi}X decays produced in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The integrated luminosity of the sample is 10.1 pb{sup -1} recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). In this analysis the decay vertex of the decay J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} as reconstructed by a silicon vertex detector is used to extract the lifetime from the data. This measurement is the average over all b-hadrons produced weighted by the product of their branching ratios into J/{psi} and their production cross sections. We find the following value for the average b hadron lifetime: {tau}{sub B} = 1.46 {+-} 0.06(stat.) {+-} 0.06(syst.) ps. This is the first measurement of the b-hadron lifetime at a hadron collider. It demonstrates that it is possible to access the large b-quark production cross section in p{bar p} collisions and to achieve high statistics even in modes which have small product branching ratios as in this case: BR(B {yields} J/{psi}X) {center_dot} BR(J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = 7.7 x 10{sup -4}.

  18. Measurement of the B¯s0 Effective Lifetime in the J/?f0(980) Final State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adametz, A.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, P.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Hoballah, M.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.

    2012-10-01

    The effective lifetime of the B¯s0 meson in the decay mode B¯s0?J/?f0(980) is measured using 1.0fb-1 of data collected in pp collisions at s=7TeV with the LHCb detector. The result is 1.700±0.040±0.026ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. As the final state is CP-odd, and CP violation in this mode is measured to be small, the lifetime measurement can be translated into a measurement of the decay width of the heavy B¯s0 mass eigenstate, ?H=0.588±0.014±0.009ps-1.

  19. Measurement of the B¯(s)(0) effective lifetime in the J/?f0(980) final state.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A

    2012-10-12

    The effective lifetime of the B ¯(s)(0) meson in the decay mode B¯(s)(0)?J/?f(0)(980) is measured using 1.0 fb(-1) of data collected in pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the LHCb detector. The result is 1.700±0.040±0.026 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. As the final state is CP-odd, and CP violation in this mode is measured to be small, the lifetime measurement can be translated into a measurement of the decay width of the heavy B¯(s)(0) mass eigenstate, ?(H)=0.588±0.014±0.009 ps(-1). PMID:23102295

  20. Measurement of high- Q 2 charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bo?d, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; Del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; de Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bo?d, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kota?ski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; ?u?niak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ota, O.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycie?, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; S?omi?ski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; ?arnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e + p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 132 pb-1 collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is presented at positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beams. The single-differential cross-sections d?/ dQ 2, d?/ dx and d?/ dy are presented for Q 2>200 GeV2. The reduced cross-section tilde{?} is presented in the kinematic range 200< Q 2<60 000 GeV2 and 0.006< x<0.562. The measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. The results are used to determine a lower limit on the mass of a hypothetical right-handed W boson.

  1. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ? 250??GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena. PMID:25166975

  2. Developing A New Test Stand For Lifetime Measurements Using A Narrow Gap Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuitt, Omani; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Morris, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) recently won a proposal "The First Four-Year Physics and Astronomy Degree at the University of the Virgin Islands; A new Era in Caribbean Participation in NASA Science" in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The proposal included building a detector life-test chamber at UVI to support the degree program as well as assist NASA by running tests on detector components and reporting the results.The team at GSFC is developing X-ray polarimeters that can be used in detecting and imaging astrophysical sources such as black holes and neutron stars. The purpose of our research is to understand the effects that the degradation of gas has on the performance of the detectors. The current generation of time projection polarimeter incorporates a narrow gap detector assembled with epoxy. The addition of the epoxy allows a smaller gap with the minimal amount of changes from the original design, enhancing the performance of the detectors.With the use of epoxy, lifetime measurements have to be made to see how the epoxy detectors compared to previous iterations. We have been studying the effects on the narrow gap detector in the Mahaffey chamber in order to determine whether the epoxy affects the cleanliness of the gas. Tests have been conducted with a residual gas analyzer (RGA) in order to monitor the cleanliness of the gas inside of the Mahaffey chamber while being baked out. Results show that the detector is in fact getting cleaner as time progresses. The plan is to recreate a detector that meets the performance criteria for 2 years and has minimal degradation.

  3. Design and characterization of a pulsed x-ray source for fluorescent lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Blankespoor, S.C. |

    1993-12-01

    To search for new, fast, inorganic scintillators, the author and his colleagues have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray source for determining fluorescent lifetimes and wavelengths of compounds in crystal or powdered form. This source uses a light-excited x-ray tube which produces x-rays when light from a laser diode strikes its photocathode. The x-ray tube has a tungsten anode, a beryllium exit window, a 30 kV maximum tube bias, and a 50 HA maximum average cathode current. The laser produces 3 {times} 10{sup 7} photons at 650 nm per {approximately}100 ps pulse, with up to 10{sup 7} pulses/sec. The time spread for the laser diode, x-ray tube, and a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is less than 120 ps fwhm. The mean x-ray photon energy, at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, is 9.4, 10.3, and 11.1 keV, respectively. They measured 140, 230, and 330 x-ray photons per laser diode pulse per steradian at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, respectively. Background x-rays due to dark current occur at a rate of 1 {times} 10{sup 6} and 3 {times} 10{sup 6} photons/sec/steradian at tube biases of 25 and 30 kV, respectively. Data characterizing the x-ray output with an aluminum filter in the x-ray beam are also presented.

  4. Total cross sections for positrons scattered elastically from helium based on new measurements of total ionization cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diana, L. M.; Chaplin, R. L.; Brooks, D. L.; Adams, J. T.; Reyna, L. K.

    1990-01-01

    An improved technique is presented for employing the 2.3m spectrometer to measure total ionization cross sections, Q sub ion, for positrons incident on He. The new ionization cross section agree with the values reported earlier. Estimates are also presented of total elastic scattering cross section, Q sub el, obtained by subtracting from total scattering cross sections, Q sub tot, reported in the literature, the Q sub ion and Q sub Ps (total positronium formation cross sections) and total excitation cross sections, Q sub ex, published by another researcher. The Q sub ion and Q sub el measured with the 3m high resolution time-of-flight spectrometer for 54.9eV positrons are in accord with the results from the 2.3m spectrometer. The ionization cross sections are in fair agreement with theory tending for the most part to be higher, especially at 76.3 and 88.5eV. The elastic cross section agree quite well with theory to the vicinity of 50eV, but at 60eV and above the experimental elastic cross sections climb to and remain at about 0.30 pi a sub o sq while the theoretical values steadily decrease.

  5. Interhemispheric transit time distributions and path-dependent lifetimes constrained by measurements of SF6, CFCs, and CFC replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Mark; Waugh, Darryn W.

    2015-06-01

    We constrain tropospheric transport from Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes to the Southern Hemisphere (SH) surface using measurements of SF6, CFCs, and CFC replacement gases and a novel maximum-entropy-based inversion approach. We provide the first estimate of the width ? of the tropospheric interhemispheric transit time distribution (TTD). We find that ? has a value of ˜1.3 years that varies little with SH latitude, compared to the mean transit time ? that increases from ˜1.1 years in the SH tropics to ˜1.4 years at the South Pole. The TTD shape parameter ?/? is thus larger in the SH tropics than at middle and high SH latitudes. Our analysis introduces a simple path-dependent lifetime that parameterizes chemical losses. The path-dependent lifetimes are estimated for CFC replacements, and systematic differences between path-dependent and global lifetimes are interpreted. The path-dependent lifetimes have the potential to provide new observational constraints on tropospheric and stratospheric loss processes.

  6. Present status of the low energy linac-based slow positron beam and positronium spectrometer in Saclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszkay, L.; Comini, P.; Corbel, C.; Debu, P.; Grandemange, P.; Pérez, P.; Rey, J.-M.; Reymond, J.-M.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.; Vallage, B.

    2014-04-01

    A new slow positron beamline featuring a large acceptance positronium lifetime spectrometer has been constructed and tested at the linac-based slow positron source at IRFU CEA Saclay, France. The new instrument will be used in the development of a dense positronium target cloud for the GBAR experiment. The GBAR project aims at precise measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen in the gravitational field of the Earth. Beyond application in fundamental science, the positron spectrometer will be used in materials research, for testing thin porous films and layers by means of positronium annihilation. The slow positron beamline is being used as a test bench to develop further instrumentation for positron annihilation spectroscopy (Ps time-of-flight, pulsed positron beam). The positron source is built on a low energy linear electron accelerator (linac). The 4.3 MeV electron energy used is well below the photoneutron threshold, making the source a genuine on-off device, without remaining radioactivity. The spectrometer features large BGO (Bismuth Germanate) scintillator detectors, with sufficiently large acceptance to detect all ortho-positronium annihilation lifetime components (annihilation in vacuum and in nanopores).

  7. a New Plunger Device for Investigating the Effects of Deformation on Proton Emission Rates via Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Smith, A. J.; McFarlane, A.; Twist, V.; Procter, M. G.; Alharshan, G. A.; Braunroth, T.; Dewald, A.; Ellinger, E.; Fransen, C.; Butler, P. A.; Scheck, M.; Joss, D. T.; Saygi, B.; McPeake, C. G.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Uusitalo, J.

    2013-06-01

    A new plunger device has been designed and built to measure the lifetimes of unbound states in exotic nuclei beyond the proton drip-line. The device is designed to work in both vacuum and dilute-gas environments made possible through the introduction of a lowvoltage piezoelectric motors. The differential plunger for unbound nuclear states, DPUNS, will be used in conjunction with the gas-filled separator RITU and the vacuum separator MARA at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, to measure the lifetimes of excited states with low population cross-sections. This is achieved by eliminating the need for a carbon foil to isolate the helium gas of RITU from the beam line thus reducing the background from beam-foil reactions. The plunger will be used to address many key facets of nuclear structure physics with particular emphasis on the effect of deformation on proton emission rates.

  8. Measurement of the B(c)+ meson lifetime using B(c)+ ---> J/psi e+ nu(e)

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-03-01

    The authors present a measurement of the B{sub c}{sup +} meson lifetime in the semileptonic decay mode B{sub c}{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. From a sample of about 360 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, they reconstruct J/{psi}e{sup +} pairs with invariant mass in the kinematically allowed range 4 < M{sub J/{psi}e} < 6 GeV/c{sup 2}. A fit to the decay-length distribution of 238 signal events yields a measured B{sub c}{sup +} meson lifetime of 0.463{sub -0.065}{sup +0.073}(stat) {+-} 0.036(syst) ps.

  9. Azadioxatriangulenium: exploring the effect of a 20 ns fluorescence lifetime in fluorescence anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogh, Sidsel A.; Bora, Ilkay; Rosenberg, Martin; Thyrhaug, Erling; Laursen, Bo W.; Just Sørensen, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Azaoxatriangulenium (ADOTA) has been shown to be highly emissive despite a moderate molar absorption coefficient of the primary electronic transition. As a result, the fluorescence lifetime is ~20 ns, longer than all commonly used red fluorescent organic probes. The electronic transitions in ADOTA are highly polarised (r 0??=??0.38), which in combination with the long fluorescence lifetime extents the size-range of biomolecular weights that can be detected in fluorescence polarisation-based experiments. Here, the rotational dynamics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) are monitored with three different ADOTA derivatives, differing only in constitution of the reactive linker. A detailed study of the degree of labelling, the steady-state anisotropy, and the time-resolved anisotropy of the three different ADOTA-BSA conjugates are reported. The fluorescence quantum yields (? fl) of the free dyes in PBS solution are determined to be ~55%, which is reduced to ~20% in the ADOTA-BSA conjugates. Despite the reduction in ? fl, a ~20 ns intensity averaged lifetime is maintained, allowing for the rotational dynamics of BSA to be monitored for up to 100 ns. Thus, ADOTA can be used in fluorescence polarisation assays to fill the gap between commonly used organic dyes and the long luminescence lifetime transition metal complexes. This allows for efficient steady-state fluorescence polarisation assays for detecting binding of analytes with molecular weights of up to 100?kDa.

  10. Alternative Size and Lifetime Measurements for High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-print Network

    Scott Pratt; Silvio Petriconi

    2003-06-16

    Two-Particle correlations based on the interference of identical particles has provided the chief means for determining the shape and lifetime of sources in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Here, Strong and Coulomb induced correlations are shown to provide equivalent information.

  11. High statistics measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Accardo, L; Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türko?lu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ?200??GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy. PMID:25279616

  12. High Statistics Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5–500 GeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    E-print Network

    Accardo, L; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türko?lu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ?200??GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  13. Positron Annihilation in Medical Substances of Insulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, R.; Szatanik, R.

    2005-05-01

    Positrons lifetimes were measured in medical substances of insulin (human and animal), differing as far as the degree of purity and time of their activity in the organism are concerned. In all of the cases the spectrum of positron lifetime was distributed into three components, with the long-life component ranging from 1.8 to 2.08 ns and the intensity taking on values from 18 to 24%. Making use of Tao-Eldrup model, the average radius of the free volume, in which o-Ps annihilated, and the degree of filling in the volume were determined. It was found that the value of the long-life component for human insulin is higher than that of animal insulin. Moreover, the value of this component clearly depends on the manner of purification of the insulin. It was also noticed that there occurs a correlation between the value of this component and the time after which it begins to be active in the organism, as well as the total time of its activity.

  14. GENETIC PARAMETERS FOR SIX MEASURES OF LENGTH OF PRODUCTIVE LIFE AND THREE MEASURES OF LIFETIME PRODUCTION BY SIX YEARS AFTER FIRST CALVING FOR HEREFORD COWS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic parameters for length of productive life given the opportunity (LPL|O), measured as days between first calving and disposal conditioned on one of six opportunity groups, (e.g., L2 is length of productive life in days given the opportunity to live 2 yr after first calving), and lifetime produ...

  15. Dynamic PET/CT measurements of induced positron activity in a prostate cancer patient after 50-MV photon radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this work was to reveal the research interest value of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in visualizing the induced tissue activity post high-energy photon radiation treatment. More specifically, the focus was on the possibility of retrieving data such as tissue composition and physical half-lives from dynamic PET acquisitions, as positron-emitting radionuclides such as 15O, 11C, and 13N are produced in vivo during radiation treatment with high-energy photons (>15 MeV). The type, amount, and distribution of induced positron-emitting radionuclides depend on the irradiated tissue cross section, the photon spectrum, and the possible perfusion-driven washout. Methods A 62-year-old man diagnosed with prostate cancer was referred for palliative radiation treatment of the pelvis minor. A total dose of 8 Gy was given using high-energy photon beams (50 MV) with a racetrack microtron, and 7 min after the end of irradiation, the patient was positioned in a PET/computed tomography (CT) camera, and a list-mode acquisition was performed for 30 min. Two volumes of interests (VOIs) were positioned on the dynamic PET/CT images, one in the urinary bladder and the other in the subcutaneous fat. Analysis of the measured relative count rate was performed in order to compute the tissue compositions and physical half-lives in the two regions. Results Dynamic analysis from the two VOIs showed that the decay constants of activated oxygen and carbon could be deduced. Calculation of tissue composition from analyzing the VOI containing subcutaneous fat only moderately agreed with that of the tabulated International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements (ICRU) data of the adipose tissue. However, the same analysis for the bladder showed a good agreement with that of the tabulated ICRU data. Conclusions PET can be used in visualizing the induced activity post high-energy photon radiation treatment. Despite the very low count rate in this specific application, wherein 7 min after treatment was about 5% of that of a standard 18F-FDG PET scan, the distribution of activated tissue elements (15O and 11C) could be calculated from the dynamic PET data. One possible future application of this method could possibly be to measure and determine the tumor tissue composition in order to identify any hypoxic or necrotic region, which is information that can be used in the ongoing therapy planning process. Trial registration The official name of the trial committee of this study is ‘Regionala etikprövningsnämnden i Stockholm’ (FE 289, Stockholm, SE-17177, Sweden). The unique identifying number is 2011/1789-31/2. PMID:23343347

  16. Lifetime measurement for the 21+ state in 140Sm and the onset of collectivity in neutron-deficient Sm isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello Garrote, F. L.; Görgen, A.; Mierzejewski, J.; Mihai, C.; Delaroche, J. P.; Girod, M.; Libert, J.; Sahin, E.; Srebrny, J.; Abraham, T.; Eriksen, T. K.; Giacoppo, F.; Hagen, T. W.; Kisielinski, M.; Klintefjord, M.; Komorowska, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Marchlewski, T.; Mitu, I. O.; Pascu, S.; Siem, S.; Stolarz, A.; Tornyi, T. G.

    2015-08-01

    Background: The chain of Sm isotopes exhibits a wide range of nuclear shapes and collective behavior. While the onset of deformation for N >82 has been well studied both experimentally and theoretically, fundamental data is lacking for some Sm isotopes with N <82 . Purpose: Electromagnetic transition rates represent a sensitive test of theoretical nuclear structure models. Lifetime measurements are furthermore complementary to Coulomb excitation experiments, and the two methods together can give access to spectroscopic quadrupole moments. Method: The lifetime of the 21+ state in 140Sm was measured with the recoil-distance Doppler shift technique using the reaction 124Te(20Ne,4 n )140Sm at 82 MeV. Theoretical calculations were performed based on a mapped collective Hamiltonian in five quadrupole coordinates (5DCH) and the Gogny D1S interaction. Results: The lifetime of the 21+ state in 140Sm was found to be 9.1(6) ps, corresponding to a B (E 2 ;21+?01+) value of 51(4) Weisskopf units. The theoretical calculations are in very good agreement with the experimental result. Conclusions: The B (E 2 ;21+?01+) value for 140Sm fits smoothly into the systematic trend for the chain of Sm isotopes. The new beyond-mean field calculations are able to correctly describe the onset of collectivity in the Sm isotopes below the N =82 shell closure for the first time.

  17. Measurement of the 7p{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} Level Lifetime in Atomic Francium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W.Z.; Simsarian, J.E.; Orozco, L.A.; Shi, W.; Sprouse, G.D.

    1997-06-01

    We present the first measurement of an atomic radiative lifetime in Fr. We use a time-correlated single photon counting technique with a cold sample of {sup 210}Fr atoms in a magneto-optic trap. The results are a precision experimental test of the atomic many-body perturbation theory applied to the heaviest alkali. The lifetime for the 7p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} level of 21.02(16) ns gives a value for the reduced transition matrix element between the levels 7s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} {r_arrow} 7p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} of 5.898(22)a{sub {infinity}} atomic units. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetime in a direct band-gap semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, Oldwig (inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A direct band-gap semiconductor is exposed to intensity-modulated photon radiation having a characteristic energy at least as great as the energy gap of the semiconductor. This produces a time dependent concentration of excess charge carriers through the material, producing a luminescence signal modulated at the same frequency as the incident radiation but shifted in phase by an amount related to the lifetime of minority carriers. In a preferred embodiment, the phase shift of the luminescence signal is determined by transforming it to a modulated electrical signal and mixing the electrical signal with a reference signal modulated at the same frequency and having a phase which is known relative to the incident radiation. Minority carrier lifetime is calculated by integrating a direct current component of the mixed signal (F sub dc) over a 2 pi range in phase of the reference signal.

  19. Measurement of lifetimes in {sup 46}V with the EUROBALL {gamma}-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jessen, K.; Moeller, O.; Dewald, A.; Brentano, P. von; Fitzler, A.; Jolie, J.; Saha, B.; Petkov, P.; Brandolini, F.; Gadea, A.; Lenzi, S. M.; De Angelis, G.; Farnea, E.; Napoli, D. R.; Gall, B. J. P.

    2006-08-15

    In {sup 46}V picosecond lifetimes were determined using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique with the Cologne plunger device coupled to the EUROBALL IV spectrometer. The experiment was carried out using the {sup 24}Mg({sup 28}Si, {alpha}pn) reaction at 110 MeV at the Strasbourg VIVITRON accelerator. Subsequently the differential decay curve method in coincidence mode was employed to derive lifetimes for four excited states in the K{sup {pi}}=0{sup -} band. The resulting transition probabilities give a comparison of isospin allowed and forbidden E1 transitions, which clarifies the decay properties of the 2{sup -},T=0 state. Furthermore the B(E2) values within the K{sup {pi}}=0{sup -} band are discussed.

  20. Characterization of arachidate Langmuir--Blodgett films by variable energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, T.; Szeles, C.; Suvegh, K.; Kiss, E.; Vertes, A.; Lynn, K.G.

    1999-11-09

    Archidate Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of different chemical composition and number of monomolecular layers deposited on silylated silica glass substrates were studied by means of positron annihilation spectroscopy. The applied methods included the measurement of the Doppler broadening of the annihilation photopeak with variable energy positron beams and bulk positron lifetime measurements. The studied samples were 58 monomolecular layers (MML) thick Mg- and Cd-arachidate, arachidic acid (50 MML) and a series of Pb-arachidate samples with 4, 10, 20, 40, and 58 MML. The investigation showed that the variable energy positron beam technique is capable of measuring the thickness of the deposited LB films. The measured positron annihilation parameters are sensitive to the chemical composition of the films and the behavior of the films in a vacuum. The results confirmed the stability of salt base LB films in high vacuum conditions and showed the desorption of pure acid films. These investigations have also shown that a strong position trap is formed in the near-surface region of the hydrophobized substrate as a consequence of the silylation process. The results suggest that positron beams provide valuable complementary information to results obtained by other techniques.

  1. Lifetime measurements and the high-spin structure of 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, S.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Recchia, F.; Gadea, A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Lunardi, S.; Ur, C. A.; Bazzacco, D.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Bizzeti-Sona, A. M.; Bouhelal, M.; de Angelis, G.; Deloncle, I.; Farnea, E.; Gottardo, A.; Haas, F.; Huyuk, T.; Laftchiev, H.; Mengoni, D.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Napoli, D. R.; Sahin, D.; Singh, P. P.; Tonev, D.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2015-04-01

    High-spin states in 36Cl were populated through the 24Mg(14N,2p)36Cl reaction at E(14N)=31 MeV. Lifetimes have been determined for fifteen states by applying the Doppler shift attenuation method. The results indicated the onset of collectivity in the high spin negative parity states. Large basis shell model calculations have been performed to understand the underlying structure of these states.

  2. Measurement of D0 lifetime with the BaBar detector

    SciTech Connect

    Simi, Gabriele; /Pisa U. /SLAC

    2009-12-17

    This work is the result of the researchers carried out during a three years Ph.D. period in the BABAR experiment. The first chapter consists in an introduction to the theoretical aspects of the D{sup 0} meson lifetime determination and CP violation parameters, as well as an overview of the CP violation in the B sector, which is the main topic of the experiment. The description of the experimental apparatus follows with particular attention to the Silicon Vertex Tracker detector, the most critical detector for the determination of decay vertices and thus of lifetimes and time dependent CP violation asymmetries. In the fourth chapter the operation and running of the vertex detector is described, as a result from the experience as Operation Manager of the SVT, with particular attention to the safety of the device and the data quality assurance. The last chapter is dedicated to the determination of the D{sup 0} meson lifetime with the BABAR detector, which is the main data analysis carried out by the candidate. The analysis is characterized by the selection of an extremely pure sample of D{sup 0} mesons for which the decay flight length and proper time is reconstructed. The description of the unbinned maximum likelihood fit follows, as well as the discussion of the possible sources of systematic uncertainties. In the appendix is also presented a preliminary study of a possible development regarding the determination of mixing and CP violation parameters for the D{sup 0} meson.

  3. Measurement of the ?b? lifetime in the exclusive decay ?b??J/??? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-06-07

    We measure the ??b lifetime in the fully reconstructed decay ??b?J/??? using 10.4 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at ?s=1.96 TeV. The lifetime of the topologically similar decay channel B??J/?K?S is also measured. We obtain ?(??b)=1.303±0.075(stat)±0.035(syst) ps and ?(B?)=1.508±0.025(stat)±0.043(syst) ps. Using these measurements, we determine the lifetime ratio of ?(??b)/?(B?)=0.864±0.052(stat)±0.033(syst).

  4. Measurement of the ?b? lifetime in the exclusive decay ?b??J/??? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-06-07

    We measure the ??b lifetime in the fully reconstructed decay ??b?J/??? using 10.4 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at ?s=1.96 TeV. The lifetime of the topologically similar decay channel B??J/?K?S is also measured. We obtain ?(??b)=1.303±0.075(stat)±0.035(syst) ps and ?(B?)=1.508±0.025(stat)±0.043(syst) ps. Using these measurements, we determine the lifetime ratio of ?(??b)/?(B?)=0.864±0.052(stat)±0.033(syst).

  5. Measurements of the lifetime of the lowest {sup 3}P{sub 1} state of neutral Ba and Ra.

    SciTech Connect

    Scielzo, N. D.; Guest, J. R.; Schulte, E. C.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Bowers, D. L.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T.; Potterveld, D. H.; Univ. of Chicago

    2006-01-01

    The lifetimes of the lowest {sup 3}P{sub 1} states of Ba and Ra were determined to be 1345 {+-} 14 ns and 422 {+-} 20 ns, respectively, by measuring the exponential decay of fluorescence after illuminating a thermal atomic beam with pulses of laser light. In addition, the {sup 1}S{sub 0}(F=1/2)-{sup 3}P{sub 1}(F=3/2) transition frequency in {sup 225}Ra was measured to be 13 999.269 {+-} 0.001 cm{sup -1} by referencing a nearby I{sub 2} transition.

  6. Measurement of the lifetimes of the lowest {sup 3}P{sub 1} state of neutral Ba and Ra

    SciTech Connect

    Scielzo, N. D.; Guest, J. R.; Schulte, E. C.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Holt, R. J.; O'Connor, T. P.; Potterveld, D. H.; Bowers, D. L.; Lu, Z.-T.

    2006-01-15

    The lifetimes of the lowest {sup 3}P{sub 1} states of Ba and Ra were determined to be 1345{+-}14 ns and 422{+-}20 ns, respectively, by measuring the exponential decay of fluorescence after illuminating a thermal atomic beam with pulses of laser light. In addition, the {sup 1}S{sub 0}(F=1/2)-{sup 3}P{sub 1}(F=3/2) transition frequency in {sup 225}Ra was measured to be 13 999.269{+-}0.001 cm{sup -1} by referencing a nearby I{sub 2} transition.

  7. The ATLAS Positron Experiment -- APEX

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Dunford, R.; Kutschera, W.; Rhein, M.D.; Schiffer, J.P.; Wilt, P.; Wuosmaa, A.; Austin, S.M.; Kashy, E.; Winfield, J.S.; Yurkon, J.E.; Bazin, D.; Calaprice, F.P.; Young, A.; Chan, K.C.; Chisti, A.; Chowhury, P.; Greenberg, J.S.; Kaloskamis, N.; Lister, C.J.; Fox, J.D.; Roa, E.; Freedman, S.; Maier, M.R.; Freer, M.; Gazes, S.; Hallin, A.L.; Liu, M.; Happ, T.; Perera, A.; Wolfs, F.L.H.; Trainor, T.; Wolanski, M. |

    1994-03-01

    APEX -- the ATLAS Positron Experiment -- is designed to measure electrons and positrons emitted in heavy-ion collisions. Its scientific goal is to gain insight into the puzzling positron-line phenomena observed at the GSI Darmstadt. It is in operation at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab. The assembly of the apparatus is finished and beginning 1993 the first positrons produced in heavy-ion collisions were observed. The first full scale experiment was carried out in December 1993, and the data are currently being analyzed. In this paper, the principles of operation are explained and a status report on the experiment is given.

  8. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I.; Gidley, David W.

    2013-04-19

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  9. Lifetime measurement of the 6.79 MeV state in {sup 15}O with the AGATA demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Michelagnoli, C.; Depalo, R.; Ur, C. A.; Menegazzo, R.; Broggini, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Caciolli, A.; Farnea, E.; Lunardi, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Keeley, N.; Erhard, M.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Marta, M.; Mengoni, D.; Mijatovic, T.; Recchia, F.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Szuecs, T.; and others

    2012-11-12

    The preliminary results of a new direct measurement of the lifetime of the first excited 3/2{sup +} state in {sup 15}O are discussed. An accurate evaluation of this lifetime is of paramount importance for the determination of the cross section of the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction, the slowest one in the CNO cycle, at the energies of the solar Gamow peak. The {sup 2}H({sup 14}N,{sup 15}O)n reaction in inverse kinematics at 32MeV beam energy (XTU Tandem, LNL) was used to populate the level of interest, which decays via a 6.79 MeV E1 gamma-ray transition to the ground state. Gamma rays were detected with 4 triple clusters of HPGe detectors of the AGATA Demonstrator array. The energy resolution and position sensitivity of this state-of-the-art gamma-ray spectrometer have been exploited to investigate the Doppler Shift Attenuation effect on the lineshape of the gamma-ray peak in the energy spectrum. The deconvolution of the lifetime effects from those due to the kinematics of the emitting nuclei has been performed using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the gamma emission and detection. CDCC-CRC calculations for the nucleon transfer process have been used for this purpose and preliminary results are shown.

  10. Minority carrier lifetime and dark current measurements in mid-wavelength infrared InAs0.91Sb0.09 alloy nBn photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, B. V.; Kim, J. K.; Kadlec, E. A.; Klem, J. F.; Hawkins, S. D.; Leonhardt, D.; Coon, W. T.; Fortune, T. R.; Cavaliere, M. A.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Shaner, E. A.

    2015-11-01

    Carrier lifetime and dark current measurements are reported for a mid-wavelength infrared InAs0.91Sb0.09 alloy nBn photodetector. Minority carrier lifetimes are measured using a non-contact time-resolved microwave technique on unprocessed portions of the nBn wafer and the Auger recombination Bloch function parameter is determined to be |F1F2|=0.292 . The measured lifetimes are also used to calculate the expected diffusion dark current of the nBn devices and are compared with the experimental dark current measured in processed photodetector pixels from the same wafer. Excellent agreement is found between the two, highlighting the important relationship between lifetimes and diffusion currents in nBn photodetectors.

  11. Measuring the lifetime of silicon nanocrystal solar cell photo-carriers by using Kelvin probe force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Borowik, L; Lepage, H; Chevalier, N; Mariolle, D; Renault, O

    2014-07-01

    We report the first measurements of photo-carrier lifetimes in silicon nanocrystal-based third generation solar cells by Kelvin force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under modulated frequency light illumination. A high concentration of active defects at the interface between the nanocrystals and silicon oxide matrix may be passivated by annealing under hydrogen. We found that the carrier lifetime, ?, is ? = 7 × 10(-5) s and ? = 3.5 × 10(-5) s within 10% accuracy for the hydrogen passivated and non-passivated nanocrystals, respectively. We used an exponential model to confirm the experimental potential measurements and to estimate photo-carrier lifetimes. PMID:24916454

  12. Lifetime measurements of the first 2+ states in 104,106Zr: Evolution of ground-state deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, F.; Bruce, A. M.; Sumikama, T.; Nishizuka, I.; Nishimura, S.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Söderström, P.-A.; Watanabe, H.; Daido, R.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Wu, J.; Xu, Z. Y.; Yagi, A.; Baba, H.; Chiga, N.; Carroll, R.; Didierjean, F.; Fang, Y.; Fukuda, N.; Gey, G.; Ideguchi, E.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kameda, D.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Kubo, T.; Lalkovski, S.; Li, Z.; Lozeva, R.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Podolyák, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Roberts, O. J.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Simpson, G. S.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Tanaka, M.; Taprogge, J.; Werner, V.; Wieland, O.

    2015-11-01

    The first fast-timing measurements from nuclides produced via the in-flight fission mechanism are reported. The lifetimes of the first 2+ states in 104,106Zr nuclei have been measured via ?-delayed ?-ray timing of stopped radioactive isotope beams. An improved precision for the lifetime of the 21+ state in 104Zr was obtained, ? (21+) =2.90-20+25 ns, as well as a first measurement of the 21+ state in 106Zr, ? (21+) =2.60-15+20 ns, with corresponding reduced transition probabilities of B (E2 ;21+ ?0g.s.+) = 0.39 (2) e2b2 and 0.31 (1) e2b2, respectively. Comparisons of the extracted ground-state deformations, ?2 = 0.39 (1) (104Zr) and ?2 = 0.36 (1) (106Zr) with model calculations indicate a persistence of prolate deformation. The data show that 104Zr is the most deformed of the neutron-rich Zr isotopes measured so far.

  13. A Measurement of the Lifetime of the Lambda_b Baryon with the CDF Detector at the Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Unverhau, Tatjana Alberta Hanna; /Glasgow U.

    2004-12-01

    In March 2001 the Tevatron accelerator entered its Run II phase, providing colliding proton and anti-proton beams with an unprecedented center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator to produce {Lambda}{sub b} baryons, which provides a unique opportunity to measure the properties of these particles. This thesis presents a measurement of the mean lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b} baryon in the semileptonic channel {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {mu}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}. In total 186 pb{sup -1} of data were used for this analysis, collected with the CDF detector between February 2002 and September 2003. To select the long-lived events from b-decays, the secondary vertex trigger was utilized. This significant addition to the trigger for Run II allows, for the first time, the selection of events with tracks displaced from the primary interaction vertex at the second trigger level. After the application of selection cuts this trigger sample contains approximately 991 {Lambda}{sub b} candidates. To extract the mean lifetime of {Lambda}{sub b} baryons from this sample, they transverse decay length of the candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit under the consideration of the missing neutrino momentum and the bias introduced by the secondary vertex trigger. The mean lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b} is measured to be {tau} = 1.29 {+-} 0.11(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.) ps equivalent to a mean decay length of c{tau} = 387 {+-} 33(stat.) {+-} 21 (syst.) {micro}m.

  14. Defects in ZnO thin films grown on ScAlMgO4 substrates probed by a monoenergetic positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uedono, A.; Koida, T.; Tsukazaki, A.; Kawasaki, M.; Chen, Z. Q.; Chichibu, SF.; Koinuma, H.

    2003-03-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films grown on ScAlMgO4 substrates were characterized by means of positron annihilation. We measured Doppler broadening spectra of annihilation radiation and photoluminescence spectra for the ZnO films deposited by laser molecular-beam epitaxy and single-crystal ZnO. Although the lifetime of positrons in single-crystal ZnO was close to the lifetime of positrons annihilated from the free state, the diffusion length of positrons was shorter than that for typical defect-free materials. We attribute this to the scattering of positrons by native defects. For the ZnO films, we observed a correlation between the defects and the lifetime of bound exciton emissions ?Ex; the main defect species detected by positron annihilation was Zn vacancies or other related defects. Isochronal annealing at 750-850 °C was found to introduce additional vacancy-type defects into the film, although the value of ?Ex was scarcely changed by the annealing.

  15. Positron Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    I will give a review of the history of low-energy positron physics, experimental and theoretical, concentrating on the type of work pioneered by John Humberston and the positronics group at University College. This subject became a legitimate subfield of atomic physics under the enthusiastic direction of the late Sir Harrie Massey, and it attracted a diverse following throughout the world. At first purely theoretical, the subject has now expanded to include high brightness beams of low-energy positrons, positronium beams, and, lately, experiments involving anti-hydrogen atoms. The theory requires a certain type of persistence in its practitioners, as well as an eagerness to try new mathematical and numerical techniques. I will conclude with a short summary of some of the most interesting recent advances.

  16. Measurement of the B{sup +} and B{sup 0} lifetimes with topological vertexing at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Abt, I.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-07-01

    The lifetimes of the B{sup +} (B{sub u}) and B{sup 0} (B{sub d}) mesons have been measured using a sample of 150,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC between 1993 and 1995. The analysis reconstructs the decay length and charge of the B meson using a novel topological technique. This method results in a high statistics sample of 6,033 (3,665) charged (neutral) vertices. The ratio of B{sup +}:B{sup 0} decays in the charged (neutral) sample is 1.8:1 (1:2.3).

  17. Lifetimes of (214)Po and (212)Po measured with Counting Test Facility at Gran Sasso National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Miramonti, L; Bellini, G; Benziger, J; Bick, D; Bonfini, G; Bravo, D; Buizza Avanzini, M; Caccianiga, B; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F; Carraro, C; Cavalcante, P; Chavarria, A; Chubakov, V; D'Angelo, D; Davini, S; Derbin, A; Etenko, A; Fomenko, K; Franco, D; Galbiati, C; Gazzana, S; Ghiano, C; Giammarchi, M; Göger-Neff, M; Goretti, A; Grandi, L; Guardincerri, E; Hardy, S; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Koshio, Y; Kryn, D; Laubenstein, M; Lewke, T; Lissia, M; Litvinovich, E; Loer, B; Lombardi, F; Lombardi, P; Ludhova, L; Machulin, I; Manecki, S; Maneschg, W; Mantovani, F; Manuzio, G; Meindl, Q; Meroni, E; Misiaszek, M; Montanari, D; Mosteiro, P; Muratova, V; Nisi, S; Oberauer, L; Obolensky, M; Ortica, F; Otis, K; Pallavicini, M; Papp, L; Perasso, L; Perasso, S; Pocar, A; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Re, A; Romani, A; Rossi, N; Sabelnikov, A; Saldanha, R; Salvo, C; Schönert, S; Simgen, H; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Sukhotin, S; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Testera, G; Vignaud, D; Vogelaar, R B; von Feilitzsch, F; Winter, J; Wojcik, M; Wright, A; Wurm, M; Xhixha, G; Xu, J; Zaimidoroga, O; Zavatarelli, S; Zuzel, G

    2014-12-01

    The decays of (214)Po into (210)Pb and of (212)Po into (208)Pb tagged by the previous decays from (214)Bi and (212)Bi have been studied inserting quartz vials inside the Counting Test Facility (CTF) at the underground laboratory in Gran Sasso (LNGS). We find that the mean lifetime of (214)Po is (236.00 ± 0.42(stat) ± 0.15(syst)) ?s and that of (212)Po is (425.1 ± 0.9(stat) ± 1.2(syst)) ns. Our results are compatible with previous measurements, have a much better signal to background ratio, and reduce the overall uncertainties. PMID:24725806

  18. Picosecond excite-and-probe absorption measurement of the 4T2 state nonradiative lifetime in ruby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayen, S. K.; Wang, W. B.; Petricevic, V.; Dorsinville, R.; Alfano, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    In a picosecond excite-and-probe absorption measurement, a 527-nm picosecond pulse excites the 4T2 state of the Cr(3+) ion in ruby and a 3.4-micron picosecond probe pulse monitors the growth and decay of population in the 2E state as a function of pump-probe delay. From the growth of population in the metastable 2E state, an upper limit of 7 ps for the nonradiative lifetime of the 4T2 state is determined.

  19. Precision lifetime measurement of the cesium $6P_{3/2}$ level using ultrafast pump-probe laser pulses

    E-print Network

    Patterson, Brian M; Ehrenreich, Thomas; Gearba, Mirela A; Brooke, George M; Scoville, James; Knize, Randy J

    2014-01-01

    Using the inherent timing stability of pulses from a mode-locked laser, we have precisely measured the cesium $6P_{3/2}$ excited state lifetime. An initial pump pulse excites cesium atoms in two counter-propagating atomic beams to the $6P_{3/2}$ level. A subsequent synchronized probe pulse ionizes atoms which remain in the excited state, and the photo-ions are collected and counted. By selecting pump pulses which vary in time with respect to the probe pulses, we obtain a sampling of the excited state population in time, resulting in a lifetime value of 30.462(46) ns. The measurement uncertainty (0.15%) is larger than our previous report of 0.12% [Phys. Rev. A 84, 010501(R) (2011)] due to the inclusion of additional data and systematic errors. In this follow-up paper we present details of the primary systematic errors encountered in the measurement, which include atomic motion within the intensity profiles of the laser beams, quantum beating in the photo-ion signal, and radiation trapping. Improvements to furt...

  20. Measurements of photocathode operational lifetime at beam currents up to 10-mA using an improved DC high voltage GaAs photogun

    SciTech Connect

    J. Grames; M. Poelker; P. Adderley; J. Brittian; J. Clark; J. Hansknecht; D. Machie; M.L. Stutzman; K. Surles-Law

    2007-06-01

    This work extends past research at Jefferson Lab aimed at better appreciating the mechanisms that limit photocathode operational lifetime at high current (> 1 mA). Specifically, the performance of an improved 100 kV DC high voltage load locked photogun will be described. Although difficult to measure directly, we believe the new gun has better vacuum conditions compared to the original gun, as indicated by enhanced photocathode lifetimes exceeding 2000 C using a 1.55 mm diameter drive laser spot at the photocathode. In addition, the dependence of the lifetime on the laser spot size at the photocathode was measured and a charge density lifetime exceeding 10^6 C/cm^2 was measured with a 0.32 mm laser spot diameter.

  1. Lifetime Measurement of the Low Lying Yrast States in 189Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chuang-Ye; Wu, Xiao-Guang; Wang, Jin-Long; Wu, Yi-Heng; Zheng, Yun; Li, Guang-Sheng; Li, Cong-Bo; Hu, Shi-Peng; Li, Hong-Wei; Liu, Jia-Jian; Luo, Peng-Wei; Yao, Shun-He

    2013-11-01

    High-spin states in 189Pt are populated through the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reaction176Yb (18O, 5n)189Pt at 87MeV beam energy. An array consisting of 13 HPGe detectors is used in conjunction with the plunger device in CIAE. The lifetimes of two levels in the yrast band are determined by using the recoil distance Doppler shift method. The transition quadrupole moments Qt are extracted. The results show that the state has a much larger Qt value than that of the ground state, whereas the value deceases quickly with spin increasing. This may contribute to the shape driving effect of the quasi-neutron from the i13/2 orbital.

  2. Positron annihilation studies of zirconia doped with metal cations of different valence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, I.; Cizek, J.; Melikhova, O.; Konstantinova, T. E.; Danilenko, I. A.; Yashchishyn, I. A.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.

    2013-06-01

    New results obtained by applying positron annihilation spectroscopy to the investigation of zirconia-based nanomaterials doped with metal cations of different valence are reported. The slow-positron implantation spectroscopy combined with Doppler broadening measurements was employed to study the sintering of pressure-compacted nanopowders of tetragonal yttria-stabilised zirconia (t-YSZ) and t-YSZ with chromia additive. Positronium (Ps) formation in t-YSZ was proven by detecting 3?-annihilations of ortho-Ps and was found to gradually decrease with increasing sintering temperature. A subsurface layer with enhanced 3?-annihilations, compared to the deeper regions, could be identified. Addition of chromia was found to inhibit Ps formation. In addition, first results of positron lifetime measurements on nanopowders of zirconia phase-stabilised with MgO and CeO2 are presented.

  3. Positron spectroscopy for materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    One of the more active areas of research on materials involves the observation and characterization of defects. The discovery of positron localization in vacancy-type defects in solids in the 1960's initiated a vast number of experimental and theoretical investigations which continue to this day. Traditional positron annihilation spectroscopic techniques, including lifetime studies, angular correlation, and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are still being applied to new problems in the bulk properties of simple metals and their alloys. In addition new techniques based on tunable sources of monoenergetic positron beams have, in the last 5 years, expanded the horizons to studies of surfaces, thin films, and interfaces. In the present paper we briefly review these experimental techniques, illustrating with some of the important accomplishments of the field. 40 refs., 19 figs.

  4. Forward-bias capacitance and current measurements for determining lifetimes and band narrowing in p-n junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Chen, P. J.; Pao, S. C.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    A new method is described and illustrated for determining the minority-carrier diffusion length and lifetime in the base region of p-n junction solar cells. The method requires only capacitance measurements at the device terminals and its accuracy is estimated to be + or - 5%. It is applied to a set of silicon p-n junction devices and the values of the diffusion lengths agree with those obtained using the current response to X-ray excitation but disagree with those obtained by the OCVD method. The reasons for the relative inaccuracy of OCVD applied to silicon devices are discussed. The capacitance method includes corrections for a two-dimensional fringing effects which occur in small area devices. For a device having highly-doped base region and surface (emitter) layer, the method can be extended to enable the determination of material properties of the degenerately doped surface layer. These material properties include the phenomenological emitter lifetime and a measure of the energy band-gap narrowing in the emitter. An alternate method for determining the energy band-gap narrowing from temperature dependence of emitter current is discussed and demonstrated.

  5. A system of beam energy measurement based on the Compton backscattered laser photons for the VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider

    E-print Network

    E. V. Abakumova; M. N. Achasov; D. E. Berkaev; V. V. Kaminsky; I. A. Koop; A. A. Korol; S. V. Koshuba; A. A. Krasnov; N. Yu. Muchnoi; E. A. Perevedentsev; E. E. Pyata; P. Yu. Shatunov; Yu. M. Shatunov; D. B. Shwartz

    2013-10-29

    The beam energy measurement system for the VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider is described. The method of Compton backscattering of $CO$ laser photons on the electron beam is used. The relative systematic uncertainty of the beam energy determination is estimated as 6\\cdot10^{-5}. It was obtained through comparison of the results of the beam energy measurements using the Compton backscattering and resonance depolarization methods.

  6. Lifetime measurement of the 6.79 MeV state in {sup 15}O with the AGATA demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Depalo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Ur, C. A.; Bazzacco, D.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Erhard, M.; Farnea, E.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Keeley, N.; Lunardi, S.; Marta, M.; Mengoni, D.; Mijatovic, T.; Recchia, F.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Szuecs, T.; and others

    2012-11-20

    The {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction is the slowest process of the CN cycle, and thus it is of high astrophysical interest since it regulates the total rate of energy and neutrinos production through the cycle. The {sup 14}N+p ground state capture is strongly influenced by a sub-threshold resonance corresponding to the 6.79 MeV state in {sup 15}O. The width of this resonance is a major source of uncertainty in the extrapolation of the reaction cross section in the Gamow energy window. Preliminary results of a new Doppler Shift Attenuation measurement of the lifetime of the 6.79 MeV state in {sup 15}O are discussed. The level of interest was populated via the {sup 2}H({sup 14}N,n){sup 15}O reaction in inverse kinematics at 32 MeV beam energy. The gamma-rays emitted in the decay of the 6.79 MeV level to the ground state were detected with the AGATA Demonstrator array of high-purity germanium detectors. The sensitivity of the shape of the peak in the gamma-ray energy spectrum to the level lifetime is investigated comparing the experimental peaks with detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the reaction mechanisms and the gamma-ray emission and detection. Nuclear levels in {sup 15}N (also populated in the {sup 14}N+{sup 2}H reaction) for which the lifetimes are known in the literature provided a test of the analysis technique.

  7. Measurement of Local Partial Pressure of Oxygen in the Brain Tissue under Normoxia and Epilepsy with Phosphorescence Lifetime Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong; Bélanger, Samuel; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    In this work a method for measuring brain oxygen partial pressure with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy system is reported. When used in conjunction with a dendritic phosphorescent probe, Oxyphor G4, this system enabled minimally invasive measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution during 4-AP induced epileptic seizures. Investigating epileptic events, we characterized the spatio-temporal distribution of the "initial dip" in pO2 near the probe injection site and along nearby arterioles. Our results reveal a correlation between the percent change in the pO2 signal during the "initial dip" and the duration of seizure-like activity, which can help localize the epileptic focus and predict the length of seizure. PMID:26305777

  8. Characterization of biological materials by frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime measurements using ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, A.; Vitta, P.; Kuril?ik, N.; Jurš?nas, S.; Bakien?, E.

    2008-01-01

    Recently developed deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs) emit at wavelengths short enough to excitate fluorescence in most biological autofluorophores. We demonstrate the possibility of harmonical modulation of the output of group-III-nitride based UV LEDs ranging from 255 to 375 nm at frequencies up to 200 MHz. This enables the application of UV LEDs for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime sensing with subnanosecond resolution. We report on measurements of fluorescence decay time in common biofluorophores (tyrosine, tryptophan, NADPH, NADH, collagen, DPA, elastin and riboflavin) using commercially available UV LEDs. We demonstrate the capacity of a multichannel LED-based frequency-resolved measurement technique to discriminate between Bacillus globigii and a variety of ambient interferants such as diesel fuel, paper, cotton, dust, etc.

  9. Lifetime and performance of NSLS storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron light sources is measured primarily in terms of beam lifetime, beam size, and the recovery of normal operation after a section of the machine has been brought to atmospheric pressure. The beam lifetime and the beam size depend on the following phenomena: Beam gas interaction which can be either elastic or inelastic scattering on residual gas nuclei or electrons. With the exception of low energy machines, this phenomenon represents the main limiting factor on lifetime; Beam interaction with trapped ions causing both beam loss and defocussing. Residual gas molecules are ionized both by circulating beam and synchrotron radiation. The cross sections for both processes are comparable. The effects of this phenomenon are most troublesome at low energies. The problem can be eliminated by switching to positron beams. Installing clearing electrodes has also been successful; Intrabeam scattering (Touschek effect) is caused by Coulomb scattering among electrons of the same bunch as they execute betatron oscillations. The Touschek effect is strongly dependent on energy and in general is a problem only in low energy machines; and Various instabilities causing both slow and fast beam decay which have been observed in both NSLS rings. A special case due to dust particles that fall into the electron beam is commonly observed in early stages of conditioning. Coherent collective instabilities will not be discussed in this paper. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Measurement of the B+-_c Meson Lifetime Using B+-_c -> J/psi + l+- + X Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Hartz, Mark Patrick; /Pittsburgh U.

    2008-11-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the average proper decay time of the B{sub c}{sup {+-}} mesons, the ground state of bottom and charm quark bound states. The lifetime measurement is carried out in the decay modes B{sub c}{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi} + e{sup {+-}} + X and B{sub c}{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi} + {mu}{sup {+-}} + X, where the J/{psi} decays as J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and the X are unmeasured particles such as {nu}{sub e} or {nu}{sub {mu}}. The data are collect by the CDF II detector which measures the properties of particles created in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions delivered by the Fermilab Tevatron. This measurement uses {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured average proper decay time of B{sub c}{sup {+-}} mesons, {tau} = 0.475{sub -0.049}{sup +0.053}(stat.) {+-} 0.018(syst.) ps, is competitive with the most precise measurements in the world and confirms previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  11. Dynamics of collisions with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiol, J.; Macri, P.; Barrachina, R. O.

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of ionization by positron impact reveals that the maximum of the electron capture to the continuum cusp is shifted from its theoretical position. In this work the hypothesis that the observed effect is the result of an anisotropic momentum distribution in the projectile-electron reference system is considered. By elaborating on the ansatz that the cusp asymmetry is qualitatively similar for positron impact than the for ion-atom collisions, we obtain fully differential cross sections that show the same features than those experimentally observed. The present estimation for the position of the maximum agrees well with cross section measurements performed in coincident electron-positron detection experiments.

  12. Direct measurements of two photon exchange on lepton-proton elastic scattering using simultaneous electron-positron beams in CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adikaram, Dasuni Kalhari

    The electric (GE) and magnetic ( GM) form factors of the proton are fundamental observables which characterize its charge and magnetization distributions. There are two methods to measure the proton form factors: the Rosenbluth separation method and the polarization transfer technique. However, the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors measured by those methods significantly disagree at momentum transfer Q2 > 1 GeV2. The most likely explanation of this discrepancy is the inclusion of two-photon exchange (TPE) amplitude contributions to the elastic electron-proton cross section which significantly changes the extraction of GE from the Rosenbluth separation measurement. The Jefferson Lab CLAS TPE experiment determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections. The primary electron beam was used to create an intense bremsstrahlung photon beam. Some of the photons were then converted to a mixed e+/ e- beam which then interacted with a liquid hydrogen target. The e+p and e-p events were detected by the CLAS (CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer). The elastic cross section ratios ((sigma( e+p)/(sigma(e -p)) were measured over a wide range of virtual photon polarization epsilon and Q2. The cross section ratios displayed a strong epsilon dependence at Q2 = 1.45 GeV2. There is no significant Q2 dependence observed at epsilon = 0.45. The results are consistent with a recent measurement at the VEPP-3 lepton storage ring in Novosibirsk and with the hadronic calculation by Blunders, Melnitchouk and Tjon. The hadronic calculation resolves the disagreement between the Rosenbluth separation and polarization transfer extractions of GE/GM at Q2 up to 2 -- 3 GeV2. Applying the GLAS TPE correction to the Rosenbluth cross section measurements significantly decreases the extracted value of GE and brings it into good agreement with the polarization transfer measurement at Q2˜1.75 GeV2. Thus, these measurements appear to resolve the proton electric form factor discrepancy for Q2 < 2 GeV2.

  13. Microstructural probing of ferritic/martensitic steels using internal transmutation-based positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krsjak, Vladimir; Dai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the use of an internal 44Ti/44Sc radioisotope source for a direct microstructural characterization of ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steels after irradiation in targets of spallation neutron sources. Gamma spectroscopy measurements show a production of ?1MBq of 44Ti per 1 g of f/m steels irradiated at 1 dpa (displaced per atom) in the mixed proton-neutron spectrum at the Swiss spallation neutron source (SINQ). In the decay chain 44Ti ? 44Sc ? 44Ca, positrons are produced together with prompt gamma rays which enable the application of different positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) analyses, including lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Due to the high production yield, long half-life and relatively high energy of positrons of 44Ti, this methodology opens up new potential for simple, effective and inexpensive characterization of radiation induced defects in f/m steels irradiated in a spallation target.

  14. Probing Positron Gravitation at HERA

    E-print Network

    Vahagn Gharibyan

    2015-07-06

    An equality of particle and antiparticle gravitational interactions holds in general relativity and is supported by indirect observations. Here I develop a method based on high energy Compton scattering to measure the gravitational interaction of accelerated charged particles. Within that formalism the Compton spectra measured at HERA rule out the positron's anti-gravity and hint for a positron's 1.3(0.2)\\% weaker coupling to the gravitational field relative to an electron.

  15. Probing Positron Gravitation at HERA

    E-print Network

    Gharibyan, Vahagn

    2015-01-01

    An equality of particle and antiparticle gravitational interactions holds in general relativity and is supported by indirect observations. Here I develop a method based on high energy Compton scattering to measure the gravitational interaction of accelerated charged particles. Within that formalism the Compton spectra measured at HERA rule out the positron's anti-gravity and hint for a positron's 1.3(0.2)\\% weaker coupling to the gravitational field relative to an electron.

  16. Wizard---An experiment to measure the cosmic rays including anto-protons, positrons, nuclei and to conduct a search for primordial antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Wizard Science Team; Golden, R.L. )

    1990-03-20

    The WiZard experiment will utilize the Astromag magnet facility onboard space station Freedom to explore the composition and energy spectra of low-Z comsic rays. Particular emphasis will be placed on a search for primordial antimatter and measurement of antiproton and positron fluxes at energies up to 400 GeV. In this paper we present the scientific goals and rationale; we describe the experimental method and summarize the present status of the WiZard project.

  17. Measurement of inclusive ? production in electron-positron interactions at the upsilon energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, A. E.; Blinov, V. E.; Bondar, A. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Groshev, V. R.; Klimenko, S. G.; Onuchin, A. P.; Panin, V. S.; Protopopov, I. Ya.; Shamov, A. G.; Sidorov, V. A.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Tayursky, V. A.; Telnov, V. I.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Tumaikin, G. M.; Undrus, A. E.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Zhilich, V. N.

    1994-09-01

    Using the MD-1 detector at the VEPP-4 e + e - strorage ring we have measured the inclusive ? and 370-1 production rates in direct ?(1S) decays 10052_2005_Article_BF01555896_TeX2GIFE1.gif begin{gathered} left< {n_? (Upsilon (1S)_{dir} )} rightrangle = 0.194 ± 0.018 ± 0.017, \\ left< {n_? - (Upsilon (1S)_{dir} )} rightrangle = 0.038 ± 0.015 ± 0.009. \\ The ? momentum spectrum in direct ?(1S) decays was obtained. We have measured also the inclusive ? production rate in the continuum at center of mass energies between 7.2 and 10.0 GeV 10052_2005_Article_BF01555896_TeX2GIFE2.gif left< {n_? (cont.)} rightrangle = 0.076 ± 0.018 ± 0.015. In the range of cms energies between 7.2 and 9.4 GeV this measurement was performed for the first time.

  18. Conforming the measured lifetimes of the $5d \\ ^2D_{3/2,5/2}$ states in Cs with theory

    E-print Network

    Sahoo, B K

    2015-01-01

    We find very good agreement between our theoretically evaluated lifetimes of the $5d \\ ^2D_{3/2}$ and $5d \\ ^2D_{5/2}$ states of Cs with the experimental values reported in [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 57}, 4204 (1998)], which were earlier evinced to be disagreeing with an earlier rigorous theoretical study [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 69}, 040501(R) (2004)] and with another precise measurement [Opt. Lett. {\\bf 21}, 74 (1996)]. In this work, we have carried out calculations of the radiative transition matrix elements using many variants of relativistic many-body methods, mainly in the coupled-cluster theory framework, and analyze propagation of the electron correlation effects to elucidate their roles for accurate evaluations of the matrix elements. We also demonstrate contributions explicitly from the Dirac-Coulomb interactions, frequency independent Breit interaction and lower order quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects. Uncertainties to these matrix elements due to different possible sources of errors are estimated. By combin...

  19. Lifetime and collisional quenching measurements of XeF*(B) by photolysis of XeF2.

    PubMed

    Eden, J G; Waynant, R W

    1978-01-01

    By photolyzing XeF 2 using ArCl* 175-nm radiation, the spontaneous radiative lifetime of the XeF(B --> X) band has been measured to be 14.25 + 0.2 nsec. Also, the rates of two-body collisional deactivation of the XeF(B) state by Ne, Ar, and XeF 2 have been determined to be 7.7 X 10(-13) cm3 sec(-1), 4.9 X 10(-12) cm3 sec(-1), and 2.6 X 10(-10) cm3 sec(-1), respectively. A three-body quenching rate of 7.2 X 10(-32) cm6 sec(-1) was found for Ar. The large two- and three-body quenching rates of XeF* by Ar suggest that Ne may be preferable to Ar as a diluent in high-pressure XeF (350-nm) laser mixtures. PMID:19680390

  20. A measurement of the response of an SCG1-C scintillation glass shower detector to 2-17.5 GeV positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.; Hale, G.; Mazur, P. O.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Areti, H.; Conetti, S.; Lebrun, P.; Ryan, T.; Brau, J. E.

    1983-04-01

    The response of an electromagnetic shower counter constructed from the new scintillation glass (SCG1-C, Ohara Optical Glass, Inc.) to positrons in the energy range 2 to 17.5 GeV was measured. The energy resolution of this 18.4 radiation length detector plus its attendant SF5 lead glass shower counter array was measured to be sigma/E = (1.64 plus or minus 0.14)% + (1.13 plus or minus 0.33)%/, square root of E with the constant term dominated by variations in the conversion point of the positron and shower leakage. This counter was found to be linear over the energy range examined. Also measured was the light output of the SCG1-C counter relative to light output of the SF5 lead glass guard blocks using 17.5 GeV positrons. It was found that the sOG1-C counter produces 5.10 plus or minus 0.30 more light at the phototube than the SF5 lead glass counters.

  1. A measurement of the response of an SCG1-C scintillation glass shower detector to 2 17.5 GeV positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.; Hale, G.; Mazur, P. O.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Areti, H.; Conetti, S.; Lebrun, P.; Ryan, T.; Brau, J. E.; Gearhart, R. A.

    1984-02-01

    We have measured the response of an electromagnetic shower counter constructed from the new scintillation glass (SCG1-C, Ohara Optical Glass, Inc.) to positrons in the energy range 2 to 17.5 GeV. We have measured the energy resolution of this 18.4 radiation length detector plus its attendant SF5 lead glass shower counter array to be ?/ E = (1.64±0.14)%+(1.13±0.33)%/? E with the constant term dominated by variations in the variations in the conversion point of the positron and shower leakage. We found this counter to be linear over the energy range examined. We have also measured the light output of the SCG1-C counter relative to light output of the SF5 lead glass guard blocks using 17.5 GeV positrons. We find that the SCG1-C counter produces 5.10±0.30 more light at the phototube than the SF5 lead glass counters.

  2. Measurement of the B?s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B?s ? D?s ???X

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.? M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.? S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.? P.; Alexeev, G.? D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.? V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.? F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.? B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.? C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.? E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X.? B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.? P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B.? C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.? M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.? W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.? E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S.? J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.? P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.? T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.? F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.? V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.? D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.? N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.? E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P.? H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J.? A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.? E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P.? D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M.? W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.? M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A.? P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.? D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.? D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.? L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.? S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.? S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.? W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.? N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.? M.; Kozelov, A.? V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V.? A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.? S.; Lee, S.? W.; Lee, W.? M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.? Z.; Lim, J.? K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.? V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.? L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.? L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.? L.; Meijer, M.? M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.? G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.? K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.? A.; Negret, J.? P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.? T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.? K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V.? M.; Popov, A.? V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.? N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M.? P.; Santos, A.? S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.? D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.? A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G.? R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D.? A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.? V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W.? M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.? W.; Vasilyev, I.? A.; Verkheev, A.? Y.; Vertogradov, L.? S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.

    2015-02-09

    We present an updated measurement of the B?s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B?s ? D?s ???X, with D?s ? ??? and ? ? K?K? (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?1. We find a flavor-specifc lifetime Tfs(B?s) = 1.479 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B? lifetime using the analogous B? ? D????X decay with D? ? ??? and ? ? K?K? , yielding T(B?) = 1.534 ± 0.019 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B?s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio Tfs(B?s)/T(B?) = 0.964 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst).

  3. Measurement of the B?s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B?s ? D?s ???X

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V.? M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.? S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.? P.; Alexeev, G.? D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-02-09

    We present an updated measurement of the B?s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B?s ? D?s ???X, with D?s ? ??? and ? ? K?K? (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?1. We find a flavor-specifc lifetime Tfs(B?s) = 1.479 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B? lifetime using the analogous B? ? D????X decay with D? ? ??? and ? ? K?K? , yielding T(B?) = 1.534 ±more »0.019 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B?s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio Tfs(B?s)/T(B?) = 0.964 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst).« less

  4. Measurement of the B(s)(0) lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B(s)(0)?D(s)(-)?(+)?X.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Borysova, M; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gogota, O; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kur?a, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Savitskyi, M; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2015-02-13

    We present an updated measurement of the B(s)(0) lifetime using the semileptonic decays B(s)(0)?D(s)(-)?(+)?X, with D(s)(-)???(-) and ??K(+)K(-) (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?[s]=1.96??TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4??fb(-1). We find a flavor-specific lifetime ?(fs)(B(s)(0))=1.479±0.010(stat)±0.021(syst)??ps. This technique is also used to determine the B(0) lifetime using the analogous B(0)?D(-)?(+)?X decay with D(-)???(-) and ??K(+)K(-), yielding ?(B(0))=1.534±0.019(stat)±0.021(syst)??ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B(s)(0) lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio ?(fs)(B(s)(0))/?(B(0))=0.964±0.013(stat)±0.007(syst). PMID:25723207

  5. Measurement of the lifetime of the Bc+ meson using the Bc+ ? J / ??+ decay mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R. C. M.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.

    2015-03-01

    The difference in total widths between the Bc+ ?and B+?mesons is measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0fb-1? collected by the LHCb experiment in 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy proton-proton collisions at the LHC. Through the study of the time evolution of Bc+ ? J / ??+ and B+ ? J / ?K+ decays, the width difference is measured to be

  6. Lifetime measurements of triaxial strongly deformed bands in {sup 163}Tm.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Moore, E. F.; Garg, U.; Gu, Y.; Frauendorf, S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Ghugre, S. S.; Hammond, N. J.; Lauritsen, T.; Li, T.; Mukherjee, G.; Pattabiraman, N. S.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Physics; Univ. of Notre Dame; Kolkata Center

    2007-06-21

    With the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, quadrupole transition moments Qt were determined for the two recently proposed triaxial strongly deformed (TSD) bands in {sup 163}Tm. The measured Qt values indicate that the deformation of these bands is larger than that of the yrast signature partners. However, the measured values are smaller than those predicted by theory. This observation appears to be valid for TSD bands in several nuclei of the region.

  7. Lifetime measurements of triaxial strongly deformed bands in {sup 163}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Moore, E. F.; Carpenter, M. P.; Hammond, N. J.; Lauritsen, T.; Mukherjee, G.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Garg, U.; Gu, Y.; Frauendorf, S.; Li, T.; Ghugre, S. S.; Pattabiraman, N. S.

    2007-06-15

    With the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, quadrupole transition moments Q{sub t} were determined for the two recently proposed triaxial strongly deformed (TSD) bands in {sup 163}Tm. The measured Q{sub t} values indicate that the deformation of these bands is larger than that of the yrast signature partners. However, the measured values are smaller than those predicted by theory. This observation appears to be valid for TSD bands in several nuclei of the region.

  8. Low Energy Positron Scattering from Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Emma; Boadle, Roisin; Machacek, Joshua; Makochekanwa, Casten; Mueller, Dennis; Sullivan, James; Buckman, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    As the simplest homonuclear diatomic molecule, molecular hydrogen is an attractive target for fundamental measurements of positron interactions, and comparisons of these measurements with the best contemporary scattering theory. Using a low-energy, high-resolution positron beam, measurements have been taken of positron scattering from molecular hydrogen between 1 and 200 eV. Total scattering, total elastic scattering, and positronium formation cross sections will be presented, as will as a range of elastic differential cross sections. Comparisons will be made with previous positron and electron scattering measurements and theoretical calculations.

  9. Measurement of the B0s Lifetime in the Flavor-Specific Decay Channel B0s?D?s?+?X

    E-print Network

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2015-02-09

    We present an updated measurement of the B0s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B0s?D?s?+?X, with D?s???? and ??K+K? (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at s...

  10. Substance Abuse among High-Risk Sexual Offenders: Do Measures of Lifetime History of Substance Abuse Add to the Prediction of Recidivism over Actuarial Risk Assessment Instruments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looman, Jan; Abracen, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    There has been relatively little research on the degree to which measures of lifetime history of substance abuse add to the prediction of risk based on actuarial measures alone among sexual offenders. This issue is of relevance in that a history of substance abuse is related to relapse to substance using behavior. Furthermore, substance use has…

  11. Positron clouds within thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.; Smith, David M.; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Kelley, Nicole A.; Lowell, Alexander W.; Schaal, Meagan M.; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2015-08-01

    We report the observation of two isolated clouds of positrons inside an active thunderstorm. These observations were made by the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of six gamma-ray detectors, which flew on a Gulfstream V jet aircraft through the top of an active thunderstorm in August 2009. ADELE recorded two 511 keV gamma-ray count rate enhancements, 35 s apart, each lasting approximately 0.2 s. The enhancements, which were approximately a factor of 12 above background, were both accompanied by electrical activity as measured by a flat-plate antenna on the underside of the aircraft. The energy spectra were consistent with a source mostly composed of positron annihilation gamma rays, with a prominent 511 keV line clearly visible in the data. Model fits to the data suggest that the aircraft was briefly immersed in clouds of positrons, more than a kilometre across. It is not clear how the positron clouds were created within the thunderstorm, but it is possible they were caused by the presence of the aircraft in the electrified environment.

  12. Positron clouds within thunderstorms

    E-print Network

    Dwyer, Joseph R; Hazelton, Bryna J; Grefenstette, Brian W; Kelley, Nicole A; Lowell, Alexander W; Schaal, Meagan M; Rassoul, Hamid K

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of two isolated clouds of positrons inside an active thunderstorm. These observations were made by the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of six gamma-ray detectors, which flew on a Gulfstream V jet aircraft through the top of an active thunderstorm in August 2009. ADELE recorded two 511 keV gamma-ray count rate enhancements, 35 seconds apart, each lasting approximately 0.2 seconds. The enhancements, which were about a factor of 12 above background, were both accompanied by electrical activity as measured by a flat-plate antenna on the underside of the aircraft. The energy spectra were consistent with a source mostly composed of positron annihilation gamma rays, with a prominent 511 keV line clearly visible in the data. Model fits to the data suggest that the aircraft was briefly immersed in clouds of positrons, more than a kilometer across. It is not clear how the positron clouds were created within the thunderstorm, but it is possible they were ca...

  13. Lifetime measurement of the cesium 6P{sub 3/2} state using ultrafast laser-pulse excitation and ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Sell, J. F.; Patterson, B. M.; Ehrenreich, T.; Brooke, G.; Scoville, J.; Knize, R. J.

    2011-07-15

    We report a precision measurement of the cesium 6P{sub 3/2} excited-state lifetime. Two collimated, counterpropagating thermal Cs beams cross perpendicularly to femtosecond pulsed laser beams. High timing accuracy is achieved from having excitation and ionization laser pulses which originate from the same mode-locked laser. Using pulse selection we vary the separation in time between excitation and ionization laser pulses while counting the ions produced. We obtain a Cs 6P{sub 3/2} lifetime of 30.460(38) ns, which is a factor of two improvement from previous measurements and with an uncertainty of 0.12%, is one of the most accurate lifetime measurements on record.

  14. Positronics of subnanometer atomistic imperfections in solids as a high-informative structure characterization tool.

    PubMed

    Shpotyuk, Oleh; Filipecki, Jacek; Ingram, Adam; Golovchak, Roman; Vakiv, Mykola; Klym, Halyna; Balitska, Valentyna; Shpotyuk, Mykhaylo; Kozdras, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Methodological possibilities of positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy applied to characterize different types of nanomaterials treated within three-term fitting procedure are critically reconsidered. In contrast to conventional three-term analysis based on admixed positron- and positronium-trapping modes, the process of nanostructurization is considered as substitutional positron-positronium trapping within the same host matrix. Developed formalism allows estimate interfacial void volumes responsible for positron trapping and characteristic bulk positron lifetimes in nanoparticle-affected inhomogeneous media. This algorithm was well justified at the example of thermally induced nanostructurization occurring in 80GeSe2-20Ga2Se3 glass. PMID:25852373

  15. Positronics of subnanometer atomistic imperfections in solids as a high-informative structure characterization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, Oleh; Filipecki, Jacek; Ingram, Adam; Golovchak, Roman; Vakiv, Mykola; Klym, Halyna; Balitska, Valentyna; Shpotyuk, Mykhaylo; Kozdras, Andrzej

    2015-02-01

    Methodological possibilities of positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy applied to characterize different types of nanomaterials treated within three-term fitting procedure are critically reconsidered. In contrast to conventional three-term analysis based on admixed positron- and positronium-trapping modes, the process of nanostructurization is considered as substitutional positron-positronium trapping within the same host matrix. Developed formalism allows estimate interfacial void volumes responsible for positron trapping and characteristic bulk positron lifetimes in nanoparticle-affected inhomogeneous media. This algorithm was well justified at the example of thermally induced nanostructurization occurring in 80GeSe2-20Ga2Se3 glass.

  16. Stability of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in the normal brain measured by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, J.L.; Strother, S.C.; Zatorre, R.J.; Alivisatos, B.; Worsley, K.J.; Diksic, M.; Yamamoto, Y.L.

    1988-05-01

    Cerebral glucose utilization (LCMRGI) was measured using the (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose method with PET in two groups of ten healthy young volunteers, each scanned in a resting state under different methodological conditions. In addition, five subjects had a second scan within 48 hr. Mean hemispheric values averaged 45.8 +/- 3.3 mumol/100 g/min in the right cerebral hemisphere and 47.0 +/- 3.7 mumol/100 g/min in the left hemisphere. A four-way analysis of variance (group, sex, region, hemisphere) was carried out on the results using three different methods of data manipulation: (a) the raw values of glucose utilization, (b) LCMRGI values normalized by the mean hemispheric gray matter LCMRGI value, and (c) log transformed LCMRGI values. For all analysis techniques, significantly higher LCMRGI values were consistently seen in the left mid and posterior temporal area and caudate nucleus relative to the right, and in the right occipital region relative to the left. The coefficient of variation of intrasubject regional differences (9.9%) was significantly smaller than the coefficient of variation for regions between subjects (16.5%). No differences were noted between the sexes and no effect of repeat procedures was seen in subjects having multiple scans. In addition, inter-regional LCMRGI correlations were examined both in values from the 20 normal subjects, as well as in a set of hypothetical abnormal values. Results were compared with those reported from other PET centers; despite certain methodological differences, the intersubject and inter-regional variation of LCMRGI is fairly constant.

  17. Positron studies of defects in ion-implanted SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, G.; Anwand, W.; Plazaola, F.; Pacaud, Y.; Skorupa, W.; Stoermer, J.; Willutzki, P.

    1996-08-01

    Radiation damage caused by the implantation of 200 keV Ge{sup +} ions into 6H-SiC has been studied by monoenergetic positron Doppler broadening and lifetime techniques. Specimens exposed to seven ion fluences ranging from 10{sup 16} to 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2}, together with unirradiated samples, were studied. The depth of the damaged crystalline layer was found to range from about 300 to 600 nm and, for ion fluences above 3{times}10{sup 17} m{sup {minus}2}, an amorphous layer is seen whose thickness increases to 133 nm at the highest fluence. Positron lifetime measurements, in combination with theoretical calculations, suggest that the main defect produced is the divacancy, but that Si monovacancies are also created. In the amorphous surface layer larger agglomerates consisting of at least four but more probably six vacancies are detected. Trapping rates are evaluated as a function of incident positron energy by applying the positron trapping model to the data. Values for defect concentrations in the damaged layers of about 50 ppm are deduced by invoking plausible assumptions; the problem of extracting defect profiles from the data is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Light-addressable measurements of cellular oxygen consumption rates in microwell arrays based on phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Hsu, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Chih-Wei; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2012-01-01

    A digital light modulation system that utilizes a modified commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) projector, which is equipped with a UV light-emitting diode as a light modulation source, has been developed to spatially direct excited light toward a microwell array device to detect the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of single cells via phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection. The microwell array device is composed of a combination of two components: an array of glass microwells containing Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) as the oxygen-sensitive luminescent layer and a microfluidic module with pneumatically actuated glass lids set above the microwells to controllably seal the microwells of interest. By controlling the illumination pattern on the DMD, the modulated excitation light can be spatially projected to only excite the sealed microwell for cellular OCR measurements. The OCR of baby hamster kidney-21 fibroblast cells cultivated on the PtOEP layer within a sealed microwell has been successfully measured at 104?±?2.96 amol s(-1) cell(-1). Repeatable and consistent measurements indicate that the oxygen measurements did not adversely affect the physiological state of the measured cells. The OCR of the cells exhibited a good linear relationship with the diameter of the microwells, ranging from 400 to 1000??m and containing approximately 480 to 1200 cells within a microwell. In addition, the OCR variation of single cells in situ infected by Dengue virus with a different multiplicity of infection was also successfully measured in real-time. This proposed platform provides the potential for a wide range of biological applications in cell-based biosensing, toxicology, and drug discovery. PMID:24348889

  19. Light-addressable measurements of cellular oxygen consumption rates in microwell arrays based on phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Hsu, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Chih-Wei; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2012-01-01

    A digital light modulation system that utilizes a modified commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) projector, which is equipped with a UV light-emitting diode as a light modulation source, has been developed to spatially direct excited light toward a microwell array device to detect the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of single cells via phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection. The microwell array device is composed of a combination of two components: an array of glass microwells containing Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) as the oxygen-sensitive luminescent layer and a microfluidic module with pneumatically actuated glass lids set above the microwells to controllably seal the microwells of interest. By controlling the illumination pattern on the DMD, the modulated excitation light can be spatially projected to only excite the sealed microwell for cellular OCR measurements. The OCR of baby hamster kidney-21 fibroblast cells cultivated on the PtOEP layer within a sealed microwell has been successfully measured at 104?±?2.96 amol s?1 cell?1. Repeatable and consistent measurements indicate that the oxygen measurements did not adversely affect the physiological state of the measured cells. The OCR of the cells exhibited a good linear relationship with the diameter of the microwells, ranging from 400 to 1000??m and containing approximately 480 to 1200 cells within a microwell. In addition, the OCR variation of single cells in situ infected by Dengue virus with a different multiplicity of infection was also successfully measured in real-time. This proposed platform provides the potential for a wide range of biological applications in cell-based biosensing, toxicology, and drug discovery. PMID:24348889

  20. Fast-timing lifetime measurements of excited states in Cu67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NiÅ£?, C. R.; Bucurescu, D.; M?rginean, N.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bocchi, G.; Bottoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Bruce, A. M.; C?ta-Danil, G.; Coló, G.; Deleanu, D.; Filipescu, D.; GhiÅ£?, D. G.; Glodariu, T.; Leoni, S.; Mihai, C.; Mason, P. J. R.; M?rginean, R.; Negret, A.; Pantelic?, D.; Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P. H.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Toma, S.; Ur, C. A.; Wilson, E.

    2014-06-01

    The half-lives of the 9/2+, 13/2+, and 15/2+ yrast states in the neutron-rich Cu67 nucleus were determined by using the in-beam fast-timing technique. The experimentally deduced E3 transition strength for the decay of the 9/2+ level to the 3/2- ground state indicates that the wave function of this level might contain a collective component arising from the coupling of the odd proton p3/2 with the 3- state in Ni66. Theoretical interpretations of the 9/2+ state are presented within the particle-vibration weak-coupling scheme involving the unpaired proton and the 3- state from Ni66 and within shell-model calculations with a Ni56 core using the jj44b residual interaction. The shell model also accounts reasonably well for the other measured electromagnetic transition probabilities.

  1. DSA lifetime measurements of 124Cs and the time-reversal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodner, E.; Pasternak, A. A.; Srebrny, J.; Kowalczyk, M.; Mierzejewski, J.; Kisieli?ski, M.; Decowski, P.; Droste, Ch; Perkowski, J.; Abraham, T.; Andrzejewski, J.; Hady?ska-Kl?k, K.; Janiak, ?.; Kasparek, A.; Marchlewski, T.; Napiorkowski, P.; Samorajczyk, J.

    2012-09-01

    A hypothesis of the chiral symmetry breaking opened a new opportunity for the study of spontaneous time-reversal symmetry breaking in an atomic nucleus. The occurence of chirality has been found in 126,128Cs nuclei for which specific electromagnetic selection rules have been found in Doppler Shift Attenuation experiments. Here, recent DSA measurements in the 124Cs nucleus are presented. The 124Cs nucleus was produced in the 114Cd(14N,4n)124Cs reaction at Heavy Ion Laboratory of the University of Warsaw. The obtained results agree with basic expectations deduced from the chiral symmetry breaking. A connection between the chirality phenomenon and the time-reversal symmetry is discussed and a possibility of using chiral doublets for studies of fundamental time reversal symmetry is suggested.

  2. In-situ characterization of free-volume holes in polymer thin films under controlled humidity conditions with an atmospheric positron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Wei; Oshima, Nagayasu; O'Rourke, Brian E.; Kuroda, Ryunosuke; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Chen Zhe; Ito, Kenji; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Takuro; Uedono, Akira; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu

    2012-07-02

    A pulsed, slow positron beam, with a diameter of 200 {mu}m, was extracted into air through a thin SiN window of an atmospheric positron probe microanalyzer (PPMA), and used to measure the ortho-positronium lifetimes {tau} in polyvinyl alcohol and polycaprolactam sub-{mu}m-thick films. By measuring the variation of {tau} as a function of relative humidity, the effect of water molecules on the hole sizes, deduced from {tau}, was examined for the films with consideration to the chain mobility. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the atmospheric PPMA to the in-situ characterization of nanoscopic holes in thin films under practical conditions.

  3. Time dependent diffusion and annihilation of positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, D.T. )

    1991-02-01

    The time-dependent diffusion equation of positrons implanted epithermally in a semi-infinite solid has been solved using a Green's function method. Subsequent lifetime spectra, deriving from the annihilation of free thermal and surface trapped positrons, and from para-Ps, have been modeled. The resulting curves resemble a sum of two exponential components. Because of the very short times involved, the contribution due to non-thermal positrons reaching the surface is much less significant than for steady-state models. At room temperature reflection of thermal positrons at the surface has very little effect on the solution to the diffusion equation. For strongly reflecting surfaces the sink and annihilation rates are qualitatively similar to those for a transparent surface, although strongly reduced.

  4. Measurement of D-D-bar mixing using the ratio of lifetimes for the decays D-->K- pi + and K+K-

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Peter H.

    We measure the rate of D0-D[over-bar] 0 mixing with the observable yCP=(?Kpi/?KK)-1, where ?KK and ?Kpi are, respectively, the mean lifetimes of CP-even D0-->K+K- and CP-mixed D0-->K-pi+ decays, using a data sample of ...

  5. Effective lifetime measurements in the B[0 over s]--> K+K?, B[superscript 0]-->K+?? and B[0 over s]-->?+K? decays

    E-print Network

    LHCb collaboration

    Measurements of the effective lifetimes in the B[0 over s]?K+K?, B0?K+??B[superscript 0]?K+?? and B[0 over s]??+K? decays are presented using 1.0 fb?11.0 fb[superscript ?1] of pp collision data collected at a centre-of-mass ...

  6. Collinear Laser-Beam Ion-Beam Measurement of the Mean Lifetime of the Ar Ii 4p'2f-Degrees-7/2 Level 

    E-print Network

    Jin, J.; Church, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The mean lifetime tau of the 4p'F-2(7/2)-degrees level of Ar II has been measured using a variant of the collinear laser-beam-fast-ion-beam spectroscopy technique. Our variant requires no mechanical motion or laser frequency tuning. The result...

  7. USING A 100 KV DC LOAD LOCK PHOTOGUN TO MEASURE PHOTOCATHODE LIFETIME OF HIGH POLARIZATION STRAINED SUPERLATTICE GAAS/GAASP AT BEAM INTENSITY >1 MILLIAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames; Benard Poelker; Philip Adderley; Joshua Brittian; James Clark; John Hansknecht; Danny Machie; Marcy Stutzman; Kenneth Surles-law; Riad Suleiman

    2007-07-02

    A new GaAs DC high voltage load lock photogun has been constructed at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), with improved vacuum and photocathode preparation capabilities. As reported previously, this gun was used to study photocathode lifetime with bulk GaAs at DC beam currents between 1 and 10 mA. In this submission, lifetime measurements were performed using high polarization strained-superlattice GaAs photocathode material at beam currents up to 1 mA, with near bandgap light from a fiber based drive laser having picosecond optical pulses and RF time structure.

  8. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarized positron beam at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bo?d, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bo?d, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kota?ski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perla?ski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluci?ski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycie?, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; S?omi?ski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; ?arnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarized positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d?/dQ2, d?/dx and d?/dy and the reduced cross section ?˜ are measured in the kinematic region Q2>185GeV2 and y<0.9, where Q2 is the four-momentum transfer squared, x the Bjorken scaling variable and y the inelasticity of the interaction. The measurements are performed separately for positively and negatively polarized positron beams. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 135.5pb-1 collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007 at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F˜3 and F3?Z are determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

  9. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    E-print Network

    ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; P. Antonioli; A. Antonov; M. Arneodo; O. Arslan; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. Bamberger; A. N. Barakbaev; G. Barbagli; G. Bari; F. Barreiro; N. Bartosik; D. Bartsch; M. Basile; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; L. Bellagamba; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; M. Bindi; C. Blohm; V. Bokhonov; T. Bold; K. Bondarenko; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; D. Boscherini; D. Bot; I. Brock; E. Brownson; R. Brugnera; N. Brummer; A. Bruni; G. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; B. Bylsma; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; R. Carlin; C. D. Catterall; S. Chekanov; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; A. Contin; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; N. Coppola; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; M. Costa; G. D'Agostini; F. Dal Corso; J. del Peso; R. K. Dementiev; S. De Pasquale; M. Derrick; R. C. E. Devenish; D. Dobur; B. A. Dolgoshein; G. Dolinska; A. T. Doyle; V. Drugakov; L. S. Durkin; S. Dusini; Y. Eisenberg; P. F. Ermolov; A. Eskreys; S. Fang; S. Fazio; J. Ferrando; M. I. Ferrero; J. Figiel; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Galas; E. Gallo; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; I. Gialas; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; D. Gladkov; C. Glasman; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; P. Gottlicher; I. Grabowska-Bold; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grigorescu; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; C. Gwenlan; T. Haas; W. Hain; R. Hamatsu; J. C. Hart; H. Hartmann; G. Hartner; E. Hilger; D. Hochman; R. Hori; A. Huttmann; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; R. Ingbir; M. Ishitsuka; H. -P. Jakob; F. Januschek; T. W. Jones; M. Jungst; I. Kadenko; B. Kahle; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; F. Karstens; I. I. Katkov; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; A. Keramidas; L. A. Khein; J. Y. Kim; D. Kisielewska; S. Kitamura; R. Klanner; U. Klein; E. Koffeman; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononenko; P. Kooijman; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; A. Lee; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; T. Y. Ling; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; K. R. Long; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; S. Magill; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; R. Mankel; A. Margotti; G. Marini; J. F. Martin; A. Mastroberardino; M. C. K. Mattingly; I. -A. Melzer-Pellmann; S. Mergelmeyer; S. Miglioranzi; F. Mohamad Idris; V. Monaco; A. Montanari; J. D. Morris; K. Mujkic; B. Musgrave; K. Nagano; T. Namsoo; R. Nania; A. Nigro; Y. Ning; T. Nobe; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; A. E. Nuncio-Quiroz; B. Y. Oh; N. Okazaki; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; K. Papageorgiu; A. Parenti; E. Paul; J. M. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; P. G. Pelfer; A. Pellegrino; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; K. Piotrzkowski; P. Plucinski; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. Polini; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; D. D. Reeder; B. Reisert; Z. Ren; J. Repond; Y. D. Ri; A. Robertson; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; R. Sacchi; U. Samson; G. Sartorelli; A. A. Savin; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; S. Schlenstedt; P. Schleper; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; V. Schonberg; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; F. Sciulli; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shehzadi; S. Shimizu; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; W. H. Smith; V. Sola; A. Solano; D. Son; V. Sosnovtsev; A. Spiridonov; H. Stadie; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; A. Stifutkin; P. Stopa; S. Suchkov; G. Susinno; L. Suszycki; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; A. D. Tapper; E. Tassi; J. Terron; T. Theedt; H. Tiecke; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; M. Vazquez; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; N. N. Vlasov; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; J. J. Whitmore; K. Wichmann; L. Wiggers; M. Wing; M. Wlasenko; G. Wolf; H. Wolfe; K. Wrona; A. G. Yagues-Molina; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; R. Yoshida; C. Youngman; O. Zabiegalov; A. F. . Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; W. Zeuner; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; A. Zichichi; Z. Zolkapli; D. S. Zotkin

    2014-05-12

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d(sigma)/dQ2, d(sigma)/dx and d(sigma)/dy and the reduced cross-section were measured in the kinematic region Q2 > 185 GeV2 and y < 0.9, where Q2 is the four-momentum transfer squared, x the Bjorken scaling variable, and y the inelasticity of the interaction. The measurements were performed separately for positively and negatively polarised positron beams. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb-1 collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F3 and F3(gamma)Z were determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

  10. Direct measurement of rotationally resolved H2 Q-branch Raman coherence lifetimes using time-resolved picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Hsu, Paul S.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Gord, James R.; Roy, Sukesh

    2010-08-01

    We report direct measurement of H2 Q-branch Raman coherence lifetimes using time-resolved picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ps-CARS). A custom-built, high-peak-power, nearly transform-limited ps laser system offers an ideal combination of frequency and temporal resolution for such measurements. The coherence lifetimes measured for pure H2 at room temperature are in good agreement with decay rates that were derived from previous high-resolution studies. Measurements were also performed in binary mixtures of H2-X (X=Ar, N2, CH4, and C2H4). These measurements can be useful for accurate H2 ps-CARS thermometry as well as for studying various H2 collisional energy-transfer processes.

  11. Multicompartmental analysis of (/sup 11/C)-carfentanil binding to opiate receptors in humans measured by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Douglass, K.H.; Mayberg, H.S.; Dannals, R.F.; Links, J.M.; Wilson, A.A.; Ravert, H.T.; Crozier, W.C.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1989-06-01

    (11C)-Carfentanil is a high affinity opiate agonist that can be used to localize mu opiate receptors in humans by positron emission tomography (PET). A four-compartment model was used to obtain quantitative estimates of rate constants for receptor association and dissociation. PET studies were performed in five normal subjects in the absence and presence of 1 mg/kg naloxone. Arterial plasma concentration of (11C)-carfentanil and its labeled metabolites were determined during each PET study. The value of k3/k4 = Bmax/kD was determined for each subject in the presence and absence of naloxone. There was a significant reduction in the value of k3/k4 from 3.4 +/- 0.92 to 0.26 +/- 0.13 in the thalamus (p less than 0.01) and from 1.8 +/- 0.33 to 0.16 +/- 0.065 in the frontal cortex (p less than 0.001). Mean values of frontal cortex/occipital cortex and thalamus/occipital cortex ratios were determined for the interval 35-70 min after injection when receptor binding is high relative to nonspecific binding. The relationship between the measured region/occipital cortex values and the corresponding values of k3/k4 in the presence and absence of naloxone was: regions/occipital cortex = 0.95 + 0.74 (k3/k4) with r = 0.98 (n = 20). Simulation studies also demonstrated a linear relationship between the thalamus/occipital cortex or frontal cortex/occipital cortex ratio and k3/k4 for less than twofold increases or decreases in k3/k4. Simulation studies in which thalamic blood flow was varied demonstrated no significant effect on the region/occipital cortex ratio at 35-70 min for a twofold increase or fourfold decrease in blood flow. Therefore, the region/occipital cortex ratio can be used to quantitate changes in k3/k4 when tracer kinetic modeling is not feasible.

  12. Lifetime Measurements of the Neutron-Rich N=30 Isotones {sup 50}Ca and {sup 51}Sc: Orbital Dependence of Effective Charges in the fp Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Recchia, F.; Corradi, L.; Angelis, G. de; Fioretto, E.; Gottardo, A.; Grodner, E.; Guiot, B.; Mason, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Sahin, E.; Silvestri, R.; Stefanini, A. M.; Mengoni, D.; Lenzi, S. M.; Lunardi, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Maglione, E.; Gadea, A.

    2009-06-19

    The lifetimes of the first excited states of the N=30 isotones {sup 50}Ca and {sup 51}Sc have been determined using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift method in combination with the CLARA-PRISMA spectrometers. This is the first time such a method is applied to measure lifetimes of neutron-rich nuclei populated via a multinucleon transfer reaction. This extends the lifetime knowledge beyond the f{sub 7/2} shell closure and allows us to derive the effective proton and neutron charges in the fp shell near the doubly magic nucleus {sup 48}Ca, using large-scale, shell-model calculations. These results indicate an orbital dependence of the core polarization along the fp shell.

  13. Measurement of the B{sup +} and B{sup 0} lifetimes from semileptonic decays at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The lifetimes of B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mesons have been measured using a sample of 150,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC between 1993 and 1995. The analysis identifies the semileptonic decays of B mesons with high (p,p{sub t}) leptons and reconstructs the B meson decay length and charge by vertexing the lepton with a partially reconstructed D meson. This method results in a sample of 634 (584) charged (neutral) decays with high charge purity. A maximum likelihood fit finds: {tau}{sub B{sup +}} = 1.60{sub {minus}0.11}{sup +0.12}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) ps, {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = 1.55{sub {minus}0.12}{sup +0.13}(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst) ps, and the ratio {tau}{sub B{sup +}}/{tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = 1.03{sub {minus}0.13}{sup +0.15}(stat) {+-} 0.08(syst).

  14. Collectivity in A ? 70 nuclei studied via lifetime measurements in 70Br and 68,70Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. J.; Wadsworth, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Kaneko, K.; Lemasson, A.; de Angelis, G.; Bader, V. M.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Bentley, M. A.; Berryman, J. S.; Braunroth, T.; Davies, P. J.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Hackstein, M.; Henderson, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Miller, D.; Morse, C.; Paterson, I.; Simpson, E. C.; Stroberg, S. R.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.

    2014-06-01

    Transition strengths for decays from low-lying states in A ? 70 nuclei have been deduced from lifetime measurements using the recoil distance Doppler shift technique. The results confirm the collectivity previously reported for the 21+?0gs+ decay in 68Se and reveal a relative decrease in collectivity in 70Br. This trend is reproduced by shell model calculations using the GXPF1A interaction in an fp model space including the Coulomb, spin-orbit and isospin non-conserving interactions. The 31+?21+ decay in 70Br is found to have a very small B(M1) value, which is consistent with the configuration of the state being dominated by the coupling of f5/2 protons and neutrons. The results suggest that the g9/2> orbit does not play an important role at low spin in these nuclei. The B(E2) values for the decays of the (T = 1) 21+ states in 70Br and 70Se are almost identical, suggesting there is no major shape change between the two nuclei at low spin.

  15. Precision muon lifetime at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulhauser, Françoise; MuLan Collaboration [1

    2006-05-01

    The goal of MuLan, positive muon lifetime measurement, is the measurement of the positive muon lifetime to 1 ppm, which will in turn determine the Fermi coupling constant GF to 0.5 ppm precision. We will describe our experimental efforts and latest achievements.

  16. When some elementary free volumes in polymers are not seen by positron annihilation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantarovich, V. P.; Bekeshev, V. G.; Pastukhov, A. V.; Davankov, V. A.; Krasil'nikova, O. K.; Belousova, E. V.; Kevdina, I. B.; Filimonov, M. K.; Gustov, V. W.

    2015-06-01

    Size distributions of elementary free volumes have been studied in mesoporous micro-heterogeneous polymer sorbents. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), low temperature gas adsorption (BET) and thermo-stimulated luminescence (TSL) measurements are employed as complementary instruments for the study. It is shown that small admixtures of rubbers are very effective for variations of the pore size distribution. While BET technique was very informative for measurements of mesopores(2-50 nm), positron annihilation was sensitive to micropores(<2 nm), but not for mesopores. The last specificity is explained by the limited positronium diffusion length in a polymer and also by inhomogeneous distribution of mesoporesin heterogeneous systems. TSL measurements gave information on sizes of rubber inclusions in compositions.

  17. Spin-Resolved Fermi Surface of the Localized Ferromagnetic Heusler Compound Cu2 MnAl Measured with Spin-Polarized Positron Annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Josef A.; Bauer, Andreas; Böni, Peter; Ceeh, Hubert; Dugdale, Stephen B.; Ernsting, David; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Leitner, Michael; Pfleiderer, Christian; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    We determined the bulk electronic structure of the prototypical Heusler compound Cu2 MnAl by measuring the angular correlation of annihilation radiation using spin-polarized positrons. To this end, a new algorithm for reconstructing 3D densities from projections is introduced that allows us to corroborate the excellent agreement between our electronic structure calculations and the experimental data. The contribution of each individual Fermi surface sheet to the magnetization was identified, and summed to a total spin magnetic moment of 3.6 ±0.5 ?B/f .u . .

  18. Modelling Positron Interactions with Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G.; Petrovic, Z.; White, R.; Buckman, S.

    2011-05-01

    In this work we link fundamental measurements of positron interactions with biomolecules, with the development of computer codes for positron transport and track structure calculations. We model positron transport in a medium from a knowledge of the fundamental scattering cross section for the atoms and molecules comprising the medium, combined with a transport analysis based on statistical mechanics and Monte-Carlo techniques. The accurate knowledge of the scattering is most important at low energies, a few tens of electron volts or less. The ultimate goal of this work is to do this in soft condensed matter, with a view to ultimately developing a dosimetry model for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The high-energy positrons first emitted by a radionuclide in PET may well be described by standard formulas for energy loss of charged particles in matter, but it is incorrect to extrapolate these formulas to low energies. Likewise, using electron cross-sections to model positron transport at these low energies has been shown to be in serious error due to the effects of positronium formation. Work was supported by the Australian Research Council, the Serbian Government, and the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Spain.

  19. Positron annihilation studies of some anomalous features of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals grown in SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraverty, S.; Mitra, Subarna; Mandal, K.; Nambissan, P.M.G.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2005-01-01

    Nanocrystalline NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles were synthesized in a SiO{sub 2} matrix and were characterized by x-ray diffraction and TEM observations. Positron lifetimes in these samples were measured. The measured positron lifetimes indicated admixtures of contributions from annihilations within the nanoparticles, at the nanoparticle-SiO{sub 2} interfaces, and from the SiO{sub 2} matrix. The individual contributions were calculated based on the known characteristics of electron-positron annihilation in solids and they were found in remarkable agreement with the known effects expected from grain size reduction and lattice contraction. However, the anomalous rise in positron lifetimes during the reduction of the grain size below 5.6 nm is a deviation from these expected trends and is attributed to the transformation of the inverse spinel structure of the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} to the normal phase, with the tetrahedral (or A) sites being fully occupied by the divalent Ni{sup 2+} ions and the Fe{sup 3+} ions transferred to the octahedral (or B) sites. The results of Moessbauer spectroscopic studies supported this argument, as the percentage of Fe{sup 3+} ions occupying the A sites drastically reduced to zero when the grain size of the samples decreased to 4.8 nm and below.

  20. Development of a transmission positron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuya, M.; Jinno, S.; Ootsuka, T.; Inoue, M.; Kurihara, T.; Doyama, M.; Inoue, M.; Fujinami, M.

    2011-07-01

    A practical transmission positron microscope (TPM) JEM-1011B has been developed to survey differences in the interaction of positron and electron beams with materials, and is installed in the Slow Positron Facility of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The TPM can share positron and electron beams, and can also be used as a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Positron transmission images up to magnification 10,000× (resolution: 50 nm) and positron diffraction patterns up to 044 family were successfully obtained by the TPM comparing them with those of electrons. The differences in material transmittances for both beams have been measured, and can be explained by the calculated results of the Monte Carlo simulation code PENELOPE-2008.

  1. Measurement of the angular and lifetime parameters of the decays Bd0-->J/psiK*0 and Bs0-->J/psiphi.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Garcia-Guerra, G A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Komissarov, E V; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G

    2009-01-23

    We present measurements of the linear polarization amplitudes and the strong relative phases that describe the flavor-untagged decays Bd0-->J/psiK*0 and Bs0-->J/psiphi in the transversity basis. We also measure the mean lifetime taus of the Bs0 mass eigenstates and the lifetime ratio taus/taud. The analyses are based on approximately 2.8 fb(-1) of data recorded with the D0 detector. From our measurements of the angular parameters we conclude that there is no evidence for a deviation from flavor SU(3) symmetry for these decays and that the factorization assumption is not valid for the Bd0-->J/psiK*0 decay. PMID:19257343

  2. Sperm metabolism is altered during storage by female insects: evidence from two-photon autofluorescence lifetime measurements in bedbugs

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Klaus; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of characterizing sperm cells without the need to stain them using spectral and fluorescence lifetime analyses after multi-photon excitation in an insect model. The autofluorescence emission spectrum of sperm of the common bedbug, Cimex lectularius, was consistent with the presence of flavins and NAD(P)H. The mean fluorescence lifetimes showed smaller variation in sperm extracted from the male (tau m, ?m = 1.54–1.84 ns) than in that extracted from the female sperm storage organ (tau m, ?m = 1.26–2.00 ns). The fluorescence lifetime histograms revealed four peaks. These peaks (0.18, 0.92, 2.50 and 3.80 ns) suggest the presence of NAD(P)H and flavins and show that sperm metabolism can be characterized using fluorescence lifetime imaging. The difference in fluorescence lifetime variation between the sexes is consistent with the notion that female animals alter the metabolism of sperm cells during storage. It is not consistent, however, with the idea that sperm metabolism represents a sexually selected character that provides females with information about the male genotype. PMID:26333813

  3. Sperm metabolism is altered during storage by female insects: evidence from two-photon autofluorescence lifetime measurements in bedbugs.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Klaus; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten

    2015-09-01

    We explore the possibility of characterizing sperm cells without the need to stain them using spectral and fluorescence lifetime analyses after multi-photon excitation in an insect model. The autofluorescence emission spectrum of sperm of the common bedbug, Cimex lectularius, was consistent with the presence of flavins and NAD(P)H. The mean fluorescence lifetimes showed smaller variation in sperm extracted from the male (tau m, ?m = 1.54-1.84 ns) than in that extracted from the female sperm storage organ (tau m, ?m = 1.26-2.00 ns). The fluorescence lifetime histograms revealed four peaks. These peaks (0.18, 0.92, 2.50 and 3.80 ns) suggest the presence of NAD(P)H and flavins and show that sperm metabolism can be characterized using fluorescence lifetime imaging. The difference in fluorescence lifetime variation between the sexes is consistent with the notion that female animals alter the metabolism of sperm cells during storage. It is not consistent, however, with the idea that sperm metabolism represents a sexually selected character that provides females with information about the male genotype. PMID:26333813

  4. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Yagishita, A.; Kosuge, T.; Saito, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shirakawa, A.; Sanami, T.; Ikeda, M.; Ohsawa, S.; Kakihara, K.; Shidara, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps-). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a 22Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  5. Radiative lifetimes of Tb

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Fedchak, J. A.; Lawler, J. E.

    2001-06-01

    Radiative lifetimes measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence are reported for 40 odd-parity levels and 36 even-parity levels of singly ionized terbium. The odd-parity levels range in energy from 29000 to 40000 cm{minus}1 and those of even-parity from 21000 to 37000 cm{minus}1. These lifetimes, with one exception, are accurate to {+-}5%. They will provide an absolute scale for accurate atomic-transition probabilities in Tb II (the second spectrum of terbium). {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  6. A method for in vitro regional aerosol deposition measurement in a model of the human tracheobronchial tree by the positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Lizal, Frantisek; Belka, Miloslav; Adam, Jan; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2015-10-01

    Researchers have been studying aerosol transport in human lungs for some decades. The overall lung deposition can be predicted with sufficient precision nowadays. However, the prediction of local deposition remains an unsolved problem. Numerical modeling of aerosol transport can provide detailed data with such precision and spatial resolution which were unavailable in the past. Yet, the necessary validation of numerical results represents a difficult task, as the experimental data in a sufficient spatial resolution are hardly available. This article introduces a method based on positron emission tomography, which allows acquisition of detailed experimental data on local aerosol deposition in a realistic model of human lungs. The method utilizes the Condensation Monodisperse Aerosol Generator modified for a safe production of radioactive aerosol particles and a special measuring rig. The scanning of the model is performed on a positron emission tomography-computed tomography scanner. The evaluation of aerosol deposition is based on a volume radioactivity analysis in a specialized, yet publicly available software. The reliability of the method was tested and its first results are discussed in the article. The measurements performed using the presented method can serve for validation of numerical simulations, since the presented lung model digital geometry is available. PMID:26276348

  7. Single crystal growth of Ga[subscript 2](Se[subscript x]Te[subscript 1;#8722;x])[subscript 3] semiconductors and defect studies via positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Jabbar, N.M.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.; Wirth, B.D.

    2012-12-10

    Small single crystals of Ga{sub 2}(Se{sub x}Te{sub 1-x}){sub 3} semiconductors, for x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, were obtained via modified Bridgman growth techniques. High resolution powder x-ray diffractometry confirms a zincblende cubic structure, with additional satellite peaks observed near the (111) Bragg line. This suggests the presence of ordered vacancy planes along the [111] direction that have been previously observed in Ga{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. Defect studies via positron annihilation spectroscopy show an average positron lifetime of {approx} 400 ps in bulk as-grown specimens. Such a large lifetime suggests that the positron annihilation sites in these materials are dominated by defects. Moreover, analyzing the electron momenta via coincidence Doppler broadening measurements suggests a strong presence of large open-volume defects, likely to be vacancy clusters or voids.

  8. Lifetime measurement of candidate chiral doublet bands in the {sup 103, 104}Rh isotopes with the RDDS method in inverse kinematics.

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Rainovski, G.; Koike, T.; Ahn, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Costin, A.; Danchev, M.; Dewald, A.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Joshi, P.; Lister, C. J.; Moller, A.; Pietralla, N.; Shinozuka, T.; Timar, J.; Wadsworth, R.; Vaman, C.; Zhu, S.; Physics; Tohoku Univ.; Univ. of Sofia; State Univ. of New York; Univ. of Tennessee; Univ. zu Koln; Univ. of York; TU Darmstadt; ATOMKI, Hungary; Michigan State Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Lifetimes of chiral candidate structures in {sup 103,104}Rh were measured using the recoil distance Doppler-shift method. The Gammasphere detector array was used in conjunction with the Cologne plunger device. Excited states of {sup 103,104}Rh were populated by the {sup 11}B({sup 96}Zr,4n){sup 103}Rh and {sup 11}B({sup 96}Zr,3n){sup 104}Rh fusion-evaporation reactions in inverse kinematics. Three and five lifetimes of levels belonging to the proposed chiral doublet bands are measured in {sup 103}Rh and {sup 104}Rh, respectively. The previously observed even-odd spin dependence of the B(M1)/B(E2) values is caused by the variation in the B(E2) values, whereas the B(M1) values decrease as a function of spin.

  9. A broad and tunable 250- to 430-nm source for microscopy and lifetime measurements by frequency doubling of a 78-MHz-picosecond white-light laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradler, Maximilian; Nielsen, Frederik D.; Eckert, Carl Elias; Riedle, Eberhard

    2014-09-01

    Broadly tunable picosecond pulses in the UV for nonlinear microscopy and lifetime measurements are not yet readily available. Complex synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillators with subsequent frequency doubling are typically used. We show that direct second harmonic generation of a visible picosecond supercontinuum source at 78 MHz renders pulses easily tunable from 250 to 430 nm. We find that an unexpectedly large numerical aperture and the use of thick crystals increase the efficiency of the frequency doubling process dramatically. The observed spectral width and efficiency are nearly two orders of magnitude larger than predicted by conventional theory. With broadband achromatic doubling, a 130 nm wide spectrum is achieved. Pulse durations of 17-35 ps are found in the UV and an average power between 1 and 70 ?W. This qualifies the setup for most UV-based microscopic investigations. As first application, the fluorescence lifetime of two differing conformations of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl) benzothiazole is measured.

  10. Measurement of the B_d0 lifetime using B_d0 to J/psi K0_S decays at Dzero

    SciTech Connect

    Balm, Paul W

    2004-12-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the B{sub d}{sup 0} lifetime in the decay to (J/{psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}), using 114 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 experiment at the Tevatron from October 15, 2002, to June 10, 2003. The measurement is motivated by the tests of the Standard Model that it makes possible. These include tests of Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicting B-meson lifetimes, and of the complex phase in the CKM-matrix as the source of CP-violation in B{sub d}{sup 0} decays to (J/{psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}).

  11. Moisture dependence of positron annihilation spectra in nylon-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; St. Clair, T. L.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Positron annihilation time spectra have been measured in nylon-6 samples as a function of their moisture content. The measured average long life component lifetime values are: 1722 + or - 47 ps (dry), 1676 + or - 40 ps (14.6 percent saturation value), 1719 + or - 26 ps (29.3 percent saturation value), 1720 + or - 35 ps (50 percent of saturation value), 1857 + or - 35 ps (78.1 percent saturation value), and 1936 + or - 57 ps (saturated). It appears that nylon-6 has a special affinity for water at low concentration levels where H2O molecules enter between the (C = O - H-N) chemical bonds between nylon molecular chains. As the water concentration increases beyond a critical level, nylon-6 specimens start trapping H2O molecules in other bond sites or potential wells. The trapped water increases the free volume in the test specimens and reduces Ps atom formation as well as its subsequent decay rate.

  12. Positron Implantation Profile Effects in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourino, Manuel Rogelio

    We have developed a technique for the measurement of positron implantation profiles (PIPE) and have used it to measure such profiles in nineteen elemental substances of density (rho) ranging from 0.53 to 19.32 gm/cm('3) and atomic number Z ranging from 3 to 82, with two positron emitters of maximum energy E(,max) = 0.54 MeV((,11)('22)Na) and 1.43 MeV((,32)('68)Ge). These data indicate that a sample's positron absorption coefficient, (alpha)(,+), depends linearly on its mass density, on its atomic number roughly as Z('0.13), and on the mean energy of the positron source that is used to measure it. This result is consistent with that predicted by the existing electron transport theories--modified for positrons--when they are applied to our experimental geometry. We utilized the technique to observe the positron implantation profile in three pressed powder pellets of B, Al, and Zn. The results of this experiment indicate that positron implantation profiles are sensitive to other than just the bulk properties of solids, and that the PIPE technique can be applied to the study of positron-surface interactions.

  13. Measurement of branching ratio and B0s lifetime in the decay B0s ? J/? f0(980) at CDF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-09-30

    We present a study of Bs0 decays to the CP-odd final state J/? f0(980) with J/? ? µ+µ- and f0(980) ? ?+?-. Using pp? collision data with an integrated luminosity of 3.8 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron we measure a Bs0 lifetime of ?(B0s ? J/? f0(980)) = 1.70-0.11+0.12(stat) ± 0.03(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the Bs0} lifetime in a decay to a CP eigenstate and corresponds in the standard model to the lifetime of the heavy Bs0 eigenstate. We also measure the product of branching fractions of B0s ? J/? f0(980)more »and f0(980) ? ?+?- relative to the product of branching fractions of B0s ? J/?? and ??K+K- to be Rf0/? = 0.257 ± 0.020(stat) ± 0.014(syst), which is the most precise determination of this quantity to date.« less

  14. Modelling Positron Transport in Biological Media - Towards a Positron Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, Z.; Garcia, G.; White, R.; Brunger, M.; Sullivan, J.; Buckman, S.

    2011-10-01

    We have a combined program of measurement, analysis and modeling for positron interactions with biologically relevant molecules. The measurement involves direct determination of positron scattering cross sections including, most importantly, positronium formation, which are then combined into a set of cross sections and, together with energy loss spectra, serve as the input to a number of modeling approaches. These include both Monte Carlo and Boltzmann approaches and, ultimately, they aim to model interactions in liquid systems in order to best approximate tissue equivalents. Results for the archetypical system, water, will be presented as well as preliminary studies on other biologically relevant molecules. We have a combined program of measurement, analysis and modeling for positron interactions with biologically relevant molecules. The measurement involves direct determination of positron scattering cross sections including, most importantly, positronium formation, which are then combined into a set of cross sections and, together with energy loss spectra, serve as the input to a number of modeling approaches. These include both Monte Carlo and Boltzmann approaches and, ultimately, they aim to model interactions in liquid systems in order to best approximate tissue equivalents. Results for the archetypical system, water, will be presented as well as preliminary studies on other biologically relevant molecules. Work supported by the Australian, Serbian and Spanish Research Council/Ministries.

  15. Positron probing of phosphorus-vacancy complexes in silicon irradiated with 15 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, N.; Emtsev, V.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Elsayed, M.; Kessler, C.; Kozlovski, V.; Oganesyan, G.

    2015-06-01

    Defects in phosphorus-doped silicon samples of floating-zone material, n-FZ-Si(P), produced under irradiation with 15 MeV protons at room temperature are studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy over the temperature range of ? 30 K - 300 K and by low- temperature Hall effect measurements. After annealing of E-centersand divacancies, we detected for the first time high concentrations of positron traps which had not been observed earlier. These defects are isochronally annealed over the temperature interval of ? 320 °C - 700 °C they manifest themselves as electrically neutral deep donor centersin the material of n-type. A long-lived component of the positron lifetime, ?2(I2 < 60%) ? 280 ps, attributed to these centers, suggests a relaxed configuration involving two vacancies. The enthalpy and entropy of annealing of these centersare Ea ? 1.05(0.21) eV and ?Sm ? 3.1(0.6)kB, respectively. It is argued that the microstructure of the defect consists of two vacancies, VV, and one atom of phosphorus, P. The split configuration of the VPV complex is shortly discussed.

  16. Bitemporal hypometabolism in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease measured by positron emission tomography with (/sup 18/F)-2-fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Prusiner, S.B.; Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Davis, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    It is well established that Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is caused by a slow infectious agent similar to the scrapie prion. However, the pathogenesis of this infection is poorly understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a 54-year-old man with autopsy confirmed CJD using (18F)-2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the Donner 280-crystal tomograph. Temporal lobe hypometabolism with hemispheric asymmetry was observed. These findings are similar to those previously obtained in PET-FDG studies of patients with clinically defined Alzheimer disease (AD). The similarities in the regional metabolic alterations between CJD and AD provide additional evidence for the possibility that AD may be caused by a slow infectious prion.

  17. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  18. Theoretical studies of the long lifetimes of the $6d \\ ^2D_{3/2,5/2}$ states in Fr: Implications for parity nonconservation measurements

    E-print Network

    Sahoo, B K

    2015-01-01

    The lifetimes of the $6d \\ ^2D_{3/2}$ and $6d \\ ^2D_{5/2}$ states in Fr are estimated to be 540(10) ns and 1704(32) ns respectively. They are determined by calculating the radiative transition amplitudes of the allowed electric dipole (E1) and the forbidden electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic dipole (M1) channels using the second order many-body perturbation theory (MBPT(2)) and the coupled-cluster (CC) method at different levels of approximation in the relativistic framework. These long lifetimes and the large electric dipole parity non conserving amplitudes of $7s \\ ^2S_{1/2} \\rightarrow 6d \\ ^2D_{3/2,5/2}$ transitions strongly favour Fr as a leading candidate for the measurement of parity nonconservation arising from the neutral current weak interaction and the nuclear anapole moment.

  19. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dispersion and lifetimes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhiting; Li, Mingda; Ren, Zhensong; Ma, Hao; Alatas, Ahmet; Wilson, Stephen D.; Li, Ju

    2015-09-01

    PbTe1-x Se x alloys are of special interest to thermoelectric applications. Inelastic x-ray scattering determination of phonon dispersion and lifetimes along the high symmetry directions for PbTe1-x Se x alloys are presented. By comparing with calculated results based on the virtual crystal model calculations combined with ab initio density functional theory, the validity of virtual crystal model is evaluated. The results indicate that the virtual crystal model is overall a good assumption for phonon frequencies and group velocities despite the softening of transverse acoustic phonon modes along [1?1?1] direction, while the treatment of lifetimes warrants caution. In addition, phonons remain a good description of vibrational modes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys.

  20. Early processes in positron and positronium chemistry: possible scavenging of epithermal e+ by nitrate ion in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Serge V.; Byakov, Vsevolod M.; Duplâtre, Gilles; Zvezhinskiy, Dmitrii S.; Stepanov, Petr S.; Zaluzhnyi, Alexandr G.

    2015-06-01

    Positron ionization slowing down, formation of the positron track, reactions of e+ with track species and its interaction with a scavenger on a subpicosecond timescale, including the process of the positronium formation process are discussed. Interpretation of the positron annihilation lifetime data on positronium formation in aqueous solutions of NO-3 anions, known as efficient scavengers of the presolvated track electrons, suggests that these ions may also capture epithermal (presolvated) positrons as well.

  1. Annihilation of positrons trapped at the (100) and (111) surfaces of Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazleev, N. G.; Kuttler, K. H.; Fry, J. L.; Weiss, A. H.

    1997-05-01

    We present results of theoretical studies of positron surface states and positron annihilation characteristics at the clean non reconstructed (100) and (111) surfaces of Si performed within the modified atomistic, superposition method. It is found that in the case of non reconstructed semiconductor surfaces, the positron surface state is localized mainly on the vacuum side of the topmost layer. The computed positron surface state energies Eb at the (100) and (111) surfaces of Si are -2.81 and -2.69 eV. In addition, calculations of the positron work functions with respect to the vacuum for bulk Si(100) and Si(111) yielded 2.34 and 2.23 eV, respectively demonstrating the stability of positron surface state on these surfaces. The positron surface state lifetime as well as probabilities for a positron trapped in a surface state to annihilate with relevant core-level electrons are computed for both surfaces, and compared with available experimental data.

  2. Double-magic nature of 132Sn and 208Pb through lifetime and cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M; Stuchbery, Andrew E; Beene, James R; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Liang, J Felix; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Radford, David C; Varner Jr, Robert L; Ayres, A.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, Meredith E; Jones, K. L.; Manning, Brett M; Mueller, Paul Edward; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Peters, William A; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; Smith, Michael Scott; Stone, N. J.; Stracener, Daniel W; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Single-neutron states in 133Sn and 209Pb, which are analogous to single electrons outside of closed atomic shells in alkali metals, were populated by the (9Be,8Be) one-neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics using particle-gamma coincidence spectroscopy. In addition, the s1/2 single-neutron hole-state candidate in 131Sn was populated by (9Be,10Be). Doubly closed-shell 132Sn (radioactive) and 208Pb (stable) beams were used at sub-Coulomb barrier energies of 3 MeV per nucleon. Level energies, gamma-ray transitions, absolute cross sections, spectroscopic factors, asymptotic normalization coefficients, and excited-state lifetimes are reported and compared to shell-model expectations. The results include a new transition and precise level energy for the 3p1/2 candidate in 133Sn, new absolute cross sections for the 1h9/2 candidate in 133Sn and 3s1/2 candidate in 131Sn, and new lifetimes for excited states in 133Sn and 209Pb. This is the first report on excited-state lifetimes of 133Sn, which provide a unique signature of the single-neutron states and 132Sn double-shell closure.

  3. Double-magic nature of 132Sn and 208Pb through lifetime and cross-section measurements.

    PubMed

    Allmond, J M; Stuchbery, A E; Beene, J R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Liang, J F; Padilla-Rodal, E; Radford, D C; Varner, R L; Ayres, A; Batchelder, J C; Bey, A; Bingham, C R; Howard, M E; Jones, K L; Manning, B; Mueller, P E; Nesaraja, C D; Pain, S D; Peters, W A; Ratkiewicz, A; Schmitt, K T; Shapira, D; Smith, M S; Stone, N J; Stracener, D W; Yu, C-H

    2014-05-01

    Single-neutron states in (133)Sn and (209)Pb, which are analogous to single-electron states outside of closed atomic shells in alkali metals, were populated by the ((9)Be, (8)Be) one-neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics using particle-? coincidence spectroscopy. In addition, the s(1/2) single-neutron hole-state candidate in (131)Sn was populated by ((9)Be, (10)Be). Doubly closed-shell (132)Sn (radioactive) and (208)Pb (stable) beams were used at sub-Coulomb barrier energies of 3 MeV per nucleon. Level energies, ?-ray transitions, absolute cross sections, spectroscopic factors, asymptotic normalization coefficients, and excited-state lifetimes are reported and compared with shell-model expectations. The results include a new transition and precise level energy for the 3p(1/2) candidate in (133)Sn, new absolute cross sections for the 1h(9/2) candidate in (133)Sn and 3s(1/2) candidate in (131)Sn, and new lifetimes for excited states in (133)Sn and (209)Pb. This is the first report on excited-state lifetimes of (133)Sn, which allow for a unique test of the nuclear shell model and (132)Sn double-shell closure. PMID:24836240

  4. Charge and fluence lifetime measurements of a dc high voltage GaAs photogun at high average current

    SciTech Connect

    J. Grames, R. Suleiman, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, J. Hansknecht, D. Machie, M. Poelker, M.L. Stutzman

    2011-04-01

    GaAs-based dc high voltage photoguns used at accelerators with extensive user programs must exhibit long photocathode operating lifetime. Achieving this goal represents a significant challenge for proposed high average current facilities that must operate at tens of milliamperes or more. This paper describes techniques to maintain good vacuum while delivering beam, and techniques that minimize the ill effects of ion bombardment, the dominant mechanism that reduces photocathode yield of a GaAs-based dc high voltage photogun. Experimental results presented here demonstrate enhanced lifetime at high beam currents by: (a) operating with the drive laser beam positioned away from the electrostatic center of the photocathode, (b) limiting the photocathode active area to eliminate photoemission from regions of the photocathode that do not support efficient beam delivery, (c) using a large drive laser beam to distribute ion damage over a larger area, and (d) by applying a relatively low bias voltage to the anode to repel ions created within the downstream beam line. A combination of these techniques provided the best total charge extracted lifetimes in excess of 1000 C at dc beam currents up to 9.5 mA, using green light illumination of bulk GaAs inside a 100 kV photogun.

  5. Positron bunching and electrostatic transport system for the production and emission of dense positronium clouds into vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Belov, A. S.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Forslund, O. K.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jernelv, I. L.; Jordan, E.; Kaltenbacher, T.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Koetting, T.; Krasnicky, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lebrun, P.; Lansonneur, P.; Lehner, S.; Liberadzka, J.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marx, L.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Rienäcker, B.; Røhne, O. M.; Rosenberger, S.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Sorrentino, F.; Spacek, M.; Storey, J.; Strojek, I. M.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I.; Vamosi, S.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    2015-11-01

    We describe a system designed to re-bunch positron pulses delivered by an accumulator supplied by a positron source and a Surko-trap. Positron pulses from the accumulator are magnetically guided in a 0.085 T field and are injected into a region free of magnetic fields through a ? -metal field terminator. Here positrons are temporally compressed, electrostatically guided and accelerated towards a porous silicon target for the production and emission of positronium into vacuum. Positrons are focused in a spot of less than 4 mm FWTM in bunches of ?8 ns FWHM. Emission of positronium into the vacuum is shown by single shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

  6. Surfaces of colloidal PbSe nanocrystals probed by thin-film positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, L.; Schut, H.; Schaarenburg, L. C. van; Eijt, S. W. H.; Al-Sawai, W.; Barbiellini, B.; Bansil, A.; Gao, Y.; Houtepen, A. J.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Huis, M. A. van; Ravelli, L.; Egger, W.; Kaprzyk, S.

    2013-08-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and positron-electron momentum density (PEMD) studies on multilayers of PbSe nanocrystals (NCs), supported by transmission electron microscopy, show that positrons are strongly trapped at NC surfaces, where they provide insight into the surface composition and electronic structure of PbSe NCs. Our analysis indicates abundant annihilation of positrons with Se electrons at the NC surfaces and with O electrons of the oleic ligands bound to Pb ad-atoms at the NC surfaces, which demonstrates that positrons can be used as a sensitive probe to investigate the surface physics and chemistry of nanocrystals inside multilayers. Ab initio electronic structure calculations provide detailed insight in the valence and semi-core electron contributions to the positron-electron momentum density of PbSe. Both lifetime and PEMD are found to correlate with changes in the particle morphology characteristic of partial ligand removal.

  7. Computational Study of Positron-Monovacancy Interaction in d-Block Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Shoji

    2015-08-01

    The positron-monovacancy interaction in d-block metals (except for Mn, Tc, and Hg) has been studied by the two-component density-functional-theory formalism [E. Boro?ski and R. M. Nieminen, Phys. Rev. B 34, 3820 (1986)]. On the unrelaxed structure, the positron lifetime calculated with the presence of a positron is generally longer than that obtained neglecting the positron effect. When the atomic positions are relaxed, the difference is widened, especially for the group V metals. The inward relaxation of the atoms surrounding the monovacancy is suppressed when the positron effect is taken into account. The difference in the positron lifetime can be also related to the bulk modulus and the cohesive energy.

  8. Carrier lifetimes in thin-film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Dohyun

    2015-09-01

    The carrier lifetimes in thin-film solar cells are reviewed and discussed. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination is dominant at low carrier density, Auger recombination is dominant under a high injection condition and high carrier density, and surface recombination is dominant under any conditions. Because the surface photovoltage technique is insensitive to the surface condition, it is useful for bulk lifetime measurements. The photoconductance decay technique measures the effective recombination lifetime. The time-resolved photoluminescence technique is very useful for measuring thin-film semiconductor or solar-cell materials lifetime, because the sample is thin, other techniques are not suitable for measuring the lifetime. Many papers have provided time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) lifetimes for copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) and CdTe thin-film solar cell. The TRPL lifetime strongly depends on open-circuit voltage and conversion efficiency; however, the TRPL life time is insensitive to the short-circuit current.

  9. Early astrocytosis in autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease measured in vivo by multi-tracer positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Schöll, Michael; Carter, Stephen F.; Westman, Eric; Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Almkvist, Ove; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Wall, Anders; Graff, Caroline; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Studying autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD), caused by gene mutations yielding nearly complete penetrance and a distinct age of symptom onset, allows investigation of presymptomatic pathological processes that can identify a therapeutic window for disease-modifying therapies. Astrocyte activation may occur in presymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because reactive astrocytes surround ?-amyloid (A?) plaques in autopsy brain tissue. Positron emission tomography was performed to investigate fibrillar A?, astrocytosis and cerebral glucose metabolism with the radiotracers 11C-Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB), 11C-deuterium-L-deprenyl (DED) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) respectively in presymptomatic and symptomatic ADAD participants (n?=?21), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n?=?11) and sporadic AD (n?=?7). Multivariate analysis using the combined data from all radiotracers clearly separated the different groups along the first and second principal components according to increased PIB retention/decreased FDG uptake (component 1) and increased DED binding (component 2). Presymptomatic ADAD mutation carriers showed significantly higher PIB retention than non-carriers in all brain regions except the hippocampus. DED binding was highest in presymptomatic ADAD mutation carriers. This suggests that non-fibrillar A? or early stage plaque depostion might interact with inflammatory responses indicating astrocytosis as an early contributory driving force in AD pathology. The novelty of this finding will be investigated in longitudinal follow-up studies. PMID:26553227

  10. Striatal and extrastriatal dopamine release in the common marmoset brain measured by positron emission tomography and [(18)F]fallypride.

    PubMed

    Ota, Miho; Ogawa, Shintaro; Kato, Koichi; Masuda, Chiaki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia show greater sensitivity to psychostimulants than healthy subjects. Sensitization to psychostimulants and resultant alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmission in rodents has been suggested as a useful model of schizophrenia. This study sought to examine the use of methylphenidate as a psychostimulant to induce dopamine release and that of [(18)F]fallypride as a radioligand to quantify the release in a primate model of schizophrenia. Four common marmosets were scanned by positron emission tomography twice, before and after methylphenidate challenge, to evaluate dopamine release. Four other marmosets were sensitized by repeated methamphetamine (MAP) administration. Then, they were scanned twice, before and after methylphenidate challenge, to evaluate whether MAP-sensitization induced greater sensitivity to methylphenidate. We revealed a main effect of the methylphenidate challenge but not the MAP pretreatment on the striatal binding potential. These results suggest that methylphenidate-induced striatal dopamine release in the common marmoset could be evaluated by [(18)F]fallypride. PMID:26232153

  11. Early astrocytosis in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease measured in vivo by multi-tracer positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Schöll, Michael; Carter, Stephen F; Westman, Eric; Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Almkvist, Ove; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Wall, Anders; Graff, Caroline; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Studying autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD), caused by gene mutations yielding nearly complete penetrance and a distinct age of symptom onset, allows investigation of presymptomatic pathological processes that can identify a therapeutic window for disease-modifying therapies. Astrocyte activation may occur in presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD) because reactive astrocytes surround ?-amyloid (A?) plaques in autopsy brain tissue. Positron emission tomography was performed to investigate fibrillar A?, astrocytosis and cerebral glucose metabolism with the radiotracers (11)C-Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB), (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl (DED) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) respectively in presymptomatic and symptomatic ADAD participants (n?=?21), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n?=?11) and sporadic AD (n?=?7). Multivariate analysis using the combined data from all radiotracers clearly separated the different groups along the first and second principal components according to increased PIB retention/decreased FDG uptake (component 1) and increased DED binding (component 2). Presymptomatic ADAD mutation carriers showed significantly higher PIB retention than non-carriers in all brain regions except the hippocampus. DED binding was highest in presymptomatic ADAD mutation carriers. This suggests that non-fibrillar A? or early stage plaque depostion might interact with inflammatory responses indicating astrocytosis as an early contributory driving force in AD pathology. The novelty of this finding will be investigated in longitudinal follow-up studies. PMID:26553227

  12. Bitemporal hypometabolism in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease measured by positron emission tomography with (F-18)2-fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Prusiner, S.B.; Jagust, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    It is well established that Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is caused by a slow infectious agent similar to the scrapie prion. However, the pathogenesis of this infection is poorly understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a 54 year old male subject with autopsy confirmed CJD using (F-18)2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the Donner 280-crystal tomograph. An x-ray computed tomographic study of the brain performed 4 days prior to PET was normal. In the PET study the frontal to temporal cortex difference of activity densities was 30% on the left and 12% on the right, reflecting temporal hypometabolism. The left-right temporal cortex difference of activity density was 25%, documenting marked hemispheric asymmetry. These findings are similar to those previously obtained in PET-FDG studies of patients with clinically defined Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and are distinctly different from PET-FDG finding in patients with other dementing illnesses or in healthy aged subjects. Recent work has demonstrated extensive biological similarities between CJD, scrapie and AD. The similarities in the regional metabolic alterations between CJD and AD provide additional evidence for the hypothesis that AD is caused by a slow infectious (prion-like) pathogen.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy of tissue autofluorescence in normal and diseased colon measured ex vivo using a fiber-optic probe

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Sergio; Thompson, Alex J.; Kennedy, Gordon T.; Roche, Kim L.; Ayaru, Lakshmana; Bansi, Devinder S.; Stamp, Gordon W.; Thillainayagam, Andrew V.; French, Paul M. W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We present an ex vivo study of temporally and spectrally resolved autofluorescence in a total of 47 endoscopic excision biopsy/resection specimens from colon, using pulsed excitation laser sources operating at wavelengths of 375 nm and 435 nm. A paired analysis of normal and neoplastic (adenomatous polyp) tissue specimens obtained from the same patient yielded a significant difference in the mean spectrally averaged autofluorescence lifetime ?570 ± 740 ps (p = 0.021, n = 12). We also investigated the fluorescence signature of non-neoplastic polyps (n = 6) and inflammatory bowel disease (n = 4) compared to normal tissue in a small number of specimens. PMID:24575345

  14. Theoretical survey on positronium formation and ionisation in positron atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Madhumita; Ghosh, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    The recent theoretical studies are surveyed and reported on the formation of exotic atoms in positron-hydrogen, positron-helium and positron-lithium scattering specially at intermediate energy region. The ionizations of these targets by positron impact was also considered. Theoretical predictions for both the processes are compared with existing measured values.

  15. Collective nature of low-lying excitations in 70,72,74Zn from lifetime measurements using the AGATA spectrometer demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louchart, C.; Obertelli, A.; Görgen, A.; Korten, W.; Bazzacco, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Bruyneel, B.; Clément, E.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Corradi, L.; Curien, D