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Sample records for positron lifetime measurements

  1. On the method of positron lifetime measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiyama, F.; Shizuma, K.; Nasai, H.; Nishi, M.

    1983-01-01

    A fast-slow coincidence system was constructed for the measurement of positron lifetimes in material. The time resolution of this system was 270 ps for the (60)Co gamma rays. Positron lifetime spectra for 14 kinds of alkali halides were measured with this system. Two lifetime components and their intensities were derived from analyses of the lifetime spectra.

  2. Positron lifetime measurements in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Parmar, Devendra S.

    1991-01-01

    Positron lifetimes in the isotropic phases of chiral nematic liquid crystal formulations and their mixtures up to the racemic level were measured. The lifetime spectra for all liquid crystal systems were analyzed into three components. Although the individual spectra in the left- and right-handed components are identical, their racemic mixtures exhibit much larger orthopositronium lifetimes; these larger lifetimes indicate the presence of larger microvoids. This result is consistent with the reportedly higher thermodynamic stability and color play range in the racemic mixtures of chiral nematic liquid crystals.

  3. Prediction of free-volume-type correlations in glassy chalcogenides from positron annihilation lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Ingram, A.; Shpotyuk, M.; Filipecki, J.

    2014-11-01

    A newly modified correlation equation between defect-related positron lifetime determined within two-state trapping model and radius of corresponding free-volume-type defects was proposed to describe compositional variations in atomic-deficient structure of covalent-bonded chalcogenides like binary As-S/Se glasses. Specific chemical environment of free-volume voids around neighboring network-forming polyhedrons was shown to play a decisive role in this correlation, leading to systematically enhanced volumes in comparison with typical molecular substrates, such as polymers.

  4. Analysis of positron lifetime spectra in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for analyzing multicomponent positron lifetime spectra in polymers was developed. It requires initial estimates of the lifetimes and the intensities of various components, which are readily obtainable by a standard spectrum stripping process. These initial estimates, after convolution with the timing system resolution function, are then used as the inputs for a nonlinear least squares analysis to compute the estimates that conform to a global error minimization criterion. The convolution integral uses the full experimental resolution function, in contrast to the previous studies where analytical approximations of it were utilized. These concepts were incorporated into a generalized Computer Program for Analyzing Positron Lifetime Spectra (PAPLS) in polymers. Its validity was tested using several artificially generated data sets. These data sets were also analyzed using the widely used POSITRONFIT program. In almost all cases, the PAPLS program gives closer fit to the input values. The new procedure was applied to the analysis of several lifetime spectra measured in metal ion containing Epon-828 samples. The results are described.

  5. Positron annihilation lifetime measurement and X-ray analysis on 120 MeV Au+7 irradiated polycrystalline tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Charu Lata; Kulriya, Pawan Kumar; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Pujari, Pradeep K.; Patil, Yashashri; Mehta, Mayur; Patel, Priyanka; Khirwadkar, Samir S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to simulate radiation damages in tungsten, potential plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors, surrogate approach of heavy ion irradiation on polycrystalline tungsten is employed. Tungsten specimen is irradiated with gold heavy ions of energy 120 MeV at different fluences. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements are carried out on pristine and ion beam irradiated tungsten specimens. The variation in positron annihilation lifetime in ion irradiated specimens confirms evolution of vacancy clusters under heavy ion irradiation. The pristine and irradiated tungsten specimens have also been characterized for their microstructural, structural, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. X-ray diffractograms of irradiated tungsten specimens show structural integrity of polycrystalline tungsten even after irradiation. Nevertheless, the increase in microstrain, electrical resistivity and microhardness on irradiation indicates creation of lattice damages inside polycrystalline tungsten specimen. On the other hand, the thermal diffusivity has not change much on heavy ion irradiation. The induction of damages in metallic tungsten is mainly attributed to high electronic energy loss, which is 40 keV/nm in present case as obtained from SRIM program. Although, concomitant effect of nuclear losses on damage creation cannot be ignored. It is believed that the energy received by the electronic system is being transferred to the atomic system by electron-phonon coupling. Eventually, elastic nuclear collisions and the transfer of energy from electronic to atomic system via inelastic collision is leading to significant defect generation in tungsten lattice.

  6. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy study of Kapton thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, G. S.; Ravelli, L.; Löwe, B.; Egger, W.; Keeble, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Variable energy positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (VE-PALS) experiments on polyimide material Kapton are reported. Thin Kapton foils are widely used in a variety of mechanical, electronic applications. PALS provides a sensitive probe of vacancy-related defects in a wide range of materials, including open volume in polymers. Varying the positron implantation energy enables direct measurement of thin foils. Thin Kapton foils are also commonly used to enclose the positron source material in conventional PALS measurements performed with unmoderated radionuclide sources. The results of depth-profiled positron lifetime measurements on 7.6 μm and 25 μm Kapton foils are reported and determine a dominant 385(1) ps lifetime component. The absence of significant nanosecond lifetime component due to positronium formation is confirmed.

  7. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  8. The free volume in dried and H2O-loaded biopolymers studied by positron lifetime measurements.

    PubMed

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Ceeh, Hubert

    2014-08-01

    We present experiments on glucose-gelatin compounds using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) in order to study the behavior of the free volume dependent on H2O loading, drying, and uniaxial pressure. A semiempirical quantum mechanical model was applied in order to correlate the lifetime of orthopositronium in nanoscaled voids to the void size. This allowed us to determine the absolute value of the mean void radius in the biopolymer samples. In addition, the variation of the total free volume of the differently treated samples is quantified and illustrated by a log-normal distribution function. Most interesting results have been obtained after saturation loading with H2O that leads to the formation of voids with a mean size of 84.3(1.9) Å(3) and to an increase of the total free volume by a factor of 2.5. This observation in the swelled sample is explained by the entropy elastic regime well above the glass transition temperature that greatly facilitates the formation of free volume. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were performed in order to determine the glass transition temperature and to support the interpretation of the results obtained by PALS. PMID:25046083

  9. Positron lifetime studies in thermoplastic polyimide test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Stclair, T. L.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were made in two thermoplastic polyimide materials recently developed at Langley. The long component lifetime values in polyimidesulfone samples are 847 + or - 81 Ps (dry) and 764 + or - 91 Ps (saturated). The corresponding values in LARC thermoplastic imides are 1080 + or - 139 Ps (dry) and 711 + or - 96 Ps (saturated). Clearly, the presence of moisture has greater effect on positron lifetime in LARC thermoplastic imides than in the case of polyimidesulfones. This result is consistent with the photomicrographic observations made on frozen water saturated specimens of these materials.

  10. Moisture dependence of positron lifetime in Kevlar-49

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Holt, William H.; Mock, Willis, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Because of filamentary character of Kevlar-49 aramid fibers, there is some concern about the moisture uptake and its effect on plastic composites reinforced with Kevlar-49 fibers. As part of continuing studies of positron lifetime in polymers, we have measured positron lifetime spectra in Kevlar-49 fibers as a function of their moisture content. The long lifetime component intensities are rather low, being only of the order of 2-3 percent. The measured values of long component lifetimes at various moisture levels in the specimens are as follows: 2072 +/- 173 ps (dry); 2013 +/- 193 ps (20.7 percent saturation); 1665 +/- 85 ps (25.7 percent saturation); 1745 +/- 257 ps (32.1 percent saturation); and 1772 +/- 217 ps (100 percent saturation). It is apparent that the long component lifetime at first decreases and then increases as the specimen moisture content increases. These results have been compared with those inferred from Epon-815 and Epon-815/K-49 composite data.

  11. Position-resolved Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Butterling, M.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2013-06-01

    A new method which allows for position-resolved positron lifetime spectroscopy studies in extended volume samples is presented. In addition to the existing technique of in-situ production of positrons inside large (cm3) bulk samples using high-energy photons up to 16 MeV from bremsstrahlung production, granular position-sensitive photon detectors have been employed. A beam of intense bremsstrahlung is provided by the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear Accelerator with high Brilliance and low Emittance) which delivers electron bunches of less than 10 ps temporal width and an adjustable bunch separation of multiples of 38 ns, average beam currents of 1 mA, and energies up to 40 MeV. Since the generation of bremsstrahlung and the transport to the sample preserves the sharp timing of the electron beam, positrons generated inside the entire sample volume by pair production feature a sharp start time stamp for positron annihilation lifetime studies with high timing resolutions and high signal to background ratios due to the coincident detection of two annihilation photons. Two commercially available detectors from a high-resolution medial positron-emission tomography system are being employed with 169 individual Lu2SiO5:Ce scintillation crystals, each. In first experiments, a positron-lifetime gated image of a planar Si/SiO2 (pieces of 12.5 mm × 25 mm size) sample and a 3-D structured metal in Teflon target could be obtained proving the feasibility of a three dimensional lifetime-gated tomographic system.

  12. Positron-Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy using Electron Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Butterling, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    2015-06-01

    A new type of an intense source of positrons for materials research has been set up at the superconducting electron linear. The source employs hard X-rays from electron- bremsstrahlung production generating energetic electron-positron pairs inside the sample under investigation. CW-operation allows performing experiments with significantly reduced pile-up artefacts in the detectors compared to pulsed mode operation in conventional accelerators. The high-resolution timing of the accelerator with bunch lengths below 10 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) allows positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) measurements with high time resolution. A single-component annihilation lifetime of Kaptonhas been measured as (381.3 ± 0.3) ps. Employing segmented detectors for the detection of both annihilation photons allows for the first time to perform a 4D tomographic reconstruction of the annihilation sites including the annihilation lifetime.

  13. Microstructural Characterization of Polymers by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1996-01-01

    Positrons provide a versatile probe for monitoring microstructural features of molecular solids. In this paper, we report on positron lifetime measurements in two different types of polymers. The first group comprises polyacrylates processed on earth and in space. The second group includes fully-compatible and totally-incompatible Semi-Interpenetrating polymer networks of thermosetting and thermoplastic polyimides. On the basis of lifetime measurements, it is concluded that free volumes are a direct reflection of physical/electromagnetic properties of the host polymers.

  14. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy source correction determination: A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Gurmeet S.; Keeble, David J.

    2016-02-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) can provide sensitive detection and identification of vacancy-related point defects in materials. These measurements are normally performed using a positron source supported, and enclosed by, a thin foil. Annihilation events from this source arrangement must be quantified and are normally subtracted from the spectrum before analysis of the material lifetime components proceeds. Here simulated PALS spectra reproducing source correction evaluation experiments have been systematically fitted and analysed using the packages PALSfit and MELT. Simulations were performed assuming a single lifetime material, and for a material with two lifetime components. Source correction terms representing a directly deposited source and various foil supported sources were added. It is shown that in principle these source terms can be extracted from suitably designed experiments, but that fitting a number of independent, nominally identical, spectra is recommended.

  15. Novel System for Potential Nondestructive Material Inspection Using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Masato; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Hattori, Kanehisa; Watanabe, Yoshihiro

    2011-08-01

    A new positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer consisting of a start γ-ray detector, a stop γ-ray detector, a digital oscilloscope, and a positron detector, which is a plastic scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube, is described. A 22Na source is placed between the positron detector and a sample to be studied. γ-ray signals related to positrons annihilating in the positron detector are rejected by anti-coincidence processing. Comparison of the positron lifetime spectrum of a steel strip collected with the new system with that collected with a conventional system using two specimens sandwiching the 22Na source shows that accurate positron lifetime measurements are possible with the new system. The new system does not require cutting of the samples and is potentially applicable to truly nondestructive onsite inspection of various materials such as those used in nuclear power plants, aircraft and cars, etc., by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS).

  16. Positron and Positronium Annihilation Lifetime, and Free Volume in Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhibin

    1995-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime measurements were carried out for six polycarbonates of different structures and four polystyrenes of different molecular weight over a wide temperature range covering the glass transition region. The o-Ps mean lifetime is very sensitive to the changes of free volume in those polymers which occur due to change of molecular structure, chain length, and temperature. The influence of the unavoidable e^{+} irradiation and physical aging on the mean lifetime and the intensity of o-Ps annihilation were studied by conducting time dependent measurements on both very aged and rejuvenated samples. Both irradiation and physical aging reduce the formation of positronium, but have no effect on the mean lifetime of Ps atoms. The free volume fraction h obtained from the positron lifetime measurements was compared with the prediction of the statistical mechanical theory of Simha and Somcynsky; good agreement was found in the melt state though clear deviations were observed in the glassy state. A free volume quantity, computed from the bulk volume, which is in a good numerical agreement with the Simha-Somcynsky h-function in the melt, gives improved agreement with the h value calculated from the positron lifetime measurements. To investigate certain anomalies observed in the computer analysis of the positron annihilation lifetime spectra on polymers, we developed a computer simulation of the experimental data, which then was used to test the accuracy of the fitting results in the different circumstances. The influence caused by a possible distribution of the o-Ps mean lifetimes and the width of the spectrometer time resolution function were studied. The theoretical connection between the o-Ps mean lifetime and the free volume hole size was reviewed based on a finite spherical potential well model, and the status of the localized Ps atom in polymers was evaluated by calculation of the barrier transmission probability and the escaping probability of the

  17. Moisture determination in composite materials using positron lifetime techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. R.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A technique was developed which has the potential of providing information on the moisture content as well as its depth in the specimen. This technique was based on the dependence of positron lifetime on the moisture content of the composite specimen. The positron lifetime technique of moisture determination and the results of the initial studies are described.

  18. Single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy with LYSO scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Deller, A.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-08-01

    We have evaluated the application of a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) based detector to single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. We compare this detector directly with a similarly configured PbWO4 scintillator, which is the usual choice for such measurements. We find that the signal to noise ratio obtained using LYSO is around three times higher than that obtained using PbWO4 for measurements of Ps excited to longer-lived (Rydberg) levels, or when they are ionized soon after production. This is due to the much higher light output for LYSO (75% and 1% of NaI for LYSO and PbWO4 respectively). We conclude that LYSO is an ideal scintillator for single-shot measurements of positronium production and excitation performed using a low-intensity pulsed positron beam.

  19. Interaction between HfC precipitates and vacancies in quenched Cu:Hf as studied by TDPAC and positron lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraj, R.; Rajaraman, R.

    2004-09-01

    A Cu:Hf sample with 1 wt% Hf as prepared by arc melting is characterized by TEM and microdiffraction analysis to contain HfC precipitates. HfC precipitates in a Cu matrix bind vacancies and divacancies strongly in the quenched Cu:Hf sample as deduced by time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) studies. Isochronal annealing studies using TDPAC and positron lifetime measurements indicate the stability of these vacancy complexes in the quenched sample for annealing treatments up to 1200 K, beyond which the de-trapping of the vacancies from HfC precipitates is observed to occur. This shows that HfC precipitates present in Cu inhibit the formation of voids by strongly binding quenched vacancies.

  20. Measurements of defect structures by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of the tellurite glass TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 doped with ions of rare earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golis, E.; Yousef, El. S.; Reben, M.; Kotynia, K.; Filipecki, J.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was the structural analysis of the TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 tellurite glasses doped with ions of the rare-earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+ based on the PALS (Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy) method of measuring positron lifetimes. Values of positron lifetimes and the corresponding intensities may be connected with the sizes and number of structural defects, such as vacancies, mono-vacancies, dislocations or pores, the sizes of which range from a few angstroms to a few dozen nanometres. Experimental positron lifetime spectrum revealed existence of two positron lifetime components τ1 and τ2. Their interpretation was based on two-state positron trapping model where the physical parameters are the annihilation velocity and positron trapping rate.

  1. Positron annihilation lifetime study of polyvinylpyrrolidone for nanoparticle-stabilizing pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Shpotyuk, O; Bujňáková, Z; Baláž, P; Ingram, A; Shpotyuk, Y

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied to characterize free-volume structure of polyvinylpyrrolidone used as nonionic stabilizer in the production of many nanocomposite pharmaceuticals. The polymer samples with an average molecular weight of 40,000 g mol(-1) were pelletized in a single-punch tableting machine under an applied pressure of 0.7 GPa. Strong mixing in channels of positron and positronium trapping were revealed in the polyvinylpyrrolidone pellets. The positron lifetime spectra accumulated under normal measuring statistics were analysed in terms of unconstrained three- and four-term decomposition, the latter being also realized under fixed 0.125 ns lifetime proper to para-positronium self-annihilation in a vacuum. It was shown that average positron lifetime extracted from each decomposition was primary defined by long-lived ortho-positronium component. The positron lifetime spectra treated within unconstrained three-term fitting were in obvious preference, giving third positron lifetime dominated by ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation in a polymer matrix. This fitting procedure was most meaningful, when analysing expected positron trapping sites in polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized nanocomposite pharmaceuticals. PMID:26444751

  2. Positron lifetimes in TTF-TCNQ and κ-(BEDT-TTF) 2Cu(NCS) 2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Shoji; Tokumoto, Madoka; Kinoshita, Nobumori; Terada, Norio; Ihara, Hideo; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Mikado, Tomohisa; Anzai, Hiroyuki

    1997-05-01

    Positron lifetimes in TTF-TCNQ (tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and κ-(BEDT-TTF) 2Cu(SCN) 2 (BEDT-TTF: bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene) single crystals have been measured utilizing a pulsed variable-energy positron beam. The bulk positron lifetimes are 338 and 357 ps, respectively. The incident positron energy dependence of the lifetime is rather weak for both materials. Theoretical simulations have been also performed with several descriptions of the electronic wave functions and the electron-positron correlation. Results are compared with each other and the experiments.

  3. Investigation and calculation of positron lifetimes of monovacancies in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shijuan; Liu, Jiandang; Ye, Bangjiao

    2016-01-01

    The first-principles calculations of positron lifetimes of mono-vacancies in crystals were investigated. We use the two-component density functional theory to respectively compute positron lifetimes of neutral charge state of VAl defect in aluminium, VSi defect in silicon, VC, VSi and VC+CSi defects in 3C silicon carbide, VGa and VAs defects in gallium arsenide, taking into account atomic relaxation due to vacancy and electronic structural relaxation due to the presence of the positron. Three different calculation schemes are used. We find that the electron density inside the vacancy more or less increases due to the presence of the positron if the ionic positions are kept fixed, and the positron becomes more localized after the electronic structural relaxation for the case of VAl defect in aluminium and VSi defect in 3C silicon carbide, but it is opposite for the case of VGa defect in gallium arsenide and VC defect in 3C silicon carbide. The results with no consideration of the relaxation are even much closer to the experimental ones, therefore the atomic relaxation due to the position play an important role in calculating the positron lifetime of mono-vacancies in crystals.

  4. A modified positron lifetime spectrometer as method of non-destructive testing in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Q.; Shi, J. J.; Jiang, J.; Liu, X. B.; Wang, R. S.; Wu, Y. C.

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims to develop a new non-destructive testing (NDT) method using positron annihilation spectroscopy, a powerful tool to detect vacancy-type defects and defect's chemical environment. A positron NDT system was designed and constructed by modifying the "sandwich" structure of sample-source-sample in the conventional positron lifetime spectrometer. The positron lifetime spectra of one single sample can be measured and analyzed by subtracting the contribution of a reference sample. The feasibility and reliability of the positron NDT system have been tested by analyzing nondestructively deformation damage caused by mechanical treatment in metals and steels. This system can be used for detecting defects and damage in thick or large-size samples without cutting off the sample materials, as well as for detecting two-dimensional distribution of defects.

  5. Two-component density functional theory calculations of positron lifetimes for small vacancy clusters in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhov, D. V.; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2005-05-01

    The positron lifetimes for various vacancy clusters in silicon are calculated within the framework of the two-component electron-positron density functional theory. The effect of the trapped positron on the electron density and on the relaxation of the structure is investigated. Our calculations show that, contrary to the usual assumption, the positron-induced forces do not compensate in general for electronic inward forces. Thus, geometry optimization is required in order to determine positron lifetime accurately. For the monovacancy and the divacancy, the results of our calculations are in good agreement with the experimental positron lifetimes, suggesting that this approach gives good estimates of positron lifetimes for larger vacancy clusters, required for their correct identification with positron annihilation spectroscopy. As an application, our calculations show that fourfold trivacancies and symmetric fourfold tetravacancies have positron lifetimes similar to monovacancies and divacancies, respectively, and can thus be confused in the interpretation of positron annihilation experiments.

  6. Spectra of Positrons Lifetimes in Choose Gel Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, R.; Muszyńska, J.; Kajdas, A.

    2006-11-01

    Spectra of positrons lifetimes in selected gel non-steride analgesic and antiphlogistic drugs were investigated. The basic components in them were sodium salts of diclophenac and they differed from one another with the chemical composition of other components. It was found that in all of the investigated spectra there occurred a component which testified to the formation of positronium. The differences in the values of ortho-Ps component lifetimes and their intensity can be attributed to the presence of ingredients modifying the effects of the drug.

  7. Study of Chemical Carcinogens by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.; Karasev, A. O.

    2013-11-01

    We have used positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to study the carcinogens C21H20BrN3, C4H7Cl2O4P, CCl4, CHCl3, AlF3, C8H12N4O, C6H4Cl2 and the non-carcinogens H2O, AlCl3, CH2Cl2, C2H6OS. We have established a correlation between the annihilation characteristics of the studied compounds and their degree of carcinogenicity.

  8. Measurement of the Ds lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermilab E791 Collaboration; Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1999-01-01

    We report the results of a precise measurement of the Ds meson lifetime based on 1662+/-56 fully reconstructed Ds-->φπ decays, from the charm hadroproduction experiment E791 at Fermilab. Using an unbinned maximum likelihood fit, we measure the Ds lifetime to be 0.518+/-0.014+/-0.007 ps. The ratio of the measured Ds lifetime to the world average D0 lifetime [1] is 1.25+/-0.04. This result differs from unity by six standard deviations, indicating significantly different lifetimes for the Ds and the D0.

  9. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of ZnO bulk samples

    SciTech Connect

    Zubiaga, A.; Plazaola, F.; Garcia, J. A.; Tuomisto, F.; Munoz-Sanjose, V.; Tena-Zaera, R.

    2007-08-15

    In order to gain a further insight into the knowledge of point defects of ZnO, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was performed on bulk samples annealed under different atmospheres. The samples were characterized at temperatures ranging from 10 to 500 K. Due to difficulties in the conventional fitting of the lifetime spectra caused by the low intensity of the defect signals, we have used an alternative method as a solution to overcome these difficulties and resolve all the lifetime components present in the spectra. Two different vacancy-type defects are identified in the samples: Zn vacancy complexes (V{sub Zn}-X) and vacancy clusters consisting of up to five missing Zn-O pairs. In addition to the vacancies, we observe negative-ion-type defects, which are tentatively attributed to intrinsic defects in the Zn sublattice. The effect of the annealing on the observed defects is discussed. The concentrations of the V{sub Zn}-X complexes and negative-ion-type defects are in the 0.2-2 ppm range, while the cluster concentrations are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower.

  12. Positron lifetime studies of decomposition in 2024 (Al-Cu-Mg) and 7010 (Al-Zn-Cu-Mg) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dlubek, G. |; Lademann, P.; Krause, H.; Krause, S.; Unger, R.

    1998-09-04

    In the current paper, the decomposition behavior of the engineering alloys 2024 (Al-Cu-Mg) and 7010 (Al-Zn-Cu-Mg) is studied using positron lifetime measurements. Positrons probe open volume defects such as vacancies and dislocations. However, they may also be used to investigate coherent zones and incoherent precipitates. In order to understand the rather complicated precipitation sequences and the response of positrons to different type of precipitates occurring in 2024 and 7010 alloys, binary and ternary laboratory alloys were also investigated under the same experimental conditions as the engineering alloys. The interpretations of the results are based on experiences of the group from extensive positron studies of laboratory alloys such as Al-Zn, Al-Zn-Mg, Al-Cu, and further Al alloys (see also the review (4)). Their collected results are shown as lifetimes and curve-shape parameters S of the electron-positron momentum distribution curves characteristic for different precipitates in Al alloys.

  13. Temperature dependence of the positron lifetime spectra of rubber-carbon black composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyi; Quarles, C. A.

    2003-10-01

    We have constructed a temperature controlled sample chamber, which uses a 30 liter liquid nitrogen Dewar and dipstick originally used for a Germanium detector, to study the temperature dependence of the positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectra of polymer composite samples. In order to understand how carbon black (CB) affects positron lifetime (LT) in rubber materials, we also investigated cross-link density by studying positron lifetime in rubber with different sulfur concentration. We provide experimental data that will characterize the temperature dependence of the positron lifetime. Data is provided for two polymers, natural rubber and SnSSBR, and for these polymers mixed with different types of CB (N-115 and N-762). The temperature range studied was from room temperature to below the glass transition temperature. We will also provide experimental data that will show the relationship between lifetime and different sulfur concentration. We will conclude with a discussion of how CB affects the positron lifetime in polymers.

  14. Positron annihilation lifetime study of radiation-damaged natural zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Gaugliardo, P.; Farnan, I.; Zhang, M.; Vance, E. R.; Davis, J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Knott, R. B.; Mudie, S.; Buckman, S. J.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a well-known candidate waste form for actinides and their radiation damage behaviour has been widely studied by a range of techniques. In this study, well-characterised natural single crystal zircons have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). In some, but not all, of the crystals that had incurred at least half of the alpha-event damage of ∼1019 α/g required to render them structurally amorphous, PALS spectra displayed long lifetimes corresponding to voids of ∼0.5 nm in diameter. The long lifetimes corresponded to expectations from published Small-Angle X-ray Scattering data on similar samples. However, the non-observation by PALS of such voids in some of the heavily damaged samples may reflect large size variations among the voids such that no singular size can be distinguished or. Characterisation of a range of samples was also performed using scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-ray scattering/diffraction, with the degree of alpha damage being inferred mainly from the Raman technique and X-ray diffraction. The observed void diameters and intensities of the long lifetime components were changed somewhat by annealing at 700 °C; annealing at 1200 °C removed the voids entirely. The voids themselves may derive from He gas bubbles or voids created by the inclusion of small quantities of organic and hydrous matter, notwithstanding the observation that no voidage was evidenced by PALS in two samples containing hydrous and organic matter.

  15. Positron annihilation lifetime study of interfaces in ternary polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghala, D.; Ramya, P.; Pasang, T.; Raj, J. M.; Ranganathaiah, C.; Williams, J. F.

    2013-06-01

    A new method based on positron lifetime spectroscopy is developed to characterize individual interfaces in ternary polymer blends and hence determine the composition dependent miscibility level. The method owes its origin to the Kirkwood-Risemann-Zimm (KRZ) model for the evaluation of the hydrodynamic interaction parameters (αij) which was used successfully for a binary blend with a single interface. The model was revised for the present work for ternary polymer blends to account for three interfaces. The efficacy of this method is shown for two ternary blends namely poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly (ethylene-co-vinylacetate)/poly(vinyl chloride) (SAN/EVA/PVC) and polycaprolactone /poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly(vinyl chloride) (PCL/SAN/PVC) at different compositions. An effective hydrodynamic interaction parameter, αeff, was introduced to predict the overall miscibility of ternary blends.

  16. Ab initio calculation of positron distribution, ACAR and lifetime in TTF-TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Shoji; Kohyama, Masanori

    2000-06-01

    We have performed ab initio calculations of positron distribution, ACAR and lifetime in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor TTF-TCNQ. The electronic structure is obtained within the LDA, while the positron state is calculated either with the LDA or with the GGA. Except the positron lifetime, differences between the LDA and GGA results are rather small. The obtained results are compared with our previous experiments and calculations.

  17. Positron fraction, electron and positron spectra measured by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolotto, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    A precise measurement by AMS-02 of the electron spectrum up to 700 GeV and of the positron spectrum and positron fraction in primary cosmic rays up 500 GeV are presented. The combined measurement of the cosmic-ray electron and positron energy spectra and fraction provide a unique tool to improve our understanding of the production, acceleration and propagation mechanism of cosmic rays.

  18. Lifetime Measurements in 162Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casarella, Clark; Aprahamian, A.; Lesher, S.; Crider, B.; Lowe, M.; Peters, E.; Prados-Estevez, F.; Ross, T.; Tully, Z.; Yates, S.

    2015-10-01

    Historically, the rare-earth region of nuclei has been a fountainhead for nuclear structure phenomena. One of the more debated structure effects is the nature of excited 0+ bands in nuclei, and continues to be an outstanding challenge in nuclear structure physics; several interpretations exist, and we hope that lifetime measurements can help distinguish between them. 162Dy has an abundance of 0+ states with limited lifetime data; we have measured excitation functions, mean lifetimes, and angular distributions of gamma rays for excited states in 162Dy at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Low lying excited states were populated up to an excitation energy of E < 3.2 MeV, where we will discuss the implications of the lifetimes under this energy threshold. This work was supported by the NSF under contract numbers PHY-1068192, PHY-1205412, and PHY-0956310.

  19. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  20. On the potential of positron lifetime spectroscopy for the study of early stages of zeolites formation from their amorphous precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosnar, S.; Kosanović, C.; Subotić, B.; Bosnar, D.; Kajcsos, Zs.; Liszkay, L.; Lohonyai, L.; Molnár, B.; Lázár, K.

    2007-02-01

    The applicability of positron lifetime (LT) spectroscopy to the study of progress of formation of Secondary Building Units (SBU) in gels yielding in FAU and LTA type zeolites was investigated. Samples were prepared from aluminosilicate gels with various degrees of local structural order. LT measurements were performed at room temperature in air and in vacuum. Coexistence of annihilation modi with long lifetime components was shown; a correlation with precursors of nucleation and type of exchanged ions was also indicated.

  1. Study of the ionic transport in polymer electrolyte using positron lifetime distribution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z. L.; Itoh, Y.; Li, S. Q.; Wang, S. J.

    1996-09-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy has been applied to measure the free-volume hole distribution in poly(ether urethane) as a function of temperature. The hole radius distribution determined from orthopositronium lifetime distribution is found to shift to a larger values with increasing temperature. This result, combined with the variation of ionic conductivity, suggests that carrier ions do not migrate naked but are bound to polymer segments through ion-dipole interaction forces, and the ion migration is controlled primarily by segmental motion of the polymer.

  2. Characterization of radiation-induced lattice vacancies in intermetallic compounds by means of positron-lifetime studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würschum, R.; Badura-Gergen, K.; Kümmerle, E. A.; Grupp, C.; Schaefer, H.-E.

    1996-07-01

    In the present paper a characterization of atomic vacancies in intermetallic compounds is given by means of positron-lifetime measurements after electron irradiation and comparison with the states after preparation, after long-time annealing, or in high-temperature equilibrium. In TiAl, Ti3Al, and Ni3Al no structural vacancies (detection limit CV=10-6) are observed at ambient temperature. This confirms that in these compounds slight deviations from stoichiometry are compensated by antisite atoms. In the Al-poor B2 alloys FeAl and NiAl, on the other hand, remnant vacancies exist due to the high thermal equilibrium vacancy concentrations and their slow diffusivities. The kinetics of vacancy elimination in FeAl and NiAl is discussed. A substantial temperature dependence of the positron lifetime in vacancies is detected in close-packed intermetallics which is attributed to an increased atomic relaxation or partial positron detrapping at high temperatures. In contrast to that, the temperature dependence of the positron lifetime in vacancies is small in the open-structured B2 aluminides. The lifetimes τf of free delocalized positrons in transition-metal aluminides and in NiZr and NiTi can be correlated to those of the pure components, taking into account the densities of valence electrons. For the positron lifetimes τ1 of vacancies in intermetallic compounds, values of τ1/τf=1.5-1.7 are observed similar as in the pure metals. Annealing studies of B2-FeAl after electron irradiation yield time constants for the disappearance of vacancies identical to those deduced recently for the equilibration of thermal vacancies. In electron-irradiated Ti aluminides annealing processes at 250 K and 450 K are observed where the latter process is tentatively attributed to long-range migration of vacancies.

  3. Lifetime measurements in 180Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. M.; Wu, X. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Li, C. B.; Gao, Z. C.; Li, G. S.; Chen, F. Q.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Hu, S. P.; Zhong, J.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, H. W.; Luo, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Lifetimes of the yrast states in 180Pt have been measured from 4+ to 8+ using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique in the coincidence mode. These states were populated by the reaction 156Gd(28Si,4 n )180Pt at a beam energy of 144 MeV. The differential decay curve method was applied to determine the lifetimes from experimental coincidence data. The B (E 2 ) values extracted from lifetimes increase with increasing spin, implying rotor behavior, but do not show the typical shape coexistence where the B (E 2 ) values present a rapid increase at very low spins. Calculations based on the triaxial projected shell model were performed for the yrast states in 180Pt and the results of both energies and E 2 transition probabilities reproduce the experimental data very well. The result also shows that a better description of the yrast band in 180Pt requires consideration of the γ degree of freedom.

  4. Lifetime measurements in neutral alkalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diberardino, Diana

    1998-12-01

    Precision measurements of transition probabilities and energies provide a means for testing atomic structure calculations. The most accurate atomic structure calculations employ many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) and are used for the interpretation of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) measurements and for testing of quantum electrodynamics (QED). Our group's measurement of the 6p/ 2P3/2,1/2 state lifetimes in atomic cesium provides constraints for recent MBPT calculations in cesium and electric dipole (E1) matrix elements. These E1 matrix elements contribute a large fraction to the weak-interaction-induced 6S[-]7S transition amplitude in cesium. Part of this thesis has been motivated by our desire to reduce the uncertainties in the measured 6p/ 2P3/2,1/2 state lifetimes in atomic cesium using improvements in our fast-beam apparatus. Thus, a new fiber optic detector system is designed to provide better collection efficiency and reduce beam tracking errors. Also, a new method of measuring the atomic beam velocity using a solid etalon is demonstrated to improve the velocity precision by a factor of seven. Additionally, this thesis describes measurements of the cesium 5d/ 2D5/2,/ 5d/ 2D3/2, and 11s/ 2S1/2 state lifetimes using pulsed-dye laser excitation of cesium vapor. The 5d/ 2D3/2 lifetime measurement, along with its branching ratio, provides the electric dipole reduced matrix element between the 5d/ 2D3/2 state and the 6p/ 2P1/2 state. Furthermore, a previous 5d/ 2D5/2 experimental value is compared with our new value and recent theoretical calculations.

  5. Measurement of the (27)P lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Charles George

    The lifetime of 27P has been measured using the Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) at the Nuclear Structure Research Laboratory (NSRL) at the University of Rochester. 27P was produced by bombarding a BeO target with a 24Mg beam at a lab energy of 118 MeV. A focal-plane detector system, consisting of a parallel-grid avalanche counter (PGAC) backed by an ionization counter (IC) and a silicon detector, was used to provide particle identification. A sodium iodide detector array was used to detect the 511 keV positron annihilation radiation produced by the decay of 27P. The result obtained for the half-life of 27P is 0.32 -0.15+0.22 s.

  6. Microstructural Characterization of Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Pater, Ruth H.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1996-01-01

    Thermoset and thermoplastic polyimides have complementary physical and mechanical properties. Whereas thermoset polyimides are brittle and generally easier to process, thermoplastic polyimides are tough but harder to process. A combination of these two types of polyimides may help produce polymers more suitable for aerospace applications. Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (S-IPN) of thermoset LaRC(TM)-RP46 and thermoplastic LaRC(TM)-IA polyimides were prepared in weight percent ratios ranging from 100:0 to 0:100. Positron lifetime measurements were made in these samples to correlate their free volume features with physical and mechanical properties. As expected, positronium atoms are not formed in these samples. The second lifetime component has been used to infer the positron trap dimensions. The 'free volume' goes through a minimum at a ratio of about 50:50, and this suggests that S-IPN samples are not merely solid solutions of the two polymers. These data and related structural properties of the S-IPN samples are discussed.

  7. Low energy positron flux generator for lifetime studies in thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; St. Clair, Terry L.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1991-01-01

    A slow positron flux generator for positron annihilation spectroscopic measurements in thin polymer films is described. The advantages of this generator include operability at room temperature and atmospheric pressure without special test film preparaton requirements.

  8. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  9. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Taira, Y; Toyokawa, H; Kuroda, R; Yamamoto, N; Adachi, M; Tanaka, S; Katoh, M

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured. PMID:23742543

  10. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  11. [Positron annihilation lifetime spectrometry (PALS) and its pharmaceutical applications].

    PubMed

    Sebe, István; Szabó, Barnabás; Zelkó, Romána

    2012-01-01

    PALS is one of the most widely used "nuclear probe" techniques for the tracking of the structural characteristics of materials. The method is based on the matter-energy equivalence principle recognized by Einstein: the electrons and positrons as particle-antiparticle pairs disappear in mutual destruction of particles, they annihilate with high-energy gamma-radiation, thus "particle-energy transition" occurs. The properties of the resulting radiation exactly correspond to the relevant properties of the electron and positron preceding the annihilation. Since electrons occur in all types of materials, the phenomenon of positron annihilation can play in any environment; consequently the method can be used for the analysis of each type of materials (crystalline and amorphous, organic and inorganic, biotic and abiotic). The present paper provides an overview of the theoretical physical background, the practical realization and evaluation of methods, their limitations, and summarizes the pharmaceutical applications published in recent years. PMID:22570984

  12. Free volume structure of realgar α-As4S4 by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Ingram, A.; Demchenko, P.

    2015-04-01

    Atomic-deficient free volume structure of realgar α-As4S4, the low-temperature modification, of tetraarsenic tetrasulfide polymorphs, is studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Eventual channels of positron annihilation in this molecular crystal are shown to be connected with low electron density entities around cage As4S4 molecules composing realgar-type structure of monoclinic P21/n space group. The overlapped spaces of bond-free solid angles around S atoms forming self-closed As4S4 molecules contribute preferentially to positron trapping modes, while a competitive influence of bound positron-electron states (positronium) stabilized in intermolecular spaces occurs also to be essential in the decomposed lifetime spectra too.

  13. Lifetime measurements for bottom hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.

    1984-09-01

    The review of lifetime measurements of bottom hadrons begins with a first measurement by JADE, followed by similar measurements by MAC and MKII groups. New MAC data are reviewed based on a total of 75,000 multihadron events taken at a c.m. energy of 29 GeV. According to Monte Carlo calculations, 18% of the lepton candidates stem from charm decay and roughly 30% were misidentified hadrons. DELCO studied electrons obtained from 42,000 multihadron events at 29 GeV. The electrons were identified by means of Cerenkov counters. JADE analayzed 22,000 multihadron events at 35 GeV. Data were analyzed using two methods - one using a sample of b-enriched events, and the other using weighted distributions. The TASSO results were obtained with two different configurations of the detector - one of which used a drift chamber and the other a vertex detector. (LEW)

  14. The study of synthetic food dyes by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    By method of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), substances are food dyes were studied: E-102 (Tartrazine), E-124 (Ponso 4R), E 132 (Indigo carmine), E-133 (Brilliant Blue), E-151 (Black Shiny). They are examined for the presence of carcinogenic properties. The difference between dyes having explicit carcinogenic properties and mutagenic properties (non-explicit carcinogens) is established.

  15. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)–Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    PubMed Central

    Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model. PMID:24957061

  16. The assessment of pore connectivity in hierarchical zeolites using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy: instrumental and morphological aspects.

    PubMed

    Zubiaga, Asier; Warringham, Robbie; Boltz, Marilyne; Cooke, David; Crivelli, Paolo; Gidley, David; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier; Mitchell, Sharon

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies demonstrated the power of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) to characterise the connectivity and corresponding effectiveness of hierarchical pore networks in zeolites. This was based on the fractional escape of ortho-positronium (Ps), formed within the micropore framework, to vacuum. To further develop this technique, here we assess the impact of the positron implantation energy and of the zeolite crystal size and the particle morphology. Conventional measurements using fast positrons and beam measurements applying moderated positrons both readily distinguish purely microporous ZSM-5 zeolites comprised of single crystals or crystal aggregates. Unlike beam measurements, however, conventional measurements fail to discriminate model hierarchical zeolites with open or constricted mesopore architectures. Several steps are taken to rationalise these observations. The dominant contribution of Ps diffusion to the PALS response is confirmed by capping the external surface of the zeolite crystals with tetraethylorthosilicate, which greatly enhances the sensitivity to the micropore network. A one-dimensional model is constructed to predict the out-diffusion of Ps from a zeolite crystal, which is validated experimentally by comparing coffin-shaped single crystals of varying size. Calculation of the trends expected on the application of fast or moderated positrons indicates that the distinctions in the initial distribution of Ps at the crystal level cannot explain the limited sensitivity of the former to the mesopore architecture. Instead, we propose that the greater penetration of fast positrons within the sample increases the probability of Ps re-entry from intercrystalline voids into mesopores connected with the external surface of zeolite crystals, thereby reducing their fractional escape. PMID:26975204

  17. Utility of positron annihilation lifetime technique for the assessment of spectroscopic data of some charge-transfer complexes derived from N-(1-Naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Adam, Abdel Majid A; Sharshar, T; Saad, Hosam A; Eldaroti, Hala H

    2014-03-25

    In this work, structural, thermal, morphological, pharmacological screening and positron annihilation lifetime measurements were performed on the interactions between a N-(1-Naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (NEDA·2HCl) donor and three types of acceptors to characterize these CT complexes. The three types of acceptors include π-acceptors (quinol and picric acid), σ-acceptors (iodine) and vacant orbital acceptors (tin(IV) tetrachloride and zinc chloride). The positron annihilation lifetime parameters were found to be dependent on the structure, electronic configuration, the power of acceptors and molecular weight of the CT complexes. The positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be used as a probe for the formation of charge-transfer (CT) complexes. PMID:24291622

  18. Positron annihilation spectroscopy with magnetically analyzed beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Lifetime measurements with magnetically analyzed positron beams were made in condensed media with uniform and non-uniform properties. As expected, the lifetime values with magnetically analyzed positron beams in uniform targets are similar to those obtained with conventional positron sources. The lifetime values with magnetically analyzed beams in targets which have non-uniform properties vary with positron energy and are different from the conventional positron source derived lifetime values in these targets.

  19. Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

  20. Defects in electron-irradiated GaAs studied by positron lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Polity, A.; Rudolf, F.; Nagel, C.; Eichler, S.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    1997-04-01

    A systematic study of electron-irradiation-induced defects in GaAs was carried out. The irradiation was performed at low temperature (4 K) with an incident energy of 2 MeV. Both, the defect formation and annealing behavior were studied in dependence on the fluence (10{sup 15}--10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}2}) in undoped, n-, and p-doped GaAs. Temperature-dependent positron lifetime measurements were performed between 20 and 600 K. The thermal stability of defects was studied by annealing experiments in the temperature range of 90--600 K. A defect complex, which anneals in a main stage at 300 K, was found in all GaAs samples after electron irradiation. A possible candidate for this defect is a complex of a vacancy connected with an intrinsic defect. A second vancancylike defect was observed in n-type material after annealing at 550 K. This defect was assumed to be in the As sublattice. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Probing the amphiphile micellar to hexagonal phase transition using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aurelia W; Fong, Celesta; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2013-07-15

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) has been utilised only sparingly for structural characterisation in self assembled materials. Inconsistencies in approaches to experimental configuration and data analysis between studies has complicated comparisons between studies, meaning that the technique has not provided a cohesive data set across the study of different self assembled systems that advance the technique towards an important tool in soft matter research. In the current work a systematic study was conducted using ionic and non-ionic micellar systems with increasing surfactant concentration to probe positron behaviour on changes between micellar phase structures, and data analysed using contemporary approaches to fit four component spectra. A characteristic orthopositronium lifetime (in the organic regions) of 3.5±0.2 ns was obtained for the hexagonal phase for surfactants with C12 alkyl chains. Chemical quenching of the positron species was also observed for systems with ionic amphiphiles. The application of PALS has also highlighted an inconsistency in the published phase diagram for the octa(ethylene oxide) monododecyl ether (C12EO8) system. These results provide new insight into how the physical properties of micellar systems can be related to PALS parameters and means that the PALS technique can be applied to other more complex self-assembled amphiphile systems. PMID:23643250

  2. Measurement of Rydberg positronium fluorescence lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements of the fluorescence lifetimes of positronium (Ps) atoms with principal quantum numbers n =10 -19 . Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states were produced via a two-color two-step 1 3S→2 3P→n 3S/n measured time-of-flight distributions were used to determine the mean lifetimes of the Rydberg levels, yielding values ranging from 3 μ s to 26 μ s . Our data are in accord with the expected radiative lifetimes of Rydberg-Stark states of Ps.

  3. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau ..-->.. nu/sub tau/W and b ..-->.. cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  4. Lifetime measurement in ^170Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Krücken, R.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Cooper, J. R.; Cederkäll, J.; Caprio, M.; Novak, J. R.; Zamfir, N. V.; Barton, C.

    1999-10-01

    The nature of the low lying K^π=0^+ excitations in deformed nuclei have recently been subject of intense discussion. In this context we present results from a Coulomb excitation experiment on ^170Yb using a 70MeV ^16O beam on a gold backed, 1.5 mg/cm^2 thick ^170Yb target. The beam was delivered by the ESTU tandem accelerator of WNSL at Yale University. Gamma rays were detected by the YRAST Ball array in coincidence with back-scattered ^16O particles, which were detected in an array of 8 solar cells. Lineshapes were observed for several transitions from collective states in ^170Yb and the lifetimes for those states were extracted using a standard DSAM analysis. The results will be presented together with a short introduction to the solar cell array at Yale (SCARY) that was used to make angular selection of the excited ^170Yb nuclei. This work is supported by the US-DOE under grant numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  5. Photo-degradation of Lexan polycarbonate studied using positron lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hareesh, K.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Pandey, A. K.; Meghala, D.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2013-02-05

    The free volume properties of pristine and UV irradiated Lexan polycarbonate have been investigated using Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS). The decrease in o-Ps life time and free volume size of irradiated sample is attributed to free volume modification and formation of more stable free radicals. These free radicals are formed due to the breakage of C-O bonds in Lexan polycarbonate after irradiation. This is also supported by the decrease in the intensity of C-O bond after exposure to UV-radiation as studied from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and it also shows that benzene ring does not undergo any changes after irradiation.

  6. A positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopic study of the corrosion protective properties of epoxy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to measure the free volume cavity sizes and free volume fractions of crosslinked epoxy coatings on steel before and after saturation with liquid water at 23[degrees]C. A direct linear relationship between the equilibrium volume fraction of water absorbed and the dry relative free volume fraction of bisphenol A epoxy coatings was found. The free volume cavity sizes and the number of free volume cavities per unit volume of these epoxies were found to decrease after water saturation. These decreases are ascribed to the occupation of 13-17% of the free volume cavities by 2-4 water molecules per cavity. The free volume cavity size of polyglycol diepoxides was found to increase after water saturation. This increase is ascribed to the expansion of the free volume cavities by water, which is substantiated by the macroscopic swelling observed in these coatings. An inverse, linear relationship between the equilibrium water uptake and the relative free volume fraction of these coatings were observed. This result coupled with the fact that less than one molecule of nitrobenzene was determined to fit into an epoxy free volume cavity, and that nitrobenzene is quite soluble in most of the epoxides, indicates that other factors besides the magnitude of the free volume fraction affect the amount of solvent absorbed by epoxy coatings. The small percentage of free volume occupied by water and the small number of water molecules capable of filling each void of the bisphenol A epoxies after water saturation correlate to the high impedance values and the good corrosion protection of these coatings, suggesting that water passes through these coatings by slow diffusion through the connected free volume cavities in the coating. Increases in the free volume cavity sizes of the polyglycol diepoxides after water saturation correlate to the low impedance and the poor corrosion protection of these coatings.

  7. Measurement of the D(s)+ lifetime.

    PubMed

    Link, J M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Castromonte, C; Machado, A A; Magnin, J; Massafferi, A; de Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Stenson, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F L; Pacetti, S; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; DiCorato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Göbel, C; Hernandez, H; Lopez, A M; Mendez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Ramirez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Luiggi, E; Moore, J E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2005-07-29

    A high statistics measurement of the D(s)+ lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. We describe the analysis of the two decay modes, D(s)+ --> phi(1020)pi+ and D(s)+ -->K*(892)0K+, used for the measurement. The measured lifetime is 507.4 +/- 5.5(stat) +/- 5.1(syst) fs using 8961 +/- 105 D(s)+ --> phi(1020)pi+ and 4680 +/- 90 D(s)+ --> K*(892)0K+ decays. This is a significant improvement over the present world average. PMID:16090867

  8. Measurement of the Omega0(c) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Iori, M.; Ayan, A.S.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, P.S.; Dauwe, L.J.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a precise measurement of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime. The data were taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment using 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. The measurement has been made using 83 {+-} 19 reconstructed {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in the {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} decay modes. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is measured to be 65 {+-} 13(stat) {+-} 9(sys) fs.

  9. Measurement of the tau lepton lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, D.; Deschizeaux, B.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mir, Ll. M.; Pacheco, A.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Gao, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Atwood, W. B.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boudreau, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Hagelberg, R.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Kasemann, M.; Knobloch, J.; Lançon, E.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Mattison, T.; Meinhard, H.; Menary, S.; Meyer, T.; Minten, A.; Miotto, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Nash, J.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Roth, A.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Bencheikh, A. M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Gamess, A.; Harvey, J.; Orteu, S.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Colrain, P.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Taylor, G.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Barczewski, T.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Roehn, S.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bernard, V.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Qian, Z.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Becker, H.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Frank, M.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Pan, Y.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Takashima, M.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Bertin, V.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, X.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Abbaneo, D.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Gatto, C.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Medacalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Wildish, T.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Kozanecki, W.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Martin, J.; Parker, D.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Mirabito, L.; Schäfer, U.; Seywerd, H.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Schmitt, M.; Shi, Z. H.; Tang, Y. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1992-04-01

    The mean lifetime of the τ lepton is measured from a sample of Z-->τ+τ- decays observed with the ALEPH detector at LEP in 1989 and 1990. A new technique is applied to the events containing two one-prong decays: the lifetime is measured from the observed correlation between the impact parameters and azimuthal angles of the two charged tracks. The lifetime is also determined from measured vertex displacements for three-prong decays and track impact parameters for one-prong decays. The combined results is ττ=291 +/- 13 (stat) +/-6 (syst.) fs. Supported by the US Department of Energy, contract DE-AC02-76ER00881.

  10. Updated measurement of the τ lepton lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-11-01

    A new measurement of the mean lifetime of the τ lepton is presented. Three different analysis methods are applied to a sample of 90 000 τ pairs, collected in 1993 and 1994 with the ALEPH detector at LEP. The average of this measurement and those previously published by ALEPH is ττ=290.1+/-1.5+/-1.1 fs.

  11. Measurements of the b baryon lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, L.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cassel, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wanke, R.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Gambino, D.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, L. M.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Using about 1.5 million hadronic Z decays recorded with the ALEPH detector, the lifetime of the b baryons has been measured using two independent data samples. From a maximum likelihood fit to the impact parameter distribution of leptons in 519 Λℓ - combinations containing a b baryon sample of 290 decays, the measured b baryon lifetime is τb-baryon = 1.05 -0.11+0.12(stat)±0.09(syst) ps. The lifetime of the Λb0 baryon from a maximum likelihood fit to the proper time distribution of 58 Λc+ℓ - candidates containing a Λb0 sample of 44 decays, is τΛb0 = 1.02 -0.18+0.23(stat) ± 0.06(syst) ps.

  12. Measurement of the Bs0 lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Mattison, T.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Fouque, G.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Karger, C.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Patton, S.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Ross, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kimfn 19, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Valassi, A.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1994-02-01

    The lifetime of the Bs0 has been measured in a data sample of 8890000 hadronic events recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP. After background subtraction 30.8 ± 6.9 events are attributed to the semileptonic decay of the Bs0 to a Ds- and an opposite-sign lepton. A maximum-likelihood fit to the distribution of the proper times of these events yields a Bs0 lifetime of τBs = 1.92 -0.35+0.45 ± 0.04 ps.

  13. Confined water in controlled pore glass CPG-10-120 studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šauša, O.; Mat'ko, I.; Illeková, E.; Macová, E.; Berek, D.

    2015-06-01

    The solidification and melting of water confined in the controlled pore glass (CPG) with average pore size 12.6 nm has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The fully-filled sample of CPG by water as well as the samples of CPG with different content of water were used. The measurements show the presence of amorphous and crystalline phases of water in this type and size of pores, freezing point depression of a confined liquid and presence of certain transitions at lower temperatures, which could be detected only for cooling regime. The localization of confined water in the partially filled pores of CPG at room temperature was studied.

  14. Per-fluorinated sulfonic acid/PTFE copolymer studied by positron annihilation lifetime and gas permeation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Hamdy F. M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.; Ohira, A.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism of gas permeation in per-fluorinated sulfonic acid/PTFE copolymer Fumapem® membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells has been investigated from the viewpoint of free volume. Three different samples, Fumapem® F-950, F-1050 and F-14100 membranes with ion exchange capacity (IEC) = 1.05, 0.95 and 0.71 meq/g, respectively were used after drying. Free volume was quantified using the positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) technique and gas permeabilities were measured for O2 and H2 as function of temperature. Good linear correlation between the logarithm of the permeabilities at different temperatures and reciprocal free volume indicate that gas permeation in dry Fumapem® is governed by the free volume. Nevertheless permeabilities are much smaller than the corresponding flexible chain polymer with a similar free volume size due to stiff chains of the perfluoroethylene backbone.

  15. Porous glasses as a matrix for incorporation of photonic materials. Pore determination by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisfeld, Pore determination by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy R.; Saraidarov, T.; Jasinska, B.

    2004-07-01

    Porous glasses prepared by the sol-gel technique have a variety of applications when incorporated by photonic materials: tunable lasers, sensors, luminescence solar concentrators, semiconductor quantum dots, biological markers. The known methods of pore size determinations, the nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry allow to determine the sizes of open pores. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) allows to determine pore sizes also of closed pores. As an example we have performed measurements of non-doped zirconia-silica-polyurethane (ZSUR) ormocer glasses and the same glasses doped with lead sulfide quantum dots. The pore radii range between 0.25-0.38 nm, total surface area 15.5-23.8 m 2/g.

  16. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisker, Wolfgang; Klocke, Axel

    1997-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide insights int eh dynamic and structural properties of dyes and their micro- environment. The implementation of fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometric systems allows to monitor large cell and particle populations with high statistical significance. In our system, a modulated laser beam is used for excitation and the phase shift of the fluorescence signal recorded with a fast computer controlled digital oscilloscope is processed digitally to determine the phase shift with respect to a reference beam by fast fourier transform. Total fluorescence intensity as well as other parameters can be determined simultaneously from the same fluorescence signal. We use the epi-illumination design to allow the use of high numerical apertures to collect as much light as possible to ensure detection of even weak fluorescence. Data storage and processing is done comparable to slit-scan flow cytometric data using data analysis system. The results are stored, displayed, combined with other parameters and analyzed as normal listmode data. In our report we discuss carefully the signal to noise ratio for analog and digital processed lifetime signals to evaluate the theoretical minimum fluorescence intensity for lifetime measurements. Applications to be presented include DNA staining, parameters of cell functions as well as different applications in non-mammalian cells such as algae.

  17. Do positrons measure atomic and molecular diameters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Jan; Fedus, Kamil; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.

    2016-07-01

    We report on density functional calculations (DFT) of elastic integral scattering cross-sections for positron collisions with argon, krypton, nitrogen and methane. The long-range asymptotic polarization potential is described using higher-order terms going much beyond an induced dipole potential (- α / r 4) while the short-range interaction is modeled by two different forms of electron - positron correlation potential (Boroński-Nieminen and Quantum Monte Carlo potentials). The results of both approaches agree quite well with the recent theoretical and measured values. Based on the present and previous theoretical and experimental data we discuss some systematics observed in integral scattering cross-sections below the positronium formation threshold. In particular we point out on the correlation between the values of scattering cross-sections and atomic dimensions.

  18. Measurement of the τ lifetime at SLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C. J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; D'oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J.; Daoudi, M.; de Sangro, R.; de Simone, P.; dell'orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P. Y.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Falciai, D.; Fero, M. J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hart, E. L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kim, Y.; King, M. E.; King, R.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Labs, J. F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Mours, B.; Müller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P. E.; Rochester, L. S.; Rothberg, J. E.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schaffner, S. F.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schneekloth, U.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Shapiro, S. L.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Snyder, J. A.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Torrence, E.; Turk, J. D.; Usher, T.; Va'vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Waite, A. P.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, D. A.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zeitlin, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhou, J.

    1995-11-01

    A measurement of the lifetime of the τ lepton has been made using a sample of 1671 Z0-->τ+τ- decays collected by the SLD detector at the SLC. The measurement benefits from the small and stable collision region at the SLC and the precision pixel vertex detector of the SLD. Three analysis techniques have been used: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The combined result is ττ=297+/-9 (stat)+/-5(syst) fs.

  19. On estimating mean lifetimes by a weighted sum of lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosper, Harrison Bertrand

    1987-10-01

    Given N lifetime measurements an estimate of the mean lifetime can be obtained from a weighted sum of these measurements. We derive exact expressions for the probability density function, the moment-generating function, and the cumulative distribution function for the weighted sum. We indicate how these results might be used in the estimation of particle lifetimes. The probability distribution function of Yost for the distribution of lifetime measurements with finite measurement error is our starting point.

  20. Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2007-05-22

    Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in heterogeneous scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Goro; Awasthi, Kamlesh; Furukawa, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence lifetime in heterogeneous multiple light scattering systems is analyzed by an algorithm without solving the diffusion or radiative transfer equations. The algorithm assumes that the optical properties of medium are constant in the excitation and emission wavelength regions. If the assumption is correct and the fluorophore is a single species, the fluorescence lifetime can be determined by a set of measurements of temporal point-spread function of the excitation light and fluorescence at two different concentrations of the fluorophore. This method is not dependent on the heterogeneity of the optical properties of the medium as well as the geometry of the excitation-detection on an arbitrary shape of the sample. The algorithm was validated by an indocyanine green fluorescence in phantom measurements and demonstrated by an in vivo measurement.

  2. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  3. The influence of microstructure on the sintering process in crystalline metal powders investigated by positron lifetime spectroscopy: II. Tungsten powders with different powder-particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staab, T. E. M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Vetter, B.; Kieback, B.; Lange, G.; Klimanek, P.

    1999-02-01

    Compacts of tungsten powder with five different powder-particle sizes (from 0953-8984/11/7/010/img7 to 0953-8984/11/7/010/img8) are subjected to pressureless sintering. We investigate the change in microstructure during the sintering process by positron lifetime spectroscopy. So as to be able to distinguish between defects having the same positron lifetime, we investigate their kinetics when the sample is annealed. In particular, we consider the annealing out of vacancy clusters after low-temperature electron irradiation, as well as recovery and recrystallization of a tungsten sheet, in as-manufactured form. Making measurements on uncompacted powder, we find an increasing fraction of positrons annihilating in surface states with decreasing powder-particle size. The powder-particle and grain sizes (influencing the x-ray domain size) are monitored additionally by means of metallography and x-ray diffraction. We find that all of the methods give results in agreement with each other. The small grain sizes at lower temperature, about one fifth of the powder-particle size, cause positrons to annihilate at grain boundaries, leading to vacancy-cluster-like signals. At the intensive-shrinkage stage, there are certainly contributions from different shrinkage mechanisms. The observed shrinkage rates can be explained by Coble creep. It is possible that dislocations also play a role as vacancy sources and sinks, since the intensive-shrinkage stage occurs in a temperature region wherein recrystallization takes place.

  4. Lifetime Measurements of Levels in 160Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casarella, Clark; Aprahamian, Ani; Crider, Ben; Lesher, Shelly; Marsh, Ian; Peters, Erin; Prados-Estevez, Francisco; Smith, Mallory; Vanhoy, Jeffrey; Yates, Steven

    2013-10-01

    The rare earth region of nuclei has been well established as a region of deformation for decades. However, the nature of vibrations built on a deformed ground state remain far from understood and present an oustanding challenge to nuclear structure physics. Studies of 158Gd has shown a preponderance of excited 0+ states with varying degrees of collectivity. We have measured level lifetimes, reduced transition probabilities and angular distributions of gamma-rays excited by inelastic neutron scattering and the use of the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM) at the University of Kentucky 7 MV Van de Graaff Accelerator Facility. Low lying excited states of 160Gd were populated up to an excitation energy of E < 2 MeV. We will present and discuss the measured level lifetimes of 160Gd and their implied degrees of collectivity. This work was supported by the NSF under contract numbers PHY-1068192, PHY-12-05412, and PHY-0956310.

  5. Electron beam induced microstructural changes and electrical conductivity in Bakelite polymer RPC detector material: A positron lifetime study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneesh Kumar, K. V.; Ningaraju, S.; Munirathnamma, L. M.; Ravikumar, H. B.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    In order to explore the structural modification induced electrical conductivity, samples of Bakelite RPC polymer detector materials were exposed to 8 MeV of electron beam with the irradiation dose from 20 kGy to 100 kGy in steps of 20 kGy. The microstructural changes upon electron beam irradiation have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. Positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime and its intensity show chain scission at lower doses (20 kGy, 40 kGy) followed by cross-linking beyond 40 kGydue to the radical reactions. The reduction in electrical conductivity of Bakelite material beyond 60 kGy is correlated to the conducting pathways and cross-links in the polymer matrix. The appropriate doses of electron beam irradiation of Bakelite material may reduce the leakage current and hence improves the performance of the detector.

  6. Free volume of mixed cation borosilicate glass sealants elucidated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and its correlation with glass properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Prasanta K.; Rath, Sangram K.; Sharma, Sandeep K.; Sudarshan, Kathi; Pujari, Pradeep K.; Chongdar, Tapas K.; Gokhale, Nitin M.

    2015-01-01

    The role of La+3/Sr+2 ratios, which is varied from 0.08 to 5.09, on density, molar volume, packing fraction, free volume, thermal and electrical properties in strontium lanthanum aluminoborosilicate based glass sealants intended for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications is evaluated. The studies reveal expansion of the glass network evident from increasing molar volume and decreasing packing fraction of glasses with progressive La+3 substitutions. The molecular origin of these macroscopic structural features can be accounted for by the free volume parameters measured from positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The La+3 induced expanded glass networks show increased number of subnanoscopic voids with larger sizes, as revealed from the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime and its intensity. A remarkably direct correspondence between the molar volume and fractional free volume trend is established with progressive La2O3 substitution in the glasses. The effect of these structural changes on the glass transition temperature, softening temperature, coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal stability as well as electrical conductivity has been studied.

  7. Measurement of the {tau} lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Falciai, D.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; (The SLD Collabor...

    1995-11-01

    A measurement of the lifetime of the {tau} lepton has been made using a sample of 1671 {ital Z}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} decays collected by the SLD detector at the SLC. The measurement benefits from the small and stable collision region at the SLC and the precision pixel vertex detector of the SLD. Three analysis techniques have been used: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The combined result is {tau}{sub {tau}}=297{plus_minus}9 (stat){plus_minus}5(syst) fs.

  8. A measurement of the b baryon lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Pacheco, A.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Atwood, W. B.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boudreau, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lançon, E.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Mattison, T.; Meinhard, H.; Menary, S.; Meyer, T.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Roth, A.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Bencheikh, A. M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bernard, V.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Qian, Z.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Takashima, M.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Bertin, V.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, X.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Abbaneo, D.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Mirabito, L.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Schmitt, M.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    In 451 000 hadronic Z 0 decays, recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP, the yields of Λℓ - and Λℓ + combinations are measured. Semileptonic decays of b baryons result in a signal of 122± 18 (stat.) -23+22 (syst.) Λℓ - combinations. From a fit to the impact parameter distributions of the leptons in the Λℓ - sample, the lifetime of b baryons is measured to be 1.12 -0.29+0.32 (stat.) ±0.16 (syst.) ps.

  9. Level Lifetime Measurements in ^150Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C. J.; Krücken, R.; Beausang, C. W.; Caprio, M. A.; Casten, R. F.; Cooper, J. R.; Hecht, A. A.; Newman, H.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Wolf, A.; Zyromski, K. E.; Zamfir, N. V.; Börner, H. G.

    2000-10-01

    Shape/phase coexistence and the evolution of structure in the region around ^152Sm have recently been of great interest. Experiments performed at WNSL, Yale University, measured the lifetime of low spin states in a target of ^150Sm with the recoil distance method (RDM) and the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM). The low spin states, both yrast and non-yrast, were populated via Coulomb excitation with a beam of ^16O. The experiments were performed with the NYPD plunger in conjunction with the SPEEDY γ-ray array. The SCARY array of solar cells was used to detect backward scattered projectiles, selecting forward flying Coulomb excited target nuclei. The measured lifetimes yield, for example, B(E2) values for transitions such as the 2^+2 arrow 2^+1 and the 2^+3 arrow 0^+_1. Data from the RDM measurment and the DSAM experiment will be presented. This work was supported by the US DOE under grants DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  10. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS): a probe for molecular organisation in self-assembled biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Fong, Celesta; Dong, Aurelia W; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-07-21

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been shown to be highly sensitive to conformational, structural and microenvironmental transformations arising from subtle geometric changes in molecular geometry in self-assembling biomimetic systems. The ortho-positronium (oPs) may be considered an active probe that can provide information on intrinsic packing and mobility within low molecular weight solids, viscous liquids, and soft matter systems. In this perspective we provide a critical overview of the literature in this field, including the evolution of analysis software and experimental protocols with commentary upon the practical utility of PALS. In particular, we discuss how PALS can provide unique insight into the macroscopic transport properties of several porous biomembrane-like nanostructures and suggest how this insight may provide information on the release of drugs from these matrices to aid in developing therapeutic interventions. We discuss the potentially exciting and fruitful application of this technique to membrane dynamics, diffusion and permeability. We propose that PALS can provide novel molecular level information that is complementary to conventional characterisation techniques. PMID:25948334

  11. Analysis of positron annihilation lifetime data by numerical Laplace inversion: Corrections for source terms and zero-time shift errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Roger B.

    1991-05-01

    We have recently described modifications to the program CONTIN [S.W. Provencher, Comput. Phys. Commun. 27 (1982) 229] for the solution of Fredholm integral equations with convoluted kernels of the type that occur in the analysis of positron annihilation lifetime data [R.B. Gregory and Yongkang Zhu, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A290 (1990) 172]. In this article, modifications to the program to correct for source terms in the sample and reference decay curves and for shifts in the position of the zero-time channel of the sample and reference data are described. Unwanted source components, expressed as a discrete sum of exponentials, may be removed from both the sample and reference data by modification of the sample data alone, without the need for direct knowledge of the instrument resolution function. Shifts in the position of the zero-time channel of up to half the channel width of the multichannel analyzer can be corrected. Analyses of computer-simulated test data indicate that the quality of the reconstructed annihilation rate probability density functions is improved by employing a reference material with a short lifetime and indicate that reference materials which generate free positrons by quenching positronium formation (i.e. strong oxidizing agents) have lifetimes that are too long (400-450 ps) to provide reliable estimates of the lifetime parameters for the shortlived components with the methods described here. Well-annealed single crystals of metals with lifetimes less than 200 ps, such as molybdenum (123 ps) and aluminum (166 ps) do not introduce significant errors in estimates of the lifetime parameters and are to be preferred as reference materials. The performance of our modified version of CONTIN is illustrated by application to positron annihilation in polytetrafluoroethylene.

  12. Physical Selectivity of Molecularly Imprinted polymers evaluated through free volume size distributions derived from Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasang, T.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    The technique of imprinting molecules of various sizes in a stable structure of polymer matrix has derived multitudes of applications. Once the template molecule is extracted from the polymer matrix, it leaves behind a cavity which is physically (size and shape) and chemically (functional binding site) compatible to the particular template molecule. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) is a well known technique to measure cavity sizes precisely in the nanoscale and is not being used in the field of MIPs effectively. This method is capable of measuring nanopores and hence suitable to understand the physical selectivity of the MIPs better. With this idea in mind, we have prepared molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with methacrylicacid (MAA) as monomer and EGDMA as cross linker in different molar ratio for three different size template molecules, viz. 4-Chlorophenol (4CP)(2.29 Å), 2-Nephthol (2NP) (3.36 Å) and Phenolphthalein (PP) (4.47Å). FTIR and the dye chemical reactions are used to confirm the complete extraction of the template molecules from the polymer matrix. The free volume size and its distribution have been derived from the measured o-Ps lifetime spectra. Based on the free volume distribution analysis, the percentage of functional cavities for the three template molecules are determined. Percentage of functional binding cavities for 4-CP molecules has been found out to be 70.2% and the rest are native cavities. Similarly for 2NP it is 81.5% and nearly 100% for PP. Therefore, PALS method proves to be very precise and accurate for determining the physical selectivity of MIPs.

  13. Plunger Lifetime Measurements in 102Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyva, G.; Spyrou, A.; Axiotis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Saha, B.; Liennemann, A.; Vlastou, R.; Napoli, D. R.; Marginean, N.; Rusu, C.; De Angelis, G.; Ur, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Balabanski, D. L.; Julin, R.

    2006-04-26

    Recently, an intense experimental effort has been devoted to the search of empirical proofs of critical-point symmetries in nuclear structure. These symmetries describe shape-phase transitions and provide parameter-free predictions (up to over-all scale factors) for excitation spectra and B(E2) values. This contribution reports on recent plunger-lifetime measurements ON 102Pd carried out at LNL, Legnaro, with the Cologne plunger apparatus coupled to the GASP spectrometer and using the 92Zr(13C,3n)102Pd reaction at 48 MeV. According to the results of our measurements, 102Pd is so far the best known paradigm of the E(5) critical-point symmetry.

  14. Positron beam position measurement for a beam containing both positrons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sereno, N.S.; Fuja, R.

    1996-08-01

    Positron beam position measurement for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac beam is affected by the presence of electrons that are also captured and accelerated along with the positrons. This paper presents a method of measuring positron position in a beam consisting of alternating bunches of positrons and electrons. The method is based on Fourier analysis of a stripline signal at the bunching and first harmonic frequencies. In the presence of a mixed species beam, a certain linear combination of bunching and first harmonic signals depends only on the position and charge of one specie of particle. A formula is derived for the stripline signal at all harmonics of the bunching frequency and is used to compute expected signal power at the bunching and first harmonic frequencies for typical electron and positron bunch charges. The stripline is calibrated by measuring the signal power content at the bunching and first harmonic frequencies for a single species beam. A circuit is presented that will be used with an APS positron linac stripline beam position monitor to detect the bunching and first harmonic signals for a beam of positrons and electrons.

  15. Characteristics of vinyl-ester and carbon fiber composite dry and wet probe by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Mahmoud; Granata, Richard D.

    2015-03-01

    Carbon fiber composites of vinylester resins, Derakane 8084 and 510A, were studied dry and after water exposure. In this study, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to investigate the free volume fraction and the size of the free volume voids within the polymer matrix. The relative free volume (fractions replae by of positron lifetime intensities) in VE8084 polymer and in VE510A (Space) polymer were 35.2% and 13.8%, respectively. The free volume lifetime and intensities were determined as a function of the polymer thickness and significant differences were observed in both polymers with versus without post-curing. The effects of water uptake in these materials were also determined by PALS. Water uptake showed a 2% change in intensity of the longer lifetime (1.85 ns) in VE8084 polymer and in VE510A about 1.8%. The longer lifetime intensities in the wet composites were 17.1% in the 8084 polymer and its carbon fiber composite and 7.1% in the 510A polymer and its carbon fiber composite. For composite with 8084 polymer saturated (0.33% water gain) with seawater at 40 or 60 °C, no change in the longer lifetime intensity was observed which indicates no water entered the free volume voids (indicates replace by and) some differences between composite and neat polymer. For 510A resin the third lifetime intensity dropped from 7.1% to 3.9% indicating 48% of the free volume filled with water in the composite only after saturation with seawater with respect to dry one.

  16. Lifetime measurements in {sup 133}Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Emediato, L.G.; Rao, M.N.; Medina, N.H.; Seale, W.A.; Botelho, S.; Ribas, R.V.; Oliveira, J.R.; Cybulska, E.W.; Espinoza-Quinones, F.R.; Guimaraes, V.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Acquadro, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    Lifetimes of low-lying levels in the one- and three-quasiparticle bands in {sup 133}Ce have been measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift technique. The E2 transition strengths extracted for the negative parity yrast states are well described by the triaxial-rotor-plus-quasiparticle and the geometrical models, but the interacting-boson-plus-fermion predictions are too small by about a factor of 3. The B(M1) values extracted for the levels in the positive parity three-quasiparticle band are consistent with the previous {nu}h{sub 11/2}{circle_times}{pi}h{sub 11/2}{circle_times}{pi}g{sub 7/2} configuration assignment to this band. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Measurement of the τ-lepton lifetime at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Belous, K.; Shapkin, M.; Sokolov, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, Anu; Bhuyan, Bipul; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dutta, Deepanwita; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, Takanori; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, Igal; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, Jean; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlova, Galina; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, Todd; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ritter, M.; Rohrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Yoshihide; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santel, Daniel; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Stanic, S.; Stanic, M.; Steder, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Tatishvili, Gocha; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Vahsen, Sven E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Youngmin; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-01-23

    The lifetime of the Tau-lepton is measured using the process , where both leptons decay to . The result for the mean lifetime, based on of data collected with the Belle detector at the resonance and below, is . The first measurement of the lifetime difference between and is performed. The upper limit on the relative lifetime difference between positive and negative leptons is at 90% C.L. (That would make sense if ERICA could take RTF....)

  18. Measurement of Beam Lifetime and Applications for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    Beam lifetime studies for the SPEAR3 storage ring are presented. The three lifetime components are separated with lifetime measurements under various combinations of beam currents and fill patterns and vertical scraper scans. Touschek lifetime is studied with rf voltage scans and with the horizontal or vertical scrapers inserted. The measurements are explained with calculations based on the calibrated lattice model. Quantum lifetime measurements are performed with reduced longitudinal and horizontal apertures, respectively, from which we deduce the radiation energy loss down to a few keV per revolution and the horizontal beam size.

  19. Emittance and lifetime measurement with damping wigglers.

    PubMed

    Wang, G M; Shaftan, T; Cheng, W X; Guo, W; Ilinsky, P; Li, Y; Podobedov, B; Willeke, F

    2016-03-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a new third-generation storage ring light source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The storage ring design calls for small horizontal emittance (<1 nm-rad) and diffraction-limited vertical emittance at 12 keV (8 pm-rad). Achieving low value of the beam size will enable novel user experiments with nm-range spatial and meV-energy resolution. The high-brightness NSLS-II lattice has been realized by implementing 30-cell double bend achromatic cells producing the horizontal emittance of 2 nm rad and then halving it further by using several Damping Wigglers (DWs). This paper is focused on characterization of the DW effects in the storage ring performance, namely, on reduction of the beam emittance, and corresponding changes in the energy spread and beam lifetime. The relevant beam parameters have been measured by the X-ray pinhole camera, beam position monitors, beam filling pattern monitor, and current transformers. In this paper, we compare the measured results of the beam performance with analytic estimates for the complement of the 3 DWs installed at the NSLS-II. PMID:27036766

  20. Emittance and lifetime measurement with damping wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. M.; Shaftan, T.; Cheng, W. X.; Guo, W.; Ilinsky, P.; Li, Y.; Podobedov, B.; Willeke, F.

    2016-03-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a new third-generation storage ring light source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The storage ring design calls for small horizontal emittance (<1 nm-rad) and diffraction-limited vertical emittance at 12 keV (8 pm-rad). Achieving low value of the beam size will enable novel user experiments with nm-range spatial and meV-energy resolution. The high-brightness NSLS-II lattice has been realized by implementing 30-cell double bend achromatic cells producing the horizontal emittance of 2 nm rad and then halving it further by using several Damping Wigglers (DWs). This paper is focused on characterization of the DW effects in the storage ring performance, namely, on reduction of the beam emittance, and corresponding changes in the energy spread and beam lifetime. The relevant beam parameters have been measured by the X-ray pinhole camera, beam position monitors, beam filling pattern monitor, and current transformers. In this paper, we compare the measured results of the beam performance with analytic estimates for the complement of the 3 DWs installed at the NSLS-II.

  1. Lifetime Measurements of Trapped ^232Th^3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalatis, Michael; Chapman, Michael

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the low lying nuclear isomer state of ^229Th which is only several eV above the nuclear ground state [1]. To date, several groups are taking a variety of approaches to finding and exciting this unique state [2], including the use of trapped Th^3+ ions. Despite this attention, few precise measurements have been made of atomic lifetimes. In this work we present experiments to measure the 6D3/2 and 6D5/2 states using laser cooled ^232Th^3+ confined in a linear Paul trap.[4pt] [1] E. Peik and Chr. Tamm, Europhys. Lett. 61, 181 (2003); V. V. Flambaum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 092502 (2006); B. R. Beck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 142501 (2007).[0pt] [2] W. G. Rellergert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 200802 (2010); S. G. Porsev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 182501 (2010); C. J. Campbell et al., Phys. Rev. Let. 106, 223001 (2011).

  2. Cholesterol-Ceramide Interactions in Phospholipid and Sphingolipid Bilayers As Observed by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    García-Arribas, Aritz B; Axpe, Eneko; Mujika, Jon Iñaki; Mérida, David; Busto, Jon V; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Lopez, Xabier; García, Jose Ángel; Ugalde, Jesus M; Plazaola, Fernando; Goñi, Félix M

    2016-05-31

    Free volume voids in lipid bilayers can be measured by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This technique has been applied, together with differential scanning calorimetry and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the effects of cholesterol (Chol) and ceramide (Cer) on free volume voids in sphingomyelin (SM) or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. Binary lipid samples with Chol were studied (DPPC:Chol 60:40, SM:Chol 60:40 mol ratio), and no phase transition was detected in the 20-60 °C range, in agreement with calorimetric data. Chol-driven liquid-ordered phase showed an intermediate free volume void size as compared to gel and fluid phases. For SM and SM:Cer (85:15 mol:mol) model membranes measured in the 20-60 °C range the gel-to-fluid phase transition could be observed with a related increase in free volume, which was more pronounced for the SM:Cer sample. MD simulations suggest a hitherto unsuspected lipid tilting in SM:Cer bilayers but not in pure SM. Ternary samples of DPPC:Cer:Chol (54:23:23) and SM:Cer:Chol (54:23:23) were measured, and a clear pattern of free volume increase was observed in the 20-60 °C because of the gel-to-fluid transition. Interestingly, MD simulations showed a tendency of Cer to change its distribution along the membrane to make room for Chol in ternary mixtures. The results suggest that the gel phase formed in these ternary mixtures is stabilized by Chol-Cer interactions. PMID:27158737

  3. Positron scattering measurements for application to medical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, James

    2015-09-01

    While the use of positrons in medical imaging is now well established, there is still much to learn regarding the transport of positrons through the body, and the subsequent damage induced. Current models of dosimetry use only a crude approximation of the collision physics involved, and at low energies misrepresent the thermalisation process to a considerable degree. Recently, collaborative work has commenced to attempt to refine these models, incorporating a better representation of the underlying physics and trying to gain a better understanding of the damage done after the emission of a positron from a medical radioisotope. This problem is being attacked from several different angles, with new models being developed based upon established techniques in plasma and swarm physics. For all these models, a realistic representation of the collision processes of positrons with relevant molecular species is required. At the Australian National University, we have undertaken a program of measurements of positron scattering from a range of molecules that are important in biological systems, with a focus on analogs to DNA. This talk will present measurements of positron scattering from a range of these molecules, as well as describing the experimental techniques employed to make such measurements. Targets have been measured that are both liquid and solid at room temperature, and new approaches have been developed to get absolute cross section data. The application of the data to various models of positron thermalisation will also be described.

  4. Investigation of the free volume and ionic conducting mechanism of poly(ethylene oxide)-LiClO4 polymeric electrolyte by positron annihilating lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jing; Gong, Zhen-Li; Yan, Xiao-Li; Gao, Shu; Zhang, Zhong-Liang; Wang, Bo

    2012-10-01

    The positron annihilation lifetime and ionic conductivity are each measured as a function of organophilic rectorite (OREC) content and temperature in a range from 160 K to 300 K. According to the variation of ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime with temperature, the glassy transition temperature is determined. The continuous maximum entropy lifetime (MELT) analysis clearly shows that the OREC and temperature have important effects on o-Ps lifetime and free volume distribution. The experimental results show that the temperature dependence of ionic conductivity obeys the Vogel—Tammann—Fulcher (VTF) and Williams—Landel—Ferry (WLF) equations, implying a free-volume transport mechanism. A linear least-squares procedure is used to evaluate the apparent activation energy related to the ionic transport in the VTF equation and several important parameters in the WLF equation. It is worthwhile to notice that a direct linear relationship between the ionic conductivity and free volume fraction is established using the WLF equation based on the free volume theory for nanocomposite electrolyte, which indicates that the segmental chain migration and ionic migration and diffusion could be explained by the free volume theory.

  5. Positron annihilation lifetime studies of changes in free volume on some biorelevant nitrogen heterocyclic compounds and their S-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, K R; Khodair, A I; Shaban, S Y

    2015-11-01

    A series of N-heterocyclic compounds was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy as well as Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) at room temperature. The results showed that the formation probability and life time of ortho-positronium in this series are structure and electron-donation character dependent, and can give more information about the structure. The DBAR provides direct information about the change of core and valance electrons as well as the number of defect types present in these compounds. PMID:26272166

  6. Lifetime measurement of high spin states in (75) Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, Javid; Trivedi, T.; Maurya, K.; Mehrotra, I.; Palit, R.; Naik, Z.; Jain, H. C.; Negi, D.; Mahanto, G.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S.; Pancholi, S.C.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Yang, Y-C; Sun, Y.; Dahl, A.; Raju, M.K.; Appannababu, S.; Kumar, S.; Choudhury, D.; Jain, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    The lifetimes of high spin states of {sup 75}Kr have been determined via {sup 50}Cr ({sup 28}Si, 2pn) {sup 75}Kr reaction in positive parity band using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The transition quadrupole moments Q deduced from lifetime measurements have been compared with {sup 75}Br. Experimental results obtained from lifetime measurement are interpreted in the framework of projected shell model.

  7. Lifetime measurements in the superdeformed band of sup 192 Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, E.F.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fernandez, P.B.; Khoo, T.L.; Ridley, S.L.; Wolfs, F.L.H. ); Ye, D.; Beard, K.B.; Garg, U. ); Drigert, M.W. ); Benet, P.; Daly, P.J. ); Wyss, R. Royal Institute of Technology, S-10444 Stockholm ); Nazarewicz, W. )

    1990-06-25

    Lifetimes were measured for transitions in the superdeformed band of {sup 192}Hg with the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The results yield an essentially constant quadrupole moment of 20{plus minus}2 {ital e} b and indicate that the sidefeeding lifetimes are of the same order as the state lifetimes. The data are consistent with calculations using the cranked Woods-Saxon Strutinsky method with pairing.

  8. Positron annihilation lifetime characterization of oxygen ion irradiated rutile TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitel, Homnath; Sarkar, A.; Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Chattopadhyay, S.; Asokan, K.; Sanyal, D.

    2016-07-01

    Ferromagnetic ordering at room temperature has been induced in rutile phase of TiO2 polycrystalline sample by O ion irradiation. 96 MeV O ion induced defects in rutile TiO2 sample has been characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopic techniques. Positron annihilation results indicate the formation of cation vacancy (VTi, Ti vacancy) in these irradiated TiO2 samples. Ab initio density functional theoretical calculations indicate that in TiO2 magnetic moment can be induced either by creating Ti or O vacancies.

  9. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Holt, W.H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  10. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.; Buckingham, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  11. Confronting recent AMS-02 positron fraction and Fermi-LAT extragalactic γ-ray background measurements with gravitino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carquín, Edson; Díaz, Marco A.; Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; Panes, Boris; Viaux, Nicolás

    2016-03-01

    Recent positron flux fraction measurements in cosmic-rays (CR) made by the AMS-02 detector confirm and extend the evidence on the existence of a new (yet unknown) source of high energy electrons and positrons. We test the gravitino dark matter of bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric models as this electrons/positrons source. Being a long lived weak-interacting and spin 3/2 particle, it offers several particularities which makes it an attractive dark matter candidate. We compute the electron, positron and γ-ray fluxes produced by each gravitino decay channel as it would be detected at the Earth's position. Combining the flux from the different decay modes we are able to reproduce AMS-02 measurements of the positron fraction, as well as the electron and positron fluxes, with a gravitino dark matter mass in the range 1-3 TeV and lifetime of ˜1.0-0.7×1026 s. The high statistics measurement of electron and positron fluxes, and the flattening in the behaviour of the positron fraction recently found by AMS-02 allow us to determine that the preferred gravitino decaying mode by the fit is W±τ∓, unlike previous analyses. Then we study the viability of these scenarios through their implication in γ-ray observations. For this we use the Extragalactic γ-ray Background recently reported by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration and a state-of-the-art model of its known contributors. Based on the γ-ray analysis we exclude the gravitino parameter space which provides an acceptable explanation of the AMS-02 data. Therefore, we conclude that the gravitino of bilinear R-parity violating models is ruled out as the unique primary source of electrons and positrons needed to explain the rise in the positron fraction.

  12. Measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime using semileptonic decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-12-15

    We report a measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel Bs(0) --> Ds- mu+ nuX (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2004. Using 5176 reconstructed Ds- mu+ signal events, we have measured the Bs(0) lifetime to be tau(Bs(0))=1.398+/-0.044(stat)(-0.025)(+0.028)(syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime to date. PMID:17280267

  13. Measurement of the Bs0 Lifetime Using Semileptonic Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Anzelc, M. S.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Jesus, A. C. S. Assis; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Ay, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellavance, A.; Benitez, J. A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Berntzon, L.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Bloom, K.; Blumenschein, U.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Calvet, S.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevallier, F.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christofek, L.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; da Motta, H.; Das, A.; Das, M.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Martins, C. De Oliveira; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doidge, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dong, H.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fatakia, S. N.; Feligioni, L.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, A.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Ginther, G.; Gollub, N.; Gómez, B.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haefner, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegeman, J. G.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jakobs, K.; Jarvis, C.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Juste, A.; Käfer, D.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J. M.; Kalk, J. R.; Kappler, S.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Khatidze, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirby, M. H.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Kryemadhi, A.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuhl, T.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Lager, S.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Bihan, A.-C. Le; Lebrun, P.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lesne, V.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Z.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martens, M.; Mattingly, S. E. K.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; Meder, D.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Michaut, M.; Miettinen, H.; Millet, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Monk, J.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mulhearn, M.; Mundim, L.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Neustroev, P.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Obrant, G.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, N.; Oshima, N.; Otec, R.; Y Garzón, G. J. Otero; Owen, M.; Padley, P.; Parashar, N.; Park, S.-J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pawloski, G.; Perea, P. M.; Perez, E.; Peters, K.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pol, M.-E.; Pompoš, A.; Pope, B. G.; Popov, A. V.; da Silva, W. L. Prado; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rani, K. J.; Ranjan, K.; Rapidis, P. A.; Ratoff, P. N.; Renkel, P.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Rodrigues, R. F.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rud, V. I.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schmitt, C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shephard, W. D.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Siccardi, V.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, X.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spurlock, B.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Stevenson, K.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tamburello, P.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Tiller, B.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tomoto, M.; Toole, T.; Torchiani, I.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Unalan, R.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van den Berg, P. J.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vartapetian, A.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vint, P.; Vlimant, J.-R.; von Toerne, E.; Voutilainen, M.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, L.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Weerts, H.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wobisch, M.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xuan, N.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, C.; Yu, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.

    2006-12-01

    We report a measurement of the Bs0 lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel Bs0→Ds-μ+νX (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002 2004. Using 5176 reconstructed Ds-μ+ signal events, we have measured the Bs0 lifetime to be τ(Bs0)=1.398±0.044(stat)-0.025+0.028(syst)ps. This is the most precise measurement of the Bs0 lifetime to date.

  14. Quantitative carrier lifetime images optically measured on rough silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Martin C.; Pingel, Sebastian; The, Manuel; Warta, Wilhelm

    2007-06-01

    Results of optical carrier lifetime measurements like carrier density imaging significantly depend on surface conditions of the sample under test. Rough or textured surfaces have a severe impact on the measurement quality since they cause blurring and overestimation of the lifetime measurement. We propose a correction method for both, the adjustment of the absolute value and the restoration of the spatial distribution of the recombination lifetime. The absolute value is corrected by taking the emissivity of the sample into account. The unblurred signal distribution is obtained by mathematical deconvolution via Wiener filtering. For this purpose an appropriate point spread function is experimentally determined.

  15. Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime by Counting Trapped Protons

    PubMed Central

    Wietfeldt, F. E.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fei, X.; Snow, W. M.; Greene, G. L.; Pauwels, J.; Eykens, R.; Lamberty, A.; Van Gestel, J.

    2005-01-01

    We measured the neutron decay lifetime by counting in-beam neutron decay recoil protons trapped in a quasi-Penning trap. The absolute neutron beam fluence was measured by capture in a thin 6LiF foil detector with known efficiency. The combination of these measurements gives the neutron lifetime: τn = (886.8 ± 1.2 ± 3.2) s, where the first (second) uncertainty is statistical (systematic) in nature. This is the most precise neutron lifetime determination to date using an in-beam method. PMID:27308145

  16. The Effect of Alloying with Magnesium on the Annealing Behavior of Aluminum Alloys Studied by Positron Lifetime Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Hamed, M. O.

    The migration enthalpy Hivm for point defects and dislocations is estimated by using positron lifetime technique; point defects and dislocations are produced as a result of plastic deformation at room temperature (RT) for the decomposition sequence, namely 5005, 5052 and 5083, of commercial Al-Mg systems. The results show that Hivm for the three systems increases as the Mg content is increased to u1=0.34±0.09 eV, u2=0.39±0.12 eV, and u3=0.42±0.08 eV for the point defect state, and u1=1.12±0.08 eV and u2=1.37±0.13 eV for the dislocation state to 5005 and 5052, respectively. All the data are analyzed in terms of the two state trapping model.

  17. Nanocluster-associated vacancies in nanocluster-strengthened ferritic steel as seen via positron-lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Liu, C. T.; Miller, M. K.; Chen, Hongmin

    2009-01-01

    Nanocluster-strengthened ferritic alloys are promising as structural materials because of their excellent high-temperature strength and radiation-damage resistance. Recently, Fu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 225502 (2007)] predicted that vacancies play an essential role in the formation and stabilization of nanoclusters in these materials. Positron-lifetime spectroscopy has been used to test this theoretical prediction in a nanocluster-strengthened Fe-based alloy. Nanoclusters (2-4 nm in diameter) containing Ti, Y, and O have been observed in a mechanically alloyed ferritic steel by atom-probe tomography. Vacancy clusters containing four to six vacancies have also been found in this material. In contrast, no vacancy clusters were detected in similar alloys containing no nanoclusters. These results indicate that vacancies are a vital component of the nanoclusters in these alloys.

  18. Lifetime measurement of the 9s level of atomic francium.

    PubMed

    Aubin, S; Gomez, E; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D

    2003-11-01

    We use two-photon resonant excitation and time-correlated single-photon counting techniques on a sample of 210Fr atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optical trap to measure the lifetime of the 9s excited level. Direct measurement of the decay through the 7P(3/2) level at 851 nm yields a lifetime of 107.53 +/- 0.80 ns. PMID:14587813

  19. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section B; Microstructural Characterization of Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Pater, Ruth H.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1998-01-01

    Thermoset and thermoplastic polyimides have complementary physical/mechanical properties. Whereas thermoset polyimides are brittle and generally easier to process, thermoplastic polyimides are tough but harder to process. It is expected that a combination of these two types of polyimides may help produce polymers more suitable for aerospace applications. Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (S-IPNs) of thermoset LaRC(Trademark)-RP46 and thermoplastic LARC(Trademark)-IA polyimides were prepared in weight percent ratios ranging from 100:0 to 0: 100. Positron lifetime measurements were made in these samples to correlate their free volume features with physical/mechanical properties. As expected, positronium atoms are not formed in these samples. The second life time component has been used to infer the positron trap dimensions. The "free volume" goes through a minimum at about 50:50 ratio, suggesting that S-IPN samples are not merely solid solutions of the two polymers. These data and related structural properties of the S-IPN samples have been discussed in this paper.

  20. Temperature Dependent Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements in a Phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, Charles J.; Smith, R. Seth; Heath, Jonathan J.

    2012-03-01

    This poster will describe an undergraduate senior research project involving fluorescence lifetime measurements in a LaSO4:Eu phosphor compound. Specifically, this project seeks to determine the temperature dependence of the lifetime. The temperature of the phosphor will be varied using a heater block with temperature control. The phosphor will be excited with the 337 nm output of a Nitrogen Laser. An Oriel Monochromator will be used to disperse the fluorescence, and the lifetime for a particular wavelength will be determined from a photomultiplier tube signal. At the time of the presentation, this project will be nearing completion; and I will discuss my progress, successes, and challenges.

  1. A preliminary measurement of the average B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Manly, S.L.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    The average B hadron lifetime was measured using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLC in 1993. From a sample of {approximately}50,000 Z{sup 0} events, a sample enriched in Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} was selected by applying an impact parameter tag. The lifetime was extracted from the decay length distribution of inclusive vertices reconstructed in three dimensions. A binned maximum likelihood method yielded an average B hadron lifetime of {tau}{sub B} = 1.577{plus_minus}0.032(stat.){plus_minus}0.046(syst.) ps.

  2. A preliminary, precise measurement of the average B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    SLD Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    The average B hadron lifetime was measured using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLC in 1993. From a sample of {approximately}50,000 Z{sup 0} events, a sample enriched in Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} was selected by applying an impact parameter tag. The lifetime was extracted from the decay length distribution of inclusive vertices reconstructed in three dimensions. A binned maximum likelihood method yielded an average B hadron lifetime of {tau}{sub B} = 1.577 {plus_minus} 0.032(stat.) {plus_minus} 0.046(syst.) ps.

  3. Measurement of the b hadron lifetime with the dipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Patton, S.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Zimmermann, A.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; St. Denis, R.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jaffe, D. E.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Valassi, A.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Thompson, L. F.; Barbeiro, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Sau Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1993-09-01

    A measurement of the average lifetime of b hadrons has been performed with dipole method on a sample of 260 000 hadronic Z decays recorded with the ALEPH detector during 1991. The dipole is the distance between the vertices built in the opposite hemispheres. The mean dipole is extracted from all the events without attempting b enrichment. Comparing the average of the data dipole distribution with a Monte Carlo calibration curve obtained with different b lifetimes, an average b hadron lifetime of 1.51±0.08 ps is extracted.

  4. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of poly(ethylene terephthalate): Contributions from rigid and mobile amorphous fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Brian; Lin, Jun; Nazarenko, Sergei; Jamieson, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    Systematic divergences in the orthopositronium (o-Ps) annihilation lifetimes, τ_3, and intensities, I_3, are observed, when comparing melt-crystallized and cold-crystallized poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as a function of crystallinity. Following a previous analysis of corresponding deviations in oxygen permeability, the divergences in I3 and τ3 are traced to distinct characteristic values for the probability of o-Ps formation and o-Ps lifetime in the rigid amorphous phase (RAF) associated with the crystalline lamellae and the mobile amorphous regions (MAF) which are unperturbed by the presence of the crystal phase. Utilizing independent information on the volume fractions of RAF and MAF, a quantitative analysis of the o-Ps annihilation parameters is possible.

  5. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gamal, S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (Vf) in DAM-ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ3 and Vf increases while I3 slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ3, Vf and I3 are higher in CR-39 than DAM-ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently Vf increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and Vf in the polymer. A relationship between Vf and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  6. A precise measurement of the average b hadron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Casper, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Wanke, R.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Sau Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    An improved measurement of the average b hadron lifetime is performed using a sample of 1.5 million hadronic Z decays, collected during the 1991-1993 runs of ALEPH, with the silicon vertex detector fully operational. This uses the three-dimensional impact parameter distribution of lepton tracks coming from semileptonic b decays and yields an average b hadron lifetime of 1.533 ± 0.013 ± 0.022 ps.

  7. Updated measurement of the average b hadron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lançon, E.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Bencheikh, A. M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrad, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Qian, Z.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Takashima, M.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jaffe, D. E.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Mirabito, L.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Schmitt, M.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Sau Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1992-11-01

    An improved measurement of the average lifetime of b hadrons has been performed with the ALEPH detector. From a sample of 260 000 hadronic Z 0 decays, recorded during the 1991 LEP run with the silicon vertex detector fully operational, a fit to the impact parameter distribution of lepton tracks coming from semileptonic decays yields an average b hadron lifetime of 1.49 ± 0.03 ± 0.06 ps.

  8. An outline of positron measurements of superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Fluss, M.J.

    1991-03-01

    Positron measurements on superconducting oxides have gone through an evolution from divergent results of low statistical precision on samples of suspect quality to convergent results of higher statistical precision on high quality samples. We outline the elements affecting the progress of these experiments and questions that can be addressed at our present state of the art. 11 refs.

  9. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  10. New Millisecond Isomer Lifetime Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, M. Nelson, R.O.; Fotiades, N.; O'Donnell, J.M.

    2014-06-15

    New half-life measurements have been made of the millisecond isomers {sup 71m}Ge, {sup 114m2}I, {sup 208m}Bi, {sup 88m1}Y, {sup 88m2}Y, and {sup 75m}As populated in neutron-induced reactions. These measurements were made using the unique time structure of the LANSCE/WNR neutron source, by observing the γ-ray decays of the isomers during the time between the LANSCE proton macropulses. Two different LANSCE proton beam time structures were used. The GEANIE array of HPGe detectors was used to detect the γ-ray decays.

  11. Positron measurements in 2H-TaSe/sub 2/ crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jean, Y.C.; Fluss, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-dependent positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening experiments are reported on single crystals of 2H-TaSe/sub 2/ to search for effects from known charge-density-wave (CDW) phase transitions. The positron lifetime in the perfect lattice and in positron trapping sites were found to be 0.173 and 0.378 ns, respectively. The apparent activation energy for the thermally generated trapping sites was found to be 0.12 eV. Doppler broadening spectra exhibited no response to the known CDW phase transitions, nor any significant overall anisotropy in their temperature dependence.

  12. Precision lifetime measurements by single-proton counting

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Hill, W.T. III; Leone, S.R.

    1995-08-01

    There is renewed interest in the accurate measurement of lifetimes of excited states in alkalis in order to test ab initio theories which are needed for the interpretation of atomic parity nonconservation measurements. While it is often assumed that the fast-beam laser method yields the most accurate lifetimes, we demonstrated that an alternative technique, time-correlated single-photon counting, is capable of achieving comparable accuracy. Using this method at JILA, we measured the lifetimes of the 6p {sup 2}p{sub 1/2} and 6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels in atomic Cs with accuracies {approx}0.2-0.3%. A high-repetition rate, femtosecond, self-modelocked Ti:sapphire laser is used to excite Cs produced in a well-collimated atomic beam. The time interval between the excitation pulse and the arrival of a fluorescence photon is measured repetitively until the desired statistics are obtained. The lifetime results are 34.75(7) ns and 30.41(10) ns for the 6p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels, respectively. These lifetimes are in agreement with those extracted from ab initio many-ody perturbation theory calculations at the sub 1% level. The measurement errors are dominated by systematic effects, and methods to alleviate these and approach an accuracy of 0.1% were determined.

  13. Real-time background suppression during frequency domain lifetime measurements.

    PubMed

    Herman, Petr; Maliwal, Badri P; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Maliwal, Baldri P

    2002-10-01

    We describe real time background suppression of autofluorescence from biological samples during frequency domain or phase modulation measurements of intensity decays. For these measurements the samples were excited with a train of light pulses with widths below 1 ps. The detector was gated off for a short time period of 10 to 40 ns during and shortly after the excitation pulse. The reference signal needed for the frequency domain measurement was provided by a long-lifetime reference fluorophore which continues to emit following the off-gating pulse. Both the sample and the reference were measured under identical optical and electronic conditions avoiding the need for correction of the photomultiplier tube signal for the gating sequence. We demonstrate frequency domain background suppression using a mixture of short- and long-lifetime probes and for a long-lifetime probe in human plasma with significant autofluorescence. PMID:12381357

  14. Measurement of Metastable Lifetimes of Highly-Charged Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is part of a series of measurements of metastable lifetimes of highly-charged ions (HCIs) which contribute to optical absorption, emission and energy balance in the Interstellar Medium (ISM), stellar atmospheres, etc. Measurements were carried out using the 14-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) at the JPL HCI facility. The ECR provides useful currents of charge states such as C(sup(1-6)+), Mg(sup(1-6)+) and Fe(sup(1-17)+). In this work the HCI beam is focused into a Kingdon electrostatic ion trap for measuring lifetimes via optical decays.

  15. Relative Defect Density Measurements of Laser Shock Peened 316L Stainless Steel Using Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus A. Gagliardi; Bulent H. Sencer; A. W. Hunt; Stuart A. Maloy; George T. Gray III

    2011-12-01

    The surface of an annealed 316L stainless steel coupon was laser shock peened and Vickers hardness measurements were subsequently taken of its surface. This Vickers hardness data was compared with measurements taken using the technique of positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy. When compared, a correlation was found between the Vickers hardness data measurements and those made using Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Although materials with a high defect density can cause the S-parameter measurements to saturate, variations in the Sparameter measurements suggest that through further research the Doppler broadening technique could be used as a viable alternative to measuring a material's hardness. In turn, this technique, could be useful in industrial settings where surface hardness and surface defects are used to predict lifetime of components.

  16. Measuring Carrier Lifetime in GaAs by Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1986-01-01

    Luminescence proposed as nondestructive technique for measuring Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination lifetime GaAs. Sample irradiated, and luminescence escapes through surface. Measurement requires no mechanical or electrical contact with sample. No ohmic contacts or p/n junctions needed. Sample not scrapped after tested.

  17. Measurement of femtosecond atomic lifetimes using ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träbert, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Two types of experiment are described that both employ an electron beam ion trap for the production of highly charged ion species with the aim of then measuring atomic level lifetimes in the femtosecond range. In one experiment (done by Beiersdorfer et al. some time ago), the lifetime measurement depends on the associated line broadening. In a recent string of experiments at Linac Coherent Light Source Stanford, the HI-LIGHT collaboration employed pump-probe excitation using the FEL as a short-pulse X-ray laser.

  18. Lifetimes Measurement for High Spin States in 107Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, S. H.; Wu, X. G.; He, C. Y.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, Y.; Li, G. S.; Li, C. B.; Hu, S. P.; Cao, X. P.; Yu, B. B.; Zhu, L. H.; Xu, C.; Cheng, Y. Y.

    2013-11-01

    The excited states in 107Ag were populated through the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reaction 100Mo (11B, 4n) 107Ag at a beam energy of 46 MeV. 12 Compton suppressed HPGe detectors and 2 planar HPGe detectors were employed to detect the de-excited γ rays from the reaction residues. Lifetimes of high spin states in 107Ag have been measured using the Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM) and the deduced B(M1) and B(E2) transition probabilities have been derived from the measured lifetimes.

  19. Measurement of the Tau Lepton Lifetime at Opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janissen, Anna Cornelia

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes a new measurement of the tau (tau) lepton lifetime using two statistically independent techniques each associated with one of the two principle decay topologies of the tau to one and three charged particles, respectively. The measurement was performed with data collected in 1990 and 1991 at the OPAL detector at the LEP e^+e ^- colliding beam accelerator at CERN. The LEP collider operates at a significantly higher energy than previous e^+e^- colliders. This presents a new experimental opportunity to investigate the physics associated with the tau<=pton in general and the tau lifetime in particular. The tau lepton is one of three similar electron -like particles: e, mu, and tau. These leptons exhibit a hierarchy of masses with: m_{e} < m_ {mu} < m_{tau}. While the electron is stable, the mu and the tau are unstable and decay via the weak interaction charged current. It is a fundamental feature of the standard model of fundamental particles and their interactions that this weak charged current has exactly the same strength for each of the three leptons; a phenomenon called lepton universality. The tau lifetime, tau_tau, can be related to the mu lifetime, tau_ mu, and the average leptonic branching ratio, BR(tau to lnu| nu), by:tau_ tau = tau_mu {G_mu G_{e}over G_tau G_ l} ({m_muover m_tau})^5 {rm BR}(tautolnu|nu)R where R is a calculable factor to account for phase space and radiative corrections, and G _l is the Fermi effective coupling strength of the weak charged current to the lepton l. Lepton universality implies that G _mu = G_{e} = G_tau. The experimentally measured tau lifetime, together with the measurements of the other quantities in the above relation, can be interpreted as a direct test of lepton universality. The tau lifetime measured with each of the two independent techniques is: eqalign{tau_1 &rm= 296.4+/-7.1(stat.)+/- 3.8(sys.) fscr tau_3 &rm= 286.3+/-7.4(stat.)+/-5.2(sys.) fs.}The systematic uncertainties for each of the

  20. Fluorescence lifetime as a new parameter in analytical cytology measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Deka, Chiranjit; Lehnert, Bruce E.; Crissman, Harry A.

    1996-05-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to quantify fluorescence decay lifetimes on fluorochrome-labeled cells/particles. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved lifetime measurements, while preserving conventional FCM capabilities. Cells are analyzed as they intersect a high-frequency, intensity-modulated (sine wave) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence signals are processed by conventional and phase-sensitive signal detection electronics and displayed as frequency distribution histograms. In this study we describe results of fluorescence intensity and lifetime measurements on fluorescently labeled particles, cells, and chromosomes. Examples of measurements on intrinsic cellular autofluorescence, cells labeled with immunofluorescence markers for cell- surface antigens, mitochondria stains, and on cellular DNA and protein binding fluorochromes will be presented to illustrate unique differences in measured lifetimes and changes caused by fluorescence quenching. This innovative technology will be used to probe fluorochrome/molecular interactions in the microenvironment of cells/chromosomes as a new parameter and thus expand the researchers' understanding of biochemical processes and structural features at the cellular and molecular level.

  1. Reinforcement Mechanism Of Polyurethane-Urea/Clay Nanocomposites Probed By Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy And Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, S. K.; Patri, M.; Sudarshan, K.; Pujari, P. K.; Khakhar, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    A basis for quantitative analysis of the reinforcement mechanism of polyurethane-urea/clay nanocomposites using two characterization methods, positron annihilation life time spectroscopy (PALS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) is provided. DMA was used to measure the constrained volume fraction of amorphous soft segments induced by nanoclay and the storage modulus of the nanocomposites. The interfacial interactions in the nanocomposites were investigated by PALS. The modulus enhancement of the organoclay nanocomposites was found to have a good correlation with the volume fraction of the constrained region and the interfacial interactions.

  2. Lifetime measurement of the 8s level in francium

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Sprouse, G.D.; Orozco, L.A.; Galvan, A. Perez

    2005-06-15

    We measure the lifetime of the 8s level of {sup 210}Fr atoms on a magneto-optically trapped sample with time-correlated single-photon counting. The 7P{sub 1/2} state serves as the resonant intermediate level for two-step excitation of the 8s level completed with a 1.3-{mu}m laser. Analysis of the fluorescence decay through the 7P{sub 3/2} level gives 53.30{+-}0.44 ns for the 8s level lifetime.

  3. Measuring Luminescence Lifetime With Help of a DSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, J. D. S.

    2009-01-01

    An instrument for measuring the lifetime of luminescence (fluorescence or phosphorescence) includes a digital signal processor (DSP) as the primary means of control, generation of excitation signals, and analysis of response signals. The DSP hardware in the present instrument makes it possible to switch among a variety of operating modes by making changes in software only.

  4. Lifetime measurement of excited states in 105Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, V. K.; Govil, I. M.

    1986-11-01

    The levels up to about 2.1 MeV in 105Ag were excited via 105Pd(p,nγ) reaction. For the first time, lifetimes of energy levels at 1023, 1042, 1097, 1166, 1243, 1295, 1328, 1386, 1442, 1543, 1558, 1587, 1719, 1923, and 2081 keV have been measured using the Doppler shift attenuation technique.

  5. Measurement of masses and lifetimes of B hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Filthaut, F.; /Nijmegen U.

    2007-05-01

    We present recent measurements by the CDF and D{O} Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider on the masses and lifetimes of B hadrons. The results are compared to predictions based on Heavy Quark Effective Theory, lattice gauge theory, and quark models.

  6. Lifetime measurement of excited states in /sup 105/Ag

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, V.K.; Govil, I.M.

    1986-11-01

    The levels up to about 2.1 MeV in /sup 105/Ag were excited via /sup 105/Pd(p,n..gamma..) reaction. For the first time, lifetimes of energy levels at 1023, 1042, 1097, 1166, 1243, 1295, 1328, 1386, 1442, 1543, 1558, 1587, 1719, 1923, and 2081 keV have been measured using the Doppler shift attenuation technique.

  7. Inhomogeneous dephasing masks coherence lifetimes in ensemble measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Griffin, Graham B.; Engel, Gregory S.; Gray, Stephen K.

    2012-04-28

    An open question at the forefront of modern physical sciences is what role, if any, quantum effects may play in biological sensing and energy transport mechanisms. One area of such research concerns the possibility of coherent energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Spectroscopic evidence of long-lived quantum coherence in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment protein complexes (PPCs), along with theoretical modeling of PPCs, has indicated that coherent energy transport might boost efficiency of energy transport in photosynthesis. Accurate assessment of coherence lifetimes is crucial for modeling the extent to which quantum effects participate in this energy transfer, because such quantum effects can only contribute to mechanisms proceeding on timescales over which the coherences persist. While spectroscopy is a useful way to measure coherence lifetimes, inhomogeneity in the transition energies across the measured ensemble may lead to underestimation of coherence lifetimes from spectroscopic experiments. Theoretical models of antenna complexes generally model a single system, and direct comparison of single system models to ensemble averaged experimental data may lead to systematic underestimation of coherence lifetimes, distorting much of the current discussion. In this study, we use simulations of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex to model single complexes as well as averaged ensembles to demonstrate and roughly quantify the effect of averaging over an inhomogeneous ensemble on measured coherence lifetimes. We choose to model the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex because that system has been a focus for much of the recent discussion of quantum effects in biology, and use an early version of the well known environment-assisted quantum transport model to facilitate straightforward comparison between the current model and past work. Although ensemble inhomogeneity is known to lead to shorter lifetimes of observed oscillations (simply inhomogeneous spectral

  8. A high statistics measurement of the Lambda(+)(c) lifetime.

    PubMed

    Link, J M; Reyes, M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Magnin, J; Massafferi, A; de Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vazquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Ramirez, J E; Segoni, I; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F L; Zallo, A; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Boschini, M; D'Angelo, P; DiCorato, M; Dini, P; Giammarchi, M; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Hernandez, H; Lopez, A M; Luiggi, E; Mendez, H; Mendez, L; Mirles, A; Montiel, E; Olaya, D; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Rivera, C; Xiong, W; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Cho, K; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2002-04-22

    A high statistics measurement of the Lambda(+)(c) lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. We describe the analysis technique with particular attention to the determination of the systematic uncertainty. The measured value of 204.6 +/- 3.4 (stat) +/- 2.5 (syst) fs from 8034 +/- 122 Lambda(+)(c)-->pK(-)pi(+) decays represents a significant improvement over the present world average. PMID:11955226

  9. Precision measurement of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-01

    The ratio of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The Λb(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode Λb(0)→J/ψpK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)→J/ψπ+ K- mode, where the π+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the Λb(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012  ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. PMID:25166658

  10. A Measurement of the Bs Lifetime at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, Sinead

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the proper lifetime of the B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF experiment at Fermilab. The B{sub s}{sup 0} meson lifetime is measured in its semileptonic decay mode, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}D{sub s}{sup -}. The D{sub s}{sup -} meson candidates are reconstructed in the decay mode D{sub s}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}, with {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}, in a trigger sample which requires a muon or an electron and another track which has a large impact parameters. The large impact parameter track is required by the silicon vertex trigger which is an innovative triggering device which has not previously been used in lifetime measurements. A total of 905 {+-} B{sub s}{sup 0} candidates are reconstructed in a sample which has an integrated luminosity of 140 pb{sup -1} using data gathered between February 2002 and August 2003. The pseudo-proper lifetime distribution of these candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit. This fit takes into account the missing momentum carried by the neutrino and the bias caused by requiring a track with large impact parameter by modeling these effects in simulations. The fit yields the result for the B{sub s}{sup 0} proper lifetime: c{tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 419 {+-} 28{sub -13}{sup +16} {micro}m and {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 1.397 {+-} 0.093{sub -0.043}{sup +0.053} ps where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  11. Gas Permeations Studied by Positron Annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jen-Pwu; Cao, Huimin; Jean, X.; Yang, Y. C.

    1997-03-01

    The hole volumes and fractions of PC and PET polymers are measured by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Direct correlations between the measured hole properties and gas permeabilities are observed. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy to study gas transport and separation of polymeric materials will be discussed.

  12. A Measurement of the D+(s) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferi, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P. /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-04-01

    A high statistics measurement of the D{sub s}{sup +} lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. They describe the analysis of the two decay modes, D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){sup 0}K{sup +}, used for the measurement. The measured lifetime is 507.4 {+-} 5.5(stat.) {+-} 5.1(syst.) is using 8961 {+-} 105 D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +} and 4680 {+-} 90 D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){sup 0} K{sup +} decays. This is a significant improvement over the present world average.

  13. DSAM lifetime measurements for the chiral bands in 194Tl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiteng, P. L.; Pasternak, A. A.; Lawrie, E. A.; Shirinda, O.; Lawrie, J. J.; Bark, R. A.; Bvumbi, S. P.; Kheswa, N. Y.; Lindsay, R.; Lieder, E. O.; Lieder, R. M.; Madiba, T. E.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Ndayishimye, J.; Ntshangase, S. S.; Papka, P.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.

    2016-06-01

    When a left-handed and a right-handed nuclear system form in angular momentum space, a pair of nearly degenerate rotational bands is observed. To identify chiral symmetry most important is to establish near-degeneracy not only in excitation energies of the partner bands, but also in their intra-band and inter-band B(M1) and B(E2) transition probabilities. This needs dedicated lifetime measurements. Such measurements were performed for four bands of 194Tl. Two of these have very close near-degeneracy and form a prime candidate for best chiral pair. The lifetime measurements confirm the excellent near-degeneracy in this chiral pair.

  14. Measurement of the Lambdab0 lifetime using semileptonic decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewin, M; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-11-01

    We report a measurement of the Lambda(b)(0) lifetime using a sample corresponding to 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 experiment in 2002-2006 during run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The Lambda(b)(0) baryon is reconstructed via the decay Lambda(b)(0)-->micronuLambda(c)(+)X. Using 4437+/-329 signal candidates, we measure the Lambda(b)(0) lifetime to be tau(Lambda(b)(0))=1.290(-0.110)(+0.119)(stat)(-0.091)(+0.087)(syst) ps, which is among the most precise measurements in semileptonic Lambda(b)(0) decays. This result is in good agreement with the world average value. PMID:17995396

  15. A precise measurement of the τ lepton lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lançon, E.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Bencheikh, A. M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Proriol, J.; Prulhiére, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Kreemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Qian, Z.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; St. Denis, R.; Takashima, M.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jaffe, D. E.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foá, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Schmitt, M.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    Three different techniques are used to measure the mean decay length of the τ lepton with a high precision vertex detector in a sample of 11 800 τ pairs coming from Z decays, collected in1991 by ALEPH at LEP. Events in which both τ's decay into one charged track are analyzed using two largely independent methods. Displaced vertices in three-prong decays yield another independent measurement. The derived lifetime is 295.5 ± 5.9 ± 3.1 fs, using mτ = 1777.1 ± 0.5 MeV/ c2. Including previous (1989-1990) ALEPH measurements, the combined τ lifetime is 294.7 ± 5.4 ± 3.0 fs.

  16. Microscopic basis of free-volume concept as studied by quasielastic neutron scattering and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, T.; Tsukushi, T.; Kaji, K.; Bartos, J.; Kristiak, J.

    1999-08-01

    We have reexamined the free-volume concept presented by Cohen and Turnbull on the basis of two microscopic quantities: the excess mean-square displacement f and the total free volume VPA,t, of poly- butadiene evaluated from the quasielastic neutron scattering and the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) data, respectively. Comparing with the viscosity η we found two relations, η=η0 exp u 20/f and η=η0 exp V*PA,0/VPA,t=η0 exp V*PA,0/vPA,f, where u20, V*PA,0 and v*PA,0 are the critical values for the mean-square displacement, the total PALS free volume, and the PALS free volume per molecule, respectively, and further v*PA,0=V*PA,0/N, N being the total number of molecules or segments. On the basis of these relations, we discuss the microscopic basis of the free-volume theory. The experimentally evaluated critical values u20 and v*PA,0 are much larger than the average values of f and vPA,f calculated from the distributions. This has been explained from the low probability of escaping motions from a molecular cage. The free volume per monomer and the free-volume fraction were calculated from the excess mean-square displacement f. The former was compared with the free-volume hole obtained by PALS, suggesting that 22 monomers are required for one PALS free-volume hole. The free-volume fraction obtained from the excess mean-square displacement was found to be 6.4% at 250 K, which is in reasonable agreement with that evaluated from the rheological data (9.0%).

  17. Improved measurement of the B 0 and B + meson lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J. P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M. N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palla, F.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J. F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Wildish, T.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J. M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H. G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H. G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J. F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A. M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M. H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J. J.; Videau, I.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J. F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J. P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1996-03-01

    The lifetimes of the B 0 and B + mesons have been measured with the Aleph detector at LEP, using approximately 3 million hadronic Z decays collected in the period 1991 1994. In the first of three methods, semileptonic decays of B 0 and B + mesons were partially reconstructed by identifying events containing a lepton with an associated D*- orbar D^0 meson. The second method used fully reconstructed B 0 and B + mesons. The third method, used to measure the B 0 lifetime, employed a partial reconstruction technique to identify B 0→ D*- π + X decays. The combined results are begin{gathered} tau _0 = 1.55 ± 0.06 ± 0.03 ps, \\ tau _ + = 1.58 ± 0.09 ± 0.03 ps, \\ tfrac{{tau _ + }}{{tau _0 }} = 1.03 ± 0.08 ± 0.02. \\ .

  18. Measurement of the B sup 0 -meson lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, S.R.; Hinshaw, D.A.; Ong, R.A.; Snyder, A.; Abrams, G.; Adolphsen, C.E.; Akerlof, C.; Alexander, J.P.; Alvarez, M.; Amidei, D.; Baden, A.R.; Ballam, J.; Barish, B.C.; Barklow, T.; Barnett, B.A.; Bartelt, J.; Blockus, D.; Bonvicini, G.; Boyarski, A.; Boyer, J.; Brabson, B.; Breakstone, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bulos, F.; Burchat, P.R.; Burke, D.L.; Butler, F.; Calvino, F.; Cence, R.J.; Chapman, J.; Cords, D.; Coupal, D.P.; DeStaebler, H.C.; Dorfan, D.E.; Dorfan, J.M.; Drell, P.S.; Feldman, G.J.; Fernandez, E.; Field, R.C.; Ford, W.T.; Fordham, C.; Frey, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Gidal, G.; Gladney, L.; Glanzman, T.; Gold, M.S.; Goldhaber, G.; Green, A.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Haggerty, J.; Hanson, G.; Harr, R.; Harris, F.A.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hayes, K.; Herrup, D.; Heusch, C.A.; Himel, T.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Hutchinson, D.; Hylen, J.; Innes, W.R.; Jaffre, M.; Jaros, J.A.; Juricic, I.; Kadyk, J.A.; Karlen, D.; Kent, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koska, W.; Kozanecki, W.; Lankford, A.J.; Larsen, R.R.; LeClair

    1990-03-05

    We report a measurement of the lifetime of the {ital B}{sup 0} meson based upon 29-GeV {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} annihilation data taken with the Mark II detector at the SLAC storage ring PEP. The {ital B}{sup 0} mesons are tagged by their decays into {ital D}{sup *{minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu} and {ital D}{sup *{minus}}{mu}{sup +}{nu}, where the {ital D}{sup *{minus}} is tagged by its decay into {pi}{sup {minus}}{ital {bar D}}{sup 0}. We reconstruct the decay vertices of 15 {ital B}{sup 0}-meson candidates and measure the {ital B}{sup 0} lifetime to be 1.20{sup +0.52}{sub {minus}0.36}{sup +0.16}{sub 0.14} psec.

  19. Measurement of the lifetime difference between Bs mass eigenstates.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dörr, C; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ehlers, J; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guenther, M; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Unel, M Karagoz; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; NcNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P A Movilla; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-03-18

    We present measurements of the lifetimes and polarization amplitudes for B(0)(s)-->J/psiphi and B(0)(d)-->J/psiK(*0) decays. Lifetimes of the heavy and light mass eigenstates in the B(0)(s) system are separately measured for the first time by determining the relative contributions of amplitudes with definite CP as a function of the decay time. Using 203+/-15 B(0)(s) decays we obtain tau(L) = (1.05(+0.16)(-0.13) +/- 0.02) ps and tau(H) = (2.07(+0.58)(-0.46) +/- 0.03) ps. Expressed in terms of the difference DeltaGamma(s) and average Gamma(s), of the decay rates of the two eigenstates, the results are DeltaGamma(s)/Gamma(s) = (65(+25)(-33) +/- 1)% and DeltaGamma(s) = (0.47(+0.19)(-0.24) +/- 0.01) ps(-1). PMID:15783473

  20. Lifetime Measurements of Tagged Exotic- and Unbound Nuclear States

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.

    2011-11-30

    A new Differential Plunger device for measuring pico-second lifetimes of Unbound Nuclear States (DPUNS) is being built at The University of Manchester. DPUNS has been designed to work with alpha-, beta- and isomer-tagging methods using the existing JUROGAM II--RITU--GREAT infrastructure at the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland. The importance of proton emission from nuclei is that it provides valuable nuclear-structure information as direct input to nuclear models beyond the drip line. New experimental data beyond the drip line can provide new extensions to these models especially with the possible coupling of weakly bound and unbound states to the continuum. The results of the first experiments to measure lifetimes of unbound nuclear states with this method was discussed along with possible future experiments which can be addressed with DPUNS using proton-, isomer- and alpha-tagging.

  1. Near-infrared spark source excitation for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, D. J. S.; Hungerford, G.; Imhof, R. E.

    1991-10-01

    We have extended the range of excitation wavelengths from spark sources used in single photon timing fluorometry into the near infrared by means of the all-metal coaxial flashlamp filled with an argon-hydrogen gas mixture. At 750 nm this mixture gives ˜15 times the intensity available from pure hydrogen for a comparable pulse duration. Measurements are demonstrated by using the laser dye IR-140 in acetone, for which a fluorescence lifetime of 1.20 ns is recorded.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9-(Methylaminomethyl

  3. Experimentally Measured Radiative Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths in Neutral Vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, C. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Belmonte, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new study of the V i atom using a combination of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform spectroscopy that contains newly measured radiative lifetimes for 25 levels between 24,648 cm‑1 and 37,518 cm‑1 and oscillator strengths for 208 lines between 3040 and 20000 Å from 39 upper energy levels. Thirteen of these oscillator strengths have not been reported previously. This work was conducted independently of the recent studies of neutral vanadium lifetimes and oscillator strengths carried out by Den Hartog et al. and Lawler et al., and thus serves as a means to verify those measurements. Where our data overlap with their data, we generally find extremely good agreement in both level lifetimes and oscillator strengths. However, we also find evidence that Lawler et al. have systematically underestimated oscillator strengths for lines in the region of 9000 ± 100 Å. We suggest a correction of 0.18 ± 0.03 dex for these values to bring them into agreement with our results and those of Whaling et al. We also report new measurements of hyperfine structure splitting factors for three odd levels of V i lying between 24,700 and 28,400 cm‑1.

  4. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  5. CMS HF calorimeter PMTs and Xi(c)+ lifetime measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, Ugur; /Iowa U.

    2003-12-01

    This thesis consists of two parts: In the first part we describe the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) selection and testing processes for the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS, a Large Hadron Collier (LHC) experiment at CERN. We report the evaluation process of the candidate PMTs from three different manufacturers, the complete tests performed on the 2300 Hamamatsu PMTs which will be used in the HF calorimeter, and the details of the PMT Test Station that is in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. In the second part we report the {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} lifetime measurement from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment at Fermilab. Based upon 301 {+-} 31 events from three di.erent decay channels, by using the binned maximum likelihood technique, we observe the lifetime of {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} as 427 {+-} 31 {+-} 13 fs.

  6. Free volume in imidazolium triflimide ([C3MIM][NTf2]) ionic liquid from positron lifetime: amorphous, crystalline, and liquid states.

    PubMed

    Dlubek, G; Yu, Yang; Krause-Rehberg, R; Beichel, W; Bulut, S; Pogodina, N; Krossing, I; Friedrich, Ch

    2010-09-28

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is used to study the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C(3)MIM][NTf(2)] in the temperature range between 150 and 320 K. The positron decay spectra are analyzed using the routine LifeTime-9.0 and the size distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer-size holes) is calculated. This distribution is in good agreement with Fürth's classical hole theory of liquids when taking into account Fürth's hole coalescence hypothesis. During cooling, the liquid sample remains in a supercooled, amorphous state and shows the glass transition in the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime at 187 K. The mean hole volume varies between 70 Å(3) at 150 K and 250 Å(3) at 265-300 K. From a comparison with the macroscopic volume, the hole density is estimated to be constant at 0.20×10(21) g(-1) corresponding to 0.30 nm(-3) at 265 K. The hole free volume fraction varies from 0.023 at 185 K to 0.073 at T(m)+12 K=265 K and can be estimated to be 0.17 at 430 K. It is shown that the viscosity follows perfectly the Cohen-Turnbull free volume theory when using the free volume determined here. The heating run clearly shows crystallization at 200 K by an abrupt decrease in the mean <τ(3)> and standard deviation σ(3) of the o-Ps lifetime distribution and an increase in the o-Ps intensity I(3). The parameters of the second lifetime component <τ(2)> and σ(2) behave parallel to the o-Ps parameters, which also shows the positron's (e(+)) response to structural changes. During melting at 253 K, all lifetime parameters recover to the initial values of the liquid. An abrupt decrease in I(3) is attributed to the solvation of e(-) and e(+) particles. Different possible interpretations of the o-Ps lifetime in the crystalline state are briefly discussed. PMID:20886945

  7. Free volume in imidazolium triflimide ([C{sub 3}MIM][NTf{sub 2}]) ionic liquid from positron lifetime: Amorphous, crystalline, and liquid states

    SciTech Connect

    Dlubek, G.; Beichel, W.; Bulut, S.; Pogodina, N.; Krossing, I.; Friedrich, Ch.

    2010-09-28

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is used to study the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C{sub 3}MIM][NTf{sub 2}] in the temperature range between 150 and 320 K. The positron decay spectra are analyzed using the routine LifeTime-9.0 and the size distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer-size holes) is calculated. This distribution is in good agreement with Fuerth's classical hole theory of liquids when taking into account Fuerth's hole coalescence hypothesis. During cooling, the liquid sample remains in a supercooled, amorphous state and shows the glass transition in the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime at 187 K. The mean hole volume varies between 70 A{sup 3} at 150 K and 250 A{sup 3} at 265-300 K. From a comparison with the macroscopic volume, the hole density is estimated to be constant at 0.20x10{sup 21} g{sup -1} corresponding to 0.30 nm{sup -3} at 265 K. The hole free volume fraction varies from 0.023 at 185 K to 0.073 at T{sub m}+12 K=265 K and can be estimated to be 0.17 at 430 K. It is shown that the viscosity follows perfectly the Cohen-Turnbull free volume theory when using the free volume determined here. The heating run clearly shows crystallization at 200 K by an abrupt decrease in the mean <{tau}{sub 3}> and standard deviation {sigma}{sub 3} of the o-Ps lifetime distribution and an increase in the o-Ps intensity I{sub 3}. The parameters of the second lifetime component <{tau}{sub 2}> and {sigma}{sub 2} behave parallel to the o-Ps parameters, which also shows the positron's (e{sup +}) response to structural changes. During melting at 253 K, all lifetime parameters recover to the initial values of the liquid. An abrupt decrease in I{sub 3} is attributed to the solvation of e{sup -} and e{sup +} particles. Different possible interpretations of the o-Ps lifetime in the crystalline state are briefly discussed.

  8. Updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-23

    We present an updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD. 4316 {tau}-pair events, selected from a 150k Z{sup 0} data sample, are analyzed using three techniques: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The measurement benefits from the small and stable interaction region at the SLC and the precision CCD pixel vertex detector of the SLD. The combined result is: {tau}{sub {tau}} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) fs.

  9. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  10. Free volume from positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature experiments in relation to structural relaxation of van der Waals molecular glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Dlubek, G; Shaikh, M Q; Rätzke, K; Paluch, M; Faupel, F

    2010-06-16

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is employed to characterize the temperature dependence of the free volume in two van der Waals liquids: 1, 1'-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexane (BMPC) and 1, 1'-di(4-methoxy-5-methylphenyl)cyclohexane (BMMPC). From the PALS spectra analysed with the routine LifeTime9.0, the size (volume) distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer size holes), its mean, [v(h)], and mean dispersion, σ(h), were calculated. A comparison with the macroscopic volume from pressure-volume-temperature (PV T) experiments delivered the hole density and the specific hole free volume and a complete characterization of the free volume microstructure in that sense. These data are used in correlation with structural (α) relaxation data from broad-band dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) in terms of the Cohen-Grest and Cohen-Turnbull free volume models. An extension of the latter model allows us to quantify deviations between experiments and theory and an attempt to systematize these in terms of T(g) or of the fragility. The experimental data for several fragile and less fragile glass formers are involved in the final discussion. It was concluded that, for large differences in the fragility of different glass formers, the positron lifetime mirrors clearly the different character of these materials. For small differences in the fragility, additional properties like the character of bonds and chemical structure of the material may affect size, distribution and thermal behaviour of the free volume. PMID:21393763

  11. Precision lifetime measurements of the 2p levels in lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Kurtz, C.; Tanner, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    These measurements are motivated by the theoretical challenges posed by lithium. The three-electron lithium atom is one of the simplest atomic systems with which to test atomic structure calculations. Recently, there were several ab initio calculations of the lithium 2s-2p oscillator strengths, which agree to 0.15%. However, the theoretical results differ by 5 sigma from the precise fast-beam-laser lifetime measurement of Gaupp and Andra (Berlin). Hence the need for a new independent and precise measurement. Improvements were added to the fast beam laser techniques developed for cesium in order to measure the lithium 2p state lifetime. Although the technique is similar to that of cesium, the lithium atom presents a few new complications. Since the atom is lighter, it travels more quickly through the interaction and detection regions. Therefore, the 670 nm wavelength requires a dye laser to produce sufficient intensity to populate the excited state. Unfortunately, the intensity of the dye laser is inherently less stable than that of a diode laser. Another complication is that the ion-beam intensity is much more sensitive to fluctuations in the accelerating voltage. Two detectors were added: one to monitor the ion-beam intensity, and the other to monitor the laser power. With the information from the additional detectors, a new data analysis scheme was developed. Sufficient data were taken to evaluate the benefits of the new detectors. No additional work is planned at Argonne for this experiment.

  12. A Superconducting Magnet UCN Trap for Precise Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Picker, R.; Altarev, I.; Bröcker, J.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Hartmann, J.; Müller, A.; Paul, S.; Schott, W.; Trinks, U.; Zimmer, O.

    2005-01-01

    Finite-element methods along with Monte Carlo simulations were used to design a magnetic storage device for ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure their lifetime. A setup was determined which should make it possible to confine UCN with negligible losses and detect the protons emerging from β-decay with high efficiency: stacked superconducting solenoids create the magnetic storage field, an electrostatic extraction field inside the storage volume assures high proton collection efficiency. Alongside with the optimization of the magnetic and electrostatic design, the properties of the trap were investigated through extensive Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:27308150

  13. Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tattersall, Wade; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P.; White, Ron D.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, Stephen J.; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco

    2014-01-28

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

  14. B(S) LIFETIME DIFFERENCE MEASUREMENTS FROM THE TEVATRON.

    SciTech Connect

    YIP, K.

    2006-07-02

    The two collider experiments at the Tevatron, CDF and D0, have made a lot of progress in B{sub s} lifetime difference measurements. Here, they have included 3 different channels of measurements, namely, B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi} + {phi}, B{sub s} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}. Combining all the available measurements, they have obtained {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} = 0.097{sub -0.042}{sup +0.041} ps{sup -1} and {bar {tau}} = 1/{Lambda}{sub s} = 1.461 {+-} 0.030 ps. {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} is now 2.3 {sigma} away from zero.

  15. Direct Lifetime Measurements of the Excited States in (72)Ni.

    PubMed

    Kolos, K; Miller, D; Grzywacz, R; Iwasaki, H; Al-Shudifat, M; Bazin, D; Bingham, C R; Braunroth, T; Cerizza, G; Gade, A; Lemasson, A; Liddick, S N; Madurga, M; Morse, C; Portillo, M; Rajabali, M M; Recchia, F; Riedinger, L L; Voss, P; Walters, W B; Weisshaar, D; Whitmore, K; Wimmer, K; Tostevin, J A

    2016-03-25

    The lifetimes of the first excited 2^{+} and 4^{+} states in ^{72}Ni were measured at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method, a model-independent probe to obtain the reduced transition probability. Excited states in ^{72}Ni were populated by the one-proton knockout reaction of an intermediate energy ^{73}Cu beam. γ-ray-recoil coincidences were detected with the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA and the S800 spectrograph. Our results provide evidence of enhanced transition probability B(E2;2^{+}→0^{+}) as compared to ^{68}Ni, but do not confirm the trend of large B(E2) values reported in the neighboring isotope ^{70}Ni obtained from Coulomb excitation measurement. The results are compared to shell model calculations. The lifetime obtained for the excited 4_{1}^{+} state is consistent with models showing decay of a seniority ν=4, 4^{+} state, which is consistent with the disappearance of the 8^{+} isomer in ^{72}Ni. PMID:27058074

  16. Lifetime measurements in 166Re: Collective versus magnetic rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. J.; Cederwall, B.; Doncel, M.; Peng, J.; Chen, Q. B.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhao, P. W.; Meng, J.; Bäck, T.; Jakobsson, U.; Auranen, K.; Bönig, S.; Drummond, M.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.; HerzáÅ, A.; Joss, D. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Leino, M.; McPeake, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Partanen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Sayǧı, B.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Taylor, M. J.; Thornthwaite, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Xiao, Z. G.

    2016-03-01

    Lifetimes of excited states in the neutron-deficient odd-odd nucleus 166Re have been measured for the first time using the recoil distance Doppler-shift method. The measured lifetime for the (8-) state; τ =480 (80) ps, enabled an assessment of the multipolarities of the γ rays depopulating this state. Information on electromagnetic transition strengths were deduced for the γ -ray transitions from the (9-),(10-), and (11-) states, and in the case of the (10-) and (11-) states limits on the B (M 1 ) and B (E 2 ) strengths were estimated. The results are compared with total Routhian surface predictions and semiclassical calculations. Tilted-axis cranking calculations based on a relativistic mean-field approach (TAC-RMF) have also been performed in order to test the possibility of magnetic rotation in the 166Re nucleus. While the TAC-RMF calculations predict a quadrupole-deformed nuclear shape with similar β2 deformation as obtained by using the TRS model, it was found that the experimental electromagnetic transition rates are in better agreement with a collective-rotational description.

  17. Direct Lifetime Measurements of the Excited States in 72Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolos, K.; Miller, D.; Grzywacz, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Al-Shudifat, M.; Bazin, D.; Bingham, C. R.; Braunroth, T.; Cerizza, G.; Gade, A.; Lemasson, A.; Liddick, S. N.; Madurga, M.; Morse, C.; Portillo, M.; Rajabali, M. M.; Recchia, F.; Riedinger, L. L.; Voss, P.; Walters, W. B.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    The lifetimes of the first excited 2+ and 4+ states in 72>Ni were measured at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method, a model-independent probe to obtain the reduced transition probability. Excited states in 72Ni were populated by the one-proton knockout reaction of an intermediate energy 73Cu beam. γ -ray-recoil coincidences were detected with the γ -ray tracking array GRETINA and the S800 spectrograph. Our results provide evidence of enhanced transition probability B (E 2 ;2+→0+) as compared to 68Ni, but do not confirm the trend of large B (E 2 ) values reported in the neighboring isotope 70Ni obtained from Coulomb excitation measurement. The results are compared to shell model calculations. The lifetime obtained for the excited 41+ state is consistent with models showing decay of a seniority ν =4 , 4+ state, which is consistent with the disappearance of the 8+ isomer in 72Ni.

  18. Drug release profiles and microstructural characterization of cast and freeze dried vitamin B12 buccal films by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Barnabás; Kállai, Nikolett; Tóth, Gergő; Hetényi, Gergely; Zelkó, Romána

    2014-02-01

    Solvent cast and freeze dried films, containing the water-soluble vitamin B12 as model drug were prepared from two polymers, sodium alginate (SA), and Carbopol 71G (CP). The proportion of the CP was changed in the films. The microstructural characterization of various samples was carried out by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The drug release kinetics of untreated and stored samples was evaluated by the conventionally applied semi-empirical power law. Correlation was found between the changes of the characteristic parameters of the drug release and the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime values of polymer samples. The results indicated that the increase of CP concentration, the freeze-drying process and the storage at 75% R.H. decreased the rate of drug release. The PALS method enabled the distinction between the micro- and macrostructural factors influencing the drug release profile of polymer films. PMID:24269613

  19. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample. 17 figs.

  20. Photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer for lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Hori, Akio; Kamada, Takeshi

    2001-05-01

    We propose a phase-modulation fluorometer that is applicable to a very weak fluorescence intensity level. In order to counter the single-photon event situation, we have introduced a combination of a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC) and a pulse height analyzer (PHA) to the phase- modulation fluorometer, the combination of which is usually used in the single-photon correlation method to measure fluorescence decay waveforms by pulsed excitation. In the proposed fluorometer, a sinusoidal response waveform that is shifted in phase over the reference one is obtained statistically as a histogram in the PHA memory and then the fluorescence lifetime can be calculated by the same procedure as the conventional analog phase-modulation method. The excitation light source used was a current- modulated ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED), whose center wavelength was 370 nm and its spectral bandwidth was 10 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes of 17.6 ns and 5.7 ns obtained for 10 ppb quinine sulfate in 0.1 N H2SO4 and for 10 ppb rhodamine 6G in ethanol, respectively, agreed well with those reported in the literature.

  1. Measuring the Neutron Lifetime using Magnetically Trapped Ultracold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumm, H. P.; Coakley, K. J.; Dewey, M. S.; Huber, M. G.; Hughes, P. P.; Thompson, A. K.; Golub, R.; Huffer, C. R.; Huffman, P. R.; O'Shaughnessy, C. M.; Schelhammer, K. W.

    2010-11-01

    The neutron beta-decay lifetime is important in both theoretical predictions of the primordial abundance of ^4He and providing a strong unitarity test of the CKM mixing matrix. We have previously demonstrated trapping of Ultracold Neutrons (UCN) in a magnetic trap, and, though statistically limited, measured a lifetime consistent with the world average. A major upgrade of the apparatus has now been completed at NIST. In our unique approach, a 0.89 nm neutron beam is incident on a superfluid ^4He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. Neutrons are downscattered by single phonon scattering in liquid helium to near rest and trapped; at sufficiently low temperatures, the low phonon density in the helium suppresses upscatter. The electron accompanying neutron decay produces scintillation in the superfluid helium and can be detected in real time. Previous statistical limitations as well as systematics related to neutron material bottling will be reduced by significant increases in field strength and trap volume. Details of analyses of the systematics as well as the initial performance benchmarks of the new apparatus will be presented.

  2. Lifetime measurements in transitional nuclei by fast electronic scintillation timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, M. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Casten, R. F.; Amro, H.; Barton, C. J.; Beausang, C. W.; Cooper, J. R.; Gürdal, G.; Hecht, A. A.; Hutter, C.; Krücken, R.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Ressler, J. J.; Berant, Z.; Brenner, D. S.; Gill, R. L.; Regan, P. H.

    2002-10-01

    A new generation of experiments studying nuclei in spherical-deformed transition regions has been motivated by the introduction of innovative theoretical approaches to the treatment of these nuclei. The important structural signatures in the transition regions, beyond the basic yrast level properties, involve γ-ray transitions between low-spin, non-yrast levels, and so information on γ-ray branching ratios and absolute matrix elements (or level lifetimes) for these transitions is crucial. A fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) system [H. Mach, R. L. Gill, and M. Moszyński, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 280, 49 (1989)], making use of BaF2 and plastic scintillation detectors, has been implemented at the Yale Moving Tape Collector for the measurement of lifetimes of states populated in β^ decay. Experiments in the A100 (Pd, Ru) and A150 (Dy, Yb) regions have been carried out, and a few examples will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under grants and contracts DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-88ER-40417, and DE-AC02-98CH10886 and by the German DFG under grant Pi 393/1.

  3. Characterization of point defects in CdTe by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsharkawy, M. R. M.; Kanda, G. S.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.; Keeble, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    Positron lifetime measurements on CdTe 0.15% Zn-doped by weight are presented, trapping to monovacancy defects is observed. At low temperatures, localization at shallow binding energy positron traps dominates. To aid defect identification density functional theory, calculated positron lifetimes and momentum distributions are obtained using relaxed geometry configurations of the monovacancy defects and the Te antisite. These calculations provide evidence that combined positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler spectroscopy measurements have the capability to identify neutral or negative charge states of the monovacancies, the Te antisite, A-centers, and divacancy defects in CdTe.

  4. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  5. The Lifetime of a beautiful and charming meson: Bc lifetime measured using the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine

    2008-09-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb-1 of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the lifetime of the Bc± meson is studied in the Bc± → J/Ψμ± + X final state. Using an unbinned likelihood simultaneous fit to J/Ψ + μ invariant mass and lifetime distributions, a signal of 810 ± 80(stat.) candidates is estimated and a lifetime measurement made of: τ(Bc±) = 0.448-0.036+0.038(stat) ± 0.032(sys) ps.

  6. Secondary cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from 1 to 100 GeV in the upper atmosphere and interstellar space, and interpretation of a recent positron flux measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, C. D.; Buffington, A.

    1976-01-01

    Secondary electron and positron fluxes generated in interstellar space and in the atmosphere from the decays of pions and kaons in inelastic nuclear interactions are calculated by Monte Carlo techniques for lepton energies in the range from 1 to 100 GeV and an assumed thickness of 10 g/sq cm or less for the interstellar or atmospheric material. A simple and accurate analytical model which summarizes the Monte Carlo results and identifies the essential parameters involved is developed and used to interpret a previous positron measurement. It is found that the thickness of interstellar and source material is about 4.3 g/sq cm for cosmic-ray positrons with energies exceeding 4 GeV, a result that is difficult to reconcile with recently proposed two-containment-volume propagation models which predict a thickness of 1.8 g/sq cm for the same energies on the basis of the energy dependence of the measured (Li+Be+B)/(C+O) ratio. It is shown that single-containment-volume (galactic) models invoking an energy-dependent leakage lifetime are compatible with the positron data, but lack a mechanism to explain the energy dependence.

  7. Positron annihilation Doppler broadening measurement for bulk amorphous alloy by using high energy positron generated from LCS gamma-ray at NEW SUBARU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, F.; Ueno, Y.; Ishii, K.; Ishiyama, T.; Iwase, A.; Miyamoto, S.; Terasawa, T.

    2016-01-01

    A simple positron annihilation measurement apparatus via pair creation has been developed using high energetic gamma beam generated by laser Compton scattering (LCS) of 1 GeV electrons circulated in a storage ring and laser light with the power more than 1 W at the New SUBARU synchrotron radiation facility, University of Hyogo. This MeV ordered energy changeable positron apparatus is useful to study defects in bulk materials. In this study, the average energy of 8MeV positron was selected by the wavelength of laser light and circulated electron energy in photon factory. As a demonstrate of non-destruction positron measurement by this apparatus, positron annihilation Doppler broadening measurement has performed for bulk size of amorphous and crystal structured Zr based alloys. The larger Doppler broadening S parameter for amorphous alloy than that for crystallized one has been successfully measured.

  8. c, b, and tau lifetime measurements in e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments at e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage rings have successfully measured the tau and D/sup 0/ lifetimes and set interesting limits on the B lifetime. So far, the conventional wisdom has prevailed. The tau lifetime is consistent with prediction; there is no sign (but little sensitivity) of a violation of universality. The charmed particle lifetimes are roughly as expected, but richer in their phenomenology than anticipated. The B lifetime is still unknown. The experimental art is developing rapidly. Several experiments have by now installed vertex detectors. Measurements of charmed particle lifetimes from e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments will complement the work that has been done at fixed target machines. Measurements of tau and B lifetimes may be the exclusive province of e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments for the next few years. (WHK)

  9. Determination of the activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations in plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy by positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Mohammed; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Badawi, Emad A.; Abdel-Rahman, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations of plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime technique. Plastic deformation using a hydraulic press produces mainly dislocations and may produce point defects. The type of defect was studied by isochronal annealing which determines the temperature range of recovery of each type. Only one type of defect (dislocations) was observed for the investigated sample and was found to be recovered within the range 455-700 K. Isothermal annealing by slow cooling was performed through this range and used in determination of the activation enthalpy of migration of dislocations which was found to be 0.26 ± 0.01 eV.

  10. Two-component density functional theory within the projector augmented-wave approach: Accurate and self-consistent computations of positron lifetimes and momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktor, Julia; Jomard, Gérald; Torrent, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Many techniques have been developed in the past in order to compute positron lifetimes in materials from first principles. However, there is still a lack of a fast and accurate self-consistent scheme that could handle accurately the forces acting on the ions induced by the presence of the positron. We will show in this paper that we have reached this goal by developing the two-component density functional theory within the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method in the open-source code abinit. This tool offers the accuracy of the all-electron methods with the computational efficiency of the plane-wave ones. We can thus deal with supercells that contain few hundreds to thousands of atoms to study point defects as well as more extended defects clusters. Moreover, using the PAW basis set allows us to use techniques able to, for instance, treat strongly correlated systems or spin-orbit coupling, which are necessary to study heavy elements, such as the actinides or their compounds.

  11. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  12. Towards a precise measurement of the cosmic-ray positron fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gast, Henning

    2009-03-01

    This thesis deals with detector concepts aiming at a precise measurement of the cosmic-ray positron fraction extending to an as yet unreached range of energy. The indirect search for dark matter is the main motivation for this endeavour.

  13. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  14. Measurements of Lifetimes and a Limit on the Lifetime Difference in the Neutral D-Meson System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1999-07-01

    Using the large hadroproduced charm sample collected in experiment E791 at Fermilab, we report the first directly measured constraint on the decay-width difference Δγ for the mass eigenstates of the D0- D¯0 system. We obtain our result from lifetime measurements of the decays D0-->K-π+ and D0-->K-K+, under the assumption of CP invariance, which implies that the CP eigenstates and the mass eigenstates are the same. The lifetime of D0-->K-K+ (the CP-even final state) is τKK = 0.410+/-0.011+/-0.006 ps, and the lifetime of D0-->K-π+ (an equal mixture of CP-odd and CP-even final states) is τKπ = 0.413+/-0.003+/-0.004 ps. The decay-width difference is Δγ = 2\\(γKK-γKπ\\) = 0.04+/-0.14+/-0.05 ps-1. We relate these measurements to measurements of mixing in the neutral D-meson system.

  15. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy in materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1988-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) has emerged as a powerful technique for research in condensed matter. It has been used extensively in the study of metals, ionic crystals, glasses and polymers. The present review concentrates on applications of positron lifetime measurements for elucidation of the physicochemical structure of polymers.

  16. Measurement of the lifetime of excited-state electron bubbles in superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ambarish; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2005-08-01

    We report on the measurement of the lifetime of bubbles in superfluid helium that contain an electron in the 1P state. The 1P bubbles are produced by laser excitation of ground-state bubbles, and are detected by ultrasonic cavitation. Our measurements show that the lifetime of these excited bubbles is much less than the calculated lifetime for radiative decay and, hence, is determined by a nonradiative mechanism.

  17. Net merit as a measure of lifetime profit: 2010 revision

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2010 revision of net merit (NM$) updates a number of key economic values as well as milk utilization statistics. Members of Project S-1040, Genetic Selection and Crossbreeding To Enhance Reproduction and Survival of Dairy Cattle, provided updated incomes and expenses used to estimate lifetime pr...

  18. Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othmer, S.; Chen, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plate arrays. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results are compared with those obtained using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

  19. Measurement of the average B hadron lifetime in Z0 decays using reconstructed vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C. J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; D'oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J.; Daoudi, M.; de Sangro, R.; de Simone, P.; dell'orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P. Y.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M. J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hart, E. L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kim, Y.; King, M. E.; King, R.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Labs, J. F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Mours, B.; Müller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P. E.; Rochester, L. S.; Rothberg, J. E.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schaffner, S. F.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schneekloth, U.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Shapiro, S. L.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Snyder, J. A.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Torrence, E.; Trandafir, A. I.; Turk, J. D.; Usher, T.; Va'vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Waite, A. P.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, D. A.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zeitlin, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhou, J.

    1995-11-01

    We report a measurement of the average B hadron lifetime using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider in 1993. An inclusive analysis selected three-dimensional vertices with B hadron lifetime information in a sample of 50×103 Z0 decays. A lifetime of 1.564+/-0.030(stat)+/-0.036(syst) ps was extracted from the decay length distribution of these vertices using a binned maximum likelihood method.

  20. Contactless Spectral-dependent Charge Carrier Lifetime Measurements in Silicon Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, John; Hamadani, Behrang; Dagenais, Mario

    Charge carrier lifetime measurements in bulk or unfinished photovoltaic (PV) materials allow for a more accurate estimate of power conversion efficiency in completed solar cells. In this work, carrier lifetimes in PV-grade silicon wafers are obtained by way of quasi-steady state photoconductance measurements. These measurements use a contactless RF system coupled with varying narrow spectrum input LEDs, ranging in wavelength from 460 nm to 1030 nm. Spectral dependent lifetime measurements allow for determination of bulk and surface properties of the material, including the intrinsic bulk lifetime and the surface recombination velocity. The effective lifetimes are fit to an analytical physics-based model to determine the desired parameters. Passivated and non-passivated samples are both studied and are shown to have good agreement with the theoretical model.

  1. Microstructural Characterization of Polymers with Positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1997-01-01

    Positrons provide a versatile probe for monitoring microstructural features of molecular solids. In this paper, we report on positron lifetime measurements in two different types of polymers. The first group comprises polyacrylates processed on earth and in space. The second group includes fully-compatible and totally-incompatible Semi-Interpenetrating polymer networks of thermosetting and thermoplastic polyimides. On the basis of lifetime measurements, it is concluded that free volumes are a direct reflection of physical/electromagnetic properties of the host polymers.

  2. A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, Keung L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers is described. This method consists of a wet chemical treatment (surface cleaning, oxidation in solution, and measurement in HF solution) to passivate the silicon surfaces, a laser diode array for carrier excitation, and a microwave bridge measuring system which is more sensitive than the microwave systems used previously for lifetime measurement. Representative experimental data are presented to demonstrate this technique. The result reveals that this method is useful for the determination of bulk lifetime of commercial silicon wafers.

  3. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  4. Using Minority Carrier Lifetime Measurement to Determine Saw Damage Characteristics on Si Wafer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan; Devayajanam, Srinivas; Basnyat, Prakash

    2015-06-14

    The damage on the Si wafer surfaces, caused by ingot cutting, is determined from measurement of minority carrier lifetime (..tau..eff). Samples are sequentially etched to remove thin layers from each surface and lifetime is measured after each etch step. The thickness-removed at which the lifetime reaches a peak value corresponds to the damage depth. This technique also allows the depth distribution of the damage to be quantified in terms of surface recombination velocity (SRV). An accurate measurement of ..tau..eff requires corrections to optical reflection, and transmission to account for changes in the surface morphology and in the wafer thickness.

  5. Phonon Lifetime Measurement by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Slow Light Technique in Optical Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Meng, Zhou; Zhou, Hui-Juan

    2013-07-01

    Phonon lifetime is a significant parameter in the process of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). In the present study, SBS slow light technique is used to measure phonon lifetime. Brillouin bandwidth is divided into natural, spontaneous and stimulated bandwidth. Compared with the traditional heterodyne-detection and pump-probe techniques, the natural Brillouin bandwidth can be obtained by SBS slow light technique, which equals the reciprocal of phonon lifetime and has no relations with the pump power. Another advantage of this technique is that the effect of polarization can be excluded. The natural Brillouin bandwidth is measured to be ~50 MHz and the phonon lifetime ~3.2 ns in the conventional single-mode fiber (SMF) at room temperature and zero strain. The obtained results are guidable in applications where the phonon lifetime information is a requisite such as phase conjugation and pulse compression.

  6. Characterization of free volume during vulcanization of styrene butadiene rubber by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical test.

    PubMed

    Marzocca, A J; Cerveny, S; Salgueiro, W; Somoza, A; Gonzalez, L

    2002-02-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect on the free volume of the advance of the cross-linking reaction in a copolymer of styrene butadiene rubber by sulfur vulcanization. The dynamic modulus and loss tangent were evaluated over samples cured for different times at 433 K by dynamic mechanical tests over a range of frequencies between 5 and 80 Hz at temperatures between 200 and 300 K. Using the William-Landel-Ferry relationship, master curves were obtained at a reference temperature of 298 K and the coefficients c(0)(1) and c(0)(2) were evaluated. From these parameters the dependence of the free volume on the cure time is obtained. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was also used to estimate the size and number density of free volume sites in the material. The spectra were analyzed in terms of continuous distributions of free volume size. The results suggest an increase of the lower free volume size when cross linking takes place. Both techniques give similar results for the dependence of free volume on the time of cure of the polymer. PMID:11863549

  7. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy Study of Neutron Irradiated High Temperature Superconductors YBa2Cu3O7-δ for Application in Fusion Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veterníková, J.; Chudý, M.; Slugeň, V.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.; Sojak, S.; Petriska, M.; Hinca, R.; Degmová, J.; Sabelová, V.

    2012-02-01

    This study focuses on the crystallographic defects introduced by neutron irradiation and the resulting changes of the superconducting properties in the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ. This material is considered to be most promising for magnet systems in future fusion reactors. Two different bulk samples, pure non-doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and multi-seed YBa2Cu3O7-δ doped by platinum (MS2F) were studied prior to and after irradiation in the TRIGA MARK II reactor in Vienna. Neutron irradiation is responsible for a significant enhancement of the critical current densities as well as for a reduction in critical temperature. The accumulation of small open volume defects (<0.5 nm) partially causes those changes. These defects were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at room temperature. A high concentration of Cu-O di-vacancies was found in both samples, which increased with neutron fluence. The defect concentration was significantly reduced after a heat treatment.

  8. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo. PMID:26644023

  9. A lifetime in photochemistry; some ultrafast measurements on singlet states

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, David

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the development of time-correlated single-photon counting techniques from the early use of spark discharge lamps as light sources through to the use of femtosecond mode-locked lasers through the personal work of the author. We used laser-excited fluorescence in studies on energy migration and rotational relaxation in synthetic polymer solutions, in biological probe molecules and in supersonic jet expansions. Time-correlated single-photon counting was the first method used in early fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and we outline the development of this powerful technique, with a comparison of techniques including wide-field microscopy. We employed these modern forms of FLIM to study single biological cells, and applied FLIM also to gain an understanding the distribution in tissue, and fates of photosensitizer molecules used in photodynamic therapy. We also describe the uses and instrumental design of laser systems for the study of ultrafast time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:27436979

  10. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  11. Measuring and Sorting Cell Populations Expressing Isospectral Fluorescent Proteins with Different Fluorescence Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Naivar, Mark; Houston, Jessica P.; Brent, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs) fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP) and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼1.5 ns vs ∼3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a “pseudophasor” that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation. PMID:25302964

  12. In Pursuit of Highly Accurate Atomic Lifetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2009-06-01

    Accurate atomic lifetime data are useful for terrestrial and astrophysical plasma diagnostics. At accuracies higher than those required for these applications, lifetime measurements test atomic structure theory in ways complementary to spectroscopic energy determinations. At the highest level of accuracy, the question arises whether such tests reach the limits of modern theory, a combination of quantum mechanics and QED, adn possibly point to physics beyond the Standard Model. If high-precision atomic lifetime measurements, especially on multiply charged ions, have not quite reached this high accuracy yet, then what is necessary to attain this goal?

  13. Spectroscopy and lifetime measurements in 66Ge,69Se, and 65Ga using fragmentation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. J.; Wadsworth, R.; Bentley, M. A.; Davies, P. J.; Henderson, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Paterson, I.; Iwasaki, H.; Lemasson, A.; Bader, V. M.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Gade, A.; Morse, C.; Stroberg, S. R.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.; de Angelis, G.; Dewald, A.; Braunroth, T.; Fransen, C.; Hackstein, M.; Miller, D.

    2015-01-01

    Lifetimes of low-lying excited states have been measured in 66Ge,69Se, and 65Ga using a γ -ray lineshape method. The results confirm the previously reported 71- state lifetime in 66Ge. The lifetime of the yrast 5 /2- state in 65Ga is measured for the first time. Lifetime measurements of two excited 3 /2- states in 69Se are also reported. Two previously unobserved γ rays have been identified in 69Se. γ -γ coincidence measurements have been used to place one of these in the level scheme. 69Se excited state populations are compared to shell-model calculations using the GXPF1A interaction in the fp model space. Theoretical spectroscopic factors to excited states in 69Se have identified three candidate levels for the origin of one of the new transitions.

  14. Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in {sup 69}As

    SciTech Connect

    Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemala, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczynski, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Angelis, G. de; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Lifetimes of high-spin states in {sup 69}As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

  15. Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in 69As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczyński, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczén, J.; Ziebliński, M.; de Angelis, G.; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A.; Brambilla, S.; Leoni, S.; Montanari, D.; Jaworski, G.; Palacz, M.; Wadsworth, R.

    2012-10-01

    Lifetimes of high-spin states in 69As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

  16. The multi-scattering model for calculations of positron spatial distribution in the multilayer stacks, useful for conventional positron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Institute of Physics, Opole University, ul. Oleska 48, 45-052 Opole ; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2013-08-21

    The spatial distribution of positrons emitted from radioactive isotopes into stacks or layered samples is a subject of the presented report. It was found that Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using GEANT4 code are not able to describe correctly the experimental data of the positron fractions in stacks. The mathematical model was proposed for calculations of the implantation profile or positron fractions in separated layers or foils being components of a stack. The model takes into account only two processes, i.e., the positron absorption and backscattering at interfaces. The mathematical formulas were applied in the computer program called LYS-1 (layers profile analysis). The theoretical predictions of the model were in the good agreement with the results of the MC simulations for the semi infinite sample. The experimental verifications of the model were performed on the symmetrical and non-symmetrical stacks of different foils. The good agreement between the experimental and calculated fractions of positrons in components of a stack was achieved. Also the experimental implantation profile obtained using the depth scanning of positron implantation technique is very well described by the theoretical profile obtained within the proposed model. The LYS-1 program allows us also to calculate the fraction of positrons which annihilate in the source, which can be useful in the positron spectroscopy.

  17. B physics: measurement of the lifetime difference between b_s mass eigenstates

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-28

    We present measurements of the lifetimes and polarization amplitudes for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K*{sup 0} decays. Lifetimes of the heavy (H) and light (L) mass eigenstates in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system are separately measured for the first time by determining the relative contributions of amplitudes with definite CP as a function of the decay time.

  18. Measurement of the Lambda b lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panikashvili, N; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-10-01

    We have measured the Lambda b lifetime using the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda, based on 1.2 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed Lambda b decays, where the J/psi and Lambda are identified via the decays J/psi --> mu+ mu- and Lambda --> ppi, we measured the Lambda b lifetime to be tau(Lambda b)=1.218 (+0.130)/(-0.115) (stat) +/- 0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B0 lifetime in the decay B0 --> J/psi(mu+ mu-)K(0)/(S)(pi+ pi-) to be tau(B0)=1.501 (+0.078)/(-0.074) (stat) +/- 0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of tau(Lambda b)/tau(B0)=0.811 (+0.096)/(-0.087) (stat) +/- 0.034(syst). PMID:17930660

  19. Measurement of the positron diffusion constants in polycrystalline molybdenum by the observation of positronium negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takuji; Iida, Simpei; Yamashita, Takashi; Nagashima, Yasuyuki

    2015-06-01

    We have measured the positron diffusion constants in polycrystalline molybdenum by the observation of positronium negative ions (Ps-). The Ps- ions emitted from the sample surface coated with Na were accelerated. The γ-rays from the accelerated Ps- ions were Doppler- shifted and thus the signals of self-annihilation of the Ps- ions were isolated from those of self-annihilation of para-positronium (p-Ps) or pair-annihilation of positrons in the bulk. Clear and reliable values of the diffusion constants have been obtained.

  20. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Brogland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting the Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to the Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 GeV and 200 GeV, We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 GeV range and determine for the first time that it continues to rise between 100 and 200 GeV,

  1. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Ackemann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting Earth's shadow, which, is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 and 200 Ge V. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 Ge V range. The three new spectral points between 100 and 200 GeV are consistent with a fraction that is continuing to rise with energy.

  2. Standard reference for instrument response function in fluorescence lifetime measurements in visible and near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chib, Rahul; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Fudala, Rafal; Borejdo, Julian; Zelent, Bogumil; Corradini, Maria G.; Ludescher, Richard D.; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Allura red (AR) fluorophore, a common dye in the food industry, displays a broad emission spectrum in water (visible-to-near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum) and has a remarkably short fluorescence lifetime of about 10 ps. This short lifetime does not depend on the emission (observation) wavelength. We examined time responses of AR fluorescence across emission wavelengths from 550 nm to 750 nm and found that it is an ideal candidate for impulse response functions in fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  3. Measurement of the fluorescence lifetime in scattering media by frequency-domain photon migration.

    PubMed

    Mayer, R H; Reynolds, J S; Sevick-Muraca, E M

    1999-08-01

    A method is presented to determine fluorescence decay lifetimes within tissuelike scattering media. Fluorescence lifetimes are determined for micromolar concentrations of the dyes 3,3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine Iodide and Indocyanine Green by frequency-domain investigations of light propagating in turbid media. Dual-wavelength photon-migration measurements that use intensity-modulated sources at excitation and emission wavelengths of the fluorophores provide optical parameters of the media as well as fluorescence properties of the dyes. The deduction of fluorescence lifetimes requires no calibration with reference fluorophores, and the results are shown to be independent of dye concentration. PMID:18323983

  4. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  5. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D.; Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J.

    2014-05-15

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 μM. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  6. Lifetime of Ionic Vacancy Created in Redox Electrode Reaction Measured by Cyclotron MHD Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Osaka, Tetsuya; Mogi, Iwao; Asanuma, Miki; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Aogaki, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    The lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in ferricyanide-ferrocyanide redox reaction have been first measured by means of cyclotron magnetohydrodynamic electrode, which is composed of coaxial cylinders partly exposed as electrodes and placed vertically in an electrolytic solution under a vertical magnetic field, so that induced Lorentz force makes ionic vacancies circulate together with the solution along the circumferences. At low magnetic fields, due to low velocities, ionic vacancies once created become extinct on the way of returning, whereas at high magnetic fields, in enhanced velocities, they can come back to their initial birthplaces. Detecting the difference between these two states, we can measure the lifetime of ionic vacancy. As a result, the lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in the oxidation and reduction are the same, and the intrinsic lifetime is 1.25 s, and the formation time of nanobubble from the collision of ionic vacancies is 6.5 ms. PMID:26791269

  7. Lifetime Measurements Using the Jefferson Lab Load-Lock Electron Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grames, J.; Adderley, P.; Baylac, M.; Brittian, J.; Charles, D.; Clark, J.; Hansknecht, J.; Poelker, M.; Stutzman, M.; Surles-Law, K.

    2005-08-01

    Lifetime measurements of bulk GaAs using a 100 kV load-lock electron gun and beam line were made. Initial tests used anodized samples to study lifetime under various conditions (gun vacuum, laser spot location, activated area). Subsequent tests used a mechanical mask to limit the active area and included improved monitoring of the gun chamber and beam line vacuum pressure. Results of these measurements support claims made at past workshops, namely photocathode lifetime improves when gun vacuum is enhanced and when electron emission from the edge of the photocathode is eliminated. The dependence upon laser spot location is less certain. Tests studying lifetime at higher beam intensity (I ~ 8 mA) have begun.

  8. Lifetime of Ionic Vacancy Created in Redox Electrode Reaction Measured by Cyclotron MHD Electrode.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Osaka, Tetsuya; Mogi, Iwao; Asanuma, Miki; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Aogaki, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    The lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in ferricyanide-ferrocyanide redox reaction have been first measured by means of cyclotron magnetohydrodynamic electrode, which is composed of coaxial cylinders partly exposed as electrodes and placed vertically in an electrolytic solution under a vertical magnetic field, so that induced Lorentz force makes ionic vacancies circulate together with the solution along the circumferences. At low magnetic fields, due to low velocities, ionic vacancies once created become extinct on the way of returning, whereas at high magnetic fields, in enhanced velocities, they can come back to their initial birthplaces. Detecting the difference between these two states, we can measure the lifetime of ionic vacancy. As a result, the lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in the oxidation and reduction are the same, and the intrinsic lifetime is 1.25 s, and the formation time of nanobubble from the collision of ionic vacancies is 6.5 ms. PMID:26791269

  9. Lifetime of Ionic Vacancy Created in Redox Electrode Reaction Measured by Cyclotron MHD Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Osaka, Tetsuya; Mogi, Iwao; Asanuma, Miki; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Aogaki, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    The lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in ferricyanide-ferrocyanide redox reaction have been first measured by means of cyclotron magnetohydrodynamic electrode, which is composed of coaxial cylinders partly exposed as electrodes and placed vertically in an electrolytic solution under a vertical magnetic field, so that induced Lorentz force makes ionic vacancies circulate together with the solution along the circumferences. At low magnetic fields, due to low velocities, ionic vacancies once created become extinct on the way of returning, whereas at high magnetic fields, in enhanced velocities, they can come back to their initial birthplaces. Detecting the difference between these two states, we can measure the lifetime of ionic vacancy. As a result, the lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in the oxidation and reduction are the same, and the intrinsic lifetime is 1.25 s, and the formation time of nanobubble from the collision of ionic vacancies is 6.5 ms.

  10. Laser measurements of the radiative lifetime of the B state of CN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A turnable dye laser was used to measure the radiative lifetime of the individual rotational levels of the B2 Sigma (+) state of CN. The radiative lifetime of the unperturbed rotational levels is 65.6 plus or minus 1.0 nsec. A longer radiative lifetime of 72 plus or minus 1 nsec is observed for the Kaon prime = 4 level of the B state. The measured values of the perturbed and unperturbed levels support the longer lifetimes for the A2 meson pion state of CN. The quenching cross section of the B2 Sigma state of CN is 41 plus or minus 20 Angstroms squared and is independent of the rotational energy of the B state.

  11. New lifetime measurements in 109Pd and the onset of deformation at N =60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, B.; Mach, H.; Aprahamian, A.; Simpson, G. S.; Rissanen, J.; GhiÅ£ǎ, D. G.; Olaizola, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; ńystö, J.; Bentley, I.; Eronen, T.; Fraile, L. M.; Jokinen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Reponen, M.; Ruchowska, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Smith, M. K.; Weber, C.

    2015-12-01

    Several new subnanosecond lifetimes were measured in 109Pd using the fast-timing β γ γ (t ) method. Fission fragments of the A =109 mass chain were produced by bombarding natural uranium with 30 MeV protons at the Jyväskylä Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. Lifetimes were obtained for excited states in 109Pd populated following β decay of 109Rh. The new lifetimes provide some insight into the evolution of nuclear structure in this mass region. In particular, the distinct structure of the two low-lying 7 /2+ states occurring systematically across the Pd isotopic chain is supported by the new lifetime measurements. The available nuclear data indicate a sudden increase in deformation at N =60 which is related to the strong p -n interaction between π g9 /2 and ν g7 /2 valence nucleons expected in this region.

  12. Measuring the free neutron lifetime to <= 0.3s via the beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, Jonathan; Fomin, Nadia; BL3 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Neutron beta decay is an archetype for all semi-leptonic charged-current weak processes. A precise value for the neutron lifetime is required for consistency tests of the Standard Model and is needed to predict the primordial 4He abundance from the theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. An effort has begun for an in-beam measurement of the neutron lifetime with an projected <=0.3s uncertainty. This effort is part of a phased campaign of neutron lifetime measurements based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the Sussex-ILL-NIST technique. Recent advances in neutron fluence measurement techniques as well as new large area silicon detector technology address the two largest sources of uncertainty of in-beam measurements, paving the way for a new measurement. The experimental design and projected uncertainties for the 0.3s measurement will be discussed.

  13. Measuring the free neutron lifetime to <= 0.3s via the beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia; Mulholland, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Neutron beta decay is an archetype for all semi-leptonic charged-current weak processes. A precise value for the neutron lifetime is required for consistency tests of the Standard Model and is needed to predict the primordial 4 He abundance from the theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. An effort has begun for an in-beam measurement of the neutron lifetime with an projected <=0.3s uncertainty. This effort is part of a phased campaign of neutron lifetime measurements based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the Sussex-ILL-NIST technique. Recent advances in neutron fluence measurement techniques as well as new large area silicon detector technology address the two largest sources of uncertainty of in-beam measurements, paving the way for a new measurement. The experimental design and projected uncertainties for the 0.3s measurement will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE office of Science, NIST and NSF.

  14. Detecting and Quantifying Biomolecular Interactions of a Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Nanoparticle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Boreham, Alexander; Pikkemaat, Jens; Volz, Pierre; Brodwolf, Robert; Kuehne, Christian; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Dernedde, Jens; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of nanoparticles with biomaterials determine the biological activity that is key for the physiological response. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS) were found recently to act as an inhibitor of inflammation by blocking selectins. Systemic application of dPGS would present this nanoparticle to various biological molecules that rapidly adsorb to the nanoparticle surface or lead to adsorption of the nanoparticle to cellular structures such as lipid membranes. In the past, fluorescence lifetime measurements of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles at a molecular and cellular/tissue level have been proven to reveal valuable information on the local nanoparticle environment via characteristic fluorescent lifetime signatures of the nanoparticle bound dye. Here, we established fluorescence lifetime measurements as a tool to determine the binding affinity to fluorescently tagged dPGS (dPGS-ICC; ICC: indocarbocyanine). The binding to a cell adhesion molecule (L-selectin) and a human complement protein (C1q) to dPGS-ICC was evaluated by the concentration dependent change in the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC. The apparent binding affinity was found to be in the nanomolar range for both proteins (L-selectin: 87 ± 4 nM and C1q: 42 ± 12 nM). Furthermore, the effect of human serum on the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC was measured and found to be different from the interactions with the two proteins and lipid membranes. A comparison between the unique lifetime signatures of dPGS-ICC in different biological environments shows that fluorescence lifetime measurements of unique dPGS-ICC fluorescence lifetime signatures are a versatile tool to probe the microenvironment of dPGS in cells and tissue. PMID:26712722

  15. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  16. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  17. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy Study of Barnett Shale Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameena, Fnu; Alsleben, Helge; Quarles, Carroll A.

    Measurements are reported of positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening parameters on 14 samples of Barnett shale core selected from 196 samples ranging from depths of 6107 to 6402 feet. The Barnett shale core was taken from EOG well Two-O-Five 2H located in Johnson county TX. The selected samples are dark clay-rich mudstone consisting of fine-grained clay minerals. The samples are varied in shape, typically a few inches long and about 1/2 inch in width and thickness, and are representative of the predominant facies in the core. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), petrographic analysis and geochemical analysis of total organic carbon (TOC) were already available for each of the selected samples. The lifetime data are analyzed in terms of three lifetime components with the shortest lifetime fixed at 125 ps. The second lifetime is attributed to positron annihilation in the bulk and positron trapping; and the third lifetime is due to positronium. Correlations of the lifetimes, intensities, the average lifetime and S and W parameters with TOC, XRF and XRD parameters are discussed. The observed correlations suggest that positron spectroscopy may be a useful tool in characterizing shale.

  18. Quantum well intersubband lifetimes measured by mid-IR pump-probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, G.L.; Sung, B.; Proctor, M.

    1995-12-31

    Semiconductor quantum wells exhibit quantum-confined electronic energy levels, or subbands, that are similar to one-dimensional {open_quotes}particle in a box{close_quotes} wavefunctions. The light effective mass of electrons allows large spatial extents of the wavefunctions and concomitantly large dipole overlaps between states. These large dipoles have been exploited in a variety of experiments including nonlinear frequency conversion, infrared photodetection, and lasing. A key parameter for many devices is the upper state lifetime. The decay of carriers in the upper state is believed to be dominated by optical phonon scattering and lifetimes on-the order of 1ps are expected. While Raman and saturation measurements have shown good agreement with theory, direct pump-probe measurements have reported longer lifetimes, partially due to carrier heating. In this paper, we discuss our mid-IR (5{mu}m) pump-probe measurements of intersubband lifetimes, performed at the Stanford Picosecond Free Electron Laser Center. At low excitation densities we observe lifetimes of about 1.5 ps, in good agreement with phonon theory. At high excitation densities the lifetime increases to 3.5 ps, demonstrating the transition from the low- to high-excitation agree.

  19. Carrier lifetime measurements using free carrier absorption transients. I. Principle and injection dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnros, Jan

    1998-07-01

    A contactless, all-optical technique for semiconductor charge carrier lifetime characterization is reviewed. The technique is based upon measurements of free carrier absorption transients by an infrared probe beam following electron-hole pair excitation by a pulsed laser beam. Main features are a direct probing of the excess carrier density coupled with a homogeneous carrier distribution within the sample, enabling precision studies of different recombination mechanisms. We show that the method is capable of measuring the lifetime over a broad range of injections (1013-1018 cm-3) probing both the minority carrier lifetime, the high injection lifetime and Auger recombination, as well as the transition between these ranges. Performance and limitations of the technique, such as lateral resolution, are addressed while application of the technique for lifetime mapping and effects of surface recombination is outlined in a companion article [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 284 (1998), part II]. Results from detailed studies of the injection dependence yield good agreement with the Shockley-Read-Hall theory, whereas the coefficient for Auger recombination shows an apparent shift to a higher value, with respect to the traditionally accepted value, at carrier densities below ˜2-5×1017 cm-3. Data also indicate an increased value of the coefficient for bimolecular recombination (radiative or trap-assisted Auger) from the generally accepted value. Measurements on an electron irradiated wafer and wafers of exceptionally high carrier lifetimes are also discussed within the framework of different recombination mechanisms.

  20. Transcutaneous measurement of the arterial input function in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Litton, J.E.; Eriksson, L. )

    1990-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a powerful tool in medical research. Biochemical function can be both precisely localized and quantitatively measured. To achieve reliable quantitation it is necessary to know the time course of activity concentration in the arterial blood during the measurement. In this study the arterial blood curve from the brachial artery is compared to the activity measured in the internal carotid artery with a new transcutaneous detector.

  1. Lifetime measurements of normally deformed and superdeformed states in 82Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.-H.; Baktash, C.; Brinkman, M. J.; Jin, H.-Q.; Rudolph, D.; Gross, C. J.; Devlin, M.; Lafosse, D. R.; Lerma, F.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sylvan, G. N.; Tabor, S. L.; Birriel, I.; Saladin, J. X.; Winchell, D. F.; Wood, V. Q.; Clark, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Wells, J. C.; Petrovici, A.; Schmid, K. W.; Faessler, A.

    1998-01-01

    Lifetimes of a superdeformed band in 82Sr were measured with the centroid shift method. The measured average quadrupole moment of this band corresponds to a quadrupole deformation of β2~0.49, which is slightly smaller than both the theoretical prediction, and the measured deformation of the SD band in the neighboring isotone 84Zr. Lifetimes of high spin states of three normally deformed rotational bands in 82Sr were also measured with the Doppler shift attenuation method technique. The quadrupole moments of these normally deformed bands show a decrease at the highest spins, supporting the predicted band terminations.

  2. Measurements of positron scattering by hydrogen, alkali metal, and other atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, T. S.; Harte, M.; Jiang, J.; Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Li, H.; Zhou, S.

    1998-08-01

    Recent developments in measurements of total and positronium (Ps) formation cross sections for positrons (in the energy range of 1-300 eV) scattered by hydrogen, alkali metal, and other atoms are reviewed. Measurements and calculations of total and Ps formation cross section ( QPs's) for positrons scattered by hydrogen atoms are in very good agreement, and for the most part there is also good agreement for sodium, potassium, and rubidium atoms, but there is a puzzling discrepancy between measured and recently calculated QPs's for sodium. Preliminary measurements of QPs's for Mg show a very rapid rise to a large maximum value less than 2 eV above the Ps formation threshold energy (0.8 eV) which may be related to the proximity of that threshold to zero energy. It appears that structure observed in e +-Ar and Kr QPs measurements may be related to capture of inner-subshell electrons.

  3. Frequency domain instrument for measuring phosphorescence lifetime distributions in heterogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Fernandez-Searra, Maria A.; Dugan, Benjamin W.; Wilson, David F.

    2001-08-01

    The luminescence lifetime distribution can be used to determine the distribution of quencher concentrations in a heterogeneous sample. We describe a frequency domain instrument for real-time measurements of phosphorescence lifetime distributions in microheterogeneous objects. In this system (1) an array of harmonics (typically 100-200 frequencies) is used to modulate the excitation source, a light emitting diode. Due to the relatively long triplet state lifetimes, the frequencies required for the modulation are typically below 40 000 kHz, which allows direct digitization of both excitation and emission signals. (2) The dependence of the phase/amplitude factor on the modulation frequency is determined by linear least-squares analysis of the emission signal, which is sampled and summed over the multiple excitation cycles. (3) The phase/amplitude relationship obtained is analyzed in real time using a "light" version of the maximum entropy algorithm, which provides a complete phosphorescence lifetime distribution. (4) The lifetime distribution is converted into the distribution of quencher concentrations using an appropriate model of quenching. The instrument is also capable of measuring phosphorescence in "single-frequency" mode, which is useful for rapid evaluation of apparent luminescence lifetimes. In this mode, a correction for an in-phase signal, which is due to backscattering and fluorescence, is applied to improve the accuracy of lifetime measurements. The instruments were tested in Stern-Volmer calibrations of Pd-porphyrin based phosphors for oxygen measurements and used for preliminary evaluation of oxygen distributions in rat tumor tissues. The instruments were found to be capable of accurate determination of lifetimes in the range of 10-3000 μs. The average duration of a single lifetime distribution measurement was about 15 s, depending on the sample and on the density of the lifetime grid in the maximum entropy method analysis. In the single

  4. Measurement of the B¯s 0 Meson Lifetime in Ds+π- Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the B¯s 0 meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to Ds+π-, to that of the B¯ 0 meson. The p p collision data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1 , collected with the LHCb detector, at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Combining our measured value of 1.010 ±0.010 ±0.008 for this ratio with the known B¯ 0 lifetime, we determine the flavor-specific B¯s 0 lifetime to be τ (B¯s 0)=1.535 ±0.015 ±0.014 ps , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This is the most precise measurement to date, and is consistent with previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  5. Measurement of the B¯s⁰ meson lifetime in Ds⁺π⁻ decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-10-24

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the B¯s⁰ meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to Ds⁺π⁻, to that of the B¯⁰ meson. The pp collision data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1  fb(-1), collected with the LHCb detector, at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Combining our measured value of 1.010±0.010±0.008 for this ratio with the known B¯⁰ lifetime, we determine the flavor-specific B¯s⁰ lifetime to be τ(B¯s⁰ )=1.535±0.015±0.014  ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This is the most precise measurement to date, and is consistent with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. PMID:25379914

  6. Positron annihilation studies of organic superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, H.L.; Lou, Y.; Ali, E.H.

    1994-09-01

    The positron lifetimes of two organic superconductors, {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br, are measured as a function of temperature across {Tc}. A drop of positron lifetime below {Tc} is observed. Positron-electron momentum densities are measured by using 2D-ACAR to search for the Fermi surface in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. Positron density distributions and positron-electron overlaps are calculated by using the orthogonalized linear combination atomic orbital (OLCAO) method to interprete the temperature dependence due to the local charge transfer which is inferred to relate to the superconducting transition. 2D-ACAR results in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br are compared with theoretical band calculations based on a first-principles local density approximation. Importance of performing accurate band calculations for the interpretation of positron annihilation data is emphasized.

  7. Apparatus and methods of measuring minority carrier lifetime using a liquid probe

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jian

    2016-04-12

    Methods and apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes using liquid probes are provided. In one embodiment, a method of measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor material comprises: providing a semiconductor material having a surface; forming a rectifying junction at a first location on the surface by temporarily contacting the surface with a conductive liquid probe; electrically coupling a second junction to the semiconductor material at a second location, wherein the first location and the second location are physically separated; applying a forward bias to the rectifying junction causing minority carrier injection in the semiconductor material; measuring a total capacitance as a function of frequency between the rectifying junction and the second junction; determining an inflection frequency of the total capacitance; and determining a minority lifetime of the semiconductor material from the inflection frequency.

  8. Fabrication of 94Zr thin target for recoil distance doppler shift method of lifetime measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, C. K.; Rohilla, Aman; Abhilash, S. R.; Kabiraj, D.; Singh, R. P.; Mehta, D.; Chamoli, S. K.

    2014-11-01

    A thin isotopic 94Zr target of thickness 520 μg /cm2 has been prepared for recoil distance Doppler shift method (RDM) lifetime measurement by using an electron beam deposition method on tantalum backing of 3.5 mg/cm2 thickness at Inter University Accelerator Center (IUAC), New Delhi. To meet the special requirement of smoothness of surface for RDM lifetime measurement and also to protect the outer layer of 94Zr from peeling off, a very thin layer of gold has been evaporated on a 94Zr target on a specially designed substrate holder. In all, 143 mg of 99.6% enriched 94Zr target material was utilized for the fabrication of 94Zr targets. The target has been successfully used in a recent RDM lifetime measurement experiment at IUAC.

  9. A Precision Measurement Of The Neutral Pion Lifetime: The PRIMEX Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Miskimen, Rory

    2008-10-13

    The PRIMEX collaboration at Jefferson Lab is completing an experimental analysis to obtain a precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Results from the experiment will be presented and comparisons made with the chiral anomaly prediction and NLO calculations. An extension of the experiment to 12 GeV for measurements of the {eta} and {eta}' radiative widths is discussed.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime measurement via a radionuclide-scintillation light source and analog cross correlation.

    PubMed

    Burden, D L; Hobbs, S E; Hieftje, G M

    1997-05-15

    beta-Emitting 90Sr is used with a plastic scintillator to produce excitation-light pulses for fluorescence lifetime analysis. This light source is less expensive, more compact, and much more reliable than traditionally employed excitation sources such as lasers or pulsed flash lamps. The pulse train from this light source varies randomly in amplitude and time. Cross-correlation signal analysis is ideal for such a source because, unlike other time domain techniques, cross correlation takes complete advantage of its random nature. Here we report on the construction of an instrument and the methods employed to make fluorescence lifetime measurements via the new source and an analog correlation processor. Although the light intensity of the scintillator-based excitation source is comparatively low, an adequate signal level can be generated. The fluorescence lifetimes of three fluorophores are measured with a 1-mCi radionuclide to demonstrate a lifetime range from less than 1.5 to 28 ns. Long-lifetime measurements require an extra calibration step in order to compensate for delay cable energy loss. The light collection efficiency of the current instrument was found to be undesirably low; improvements in the instrument optics are suggested that will increase the collection efficiency and enhance the detection capability. PMID:9164162

  11. On the measurement the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons in a vacuum quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J. D.; Penttila, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime ({approx}882 s) with an accuracy of 10{sup -4}. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of UCNs confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at LANL has developed a prototype ultra-cold neutron UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100 UCN/cm{sup 3}. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10{sup -4} in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic error in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap.

  12. On the Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime Using Ultracold Neutrons in a Vacuum Quadrupole Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. David; Penttila, S. I.

    2005-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime (~886 s) with an accuracy of 10−4. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a prototype UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100/cm3 [1]. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10−4 in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic uncertainty in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap. PMID:27308151

  13. Effect of free volume and temperature on the structural relaxation in polymethylphenylsiloxane: a positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature study.

    PubMed

    Dlubek, G; Shaikh, M Q; Krause-Rehberg, R; Paluch, M

    2007-01-14

    The microstructure of the free volume and its temperature dependence in polymethylphenylsiloxane (PMPS) have been examined using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and pressure-volume-temperature experiments. The hole-free volume fraction h and the specific hole-free and occupied volumes, Vf=hV and Vocc=(1-h)V, were estimated employing the Simha-Somcynsky (SS) lattice-hole theory. From the PALS spectra analyzed with the new routine LT9.0 the hole size distribution, its mean, , and mean dispersion, sigmah, were calculated. A comparison of with V and Vf delivered a constant specific hole number Nh'. Using a fluctuation approach the temperature dependency of the volume of the smallest representative freely fluctuating subsystem, , is estimated to vary from approximately 8.5 nm3 at Tg to approximately 3 nm3 at T/Tg>or=1.15. Unlike other polymers, the segmental relaxation from dielectric spectroscopy of PMPS follows the Cohen-Turnbull free volume theory almost perfectly in the temperature and pressure ranges between 243 and 279 K and 0 and approximately 100 MPa. This behavior correlates with the small mass of the SS lattice mer which indicates the high flexibility of the PMPS chain. Above 293 K and approximately 150 MPa, the free volume prediction gives relaxation times that are too small, which indicates that effects of thermal energy must be included in the analysis. To quantify the degree to which volume and thermal energy govern the structural dynamics the ratio of the activation enthalpies, Ei=R[(d ln taudT1)]i (tau-relaxation time of alpha relaxation), at constant volume V and constant pressure P, EV/EP, is frequently determined. The authors present arguments for necessity to substitute EV with EVf, the activation enthalpy at constant (hole) free volume, and show that EVf/EP changes as expected: increasing with increasing free volume, i.e., with increasing temperature and decreasing pressure. EVf/EP (=0.04-0.1) exhibits remarkably

  14. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  15. Measurement of the ratio of B+ and B0 meson lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schukin, A A; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shephard, W D; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Song, Y; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Steinbrück, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2005-05-13

    The ratio of the B+ and B0 meson lifetimes was measured using data collected in 2002-2004 by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These mesons were reconstructed in B-->mu(+)nuD(*-)X decays, which are dominated by B0 and B-->mu(+)nuD 0X decays, which are dominated by B+. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be tau(+)/tau(0)=1.080+/-0.016(stat)+/-0.014(syst). PMID:15904361

  16. New lifetime measurements in the stable semimagic Sn isotopes using the Doppler-shift attenuation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, A.; Walker, J.; Leske, J.; Speidel, K.-H.; Stuchbery, A. E.; East, M.; Boutachkov, P.; Cederkäll, J.; Doornenbal, P.; Egido, J. L.; Ekström, A.; Gerl, J.; Gernhäuser, R.; Goel, N.; Górska, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Maier-Komor, P.; Modamio, V.; Naqvi, F.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Schaffner, H.; Schwengner, R.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2011-09-01

    Precise measurements of lifetimes in the picosecond range of excited states in the stable even-A Sn isotopes 112,114,116,122Sn have been performed using the Doppler shift attenuation technique. For the first excited 2+ states in 112Sn, 114Sn and 116Sn the E2 transition strengths deduced from the measured lifetimes are in disagreement with the previously adopted values. They indicate a shallow minimum at N = 66 in contrast to the maximum at mid-shell predicted by modern shell model calculations.

  17. Study on Defects in H+ion Implanted B2 type Fe-Al Alloy using Slow Positron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komagata, S.; Kawasuso, A.; Yabuuchi, A.; Maekawa, M.; Batchulun, C.; Yasuda, K.; Ishigami, R.; Kume, K.; Iwase, A.; Hori, F.

    Fe48-at.%Al alloy were implanted with 50 keV H+ ions to the fluence of 3×1016 and 1×1018/cm2 at room temperature. Positron annihilation Doppler broadening and lifetime measurements for these alloys have been carried out using slow positron beam apparatus with an energy range of 0.2 to 30.2 keV. The positron annihilation S-parameter decreased by H+ ion irradiation. Also the positron lifetimes for hydrogen deposited region in the alloy decreased by the irradiation. These results show that implanted H atoms were trapped by vacancy type defects.

  18. Lifetime measurement of excited low-spin states via the (p, p‧ γ) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, A.; Derya, V.; Mineva, M. N.; Petkov, P.; Pickstone, S. G.; Spieker, M.; Zilges, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper a method for lifetime measurements in the sub-picosecond regime via the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) following the inelastic proton scattering reaction is presented. In a pioneering experiment we extracted the lifetimes of 30 excited low-spin states of 96Ru, taking advantage of the coincident detection of scattered protons and de-exciting γ-rays as well as the large number of particle and γ-ray detectors provided by the SONIC@HORUS setup at the University of Cologne. The large amount of new experimental data shows that this technique is suited for the measurement of lifetimes of excited low-spin states, especially for isotopes with a low isotopic abundance, where (n ,n‧ γ) or - in case of investigating dipole excitations - (γ ,γ‧) experiments are not feasible due to the lack of sufficient isotopically enriched target material.

  19. Lifetime measurement of 2+- state in 74Zn by recoil-distance Doppler-shift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikura, M.; Mouginot, B.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Matea, I.; Stefan, I.; Verney, D.; Assie, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Borcea, C.; Burger, A.; Burgunder, G.; Buta, A.; Cáceres, L.; Cléement, E.; Coquard, L.; de Angelis, G.; de France, G.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Dewald, A.; Dijon, A.; Dombradi, Z.; Fiori, E.; Fransen, C.; Friessner, G.; Gaudefroy, L.; Georgiev, G.; Grévy, S.; Hackstein, M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Ibrahim, F.; Kamalou, O.; Kmiecik, M.; Lozeva, R.; Maj, A.; Mihai, C.; Möller, O.; Myalski, S.; Negoita, F.; Pantelica, D.; Perrot, L.; Pissulla, Th.; Rotaru, F.; Rother, W.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Ujic, P.

    2013-09-01

    We have performed the first direct lifetime measurement of the 2+- state in 74Zn. The neutron-rich 74Zn beam was produced by in-flight fragmentation of 76Ge at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds and separated with the LISE spectrometer. The lifetime of the 2+- state was measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method with the Cologne plunger device combined with the EXOGAM detectors. The lifetime of the 2+- state in 74Zn was determined to be 27.0(24) ps, which corresponds to a reduced transition probability B(E2; 2+- -> 0+) = 370(33) e2fm4.

  20. Interpreting aerosol lifetimes using the GEOS-Chem model and constraints from radionuclide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Pierce, J. R.; Martin, R. V.

    2014-04-01

    Aerosol removal processes control global aerosol abundance, but the rate of that removal remains uncertain. A recent study of aerosol-bound radionuclide measurements after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident documents 137Cs removal (e-folding) times of 10.0-13.9 days, suggesting that mean aerosol lifetimes in the range of 3-7 days in global models might be too short by a factor of two. In this study, we attribute this discrepancy to differences between the e-folding and mean aerosol lifetimes. We implement a simulation of 137Cs and 133Xe into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and examine the removal rates for the Fukushima case. We find a general consistency between modelled and measured e-folding times. The simulated 137Cs global burden e-folding time is about 14 days. However, the simulated mean lifetime of aerosol-bound 137Cs over a 6-month post-accident period is only 1.8 days. We find that the mean lifetime depends strongly on the removal rates in the first few days after emissions, before the aerosols leave the boundary layer and are transported to altitudes and latitudes where lifetimes with respect to wet removal are longer by a few orders of magnitude. We present sensitivity simulations that demonstrate the influence of differences in altitude and location of the radionuclides on the mean lifetime. Global mean lifetimes are shown to strongly depend on the altitude of injection. The global mean 137Cs lifetime is more than one order of magnitude greater for the injection at 7 km than into the boundary layer above the Fukushima site. Instantaneous removal rates are slower during the first few days after the emissions for a free tropospheric versus boundary layer injection and this strongly controls the mean lifetimes. Global mean aerosol lifetimes for the GEOS-Chem model are 3-6 days, which is longer than that for the 137Cs injected at the Fukushima site (likely due to precipitation shortly after Fukushima emissions), but similar to the

  1. Spatially resolved measurements of charge carrier lifetimes in CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, C.; Hempel, H.; Buschmann, V.; Siebert, T.; Heisler, C.; Wesch, W.; Ronning, C.

    2013-03-01

    The lifetime of the minority charge carriers in polycrystalline Cadmium Telluride (pc-CdTe) for solar cell applications is a crucial material parameter and has been determined by analysis of the decay curves of the luminescence signal. Both the lateral and the transversal distributions of the carrier lifetime on the surface and in the bulk of pc-CdTe material as well as the respective solar cell characteristics were measured as a function of the deposition technique, the activation treatment, and the incorporation of additional group-V elements. The results are compared to prior studies. It was found that an activation process passivates grain boundaries and increases the carrier lifetime, which is then higher at the pn-junction than at the surface. Furthermore, nitrogen and phosphorus doping of the CdTe absorber material influences the charge carrier lifetime. The results show that the spatial resolved measurement of the carrier lifetime in pc-CdTe gives an important insight to the charge carrier dynamics of the material.

  2. UCNtau: A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Beta-Decay Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Yu

    2015-10-01

    Eighty years after Chadwick discovered the neutron, physicists today still debate over how long the neutron lives. Measurements of the neutron lifetime have achieved the 0.1% level of precision (~1 s), however, experiments using the bottle technique yield lifetime results systematically lower than those using the beam technique. Measuring the neutron lifetime is difficult due to several limitations: the low energy of the decay products, the inability to track slow neutrons, and the fact that the neutron lifetime is long (880 . 3 +/- 1 . 1 s, PDG2014). In particular, slow neutrons are susceptible to many loss mechanisms other than beta-decay, such as upscattering and absorption on material surfaces; they act on time scales comparable to the neutron beta-decay and thus make the extraction of the beta-decay lifetime very challenging. In the UCN τ experiment, we trap ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a magnetic-gravitational trap. The apparatus, installed at the Los Alamos UCN source, has been used to develop new techniques-using field confinements with attentions to the phase space evolution of trapped neutrons-with an aim to reduce the uncertainty to 1 s (and better). I will report first competitive results and discuss plans to quantify systematic effects. The work was supported by the NSF (Grant-1306942 to IU) and the LANL LDRD program.

  3. Measurement of the B/s0 lifetime in B/s0 --> K+ K- decays

    SciTech Connect

    Pounder, Nicola Louise; /Oxford U.

    2009-02-01

    A method is presented to simultaneously separate the contributions to a sample of B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup {prime}-} decays, where h = {pi} or K, and measure the B meson lifetimes in the sample while correcting for the bias in the lifetime distributions due to the hadronic trigger at the CDF experiment. Using 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at CDF the B{sup 0} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = 1.558{sub -0.047}{sup +0.050}{sub stat} {+-} 0.028{sub syst} ps, in agreement with the world average measurement. The B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime in the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} decay is measured as {tau}{sub B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}} = 1.51{sub -0.11}{sup +0.13}{sub stat} {+-} 0.04{sub syst} ps. No difference is observed between the lifetime and other measurements of the average B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime or the lifetime of the light B{sub s}{sup 0} mass eigenstate determined from B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decays. With the assumptions that B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} is 100% CP-even and that {tau}{sub B{sub s}{sup 0}} = {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} the width difference in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system is determined as {Delta}{Lambda}{sup CP}/{Lambda} = 0.03{sub -0.15}{sup +0.17}{sub stat} {+-} 0.05{sub syst} using the current world average B{sup 0} lifetime. This is consistent with zero and with the current world average measurement.

  4. Noninvasive measurement of regional myocardial glucose metabolism by positron emission computed tomography. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1980-06-01

    While the results of regional myocardial glucose metabolism measurements using positron emission computed tomography (/sup 13/N-ammonia) are promising, their utility and value remains to be determined in man. If this technique can be applied to patients with acute myocardial ischemia or infarction it may permit delineation of regional myocardial segments with altered, yet still active metabolism. Further, it may become possible to evaluate the effects of interventions designed to salvage reversibly injured myocardium by this technique.

  5. Electroweak measurements in electron-positron collisions at W-boson-pair energies at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; DELPHI Collaboration; L3 Collaboration; OPAL Collaboration; LEP Electroweak Working Group 1

    2013-11-01

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3 fb-1 collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 GeV to 209 GeV.

  6. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  7. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. PMID:25279617

  8. Measuring electron-positron annihilation radiation from laser plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Tommasini, R.; Seely, J.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Pereira, N.; Gregori, G.; Falk, K.; Mithen, J.; Murphy, C. D.

    2012-10-15

    We investigated various diagnostic techniques to measure the 511 keV annihilation radiations. These include step-wedge filters, transmission crystal spectroscopy, single-hit CCD detectors, and streaked scintillating detection. While none of the diagnostics recorded conclusive results, the step-wedge filter that is sensitive to the energy range between 100 keV and 700 keV shows a signal around 500 keV that is clearly departing from a pure Bremsstrahlung spectrum and that we ascribe to annihilation radiation.

  9. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochomes in the sample.

  10. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOEpatents

    Buican, T.N.

    1993-05-04

    Apparatus and method is described for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochromes in the sample.

  11. LASER COOLING: Measurement of the lifetime of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permyakova, O. I.; Yakovlev, A. V.; Chapovskii, P. L.

    2008-09-01

    The lifetimes of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap are measured at different populations of the 'bright' and 'dark' hyperfine states of captured atoms. It is found that the lifetime of atoms in the trap decreases if they spend more time in the bright state. A simple explanation of this effect is proposed which is based on the increase in the transport cross section for collisions of thermal rubidium atoms surrounding the trap with cold rubidium atoms upon their electronic excitation.

  12. Accurate lifetime measurements for the noble gases by the electron beam alignment technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorny, M. B.; Kazantsev, S. A.; Matisov, B. G.; Polezhaevs, N. T.

    1985-03-01

    Accurate lifetime measurement for the 41 P 1, 41 D 2, 51 D 2 helium and the atomic 2 p and 3 p states of other noble gases was performed by the low energy electron beam alignment technique. An account of the influence of magnetic field on the electron path was made to obtain the real Hanle signal shape. The influence of the radiation trapping in the collision chamber was analysed with regard to the metastables diffusion. The experimental data were compared with the results of other methods of the lifetime determination.

  13. Measurement of the lifetime of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakova, O I; Yakovlev, A V; Chapovskii, P L

    2008-09-30

    The lifetimes of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap are measured at different populations of the 'bright' and 'dark' hyperfine states of captured atoms. It is found that the lifetime of atoms in the trap decreases if they spend more time in the bright state. A simple explanation of this effect is proposed which is based on the increase in the transport cross section for collisions of thermal rubidium atoms surrounding the trap with cold rubidium atoms upon their electronic excitation. (laser cooling)

  14. Measurement of the Ξb- and Ωb- baryon lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-09-01

    Using a data sample of pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1, the Ξb- and Ωb- baryons are reconstructed in the Ξb-→J/ψΞ- and Ωb-→J/ψΩ- decay modes and their lifetimes measured to be

  15. Measurement of the Masses and Lifetimes of B Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Catastini, Pierluigi; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-05-01

    The latest results for the B Hadron sector at the Tevatron Collider are summarized. The properties of B hadrons can be precisely measured at the Tevatron. In particularly they will focus on the masses and lifetimes. The new Tevatron results for the CP violation in B Hadrons are also discussed.

  16. Ultracold neutron detector for the spectrometer of a neutron lifetime measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. A.; Vasiljev, A. V.; Ivanov, E. A.; Ilyin, D. S.; Krivshich, A. G.; Serebrov, A. P.

    2016-04-01

    The gas-discharge detector is designed for the neutron lifetime spectrometer. The detector is intended for ultracold neutron flux monitoring in measurement cycles at the specrtometer (ILL, Grenoble, France). The detector has been successively tested with a Pu-Be neutron source under laboratory conditions and as a part of the spectrometer.

  17. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  18. Measurement of natural radiative lifetime of excited levels of Tm atom

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chengfei; Jiang Zhankui; Zhou Dafan; Liang Xiuqing

    1988-10-01

    The natural radiative lifetime of some low-lying excited levels in Tm atoms have been determined from measurements of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence in atomic beam. The levels were selectively populated by the light from a pulsed tunable dye laser pumped by an excimer laser or a Nd:YAG laser.

  19. An Undergraduate Experiment on Nuclear Lifetime Measurement Using the Doppler Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. L.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    While designed for a senior undergraduate laboratory, the experiment illustrates the principles involved in the various Doppler techniques currently used in nuclear lifetime studies and demonstrates the versatility of the Ge(Li) detector in applications other than direct energy or intensity measurement. (Author/TS)

  20. Interpreting aerosol lifetimes using the GEOS-Chem model and constraints from radionuclide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Pierce, J. R.; Martin, R. V.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol removal processes control global aerosol abundance, but the rate of that removal remains uncertain. A recent study of aerosol-bound radionuclide measurements after the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident documents 137Cs removal (e-folding) times of 10.0 to 13.9 days, suggesting that mean aerosol lifetimes in the range of 3-7 days in global models might be too short by a factor of two. In this study, we attribute this discrepancy to differences between the e-folding and mean aerosol lifetimes. We implement a~simulation of 137Cs and 133Xe into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and examine the removal rates for the Fukushima case. We find a~general consistency between modelled and measured e-folding times. The simulated 137Cs global burden e-folding time is about 14 days. However, the simulated mean lifetime of aerosol-bound 137Cs over a 6 month post-accident period is only 1.8 days. We find that the mean lifetime depends strongly on the removal rates in the first few days after emissions, before the aerosols leave the boundary layer and are transported to altitudes and latitudes where lifetimes with respect to wet removal are longer by a few orders of magnitude. We present sensitivity simulations that demonstrate the influence of differences in altitude and location of the radionuclides on the mean lifetime. Global mean lifetimes are shown to strongly depend on the altitude of injection. The global mean 137Cs lifetime is more than one order of magnitude greater for the injection at 7 km than into the boundary layer above the Fukushima site. Instantaneous removal rates are slower during the first few days after the emissions for a free tropospheric vs. boundary layer injection and this strongly controls the mean lifetimes. Global mean aerosol lifetimes for the GEOS-Chem model are 3-6 days, which is longer than for the 137Cs injected at the Fukushima site (likely due to precipitation shortly after Fukushima emissions), but about the same as the

  1. Carrier Lifetime Measurement for Characterization of Ultraclean Thin p/p+ Silicon Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhami Khorasani, Arash

    Carrier lifetime is one of the few parameters which can give information about the low defect densities in today's semiconductors. In principle there is no lower limit to the defect density determined by lifetime measurements. No other technique can easily detect defect densities as low as 10 -9 - 10-10 cm-3 in a simple, contactless room temperature measurement. However in practice, recombination lifetime τ r measurements such as photoconductance decay (PCD) and surface photovoltage (SPV) that are widely used for characterization of bulk wafers face serious limitations when applied to thin epitaxial layers, where the layer thickness is smaller than the minority carrier diffusion length Ln. Other methods such as microwave photoconductance decay (µ-PCD), photoluminescence (PL), and frequency-dependent SPV, where the generated excess carriers are confined to the epitaxial layer width by using short excitation wavelengths, require complicated configuration and extensive surface passivation processes that make them time-consuming and not suitable for process screening purposes. Generation lifetime τg, typically measured with pulsed MOS capacitors (MOS-C) as test structures, has been shown to be an eminently suitable technique for characterization of thin epitaxial layers. It is for these reasons that the IC community, largely concerned with unipolar MOS devices, uses lifetime measurements as a "process cleanliness monitor." However when dealing with ultraclean epitaxial wafers, the classic MOS-C technique measures an effective generation lifetime τgeff which is dominated by the surface generation and hence cannot be used for screening impurity densities. I have developed a modified pulsed MOS technique for measuring generation lifetime in ultraclean thin p/p+ epitaxial layers which can be used to detect metallic impurities with densities as low as 10-10 cm-3. The widely used classic version has been shown to be unable to effectively detect such low impurity

  2. Brain energy metabolism and dopaminergic function in Huntington's disease measured in vivo using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Leenders, K.L.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Quinn, N.; Marsden, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with typical Huntington's disease was investigated with computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography. Regional cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction, oxygen and glucose utilization, L-Dopa uptake, and dopamine (D2) receptor binding were measured using several positron-labelled tracers. CT showed slight atrophy of the head of caudate but no cortical atrophy, although distinct frontal lobe dysfunction was present on psychometric testing. Oxygen and glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow were decreased in the striata and to a lesser extent in frontal cortex. Cerebral blood flow was in the low normal range throughout the remainder of the brain. A normal metabolic ratio was found in all regions, since the changes in glucose utilization paralleled those in oxygen consumption. The capacity of the striatum to store dopamine as assessed by L-( YF)-fluorodopa uptake was normal, but dopamine (D2) receptor binding was decreased when compared to normal subjects.

  3. Measurement of the hadronic cross section in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-11-01

    This thesis describes the most precise measurement to date of the ratio R, the hadronic cross section in lowest order electron-positron annihilation to the cross section for muon pair production in lowest order electron-positron annihilation. This experiment is of interest because R is a fundamental parameter that tests in a model independent way the basic assumptions of strong interaction theories. According to the assumptions of one of these theories the value of R is determined simply from the electric charges, spin, and color assignments of the produced quark-pairs. The experiment was carried out with the MAgnetic Calorimeter using collisions of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons at the 2200m circumference PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector is one of the best-suited collider detectors for measuring R due to its nearly complete coverage of the full angular range. The data for this experiment were accumulated between February 1982 and April 1983 corresponding to a total event sample of about 40,000 hadronic events. About 5% of the data were taken with 14 GeV beams and the rest of the data were taken with 14.5 GeV beams. A description of particle interactions and experimental considerations is given.

  4. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Iqbal, M; Liu, R; Chi, Y

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper. PMID:26931839

  5. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  6. Precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei based on Doppler-shift techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Hironori

    2013-04-19

    A recent progress in precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University is presented. The Recoil Distance Doppler-shift (RDDS) technique has been applied to nuclear reactions involving intermediate-energy rare isotope (RI) beams, to determine absolute transition strengths between nuclear states model independently from level lifetimes of interest. As such an example, recent lifetime measurements of the first 2{sup +} states in the neutron-rich {sup 62,64,66}Fe isotopes at and around N=40 are introduced. The experiment was performed at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL using a unique combination of several experimental instruments; the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA), the plunger device, and the S800 spectrograph. The reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2) are determined directly from the measured lifetimes. The observed trend of B(E2) clearly demonstrates that an enhanced collectivity persists in {sup 66}Fe despite the harmonic-oscillator magic number N=40. The present results are also discussed in comparison with the large-scale shell model calculations, pointing to a possible extension of the deformation region beyond N=40.

  7. A magneto-gravitational neutron trap for the measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat, Daniel J.

    Neutron decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta-decay. The mean decay lifetime is a key input for predicting the abundance of light elements in the early universe. A precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, when combined with other neutron decay observables, can test for physics beyond the standard model in a way that is complimentary to, and potentially competitive with, results from high energy collider experiments. Many previous measurements of the neutron lifetime used ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in material bottles. In a material bottle experiment, UCN are loaded into the apparatus, stored for varying times, and the surviving UCN are emptied and counted. These measurements are in poor agreement with experiments that use neutron beams, and new experiments are needed to resolve the discrepancy and precisely determine the lifetime. Here we present an experiment that uses a bowl-shaped array of NdFeB magnets to confine neutrons without material wall interactions. The trap shape is designed to rapidly remove higher energy UCN that might slowly leak from the top of the trap, and can facilitate new techniques to count surviving UCN within the trap. We review the scientific motivation for a precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, and present the commissioning of the trap. Data are presented using a vanadium activation technique to count UCN within the trap, providing an alternative method to emptying neutrons from the trap and into a counter. Potential systematic effects in the experiment are then discussed and estimated using analytical and numerical techniques. We also investigate solid nitrogen-15 as a source of UCN using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy. We conclude with a discussion of forthcoming research and development for UCN detection and UCN sources.

  8. Wafer Preparation and Iodine-Ethanol Passivation Procedure for Reproducible Minority-Carrier Lifetime Measurement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Mehta, V.; Li, C.; Johnston, S.

    2008-05-01

    Measurement of the bulk minority-carrier lifetime (T{sub b}) by optical methods, such as photocurrent decay or quasi-steady-state photoconductance (QSSPC), is strongly influenced by surface recombination. Several techniques are known to lower the effective surface recombination velocity, including the following: use of oxidation, floating N/P junction, SiN:H layer, HF immersion, and use of iodine in ethanol or methanol (I-E solution). Using I-E appears to be very simple and does not require any high-temperature treatment such as oxidation, diffusion, or nitridation processes, which can change T{sub b}. However, this is not a preferred procedure within the photovoltaic community because it is difficult to obtain same T{sub b} values reproducibly, particularly when the wafer lifetime is long. The objectives are: (1) Investigate various reasons why lifetime measurements may be irreproducible using I-E solution passivation. (2) Study the influence of the strength of iodine in the ethanol solution, wafer-cleaning procedures, influence of the wafer container during lifetime measurements, and the stability of I-E. (3) Compare lifetimes of wafers (having different T{sub b}) by various techniques such as QSSPC and transient photoconductive decay using short laser pulses of different light intensity; (4) Make minority-carrier diffusion length (L) measurements by a surface photovoltage technique, and to use T{sub b} and L data to determine diffusivity (D) values for various impurity and defect concentrations, using the relationship L{sup 2} = D* T{sub b}.

  9. Measurement of short lifetimes in highly-charged ions using a two-foil target

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Dunford, R.W.; Gemmell, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    One of the frontiers in the study of the atomic physics of highly-charged ions is the measurement of lifetimes in the 100 fs to 10 ps regime. The standard technique for measuring lifetimes of states in highly-charged ions is the beam-foil time-of-flight method in which the intensity of an emission line is monitored as a function of the separation between the exciting foil and the portion of the beam being viewed by the detector. This method becomes increasingly difficult as the decay lengths of the states of interest become shorter. At a typical beam velocity of 10% of the speed of light, the beam travels 30 microns in a picosecond. The standard beam-foil time-of-flight method necessitates observation of the decay radiation within one or two decay lengths from the foil while preventing the detectors from observing the beam spot at the foil. For short-lived states this requires tight collimation of the detector with a resulting loss in solid angle. We are developing a method for measuring ultrashort atomic lifetimes utilizing a two-foil target. As a specific case to demonstrate the feasibility of our method, we are studying the decay of the 2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} level in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. This level has a calculated lifetime of 9.5 ps which corresponds to a decay length of 380 {mu}m. For krypton, theory predicts that 90% of the 2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} states decay via M2 radiation to the ground state. A measurement of the lifetime of this state would contribute to an important current problem which concerns the understanding of atomic structure when both electron correlations and relativistic effects are simultaneously important.

  10. Lifetime measurements of normally deformed and superdeformed states in {sup 82}Sr

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Baktash, C.; Brinkman, M.J.; Jin, H.; Rudolph, D.; Gross, C.J.; Devlin, M.; LaFosse, D.R.; Lerma, F.; Sarantites, D.G.; Sylvan, G.N.; Tabor, S.L.; Birriel, I.; Saladin, J.X.; Winchell, D.F.; Wood, V.Q.; Clark, R.M.; Fallon, P.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Wells, J.C. |; Petrovici, A.; Schmid, K.W.; Faessler, A.

    1998-01-01

    Lifetimes of a superdeformed band in {sup 82}Sr were measured with the centroid shift method. The measured average quadrupole moment of this band corresponds to a quadrupole deformation of {beta}{sub 2}{approx}0.49, which is slightly smaller than both the theoretical prediction, and the measured deformation of the SD band in the neighboring isotone {sup 84}Zr. Lifetimes of high spin states of three normally deformed rotational bands in {sup 82}Sr were also measured with the Doppler shift attenuation method technique. The quadrupole moments of these normally deformed bands show a decrease at the highest spins, supporting the predicted band terminations. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Fluorescent lifetime measurements of rare-earth elements in gallium arsenide. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Topp, D.J.

    1990-12-01

    Lifetime measurements of the excited states of three GaAs semiconductors doped with the rare earth elements Erbium (Er), Praseodymium (Pr), and Thulium (Tm) has been studied using a pulsed nitrogen laser and germanium detector. The measurements were made with an experimental set up with a system response time of 0.34 microseconds. A 330 milliwatt nitrogen laser with a wavelength of 3370 angstroms was used to excite transitions of the rare earth elements.

  12. Three-dimensional printed miniaturized spectral system for collagen fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Koslakiewicz, Ronald; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-07-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g., type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes such as wound healing and fibrosis. When excited by ultraviolet light, collagens exhibit autofluorescence distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Here, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system as a noninvasive probe for monitoring tissue collagen compositions. A sine-modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain fluorescence lifetime measurements under three wavelength bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387, 409, and 435 nm. We employed a lithography-based three-dimensional (3-D) printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optomechanics in a handheld form factor. We examined the characteristics of the optomechanics with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (from LED) and mechanical (from handling) strain on the optical system. The geometry was further optimized with ray tracing to form the final 3-D printed structure. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes. This system represents a low cost, handheld probe for clinical tissue monitoring applications.

  13. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optical mount in a hand-held form factor. We examined the characteristics of the 3D printed optical system with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (LED) and mechanical (handling) strain on the optical system. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  14. New lifetime measurements in Pd109 and the onset of deformation at N=60

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bucher, B.; Mach, H.; Aprahamian, A.; Simpson, G. S.; Rissanen, J.; Ghiţă, D. G.; Olaizola, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; Äystö, J.; Bentley, I.; et al

    2015-12-14

    We measured several new subnanosecond lifetimes in 109Pd using the fast-timing βγ γ (t ) method. Fission fragments of the A = 109 mass chain were produced by bombarding natural uranium with 30 MeV protons at the Jyväskylä Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. We obtained lifetimes for excited states in 109Pd populated following β decay of 109Rh. The new lifetimes provide some insight into the evolution of nuclear structure in this mass region. In particular, the distinct structure of the two low-lying 7/2+ states occurring systematically across the Pd isotopic chain is supported by the new lifetime measurements.more » Finally, the available nuclear data indicate a sudden increase in deformation at N = 60 which is related to the strong p-n interaction between πg9/2 and νg7/2 valence nucleons expected in this region.« less

  15. Fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify sub-cellular oxygen measurements in live macrophage during bacterial invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragavon, Joe; Amiri, Megdouda; Marteyn, Benoit; Sansonetti, Philipe; Shorte, Spencer

    2011-03-01

    Fluorophore concentration, the surrounding microenvironment, and photobleaching greatly influence the fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore, increasing the difficulty to directly observe micro-environmental factors such as pH and oxygen. However, the fluorescence lifetime of a fluorophore is essentially independent of both the fluorophore concentration and photobleaching, providing a viable alternative to intensity measurements. The development of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) allows for the direct measurement of the microenvironment surrounding a fluorophore. Pt-porphyrin is a fluorophore whose optical properties include a very stable triplet excited state. This energy level overlaps strongly with the ground triplet state of oxygen, making the phosphorescent lifetime directly proportional to the surrounding oxygen concentration. Initial experiments using this fluorophore involved the use of individual microwells coated with the porphyrin. Cells were allowed to enter the micro-wells before being sealed to create a diffusionally isolated volume. The decrease in the extracellular oxygen concentration was observed using FLI. However, this isolation technique provides only the consumption rate but cannot indicate the subcellular oxygen distribution. To improve upon this, live macrophages are loaded with the porphyrin and the fluorescence lifetime determined using a Lambert Instruments Lifa-X FLI system. Initial results indicate that an increase in subcellular oxygen is observed upon initial exposure to invasive bacteria. A substantial decrease in oxygen is observed after about 1 hour of exposure. The cells remain in this deoxygenated state until the bacteria are removed or cell death occurs.

  16. Atmospheric lifetime of caesium-137 as an estimate of aerosol lifetime -quantified from global measurements in the months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iren Kristiansen, Nina; Stohl, Andreas; Wotawa, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Radionuclides like caesium-137 (137Cs) can be emitted to the atmosphere in great quantities during nuclear accidents and are of significant health impact. A global set of radionuclide measurements collected over several months after the accidental release from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 has been used to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs. Lifetime is here defined as the e-folding time scale (the time interval in which the exponential decay of the 137Cs quantity has decreased by factor of e). The estimated atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs can also be used as an estimate of the lifetime of aerosols in the atmosphere. This is based on the fact that 137Cs attaches to the ambient accumulation-mode (AM) aerosols and trace their fate in the atmosphere. The 137Cs "tags" the AM aerosols and both the 137Cs and AM aerosols are removed simultaneously from the atmosphere by scavenging within clouds, precipitation and dry deposition. The 137Cs emitted from Fukushima attached mainly to sulphate aerosols in the size range 0.1-2 μm diameter. Measured 137Cs activity concentrations from several stations spread mostly over the Northern Hemisphere were evaluated, and the decrease in activity concentrations over time (after correction for radioactive decay) reflects the removal of aerosols by wet and dry deposition. Corrections for air mass transport were made using measurements of the noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe) which was also released during the accident. This noble gas does not attach to the aerosols and was thus used as a passive tracer of air mass transport. The atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs was estimated to 10.0-13.9 days during April and May 2011. This represents the atmospheric lifetime of a "background" AM aerosol well mixed in the extratropical northern hemisphere troposphere. It is expected that the lifetime of this vertically mixed background aerosol is longer than the lifetime of fresh AM aerosols directly emitted from surface sources

  17. Probing electron correlation through radiative lifetime measurements upon inner-valence photoionization of Ne and Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Norihiro; Kosugi, Satoshi; Ito, Yumi; Inoue, Naoki; Nagoshi, Tatsuro; Kuze, Nobuhiko; Harries, James R.; Sullivan, James P.; Nagata, Tetsuo; Sokell, Emma; Koike, Fumihiro; Azuma, Yoshiro

    2016-07-01

    This work demonstrates that electron correlation can have a strong effect on the radiative lifetime of atoms. We report measurements of the radiative lifetimes of inner-valence hole states, the 3s3p6 2S1/2 state of Ar+ and the 2s2p6 2S1/2 state of Ne+ by using the time-correlated single photon counting technique combined with photoionization by synchrotron radiation. Theoretical calculations utilizing the multi-configuration Dirac–Fock method agreed well with the experimental results. In particular, the radiative lifetime was found to depend very sensitively on the mixing of valence excited state configurations. While the Ne+ 2s2p6 2S1/2 state only has relatively weak inter-shell correlation, Ar+ 3s3p6 2S1/2 state has strong intra-shell correlation within the M-shell. This intra-shell correlation enhances configuration mixing and causes the radiative lifetime of the Ar+ 3s3p6 2S1/2 state to become very much longer than that of the Ne+ 2s2p6 2S1/2 state.

  18. Precision Measurements of Atomic Lifetimes and Hyperfine Energies in Alkali Like Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2005-03-04

    Financial support of this research project has lead to advances in the study of atomic structure through precision measurements of atomic lifetimes, energy splittings, and transitions energies. The interpretation of data from many areas of physics and chemistry requires an accurate understanding of atomic structure. For example, scientists in the fields of astrophysics, geophysics, and plasma fusion depend on transition strengths to determine the relative abundances of elements. Assessing the operation of discharges and atomic resonance line filters also depends on accurate knowledge of transition strengths. Often relative transition strengths are measured precisely, but accurate atomic lifetimes are needed to obtain absolute values. Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes and energy splittings also provide fundamentally important atomic structure information. Lifetimes of allowed transitions depend most strongly on the electronic wave function far from the nucleus. Alternatively, hyperfine splittings give important information about the electronic wave function in the vicinity of the nucleus as well as the structure of the nucleus. Our main focus throughout this project has been the structure of atomic cesium because of its connection to the study of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC). The interpretation of atomic PNC experiments in terms of weak interaction coupling constants requires accurate knowledge of the electronic wave function near the nucleus as well as far from the nucleus. It is possible to address some of these needs theoretically with sophisticated many-electron atomic structure calculations. However, this program has been able to address these needs experimentally with a precision that surpasses current theoretical accuracy. Our measurements also play the important role of providing a means for testing the accuracy of many-electron calculations and guiding further theoretical development, Atomic systems such as cesium, with a single electron

  19. Precision Measurement of the Mass and Lifetime of the Ξb- Baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the Ξb- baryon using about 1800 Ξb- decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the Ξb-→Ξc0π-, Ξc0→p K-K-π+ channel and the mass and lifetime are measured using the Λb0→Λc+π- mode as a reference. We measure M (Ξb-)-M (Λb0)=178.36 ±0.46 ±0.16 MeV /c2 , (τΞb-/τΛb0)=1.089 ±0.026 ±0.011 , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results lead to a factor of 2 better precision on the Ξb- mass and lifetime compared to previous best measurements, and are consistent with theoretical expectations.

  20. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξb⁻ baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2014-12-12

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)⁻ baryon using about 1800 Ξ(b)⁻ decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb⁻¹ collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the Ξ(b)⁻→Ξ(c)⁰π⁻, Ξ(c)⁰→pK⁻K⁻π⁺ channel and the mass and lifetime are measured using the Λ(b)⁰→Λ(c)⁺π⁻ mode as a reference. We measure M(Ξ(b)⁻)-M(Λ(b)⁰)=178.36±0.46±0.16  MeV/c², (τ(Ξ(b)⁻)/τ(Λ(b)⁰)=1.089±0.026±0.011, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results lead to a factor of 2 better precision on the Ξ(b)⁻ mass and lifetime compared to previous best measurements, and are consistent with theoretical expectations. PMID:25541768

  1. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Z. E.; Torres, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of 106Cd to study excited states of 110Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  2. Lifetime measurements using the CLARA-PRISMA setup around the {sup 48}Ca doubly-magic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Gadea, A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; Fioretto, E.; Grodner, E.; Mason, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Mengoni, D.; Farnea, E.; Bazzacco, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Ur, C. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Lunardi, S.; Scarlassara, F.; Dewald, A.

    2008-11-11

    The lifetimes of the first excited states of nuclei around the doubly-magic nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been determined using a novel method that combines the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) method with the CLARA-PRISMA spectrometers. This is the first time such a method is applied to measure lifetimes of neutron-rich nuclei populated via a multinucleon transfer reaction. This novel method and some preliminary results on lifetimes are presented.

  3. Characterization of ZnSe(Te) scintillators by frequency domain luminescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickevičius, J.; Tamulaitis, G.; Vitta, P.; Žukauskas, A.; Starzhinskiy, N.; Ryzhikov, V.

    2009-10-01

    Dynamics of photoluminescence (PL) decay in Te-doped ZnSe scintillator crystal is studied using frequency domain luminescence lifetime measurement technique, which enables simultaneous characterization of components in multicomponent PL decay in a wide time window ranging from millisecond to nanosecond domain. Evolution of decay times and relative contributions of the decay components corresponding to different PL decay mechanisms was revealed as a function of temperature.

  4. Study of excitation transfer in laser dye mixtures by direct measurement of fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Dienes, A.

    1973-01-01

    By directly measuring the donor fluorescence lifetime as a function of acceptor concentration in the laser dye mixture Rhodamine 6G-Cresyl violet, we found that the Stern-Volmer relation is obeyed, from which the rate of excitation transfer is determined. The experimental results indicate that the dominant mechanism responsible for the efficient excitation transfer is that of resonance transfer due to long range dipole-dipole interaction.

  5. Line identification and lifetime measurements in the XUV and soft X-ray regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1979-01-01

    A summary of the data acquired concerning line identification and lifetime measurements in the xuv and soft X-ray regions for a variety of both resonance transitions and forbidden transitions in ions of astrophysical interest is provided. Particular attention is called to a few papers which appeared in the Astrophysical Journal. These are of special relevance to specific astrophysical data needs. The many experiments completed in areas related to but somewhat outside the confines of the project title are mentioned.

  6. UCNtau: Study of Lifetime Measurement in a Magneto-Gravitational Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Alexander; Salvat, D.; Adamek, E.; Bowman, D.; Clayton, S.; Cude, C.; Fox, W.; Hogan, G.; Hickerson, K.; Holley, A. T.; Liu, C.-Y.; Makela, M.; Manus, G.; Morris, C.; Penttila, S.; Ramsey, J.; Sawtelle, S.; Solberg, K.; Vanderwerp, J.; VornDick, B.; Walstrom, P.; Wang, Z.; Young, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The UCNtau project is intended to develop a new measurement of the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons (UCNs) stored in a magneto-gravitational trap. In this article, we will describe the development of the experiment so far, including the trap itself, the UCN transport and monitoring system, the neutron detection methods, and the Monte Carlo simulations that have been used to model these elements. Finally, we will describe the first systematic effects that we plan to study using this apparatus.

  7. Measurement of human cerebral blood flow with (15O)butanol and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Berridge, M.S.; Adler, L.P.; Nelson, A.D.; Cassidy, E.H.; Muzic, R.F.; Bednarczyk, E.M.; Miraldi, F. )

    1991-09-01

    Although H2(15)O is widely used for CBF measurement by positron tomography, it underestimates CBF, especially at elevated flow rates. Several tracers, including butanol, overcome this problem, but the short half-life of 15O provides advantages that cause water to remain the tracer of choice. The authors report the first use and evaluation of 15O-labeled butanol for CBF measurement. Flow measurements made in a similar fashion with water and butanol at 10-min intervals were compared in normal volunteers under resting and hypercapnic conditions. Regional analysis showed good agreement between the tracers at low flows, and significant underestimation of flow by water relative to butanol in regions of elevated flow. The observed relationship between the tracers and the curve-fitted permeability-surface area product for water (133 ml.100 g-1.min-1) follow the known relationship between water and true flow. These observations indicate that (15O)-butanol provided accurate measurements of human regional CBF under conditions of elevated perfusion. They conclude that butanol is a convenient and accurate method for routine CBF determination by positron emission tomography.

  8. Sub-nanosecond lifetime measurement using the recoil-distance method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The electromagnetic properties of low-lying nuclear states are a sensitive probe of both collective and single-particle degrees of freedom in nuclear structure. The recoil-distance technique provides a very reliable, direct and precise method for measuring lifetimes of nuclear states with lifetimes ranging from less than one to several hundred picoseconds. This method complements the powerful, but complicated, heavy-ion induced Coulomb excitation technique for measuring electromagnetic properties. The recoil distance technique has been combined with heavy-ion induced Coulomb excitation to study a variety of problems. Examples discussed are: study of the two-phonon triplet in {sup 110}Pd, coupling of the {beta} and {gamma} degrees of freedom in {sup 182,184}W, highly deformed {gamma} bands in {sup 165}Ho, octupole collectivity in {sup 96}Zr, and opposite parity states in {sup 153}Eu. Consistency between the Coulomb excitation results and the lifetime measurements confirms the reliability of the complex analysis often encountered in heavy-ion induced Coulomb excitation work.

  9. Measurements of the Bs0 and Λb0 lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OPAL Collaboration; Ackerstaff, K.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S. F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A. N.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S. D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bloomer, J. E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, R. M.; Burckhart, H. J.; Burgard, C.; Bürgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlton, D. G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R. L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Davis, R.; de Jong, S.; del Pozo, L. A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M. S.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J. E. G.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Evans, H. G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A. A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fürtjes, A.; Futyan, D. I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S. M.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwé, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hobson, P. R.; Hocker, A.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Horváth, D.; Hossain, K. R.; Howard, R.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Ingram, M. R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C. R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T. R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P. I.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S. R.; Layter, J. G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Losty, M. J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; MacPherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mättig, P.; McDonald, W. J.; McKenna, J.; McKigney, E. A.; McMahon, T. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Müller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H. A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Pálinkás, J.; Pásztor, G.; Pater, J. R.; Patrick, G. N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rembser, C.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S. A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Rooke, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D. R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sang, W. M.; Sarkisyan, E. K. G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H. C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W. G.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, D.; Ströhmer, R.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S. D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M. A.; von Törne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trócsányi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Utzat, P.; van Kooten, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E. H.; Voss, H.; Wäckerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; White, J. S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents updated measurements of the lifetimes of the Bs0 meson and the Λb0 baryon using 4.4 million hadronic Z0 decays recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP from 1990 to 1995. A sample of Bs0 decays is obtained using Ds-l+ combinations, where the Ds- is fully reconstructed in the φπ-, K*0K- and K-K0S decay channels and partially reconstructed in the φl-ν¯X decay mode. A sample of Λb0 decays is obtained using Λc+l- combinations, where the Λc+ is fully reconstructed in its decay to a pK-π+ final state and partially reconstructed in the Λl+νX decay channel. From 172+/-28 Ds-l+ combinations attributed to Bs0 decays, the measured lifetime is τ(Bs0)=1.50+0.16-0.15+/- 0.04 ps, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. From the 129+/-25 Λc+l- combinations attributed to Λb0 decays, the measured lifetime is τ(Λb0)=1.29+0.24- 0.22+/-0.06 ps, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  10. Measurement of the $B^-$ lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-04-01

    The collection of a large number of B hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper decay time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper they present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B{sup -} using the mode B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}. The B{sup -} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup -}} = 1.663 {+-} 0.023 {+-} 0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  11. On the Uncertainty in Single Molecule Fluorescent Lifetime and Energy Emission Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; McCollom, Alex D.

    1996-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least squares methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large, however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67 percent of those can be noise, and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous Poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probability density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. The ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background noise and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  12. On the uncertainty in single molecule fluorescent lifetime and energy emission measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; Mccollom, Alex D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least square methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67% of those can be noise and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probably density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. the ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background nose and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  13. Positron emission tomography for measurement of copper fluxes in live organisms.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fangyu

    2014-05-01

    Copper is an essential nutrient for the physiology of live organisms, but excessive copper can be harmful. Copper radioisotopes are used for measurement of copper fluxes in live organisms using a radioactivity assay of body fluids or whole-body positron emission tomography (PET). Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is a versatile tool for real-time measurement of copper fluxes combining the high sensitivity and quantification capability of PET and the superior spatial resolution of CT for anatomic localization of radioactive tracer activity. Kinetic analysis of copper metabolism in the liver and extrahepatic tissues of Atp7b(-/-) knockout mice, a mouse model of Wilson's disease, demonstrated the feasibility of measuring copper fluxes in live organisms with PET/CT using copper-64 chloride ((64) CuCl2 ) as a radioactive tracer ((64) CuCl2 -PET/CT). (64) CuCl2 -PET/CT holds potential as a useful tool for the diagnosis of inherited and acquired human copper metabolism disorders and for monitoring the effects of copper-modulating therapy. PMID:24628290

  14. Application of Positron Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy to the Measurement of the Uniformity of Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, C. A.; Sheffield, Thomas; Stacy, Scott; Yang, Chun

    2009-03-10

    The uniformity of rubber-carbon black composite materials has been investigated with positron Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (DBS). The number of grams of carbon black (CB) mixed into one hundred grams of rubber, phr, is used to characterize a sample. A typical concentration for rubber in tires is 50 phr. The S parameter measured by DBS has been found to depend on the phr of the sample as well as the type of rubber and carbon black. The variation in carbon black concentration within a surface area of about 5 mm diameter can be measured by moving a standard Na-22 or Ge-68 positron source over an extended sample. The precision of the concentration measurement depends on the dwell time at a point on the sample. The time required to determine uniformity over an extended sample can be reduced by running with much higher counting rate than is typical in DBS and correcting for the systematic variation of S parameter with counting rate. Variation in CB concentration with mixing time at the level of about 0.5% has been observed.

  15. Measurement of the overlineB0 and B- meson lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miotto, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jaffe, D. E.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Schmitt, M.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Sau Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    The lifetimes of the overlineB0 and B- mesons have been measured with the ALEPH detector at LEP. Semileptonic decays of overlineB0 and B- mesons were partially reconstructed by identifying events containing a lepton with an associated D ∗+or D 0 meson. The proper time of the B meson was estimated from the measured decay length and the momentum and mass of the D-lepton system. A fit to the proper time of 77 D ∗+ℓ - and 77 D0ℓ - candidates, combined with a constraint on the lifetime ratio ( {τ -}/{τ 0}) arising from the relative rates of observed D ∗+ℓ - and D0ℓ - events, yielded the following lifetimes: τ 0=1.52 -0.18+0.20( stat.) -0.13+0.07( syst.) ps, τ - = 1.47 -0.19+0.22( stat.) -0.14+0.15( syst.) ps, {τ -}/{τ 0} = 0.96 -0.15+0.19( stat.) -0.12+0.18( syst.) .

  16. LIFETIME MEASUREMENT WITH PSEUDO MOVEABLE SEPTUM IN NSLS X-RAY RING

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.M.; Choi; J.; Kramer; S.; Shaftan; T.; Heese; R.; Yang; X.

    2011-03-28

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3 GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory and starts to commission in 2014. The beam injection works with two septa and four fast kicker magnets in an injection section. To improve the injection stability and reproducibility, we plan to implement a slow local bump on top of the fast bump so that the fast kicker strength is reduced. This bump works as a pseudo movable septum. We can also use this 'movable' septum to measure the storage ring beam partial lifetime resulting from the septum edge and possibly increasing the lifetime by moving the stored beam orbit away from the edge. We demonstrate the feasibility of this idea, by implementing DC bump in NSLS X-ray ring. We report the results of beam lifetime measurements as a function of the amplitude of this bumped orbit relative to the septum and the idea of a slow bump that could reduce the fast bump magnet strengths.

  17. Apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K.; Johnston, Steven W.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearity for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  18. Toward a measurement of α -decay lifetime change at high pressure: The case of 241Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissim, Noaz; Belloni, Fabio; Eliezer, Shalom; Delle Side, Domenico; Martinez Val, José Maria

    2016-07-01

    This paper suggests that a change in the lifetime of the α -decay process in 241Am may be detected at high pressures achievable in the laboratory, essentially, due to the extraordinary high compressibility of Am at the megabar range. The Thomas-Fermi model was used to calculate the effect of high pressure on the atomic electron density and the variation of the atomic potential of 241Am . It was found that at pressures of about 0.5 Mbar the relative change in the lifetime of 241Am is about -2 ×10-4 . Detailed experimental procedures to measure this effect by compressing the 241Am metal in a diamond-anvil cell are presented where diagnostics is based on counting of the 60-keV γ rays accompanying the α decay and/or mass spectrometry on the 237Np/241Am isotope ratio.

  19. Measurement of the metastable lifetime for the 2s^2 2p^2 ^1So level in O^2+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Cadez, I.; Chutjian, A.; Niimura, M.

    2004-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of the 1S0 level was found to be 540 +/- 27 ms. This is in good agreement with a previous measurement and with a number of theoretical calculations. Metastable lifetimes, when combined with collisional excitation rates, can provide a diagnostic for electron density Ne in a stellar or solar plasma.

  20. A measurement of A FBb in lifetime tagged heavy flavour Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Mattison, T.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Nencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Payne, D. G.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Schael, S.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Jacquet, M.; Kimtr19, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Simion, S.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Martin, E. B.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1994-08-01

    A new measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in Z→ b overlineb decays is presented. Hadrons from b decays are tagged using their long lifetimes. The b quark charge and direction are reconstructed with a hemisphere charge algorithm. The asymmetry and reconstructed b hemisphere charge are measured in the 69 pb -1 of data collected by ALEPH during 1991, 1992 and 1993. They are used to extract sin 2θ Weff, which is determined to be 0.2315 ± 0.0016 (stat.) ± 0.0009 (syst.), corresponding to an AFBb of 0.0992 ± 0.0084 (stat.) ± 0.0046 (syst.).

  1. Measurement of Beauty and Charm Photoproduction at H1 using inclusive lifetime tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, L.

    2005-10-06

    A measurement of the charm and beauty photoproduction cross sections at the ep collider HERA is presented. The lifetime signature of c and b-flavoured hadrons is exploited to determine the fractions of events in the sample containing charm or beauty. Differential cross sections as a function of the jet transverse momentum, the rapidity and x{sub {gamma}}{sup obs} are measured in the photoproduction region Q2 < 1 GeV2, with inelasticity 0.15 < y < 0.8. The results are compared with calculations in next-to-leading order perturbative QCD and Monte Carlo models as implemented in PYTHIA and CASCADE.

  2. B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing and lifetime difference measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Catastini, Pierluigi

    2010-02-10

    We review latest experimental results on the Bs mixing and lifetime difference measurements at CDF. We report on the latest beta{sub s} and DELTAGAMMA{sub s} results from B{sub s}->J/psiphi. We also discuss flavor specific DELTAGAMMA{sub s} measurements, including information from hadronic channels, B{sub s}->D{sub s}D{sub s} and B{sub s}->KK. We describe the new flavor tagging methodology and its calibration using the B{sub s} oscillations.

  3. Measurements of the masses, lifetimes and decay modes of hadrons at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2010-05-01

    The Tevatron provides 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions and allows for collection of rich b-hadron samples to the two experiments CDF and D0. The study of heavy flavor properties represents a fruitful opportunity to investigate the flavor sector of the Standard Model (SM) and to look for hints of New Physics (NP). Here we report the first measurement of polarization amplitudes in B{sub s}{sup 0} charmless decays, world leading results on b-hadron lifetimes, and measurements of several other properties of b-hadrons.

  4. Surface recombination velocity and lifetime in InP measured by transient microwave reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothra, S.; Tyagi, S. D.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity are determined in organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)-grown InP by a contactless microwave technique. For lightly doped n-type InP, a surface recombination velocity of 5000 cm/s is measured. However, in solar cells with a heavily doped n-type emitter a surface recombination velocity of 1 x 10 to the 6th cm/s is observed. Possible reasons for this due to surface pinning are discussed. The effects of various chemical treatments and SiO on the surface recombination velocity are measured.

  5. Measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability with positron emission tomography and (68Ga)EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Goble, J.C.; Bird, J.H.; Girton, M.E.; Doppman, J.L.; Rapoport, S.I.; Barranger, J.A.

    1984-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was employed to examine time-dependent changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to (68Ga)ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) in the rhesus monkey, following reversible barrier opening by intracarotid infusion of a hypertonic mannitol solution. The PET technique, when combined with measurements of plasma radioactivity, provided a quantitative measure of the cerebrovascular permeability-area product (PA) at different times following mannitol infusion. Hypertonic mannitol treatment reversibly increased PA to (68Ga)EDTA more than 10-fold; much of the barrier effect was over by 10 min after mannitol treatment. The results show that PET can be used to measure transient changes in BBB integrity in specific brain regions, under in vivo, noninvasive conditions.

  6. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  7. Measurement of the lifetime difference in the B0(s) system.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Motta, H da; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Martins, C De Oliveira; Dean, S; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kulik, Y; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Luo, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, D; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Silva, W L Prado da; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Titov, M; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; White, V; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2005-10-21

    We present a study of the decay B0(s) --> J/psiphi. We obtain the CP-odd fraction in the final state at time zero, Rperpendicular = 0.16 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.02 (syst), the average lifetime of the (B0(s), B0(s)) system, tau(B0(s)) = 1.39(+0.13)(-0.16)(stat)(+0.01)(-0.02)(syst) ps, and the relative width difference between the heavy and light mass eigenstates, DeltaGamma/Gamma tripple bond (GammaL - GammaH)/Gamma = 0.24(+0.28)(-0.38)(stat)(+0.03)(-0.04)(syst). With the additional constraint from the world average of the lifetime measurements using semileptonic decays, we find tau(B0(s)) = 1.39 +/- 0.06 ps and DeltaGamma/Gamma = 0.25(+0.14)(-0.15). For the ratio of the B0(s) and B0 lifetimes we obtain tau(B0(s))/tau(B0) = 0.91 +/- 0.09(stat) +/- 0.003(syst). PMID:16383817

  8. Measurement of the lifetimes of the neutral and charged D mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Gladney, L.D.

    1985-03-01

    Results are presented on the use of a high-resolution drift chamber in the Mark II Detector at PEP to measure the lifetimes of D/sup 0/ and D/sup + -/ mesons produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at 29 GeV. Based on a sample of 74 events for the D/sup 0/ mesons and 23 events for the D/sup + -/ mesons, the lifetimes are found to be tau/sub D/sup 0/ = 4.7/sub -0.8//sup +0.9/ +- 0.5 x 10/sup -13/ s; tau/sub D/sup + -// = 8.9/sub -2.7//sup +3.8/ +- 1.3 x 10/sup -13/ s. The ratio of these lifetimes, tau/sub D/sup 0///tau/sub D/sup + -// = 1.9/sub -0.7//sup +0.9/ +- 0.3, indicates that the decays of these mesons cannot be explained by the simple spectator model of charmed particle decay.

  9. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of High Performance Polymer Films under CO2 Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Quarles; John R. Klaehn; Eric S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2010-08-01

    Positron annihilation Lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements are reported for six polymer films as a function of carbon dioxide absolute pressure ranging from 0 to 45 psi. Since the polymer films were thin and did not absorb all positrons, corrections were made in the lifetime analysis for the absorption of positrons in the positron source and sample holder using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. Different polymers are found to behave differently. Some polymers studied form positronium and some, such as the polyimide structures, do not. For those samples that form positronium an interpretation in terms of free volume is possible; for those that don’t form positronium, further work is needed to determine how best to describe the behavior in terms of the bulk positron annihilation parameters. Some polymers exhibit changes in positron lifetime and intensity under CO2 pressure which may be described by the Henry or Langmuir sorption models, while the positron response of other polymers is rather insensitive to the CO2 pressure. The results demonstrate the usefulness of positron annihilation spectroscopy in investigating the sorption of CO2 into various polymers at pressures up to about 3 atm.

  10. Studies on the Use of Liquid Surface Passivation for Lifetime Measurements on Good-Quality Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Devayajanam, S.; Rupnowski, P.; Shet, S.; Sopori, B. L.; Ravindra, N. M.; Caskey, D.; Chang, J.; Covington, J.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated several liquid passivants, viz. solutions of iodine ethanol (IE), quinhydrone methanol (QHM), and potassium cyanide (KCN), for measuring minority-carrier lifetime. Lifetime was measured by the WCT-100 (Sinton Instruments) and WT-2000 (Semilab). Our results show that both IE and QHM passivation are reliable mechanisms. We also find that the KCN solution is moderately passivating on oxidized surfaces, but is only minimally effective on bare Si surfaces. This paper presents details of our studies. In particular, the effect of illumination on IE-passivated surfaces and possible reasons for variations in lifetime measurement are discussed.

  11. Design and construction of a Vertex Chamber and measurement of the average B-Hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-10-01

    Four parameters describe the mixing of the three quark generations in the Standard Model of the weak charged current interaction. These four parameters are experimental inputs to the model. A measurement of the mean lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks, or B-Hadrons, constrains the magnitudes of two of these parameters. Measurement of the B-Hadron lifetime requires a device that can measure the locations of the stable particles that result from B-Hadron decay. This device must function reliably in an inaccessible location, and survive high radiation levels. We describe the design and construction of such a device, a gaseous drift chamber. Tubes of 6.9 mm diameter, having aluminized mylar walls of 100 ..mu..m thickness are utilized in this Vertex Chamber. It achieves a spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m, and a resolution in extrapolation to the B-Hadron decay location of 87 ..mu..m. Its inner layer is 4.6 cm from e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams. The Vertex Chamber is situated within the MAC detector at PEP. We have analyzed botht he 94 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity accumulated at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the Vertex Chamber in place as well as the 210 pb/sup -1/ accumulated previously. We require a lepton with large momentum transverse to the event thrust axis to obtain a sample of events enriched in B-Hadron decays. The distribution of signed impact parameters of all tracks in these events is used to measure the B-Hadron flight distance, and hence lifetime. 106 refs., 79 figs., 20 tabs.

  12. Measurement of the inclusive b-lifetime using Jp's at the CDF-experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Hans; Benjamin, Doug

    1996-05-01

    We present the measurement of the average lifetime of b-hadrons produced in pbarp collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV weighted by their branching ratios into J/ψ We use dimuon data which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ≈ 90 pb-1 recorded with the CDF-detector during the 1994 to 95 running period. After all selection cuts and background subtraction we are left with a high statistics sample of 62656 J/ψ decaying into μ^+μ^- reconstructed in the CDF Silicon VerteX detector (SVX) where 17.8% of these events come from b-decays. We measure the average B lifetime to be 1.52 ; ± 0.015; (stat);^+0.038_-0.027;(sys); ps (preliminary). The precision of this measurement is significantly improved compared to the inclusive lifetime measurement published previously using ≈ 10 pb-1 of data recorded in 91-92. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC03-76SF00098. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DEFG03-95-ER-40938. ^*We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation.

  13. Magnetic moment and lifetime measurements of Coulomb-excited states in Cd106

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Benczer-Koller, N.; Kumbartzki, G. J.; Speidel, K. -H.; Torres, D. A.; Robinson, S. J. Q.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Allmond, J. M.; Fallon, P.; Abramovic, I.; Bernstein, L. A.; et al

    2016-09-06

    The Cd isotopes are well studied, but experimental data for the rare isotopes are sparse. At energies above the Coulomb barrier, higher states become accessible. Remeasure and supplement existing lifetimes and magnetic moments of low-lying states in 106Cd. Methods: In an inverse kinematics reaction, a 106Cd beam impinging on a 12C target was used to Coulomb excite the projectiles. The high recoil velocities provide a unique opportunity to measure g factors with the transient-field technique and to determine lifetimes from lineshapes by using the Doppler-shift-attenuation method. Large-scale shell-model calculations were carried out for 106Cd. As a result, the g factorsmore » of the 2+1 and 4+1 states in 106Cd were measured to be g(2+1) = +0.398(22) and g(4+1) = +0.23(5). A lineshape analysis yielded lifetimes in disagreement with published values. The new results are τ(106Cd; 2+1) = 7.0(3) ps and τ(106Cd; 4+1) = 2.5(2) ps. The mean life τ(106Cd; 2+2) = 0.28(2) ps was determined from the fully-Doppler-shifted γ line. Mean lives of τ(106Cd; 4+3) = 1.1(1) ps and τ(106Cd; 3–1) = 0.16(1) ps were determined for the first time. In conclusion, the newly measured g(4+1) of 106Cd is found to be only 59% of the g(2+1). This difference cannot be explained by either shell-model or collective-model calculations.« less

  14. Measurement requirements and techniques for degradation studies and lifetime prediction testing of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Derringer, G. C.; Wood, V. E.; Wilkes, K. E.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Tests of weathering and aging behavior are being developed to characterize the degradation and predict the lifetimes of low-cost photovoltaic arrays. Environmental factors which affect array performance include UV radiation, thermal energy, water, oxygen (generally involved in synergistic effects with UV radiation or high temperatures), physical stress, pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and ozone), abrasives and dirt. A survey of photovoltaic array testing has shown the need to establish quantitative correlations between certain measurable properties (carbonyl formation, glass transition temperature, and molecular weight change) and modes of degradation and failure.

  15. Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosives molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Alan; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark; Park, Melvin; Eiceman, Gary; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailors the stability of the molecular adduct complex. TIMS flexibility to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments / low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with higher confidence levels. PMID:26153567

  16. Lifetime measurements and dipole transition rates for superdeformed states in {sup 190}Hg.

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, H.

    1999-03-24

    The Doppler-shift attenuation method was used to measure life-times of superdeformed (SD) states for both the yrast and the first excited superdeformed band of {sup 190}Hg. Intrinsic quadruple moments Q{sub 0} were extracted. For the first time, the dipole transition rates have been extracted for the inter-band transitions which connect the excited SD band to the yrast states in the second minimum. The results support the interpretation of the excited SD band as a rotational band built on an octupole vibration.

  17. Lifetime measurements in neutron-rich 63,65Co isotopes using the AGATA demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modamio, V.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Lunardi, S.; Lenzi, S. M.; Gadea, A.; Mengoni, D.; Bazzacco, D.; Algora, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Birkenbach, B.; Bracco, A.; Bruyneel, B.; Bürger, A.; Chavas, J.; Corradi, L.; Crespi, F. C. L.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; de France, G.; Depalo, R.; Dewald, A.; Doncel, M.; Erduran, M. N.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Fransen, Ch.; Geibel, K.; Gottardo, A.; Görgen, A.; Habermann, T.; Hackstein, M.; Hess, H.; Hüyük, T.; John, P. R.; Jolie, J.; Judson, D.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Kempley, R.; Leoni, S.; Melon, B.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mijatović, T.; Million, B.; Möller, O.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Nannini, A.; Napoli, D. R.; Podolyak, Zs.; Pollarolo, G.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Rother, W.; Sahin, E.; Salsac, M. D.; Scarlassara, F.; Sieja, K.; Söderström, P. A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Stezowski, O.; Szilner, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Travers, B.; Ur, C. A.

    2013-10-01

    Lifetimes of the low-lying (11/2-) states in 63,65Co have been measured employing the recoil distance doppler shift method (RDDS) with the AGATA γ-ray array and the PRISMA mass spectrometer. These nuclei were populated via a multinucleon transfer reaction by bombarding a 238U target with a beam of 64Ni. The experimental B(E2) reduced transition probabilities for 63,65Co are well reproduced by large-scale shell-model calculations that predict a constant trend of the B(E2) values up to the N=40 67Co isotope.

  18. Setup and operation of gamma-ray measurement systems to maximize detector lifetime and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, David G.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1999-10-01

    The details for optimizing gamma-ray measurement system for specific applications are not always well understood. The setup and operation of a system plays an important role in performance aspects such as maximizing detector lifetime, stability and minimizing the signal to noise ratio. In addition to system setup and operation, the effects of scintillation detector design and accompanying electronics (PMT) are discussed with respect to both gross counting and spectroscopy measurements in order to obtain reliable results. Data has been taken with various sodium iodide scintillation detectors to study system stability during transient such as power cycling and count rate fluctuations. These fluctuations may introduce substantial measurement uncertainty, and if not accounted for will propagate into an analyses. The above transients can also affect the detector lifetime, and if the system conditions are monitored properly, they can be used as a predictive tool for determining the useful life of a detector. Data is also presented to examine counting statistics in an overlapping spectrum as a function of spectral resolution and count rate. The objective is to determine the optimum counting time for the spectrum to reach a statistically stable shape. The data is reduced by examining the standard deviation of fitted Gaussian curves at ten second intervals. The result is a contour plat showing the time needed to reach stability, which increase with spectral resolution and decrease with a rising count rate.

  19. Muon Lifetime Measurement and Introduction to the use of FPGAs in Experimental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaseñor, L.

    2008-07-01

    During the laboratory sessions at the Workshop, the students used a simple experimental setup to measure the muon lifetime with a 10% statistical error. The muon detector consisted of a sealed container, filled with liquid scintillator, coupled to a 2.5″ photomultiplier (PMT). A personal computer (PC) was used to control a digital oscilloscope which directly measured the time interval between two consecutive PMT pulses in a time window of 20 μs. The students were also introduced to the use of root to analyze the muon data and to measure the muon lifetime. They were also presented with a basic introduction to the application of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) in data acquisition (DAQ) systems by means of examples. We started with a brief introduction to the VHDL language and the software package used to program FPGAs and PROMs on a commercial FPGA development board. They learned to program FPGAs for handling data transfers using the RS-232 port of a PC. They were also introduced to the concepts of circular RAMs (Random Access Memory) and FIFO (First-In First-Out) memories in the context of fast and efficient DAQ systems. We emphasized the way in which inexpensive FPGA-based electronics replaces the use of traditionally used electronics modules, such as NIM, CAMAC, FASTBUS, VME, etc., to construct fast and powerful DAQ systems.

  20. A measurement of the lambda_b lifetime at the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, Marcus Philip; /Lancaster U.

    2007-07-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon, performed using data from proton-antiproton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{ovr P{nu}}{sub {mu}}X was reconstructed in approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the D0 detector in 2002-2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A signal of 4437 {+-} 329 {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} pairs was obtained, and the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime was measured using a binned {chi}{sup 2} fit, which gives a value {tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 1.290{sub -0.110}{sup +0.119}(stat){sub -0.091}{sup +0.085}(syst) ps. This result is consistent with the world average and is one of the most precise measurements of this quantity.

  1. A Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Lifetime via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The neutral pion radiative width has been measured to 8.411 eV ± 1.8% + 1.13% - 1.70% (lifetime = 7.826 ± 0.14 + 0.088 - 0.133 x 10-17 s) utilizing the Primakoff effect and roughly 4.9 to 5.5 GeV photons at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA. The Hall B Photon Tagger, the Hall B Pair Spectrometer, a state of the art Hybrid Calorimter enabled precision incident photon energy measurement, photon flux measurement, and neutral pion identification, respectively. With these and other hardware and software tools, elastic neutral pion yields were extracted from the data. A well developed and understood simulation calculated geometric and software cut efficiency curves. The simulation also provided photo-pion production response functions to fit the experimental cross sections and extract the Primakoff cross section and thus the neutral pion radiative width and lifetime. Future work includes improving understanding of the nuclear incoherent process and any other background sources of elastic neutral pions in this data.

  2. Muon Lifetime Measurement and Introduction to the use of FPGAs in Experimental Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Villasenor, L.

    2008-07-02

    During the laboratory sessions at the Workshop, the students used a simple experimental setup to measure the muon lifetime with a 10% statistical error. The muon detector consisted of a sealed container, filled with liquid scintillator, coupled to a 2.5'' photomultiplier (PMT). A personal computer (PC) was used to control a digital oscilloscope which directly measured the time interval between two consecutive PMT pulses in a time window of 20 {mu}s. The students were also introduced to the use of root to analyze the muon data and to measure the muon lifetime. They were also presented with a basic introduction to the application of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) in data acquisition (DAQ) systems by means of examples. We started with a brief introduction to the VHDL language and the software package used to program FPGAs and PROMs on a commercial FPGA development board. They learned to program FPGAs for handling data transfers using the RS-232 port of a PC. They were also introduced to the concepts of circular RAMs (Random Access Memory) and FIFO (First-In First-Out) memories in the context of fast and efficient DAQ systems. We emphasized the way in which inexpensive FPGA-based electronics replaces the use of traditionally used electronics modules, such as NIM, CAMAC, FASTBUS, VME, etc., to construct fast and powerful DAQ systems.

  3. Measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ωb- baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A proton-proton collision data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected by LHCb at √{s }=7 and 8 TeV, is used to reconstruct 63 ±9 Ωb-→Ωc0π-, Ωc0→p K-K-π+ decays. Using the Ξb-→Ξc0π-, Ξc0→p K-K-π+ decay mode for calibration, the lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of the Ωb- baryon are measured to be τΩb-/τΞb-=1.11 ±0.16 ±0.03 , τΩb-=1.78 ±0.26 ±0.05 ±0.06 ps , where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic and from the calibration mode (for τΩb- only). A measurement is also made of the mass difference, mΩb--mΞb-, and the corresponding Ωb- mass, which yields mΩb--mΞb-=247.4 ±3.2 ±0.5 MeV /c2 , mΩb-=6045.1 ±3.2 ±0.5 ±0.6 MeV /c2 . These results are consistent with previous measurements.

  4. Recent Progress Towards a Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime Using Magnetically Trapped Ultracold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelhammer, K. W.; Huffer, C. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Marley, D. E.; Coakley, K. J.; Huber, Michael; Hughes, P. P.; Mumm, H. P.; Thompson, A. K.; Yue, A. T.; Abrams, N. C.

    2012-03-01

    Free neutron beta decay is a fundamental process in the Standard Model that can be used to test the weak interaction as well as provide information about primordial ^4He abundance. Recent precision measurements of the neutron lifetime have led to reduced confidence in the absolute value of this parameter; due presumably to unknown systematic effects. This work seeks to measure the neutron lifetime using a different technique that employs a superconducting magnetic trap to confine ultracold neutrons. Neutrons are loaded into the trap through the superthermal technique where 1 mEv neutrons down scatter from phonons in liquid helium losing the majority of their energy. Neutrons in the appropriate spin state are then confined by the static magnetic field. During the past year, over 400 run cycles of data were collected using the upgraded apparatus. Analysis of previous data sets was limited due to large numbers of background events relative to the neutron decay signal. An increased number of trapped neutrons as well as a analysis using pulse shape discrimination allows one to significantly increase the overall precision of the measurement. Details of this ongoing analysis will be presented with preliminary results.

  5. Measurement of the Bs(0) → Ds-Ds+ and Bs(0) → D-Ds+ effective lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Warrington, N; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-03-21

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the B(s)(0) meson in the decay B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ is reported using a proton-proton collision data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ effective lifetime is 1.379 ± 0.026 ± 0.017 ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light B(s)(0) mass eigenstate of ΓL = 0.725 ± 0.014 ± 0.009 ps(-1). The B(s)(0) lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific B(s)(0)→ D-Ds+ decay to be 1.52 ± 0.15 ± 0.01 ps. PMID:24702350

  6. Measuring excited state lifetime of Rb atoms with pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X.; Boiko, D. L.

    2015-08-31

    A technique for measuring the excited state lifetime τ{sub ex} of optical transitions in alkali atoms is presented. It is a form of pump-probe technique based on time-resolved optical transmission through the atomic vapor cell. This technique can serve as an alternative to the traditionally used time-resolved photofluorescence methods when measuring alkali vapor cells with heavily quenched fluorescence, where the τ{sub ex} is expected to be on the order of a few nanoseconds, and the highly sensitive fluorescence detectors with sub-nanosecond temporal resolution that are required may not be available. We use this technique to measure the τ{sub ex} of Rb atoms in vapor cells with different buffer gas pressures.

  7. Calculations and measurements for the SLAC SLC positron return quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Early, R.A.; Cobb, J.K.

    1986-09-01

    The three-dimensional magnetostatic computer program TOSCA, running on the NMFECC CRAY X-MP computer, was used to compute the integral of gradient length for the SLC type QT4 positron return line quadrupole magnet. Since the bore diameter of the magnet is 12.7 centimeters, and the length is only 10.16 centimeters, three dimensional effects are important. POISSON calculations were done on a two-dimensional model to obtain magnetic shimming which assured enough positive twelve pole to offset end effects, while TOSCA was used to estimate the effective length of the quadrupole. No corrections were required on the magnet as built. Measurements showed that the required integrated gradient was achieved for the given current, and that integrated higher harmonics were generally less than 0.1% of the quadrupole component.

  8. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2000-10-01

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results.

  9. Measurement of the B+- lifetime and top quark identification using secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, Ariel G

    2004-02-01

    This dissertation presents a preliminary measurement of the B{sup {+-}} lifetime through the full reconstruction of its decay chain, and the identification of top quark production in the electron plus jets channel using the displaced vertex b-tagging method. Its main contribution is the development, implementation and optimization of the Kalman filter algorithm for vertex reconstruction, and of the displaced vertex technique for tagging jets arising from b quark fragmentation, both of which have now become part of the standard D0 reconstruction package. These two algorithms fully exploit the new state-of-the-art tracking detectors, recently installed as part of the Run 2 D0 upgrade project. The analysis is based on data collected during Run 2a at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Hadron Collider up to April 2003, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 60 pb{sup -1}. The measured B meson lifetime of {tau} = 1.57 {+-} 0.18 ps is in agreement with the current world average, with a competitive level of precision expected when the full data sample becomes available.

  10. Frequency-domain measurement of the spin-imbalance lifetime in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quay, C. H. L.; Dutreix, C.; Chevallier, D.; Bena, C.; Aprili, M.

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the lifetime of spin imbalances in the quasiparticle population of a superconductor (τs) in the frequency domain. A time-dependent spin imbalance is created by injecting spin-polarized electrons at finite excitation frequencies into a thin-film mesoscopic superconductor (Al) in an in-plane magnetic field (in the Pauli limit). The time-averaged value of the spin-imbalance signal as a function of excitation frequency frf shows a cutoff at frf≈1 /(2 π τs) . The spin-imbalance lifetime is relatively constant in the accessible ranges of temperatures, with perhaps a slight increase with increasing magnetic field. Taking into account sample thickness effects, τs is consistent with previous measurements and of the order of the electron-electron scattering time τe e. Our data are qualitatively well described by a theoretical model taking into account all quasiparticle tunneling processes from a normal metal into a superconductor.

  11. High-resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear-structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Avignone, F.T. III.

    1981-02-28

    Extensive data analysis and theoretical analysis has been done to complete the extensive decay scheme investigation of /sup 206/ /sup 208/Fr and the level structures of /sup 206/ /sup 208/Rn. A final version of a journal article is presented in preprint form. Extensive Monte Carlo calculations have been made to correct the end point energies of positron spectra taken with intrinsic Ge detectors for annihilation radiation interferences. These calculations were tested using the decay of /sup 82/Sr which has previously measured positron branches. This technique was applied to the positron spectra collected at the on-line UNISOR isotope separator. The reactions used were /sup 60/Ni(/sup 20/Ne;p2n)/sup 77/Rb and /sup 60/Ni(/sup 20/Ne;pn)/sup 78/Rb. Values for 5, ..gamma..-..beta../sup +/ coincidence positron end point energies are given for the decay of /sup 77/Rb. The implied Q-value is 5.075 +- 0.010 MeV. A complete paper on the calculated corrections is presented. A flow chart of a more complete program which accounts for positrons scattering out of the detector and for bremsstralung radiation is also presented. End-point energies of four ..beta../sup +/ branches in /sup 77/Rb are given as well as a proposed energy level scheme of /sup 75/Kr based on ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidence data taken at UNISOR.

  12. Interpretation of recent positron-electron measurements between 20 and 800 MeV. [interplanetary cosmic ray solar modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerin, C. J.; Hartman, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Recently measured positron and negatron spectra are discussed with regard to the problem of solar modulation. At energies above 180 MeV, the spherically symmetric Fokker-Planck equation with a diffusion coefficient proportional to particle rigidity provides reasonable fits to both the positron and total electron data. At energies below 180 MeV, the data are consistent with a continuation of the same diffusion coefficient and a local source of negatrons or with a change in the diffusion coefficient to a constant value.

  13. Three-dimensional positron annihilation momentum measurement technique applied to measure oxygen-atom defects in 6H silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christopher S.

    A three-dimensional Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy System (3DPASS) capable to simultaneously measure three-dimensional electron-positron (e--e+) momentum densities measuring photons derived from e--e+ annihilation events was designed and characterized. 3DPASS simultaneously collects a single data set of correlated energies and positions for two coincident annihilation photons using solid-state double-sided strip detectors (DSSD). Positions of photons were determined using an interpolation method which measures a figure-of-merit proportional to the areas of transient charges induced on both charge collection strips directly adjacent to the charge collection strips interacting with the annihilation photons. The subpixel resolution was measured for both double-sided strip detectors (DSSD) and quantified using a new method modeled after a Gaussian point-spread function with a circular aperture. Error associated with location interpolation within an intrinsic pixel in each of the DSSDs, the subpixel resolution, was on the order of +/- 0.20 mm (this represents one-standard deviation). The subpixel resolution achieved was less than one twenty-fifth of the 25-mm2 square area of an intrinsic pixel created by the intersection of the DSSDs' orthogonal charge collection strips. The 2D ACAR and CDBAR response for single-crystal copper and 6H silicon carbide (6H SiC) was compared with results in the literature. Two additional samples of 6H SiC were irradiated with 24 MeV O+ ions, one annealed and one un-annealed, and measured using 3DPASS. Three-dimensional momentum distributions with correlated energies and coincident annihilation photons' positions were presented for all three 6H SiC samples. 3DPASS was used for the first experimental measurement of the structure of oxygen defects in bulk 6H SiC.

  14. Measurement of the average {ital B} hadron lifetime in {ital Z}{sup 0} decays using reconstructed vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; (SLD Collabora...

    1995-11-13

    We report a measurement of the average {ital B} hadron lifetime using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider in 1993. An inclusive analysis selected three-dimensional vertices with {ital B} hadron lifetime information in a sample of 50{times}10{sup 3} {ital Z}{sup 0} decays. A lifetime of 1.564{plus_minus}0.030(stat){plus_minus}0.036(syst) ps was extracted from the decay length distribution of these vertices using a binned maximum likelihood method. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  15. RDDS lifetime measurements of low-lying superdeformed states in {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, R.; Dewald, A.; Kruecken, R.

    1996-12-31

    The lifetimes of three low-lying states in the superdeformed (SD) yrast band of {sup 194}Hg were measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. The deduced transition quadrupole moments, Q{sub t}, equal those extracted from a DSAM measurement for the high-lying states of the band corroborate the assumption that the decay out of SD bands does not strongly affect the structure of the corresponding states. By a simple mixing-model the decay can be described assuming a very small admixture of normal-deformed (ND) states to the decaying SD states. The deduced ND mixing amplitudes for the yrast SD bands in {sup 192,194}Hg and {sup 194}Pb are presented along with average transition quadrupole moments for the lower parts of the excited SD bands.

  16. Z =50 core stability in 110Sn from magnetic-moment and lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbartzki, G. J.; Benczer-Koller, N.; Speidel, K.-H.; Torres, D. A.; Allmond, J. M.; Fallon, P.; Abramovic, I.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bevins, J. E.; Crawford, H. L.; Guevara, Z. E.; Gürdal, G.; Hurst, A. M.; Kirsch, L.; Laplace, T. A.; Lo, A.; Matthews, E. F.; Mayers, I.; Phair, L. W.; Ramirez, F.; Robinson, S. J. Q.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Wiens, A.

    2016-04-01

    Background: The structure of the semimagic 50Sn isotopes were previously studied via measurements of B (E 2 ;21+→01+ ) and g factors of 21+ states. The values of the B (E 2 ;21+ ) in the isotopes below midshell at N = 66 show an enhancement in collectivity, contrary to predictions from shell-model calculations. Purpose: This work presents the first measurement of the 2 1+ and 4 1+ states' magnetic moments in the unstable neutron-deficient 110Sn. The g factors provide complementary structure information to the interpretation of the observed B (E 2 ) values. Methods: The 110Sn nuclei have been produced in inverse kinematics in an α -particle transfer reaction from 12C to 106Cd projectiles at 390, 400, and 410 MeV. The g factors have been measured with the transient field technique. Lifetimes have been determined from line shapes using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Results: The g factors of the 21+ and 41+ states in 110Sn are g (21+) = +0.29(11) and g (41+) = +0.05(14), respectively. In addition, the g (41+) = +0.27(6) in 106Cd has been measured for the first time. A line-shape analysis yielded τ (110Sn ; 21+) = 0.81(10) ps and a lifetime of τ (110Sn ; 31-) = 0.25(5) ps was calculated from the fully Doppler-shifted γ line. Conclusions: No evidence has been found in 110Sn that would require excitation of protons from the closed Z =50 core.

  17. Shot noise as a measure of the lifetime and energy splitting of Majorana bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Lü, Hai-Feng; Guo, Zhen; Ke, Sha-Sha; Zhang, Huai-Wu; Guo, Yong

    2015-04-28

    We propose a scheme to measure the lifetime and energy splitting of a pair of Majorana bound states at the ends of a superconducting nanowire by using the shot noise in a dynamical channel blockade system. A quantum dot is coupled to one end of the wire and connected with two electron reservoirs. It is found that a finite Majorana energy splitting tends to produce a super-Poissonian shot noise, while Majorana relaxation process relieves the dynamical channel blockade and suppresses the noise Fano factor. When the dot energy level locates in the middle of the gap of topological superconductor, the Fano factor is independent on Majorana lifetime and Majorana energy splitting is thus extracted. For a finite energy splitting, we could evaluate the Majorana relaxation rate from the suppression of Fano factor. Under a realistic condition, the expected resolution of Majorana energy splitting and its relaxation rate calculated from our model are about 1μeV and 0.01−1μeV, respectively.

  18. Lifetime measurements of normal deformed states in {sub 71}{sup 165}Lu

    SciTech Connect

    Andgren, K.; Podolyak, Zs.; Gelletly, W.; Walker, P. M.; Wheldon, C.; Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Moeller, O.; Pissulla, T.; Xu, F.R.; Algora, A.; Axiotis, M.; Angelis, G. de; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Marginean, N.; Martinez, T.; Rusu, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Lunardi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Picosecond lifetimes of medium spin states in {sup 165}Lu were measured for the first time. The reaction used to populate the nucleus of interest was {sup 139}La({sup 30}Si,4n){sup 165}Lu at a beam energy of 135 MeV. The beam was provided by the XTU-tandem accelerator of Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy. By using the differential decay curve method, lifetimes of 19 states in four different rotational bands were obtained. Therefrom the B(E2) values and the transitional quadrupole moments were deduced. The obtained Q{sub t} for the different bands are compared with total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations and particle-rotor-model calculations. The TRS calculations predict different axial symmetric shapes for the bands built on the 9/2{sup -}[514], 9/2{sup +}[404], and 1/2{sup -}[541] configurations, with a {gamma} softness for the 9/2{sup -}[514] configuration. This band has also been studied using the particle-rotor model, the results of which, however, are consistent with a triaxial shape with a {gamma} value of -15 degrees.

  19. Light emitting diode-based nanosecond ultraviolet light source for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Tsutomu; Misawa, Hiroaki

    1995-12-01

    A compact pulsed-light source is devised from an InGaN/AlGaN double heterostructure light-emitting diode (LED). The LED emits a 450-nm (blue) light under conventional dc operation below 30 mA. When a current larger than 50 mA is applied, the intensity of the 450-nm light saturates, but that of the 380-nm light due to the InGaN component continues to increase. This phenomenon is utilized to realize a nanosecond ultraviolet (UV) light source. Under repetitive, large current pulsing (frequency=10 kHz, pulse width=4 ns, peak current=2 A), the peak LED emission shifts from 450 to 380 nm. Intense light pulses (peak value=40 mW) of 4-ns duration were generated. To evaluate the potential of the pulsed LED as an excitation source, the fluorescence lifetime of a quinine-sulfate solution was measured. The observed lifetime characteristics agreed well with the generally accepted behavior.

  20. Shot noise as a measure of the lifetime and energy splitting of Majorana bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Hai-Feng; Guo, Zhen; Ke, Sha-Sha; Guo, Yong; Zhang, Huai-Wu

    2015-04-01

    We propose a scheme to measure the lifetime and energy splitting of a pair of Majorana bound states at the ends of a superconducting nanowire by using the shot noise in a dynamical channel blockade system. A quantum dot is coupled to one end of the wire and connected with two electron reservoirs. It is found that a finite Majorana energy splitting tends to produce a super-Poissonian shot noise, while Majorana relaxation process relieves the dynamical channel blockade and suppresses the noise Fano factor. When the dot energy level locates in the middle of the gap of topological superconductor, the Fano factor is independent on Majorana lifetime and Majorana energy splitting is thus extracted. For a finite energy splitting, we could evaluate the Majorana relaxation rate from the suppression of Fano factor. Under a realistic condition, the expected resolution of Majorana energy splitting and its relaxation rate calculated from our model are about 1 μ eV and 0.01 - 1 μ eV , respectively.

  1. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. PMID:26397162

  2. Effect of positron source irradiation on positronium annihilation in fine powdered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Z. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation were measured as a function of time to study the irradiation effect by 22Na positron source in fine powdered alumina. The γ-Al2O3 samples were put in a vacuum chamber with a pressure of about 10-6 Torr and were cooled down to 10 K by a closed-cycle helium gas refrigerator. The irradiation of γ-Al2O3 samples by positron source was taken for a duration of about two days immediately after the sample was cooled down. After that, the sample was subjected to a warm up process from 10 K to 300 K with a step of 10 K. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectra were measured simultaneously during these processes. Two long lifetime components corresponding to ortho-positronium annihilation were observed. A significant shortening of these long lifetime components and a large increase in S parameter is observed during irradiation. It is supposed that positron source irradiation creates a large number of paramagnetic centers on the surface of the γ-Al2O3 grains, which induce spin conversion quenching of positronium. The irradiation induced paramagnetic centers are unstable above 70 K and are nearly annealed out when the temperature rises to 190 K. After warming up of the sample to room temperature, the positron lifetime spectrum is identical to that before irradiation. It was also found that after irradiation, a medium long lifetime component of about 5 ns appears, of which the intensity increases with increasing irradiation time. This may be originated from the formation of the surface o-Ps state. This surface o-Ps state is also inhibited at elevated temperatures. Our results indicate that positronium is a very sensitive probe for the surface defects in porous materials.

  3. High-throughput measurement of the long excited-state lifetime of quantum dots in flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Eshan; Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Houston, Jessica P.

    2014-03-01

    The long fluorescence lifetime of quantum dots (QDs) is not often utilized in high-throughput bioassays, despite of the potential for the lifetime to be an optimum parameter for multiplexing with spectrally overlapping excitable species that have short fluorescence lifetimes. The limitation of currently available instruments that can rapidly resolve complex decay kinetics of QDs contributes to this dearth. Therefore work in our laboratory is focused on developing unique and reliable frequency-domain flow cytometry (FDFC) systems as well as QDs applications where fluorescence dynamics are exploited. In this paper we demonstrate both by simulation and experimental validation, the viability of rapidly capturing the fluorescence lifetime of QDs from single QDs-labeled cells and microspheres by employing a home-built FDFC system. With FDFC theory we simulated measurements of long-lived QDs decays and evaluated the potential to discriminate multi-exponential decay profiles of QDs from typical cellular autofluorescence lifetimes. Our FDFC simulation work included calculations of fluorescence phase-shifts at multiple modulation frequencies extracted from square wave modulation signals (i.e. similar to heterodyning frequency-domain spectroscopy). Experimental work to support the result from our simulations involved acquiring measurements from real samples and processing them for multi-frequency phase shifts. Additionally the average excited-state lifetimes of QDs (streptavidin conjugated CdSe/Zns and oleic acid coated CdSxSe1-x/ZnS) measured were found to be greater than 15 ns. The average lifetime results were consistent with published literature values as well as verified with independent time domain measurements. This work opens the possibility of developing powerful bioassays using FDFC based on the long fluorescence lifetime of QDs.

  4. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted. PMID:27245647

  5. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    PubMed Central

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D.; Wilkinson, Martin G.; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A. E.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening. PMID:25798136

  6. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density In The Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Krasnykh, A.K; Byrd, J.; Santis, S.De; Sonnad, K.G.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; /CERN

    2008-07-03

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appear to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regions if the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  7. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud density In the Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, Mauro T.F.; Krasnykh, Anatoly K.; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnaad, Kiran G.; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom

    2008-06-18

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electrons clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appears to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regionsif the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  8. Measurement of the B(0) and B(+) meson lifetimes with fully reconstructed hadronic final states.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D W; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weideman, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, L; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Vaugnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; De Silva, A; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-11-12

    The B(0) and B(+) meson lifetimes have been measured in e(+)e(-) annihilation data collected in 1999 and 2000 with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies near the Upsilon(4S) resonance. Events are selected in which one B meson is fully reconstructed in a hadronic final state while the second B meson is reconstructed inclusively. A combined fit to the B(0) and the B(+) decay time difference distributions yields tau(B(0)) = 1.546+/-0.032(stat)+/-0.022(syst) ps, tau(B(+)) = 1.673+/-0.032(stat)+/-0.023(syst) ps, and tau(B(+))/tau(B(0)) = 1.082+/-0.026(stat)+/-0.012(syst). PMID:11690464

  9. Lifetime Measurement of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} State in {sup 20}C

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, M.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Paschalis, S.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Gros, S.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Lee, I. Y.; Starosta, K.; Baugher, T.; Gade, A.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Voss, P.; Walsh, K. A.; Bazin, D.; Grinyer, G. F.; Weisshaar, D.

    2011-09-02

    Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state in the near-dripline nucleus {sup 20}C. The deduced value of {tau}{sub 2{sub 1}{sup +}}=9.8{+-}2.8(stat){sub -1.1}{sup +0.5}(syst) ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2;2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sub g.s.}{sup +})=7.5{sub -1.7}{sup +3.0}(stat){sub -0.4}{sup +1.0}(syst) e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges.

  10. Lifetime measurements of the yrast 8+ and 9+ states in As70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, C.; Iwasaki, H.; Lemasson, A.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; McDaniel, S.; Nichols, A. J.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Stroberg, S. R.; Voss, P.; Wadsworth, R.; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.; Winkler, R.

    2014-09-01

    The lifetimes of the yrast 8+ and 9+ states of As70 have been measured via the γ-ray lineshape method following population by the 9Be(78Rb,70As) reaction at 101.6 MeV/nucleon. The strength of the E18+→7- transition is found to be B(E1)=1.3(5)×10-5 e2fm2 or 1.2(4)×10-5 Weisskopf units (W.u.) while the 9+→8+ M1 transition is found to have a strength of B (M1)=1.5(8) μN2 or 0.85(42) W.u. The implications for the structure of these states is discussed and found to be consistent with an assignment to a πg9/2νg9/2 configuration.

  11. Measuring protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Day, Richard N

    2014-03-15

    The method of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative approach that can be used to detect Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The use of FLIM to measure the FRET that results from the interactions between proteins labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs) inside living cells provides a non-invasive method for mapping interactomes. Here, the use of the phasor plot method to analyze frequency domain (FD) FLIM measurements is described, and measurements obtained from cells producing the 'FRET standard' fusion proteins are used to validate the FLIM system for FRET measurements. The FLIM FRET approach is then used to measure both homologous and heterologous protein-protein interactions (PPI) involving the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). C/EBPα is a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, and localizes to heterochromatin where it interacts with the heterochromatin protein 1 alpha (HP1α). The FLIM-FRET method is used to quantify the homologous interactions between the FP-labeled basic leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα. Then the heterologous interactions between the C/EBPa BZip domain and HP1a are quantified using the FRET-FLIM method. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. PMID:23806643

  12. Measurement of the bottom hadron lifetime at the Z{sup 0} resonancce

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, D.H.

    1992-06-01

    We have measured the bottom hadron lifetime from b{bar b} events produced at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Using the precision vertex detectors of the Mark II detector at the Stanford Linear Collider, we developed an impact parameter tag to identify bottom hadrons. The vertex tracking system resolved impact parameters to 30 {mu}m for high momentum tracks, and 70 {mu}m for tracks with a momentum of 1 GeV. We selected B hadrons with an efficiency of 40% and a sample purity of 80%, by requiring there be at least two tracks in a single jet that significantly miss the Z{sup 0} decay vertex. From a total of 208 hadronic Z{sup 0} events collected by the Mark II detector in 1990, we tagged 53 jets, of which 22 came from 11 double-tagged events. The jets opposite the tagged ones, referred as the ``untagged`` sample, are rich in B hadrons and unbiased in B decay times. The variable {Sigma}{delta} is the sum of impact parameters from tracks in the jet, and contains vital information on the B decay time. We measured the B lifetime from a one-parameter likelihood fit to the untagged {Sigma}{delta} distribution, obtaining {tau}{sub b} = 1.53{sub {minus}0.45}{sup +0.55}{plus_minus}0.16 ps which agrees with the current world average. The first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error was dominated by uncertainties in the track resolution function. As a check, we also obtained consistent results using the {Sigma}{delta} distribution from the tagged jets and from the entire hadronic sample without any bottom enrichment.

  13. Measurement of the bottom hadron lifetime at the Z sup 0 resonancce

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, D.H.

    1992-06-01

    We have measured the bottom hadron lifetime from b{bar b} events produced at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Using the precision vertex detectors of the Mark II detector at the Stanford Linear Collider, we developed an impact parameter tag to identify bottom hadrons. The vertex tracking system resolved impact parameters to 30 {mu}m for high momentum tracks, and 70 {mu}m for tracks with a momentum of 1 GeV. We selected B hadrons with an efficiency of 40% and a sample purity of 80%, by requiring there be at least two tracks in a single jet that significantly miss the Z{sup 0} decay vertex. From a total of 208 hadronic Z{sup 0} events collected by the Mark II detector in 1990, we tagged 53 jets, of which 22 came from 11 double-tagged events. The jets opposite the tagged ones, referred as the untagged'' sample, are rich in B hadrons and unbiased in B decay times. The variable {Sigma}{delta} is the sum of impact parameters from tracks in the jet, and contains vital information on the B decay time. We measured the B lifetime from a one-parameter likelihood fit to the untagged {Sigma}{delta} distribution, obtaining {tau}{sub b} = 1.53{sub {minus}0.45}{sup +0.55}{plus minus}0.16 ps which agrees with the current world average. The first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error was dominated by uncertainties in the track resolution function. As a check, we also obtained consistent results using the {Sigma}{delta} distribution from the tagged jets and from the entire hadronic sample without any bottom enrichment.

  14. Measurement of cosmic ray positron and negatron spectra between 50 and 800 MeV. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of cosmic ray positrons and negatrons at energies between 50 and 800 MeV. Comparisons of the separate positron and negatron spectra observed near the earth with their expected intensities in interstellar space can be used to investigate the complex (and variable) interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the expanding solar wind. The present measurements, which have established finite values or upper limits for the positron and negatron spectral between 50 and 800 MeV, have confirmed earlier evidence for the existence of a dominant component of negatrons from primary sources in the galaxy. The present results are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that the positron component is in fact mainly attributable to collisions between cosmic ray nuclei and the interstellar gas. The estimate of the absolute intensities confirm the indications from neutron monitors that in 1972 the interplanetary cosmic ray intensities were already recovering toward their high levels observed in 1965.

  15. CFCl3 (CFC-11): UV absorption spectrum temperature dependence measurements and the impact on its atmospheric lifetime and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2013-09-01

    (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95-230 nm) and temperature (216-296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than that currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The calculated global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 ± 0.7 years (2σ uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current UV spectrum recommendations.

  16. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Tm I and Tm II levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Xinghao; Yu, Qi; Li, Yongfan; Gao, Yang; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 88 levels of Tm I in the energy range 22 791.176-48 547.98 cm-1 and 29 levels of Tm II in the range 27 294.79-65 612.85 cm-1 were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-ablation plasma. The lifetime values obtained are in the range from 15.4 to 7900 ns for Tm I and from 36.5 to 1000 ns for Tm II. To the best of our knowledge, 77 lifetimes of Tm I and 22 lifetimes of Tm II are reported for the first time. Good agreements between the present results and the previous experimental values were achieved for both Tm I and Tm II.

  17. CFCI3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime and Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2014-01-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95 - 230 nm) and temperature (216 - 296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The obtained global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 +- 0.7 years (2 sigma uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current spectrum recommendations

  18. Positron-rubidium scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    A 5-state close-coupling calculation (5s-5p-4d-6s-6p) was carried out for positron-Rb scattering in the energy range 3.7 to 28.0 eV. In contrast to the results of similar close-coupling calculations for positron-Na and positron-K scattering the (effective) total integrated cross section has an energy dependence which is contrary to recent experimental measurements.

  19. Inclusive measurements of inelastic electron and positron scattering from unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets.

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Jackson, H. E.; HERMES Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    Results of inclusive measurements of inelastic electron and positron scattering from unpolarized protons and deuterons at the HERMES experiment are presented. The structure functions F{sub 2}{sup p} and F{sub 2}{sup d} are determined using a parameterization of existing data for the longitudinal-to-transverse virtual-photon absorption cross-section ratio. The HERMES results provide data in the ranges 0.006 {le} x {le} 0.9 and 0.1 GeV{sup 2} {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 20 GeV{sup 2}, covering the transition region between the perturbative and the non-perturbative regimes of QCD in a so-far largely unexplored kinematic region. They are in agreement with existing world data in the region of overlap. The measured cross sections are used, in combination with data from other experiments, to perform fits to the photon-nucleon cross section using the functional form of the ALLM model. The deuteron-to-proton cross-section ratio is also determined.

  20. High resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Avignone, F.T. III

    1982-02-28

    Research progress in briefly described, and details are presented in the attached preprints and reprints: (1) precision mass differences in light rubidium and krypton isotopes utilizing beta endpoint measurements; (2) precision mass measurements utilizing beta endpoints; (3) Monte Carlo calculations predicting the response of intrinsic GE detectors to electrons and positrons; and (4) reactor antineutrino spectra and nuclear spectroscopy of isotopes far from beta stability. (WHK)

  1. Positron annihilation study of the micro-defects induced by cavitation in mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong; Hao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Baoyi

    2008-08-01

    Cavitation-induced micro-defects in mild steel after cavitation experiment in the fluid field have been studied by positron Doppler broadening measurement and positron annihilation lifetime spectra (PALS). Depth-resolved positron Doppler S-parameter (DPDS) results showed that S-parameter increased and micro-defects between the surface and the bulk has obvious variation with depth during the cavitation process. From the positron lifetime results, it was found that the size and number of micro-defects increase with the development of cavitation. These results suggest that more micro-defects are generated in mild steel bulk during the cavitation process than those in the mild steel surface layer region, although more mico-defects seen in the mild steel surface layer. Moreover, the size of micro-defects in mild steel bulk increases remarkably owing to their transfer and aggregation.

  2. Measurement of the B meson Lifetimes with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Uozumi, Satoru; /Tsukuba U.

    2006-01-01

    The lifetimes of the B{sup -}, B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons are measured using partially reconstructed semileptonic decays. Following semileptonic decay processes and their charge conjugates are used for this analysis: B{sup -}/B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{nu}D{sup 0}X; B{sup -}/B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{nu}D*{sup +}X; B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{nu}D{sub s}{sup +}x, where {ell}{sup -} denotes either a muon or electron. The data are collected during 2002-2004 by the 8 GeV single lepton triggers in CDF Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Corresponding integrated luminosity is about 260 and 360 pb{sup -1} used for the B{sup -}/B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime analyses, respectively. With the single lepton triggers, events which contain a muon or electron with a transverse momentum greater than 8 GeV/c are selected. For these lepton candidates, further lepton identification cuts are applied to improve purity of the B semileptonic decay signal. After the lepton selection, three types of charm mesons associated with the lepton candidates are reconstructed. Following exclusive decay modes are used for the charm meson reconstruction: D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}; D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sub s}{sup +}, followed by D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}; D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup +}, followed by {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. Here {pi}{sub s}{sup +} denotes a slow pion from D*{sup +} decay. Species of the reconstructed charm meson identify the parent B meson species. However in the B{sup -}/B{sup 0} semileptonic decays, both mesons decay into the identical lepton + D{sup 0} final state. To solve this mixture of the B components in the D{sup 0} sample, they adopt the following method: First among the inclusive D{sup 0} sample, they look for the D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0} {pi}{sub s}{sup +} signal. The inclusive D{sup 0} sample is then split into the two samples of D{sup 0} mesons which are from the D

  3. Radio frequency coupling apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Steven W.; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample using radio-frequency coupling. The measuring apparatus includes an antenna that is positioned a coupling distance from a semiconductor sample which is exposed to light pulses from a laser during sampling operations. A signal generator is included to generate high frequency, such as 900 MHz or higher, sinusoidal waveform signals that are split into a reference signal and a sample signal. The sample signal is transmitted into a sample branch circuit where it passes through a tuning capacitor and a coaxial cable prior to reaching the antenna. The antenna is radio-frequency coupled with the adjacent sample and transmits the sample signal, or electromagnetic radiation corresponding to the sample signal, to the sample and receives reflected power or a sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal back. To lower impedance and speed system response, the impedance is controlled by limiting impedance in the coaxial cable and the antenna reactance. In one embodiment, the antenna is a waveguide/aperture hybrid antenna having a central transmission line and an adjacent ground flange. The sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal is then transmitted to a mixer which also receives the reference signal. To enhance the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus, the mixer is operated to phase match the reference signal and the sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal.

  4. Measurement of the polarized forward-backward asymmetry of Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} using a lifetime tag and momentum-weighted track charge

    SciTech Connect

    The SLD Collaboration

    1995-08-01

    We present a direct measurement of the parity-violating parameter A{sub b} by analyzing the left-right forward-backward asymmetry of b quarks in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} Z{sup o} {yields} b{bar b}. The SLD experiment observes hadronic decays of Z{sup o} bosons produced at resonance in collisions of longitudinally polarized electrons and unpolarized positrons at the SLC. Heavy flavor decays of the Z{sup o} are identified by taking advantage of the long lifetime of B hadrons, the small, stable SLC beam spot, and precise tracking from SLD. The asymmetry A{sub b} is measured with a self-calibrating technique employing momentum-weighted track charge from both hemispheres in the tagged events. From our 1994--1995 sample of 3.6 pb{sup {minus}1} of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation data with a luminosity-weighted average e{sup {minus}} polarization of 77.3%, and our 1993 sample of 1.8 pb{sup {minus}1} with a luminosity-weighted polarization of 63.1%, we obtain A{sub b}(preliminary) = 0.843 {plus_minus} 0.046(stat.) {plus_minus} 0.051(syst.).

  5. Positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E J; Phelps, M E

    1979-01-01

    Conventional nuclear imaging techniques utilizing lead collimation rely on radioactive tracers with little role in human physiology. The principles of imaging based on coincidence detection of the annihilation radiation produced in positron decay indicate that this mode of detection is uniquely suited for use in emission computed tomography. The only gamma-ray-emitting isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are positron emitters, which yield energies too high for conventional imaging techniques. Thus development of positron emitters in nuclear medicine imaging would make possible the use of a new class of physiologically active, positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The application of these principles is described in the use of a physiologically active compound labeled with a positron emitter and positron-emission computed tomography to measure the local cerebral metabolic rate in humans. PMID:440173

  6. Frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime measurements via frequency segmentation and recombination as applied to pyrene with dissolved humic materials.

    PubMed

    Marwani, Hadi M; Lowry, Mark; Xing, Baoshan; Warner, Isiah M; Cook, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the association behavior of pyrene with different dissolved humic materials (DHM) was investigated utilizing the recently developed segmented frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime method. The humic materials involved in this study consisted of three commercially available International Humic Substances Society standards (Suwannee River fulvic acid reference, SRFAR, Leonardite humic acid standard, LHAS, and Florida peat humic acid standard, FPHAS), the peat derived Amherst humic acid (AHA), and a chemically bleached Amherst humic acid (BAHA). It was found that the three commercial humic materials displayed three lifetime components, while both Amherst samples displayed only two lifetime components. In addition, it was found that the chemical bleaching procedure preferentially removed red wavelength emitting fluorophores from AHA. In regards to pyrene association with the DHM, different behavior was found for all commercially available humics, while AHA and BAHA, which displayed strikingly similar behavior in terms of fluorescence lifetimes. It was also found that there was an enhancement of pyrene's measured lifetime (combined with a decrease in pyrene emission) in the presence of FPHAS. The implications of this long lifetime are discussed in terms of (1) quenching mechanism and (2) use of the fluorescence quenching method used to determine the binding of compounds to DHM. PMID:18546063

  7. Measurements of hydroxyl concentrations and lifetimes in laminar flames using picosecond time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, T A; Klassen, M S; King, G B; Laurendeau, N M

    1996-04-20

    Picosecond time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (PITLIF) can potentially be used to obtain measurements of minor species concentrations in rapidly fluctuating flames. Previous studies demonstrated this potential for atomic sodium by monitoring the temporal fluorescence signal with both an equivalent-time and a real-time sampling method. In this developmental study, PITLIF is used to determine hydroxyl concentrations in laminar CH(4)-O(2)-N(2) flames by the measurement of both the integrated fluorescence signal and the fluorescence lifetime. The quenching environment can be monitored with real-time sampling, and thus the necessary quenching rate coefficient is obtained in 348 us, which is fast enough for use in many turbulent flows. Fluorescence lifetimes of OH are also measured at different equivalence ratios in laminar flames by the use of the equivalent-time sampling technique. These results compare favorably with predicted lifetimes based on relevant quenching cross sections and calculated species concentrations. PMID:21085341

  8. Measurement of the B-cmeson lifetime in the decay B-c→J/ψπ⁻

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2013-01-02

    The lifetime of the B-c meson is measured using 272 exclusive B-c→J/ψ(→μ⁺μ⁻)π⁻ decays reconstructed in data from proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb⁻¹ recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The lifetime of the B-cmeson is measured to be τ(B-c)=0.452±0.048(stat)±0.027(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the B-c meson lifetime in a fully reconstructed hadronic channel, and it agrees with previous results and has comparable precision.

  9. Test-Retest Repeatability of Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements using Rubidium-82 Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efseaff, Matthew

    Rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been proposed for routine myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification. Few studies have investigated the test-retest repeatability of this method. Same-day repeatability of rest MBF imaging was optimized with a highly automated analysis program using image-derived input functions and a dual spillover correction (SOC). The effects of heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and subject hemodynamics on test-retest repeatability were investigated at rest and during hyperemic stress. Factors affecting rest MBF repeatability included gender, suspected coronary artery disease, and dual SOC (p < 0.001). The best repeatability coefficient for same-day rest MBF was 0.20 mL/min/g using a six-minute scan-time, iterative reconstruction, dual SOC, resting rate-pressure-product (RPP) adjustment, and a left atrium image-derived input function. The serial study repeatabilities of the optimized protocol in subjects with homogeneous RPPs and tracer infusion profiles was 0.19 and 0.53 mL/min/g at rest and stress, and 0.95 for stress / rest myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Subjects with heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and hemodynamic conditions had significantly less repeatable MBF measurements at rest, stress, and stress/rest flow reserve (p < 0.05).

  10. Oxygen extraction fraction measurement using quantitative susceptibility mapping: Comparison with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kohsuke; Liu, Tian; Murakami, Toshiyuki; Goodwin, Jonathan; Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Higuchi, Satomi; Wang, Yi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ogawa, Akira; Sasaki, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    The purposes of this study are to establish oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) measurements using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to compare QSM-OEF data with the gold standard (15)O positron emission tomography (PET). Twenty-six patients with chronic unilateral internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion, and 15 normal subjects were included. MRI scans were conducted using a 3.0 Tesla scanner with a three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled sequence. QSM images were created using the morphology-enabled dipole inversion method, and OEF maps were generated from QSM images using extraction of venous susceptibility induced by deoxygenated hemoglobin. Significant correlation of relative OEF ratio to contra-lateral hemisphere between QSM-OEF and PET-OEF was observed (r = 0.62, p < 0.001). The local (intra-section) correlation was also significant (r = 0.52, p < 0.001) in patients with increased PET-OEF. The sensitivity and specificity of OEF increase in QSM was 0.63 (5/8) and 0.89 (16/18), respectively, in comparison with PET. In conclusion, good correlation was achieved between QSM-OEF and PET-OEF in the identification of elevated OEF in affected hemispheres of patients with unilateral chronic steno-occlusive disease. PMID:26661168

  11. Genetic Interactions Found Between Calcium Channel Genes Modulate Amyloid Load Measured by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Hohman, Timothy J.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) is known to have a complex, oligogenic etiology, with considerable genetic heterogeneity. We investigated the influence of genetic interactions between genes in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathway on amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition as measured by PiB or AV-45 ligand positron emission tomography (PET) to aid in understanding LOAD’s genetic etiology. Subsets of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohorts were used for discovery and for two independent validation analyses. A significant interaction between RYR3 and CACNA1C was confirmed in all three of the independent ADNI datasets. Both genes encode calcium channels expressed in the brain. The results shown here support previous animal studies implicating interactions between these calcium channels in amyloidigenesis and suggest that the pathological cascade of this disease may be modified by interactions in the amyloid-calcium axis. Future work focusing on the mechanisms of such relationships may inform targets for clinical intervention. PMID:24026422

  12. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-08-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10-11 to 10-10 cm3 s-1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V-1 s-1). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles.

  13. Measurements of mean lifetime and branching fractions of b hadrons decaying to J/ ψ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Pacheco, A.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Atwood, W. B.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boudreau, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lançon, E.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Mattison, T.; Meinhard, H.; Menary, S.; Meyer, T.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Roth, A.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Bencheikh, A. M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bernard, V.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Qian, Z.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Hauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Takashima, M.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Bertin, V.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, X.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Abbaneo, D.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Mirabito, L.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Peter, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Schmitt, M.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Sau Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Zoberning, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    From a data sample of 450 000 hadronic events recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP, 92±10 events are observed containing a J/ψ meson decaying to μ+μ- or e +e -. From these data the measured inclusive branching fraction for a b flavoured hadron to decay to a J/ψ is BR(b→ J/ ψX) = (1.21±0.13 (stat.)±0.08 (syst.))%, and the average b hadron lifetime in the events tagged with a J/ ψ is τb = 1.35 +0.19-0.17±0.05 ps. Five events are observed consistent with the exclusive decay B ± → J/ ψK ± and from these events the exclusive branching fraction is measured to be BR(B ± → J/ ψK ±) = (0.22±0.10±0.02)%. Upper limits for other exclusive branching ratios are given.

  14. Lifetime measurements of 17C excited states and three-body and continuum effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smalley, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Navratil, P.; Roth, R.; Langhammer, J.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Barryman, J. S.; Campbell, C. M.; Dohet-Eraly, J.; et al

    2015-12-18

    We studied transition rates for the lowest 1/2+ and 5/2+ excited states of 17C through lifetime measurements with the GRETINA array using the recoil-distance method. The present measurements provide a model-independent determination of transition strengths giving the values of B(M1;1/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 1.04+0.03–0.12 × 10–2μ2N and B(M1;5/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 7.12+1.27–0.96 × 10–2μ2N. The quenched M1 transition strength for the 1/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, with respect to the 5/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, has been confirmed with greater precision. Furthermore, the current data are compared to importance-truncated no-core shell model calculations addressing effects due to continuum and three-body forces.

  15. Measuring the lifetime experience of domestic violence: application of the life history calendar method.

    PubMed

    Yoshihama, Mieko; Clum, Kimberly; Crampton, Alexandra; Gillespie, Brenda

    2002-06-01

    In the absence of a "gold standard," research on domestic violence relies primarily on self-report, the quality of which is known to decline as the length of the recall period increases. Eliciting valid and reliable self-report data is crucial to the development of prevention and intervention policies and services. Nevertheless, existing measures typically do not incorporate devices to facilitate respondents' recall of the lifetime experience of domestic violence. This article describes the application of the Life History Calendar (LHC) method (Freedman, Thornton, Camburn, Alwin, & Young-DeMarco, 1988) to increase a respondent's recall of domestic violence victimization over the lifecourse. The LHC method elicits memorable information of a personal nature (e.g., children's birth dates) and uses this information to facilitate the recall of less memorable events. A recent field test of this LHC measure indicates its utility in assessing domestic violence victimization, which takes place in a complex sequence of episodes and often involves multiple perpetrators over the lifecourse. PMID:12102055

  16. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X. -Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10−11 to 10−10 cm3 s−1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V−1 s−1). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles. PMID:27477058

  17. Comparison of Minority Carrier Lifetime Measurements in Superstrate and Substrate CdTe PV Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, T. A.; Dhere, R. G.; Duenow, J. N.; Kuciauskas, D.; Kanevce, A.; Bergeson, J. D.

    2011-07-01

    We discuss typical and alternative procedures to analyze time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements of minority carrier lifetime (MCL) with the hope of enhancing our understanding of how this technique may be used to better analyze CdTe photovoltaic (PV) device functionality. Historically, TRPL measurements of the fast recombination rate (t1) have provided insightful correlation with broad device functionality. However, we have more recently found that t1 does not correlate as well with smaller changes in device performance, nor does it correlate well with performance differences observed between superstrate and substrate CdTe PV devices. This study presents TRPL data for both superstrate and substrate CdTe devices where both t1 and the slower TRPL decay (t2) are analyzed. The study shows that changes in performance expected from small changes in device processing may correlate better with t2. Numerical modeling further suggests that, for devices that are expected to have similar drift field in the depletion region, effects of changes in bulk MCL and interface recombination should be more pronounced in t2. Although this technique may provide future guidance to improving CdS/CdTe device performance, it is often difficult to extract statistically precise values for t2, and therefore t2 data may demonstrate significant scatter when correlated with performance parameters.

  18. Lifetime measurements in {sup 93}Nb from photon and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Orce, J. N.; McKay, C. J.; Lesher, S. R.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Fransen, C.; Linnemann, A.; Werner, V.; Friessner, G.; Muecher, D.; Scholl, C.; Warr, N.; Brentano, P. von; Pietralla, N.; Kohstall, C.; Pitz, H. H.; Stedile, F.; Walter, S.; Kneissl, U.; Scheck, M.; Yates, S. W.

    2007-01-15

    The low-spin structure of {sup 93}Nb has been studied using the {sup 93}Nb({gamma},{gamma}{sup '}), {sup 93}Nb(n,n{sup '}{gamma}) and {sup 94}Zr(p,2n{gamma}{gamma}){sup 93}Nb reactions. Lifetimes were determined from both {sup 93}Nb({gamma},{gamma}{sup '}) and {sup 93}Nb(n,n{sup '}{gamma}) measurements. Branching ratios were measured, and multipolarities and spin assignments were determined from the {sup 94}Zr(p,2n{gamma}{gamma}){sup 93}Nb angular correlation experiment. From M1 and E2 strengths, the J{sup {pi}}=9/2{sup +} and 7/2{sup +} states at 1297.1 keV and 1483.6 keV, respectively, are proposed as members of the quintet of mixed-symmetry states associated with the {pi}1g{sub 9/2}(multiply-in-circle sign)(2{sub 1,MS}{sup +},{sup 92}Zr) configuration. The large B(M1) values determined in {sup 93}Nb cannot be explained within the weak coupling limit of the interacting boson fermion model.

  19. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Yi, H T; Wu, X; Haroldson, R; Gartstein, Y N; Rodionov, Y I; Tikhonov, K S; Zakhidov, A; Zhu, X-Y; Podzorov, V

    2016-01-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10(-11) to 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1)) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles. PMID:27477058

  20. Toward the measurement of multiple fluorescence lifetimes in flow cytometry: maximizing multi-harmonic content from cells and microspheres.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Patrick; Naivar, Mark A; Houston, Jessica P

    2015-11-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful means for in vitro cellular analyses where multi-fluorescence and multi-angle light scattering can indicate unique biochemical or morphological features of single cells. Yet, to date, flow cytometry systems have lacked the ability to capture complex fluorescence dynamics due to the transient nature of flowing cells. In this contribution we introduce a simple approach for measuring multiple fluorescence lifetimes from a single cytometric event. We leverage square wave modulation, Fourier analysis, and high frequency digitization and show the ability to resolve more than one fluorescence lifetime from fluorescently-labelled cells and microspheres. Illustration of a flow cytometer capable of capturing multiple fluorescence lifetime measurements; creating potential for multi-parametric, time-resolved signals to be captured for every color channel. PMID:25727072

  1. Positronics of radiation-induced effects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kozyukhin, S. A.; Shpotyuk, M.; Ingram, A.; Szatanik, R.

    2015-03-15

    Using As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and AsS{sub 2} glasses as an example, the principal possibility of using positron annihilation spectroscopy methods for studying the evolution of the free volume of hollow nanoobjects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors exposed to radiation is shown. The results obtained by measurements of the positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening of the annihilation line in reverse chronological order are in full agreement with the optical spectroscopy data in the region of the fundamental absorption edge, being adequately described within coordination defect-formation and physical-aging models.

  2. Positrons from supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1993-01-01

    Positrons are produced in the ejecta of supernovae by the decay of nucleosynthetic Co-56, Ti-44, and Al-26. We calculate the probability that these positrons can survive without annihilating in the supernova ejecta, and we show that enough of these positrons should escape into the interstellar medium to account for the observed diffuse Galactic annihilation radiation. The surviving positrons are carried by the expanding ejecta into the interstellar medium where their annihilation lifetime of 10 exp 5 - 10 exp 6 yr is much longer than the average supernovae occurrence time of about 100 yr. Thus, annihilating positrons from thousands of supernovae throughout the Galaxy produce a steady diffuse flux of annihilation radiation. We further show that combining the calculated positron survival fractions and nucleosynthetic yields for current supernova models with the estimated supernova rates and the observed flux of diffuse Galactic annihilation radiation suggests that the present Galactic rate of Fe-56 nucleosynthesis is about 0.8 +/- 0.6 solar mass per 100 yr.

  3. Predicted CALET measurements of electron and positron spectra from 3 to 20 GeV using the geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, B. F.

    2014-05-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is an imaging calorimeter under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014 for a planned 5 year mission. CALET consists of a charge detection module (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (X∘) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) with 27 X∘ of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of the experiment are to measure the electron e+e energy spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1000 TeV. In this paper we describe how the geomagnetic field at the 51.6° inclination orbit of the ISS can be used to allow CALET to measure the distinct electron and positron fluxes. The positron fraction has been seen to rise above ˜10 GeV by previous experiments (HEAT, AMS-01), and more recently to continue to increase to higher energies (˜80 GeV for PAMELA, ˜200 GeV for Fermi and ˜350 GeV with the best statistics for AMS-02). Utilizing the geomagnetic cutoff, CALET will be able to distinguish electrons and positrons in the ˜3-20 GeV energy range where the positron fraction turns upward to complement existing high statistics measurements.

  4. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Positron annihilation spectroscopy in materials structure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafutin, Viktor I.; Prokop'ev, Evgenii P.

    2002-01-01

    A relatively new method of materials structure analysis — positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) — is reviewed. Measurements of positron lifetimes, the determination of positron 3γ- and 2γ-annihilation probabilities, and an investigation of the effects of different external factors on the fundamental characteristics of annihilation constitute the basis for this promising method. The ways in which the positron annihilation process operates in ionic crystals, semiconductors, metals and some condensed matter systems are analyzed. The scope of PAS is described and its prospects for the study of the electronic and defect structures are discussed. The applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy in radiation physics and chemistry of various substances as well as in physics and chemistry of solutions are exemplified.

  5. Volatility of organic molecular markers used for source apportionment analysis: measurements and implications for atmospheric lifetime.

    PubMed

    May, Andrew A; Saleh, Rawad; Hennigan, Christopher J; Donahue, Neil M; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-11-20

    Molecular markers are organic species used to define fingerprints for source apportionment of ambient fine particulate matter. Traditionally, these markers have been assumed to be stable in the atmosphere. This work investigates the gas-particle partitioning of eight organic species used as molecular markers in receptor models for biomass burning (levoglucosan), motor vehicles (5α-cholestane, n-hexacosane, n-triacontane, 1,2-benz[a]anthracene, coronene), and meat cooking (cholesterol, oleic acid). Experiments were conducted using a thermodenuder to measure the evaporation of single component particles. The data were analyzed using the integrated volume method to determine saturation concentrations and enthalpies of vaporization for each compound. The results indicate that appreciable quantities (>10%) of most of these markers exist in the gas phase under typical atmospheric conditions. Therefore, these species should be considered semivolatile. Predictions from a chemical kinetics model indicate that gas-particle partitioning has important effects on the atmospheric lifetime of these species. The atmospheric decay of semivolatile compounds proceeds much more rapidly than nonvolatile compounds because gas-phase oxidation induces evaporation of particle-phase material. Therefore, both gas-particle partitioning and chemical reactions need to be accounted for when semivolatile molecular markers are used for source apportionment studies. PMID:23013599

  6. Optimized streak-camera system: wide excitation range and extended time scale for fluorescence lifetime measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Urs; Buehler, Christof; Betz, Michael; Zuber, Herbert; Anliker, M.

    1994-08-01

    A new versatile system for the measurement of time-resolved fluorescence emission spectra of biomolecules is presented. Frequency doubling and tripling of a Ti:Sapphire laser allows excitation over a wide wavelength range. The influence of increasing the spectral resolution on the time resolution has been investigated. System performance can be optimized for best resolution in the spectral or time domain, respectively. System performance can be optimized for best resolution in the spectral or time domain, respectively. The currently achieved temporal resolution is 6 psec, and the best spectral resolution is 3 nm. Long fluorescence decays can be resolved with optimal time resolution by way of taking into account the flyback of the streak camera. With the system described, the core complex ((alpha) (beta) )3APCLC8.9 of the phycobilisome from the photosynthetic cyanobacteria Mastigocladus laminosus has been analyzed. Lifetime analysis clearly demonstrated the influence of the linker polypeptide on the phycobiliprotein complex and the identity of native and reconstituted complex.

  7. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M

    2014-07-18

    Using a proton-proton collision data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1) collected by LHCb at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, about 3800 Ξ(b)(0) → Ξ(c)(+)π(-), Ξ(c)(+)) → pK(-)π(+) signal decays are reconstructed. From this sample, the first measurement of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon lifetime is made, relative to that of the Λ(b)(0) baryon. The mass differences M(Ξ(b)(0))-M(Λ(b)(0)) and M(Ξ(c)(+))-M(Λ(c)(+)) are also measured with precision more than 4 times better than the current world averages. The resulting values are τ(Ξ(b)(0))/τ(Λ)(b)(0)) = 1.006 ± 0.018 ± 0.010,M(Ξ(b)(0))-M(Λ(b)(0)) = 172.44 ± 0.39 ± 0.17 MeV/c(2),M(Ξ(c)(+))-M(Λ(c)(+)) = 181.51 ± 0.14 ± 0.10 MeV/c(2),where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The relative rate of Ξ(b)(0) to Λ(b)(0) baryon production is measured to be f(Ξ)(b)(0))/f(Λ)(b)(0))B(Ξ(b)(0) → Ξ(c)(+)π(-))/B(Λ(b)(0) → Λ(c)(+)π(-))B(Ξ(c)(+) → pK(-)π(+))/B(Λ(c)(+) → pK(-)}π(+)) = (1.88 ± 0.04 ± 0.03) × 10(-2),where the first factor is the ratio of fragmentation fractions, b → Ξ(b)(0) relative to b → Λ(b)(0). Relative production rates as functions of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity are also presented. PMID:25083633

  8. Long-lifetime Ru(II) complexes for the measurement of high molecular weight protein hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Szmacinski, H; Castellano, F N; Terpetschnig, E; Dattelbaum, J D; Lakowicz, J R; Meyer, G J

    1998-03-01

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of two asymmetrical ruthenium(II) complexes, [Ru(dpp)2(dcbpy)]2+ and [Ru(dpp)2(mcbpy)]2+, as well as the water soluble sulfonated derivatives [Ru(dpp(SO3Na)2)2(dcbpy)]2+ and [Ru(dpp(SO3Na)2)2(mcbpy)]2+ (dpp is 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, dcbpy is 4,4'-dicarboxylic acid-2,2'-bipyridine, mcbpy is 4-methyl,4'-carboxylic acid-2,2'-bipyridine, and dpp(SO3Na)2 is the disulfonated derivative of dpp) as probes for the measurement of the rotational motions of proteins. The spectral (absorption, emission, and anisotropy) and photophysical (time-resolved intensity and anisotropy decays) properties of these metal-ligand complexes were determined in solution, in both the presence and absence of human serum albumin (HSA). These complexes display lifetimes ranging from 345 ns to 3.8 microseconds in deoxygenated aqueous solutions under a variety of conditions. The carboxylic acid groups on these complexes were activated to form N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters which were used to covalently lable HSA, and were characterized spectroscopically in the same manner as above. Time-resolved anisotropy measurements were performed to demonstrate the utility of these complexes in measuring long rotational correlation times of bioconjugates between HSA and antibody to HSA. The potential usefulness of these probes in fluorescence polarization immunoassays was demonstrated by an association assay of the Ru(II)-labeled HSA with polyclonal antibody. PMID:9546056

  9. Thermal vacancy formation and positron-vacancy interaction in Ti3Al at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würschum, R.; Kümmerle, E. A.; Badura-Gergen, K.; Seeger, A.; Herzig, Ch.; Schaefer, H.-E.

    1996-07-01

    In order to study the formation of thermal vacancies in the Ti-Al alloy system, high-temperature positron lifetime measurements together with a modeling of defect formation in the framework of nearest-neighbor pair bonds were performed for α2Ti3Al and compared to recent results on γTiAl [U. Brossmann, R. Würschum, K. Badura, and H.-E. Schaefer, Phys. Rev. B 49, 6457 (1994)]. Substantial increases of the positron lifetime τ were observed for Ti65.6Al34.4 and Ti77.1Al22.9 in the temperature range T≳1200 K where thermal vacancy concentrations above the detection limit of positron annihilation are expected from the model calculations for the α2 phase. Within the high-temperature increase of the positron lifetime in the α2 and the β phase single-component positron lifetime spectra were observed. This behavior is in contrast to the two-component spectra observed conventionally at intermediate positron trapping rates and is attributed to a fast detrapping and retrapping of positrons at vacancies due to a low positron-vacancy binding energy. For this case, a vacancy formation enthalpy of HFV=(1.55±0.2) eV in α2Ti65.6Al34.4 and HFV=(1.8±0.2) eV in βTi77.1Al22.9 can be derived. These results are discussed in the context of recent 44Ti tracer diffusion studies.

  10. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  11. Compact solid-state CMOS single-photon detector array for in vivo NIR fluorescence lifetime oncology measurements.

    PubMed

    Homulle, H A R; Powolny, F; Stegehuis, P L; Dijkstra, J; Li, D-U; Homicsko, K; Rimoldi, D; Muehlethaler, K; Prior, J O; Sinisi, R; Dubikovskaya, E; Charbon, E; Bruschini, C

    2016-05-01

    In near infrared fluorescence-guided surgical oncology, it is challenging to distinguish healthy from cancerous tissue. One promising research avenue consists in the analysis of the exogenous fluorophores' lifetime, which are however in the (sub-)nanosecond range. We have integrated a single-photon pixel array, based on standard CMOS SPADs (single-photon avalanche diodes), in a compact, time-gated measurement system, named FluoCam. In vivo measurements were carried out with indocyanine green (ICG)-modified derivatives targeting the αvβ 3 integrin, initially on a genetically engineered mouse model of melanoma injected with ICG conjugated with tetrameric cyclic pentapeptide (ICG-E[c(RGD f K)4]), then on mice carrying tumour xenografts of U87-MG (a human primary glioblastoma cell line) injected with monomeric ICG-c(RGD f K). Measurements on tumor, muscle and tail locations allowed us to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo lifetime measurements with the FluoCam, to determine the characteristic lifetimes (around 500 ps) and subtle lifetime differences between bound and unbound ICG-modified fluorophores (10% level), as well as to estimate the available photon fluxes under realistic conditions. PMID:27231622

  12. EBIT in the Magnetic Trapping Mode: Mass Spectrometry, Atomic Lifetime Measurements, and Charge Transfer Reactions of Highly Charged Atomic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikhard, L; Beiersdorfer, P; Trabert, E

    2001-07-10

    Although it may sound like a contradiction in terms, the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) works as an ion trap even when the electron beam is switched off. We present various experiments that exploit the ''magnetic trapping mode'' for investigations of ion confinement, charge exchange processes, atomic lifetime and ion mass measurements.

  13. Compact solid-state CMOS single-photon detector array for in vivo NIR fluorescence lifetime oncology measurements

    PubMed Central

    Homulle, H. A. R.; Powolny, F.; Stegehuis, P. L.; Dijkstra, J.; Li, D.-U.; Homicsko, K.; Rimoldi, D.; Muehlethaler, K.; Prior, J. O.; Sinisi, R.; Dubikovskaya, E.; Charbon, E.; Bruschini, C.

    2016-01-01

    In near infrared fluorescence-guided surgical oncology, it is challenging to distinguish healthy from cancerous tissue. One promising research avenue consists in the analysis of the exogenous fluorophores’ lifetime, which are however in the (sub-)nanosecond range. We have integrated a single-photon pixel array, based on standard CMOS SPADs (single-photon avalanche diodes), in a compact, time-gated measurement system, named FluoCam. In vivo measurements were carried out with indocyanine green (ICG)-modified derivatives targeting the αvβ3 integrin, initially on a genetically engineered mouse model of melanoma injected with ICG conjugated with tetrameric cyclic pentapeptide (ICG−E[c(RGD f K)4]), then on mice carrying tumour xenografts of U87-MG (a human primary glioblastoma cell line) injected with monomeric ICG−c(RGD f K). Measurements on tumor, muscle and tail locations allowed us to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo lifetime measurements with the FluoCam, to determine the characteristic lifetimes (around 500 ps) and subtle lifetime differences between bound and unbound ICG-modified fluorophores (10% level), as well as to estimate the available photon fluxes under realistic conditions. PMID:27231622

  14. Development of a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Seki, C.; Kashikura, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed and tested a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface of animals. The beta camera consists of a thin CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, a tapered fiber optics plate (taper fiber) and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The taper fiber is the key component of the camera. We have developed two types of beta cameras. One is 20mm diameter field of view camera for imaging brain surface of cats. The other is 10mm diameter camera for that of rats. Spatial resolutions of beta camera for cats and rats were 0.8mm FWHM and 0.5mm FWHM, respectively. We confirmed that developed beta cameras may overcome the limitation of the spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography (PET).

  15. Regional structure-function correlations in chronic obstructive lung disease measured with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Brudin, L H; Rhodes, C G; Valind, S O; Buckingham, P D; Jones, T; Hughes, J M

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Positron emission tomography, performed with isotopes of very short half life, can be used to relate local lung tissue density to local ventilation and to the ventilation:perfusion ratio. This method has been used in 10 patients with severe chronic airflow obstruction and differing values for carbon monoxide transfer factor (TLCO) and transfer coefficient (KCO). METHODS: Ventilation (VA) and the ventilation:perfusion ratio (V/Q), lung density, and blood volume were measured regionally in a single transaxial section at mid-heart level with the patients in a supine position. Alveolar volume, extravascular tissue lung density, and perfusion (Q) were derived. Twenty five regions with abnormalities in the ventilation images were analysed. RESULTS: Tissue density showed a negative correlation with the ratio V/Q (r = 0.55) and a positive correlation with Q (r = 0.59) and blood volume (r = 0.65). In four patients with a low carbon monoxide transfer factor (TLCO) and transfer coefficient (KCO) < 50% predicted many regions with low VA had low tissue density and normal or high V/Q. On the other hand, in four patients with TLCO and KCO > 50% predicted many regions with low VA had normal or high tissue density and low values of V/Q. The other two patients had patterns between these two extremes. Individual ratios between mean values of tissue density and V/Q had a positive correlation with KCO (% pred; r = 0.79). CONCLUSIONS: These findings link structural differences with distinctive functional patterns; they reinforce the view that bronchial inflammation or oedema predominate in some patients with chronic airflow obstruction, whereas alveolar destruction is the major feature in others. Images PMID:1465748

  16. Doubly differential measurements for multiple ionization of argon by electron impact: Comparison with positron impact and photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A.C.F.; Hasan, A.; Yates, T.; DuBois, R.D.

    2003-05-01

    Doubly differential cross sections for single and multiple ionization of Ar have been measured for 500, 750, and 1000 eV electron impact. The cross sections were measured as a function of projectile energy loss and scattering angle. The energy loss range was 0-85% of the initial projectile energy and scattering angles were between {+-}22 deg. The data were put on an absolute scale by normalizing to total ionization cross sections available in the literature and found to be in good agreement with the absolute electron impact cross sections from DuBois and Rudd. For 750 eV impact, a comparison was made between the present electron impact data and positron impact data obtained using the same experimental conditions. The same energy dependence and yields for single ionization were found for both electron and positron impact. On the other hand, the double- and triple-ionization yields are smaller for positron impact as compared to electron impact. Comparisons with photoionization data showed that for outer shell ionization the fractions of double and triple ionization of argon by photon impact are in quite good agreement with the present electron impact data.

  17. On Possible Interpretations of the High Energy Electron-Positron Spectrum Measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.; Profumo, S.; Strong, A.W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bloom, E.D.; Bregeon, J.; Di Bernardo, G.; Gaggero, D.; Giglietto, N.; Kamae, T.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Moiseev, A.A.; Morselli, A.; Ormes, J.F.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pohl, M.; Razzano, M.; Sgro, C.

    2009-05-15

    The Fermi-LAT experiment recently reported high precision measurements of the spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons-plus-positrons (CRE) between 20 GeV and 1 TeV. The spectrum shows no prominent spectral features, and is significantly harder than that inferred from several previous experiments. Here we discuss several interpretations of the Fermi results based either on a single large scale Galactic CRE component or by invoking additional electron-positron primary sources, e.g. nearby pulsars or particle Dark Matter annihilation. We show that while the reported Fermi-LAT data alone can be interpreted in terms of a single component scenario, when combined with other complementary experimental results, specifically the CRE spectrum measured by H.E.S.S. and especially the positron fraction reported by PAMELA between 1 and 100 GeV, that class of models fails to provide a consistent interpretation. Rather, we find that several combinations of parameters, involving both the pulsar and dark matter scenarios, allow a consistent description of those results. We also briefly discuss the possibility of discriminating between the pulsar and dark matter interpretations by looking for a possible anisotropy in the CRE flux.

  18. High sensitivity of positron annihilation to thermal oxidation of polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Nanasawa, Atsushi

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate the high sensitivity of positron annihilation to compositional changes related to the thermal degradation of polyethylene (PE). Positron annihilation γ-ray and lifetime measurements were conducted for PE films with and without antioxidant (1000-ppm Ciba® IRGANOX® 1076), subjected to heat treatment at 100 °C for different periods, to a maximum of 30 days. For the film without antioxidant, the positron Doppler parameter (S) and ortho-positronium formation probability (Io-Ps) appreciably decreased with increased heat treatment times, whereas they barely changed for the film with antioxidant. This, together with the Fourier transform infrared measurements, demonstrated that the variations of S and Io-Ps are caused by the thermal oxidation of PE. The S parameter was found to be sensitive to the early stage of degradation, where the carbonyl concentration is inferred to be lower than 100 ppm. The high sensitivity results from the large positron mobility in PE and from the high positron affinity of oxygen-containing polar groups. This work provides the basis for an application of positron annihilation to sensitive detection of the initial degradation of PE and other nonpolar polymers.

  19. Picosecond planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of OH A 2 ( 2) lifetime and energy transfer in atmospheric pressure flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, Frank C.; Nielsen, Tim; Burrows, Michael; Andresen, Peter

    1997-08-01

    A picosecond, excimer-Raman laser (268 nm, 400 ps FWHM) was used for laser sheet excitation of OH in the (2, 0) band. The fluorescence was detected with a fast-gated, intensified camera (400-ps gate width). The effective collisional lifetime of the spectrally integrated fluorescence was measured in two dimensions by shifting the intensifier gate across the decay curve. The average lifetime is 2.0 ns for a stoichiometric methane air flame with spatial variations of 10 . Shorter collisional lifetimes were measured for rich flame conditions that are due to a higher number density of the quenchers. Vibrational energy transfer (VET) was observed in premixed methane air and methane oxygen flames by putting the fast-gated camera behind a spectrometer. The spectrum of the methane air flame shows strong VET in contrast with the methane oxygen flame. This is because N 2 is a weak electronic quencher but a strong VET agent. By fitting the measured time dependence of the different vibrational populations ( 2, 1, 0) to a four-level model, rate constants for quenching and VET were determined. For the lower states ( 0, 1) our results are in good agreement with literature values. For a prediction of a spectrally integrated, collisional lifetime in a known collisional environment it is important to consider not only the quenching but also the amount of energy transfer in the excited state as well as the spectral detection sensitivity.

  20. Measurement of the B¯(s)(0) effective lifetime in the J/ψf0(980) final state.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-10-12

    The effective lifetime of the B ¯(s)(0) meson in the decay mode B¯(s)(0)→J/ψf(0)(980) is measured using 1.0 fb(-1) of data collected in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the LHCb detector. The result is 1.700±0.040±0.026 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. As the final state is CP-odd, and CP violation in this mode is measured to be small, the lifetime measurement can be translated into a measurement of the decay width of the heavy B¯(s)(0) mass eigenstate, Γ(H)=0.588±0.014±0.009 ps(-1). PMID:23102295

  1. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  2. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  3. Positron annihilation studies in solid 2-aminopyridine, 3-aminopyridine, 4-aminopyridine and 2-aminopyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netto, A. Marques; Bicalho, S. M. C. M.; Filgueiras, Ca. L.; Machado, J. C.

    1985-09-01

    Positron annihilation lifetimes and Doppler-broadened annihilation lines have been measured in solid 2-aminopyridine (2-APY), 3-aminopyridine (3-APY), 4-aminopyridine (4-APY) and 2-aminopyrimidine (2-APYM). The results point to the formation of positronium in the solid pyridines and the yields are discussed in terms of the structures and the electron donation character of the compounds.

  4. Lifetimes in neutron-rich Nd isotopes measured by Doppler profile method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    Lifetimes of the rotational levels in neutron-rich even-even Nd isotopes were deduced from the analysis of the Doppler broadened line shapes. The experiment was performed at Daresbury with the Eurogam array, which at that time consisted of 45 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and 5 Low-Energy Photon Spectrometers. The source was in the form of a 7-mm pellet which was prepared by mixing 5-mg; {sup 248}Cm and 65-mg KCl and pressing it under high pressure. Events for which three or more detectors fired were used to construct a cubic data array whose axes represented the {gamma}-ray energies and the contents of each channel the number of events with that particular combination of {gamma}-ray energies. From this cubic array, one-dimensional spectra were generated by placing gates on peaks on the other two axes. Gamma-ray spectra of even-even Nd isotopes were obtained by gating on the transitions in the complimentary Kr fragments. The gamma peaks de-exciting states with I {>=} 12 h were found to be broader than the instrumental line width due to the Doppler effect. The line shapes of they-ray peaks were fitted separately with a simple model for the feeding of the states and assuming a rotational band with constant intrinsic quadruple moment and these are shown in Fig. I-27. The quadrupole moments thus determined were found to be in good agreement with the quadrupole moments measured previously for lower spin states. Because of the success of this technique for the Nd isotopes, we intend to apply this technique to the new larger data set collected with the Eurogam II array. The results of this study were published.

  5. Developing A New Test Stand For Lifetime Measurements Using A Narrow Gap Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuitt, Omani; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Morris, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) recently won a proposal "The First Four-Year Physics and Astronomy Degree at the University of the Virgin Islands; A new Era in Caribbean Participation in NASA Science" in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The proposal included building a detector life-test chamber at UVI to support the degree program as well as assist NASA by running tests on detector components and reporting the results.The team at GSFC is developing X-ray polarimeters that can be used in detecting and imaging astrophysical sources such as black holes and neutron stars. The purpose of our research is to understand the effects that the degradation of gas has on the performance of the detectors. The current generation of time projection polarimeter incorporates a narrow gap detector assembled with epoxy. The addition of the epoxy allows a smaller gap with the minimal amount of changes from the original design, enhancing the performance of the detectors.With the use of epoxy, lifetime measurements have to be made to see how the epoxy detectors compared to previous iterations. We have been studying the effects on the narrow gap detector in the Mahaffey chamber in order to determine whether the epoxy affects the cleanliness of the gas. Tests have been conducted with a residual gas analyzer (RGA) in order to monitor the cleanliness of the gas inside of the Mahaffey chamber while being baked out. Results show that the detector is in fact getting cleaner as time progresses. The plan is to recreate a detector that meets the performance criteria for 2 years and has minimal degradation.

  6. Design and characterization of a pulsed x-ray source for fluorescent lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Blankespoor, S.C. |

    1993-12-01

    To search for new, fast, inorganic scintillators, the author and his colleagues have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray source for determining fluorescent lifetimes and wavelengths of compounds in crystal or powdered form. This source uses a light-excited x-ray tube which produces x-rays when light from a laser diode strikes its photocathode. The x-ray tube has a tungsten anode, a beryllium exit window, a 30 kV maximum tube bias, and a 50 HA maximum average cathode current. The laser produces 3 {times} 10{sup 7} photons at 650 nm per {approximately}100 ps pulse, with up to 10{sup 7} pulses/sec. The time spread for the laser diode, x-ray tube, and a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is less than 120 ps fwhm. The mean x-ray photon energy, at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, is 9.4, 10.3, and 11.1 keV, respectively. They measured 140, 230, and 330 x-ray photons per laser diode pulse per steradian at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, respectively. Background x-rays due to dark current occur at a rate of 1 {times} 10{sup 6} and 3 {times} 10{sup 6} photons/sec/steradian at tube biases of 25 and 30 kV, respectively. Data characterizing the x-ray output with an aluminum filter in the x-ray beam are also presented.

  7. Whitecap lifetime stages from infrared imagery with implications for microwave radiometric measurements of whitecap fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Henry; Smith, Geoffrey B.; Snow, Charlotte M.; Dowgiallo, David J.; Bobak, Justin P.; Anguelova, Magdalena D.

    2015-11-01

    Quantifying active and residual whitecap fractions separately can improve parameterizations of air-sea fluxes associated with breaking waves. We use data from a multi-instrumental field campaign on Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP) to simultaneously capture the signatures of active and residual whitecaps at visible, infrared (IR), and microwave wavelengths using, respectively, video camera, mid-IR camera, and a radiometer at 10 GHz. We present results from processing and analyzing IR images and correlating this information with radiometric time series of brightness temperature at horizontal and vertical polarizations TBH and TBV. The results provide evidence that breaking crests and decaying foam appear in mid-IR as bright and dark pixels clearly distinguishing active from residual whitecaps. We quantify the durations of whitecap lifetime stages from the IR images and identify their corresponding signatures in TB time series. Results show that TBH and TBV vary in phase during the active and in antiphase during the residual whitecap stages. A methodology to distinguish active and residual whitecaps in radiometric time series without a priori IR information has been developed and verified with corresponding IR and video images. The method uses the degree of polarization P (the ratio between the sum and difference of TBV and TBH) to capture whitecaps as prominent spikes. The maximum and zero-crossing of the first derivative of P serve to identify the presence of active whitecaps, while the minimum of dP marks the transition from active to residual whitecap stage. The findings have implications for radiometric measurements of active and total whitecap fractions.

  8. CFCl3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, M.; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both a major ozone-depleting substance and a potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95-230 nm) and temperature (216-296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D coupled chemistry-radiation-dynamics model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The modeled global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 × 0.7 years (2σ uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current UV spectrum recommendations. CFCl 3 (CFC-11) 2-D model results: Left: Global annually averaged loss rate coefficient (local lifetime) and photolysis and reaction contributions (see legend). Middle: Molecular loss rate and uncertainty limits; the slow and fast profiles were calculated using the 2σ uncertainty estimates in the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum from this work. Right: CFC-11 concentration profile. CFC-11 loss process contribution to the overall local lifetime uncertainty (2σ) calculated using the 2-D model (see text). Left: Results obtained from this work. Right: Results obtained using model input from Sander et al. [2011] and updates in SPARC [2013].

  9. Measured dose rate constant from oncology patients administered 18F for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Brian; Holahan, Brian; Aime, Jean; Humm, John; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Patient exposure rate measurements verify published patient dose rate data and characterize dose rates near 2-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) patients. A specific dose rate constant based on patient exposure rate measurements is a convenient quantity that can be applied to the desired distance, injection activity, and time postinjection to obtain an accurate calculation of cumulative external radiation dose. This study reports exposure rates measured at various locations near positron emission tomography (PET) {sup 18}F-FDG patients prior to PET scanning. These measurements are normalized for the amount of administered activity, measurement distance, and time postinjection and are compared with other published data. Methods: Exposure rates were measured using a calibrated ionization chamber at various body locations from 152 adult oncology patients postvoid after a mean uptake time of 76 min following injection with a mean activity of 490 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Data were obtained at nine measurement locations for each patient: three near the head, four near the chest, and two near the feet. Results: On contact with, 30 cm superior to and 30 cm lateral to the head, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.482 (0.511), 0.135 (0.155), and 0.193 (0.223) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. On contact with, 30 cm anterior to, 30 cm lateral to and 1 m anterior to the chest, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.623 (0.709), 0.254 (0.283), 0.190 (0.218), and 0.067 (0.081) {mu}Sv/MBq h respectively. 30 cm inferior and 30 cm lateral to the feet, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.024 (0.022) and 0.039 (0.044) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. Conclusions: The measurements for this study support the use of 0.092 {mu}Sv m{sup 2}/MBq h as a reasonable representation of the dose rate anterior from the chest of

  10. Analysis of the photo voltage decay /PVD/ method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in P-N junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    The photo voltage decay (PVD) method for the measurement of minority carrier lifetimes in P-N junction solar cells with cell thickness comparable to or even less than the minority carrier diffusion length is examined. The method involves the generation of free carriers in the quasi-neutral bulk material by flashes of light and the monitoring of the subsequent decay of the induced open-circuit voltages as the carriers recombine, which is dependent on minority carrier recombination lifetime. It is shown that the voltage versus time curve for an ordinary solar cell (N(+)-P junction) is proportional to the inverse minority carrier lifetime plus a factor expressing the ratio of diffusion length to cell thickness. In the case of an ideal back-surface-field cell (N(+)-P-P(+) junction) however, the slope is directly proportional to the inverse minority carrier lifetime. It is noted that since most BSF cells are not ideal, possessing a sizable back surface recombination velocity, the PVD measurements must be treated with caution and supplemented with other nonstationary methods.

  11. Measurement of the B0s lifetime in the exclusive decay channel B0s-->J/psiphi.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahmed, S N; Ahn, S H; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, T C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baffioni, S; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Binder, M; Bischoff, A; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Bonamy, P; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Boswell, C; Brandt, A; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Casey, D; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Colling, D J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Del Signore, K; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Fein, D; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Gao, M; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Geurkov, G; Ginther, G; Goldmann, K; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gu, W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hanlet, P; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, C; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; 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Li, Q Z; Li, X; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lu, J; Lubatti, H J; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Luo, C; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Maity, M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Marshall, T; Martens, M; Martin, M I; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; McMahon, T; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Meng, X; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; 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Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Steinbrück, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trippe, T G; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Von Vlimant, J-R; Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wallace, N; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wlodek, T; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wu, Z; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, B; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zheng, H; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2005-02-01

    Using the exclusive decay B0s-->J/psi(mu+mu-)phi(K+K-), we report the most precise single measurement of the B0s lifetime. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 220 pb(-1) collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in 2002-2004. We reconstruct 337 signal candidates, from which we extract the B0s lifetime, tau(B0s)=1.444(+0.098)(-0.090)(stat)+/-0.020(sys) ps. We also report a measurement for the lifetime of the B0 meson using the exclusive decay B0-->J/psi(mu+mu-)K*0(892)(K+pi-). We reconstruct 1370 signal candidates, obtaining tau(B0)=1.473(+0.052)(-0.050)(stat)+/-0.023(sys) ps, and the ratio of lifetimes, tau(B0s)/tau(B0)=0.980(+0.076)(-0.071)(stat)+/-0.003(sys). PMID:15783550

  12. Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime Using a Gravitational Trap and a Low-Temperature Fomblin Coating

    PubMed Central

    Serebrov, A.; Varlamov, V.; Kharitonov, A.; Fomin, A.; Pokotilovski, Yu.; Geltenbort, P.; Butterworth, J.; Krasnoschekova, I.; Lasakov, M.; Tal’daev, R.; Vassiljev, A.; Zherebtsov, O.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new value for the neutron lifetime of 878.5 ± 0.7stat. ± 0.3syst. This result differs from the world average value by 6.5 standard deviations and by 5.6 standard deviations from the previous most precise result. However, this new value for the neutron lifetime together with a β-asymmetry in neutron decay, A0, of −0.1189(7) is in a good agreement with the Standard Model. PMID:27308146

  13. Positron microprobe at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka, P; Howell, R; Stoeffl, W

    1998-11-01

    The electron linac based positron source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. We are building a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with sub-micron resolution. The widely spaced and intense positron packets from the tungsten moderator at the end of the 100 MeV LLNL linac are captured and trapped in a magnetic bottle. The positrons are then released in 1 ns bunches at a 20 MHz repetition rate. With a three-stage re-moderation we will compress the cm-sized original beam to a 1 micro-meter diameter final spot on the target. The buncher will compress the arrival time of positrons on the target to less than 100 ps. A detector array with up to 60 BaF2 crystals in paired coincidence will measure the annihilation radiation with high efficiency and low background. The energy of the positrons can be varied from less than 1 keV up to 50 keV.

  14. Investigation of ionic conductivity of polymeric electrolytes based on poly (ether urethane) networks using positron probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z. L.; Wang, B.; Li, S. Q.; Wang, S. J.; Liu, H.; Xie, H. Q.

    1994-10-01

    Positron-lifetime measurements have been made for poly (ether urethane) undoped and doped with [LiClO 4]/[Unit]=0.05 in the temperature range of 120-340 K. The measured lifetime spectra were resolved into three components. The lifetime and the intensity of orthopositronium were used to evaluate the amount of the free volume in poly (ether urethane). It was found that the variation of ionic conductivity with temperature and salt concentration can be rationalised in terms of free volume consideration.

  15. SU-E-T-230: Measurement of Proton-Activated Positron Emission with PRESAGE 3-D Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M; Mawlawi, O; Ibbott, G; Adamovics, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measurement of positron emission following proton beam irradiation of a target has been studied as a method of in-vivo dosimetry. Relative dosimetry studies between a phantom and treatment plan are susceptible to range uncertainties from material heterogeneities and setup error. By using the radiochromic polyurethane dosimeter PRESAGE, we can correlate the proton dose distribution to the PET activity measurement within a single detector. The PRESAGE formulation used was developed for high-LET proton radiotherapy, has similar density and RLSP to tissue, and consists of a greater carbon component, which gives it a higher positron signal than many other 3D detectors. Methods: Three cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters were irradiated semi-uniformly to 500 cGy with 180- MeV protons. The beam was directed along the dosimeter axis and delivered a 2-cm SOBP at the center of the dosimeter. The dosimeters were rushed to a nearby PET/CT where imaging began within 15 minutes, less than a single half-life of 11C. A 3-hr measurement captured the full activation decay. Afterwards, the dose profiles were measured by optical-CT. A direct comparison between the measured dose and the positron emission was performed using CERR software. Results: The correlations between dose distributions and PET activity were consistent with previous studies in that the proximal region of the SOBP displayed the highest activity. The spatial distributions between the dose and activity were similar. Along the central axis of the beam, we found a shift in the distal 80% of 1 cm. The lateral profile showed good agreement between dose and activity. PET imaging times between 30-min and 3-hrs showed <5% discrepancy. Conclusion: PRESAGE dosimeters offer a strong and unique potential to accurately correlate dosimetric and PET activation information. Implementation in an anthropomorphic phantom could be used to study representative treatment plans. NIH grant 5R01CA100835.

  16. Positron sensing of distribution of defects in depth materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchishin, A. I.; Kupchishin, A. A.; Voronova, N. A.; Kirdyashkin, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    It was developed a non-destructive method of positron sensing, which allows to determine the distribution of defects in the depth of the material. From the analysis we can conclude that the angular distribution curves of annihilation photons (well as and on the characteristics in experiments on the lifetime, 3γ - angular correlation, Doppler effect) is influenced by three main factors: a) The distribution of defects in the depth of the material, their dimensions as well as parameters of the interaction of positrons with defects. With increasing the concentration of defects the intensity Jγ(a, ξ) varies more; b) Modification of the energy spectrum of slow positrons due to the influence of defects, wherein the spectrum of positrons becomes softer, and the average energy of the positron annihilation is reduced; c) Deformation of the momentum distribution of the electrons in the region of defect. The energy spectrum of electrons is also becomes softer, and the average energy of the electrons (on which positrons annihilate) is less. The experimentally were measured spectra of photons in the zone of annihilation and were calculated the distribution of defects in depth for a number of metals.

  17. Phases and defects in 2-norbornylene. A positron study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgardzińska, B.; Gorgol, M.; Goworek, T.

    2016-08-01

    Positron lifetime spectra were measured in solid and liquid phases of 2-norbornylene. No accumulation of excess electrons in the brittle phase was observed. The vacancy activation enthalpy in plastic phase was found equal (0.13 ± 0.02) eV. The temperature dependence of positronium lifetime in the bulk deviates from expectations of two-state model; it can be explained by an assumption that some of positronium atoms are created directly in vacancies (not transferred from the bulk). The macroscopic surface tension of liquid norbornylene at 330 K is estimated as (23.1-26.6) mN/m.

  18. Measurement of the B s0 lifetime and production rate with D s-ℓ + combinations in Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wanke, R.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Denis, R. St; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; M