Science.gov

Sample records for possibly involves kallikrein

  1. Glandular kallikreins in the teleost Cyprinus carpio: tissue distribution, possible involvement in prolactin processing, and effect of 17 beta-estradiol in vivo.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, J; Fernández, K; Haussmann, D; Richards, G; Barra, V; Kausel, G

    2002-09-01

    We examined glandular kallikrein (GK), a putative prolactin processing protease, in the teleost Cyprinus carpio. When employing an anti-Centropristis striata GK antibody proteins of 39 kDa in muscle, 52 kDa in gill, 52 kDa in kidney, and two proteins of 46 and 72 kDa in pituitary gland were detected. Immunoreactive kallikreins were recognized in intermuscle cell tissue, epithelial gill cells, apical region of tubular cells, and prolactin producing lactotrophs in pituitary gland, suggesting a osmoregulatory role for this enzyme. We found three prolactin (PRL) variants using anti-tilapia PRL antibodies, in pituitary gland 23 and 16 kDa, and in plasma 23 and 22 kDa forms. Clearly co-localization of GK and PRL in lactotrophs could be demonstrated. In winter-acclimatized male carp, where the pituitary PRL level is low, 17beta-estradiol treatment increased PRL but not GK immunoreactivity. In contrast to GK and PRL co-regulation by estrogen in mammalian pituitary gland, no similar effect on immunoreactive PRL and GK was observed in the ichtyc pituitary. No changes in GK immunostaining occurred in gill or muscle tissue in response to estrogen treatment. These results, taken with the observation of significantly increased GK immunoreactivity in the apical region of kidney tubular cells in estrogen treated male carp, indicate that the regulation of GK expression in pituitary and kidney could be different in fish with respect to mammals. PMID:12392686

  2. Toward the first class of suicide inhibitors of kallikreins involved in skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao; Soualmia, Feryel; Furio, Laetitia; Renard, Jean-François; Kempen, Isabelle; Qin, Lixian; Pagano, Maurice; Pirotte, Bernard; El Amri, Chahrazade; Hovnanian, Alain; Reboud-Ravaux, Michèle

    2015-01-22

    The inhibition of kallikreins 5 and 7, and possibly kallikrein 14 and matriptase, (that initiates the kallikrein proteolytic cascade) constitutes an innovative way to treat some skin diseases such as Netherton syndrome. We present here the inhibitory properties of coumarin-3-carboxylate derivatives against these enzymes. Our small collection of these versatile organic compounds was enriched by newly synthesized derivatives in order to obtain molecules selective against one, two, three enzymes or acting on the four ones. We evidenced a series of compounds with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. A suicide mechanism was observed against kallikrein 7 whereas the inactivation was either definitive (suicide type) or transient for kallikreins 5 and 14, and matriptase. Most of these potent inhibitors were devoid of cytotoxicity toward healthy human keratinocytes. In situ zymography investigations on skin sections from human kallikrein 5 transgenic mouse revealed significant reduction of the global proteolytic activity by several compounds. PMID:25489658

  3. Involvement of Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Normal and Pathologic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Ana Carolina B.; da Cunha, Bianca Rodrigues; Henrique, Tiago; Tajara, Eloiza H.

    2015-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a subgroup of serine proteases that participate in proteolytic pathways and control protein levels in normal physiology as well as in several pathological conditions. Their complex network of stimulatory and inhibitory interactions may induce inflammatory and immune responses and contribute to the neoplastic phenotype through the regulation of several cellular processes, such as proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. This family of proteases, which includes one of the most useful cancer biomarkers, kallikrein-related peptidase 3 or PSA, also has a protective effect against cancer promoting apoptosis or counteracting angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Therefore, they represent attractive therapeutic targets and may have important applications in clinical oncology. Despite being intensively studied, many gaps in our knowledge on several molecular aspects of KLK functions still exist. This review aims to summarize recent data on their involvement in different processes related to health and disease, in particular those directly or indirectly linked to the neoplastic process. PMID:26783378

  4. 1,2,4-Triazole derivatives as transient inactivators of kallikreins involved in skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao; Furio, Laetitia; Reboud-Ravaux, Michèle; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Hovnanian, Alain; El Amri, Chahrazade

    2013-08-15

    We describe here 1,2,4-triazoles derivatives identified as transient inactivators acting at the nanomolar level on human kallikreins (hK5, hK7 and hK14) and matriptase. Both the nature of the targeted enzymes and structural variations of the inhibitors influence the life-times of acyl-enzymes. These nonpeptidic, transient and low-molecular-weight inhibitors were found to be noncytotoxic against healthy human keratinocytes. These molecules may be useful to counteract dysregulated proteolytic cascades observed in dermatological disorders such as Netherton syndrome. PMID:23849879

  5. Involvement of Kallikrein-Kinin System on Cardiopulmonary Alterations and Inflammatory Response Induced by Purified Aah I Toxin from Scorpion Venom.

    PubMed

    Medjadba, Wafa; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2016-02-01

    Bradykinins are released from kininogen by kallikrein. They increase capillary lung permeability after their binding to β1 and especially β2 receptors before being metabolized by kininase enzyme. This study was performed to evaluate cardiopulmonary damages and inflammatory response on injected rats with Aah I toxin of scorpion venom and the involvement of Kallikrein-Kinin system in this pathogenesis. Obtained results revealed that Aah I toxin induces inflammatory cell infiltration accompanied by cellular peroxidase activities, a release of cytokine levels, pulmonary and myocardial damage, with altered metabolic activities and imbalanced redox status. Administration of aprotinin (bradykinin inhibitor) and especially icatibant (bradykinin β2 receptor antagonist) seemed to be able to protect animals against the toxicity of Aah I; nevertheless, the use of captopril (kininase II inhibitor) reduced partially some cardiac disorders. These findings indicate that the kallikrein-kinin system may contribute to the physiopathological effect and lung edema formation induced by toxin, which suggests a potential use of drugs with significant anti-kinin properties. PMID:26361946

  6. α2 Integrin-Dependent Suppression of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell Invasion Involves Ectodomain Regulation of Kallikrein-Related Peptidase-5

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yao; Marzan, David; Lin, Grace; Goodison, Steve; Silletti, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrate that the α2-integrin (α2) mediates pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell interactions with collagens. We found that while well-differentiated cells use α2 exclusively to adhere and migrate on collagenI, poorly differentiated PDAC cells demonstrate reduced reliance on, or complete loss of, α2. Since well-differentiated PDAC lines exhibit reduced in vitro invasion and α2-blockade suppressed invasion of well-differentiated lines exclusively, we hypothesized that α2 may suppress the malignant phenotype in PDAC. Accordingly, ectopic expression of α2 retarded in vitro invasion and maintenance on collagenI exacerbated this effect. Affymetrix profiling revealed that kallikrein-related peptidase-5 (KLK5) was specifically upregulated by α2, and reduced α2 and KLK5 expression was observed in poorly differentiated PDAC cells in situ. Accordingly, well-differentiated PDAC lines express KLK5, and KLK5 blockade increased the invasion of KLK5-positive lines. The α2-cytoplasmic domain was dispensable for these effects, demonstrating that the α2-ectodomain and KLK5 coordinately regulate a less invasive phenotype in PDAC. PMID:22203845

  7. Kallikrein-related peptidase-8 (KLK8) is an active serine protease in human epidermis and sweat and is involved in a skin barrier proteolytic cascade.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Azza; Amodeo, Vanessa; Smith, Christopher R; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2011-01-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase-8 (KLK8) is a relatively uncharacterized epidermal protease. Although proposed to regulate skin-barrier desquamation and recovery, the catalytic activity of KLK8 was never demonstrated in human epidermis, and its regulators and targets remain unknown. Herein, we elucidated for the first time KLK8 activity in human non-palmoplantar stratum corneum and sweat ex vivo. The majority of stratum corneum and sweat KLK8 was catalytically active, displaying optimal activity at pH 8.5 and considerable activity at pH 5. We also showed that KLK8 is a keratinocyte-specific protease, not secreted by human melanocytes or dermal fibroblasts. KLK8 secretion increased significantly upon calcium induction of terminal keratinocyte differentiation, suggesting an active role for this protease in upper epidermis. Potential activators, regulators, and targets of KLK8 activity were identified by in vitro kinetic assays using pro-KLK8 and mature KLK8 recombinant proteins produced in Pichia pastoris. Mature KLK8 activity was enhanced by calcium and magnesium ions and attenuated by zinc ions and by autocleavage after Arg(164). Upon screening KLK8 cleavage of a library of FRET-quenched peptides, trypsin-like specificity was observed with the highest preference for (R/K)(S/T)(A/V) at P1-P1'-P2'. We also demonstrated that KLK5 and lysyl endopeptidase activate latent pro-KLK8, whereas active KLK8 targets pro-KLK11, pro-KLK1, and LL-37 antimicrobial peptide activation in vitro. Together, our data identify KLK8 as a new active serine protease in human stratum corneum and sweat, and we propose regulators and targets that augment its involvement in a skin barrier proteolytic cascade. The implications of KLK8 elevation and hyperactivity in desquamatory and inflammatory skin disease conditions remain to be studied. PMID:20940292

  8. Human plasma kallikrein releases neutrophil elastase during blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kucich, U; James, H L; Scott, C F; Schapira, M; Zimmerman, M; Cohen, A B; Colman, R W

    1983-01-01

    Elastase is released from human neutrophils during the early events of blood coagulation. Human plasma kallikrein has been shown to stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis, aggregation, and oxygen consumption. Therefore, the ability of kallikrein to release neutrophil elastase was investigated. Neutrophils were isolated by dextran sedimentation, and elastase release was measured by both an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an enzymatic assay using t-butoxy-carbonyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-amino methyl coumarin as the substrate. Kallikrein, 0.1-1.0 U/ml, (0.045-0.45 microM), was incubated with neutrophils that were preincubated with cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/ml). The release of elastase was found to be proportional to the kallikrein concentration. Kallikrein released a maximum of 34% of the total elastase content, as measured by solubilizing the neutrophils in the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. A series of experiments was carried out to determine if kallikrein was a major enzyme involved in neutrophil elastase release during blood coagulation. When 10 million neutrophils were incubated in 1 ml of normal plasma in the presence of 30 mM CaCl2 for 90 min, 2.75 micrograms of elastase was released. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in prekallikrein-deficient or Factor XII-deficient plasma released less than half of the elastase, as compared with normal plasma. The addition of purified prekallikrein to prekallikrein-deficient plasma restored neutrophil elastase release to normal levels. Moreover, release of elastase was enhanced in plasma deficient in C1-inhibitor, the major plasma inhibitor of kallikrein. This release was not dependent upon further steps in the coagulation pathway, or on C5a, since levels of elastase, released in Factor XI- or C5-deficient plasma, were similar to that in normal plasma, and an antibody to C5 failed to inhibit elastase release. These data suggest that kallikrein may be a major enzyme responsible for the release of elastase during blood

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human kallikrein 7, a serine protease of the multigene kallikrein family

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, Israel S.; Ständker, Ludger; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2007-08-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant human kallikrein 7, directly synthesized in the active form in E. coli, is described. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution from native crystals. Human kallikreins are a group of serine proteases of high sequence homology whose genes are grouped as a single cluster at chromosome 19. Although the physiological roles of kallikreins are generally still unknown, members of the kallikrein family have been clearly implicated in pathological situations such as cancer and psoriasis. Human kallikrein 7 (hK7) has been shown to be involved in pathological keratinization, psoriasis and ovarian cancer. In order to gain insight into the molecular structure of this protein, hK7 was crystallized after recombinant production in its folded and active form using a periplasmic secretion vector in Escherichia coli. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group H32 and diffracted to 2.8 Å. The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement using the mouse kallikrein-related protein neuropsin. Completion of the model and structure refinement are under way.

  10. Evidence for the involvement of a plasma kallikrein-kinin system in the immediate hypotension produced by endotoxin in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Katori, M.; Majima, M.; Odoi-Adome, R.; Sunahara, N.; Uchida, Y.

    1989-01-01

    1. In vitro incubation of normal rat plasma with endotoxin from E. coli (3-10 mg ml-1) in the incubation mixture) caused a dose-dependent increase in levels of free kinin and plasma kallikrein in the presence of o-phenanthroline, together with a mirror-image, dose-dependent decrease in the residual levels of the precursors, plasma prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen. Low-molecular-weight kininogen levels were not modified. 2. Intravenous injection of endotoxin (3-30 mg kg-1) into the femoral vein of anaesthetized rats resulted in dose-dependent hypotension. In blood collected up to 15 min after injection, the levels of prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen in plasma were decreased while levels of the active forms, plasma kallikrein and free kinin, showed a transient increase in the blood 1 min after administration of endotoxin. 3. A degradation product of bradykinin, des-Phe8-Arg9-bradykinin, as measured by a newly developed enzyme immunoassay, was detectable up to 5 min after administration of endotoxin. 4. Intravenous infusion of soybean trypsin inhibitor inhibited both the formation of bradykinin and des-Phe8-Arg9-bradykinin and the initial hypotension. 5. It can be concluded from our results that plasma prekallikrein is activated in the blood immediately after administration of endotoxin to rats and that bradykinin is a major cause of the immediate hypotension. PMID:2692754

  11. Evolutionary History of Tissue Kallikreins

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Pampalakis, Georgios; Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Sotiropoulou, Georgia

    2010-01-01

    The gene family of human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) encodes proteins with diverse and pleiotropic functions in normal physiology as well as in disease states. Currently, the most widely known KLK is KLK3 or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that has applications in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of prostate cancer. The KLK gene family encompasses the largest contiguous cluster of serine proteases in humans which is not interrupted by non-KLK genes. This exceptional and unique characteristic of KLKs makes them ideal for evolutionary studies aiming to infer the direction and timing of gene duplication events. Previous studies on the evolution of KLKs were restricted to mammals and the emergence of KLKs was suggested about 150 million years ago (mya). In order to elucidate the evolutionary history of KLKs, we performed comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of KLK homologous proteins in multiple genomes including those that have been completed recently. Interestingly, we were able to identify novel reptilian, avian and amphibian KLK members which allowed us to trace the emergence of KLKs 330 mya. We suggest that a series of duplication and mutation events gave rise to the KLK gene family. The prominent feature of the KLK family is that it consists of tandemly and uninterruptedly arrayed genes in all species under investigation. The chromosomal co-localization in a single cluster distinguishes KLKs from trypsin and other trypsin-like proteases which are spread in different genetic loci. All the defining features of the KLKs were further found to be conserved in the novel KLK protein sequences. The study of this unique family will further assist in selecting new model organisms for functional studies of proteolytic pathways involving KLKs. PMID:21072173

  12. Inhibitors of Kallikrein in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, David J.

    1972-01-01

    Human plasma was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration to determine which method would give the greatest number of clearly separable kallikrein inhibitory peaks. With G-200 gel filtration three peaks could be separated which were demonstrated to contain α2-macroglobulin, C1̄ inactivator, and α1-antitrypsin. No other kallikrein inhibitors could be identified. The fractions containing C1̄ inactivator and α2-macroglobulin appeared to be more effective against kallikrein than that containing α1-antitrypsin. A patient with hereditary angioneurotic edema was shown to have an abnormal C1̄ inactivator protein capable of interfering with kallikrein's biologic, but not its esterolytic activity. Heat-treated human plasma, a commonly used source of kininogen for experiments with kallikrein, was shown to have kallikrein inhibitory activity. PMID:4113391

  13. The kallikrein-kinin system in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Menakshi; Pouliot, Mylène; Couture, Réjean; Vaucher, Elvire

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major microvascular complication associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can lead to visual impairment and blindness. Current treatment strategies for DR are mostly limited to laser therapies, steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, which are often associated with unwanted side effects leading to further complications. Recent evidence suggests that kinins play a primary role in the development of DR through enhanced vascular permeability, leukocytes infiltration, and other inflammatory mechanisms. These deleterious effects are mediated by kinin B1 and B2 receptors, which are expressed in diabetic human and rodent retina. Importantly, kinin B1 receptor is virtually absent in sane tissue, yet it is induced and upregulated in diabetic retina. These peptides belong to the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS), which contains two separate and independent pathways of regulated serine proteases, namely plasma kallikrein (PK) and tissue kallikrein (TK) that are involved in the biosynthesis of bradykinin (BK) and kallidin (Lys-BK), respectively. Hence, ocular inhibition of kallikreins or antagonism of kinin receptors offers new therapeutic avenues in the treatment and management of DR. Herein, we present an overview of the principal features and known inflammatory mechanisms associated with DR along with the current therapeutic approaches and put special emphasis on the KKS as a new and promising therapeutic target due to its link with key pathways directly associated with the development of DR. PMID:25130041

  14. 4-Kallikrein Test and Kallikrein Markers in Prostate Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michelle L; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2016-02-01

    A preponderance of clinical evidence supports a significant public health benefit for prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening and early detection of prostate cancer in appropriately counseled and selected men. Population-based screening with PSA decreases prostate cancer mortality; however, because of relatively poor specificity, PSA-based screening may also increase the detection of clinically insignificant cancers that would otherwise never require treatment. Use of newer biomarkers that increase the specificity for prostate cancer detection may aid in risk stratification and the appropriate identification of men for prostate biopsy. The authors review the 4-kallikrein panel and 4K probability score. PMID:26614027

  15. On the mechanism of rat uterus desensitization to kallikrein.

    PubMed

    Heneine, I F; Feitosa, M H; Beraldo, W T; Oliveira, G M; Pesquero, J L

    1992-01-01

    An inactive form of kallikrein prepared by iodination with cold iodine, did not show any enzymatic or oxytocic action. However, a competitive pattern between this inactive and active kallikrein was observed in rat uterus preparation: When the inactive form was applied several times in the muscle, a single dose of active kallikrein was unable to cause contraction, but a double dose elicited a response. The rhythmic movement caused by a singular dose of active kallikrein, had its time curtailed by adding the inactive kallikrein to the bath. The inactive kallikrein did not interfere with bradykinin activity. PMID:1462820

  16. Crystal structure of recombinant human tissue kallikrein at 2.0 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, B. A.; Liu, B.; Barnes, M.; Springman, E. B.

    1998-01-01

    Human tissue kallikrein, a trypsin-like serine protease involved in blood pressure regulation and inflammation processes, was expressed in a deglycosylated form at high levels in Pichia pastoris, purified, and crystallized. The crystal structure at 2.0 A resolution is described and compared with that of porcine kallikrein and of other trypsin-like proteases. The active and S1 sites (nomenclature of Schechter I, Berger A, 1967, Biochem Biophys Res Commun 27:157-162) are similar to those of porcine kallikrein. Compared to trypsin, the S1 site is enlarged owing to the insertion of an additional residue, cis-Pro 219. The replacement Tyr 228 --> Ala further enlarges the S1 pocket. However, the replacement of Gly 226 in trypsin with Ser in human tissue kallikrein restricts accessibility of substrates and inhibitors to Asp 189 at the base of the S1 pocket; there is a hydrogen bond between O delta1Asp189 and O gammaSer226. These changes in the architecture of the S1 site perturb the binding of inhibitors or substrates from the modes determined or inferred for trypsin. The crystal structure gives insight into the structural differences responsible for changes in specificity in human tissue kallikrein compared with other trypsin-like proteases, and into the structural basis for the unusual specificity of human tissue kallikrein in cleaving both an Arg-Ser and a Met-Lys peptide bond in its natural protein substrate, kininogen. A Zn+2-dependent, small-molecule competitive inhibitor of kallikrein (Ki = 3.3 microM) has been identified and the bound structure modeled to guide drug design. PMID:9568894

  17. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human renal kallikrein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.A.; Yun, Z.X.; Close, J.A.; Tregear, G.W.; Kitamura, N.; Nakanish, S.; Callen, D.F.; Baker, E.; Hyland, V.J.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I.

    1988-05-03

    Glandular kallikreins are a family of proteases encoded by a variable number of genes in different mammalian species. In all species examined, however, one particular kallikrein is functionally conserved in its capacity to release the vasoactive peptide, Lys-bradykinin, from low molecular weight kininogen. This kallikrein is found in the kidney, pancreas, and salivary gland, showing a unique pattern of tissue-specific expression relative to other members of the family. The authors have isolated a genomic clone carrying the human renal kallikrein gene and compared the nucleotide sequence of its promoter region with those of the mouse renal kallikrein gene and another mouse kallikrein gene expressed in a distinct cell type. They find four sequence elements conserved between renal kallikrein genes from the two species. They have also shown that the human gene is localized to 19q13, a position analogous to that of the kallikrein gene family on mouse chromosome 7.

  18. Kallikrein gene downregulation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yousef, G M; Yacoub, G M; Polymeris, M-E; Popalis, C; Soosaipillai, A; Diamandis, E P

    2004-01-12

    Recent evidence suggests that many members of the human kallikrein gene family are differentially regulated in breast cancer and other endocrine-related malignancies. In this study, we utilised the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and expressed sequence tag (EST) databases of the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) to perform in silico analyses of the expression pattern of the 15 human kallikrein genes in normal and cancerous breast tissues and cell lines using different analytical tools such as Virtual Northern blotting, Digital Differential Display and X-profiler. Our results indicate that at least four kallikrein genes (KLK5, 6, 8, 10) are downregulated in breast cancer. Probing eight normal and 24 breast cancer SAGE libraries with gene-specific tags for each of the above kallikreins indicated moderate-to-high expression densities in normal breast (27-319 tags per million; tpm, in two to five out of eight libraries), compared to no or low expression (0 - 34 tpm in zero to two libraries out of 24) in breast cancer. These data were verified by screening the EST databases, where all mRNA clones isolated for these genes, except for one in each, were from normal breast libraries, with no clones detected from breast cancer tissues or cell lines (with the exception of KLK8). X-profiler comparison of two pools of normal and breast cancer libraries further verified the presence of significant downregulation of expression levels of 4 of the kallikreins genes (KLK5, 6, 10, 12). We experimentally verified the downregulation of these four kallikreins (KLK5, 6, 8, 10 and 12) by RT - PCR analysis. PMID:14710225

  19. Separation of Plasma Thromboplastin Antecedent from Kallikrein by the Plasma α2-Macroglobulin, Kallikrein Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, Peter C.

    1971-01-01

    Plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA, factor XI) is an important intermediate in the intrinsic coagulation system, and plasma kallikrein has been implicated as a mediator of the inflammatory process. Whereas their biologic activities are functionally distinct, their identity as separate entities in plasma has not been fully established, and the nature of their plasma inhibitors has not been completely characterized. A partially purified preparation containing the clotting, tosyl arginine methyl ester (TAMe) esterase and kinin-producing activities of these substances has been prepared by DEAE-cellulose chromatography of a Celite eluate obtained from acid-treated human plasma. These activities were not separable by acrylamide gel electrophoresis nor by isoelectric focusing, their pI being approximately 8.7. Human plasma α2-macroglobulin has been shown to inhibit the proteolytic activity of kallikrein and to inhibit partially its TAMe esterase activity. An α2-macroglobulin, PTA, kallikrein incubation mixture was separated by gel filtration chromatography. The α2-macroglobulin formed a high molecular weight complex with kallikrein and appeared in early chromatographic fractions. The PTA-clotting activity was not inhibited by the α2-macroglobulin; 64% of the initial PTA activity was isolated in later fractions free of kallikrein-induced kinin-like activity. In contrast, clotting, TAMe esterase, and kinin-forming activities were inhibited after gel filtration chromatography of an incubation mixture of these activities and partially purified C1̄ inactivator (C1 esterase inhibitor). Electrofocusing of an incubation mixture of an activated PTA, kallikrein preparation, and α2-macroglobulin resulted in the isolation of a PTA fraction free of kallikrein proteolytic activity, and with 4% of the original TAMe esterase activity. In this manner, activated PTA and plasma kallikrein have been shown to be distinct substances, and methods have been introduced for the further

  20. Renal kallikrein in chronic hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Chen, L W; Chien, C T; Wu, M S; Tsai, T J

    1996-09-01

    1. We have studied the role of kallikrein (KK) in the maintenance of renal function in chronic hypoxic rats (high altitude; HA), compared with control rats kept at sea level (SL). Hypoxia was induced by placing female Wistar rats (198-290 g) in an altitude chamber (5500 m) 15 h/day for 4 weeks. Experiments were also conducted to study the interaction of KK with renal nerve activity and endothelin (ET), two parameters previously shown to be altered in this model. 2. It was found that renal cortex tissue KK activity (TKA) was not significantly different in 10 SL and 10 HA rats. However, the urinary KK activity (UKA) was reduced nearly to half (from 35.2 +/- 4.6 to 18.5 +/- 1.7 pkat/min) in HA rats after 4 weeks of chronic hypoxia. 3. Acute renal denervated diuresis was accompanied by a significant increase in UKA (from 9 +/- 2 to 14 +/- 2 pkat/min in HA and denervated HA rats, respectively; P < 0.05) in HA rats. Intrarenal arterial pretreatment of aprotinin reduced the denervated diuresis. 4. Endothelin (600 ng/kg per h) reduced urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion in the ipsilateral kidney in another 10 SL and 10 HA rats. The extent of the drop of these parameters was significantly less in HA rats. Urinary KK activity was correlated significantly with the measured renal functional parameters (r ranging from 0.472 to 0.612) in SL rats, but was insignificant in HA rats (r ranging from 0.032 to 0.192). 5. We have demonstrated that chronic exposure to hypoxia decreases urinary KK excretion and that KK is involved in acute renal denervated diuresis generated in these animals. The present study suggests that KK plays a partial role in the maintenance of renal function in chronic hypoxic rats. PMID:8911720

  1. Kallikrein-kinin system in the plasma of snakes.

    PubMed

    Picarelli, Z P; Prezoto, B C; Hiraichi, E; Abdalla, F M

    1992-01-01

    Using pharmacological preparations suitable for assay of mammalian kinins, it was shown that Bothrops jararaca (Bj) venom and other kininogenases were unable to release kinins from snake plasma. The kallikrein-kinin system presents species-specificity in birds. In order to detect such a specificity in snakes, the effects of Bj venom on snake blood pressure and the effect of incubates of snake plasma with trypsin, on snake blood pressure and snake uterus, were studied. The possibility of activating snake plasma kallikrein with ellagic acid, glass beads or kaolin was also investigated. Whereas plasma of the snakes Waglerophis merremii (Wm) and Crotalus durissus (Cd), were shown to contain factor XII, prekallikrein, kininogen, kininases and to present a low but definite activation rate of the kinin system, the plasmas of Bj, Bothrops mojeni (Bm) and Oxyrophus trigeminus (Ot), yielded only kininogen and kininases. Activation of the system was not even detected by the sensitive substrate Ac-Phe-Arg-Nan (acetyl-phenylalanyl-arginyl-4nitro-anilide), indicating that the plasma of these species does not possess either factor XII and/or prekallikrein. Snake plasma may constitute an interesting model for the study of blood clotting, fibrinolytic and complement systems. PMID:1609651

  2. Plasma Kallikrein Inhibitors in Cardiovascular Disease: An Innovative Therapeutic Approach.

    PubMed

    Kolte, Dhaval; Shariat-Madar, Zia

    2016-01-01

    Plasma prekallikrein is the liver-derived precursor of the trypsin-like serine protease plasma kallikrein, and circulates in plasma bound to high molecular weight kininogen. Plasma prekallikrein is activated to plasma kallikrein by activated factor XII or prolylcarboxypeptidase. Plasma kallikrein regulates the activity of multiple proteolytic cascades in the cardiovascular system such as the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, the kallikrein-kinin system, the fibrinolytic system, the renin-angiotensin system, and the complement pathways. As such, plasma kallikrein plays a central role in the pathogenesis of thrombosis, inflammation, and blood pressure regulation. Under physiological conditions, plasma kallikrein serves as a cardioprotective enzyme. However, its increased plasma concentration or hyperactivity perpetuates cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this article, we review the biochemistry and cell biology of plasma kallikrein and summarize data from preclinical and clinical studies that have established important functions of this serine protease in CVD states. Finally, we propose plasma kallikrein inhibitors as a novel class of drugs with potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of CVDs. PMID:25853524

  3. Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) and the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Filippou, Panagiota S; Karagiannis, George S; Musrap, Natasha; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2016-08-01

    The kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent the largest family of serine proteases within the human genome and are expressed in various tissues. Although they regulate several important physiological functions, KLKs have also been implicated in numerous pathophysiological processes, including cancer. Growing evidence describing the deregulation of KLK expression and secretion, as well as activation in various malignancies, has uncovered their potential as mediators of cancer progression, biomarkers of disease and as candidate therapeutic targets. The diversity of signalling pathways and proteolytic cascades involving KLKs and their downstream targets appears to affect cancer biology through multiple mechanisms, including those related to the hallmarks of cancer. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the importance of KLK-driven molecular pathways in relation to cancer cell traits associated with the hallmarks of cancer and to highlight their potential in personalized therapeutics. PMID:26886390

  4. Evidence suggesting possible SCA1 gene involvement in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.R.; Wange, S.; Sun, C.

    1994-09-01

    Several findings suggest a possible role for the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p in some cases of schizophrenia. First, linkage analyses in Irish pedigrees provided LOD scores up to 3.0 for one model tested using microsatellites closely linked to SCA1. Reanalysis of these data using affected sibpair methods yielded a significant result (p = 0.01) for one marker. An attempt to replicate this linkage finding was made using 44 NIMH families (206 individuals, 80 affected) and 12 Utah families (120 individuals, 49 affected). LOD scores were negative in these new families, even allowing for heterogeneity, as were results using affected sibpair methods. However, one Utah family provided a LOD score of 1.3. We also screened the SCA1 trinucleotide repeat to search for expansions characteristic of this disorder in these families and in 38 additional unrelated schizophrenics. We found 1 schizophrenic with 41 repeats, which is substantially larger than the maximum size of 36 repeats observed in previous studies of several hundred controls. We are now assessing whether the distribution of SCA1 repeats differs significantly in schizophrenia versus controls. Recent reports suggest possible anticipation in schizophrenia (also characteristic of SCA1) and a few cases of psychiatric symptoms suggesting schizophrenia have been observed in the highly related disorder DRPLA (SCA2), which is also based on trinucleotide repeat expansion. These findings suggest that further investigations of this gene and chromosome region may be a priority.

  5. Various Possible Toxicants Involved in Thyroid Dysfunction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Jagminder K; Salwan, Poonam; Salwan, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    About 300 million people across the world suffer from thyroid gland dysfunction. Environmental factors play an important role in causation of autoimmune thyroid diseases in susceptible individuals. Genetics contributes to 70% of the risk. In order to reduce the risk, we need to understand the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk due to positive family history. The ideal study to see the impact of a thyroid toxicant consists of directly measuring the degree of exposure to toxicant in an individual with his thyroid status. Knowledge of various factors influencing thyroid dysfunction can help in interpreting the results of such studies in a better way. This article is an attempt to highlight the various possible toxicants affecting thyroid function so that adequate measures can be undertaken to control excessive exposure in future to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders. PMID:26894086

  6. Various Possible Toxicants Involved in Thyroid Dysfunction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jagminder K.; Salwan, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    About 300 million people across the world suffer from thyroid gland dysfunction. Environmental factors play an important role in causation of autoimmune thyroid diseases in susceptible individuals. Genetics contributes to 70% of the risk. In order to reduce the risk, we need to understand the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk due to positive family history. The ideal study to see the impact of a thyroid toxicant consists of directly measuring the degree of exposure to toxicant in an individual with his thyroid status. Knowledge of various factors influencing thyroid dysfunction can help in interpreting the results of such studies in a better way. This article is an attempt to highlight the various possible toxicants affecting thyroid function so that adequate measures can be undertaken to control excessive exposure in future to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders. PMID:26894086

  7. Prekallikein and kallikrein inhibitor in liver cirrhosis and hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Faciullacci, M; Galli, P; Monetti, M G; Pela, I; Del Bianco, P L

    1976-01-01

    Plasma prekallikrein (kallikreinogen) and kallikrein inhibitor, assayed with the kaolin activable esterase method, have been evaluated in 20 patients with hepatic cirrhosis, in 12 cases with jaundice from acute viral hepatitis, and in 9 normal. A significant reduction of the plasma prekallikrein in cirrhosis has been found. A lowering of plasma prekallikrein has also been observed in viral hepatitis; in this condition, however, the modifications were less important than those obtained in cirrhosis. In three cases of hepatitis, the behaviour of the plasma prekallikrein and kallikrein inhibitor have been controlled during the period of the disease and compared with the behaviour of some conventional parameters, such as serum transaminases and bilirubin. An important increase of the prekallikrein level has been observed during the improvement of hepatitis. These data confirm the implication of the prekallikrein-kallikrein system in severe liver diseases, and indirectly points out the role of the liver in maintaining the physiological balance of the kallikrein system. PMID:1084679

  8. Husband and wife with sarcoidosis: possible environmental factors involved

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous multisystem disorder of unclear etiology that involves any organ, most commonly the lung and the lymph nodes. It is hypothesized that the disease derives from the interaction between single or multiple environmental factors and genetically determined host factors. Multiple potential etiologic agents for sarcoidosis have been proposed without any definitive demonstration of causality. We report the case of two patients, husband (57 years old) and wife (55 years old), both suffering from sarcoidosis. They underwent a lymph node biopsy by mediastinoscopy which showed a “granulomatous epithelioid giant cell non-necrotising chronic lymphadenitis”. They had lived up to 3 years ago in the country in a farm, in contact with organic dusts, animals such as dogs, chickens, rabbits, pigeons; now they have lived since about 3 years in an urban area where there are numerous chemical industries and stone quarries. The aim of this case report was to focus on environmental factors that might be related to the pathogenesis of the sarcoidosis. PMID:23351275

  9. Pre-stimulation of the kallikrein system in cisplatin-induced acute renal injury: An approach to renoprotection

    SciTech Connect

    Aburto, Andrés; Barría, Agustín; Cárdenas, Areli; Carpio, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos D.; Burgos, Maria E.; Ardiles, Leopoldo

    2014-10-15

    Antineoplastic treatment with cisplatin is frequently complicated by nephrotoxicity. Although oxidative stress may be involved, the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for renal damage have not been completely clarified. In order to investigate the role of the renal kinin system in this condition, a group of rats was submitted to high potassium diet to stimulate the synthesis and excretion of tissue kallikrein 1 (rKLK1) previous to an intraperitoneal injection of 7 mg/kg cisplatin. A significant reduction in lipoperoxidation, evidenced by urinary excretion of malondialdehyde and renal immunostaining of hidroxy-nonenal, was accompanied by a decline in apoptosis. Coincident with these findings we observed a reduction in the expression of renal KIM-1 suggesting that renoprotection may be occurring. Stimulation or indemnity of the renal kinin system deserves to be evaluated as a complementary pharmacological measure to diminish cisplatin nephrotoxicity. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced-renal damage have not been completely clarified. • Cisplatin induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. • The renal kallikrein-kinin system is protective in experimental acute renal damage. • Kallikrein stimulation reduces oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by cisplatin. • Protection of the kallikrein-kinin system may reduce cisplatin toxicity.

  10. Myeloperoxidase Interacts with Endothelial Cell-Surface Cytokeratin 1 and Modulates Bradykinin Production by the Plasma Kallikrein-Kinin System

    PubMed Central

    Astern, Joshua M.; Pendergraft, William F.; Falk, Ronald J.; Jennette, J. Charles; Schmaier, Alvin H.; Mahdi, Fakhri; Preston, Gloria A.

    2007-01-01

    During an inflammatory state, functional myeloperoxidase (MPO) is released into the vessel as a result of intravascular neutrophil degradation. One mechanism of resulting cellular injury involves endothelial internalization of MPO, which causes oxidative damage and impairs endothelial signaling. We report the discovery of a protein that facilitates MPO internalization, cytokeratin 1 (CK1), identified using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry. CK1 interacts with MPO in vitro, even in the presence of 100% human plasma, thus substantiating biological relevance. Immunofluorescent microscopy confirmed that MPO added to endothelial cells can co-localize with endogenously expressed CK1. CK1 acts as a scaffolding protein for the assembly of the vasoregulatory plasma kallikrein-kinin system; thus we explored whether MPO and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) reside on CK1 together or whether they compete for binding. The data support cooperative binding of MPO and HK on cells such that MPO masked the plasma kallikrein cleavage site on HK, and MPO-generated oxidants caused inactivation of both HK and kallikrein. Collectively, interactions between MPO and the components of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system resulted in decreased bradykinin production. This study identifies CK1 as a facilitator of MPO-mediated vascular responses and thus provides a new paradigm by which MPO affects vasoregulatory systems. PMID:17591979

  11. Positive Selection Shaped the Convergent Evolution of Independently Expanded Kallikrein Subfamilies Expressed in Mouse and Rat Saliva Proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Karn, Robert C.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2011-01-01

    We performed proteomics studies of salivas from the genome mouse (C57BL/6 strain) and the genome rat (BN/SsNHsd/Mcwi strain). Our goal was to identify salivary proteins with one or more of three characteristics that may indicate that they have been involved in adaptation: 1) rapid expansion of their gene families; 2) footprints of positive selection; and/or 3) sex-limited expression. The results of our proteomics studies allow direct comparison of the proteins expressed and their levels between the sexes of the two rodent species. Twelve members of the Mus musculus species-specific kallikrein subfamily Klk1b showed sex-limited expression in the mouse saliva proteomes. By contrast, we did not find any of the Rattus norvegicus species-specific kallikrein subfamily Klk1c proteins in male or female genome rat, nor transcripts in their submandibular glands. On the other hand, we detected expression of this family as transcripts in the submandibular glands of both sexes of Sprague-Dawley rats. Using the CODEML program in the PAML package, we demonstrate that the two rodent kallikrein subfamilies have apparently evolved rapidly under the influence of positive selection that continually remodeled the amino acid sites on the same face in the members of the subfamilies. Thus, although their kallikrein subfamily expansions were independent, this evolutionary pattern has occurred in parallel in the two rodent species, suggesting a form of convergent evolution at the molecular level. On the basis of this new data, we suggest that the previous speculative function of the species-specific rodent kallikreins as important solely in wound healing in males be investigated further. In addition to or instead of that function, we propose that their sex-limited expression, coupled with their rapid evolution may be clues to an as-yet-undetermined interaction between the sexes. PMID:21695125

  12. Human plasma kallikrein-kinin system: Physiological and biochemical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, J.W.; Shariat-Madar, z

    2016-01-01

    The plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) plays a critical role in human physiology. The KKS encompasses coagulation factor XII (FXII), the complex of prekallikrein (PK) and high molecular weight kininogen (HK). The conversion of plasma to kallikrein by the activated FXII and in response to numerous different stimuli leads to the generation of bradykinin (BK) and activated HK (HKa, an antiangiogenic peptide). BK is a proinflammatory peptide, a pain mediator and potent vasodilator, leading to robust accumulation of fluid in the interstitium. Systemic production of BK, HKa with the interplay between BK bound-BK receptors and the soluble form of HKa are key to angiogenesis and hemodynamics. KKS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammation, hypertension, endotoxemia, and coagulopathy. In all these cases increased BK levels is the hallmark. In some cases, the persistent production of BK due to the deficiency of the blood protein C1-inhibitor, which controls FXII, is detrimental to the survival of the patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE). In others, the inability of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to degrade BK leads to elevated BK levels and edema in patients on ACE inhibitors. Thus, the mechanisms that interfere with BK liberation or degradation would lead to blood pressure dysfunction. In contrast, anti-kallikrein treatment could have adverse effects in hemodynamic changes induced by vasoconstrictor agents. Genetic models of kallikrein deficiency are needed to evaluate the quantitative role of kallikrein and to validate whether strategies designed to activate or inhibit kallikrein may be important for regulating whole-body BK sensitivity. PMID:19689262

  13. Tissue kallikrein activation of the epithelial Na channel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankit B.; Chao, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial Na Channels (ENaC) are responsible for the apical entry of Na+ in a number of different epithelia including the renal connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct. Proteolytic cleavage of γ-ENaC by serine proteases, including trypsin, furin, elastase, and prostasin, has been shown to increase channel activity. Here, we investigate the ability of another serine protease, tissue kallikrein, to regulate ENaC. We show that excretion of tissue kallikrein, which is secreted into the lumen of the connecting tubule, is stimulated following 5 days of a high-K+ or low-Na+ diet in rats. Urinary proteins reconstituted in a low-Na buffer activated amiloride-sensitive currents (INa) in ENaC-expressing oocytes, suggesting an endogenous urinary protease can activate ENaC. We next tested whether tissue kallikrein can directly cleave and activate ENaC. When rat ENaC-expressing oocytes were exposed to purified tissue kallikrein from rat urine (RTK), ENaC currents increased threefold in both the presence and absence of a soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). RTK and trypsin both decreased the apparent molecular mass of cleaved cell-surface γ-ENaC, while immunodepleted RTK produced no shift in apparent molecular mass, demonstrating the specificity of the tissue kallikrein. A decreased effect of RTK on Xenopus ENaC, which has variations in the putative prostasin cleavage sites in γ-ENaC, suggests these sites are important in RTK activation of ENaC. Mutating the prostasin site in mouse γ-ENaC (γRKRK186QQQQ) abolished ENaC activation and cleavage by RTK while wild-type mouse ENaC was activated and cleaved similar to that of the rat. We conclude that tissue kallikrein can be a physiologically relevant regulator of ENaC activity. PMID:22622459

  14. Vaspin inhibits kallikrein 7 by serpin mechanism.

    PubMed

    Heiker, John T; Klöting, Nora; Kovacs, Peter; Kuettner, E Bartholomeus; Sträter, Norbert; Schultz, Stephan; Kern, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2013-07-01

    The molecular target of the adipokine vaspin (visceral adipose tissue-derived serpin; serpinA12) and its mode of action are unknown. Here, we provide the vaspin crystal structure and identify human kallikrein 7 (hK7) as a first protease target of vaspin inhibited by classical serpin mechanism with high specificity in vitro. We detect vaspin-hK7 complexes in human plasma and find co-expression of both proteins in murine pancreatic β-cells. We further demonstrate that hK7 cleaves human insulin in the A- and B-chain. Vaspin treatment of isolated pancreatic islets leads to increased insulin concentration in the media upon glucose stimulation without influencing insulin secretion. By application of vaspin and generated inactive mutants, we find the significantly improved glucose tolerance in C57BL/6NTac and db/db mice treated with recombinant vaspin fully dependent on the vaspin serpin activity and not related to vaspin-mediated changes in insulin sensitivity as determined by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. Improved glucose metabolism could be mediated by increased insulin plasma concentrations 150 min after a glucose challenge in db/db mice, supporting the hypothesis that vaspin may inhibit insulin degradation by hK7 in the circulation. In conclusion, we demonstrate the inhibitory serpin nature and the first protease target of the adipose tissue-derived serpin vaspin, and our findings suggest hK7 inhibition by vaspin as an underlying physiological mechanism for its compensatory actions on obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:23370777

  15. Identification by in silico and in vitro screenings of small organic molecules acting as reversible inhibitors of kallikreins.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao; Bertonati, Claudia; Qin, Lixian; Furio, Laetitia; El Amri, Chahrazade; Hovnanian, Alain; Reboud-Ravaux, Michèle; Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2013-01-01

    Netherton syndrome is caused by loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 encoding the Kazal-type inhibitor LEKTI-1 leading to dysregulation of proteolytic cascades involving several kallikreins. We used both structure-based and ligand-based virtual screening computations to identify commercially available non-covalent inhibitors of human kallikrein 5 (hK5), a serine protease (trypsin-like) that plays a central role in the initiation of the molecular cascades leading to the Netherton syndrome phenotype. The efficacy and mechanism of inhibition of the identified new families of organic compounds were analyzed not only for hK5 but also on other proteases implicated in the cascades (hK7, hK14 and matriptase). These inhibitors are nontoxic on healthy human keratinocytes and are structurally different from traditional serine protease inhibitors validating their potential utility as initial hits to control proteolytic disorders observed in dermatological pathologies such as Netherton syndrome. PMID:24211642

  16. Prognostic significance of human tissue kallikrein-related peptidases 6 and 10 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolin, David L; Sy, Keiyan; Rotondo, Fabio; Bassily, Mena N; Kovacs, Kalman; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Streutker, Catherine J; Yousef, George M

    2014-09-01

    The prognosis of patients following surgery for gastric cancer is often poor and is estimated using traditional clinicopathological parameters, which can be inaccurate predictors of future survival. Kallikreins are a group of serine proteases, which are differentially expressed in many human tumors and are being investigated as potential cancer biomarkers. This study assessed the prognostic utility of human tissue kallikrein-like peptidases 6 and 10 (KLK6 and KLK10) and correlated their expression with histopathological and clinical parameters in gastric cancer. We constructed a gastric tumor tissue microarray from 113 gastrectomy specimens and quantified KLK6 and KLK10 expression using immunohistochemistry. To overcome the problem of inter-observer variability and subjectivity in immunohistochemistry interpretation, a whole-slide scanned image of the tissue microarray was analyzed using an automated algorithm to quantify staining intensity. KLK6 expression was positively correlated with nodal involvement (p=0.002) and was predictive of advanced-stage disease (p<0.05). Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that tumors expressing high levels of KLK6 were significantly associated with significantly lower overall survival (p=0.04). KLK10 overexpression was also a predictor of advanced-stage disease (p<0.01), but was not significantly correlated with lymph node involvement or survival period. Our results show the potential ability of KLK6 as a prognostic marker for gastric cancer. PMID:25153389

  17. Effects of restriction of sodium or administration of fludrocortisone on parotid salivary kallikrein in man.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, D; Proud, D; Lawton, W J; Yates, K N; Highet, P; Pisano, J J; Keiser, H R

    1982-07-01

    Urinary kallikrein is increased by restriction of dietary sodium and by administration of fludrocortisone, a sodium-retaining steroid. In order to determine whether salivary kallikrein responds similarly, we studied 16 normal volunteers after 1-week periods of daily intake of 9, 109, and 259 mEQ of sodium; 10 subjects were studied after addition of 0.6 mg/day fludrocortisone for a week to a regimen of 109 mEq/day sodium. During sodium restriction, parotid saliva had a significantly higher mean concentration of kallikrein ad potassium and a significantly lower concentration of sodium than during periods of intake of 109 or 259 mEq/day sodium. Sodium restriction also caused significantly higher urinary excretion of kallikrein and aldosterone. Salivary amylase remained unchanged during the three sodium periods. Administration of fludrocortisone significantly increased the mean concentration of parotid kallikrein and excretion of urinary kallikrein in comparison with control levels, however the concentrations of parotid sodium and potassium did not change significantly. Four patients studied before and after removal of aldosterone-producing adenomas each showed decreased concentrations of parotid kallikrein and potassium and increased concentrations of parotid sodium after surgery. It is concluded that both salivary and urinary kallikrein increased in response to restriction of sodium and that these increases were mediated by levels of sodium-retaining steroid. Increased output of kallikrein in response to increased levels of sodium-retaining steroid may be a generalized response of organs that contain glandular kallikrein and can conserve sodium. PMID:6919568

  18. Tissue kallikrein in cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal diseases and skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chao, Julie; Shen, Bo; Gao, Lin; Xia, Chun-Fang; Bledsoe, Grant; Chao, Lee

    2010-04-01

    Tissue kallikrein (KLK1) processes low-molecular weight kininogen to produce vasoactive kinins, which exert biological functions via kinin receptor signaling. Using various delivery approaches, we have demonstrated that tissue kallikrein through kinin B2 receptor signaling exhibits a wide spectrum of beneficial effects by reducing cardiac and renal injuries, restenosis and ischemic stroke, and by promoting angiogenesis and skin wound healing, independent of blood pressure reduction. Protection by tissue kallikrein in oxidative organ damage is attributed to the inhibition of apoptosis, inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Tissue kallikrein also enhances neovascularization in ischemic heart and limb. Moreover, tissue kallikrein/kinin infusion not only prevents but also reverses kidney injury, inflammation and fibrosis in salt-induced hypertensive rats. Furthermore, there is a wide time window for kallikrein administration in protection against ischemic brain infarction, as delayed kallikrein infusion for 24 h after cerebral ischemia in rats is effective in reducing neurological deficits, infarct size, apoptosis and inflammation. Importantly, in the clinical setting, human tissue kallikrein has been proven to be effective in the treatment of patients with acute brain infarction when injected within 48 h after stroke onset. Finally, kallikrein promotes skin wound healing and keratinocyte migration by direct activation of protease-activated receptor 1. PMID:20180644

  19. The Kallikrein-Kinin System as a Regulator of Cardiovascular and Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2015-01-01

    and Brown Norway rats this RFLP cosegregated with an increase in blood pressure. However, humans, rats and mice with a deficiency in one or more components of the kallikrein-kinin-system (KKS) or chronic KKS blockade do not have hypertension. In the kidney, kinins are essential for proper regulation of papillary blood flow and water and sodium excretion. B2-KO mice appear to be more sensitive to the hypertensinogenic effect of salt. Kinins are involved in the acute antihypertensive effects of ACE inhibitors but not their chronic effects (save for mineralocorticoidsalt-induced hypertension). Kinins appear to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and skin inflammation; they act on innate immunity as mediators of inflammation by promoting maturation of dendritic cells, which activate the body’s adaptive immune system and thereby stimulate mechanisms that promote inflammation. On the other hand, kinins acting via NO contribute to the vascular protective effect of ACE inhibitors during neointima formation. In myocardial infarction produced by ischemia/reperfusion, kinins help reduce infarct size following preconditioning or treatment with ACE inhibitors. In heart failure secondary to infarction, the therapeutic effects of ACE inhibitors are partially mediated by kinins via release of NO, while drugs that activate the angiotensin type 2 receptor act in part via kinins and NO. Thus kinins play an important role in regulation of cardiovascular and renal function as well as many of the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors and ARBs on target organ damage in hypertension. PMID:23737209

  20. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. IMPORTANCE Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural

  1. Urinary kallikrein in the rat: stimulation with angiotensin infusion but depression with increasing sodium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, I H; Lee, G; Brownlee, A A

    1994-01-01

    1. The kallikrein response to angiotensin II infusion in the conscious rat was studied to compare it with the response in the dog. 2. Active kallikrein was measured by the aprotinin-suppressible esterase technique in 20 min periods. Angiotensin (5 x 10(-9) to 5 x 10(-2) micrograms min-1) was infused in 10 mM saline in period 10 (group A), or in 90 mM saline in periods 10-12 (group B). 3. In group A, no dose of angiotensin was antinatriuretic. Natriuresis and urinary sodium concentration were dose dependent. 4. Kallikrein excretion was dose dependent with angiotensin (P < 0.0001) and inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration (P = 0.011). In natriuretic and non-natriuretic rats, kallikrein excretion after angiotensin was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period. 5. In group B, natriuresis and urinary sodium concentration were dose dependent. Kallikrein excretion in periods 10-13 was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period (P = 0.0001) and inversely correlated with urinary osmolality in periods 9-13. 6. Infusion of angiotensin II at 5 x 10(-6) micrograms min-1 led to antinatriuresis. 7. Formulae were derived which enabled the opposing effects of angiotensin and urinary sodium concentration on kallikrein excretion to be separated. In group A both these effects were statistically significant only in the natriuretic rats (natriuresis > 20 mumols per period). In group B the formulae showed a dose-dependent rise in kallikrein excretion, which was counteracted by the decrease in kallikrein excretion associated with the increasing urinary sodium concentration. 8. With infusions of 0.9% saline, kallikrein excretion in periods 10-13 was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period (P = 0.001). 9. The overall effect in the rat differs from that in the dog, where kallikrein increases with angiotensin natriuresis and dilution of the urine occurs. PMID

  2. Biochemical characterization of a novel high-affinity and specific plasma kallikrein inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kolte, D; Bryant, JW; Holsworth, D; Wang, J; Akbari, P; Gibson, GW; Shariat-Madar, Z

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Kallikrein acts on high molecular weight kininogen (HK) to generate HKa (cleaved HK) and bradykinin (BK). BK exerts its effects by binding to B2 receptors. The activation of B2 receptors leads to the formation of tissue plasminogen activator, nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI2). An elevated kallikrein-dependent pathway has been linked to cardiovascular disease risk. The aim of this study was to investigate whether our novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor abolishes kallikrein-mediated generation of BK from HK and subsequent BK-induced NO and PGI2 formation, thereby influencing endothelial pathophysiology during chronic inflammatory diseases. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Kinetic analysis was initially used to determine the potency of PF-04886847. Biochemical ligand binding assays, immunological methods and calcium flux studies were used to determine the selectivity of the kallikrein inhibitor. In addition, the effect of PF-04886847 on BK-induced relaxation of the rat aortic ring was determined in a model of lipopolysaccharide-induced tissue inflammation. KEY RESULTS Evidence was obtained in vitro and in situ, indicating that PF-04886847 is a potent and specific inhibitor of plasma kallikrein. PF-04886847 efficiently blocked calcium influx as well as NO and PGI2 formation mediated through the BK-stimulated B2 receptor signalling pathway. PF-04886847 blocked kallikrein-induced endothelial-dependent relaxation of isolated rat aortic rings pre-contracted with phenylephrine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS PF-04886847 was shown to be the most potent small molecule inhibitor of plasma kallikrein yet described; it inhibited kallikrein in isolated aortic rings and cultured endothelial cells. Overall, our results indicate that PF-04886847 would be useful for the treatment of kallikrein-mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:21175583

  3. Location of several putative genes possibly involved in human breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Driouch, K; Briffod, M; Bièche, I; Champème, M H; Lidereau, R

    1998-05-15

    Cancer is a genetic disease resulting from an accumulation of genetic abnormalities in various regulatory genes. Most studies on genetic alterations in human breast cancer have involved primary tumors. The possible involvement of specific tumor suppressor genes in the later stages of cancer progression is poorly documented. We investigated allelic losses associated with breast cancer progression by analyzing 55 polymorphic markers on 11 autosomal chromosomes in a series of 49 relapses (23 local recurrences and 26 distant metastases). All of the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) regions reported in primary breast tumors were frequent in both series of relapses. These results suggest that the allelic losses that are common to the different series of samples occur very early during tumor progression. This study points to candidate metastasis-related genes targeted by LOH on chromosome arms 3p21.3, 16q22.2-23.2, and, possibly, 7q31 but provides no clear evidence of LOH affecting previously described metastasis-related genes such as NME1, MTS1, and TSG101. PMID:9605747

  4. Possible Involvement of Photoperiodic Regulation in Reproductive Endocrine System of Female Olive Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Chi Hoon; Hur, Sung Pyu; Kim, Byeong Hoon; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Young Don

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of female olive flounder. To investigate the influence on brain-pituitary axis in endocrine system by regulating photoperiod, compared expression level of Kisspeptin and sbGnRH mRNA in brain and FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA in pituitary before and after spawning. Photoperiod was treated natural photoperiod and long photoperiod (15L:9D) conditions from Aug. 2013 to Jun. 2014. Continuous long photoperiod treatment from Aug. (post-spawning phase) was inhibited gonadal development of female olive flounder. In natural photoperiod group, the Kiss2 expression level a significant declined in Mar. (spawning period). And also, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels were increasing at this period. However, in long photoperiod group, hypothalamic Kiss2, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels did not show any significant fluctuation. These results suggest that expression of hypothalamic Kiss2, GtH and GH in the pituitary would change in response to photoperiod and their possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of the BPG axis. PMID:25949205

  5. Melatonin in humans: Possible involvement in SIDS, and use in contraceptives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Lynch, Harry J.; Sturner, William Q.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively few tools exist for assessing the possible involvement of melatonin in normal or abnormal physiologlcal and behavioral states. One cannot perform the classic ablation experiment of endocrinologists by cavalierly removing the human's pineal, nor derive the same effect pharmacologically by administering a drug which blocks the actions of the indole on its receptors (because no such drugs, demonstrated to work in humans, exist). About all that can be done is to administer the melatonin and see what happens, or measure its levels in a body fluid and determine whether its temporal patterns track those of the physiological or behavioral variable being examined. The clinical state of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) which apparently is associated with abnormalities in melatonin concentrations within body fluids obtained at autopsy is described. New data which suggest that exogenous melatonin has sufficient antigonadal potency to allow it to replace estrogen and, acting in combination with norethisterone, serve as a useful contraceptive agent is summarized.

  6. Possible involvement of eEF1A in Tomato spotted wilt virus RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Komoda, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Kawamura-Nagaya, Kazue; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2014-11-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is a negative-strand RNA virus in the family Bunyaviridae and propagates in both insects and plants. Although TSWV can infect a wide range of plant species, host factors involved in viral RNA synthesis of TSWV in plants have not been characterized. In this report, we demonstrate that the cell-free extract derived from one of the host plants can activate mRNA transcriptional activity of TSWV. Based on activity-guided fractionation of the cell-free extract, we identified eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF) 1A as a possible host factor facilitating TSWV transcription and replication. The RNA synthesis-supporting activity decreased in the presence of an eEF1A inhibitor, suggesting that eEF1A plays an important role in RNA synthesis of TSWV. PMID:25151062

  7. Review of endocrine disorders associated with environmental toxicants and possible involved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Bahadar, Haji; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are released into environment from different sources. They are mainly used in packaging industries, pesticides and food constituents. Clinical evidence, experimental models, and epidemiological studies suggest that EDC have major risks for human by targeting different organs and systems in the body. Multiple mechanisms are involved in targeting the normal system, through estrogen receptors, nuclear receptors and steroidal receptors activation. In this review, different methods by which xenobiotics stimulate signaling pathways and genetic mutation or DNA methylation have been discussed. These methods help to understand the results of xenobiotic action on the endocrine system. Endocrine disturbances in the human body result in breast cancer, ovarian problems, thyroid eruptions, testicular carcinoma, Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, nerve damage and obesity. EDC characterize a wide class of compounds such as organochlorinated pesticides, industrial wastes, plastics and plasticizers, fuels and numerous other elements that exist in the environment or are in high use during daily life. The interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems, especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to reproductive problems, diabetes, and breast, testicular and ovarian cancers should be deeply investigated. There should also be a focus on public awareness of these EDC risks and their use in routine life. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize all evidence regarding different physiological disruptions in the body and possible involved mechanisms, to prove the association between endocrine disruptions and human diseases. PMID:26497928

  8. On the possible involvement of bovine serum albumin precursor in lipofection pathway.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anubhab; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2014-03-01

    Protein factors involved in lipofection pathways remain elusive. Using avidin-biotin affinity chromatography and mass finger printing analysis technique, herein we report the identification of a 70 kDa size protein (bovine serum albumin precursor, BSAP) which binds strongly with lipoplexes and may play role in lipofection pathway. Using multiple cultured animal cells and three structurally different cationic transfection lipids, we show that the efficiencies of liposomal transfection vectors get significantly enhanced (by ~2.5- to 5.0-fold) in cells pre-transfected with lipoplexes of reporter plasmid construct encoding BSAP. Findings in the cellular uptake experiments in A549 cells cultured in DMEM supplemented with 10 percent (w/w) BODIPY-labelled BSAP are consistent with the supposition that BSAP enters cell cytoplasm from the cell culture medium (DMEM supplemented with 10 percent FBS) used in lipofection. Cellular uptake studies by confocal microscopy using BODIPY-labelled BSAP and FITC-labelled plasmid DNA revealed co-localization of plasmid DNA and BSAP within the cell cytoplasm and nucleus. In summary, the present findings hint at the possible involvement of BSAP in lipofection pathway. PMID:24499789

  9. Possible involvement of Epstein-Barr virus in the pathogenesis of Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, N; Saito, I; Haruta, J

    1994-08-01

    We examined the possible involvement of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of Sjogren's syndrome (SS) using B cell lines (BCLs) spontaneously established from the peripheral blood. These BCLs were positive for EBNA and produced a large amount of infecting EBV in culture, a feature unique to SS-BCLs. Polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that EBV with a B95-8-like U2 region was dominant in SS-BCLs. The nucleotide sequences of the U2 region of SS-EBV obtained so far have shown high homology to those of B95-8 EBV. However, there was a substantial amount of deletion and substitution of nucleotides within the U2 region of SS-EBV when compared with B95-8 EBV. This might enable SS-BCLs to escape immune recognition by cytotoxic T cells specific to EBNA-2. In addition, SS-EBV contains the sequence that spans the B95-8-deleted region. Furthermore, transfer of SS-BCLs to SCID mice induced monoclonal lymphoproliferative disorders that resembled those arising in SS. These data further support the motion that reactivation of EBV is deeply involved in polyclonal B cell activation and the development of B cell malignancies in SS. PMID:8050188

  10. Circulating microRNAs and Kallikreins before and after Radical Prostatectomy: Are They Really Prostate Cancer Markers?

    PubMed Central

    Egidi, Maria Giulia; Serva, Maria Rita; Guelfi, Gabriella; Zampini, Danilo; Mechelli, Luca; Mearini, Ettore

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to monitor serum levels of two miRNAs (miR-21 and miR-141) and three KLKs (hK3/PSA, hK11, and hK13) before and 1, 5, and 30 days after radical prostatectomy, in order to characterize their fluctuations after surgery. 38 patients with prostate cancer were included. miR-21 and miR-141 were quantified through real-time PCR, while ELISA assays were used to quantify hK3 (PSA), hK11, and hK13. Both miR-21 and miR-141 showed a significant increase at the 5th postoperative day, after which a gradual return to the preoperative levels was recorded. These findings suggest that miR-21 and miR-141 could be involved in postsurgical inflammatory processes and that radical prostatectomy does not seem to alter their circulating levels. Postoperative serum kallikreins showed a significant decrease, highlighting the potential usefulness of kallikreins apart from PSA as potential prostate cancer markers. PMID:24288670

  11. Is patient involvement possible when decisions involve scarce resources? A qualitative study of decision-making in primary care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian Rees; Berney, Lee; Kelly, Moira; Doyal, Len; Griffiths, Chris; Feder, Gene; Hillier, Sheila; Rowlands, Gillian; Curtis, Sarah

    2004-07-01

    Greater patient involvement has become a key goal of health care provision. This study explored the way in which general practitioners (GPs) in the UK manage the dual responsibilities of treating individual patients and making the most equitable use of National Health Service (NHS) resources in the context of the policy of greater patient involvement in decision-making. We undertook a qualitative study incorporating a series of interviews and focus groups with a sample of 24 GPs. We analysed GP accounts of decision-making by relating these to substantive ethical principles and the key procedural principle of explicitness in decision-making. GPs saw patient involvement in positive terms but for some GPs involvement served an instrumental purpose, for instance improving patient 'compliance'. GPs identified strongly with the role of patient advocate but experienced role tensions particularly with respect to wider responsibilities for budgets, populations, and society in general. GPs had an implicit understanding of the key ethical principle of explicitness and of other substantive ethical principles but there was incongruence between these and their interpretation in practice. Limited availability of GP time played an important role in this theory/practice gap. GPs engaged in implicit categorisation of patients, legitimating this process by reference to the diversity and complexity of general practice. If patient involvement in health care decision-making is to be increased, then questions of scarcity of resources, including time, will need to be taken into account. If strategies for greater patient involvement are to be pursued then this will have significant implications for funding primary care, particularly in terms of addressing the demands made on consultation time. Good ethics and good professional practice cost money and must be budgeted for. More explicit decision-making in primary care will need to be accompanied by greater explicitness at the national level

  12. A phenomenographic analysis of first-year engineering students' experiences with problems involving multiple possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dringenberg, Emily A.

    Engineers are expected to solve problems that are ill-structured. These problems are presented with a lack of necessary information and allow for different ways of engaging with the problem; they are open-ended and involve multiple possible solutions with multiple means of evaluation. In order to allow maximum time for students to develop skills for solving such problems, undergraduate engineering programs can introduce such problems during the first year of students' education, in the form of cornerstone design tasks. This provides students with more opportunities to develop their ability to engage with ill-structured problems, which are characteristic of engineering work. Researchers have documented variation within both the behavior and perceptions of students' early experiences with design problems. General themes include novice-like design behavior, discomfort with lack of information, difficulty with problem scoping, and resistance to ambiguity. To build on these generalizations of students' experiences, a more thorough understanding of the variation in how students experience this phenomenon of engaging with ill-structured problems is needed to design effective learning environments. This work presents the qualitatively different ways that engineering students experience problems with multiple possible solutions during their first year of engineering studies. Using phenomenography as the methodological framework, data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 27 first-year engineering students. The iterative, phenomenographic analysis resulted in seven descriptive categories for the ways participants experienced problems involving multiple possible solutions. The names of these categories represent the different foci of the students' experiences: completion, transition, iteration, organization, collaboration, reasoning, and growth. These categories are organized along two crucial dimensions of variation: reaction to ambiguity and role

  13. Natural and synthetic inhibitors of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs).

    PubMed

    Goettig, Peter; Magdolen, Viktor; Brandstetter, Hans

    2010-11-01

    Including the true tissue kallikrein KLK1, kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent a family of fifteen mammalian serine proteases. While the physiological roles of several KLKs have been at least partially elucidated, their activation and regulation remain largely unclear. This obscurity may be related to the fact that a given KLK fulfills many different tasks in diverse fetal and adult tissues, and consequently, the timescale of some of their physiological actions varies significantly. To date, a variety of endogenous inhibitors that target distinct KLKs have been identified. Among them are the attenuating Zn(2+) ions, active site-directed proteinaceous inhibitors, such as serpins and the Kazal-type inhibitors, or the huge, unspecific compartment forming α(2)-macroglobulin. Failure of these inhibitory systems can lead to certain pathophysiological conditions. One of the most prominent examples is the Netherton syndrome, which is caused by dysfunctional domains of the Kazal-type inhibitor LEKTI-1 which fail to appropriately regulate KLKs in the skin. Small synthetic inhibitory compounds and natural polypeptidic exogenous inhibitors have been widely employed to characterize the activity and substrate specificity of KLKs and to further investigate their structures and biophysical properties. Overall, this knowledge leads not only to a better understanding of the physiological tasks of KLKs, but is also a strong fundament for the synthesis of small compound drugs and engineered biomolecules for pharmaceutical approaches. In several types of cancer, KLKs have been found to be overexpressed, which makes them clinically relevant biomarkers for prognosis and monitoring. Thus, down regulation of excessive KLK activity in cancer and in skin diseases by small inhibitor compounds may represent attractive therapeutical approaches. PMID:20615447

  14. Possible involvement of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in cough reflex.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junzo; Nakanishi, Yuki; Ishikawa, Yoko; Hayashi, Shun-Suke; Asato, Megumi; Ohsawa, Masahiro

    2011-02-10

    We examined the involvement of tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium channels in the peripheral mechanisms of the cough reflex in mice. We also examined the possibility of using ambroxol as an effective antitussive agent, and found that it produced antitussive effects through the inhibition of TTX-resistant sodium channels. The inhalation of fenvalerate, at concentrations of 0.3, 1 and 3μg/ml, for 5min produced coughs in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, at a dose of 1μg/kg, s.c., slightly but significantly reduced the number of fenvalerate (3μg/ml)-induced coughs. However, the number of fenvalerate-induced coughs in tetorodotoxin-treated mice was still significantly greater than those in vehicle (0.4% DMSO) alone inhaled mice. On the other hand, pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, at a dose of 1μg/kg, s.c., almost completely reduced the number of citric acid (0.25M)-induced coughs to the level in vehicle (saline) alone inhaled mice. Pretreatment with ambroxol, at doses of 10, 30, 100 and 300mg/kg, p.o., dose-dependently and significantly reduced the number of fenvalerate (3μg/ml)-induced coughs. The present findings indicate that TTX-resistant sodium channels may play an important role in the enhancement of C-fiber-mediated cough pathways. Furthermore, ambroxol may prove to be a useful cough suppressant. PMID:21130084

  15. Possible involvement of lipoic acid in binding protein-dependent transport systems in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Richarme, G

    1985-04-01

    We describe the properties of the binding protein dependent-transport of ribose, galactose, and maltose and of the lactose permease, and the phosphoenolpyruvate-glucose phosphotransferase transport systems in a strain of Escherichia coli which is deficient in the synthesis of lipoic acid, a cofactor involved in alpha-keto acid dehydrogenation. Such a strain can grow in the absence of lipoic acid in minimal medium supplemented with acetate and succinate. Although the lactose permease and the phosphoenolypyruvate-glucose phosphotransferase are not affected by lipoic acid deprivation, the binding protein-dependent transports are reduced by 70% in conditions of lipoic acid deprivation when compared with their activity in conditions of lipoic acid supply. The remaining transport is not affected by arsenate but is inhibited by the uncoupler carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone; however the lipoic acid-dependent transport is completely inhibited by arsenate and only weakly inhibited by carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone. The known inhibitor of alpha-keto acid dehydrogenases, 5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, completely inhibits all binding protein-dependent transports whether in conditions of lipoic supply or deprivation; the results suggest a possible relation between binding protein-dependent transport and alpha-keto acid dehydrogenases and shed light on the inhibition of these transports by arsenicals and uncouplers. PMID:3920206

  16. Possible Involvement of Insulin Resistance in the Progression of Cancer Cachexia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Murakami, Tomoyasu; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem among cancer patients, affecting up to 85% of patients with certain cancers. In severe cases, malnutrition can progress to cachexia, a specific form of malnutrition characterized by loss of lean body mass and muscle wasting. Although this muscle wasting might be a product of enhanced protein degradation, the precise mechanisms of cancer cachexia are not fully elucidated. Based on basic and clinical research, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance have been postulated to be associated with cancer cachexia. Since insulin in the skeletal muscle inhibits protein degradation and promotes protein synthesis, insulin resistance could be a possible cause of cancer cachexia. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of insulin resistance in the development of cancer cachexia in tumor-bearing mice. The signaling protein in the insulin cascade was attenuated in the skeletal muscle and hypothalamus from tumor-bearing mice. We identified Chrysanthemum morifolium RAMAT., known as Kikuka, as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) ligand. Treatment with Kikuka attenuates the skeletal muscle changes in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggest that this natural PPARγ activator might be an attractive candidate for the treatment of cancer cachexia. In the symposium, we presented the PPARγ activator-induced improvement of cancer cachexia. PMID:27150920

  17. Possible involvement of a tetrahydrobiopterin in photoreception for UV-B-induced anthocyanin synthesis in carrot.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Junko; Nakata, Rieko; Ueno, Hiroshi; Murakami, Akio; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies of action spectra for UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation in cultured carrot cells indicated that a reduced form of pterin, possibly tetrahydrobiopterin, contributes to UV-B photoreception. In this report, we provide additional evidence for the involvement of pterin in UV-B light sensing. UV-B-induced phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity was considerably suppressed by N-acetylserotonin (an inhibitor of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis), and this suppression was partially recovered by adding biopterin or tetrahydrobiobiopterin. In addition, protein(s) specifically bound to biopterin were detected by radiolabeling experiments in N-acetylserotonin-treated cells. Furthermore, diphenyleneiodonium, a potent inhibitor of electron transfer, completely suppressed UV-B-induced PAL activity. These results suggest the occurrence of an unidentified UV-B photoreceptor (other than UVR8, the tryptophan-based UV-B sensor originally identified in Arabidopsis) with reduced pterin in carrot cells. After reexamining published action spectra, we suggest that anthocyanin synthesis is coordinately regulated by these two UV-B sensors. PMID:24943195

  18. Possible involvement of soluble B7-H4 in T cell-mediated inflammatory immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Yosuke; Kobori, Hiroko; Piao, Jinhua; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Sachiko; Azuma, Miyuki

    2009-11-13

    B7-H4, a newly identified B7 family molecule, is reported to regulate T cell activation. However, the expression and function of B7-H4 remain controversial. Here, we demonstrated that B7-H4 expression in immune cells was undetectable at both the transcription and cell-surface protein levels. B7-H4 transfectants augmented anti-CD3 mAb-induced re-directed cytotoxicity and this was inhibited by anti-B7-H4 mAb. In a hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity model, treatment with anti-B7-H4 mAb at sensitization, but not at challenge, efficiently suppressed the ear swelling and CD8(+) T cell activation assessed by CD25 expression and IFN-gamma production. We found that cells expressing B7-H4 secreted soluble B7-H4 and the serum B7-H4 level increased with disease progression in lupus-prone and collagen-induced arthritis autoimmune mice and after the antigen challenge in allergic inflammatory diseases. Our results suggest a different action of B7-H4 in T cell-mediated inflammatory responses and the possible involvement of soluble B7-H4 in inflammatory immune responses. PMID:19723502

  19. Aldrin-induced locomotor activity: possible involvement of the central GABAergic-cholinergic-dopaminergic interaction.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, S; Poddar, M K

    2001-01-01

    Aldrin (5 mg/kg/day, p.o.) under nontolerant condition, administered either for a single day or for 12 consecutive days, enhanced locomotor activity (LA) of rats. The increase in LA was greater in rats treated with aldrin for 12 consecutive days than that observed with a single dose. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the involvement of possible interactions of central GABAergic, cholinergic and dopaminergic systems using their agonist(s) and antagonist(s) in the regulation of LA in aldrin nontolerant rats. Administration of either L-DOPA along with carbidopa or bicuculline potentiated aldrin-induced increase in LA under nontolerant condition as well as LA of the control rats. Treatment with muscimol, haloperidol, atropine or physostigmine all decreased the LA of both aldrin nontolerant and control rats. Further, the application of (a) haloperidol along with bicuculline, atropine or physostigmine and (b) physostigmine along with bicuculline or L-DOPA + carbidopa significantly reduced LA but L-DOPA + carbidopa along with atropine or bicuculline increased LA of the control rats. These agonist(s)/antagonist(s)-induced decrease or increase in LA of the control rats were attenuated or potentiated, respectively, when those agonist(s)/antagonist(s) under abovementioned condition were administered to aldrin nontolerant rats. The attenuating or potentiating effects of aldrin on agonist(s)/antagonist(s) (either individually or in different combinations)-induced change in LA were greater in rats treated with aldrin for 12 consecutive days than that observed with a single-dose aldrin treatment. These results suggest that aldrin, under nontolerant condition, reduces central GABAergic activity and increases LA by activating dopaminergic system via inhibition of cholinergic activity. The treatment with aldrin for 12 consecutive days produces greater effect than that caused by a single-day treatment. PMID:11785907

  20. The GNA13-RhoA signaling axis suppresses expression of tumor protective Kallikreins.

    PubMed

    Teo, Cui Rong; Casey, Patrick J; Rasheed, Suhail Ahmed Kabeer

    2016-10-01

    Gα13 (encoded by GNA13 gene) is the alpha subunit of a heterotrimeric G-protein that mediates signaling through specific G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Increased GNA13 expression has been observed in metastatic breast cancer cells. Recently, we have shown that enhanced GNA13 signaling in MCF-10a cells, a benign breast cancer cell line increased its invasiveness. Previous studies have reported that Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs 1-15) are down-regulated in breast tumors and may have a tumor protective function. However, the mechanisms that lead to the down-regulation of KLK genes in breast cancer are yet to be elucidated. We found that enhanced GNA13 signaling represses KLK gene expression in breast cancer, and undertook examination of the mechanisms involved. A microarray analysis revealed down-regulation of several members of the Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK) gene family, namely KLK5, KLK6, KLK7, KLK8 and KLK10, in MCF-10a lines with enhanced GNA13 protein expression. Using real-time PCR and promoter analysis, we identified that the mRNA expression and promoter activities of these KLKs are suppressed upon enforced expression of GNA13 in MCF-10a cells. Using Rhotekin pull-down assays, we identified that GNA13 suppressed Rho-A activation and protein levels in MCF-10a cells. Blocking Rho-A activation using C3-toxin or by inhibiting its down-stream effector, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), reduced the above-mentioned KLK mRNAs in MCF-10A cells. Importantly, in a metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-157, knock down of GNA13 alone was sufficient to induce the expression KLK mRNAs. Taken together, our findings suggested that enhanced GNA13 signaling down-regulates KLK gene transcription. The ability of enhanced GNA13 signaling to suppress KLK gene expression appears at least in part due to the ability of enhanced GNA13 signaling to negatively impact Rho/ROCK-signaling. PMID:27424208

  1. Evolution of the plasma and tissue kallikreins, and their alternative splicing isoforms.

    PubMed

    Koumandou, Vassiliki Lila; Scorilas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Kallikreins are secreted serine proteases with important roles in human physiology. Human plasma kallikrein, encoded by the KLKB1 gene on locus 4q34-35, functions in the blood coagulation pathway, and in regulating blood pressure. The human tissue kallikrein and kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) have diverse expression patterns and physiological roles, including cancer-related processes such as cell growth regulation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), the product of the KLK3 gene, is the most widely used biomarker in clinical practice today. A total of 15 KLKs are encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome (19q13.3-13.4), which makes them ideal for evolutionary analysis of gene duplication events. Previous studies on the evolution of KLKs have traced mammalian homologs as well as a probable early origin of the family in aves, amphibia and reptilia. The aim of this study was to address the evolutionary and functional relationships between tissue KLKs and plasma kallikrein, and to examine the evolution of alternative splicing isoforms. Sequences of plasma and tissue kallikreins and their alternative transcripts were collected from the NCBI and Ensembl databases, and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis was performed by Bayesian as well as maximum likelihood methods. Plasma and tissue kallikreins exhibit high sequence similarity in the trypsin domain (>50%). Phylogenetic analysis indicates an early divergence of KLKB1, which groups closely with plasminogen, chymotrypsin, and complement factor D (CFD), in a monophyletic group distinct from trypsin and the tissue KLKs. Reconstruction of the earliest events leading to the diversification of the tissue KLKs is not well resolved, indicating rapid expansion in mammals. Alternative transcripts of each KLK gene show species-specific divergence, while examination of sequence conservation indicates that many annotated human KLK isoforms are missing

  2. The Role of the Kallikrein-Kinin System Genes in the Salt Sensitivity of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Dongfeng; Zhao, Qi; Kelly, Tanika N.; Hixson, James E.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Cao, Jie; Chen, Jing; Li, Jianxin; Chen, Jichun; Ji, Xu; Hu, Dongsheng; Wang, Xushan; Liu, De-Pei; He, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    The current study comprehensively examined the association between common genetic variants of the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) and blood pressure salt sensitivity. A 7-day low-sodium followed by a 7-day high-sodium dietary intervention was conducted among 1,906 Han Chinese participants recruited from 2003 to 2005. Blood pressure was measured by using a random-zero sphygmomanometer through the study. A total of 205 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering 11 genes of the KKS were selected for the analyses. Genetic variants of the bradykinin receptor B2 gene (BDKRB2) and the endothelin converting enzyme 1 gene (ECE1) showed significant associations with the salt-sensitivity phenotypes even after adjustment for multiple testing. Compared with the major G allele, the BDKRB2 rs11847625 minor C allele was significantly associated with increased systolic blood pressure responses to low-sodium intervention (P = 0.0001). Furthermore, a haplotype containing allele C was associated with an increased systolic blood pressure response to high-sodium intervention (P = 0.0009). Seven highly correlated ECE1 SNPs were shown to increase the diastolic blood pressure response to low-sodium intervention (P values ranged from 0.0003 to 0.002), with 2 haplotypes containing these 7 SNPs also associated with this same phenotype (P values ranged from 0.0004 to 0.002). In summary, genetic variants of the genes involved in the regulation of KKS may contribute to the salt sensitivity of blood pressure. PMID:23035147

  3. Study of the possible mechanisms involved in the mucosal immune system activation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Perdigón, G; Vintiñi, E; Alvarez, S; Medina, M; Medici, M

    1999-06-01

    The induction of a mucosal immune response is not easy due to the development of oral tolerance, but under some conditions, bacteria can activate this immune system. Antigens administered orally can interact with M cells of Peyer's patches or bind to the epithelial cells. We have demonstrated that certain lactic acid bacteria are able to induce specific secretory immunity, and others will enhance the gut inflammatory immune response. The aim of this work was to establish the reason for these different behaviors and to define possible mechanisms involved in the interaction of lactic acid bacteria at the intestinal level. We studied IgA+ and IgM+ B cells comparatively in bronchus and intestine and CD4+ T cells and IgA anti-lactic acid bacteria antibodies in the intestinal fluid, induced by oral administration of Lactobacillus casei, Lb. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. plantarum, Lb. rhamnosus, Lactococcus lactis, and Streptococcus salivarius ssp. thermophilus. The increase in the IgA+ B cells in the bronchus means that these lactic acid bacteria were able to induce the IgA cycle by interaction with M cells from Peyer's patches or intestinal epithelial cells. The IgM+ cells increased when the stimulus did not induce the switch from IgM+ to IgA+. The increase in the CD4+ cells suggests interaction of Peyer's patches and enhancement of the B- and T-cell migration. The anti-lactic acid bacteria antibody is related to the processing and presentation of the microorganisms to the immune cells. We demonstrated that Lb. casei and Lb. plantarum were able to interact with Peyer's patch cells and showed an increase in IgA-, CD4+ cells, and antibodies specific for the stimulating strain. Lactobacillus acidophilus induced gut mucosal activation by interaction with the epithelial cells without increase in the immune cells associated with the bronchus. Although Lb. rhamnosus and Strep. salivarius ssp. thermophilus interact with epithelial cells, they also induced

  4. Immigrant Parent Involvement in U.S. Schools: Current Practices and Future Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleixo, Marina Bandeira

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines how parent involvement expectations are communicated and enacted in interactions at one small urban high school. Through detailed descriptions of school interactions between supporting staff and immigrant parents, this study examines how parent involvement expectations are understood and perceived. Although scholarly…

  5. Kallikrein-related Peptidase 5 Functions in Proteolytic Processing of Profilaggrin in Cultured Human Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Mami; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Motoyama, Akira; Ohta, Isao; Tatsuno, Kazuki; Ito, Taisuke; Kabashima, Kenji; Hibino, Toshihiko; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Filaggrin protein is synthesized in the stratum granulosum of the skin and contributes to the formation of the human skin barrier. Profilaggrin is cleaved by proteolytic enzymes and converted to functional filaggrin, but its processing mechanism remains not fully elucidated. Kallikrein-related peptidase 5 (KLK5) is a major serine protease found in the skin, which is secreted from lamellar granules following its expression in the stratum granulosum and activated in the extracellular space of the stratum corneum. Here, we searched for profilaggrin-processing protease(s) by partial purification of epidermal extracts and found KLK5 as a possible candidate. We used high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry to show that KLK5 cleaves profilaggrin. Furthermore, based on a proximity ligation assay, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy analysis, we reveal that KLK5 and profilaggrin co-localize in the stratum granulosum in human epidermis. KLK5 knockdown in normal cultured human epidermal keratinocytes resulted in higher levels of profilaggrin, indicating that KLK5 potentially functions in profilaggrin cleavage. PMID:23629652

  6. Hydrolysis of somatostatin by human tissue kallikrein after the amino acid pair phe-Phe.

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, D C; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L

    1997-01-01

    Somatostatin-(1-14) was hydrolysed by human tissue kallikrein at the Phe7-Trp8 bond, after a Phe-Phe pair of amino acids, with similar kinetic parameters to those described for human high- and low-molecular-mass kininogens. Substance P and human insulin, which also contain a Phe-Phe pair in their sequences, were both resistant. More details of this hydrolytic specificity of human tissue kallikrein were obtained by synthesizing and assaying internally quenched fluorescent peptides containing the sequence of somatostatin-(1-14), as well as the reactive-centre loop of human kallikrein-binding protein (kallistatin). We also observed that human tissue kallikrein hydrolysed growth hormone-releasing hormone at the Arg11-Lys12 bond, although this peptide contains in its structure a pair of leucines (Leu22-Leu23), in contrast with the Phe-Phe pair in somatostatin. We have also demonstrated the susceptibility to human tissue kallikrein of some chromogenic peptide s with the general structure of X-Phe-Phe-p-nitroanilide and D-Pro-Phe-Phe-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide. PMID:9355730

  7. Effect of Various Concentrations of Caffeine, Pentoxifylline, and Kallikrein on Hyperactivation of Frozen Bovine Semen

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Ibrahim A. H.; Danfour, Mohamed A.; Galewan, Fatma A. M.; Dkhil, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, pentoxifylline, and kallikrein are substances that affect the efficiency of sperms in the fertilization process; however, they have not been adequately studied. The present study aimed to examine the influence of caffeine, kallikrein, and pentoxifylline on sperm motility in bovine as well as investigate their optimum concentrations for increasing the movement of sperms in bovine. Frozen bovine sperms were thawed in universal IVF medium supplemented with 1, 5, and 10 mM caffeine or pentoxifylline or 1, 4, and 8 U/mL kallikrein and were then incubated for 30 min. Treated semen parameters were analyzed using a computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA). Data analysis showed that the mean values concerning progression and motility of sperm increased in caffeine and pentoxifylline treatments when compared with the kallikrein group. The obtained results revealed that kallikrein is not necessary for the improvement of bovine sperm motility. Additionally, our results revealed that 5 mM from caffeine was the best concentration added to the medium, followed by 1 or 5 mM from pentoxifylline. Therefore, it is concluded from the present study that caffeine has hyperactivation efficacy at 5 mM concentration compared to other treatments. PMID:25950005

  8. Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) regulates oxygen-dependent expression of voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels and tissue kallikrein during human trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanmin; Kumar, Premlata; Mendelson, Carole R

    2013-06-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) serves a critical O2-dependent regulatory role in the differentiation of human cytotrophoblasts to syncytiotrophoblast. In this study, we investigated expression of genes encoding tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and voltage-gated K(+) channels (KV7) during differentiation of human trophoblasts in culture and the roles of ERRγ and O2 tension in their regulation. Expression of KLK1 and the KV7 channel subunits, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5, increased during differentiation of cultured human trophoblast cells in a 20% O2 environment. Notably, together with ERRγ, expression of KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5 was markedly reduced when cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment (2% O2). Moreover, upon transduction of trophoblast cells with short hairpin RNAs for endogenous ERRγ, KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, and KCNE3 expression was significantly decreased. Promoter and site-directed mutagenesis studies in transfected cells identified putative ERRγ response elements within the KLK1 and KCNE1 5'-flanking regions required for ERRγ-stimulated transcriptional activity. Binding of endogenous ERRγ to these ERRγ response elements increased during trophoblast differentiation in culture and was inhibited by hypoxia. The KV7 blocker linopirdine reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and aggregation of cultured human trophoblasts, suggesting a possible role of KV7 channels in cell fusion and differentiation. Illumina gene expression arrays of cultured human trophoblast cells revealed several genes upregulated during syncytiotrophoblast differentiation and downregulated upon ERRγ knockdown involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and synthesis of steroid and peptide hormones required for placental development and function. Collectively, these findings suggest that ERRγ mediates O2-dependent expression of genes involved in human trophoblast differentiation, function, and vascular homeostasis. PMID:23584901

  9. Estrogen-Related Receptor γ (ERRγ) Regulates Oxygen-Dependent Expression of Voltage-gated Potassium (K+) Channels and Tissue Kallikrein during Human Trophoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanmin; Kumar, Premlata

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) serves a critical O2-dependent regulatory role in the differentiation of human cytotrophoblasts to syncytiotrophoblast. In this study, we investigated expression of genes encoding tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and voltage-gated K+ channels (KV7) during differentiation of human trophoblasts in culture and the roles of ERRγ and O2 tension in their regulation. Expression of KLK1 and the KV7 channel subunits, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5, increased during differentiation of cultured human trophoblast cells in a 20% O2 environment. Notably, together with ERRγ, expression of KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5 was markedly reduced when cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment (2% O2). Moreover, upon transduction of trophoblast cells with short hairpin RNAs for endogenous ERRγ, KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, and KCNE3 expression was significantly decreased. Promoter and site-directed mutagenesis studies in transfected cells identified putative ERRγ response elements within the KLK1 and KCNE1 5′-flanking regions required for ERRγ-stimulated transcriptional activity. Binding of endogenous ERRγ to these ERRγ response elements increased during trophoblast differentiation in culture and was inhibited by hypoxia. The KV7 blocker linopirdine reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and aggregation of cultured human trophoblasts, suggesting a possible role of KV7 channels in cell fusion and differentiation. Illumina gene expression arrays of cultured human trophoblast cells revealed several genes upregulated during syncytiotrophoblast differentiation and downregulated upon ERRγ knockdown involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and synthesis of steroid and peptide hormones required for placental development and function. Collectively, these findings suggest that ERRγ mediates O2-dependent expression of genes involved in human trophoblast differentiation, function, and vascular homeostasis. PMID:23584901

  10. Tissue kallikrein is required for the cardioprotective effect of cyclosporin A in myocardial ischemia in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Youcef, G; Belaidi, E; Waeckel, L; Fazal, L; Clemessy, M; Vincent, M P; Zadigue, G; Richer, C; Alhenc-Gelas, F; Ovize, M; Pizard, A

    2015-03-01

    Clinical and experimental studies suggest that pharmacological postconditioning with Cyclosporin A (CsA) reduces infarct size in cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. CsA interacts with Cyclophilin D (CypD) preventing opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Tissue kallikrein (TK) and its products kinins are involved in cardioprotection in ischemia. CypD knockout mice are resistant to the cardioprotective effects of both CsA and kinins suggesting common mechanisms of action. Using TK gene knockout mice, we investigated whether the kallikrein-kinin system is involved in the cardioprotective effect of CsA. Homozygote and heterozygote TK deficient mice (TK(-/-), TK(+/-)) and wild type littermates (TK(+/+)) were subjected to cardiac ischemia-reperfusion with and without CsA postconditioning. CsA reduced infarct size in TK(+/+) mice but had no effect in TK(+/-) and TK(-/-) mice. Cardiac mitochondria isolated from TK(-/-) mice had indistinguishable basal oxidative phosphorylation and calcium retention capacity compared to TK(+/+) mice but were resistant to CsA inhibition of mPTP opening. TK activity was documented in mouse heart and rat cardiomyoblasts mitochondria. By proximity ligation assay TK was found in close proximity to the mitochondrial membrane proteins VDAC and Tom22, and CypD. Thus, partial or total deficiency in TK induces resistance to the infarct size reducing effect of CsA in cardiac ischemia in mice, suggesting that TK level is a critical factor for cardioprotection by CsA. TK is required for the mitochondrial action of CsA and may interact with CypD. Genetic variability in TK activity has been documented in man and may influence the cardioprotective effect of CsA. PMID:25623731

  11. In-silico analysis of kallikrein gene expression in pancreatic and colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Yousef, George M; Borgoño, Carla A; Popalis, Cynthia; Yacoub, George M; Polymeris, Mary-Ellen; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2004-01-01

    Human kallikreins are a cluster of 15 serine protease genes located in the chromosomal band 19q13.4, a non-randomly rearranged region in many solid tumors, including pancreatic cancer. We utilized the SAGE and EST databases of the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project to perform in-silico analysis of kallikrein gene expression in normal and cancerous pancreatic and colon tissues and cell lines using virtual Northern blotting (VNB), digital differential display (DDD) and X-profiler. At least two kallikreins, KLK6 and KLK10, are significantly up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. We probed 2 normal and 6 pancreatic cancer SAGE libraries with gene-specific tags for each of these kallikreins. KLK6 was found to be expressed in 5/6 cancer libraries and showed the most marked (5-fold) increase in average expression levels in cancer vs. normal. These data were verified by screening the EST databases, where all mRNA clones isolated were from cancerous libraries, with no clones detected in normal pancreatic tissues or cell lines. X-profiler comparison of two pools of normal and cancerous pancreatic libraries further verified the significant increase of KLK6 expression levels in pancreatic cancer. DDD data showed a 13-fold increase in KLK10 expression in pancreatic cancer. Three kallikrein genes, KLK6, 8 and 10 are overexpressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon, while one kallikrein, KLK1, is down-regulated. While no expression of KLK6 was detected in normal colon, KLK6-specific tags were detectable in 2 cancer libraries. Similar results were obtained by EST screening; no KLK6 clones were detected in any of the 28 normal libraries examined, while 10 KLK6 EST clones were found in colon adenocarcinoma. KLK10 was not detectable in normal colon. Gene-specific tags were, however, detectable with high density in colon cancer and 7 EST clones were found to be expressed in colon Adenocarcinoma. PMID:15015574

  12. Effect of Kallikrein 4 Loss on Enamel Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Charles E.; Richardson, Amelia S.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Bartlett, John D.; Hu, Jan C-C.; Simmer, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Enamel formation depends on a triad of tissue-specific matrix proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) to help initiate and stabilize progressively elongating, thin mineral ribbons of hydroxyapatite formed during an appositional growth phase. Subsequently, these proteins are eradicated to facilitate lateral expansion of the hydroxyapatite crystallites. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in enamel mineralization occurring in mice unable to produce kallikrein 4 (Klk4), a proteinase associated with terminal extracellular degradation of matrix proteins during the maturation stage. Mice lacking functional matrix metalloproteinase 20 (Mmp20), a proteinase associated with early cleavage of matrix proteins during the secretory stage, were also analyzed as a frame of reference. The results indicated that mice lacking Klk4 produce enamel that is normal in thickness and overall organization in terms of layers and rod/inter-rod structure, but there is a developmental defect in enamel rods where they first form near the dentinoenamel junction. Mineralization is normal up to early maturation after which the enamel both retains and gains additional proteins and is unable to mature beyond 85% mineral by weight. The outmost enamel is hard, but inner regions are soft and contain much more protein than normal. The rate of mineral acquisition overall is lower by 25%. Mice lacking functional Mmp20 produce enamel that is thin and structurally abnormal. Relatively high amounts of protein remain throughout maturation, but the enamel is able to change from 67 to 75% mineral by weight during maturation. These findings reaffirm the importance of secreted proteinases to enamel mineral acquisition. PMID:21454549

  13. Clinical significance of kallikrein-related peptidase-4 in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Papagerakis, Petros; Pannone, Giuseppe; Zheng, L I; Athanassiou-Papaefthymiou, Maria; Yamakoshi, Yashuo; McGuff, Howard Stan; Shkeir, Omar; Ghirtis, Konstantinos; Papagerakis, Silvana

    2015-04-01

    Kallikrein-related-peptidase-4 (KLK4), a serine protease originally discovered in developing tooth with broad target sequence specificity, serves vital functions in dental enamel formation. KLK4 is involved in degradation of extracellular matrix proteins and it is thought that this proteolytic activity could also promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Recent studies have associated KLK4 expression with tumor progression and clinical outcome, particularly in prostate and ovarian cancer. Very little is known in regard KLK4 involvement in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). Our objective was to investigate KLK4 expression in OSCC pathogenesis and disease progression. KLK4 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, western blots and zymograms in OSCC lines. Invasion assays using high versus low/undetectable KLK4-expressing OSCC cell lines were performed jointly with KLK4 siRNA inhibition. A large collection of OSCC specimens was evaluated for KLK4 expression and correlation with patients' characteristics and outcomes were determined. Our data indicate that KLK4 is differentially expressed in oral carcinomas. OSCC cell lines with high invasive and metastatic potential have the highest levels of KLK4 expression. KLK4 mRNA and protein expression correlated with enzyme activity detected by zymograms. Inhibition of KLK4 expression results in diminished invasive potential in OSCC cell lines. Consistently, KLK4 expression is stronger in primary tumors that later either recurred or developed metastases, suggesting that its preferential expression in OSCC might contribute to individual tumor biology. Therefore, this study provides supportive evidence in favor of a prognostic value for KLK4 in OSCC and suggests that KLK4 could serve as a potential therapeutic target in patients with oral cancer. PMID:25862839

  14. Possible involvement of the Sigma-1 receptor chaperone in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tomohisa, Mori; Junpei, Ohya; Aki, Masumoto; Masato, Harumiya; Mika, Fukase; Kazumi, Yoshizawa; Teruo, Hayashi; Tsutomu, Suzuki

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that ligands of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone (Sig-1R) regulate pain-related behaviors. Clinical use of chemotherapeutics is often compromised due to their adverse side effects, particularly those related to neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that repeated administration of oxaliplatin and paclitaxel produces neuropathy in rodents. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the involvement of the Sig-1R in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy by examining the effects of oxaliplatin and paclitaxel on the Sig-1R levels in the spinal cord, and by examining the effects of Sig-1R agonist and antagonist on oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel-induced neuropathy in rats. Chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathic pain was accompanied by a significant reduction of the Sig-1R level in the spinal cord. Furthermore, the administration of paclitaxel to CHO cells that stably overexpressed Sig-1Rs induced the clustering of Sig-1Rs. We also found that the Sig-1R agonist SA4503 potently inhibited the neuropathy induced by oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel, whereas this action was abolished by the Sig-1R antagonist NE-100. These results suggest that the reduction of Sig-1R activity is involved in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy, and the Sig-1R agonist SA4503 could serve as a potential candidate for the treatment of chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy. PMID:26234785

  15. Effect of diet and fenfluramine on thermogenesis in the rat: possible involvement of serotonergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, N J; Stock, M J

    1987-01-01

    A single injection of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT, 1 mg/kg, s.c.) in rats stimulated resting oxygen consumption (Vo2) by 21 percent; this was reduced (to 8 percent) by pretreatment with hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, s.c.). DL-fenfluramine injection (20 mg/kg, s.c.) stimulated metabolic rate (Vo2) by about 40 percent, but caused only 11 and 15 per cent increases in animals pretreated with hexamethonium or metergoline (5 mg/kg, s.c.), respectively. Interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity, assessed from mitochondrial GDP-binding, was increased by 96 per cent in intact tissue 1 h after fenfluramine injection; this response was completely prevented by surgical sympathectomy of interscapular BAT. Metergoline significantly inhibited (by 46 percent) the acute thermic response (postprandial rise in Vo2) to a 40-kJ meal in normal rats, and depressed resting Vo2 in protein-deficient rats by 18 percent, but did not affect resting Vo2 in control animals. BAT activity (mitochondrial GDP-binding) was elevated by 56 per cent in rats fed the low-protein diet, but this difference was almost completely abolished by prior treatment with metergoline. These data demonstrate a potent thermogenic effect of fenfluramine which apparently involves serotonergic pathways and activation of sympathetic outflow to BAT, and indicate that acute thermic responses to food and chronic thermogenic responses to low-protein diets may also involve serotonergic mechanisms. PMID:3667065

  16. A possible collision involving the large main-belt asteroid (596) Schiela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, R.

    2011-02-01

    On 2010 December 11.5, Steve Larson of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, observing with the 0.68m f/1.8 Schmidt telescope of the Catalina Sky Survey, found that the minor planet (596) Scheila appeared to be exhibiting comet-like behaviour. This unique phenomenon is thought to be the result of a high-speed collision between Scheila (diameter ~113km) and a much smaller object, possibly some 10-100 metres across, orbiting in the outer regions of the Main Belt. The discovery was reported in Central Bureau Electronic Telegram no.2583 issued by the IAU on December 12.

  17. Biodegradation of ivory (natural apatite): possible involvement of fungal activity in biodeterioration of the Lewis Chessmen.

    PubMed

    Pinzari, Flavia; Tate, James; Bicchieri, Marina; Rhee, Young Joon; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2013-04-01

    Fungal biodeterioration of ivory was investigated with in vitro inoculation of samples obtained from boar and walrus tusks with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Serpula himantioides, species of known geoactive abilities. A combination of light and scanning electron microscopy together with associated analytical techniques was used to characterize fungal interactions with the ivory, including changes in ivory composition, dissolution and tunnelling, and the formation of new biominerals. The research was aimed at providing further understanding of the potential roles of fungi in the colonization and deterioration of ivory in terrestrial environments, but also contributes to our knowledge regarding the possible origins of the surface damage observed on early medieval sculptures made largely from walrus tusks, referred to as 'the Lewis hoard of gaming pieces', that were presumably produced for playing chess. The experiments have shown that the possibility of damage to ivory being caused by fungi is realistic. Scanning electron microscopy revealed penetration of fungal hyphae within cracks in the walrus tusk that showed also widespread tunnelling by fungal hyphae as well as 'fungal footprints' where the surface was etched as a consequence of mycelial colonization. Similar phenomena were observed with boar tusk ivory, while production of metabolites could lead to complete dissolution of the sample. Colonization of ivory and/or exposure to fungal activity lead to extensive secondary biomineral formation, and this was identified as calcium oxalate, mainly as the monohydrate, whewellite. PMID:23157656

  18. A Gene Island with Two Possible Configurations Is Involved in Chromatic Acclimation in Marine Synechococcus

    PubMed Central

    Humily, Florian; Partensky, Frédéric; Six, Christophe; Farrant, Gregory K.; Ratin, Morgane; Marie, Dominique; Garczarek, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Synechococcus, the second most abundant oxygenic phototroph in the marine environment, harbors the largest pigment diversity known within a single genus of cyanobacteria, allowing it to exploit a wide range of light niches. Some strains are capable of Type IV chromatic acclimation (CA4), a process by which cells can match the phycobilin content of their phycobilisomes to the ambient light quality. Here, we performed extensive genomic comparisons to explore the diversity of this process within the marine Synechococcus radiation. A specific gene island was identified in all CA4-performing strains, containing two genes (fciA/b) coding for possible transcriptional regulators and one gene coding for a phycobilin lyase. However, two distinct configurations of this cluster were observed, depending on the lineage. CA4-A islands contain the mpeZ gene, encoding a recently characterized phycoerythrobilin lyase-isomerase, and a third, small, possible regulator called fciC. In CA4-B islands, the lyase gene encodes an uncharacterized relative of MpeZ, called MpeW. While mpeZ is expressed more in blue light than green light, this is the reverse for mpeW, although only small phenotypic differences were found among chromatic acclimaters possessing either CA4 island type. This study provides novel insights into understanding both diversity and evolution of the CA4 process. PMID:24391958

  19. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:25764429

  20. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24614164

  1. Antinociceptive action of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi) in mice: possible mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Khanna, N; Bhatia, Jagriti

    2003-10-01

    The alcoholic leaf extract of Ocimum sanctum (OS, Tulsi) was tested for analgesic activity in mice. In the glacial acetic acid (GAA)-induced writhing test, OS (50, 100 mg/kg, i.p.; and 50, 100, 200 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the number of writhes. OS (50, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) also increased the tail withdrawal latency in mice. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p.), an opioid antagonist, and DSP-4 (50 mg/kg, i.p.), a central noradrenaline depletor, attenuated the analgesic effect of OS in both the experimental models, whereas, PCPA (300 mg/kg, i.p.), a serotonin synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the action of OS on tail flick response in mice. The results of our study suggest that the analgesic action of OS is exerted both centrally as well as peripherally and involves an interplay between various neurotransmitter systems. PMID:12963158

  2. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein

    PubMed Central

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24614164

  3. Possible involvement of miRNAs in tropism of Parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Anbarlou, Azadeh; AkhavanRahnama, Mahshid; Atashi, Amir; Soleimani, Masoud; Arefian, Ehsan; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Human Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) is one of the most important pathogens that targets erythroid lineage. Many factors were mentioned for restriction to erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs). Previous studies showed that in non-permissive cells VP1 and VP2 (structural proteins) mRNAs were detected but could not translate to proteins. A bioinformatics study showed that this inhibition might be due to specific microRNAs (miRNAs) present in non-permissive cells but not in permissive EPCs. To confirm the hypothesis, we evaluated the effect of miRNAs on VP expression. CD34(+) HSCs were separated from cord blood. Then, CD34(+) cells were treated with differentiation medium to obtain CD36(+) EPCs. To evaluate the effect of miRNAs on VP expression in MCF7 and HEK-293 cell lines (non-permissive cells) and CD36(+) EPCs, dual luciferase assay was performed in presence of shRNAs against Dicer and Drosha to disrupt miRNA biogenesis. QRT-PCR was performed to check down-regulation of Dicer and Drosha after transfection. All measurements were done in triplicate. Data means were compared using one-way ANOVAs. MicroRNA prediction was done by the online microRNA prediction tools. No significant difference was shown in luciferase activity of CD36(+) EPCs after co-transfection with shRNAs, while it was significant in non-permissive cells. Our study revealed that miRNAs may be involved in inhibition of VP expression in non-permissive cells, although further studies are required to demonstrate which miRNAs exactly are involved in regulation of PVB19 replication. PMID:26878856

  4. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. "Sniff" test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  5. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. “Sniff” test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  6. Possible involvement of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillaceae in structural modifications of Tuber borchii fruit bodies.

    PubMed

    Citterio, B; Malatesta, M; Battistelli, S; Marcheggiani, F; Baffone, W; Saltarelli, R; Stocchi, V; Gazzanelli, G

    2001-03-01

    Previous studies on Tuber borchii fruit bodies in early maturation stages suggested a role of bacteria in sporocarp structural modifications. In order to verify this hypothesis, in the present study we investigated by means of microbial and ultrastructural approaches, the bacterial population of T. borchii sporocarps from intermediate maturation phases to advanced decomposition stages, paying particular attention to chitinolytic and cellulolytic bacteria and to their relationships with ascii and ascospores. We found that Pseudomonas fluorescens and spore-forming Bacillaceae, both able to degrade cellulose and chitin, are present inside the sporocarps in all maturation stages investigated. Moreover, rod-shaped bacteria seem able to erode ascus walls and colonize the interior of ascii containing mature spores. These results suggest a possible role of these bacteria in the process of ascus opening. Moreover, the presence of P. fluorescens and Bacillaceae on isolated mature spores after decontamination suggests an intimate association between these bacteria and the ascospores. PMID:11315117

  7. Cholinergic neurotransmission seems not to be involved in depression but possibly in personality.

    PubMed Central

    Fritze, J; Lanczik, M; Sofic, E; Struck, M; Riederer, P

    1995-01-01

    Concordant with the adrenergic-cholinergic imbalance hypothesis of affective psychosis, there is a cholinergic supersensitivity in depression. Thus, the anticholinergic properties of some antidepressants might contribute to their efficacy. However, in the present double-blind studies (n = 20) with mianserin and viloxazine, respectively, which lack anticholinergic properties, adjunctive treatment with the anticholinergic biperiden versus placebo did not enhance the antidepressive efficacy. Therefore, we hypothesized that cholinergic supersensitivity might be linked to some possibly predisposing dimension of personality. Indeed, in healthy male volunteers (n = 11) the behavioral and cardiovascular sensitivity to physostigmine correlated significantly with "irritability" and "emotional lability" as well as with habitually passive strategies in stress coping. The rise in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine correlated with "retardation"; that of epinephrine with active coping. Thus, the cholinergic supersensitivity in affective psychoses might be linked to a personality dimension like stress sensitivity rather than to the diagnostic category itself. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7865500

  8. Cleavage Activation of Human-adapted Influenza Virus Subtypes by Kallikrein-related Peptidases 5 and 12*

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step in the influenza virus replication cycle is the cleavage activation of the HA precursor. Cleavage activation of influenza HA enables fusion with the host endosome, allowing for release of the viral genome into the host cell. To date, studies have determined that HA activation is driven by trypsin-like host cell proteases, as well as yet to be identified bacterial proteases. Although the number of host proteases that can activate HA is growing, there is still uncertainty regarding which secreted proteases are able to support multicycle replication of influenza. In this study, we have determined that the kallikrein-related peptidases 5 and 12 are secreted from the human respiratory tract and have the ability to cleave and activate HA from the H1, H2, and H3 subtypes. Each peptidase appears to have a preference for particular influenza subtypes, with kallikrein 5 cleaving the H1 and H3 subtypes most efficiently and kallikrein 12 cleaving the H1 and H2 subtypes most efficiently. Cleavage analysis using HA cleavage site peptide mimics revealed that the amino acids neighboring the arginine cleavage site affect cleavage efficiency. Additionally, the thrombolytic zymogens plasminogen, urokinase, and plasma kallikrein have all been shown to cleave and activate influenza but are found circulating mainly as inactive precursors. Kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 12 were examined for their ability to activate the thrombolytic zymogens, and both resulted in activation of each zymogen, with kallikrein 12 being a more potent activator. Activation of the thrombolytic zymogens may therefore allow for both direct and indirect activation of the HA of human-adapted influenza viruses by kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 12. PMID:23612974

  9. Possible involvement of histamine, dopamine, and noradrenalin in the periaqueductal gray in electroacupuncture pain relief.

    PubMed

    Murotani, Tomotaka; Ishizuka, Tomoko; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Wang, Xiaoming; Mori, Kazu; Sasaki, Kazuro; Ishida, Torao; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Acupuncture and electroacupuncture are used in pain relief; however, the mechanism underlying the analgesic effect of acupuncture is unclear. Several lines of evidence propose that the periaqueductal gray (PAG), which is one of the regions that contributes to the endogenous pain inhibitory system, is involved in the analgesic effect of acupuncture, and the region receives several neural projections such as histamine and noradrenalin and contains the dopamine cell bodies. The current study examined the effects of electroacupuncture at Zusanli (ST36) and Shangjuxu (ST37) acupoints, which are used for clinical pain control, on the release of neurotransmitters in the PAG in rats. Histamine and dopamine release was increased after pain stimulus, while the changes were completely abolished by electroacupuncture. Pain stimulus had no effect on noradrenalin release, but electroacupuncture increased its release. These findings indicate that acupuncture at Zusanli and Shangjuxu exerts an antinociceptive effect via the activation of neurons in the PAG and that the histaminergic, dopaminergic, and noradrenalinergic systems in the PAG are related to electroacupuncture-induced pain relief. PMID:19819232

  10. Possible involvement of Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA in peptide bond formation.

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, I; Ueda, T; Watanabe, K

    1998-01-01

    Experimental results are presented suggesting that 23S rRNA is directly involved in the peptide bond formation usually performed on the ribosome. Although several reports have indicated that the eubacterial peptidyltransferase reaction does not necessarily require all the ribosomal proteins, the reconstitution of peptidyltransferase activity by a naked 23S rRNA without the help of any of the ribosomal proteins has not been reported previously. It is demonstrated that an E. coli 23S rRNA transcript synthesized by T7 RNA polymerase in vitro was able to promote peptide bond formation in the presence of 0.5% SDS. The reaction was inhibited by the peptidyltransferase-specific antibiotics chloramphenicol and carbomycin, and by digestion with RNases A and T1. Site-directed mutageneses at two highly conserved regions close to the peptidyltransferase center ring, G2252 to U2252 and C2507G2581 to U2507A2581, also suppressed peptide bond formation. These findings strongly suggest that 23S rRNA is the peptidyltransferase itself. PMID:9510328

  11. [Possible involvement of Epstein-Barr virus in the pathogenesis of Sjögren's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Haruta, J; Saito, I

    1995-10-01

    Research into the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of SS has been a focus of interest for the past decade. The use of EBV as a probe for cellular and humoral immune responses has contributed to our current understanding of SS. However, it is still difficult to assign a role to EBV in the pathogenesis of SS. We have already demonstrated a) increased excretion of EBV in the saliva of SS, increased levels of EBV DNA in salivary gland biopsies of SS patients and spontaneous and massive production of transforming EBV in B cell lines established from SS patients. These data suggest that the reactivation of EBV might be deeply involved in disease perpetuation, polyclonal B cell activation and B cell malignancy in SS, even if it is not the primary cause. Recently, we examined the nucleotide sequence of the U2 region in EBV obtained from SS patients. The U2 region contains genes encoding EBNA-2, which plays an important role in B cell transformation and activation. In addition, studies on the breakdown of self-tolerance, and intriguing evidence supporting a potential role for infectious agents such as EBV and retroviruses also offer novel views of inflammation of salivary gland. This review will discuss recent advances in these subjects. PMID:8531359

  12. Oxytocin is involved in the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil: Possible role of CREB.

    PubMed

    Khoshneviszadeh, Mahsima; Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Payandemehr, Borna; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-08-10

    Sildenafil is a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor mainly used for male erectile dysfunction. One of rare yet serious adverse effects of Sildenafil is its potential to decrease seizure threshold. Ample evidence suggests that Sildenafil exerts central effects through induction of Oxytocin (OT) secretion and CREB phosphorylation. The aim of the present study is to evaluate potential roles of OT and CREB in the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil. The Pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure was used as a standard convulsion model in this study. OT release and pCREB expression were evaluated in the hippocampus of mice using ELISA and western blot assays, respectively. Our results showed that Sildenafil at the dose of 10mgkg(-1) or higher, significantly decreased seizure threshold. Pretreatment with a non-effective dose of OT, potentiated while OT receptor antagonist, Atosiban, reversed fully the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil (5mgkg(-1)). At biochemical inspection, Sildenafil markedly increased CREB which was attenuated by coadministration of Atosiban. The present study shows for the first time that OT release and the subsequent CREB phosphorylation are involved in the proconvulsant effects of acute Sildenafil treatment in an experimental model of seizure. PMID:27220266

  13. Lithium inhibits invasion of glioma cells; possible involvement of glycogen synthase kinase-3

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Michal O.; Dmitrieva, Nina; Stein, Andrew M.; Cutter, Jennifer L.; Godlewski, Jakub; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Nita, Masayuki; Berens, Michael E.; Sander, Leonard M.; Newton, Herbert B.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Lawler, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Therapies targeting glioma cells that diffusely infiltrate normal brain are highly sought after. Our aim was to identify novel approaches to this problem using glioma spheroid migration assays. Lithium, a currently approved drug for the treatment of bipolar illnesses, has not been previously examined in the context of glioma migration. We found that lithium treatment potently blocked glioma cell migration in spheroid, wound-healing, and brain slice assays. The effects observed were dose dependent and reversible, and worked using every glioma cell line tested. In addition, there was little effect on cell viability at lithium concentrations that inhibit migration, showing that this is a specific effect. Lithium treatment was associated with a marked change in cell morphology, with cells retracting the long extensions at their leading edge. Examination of known targets of lithium showed that inositol monophosphatase inhibition had no effect on glioma migration, whereas inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) did. This suggested that the effects of lithium on glioma cell migration could possibly be mediated through GSK-3. Specific pharmacologic GSK-3 inhibitors and siRNA knockdown of GSK-3α or GSK-3β isoforms both reduced cell motility. These data outline previously unidentified pathways and inhibitors that may be useful for the development of novel anti-invasive therapeutics for the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:18715951

  14. Differential anti-cancer effects of purified EPA and DHA and possible mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Serini, S; Fasano, E; Piccioni, E; Cittadini, A R M; Calviello, G

    2011-01-01

    As the concepts of pharmaconutrition are receiving increasing attention, it seems essential to clearly assess the effects of specific dietary compounds in specific groups of patients or clinical conditions. We are herein interested in better defining the differential anti-neoplastic effects of the two major n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids present in fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The efficiency of these fatty acids represents a subject of intense interest and debate, and whereas plenty of preclinical studies have strongly demonstrated their preventive and therapeutic effect in different kinds of cancers, the results of the epidemiologic studies are still controversial, and only a few trials have been performed. It has been reported that EPA and DHA may act either through the same or different mechanisms, thus suggesting that a differential efficacy could exist. At present, however, this point has not been clarified, although its better comprehension would allow a more proper and effective use of these fatty acids in the human interventional studies. In an attempt to elucidate this aspect we have herein analyzed the data obtained in the studies which have directly compared the antitumor effects of separate treatments with EPA or DHA. Most of the in vitro data indicate DHA as the more powerful antineoplastic agent. However, an equivalent efficiency of EPA and DHA is suggested by the few in vivo studies. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed and pathways of cell growth that could be differentially influenced by EPA and DHA are described. PMID:21824086

  15. CCR2-V64I genetic polymorphism: a possible involvement in HER2+ breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Banin-Hirata, Bruna Karina; Losi-Guembarovski, Roberta; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Campos, Clodoaldo Zago; Mazzuco, Tânia Longo; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Ceribelli, Jesus Roberto; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2016-05-01

    Many tumor cells express chemokines and chemokine receptors, and these molecules can affect both tumor progression and anti-tumor immune response. Genetic polymorphisms of some chemokine receptors were found to be closely related to malignant tumors, especially in metastasis process, including breast cancer (BC). Considering this, it was investigated a possible role for CCR2-V64I (C-C chemokine receptor 2) and CCR5-Δ32 (C-C chemokine receptor 5) genetic variants in BC context. Patients were divided into subgroups according to immunohistochemical profile of estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression. No significant associations were found in relation to susceptibility (CCR2-V64I: OR 1.32; 95 % CI 0.57-3.06; CCR5-∆32: OR 1.04; 95 % CI 0.60-1.81), clinical outcome (tumor size, lymph nodes commitment and/or distant metastasis, TNM staging and nuclear grade) or therapeutic response (recurrence and survival). However, it was found a significant correlation between CCR2-V64I allelic variant and HER2 immunohistochemical positive samples (p = 0.026). All in all, we demonstrate, for the first time, a positive correlation between CCR2 receptor gene polymorphism and a subgroup of BC related to poor prognosis, which deserves further investigation in larger samples for validation. PMID:25716470

  16. Regional intestinal absorption and biliary excretion of fluvastatin in the rat: possible involvement of mrp2.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Anders; Sjöberg, Asa; Bredberg, Ulf; Toreson, Helena; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Lennernäs, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The first purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo absorption, biliary secretion, and first-pass effect of fluvastatin following regional intestinal dosing in the rat. We also examined the membrane transport mechanisms and made in silico predictions of the relative importance of various intestinal regions to the human absorption of fluvastatin. Fluvastatin was administered intravenously (2, 10, and 20 micromol/kg) and into the duodenum (1.46, 2.92, 7.32, and 14.6 micromol/kg), jejunum (14.6 micromol/kg), ileum (1.46 and 14.6 mciromol/kg), and colon (1.46 and 14.6 micromol/kg) as a solution to conscious rats. In a separate group of rats, bile was collected after an i.v. dose of fluvastatin (2 micromol/kg). In the Caco-2 model the bidirectional transport of fluvastatin (16 microM) was investigated with and without various efflux inhibitors (verapamil, vinblastine, probenecid, and indomethacin, 160 microM). The human in vivo absorption of fluvastatin from an oral immediate release tablet and that from an oral extended release tablet (both 40 mg) were simulated in GastroPlus. Neither the dose nor the intestinal region influenced the bioavailability of fluvastatin significantly. The rate of absorption was, however, affected by both the dose and the site of administration; duodenum = jejunum > colon > ileum, and higher following the high dose. Increasing the i.v. dose from 2 to 20 micromol/kg decreased the clearance (26 +/- 3 to 12 +/- 1 mL/min/kg), the hepatic extraction (66 +/- 8 to 30 +/- 2%), and the volume of distribution (7.3 +/- 0.3 to 2.1 +/- 0.7 L/kg) for fluvastatin (p < 0.05). Neither bile cannulation nor bile sampling affected the pharmacokinetics. Fluvastatin was secreted into the bile, probably by active transport. The in vitro permeability for fluvastatin was high (>10 x 10(-6) cm/s). Indomethacin, but not the other inhibitors, affected the transport in both directions suggesting mrp2 to be involved. In silico, 93% of the dose was absorbed from

  17. Possible involvement of inflammatory/reparative processes in the development of uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Protic, Olga; Toti, Paolo; Islam, Md Soriful; Occhini, Rossella; Giannubilo, Stefano Raffaele; Catherino, William H; Cinti, Saverio; Petraglia, Felice; Ciavattini, Andrea; Castellucci, Mario; Hinz, Boris; Ciarmela, Pasquapina

    2016-05-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are benign tumors in the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. The most common histological type is the "usual leiomyoma", characterized by overexpression of ECM proteins, whereas the "cellular type" has higher cellular content. Our objective is to investigate the involvement of inflammatory and reparative processes in leiomyoma pathobiology. Using a morphological approach, we investigate the presence of inflammatory cells. Next, we determine the localization of the ECM, the presence/absence of fibrotic cells via α-sma and desmin and the immunohistochemical profile of the mesenchymal cells with respect to CD34. Finally, we explore the effect of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15, GM-CSF and IFN-γ) on pro-fibrotic factor activin A mRNA expression in vitro. Higher numbers of macrophages were found inside and close to leiomyomas as compared to the more distant myometrium. Cellular leiomyomas showed more macrophages and mast cells than the "usual type". Inside the fibroid tissue, we found cells positive for α-sma, but negative for desmin and a large amount of collagen surrounding the nodule, suggestive of myofibroblasts producing ECM. In the myometrium and leiomyomas of the "usual type", we identified numerous CD34+ fibroblasts, which are known to give rise to myofibroblasts upon loss of CD34 expression. In leiomyomas of the "cellular type", stromal fibroblasts were CD34-negative. Finally, we found that TNF-α increased activin A mRNA in myometrial and leiomyoma cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the presence of inflammatory cells in uterine leiomyomas, which may contribute to excessive ECM production, tissue remodeling and leiomyoma growth. PMID:26613601

  18. Possible involvement of oxytocin in modulating the stress response in lactating dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Mhairi A.; Tops, Mattie

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin can attenuate the physiological and behavioral response to stress in animals. In this study we investigated the relationship between plasma oxytocin concentrations and the behavioral and physiological response of dairy cows to a repeated psychological stressor (novel environment). Twenty lactating multi-parous dairy cows were milked in a familiar milking parlor and in a novel environment. Blood samples were collected before and after milking in the familiar parlor (baseline) and on the second and fifth day in the novel parlor to measure plasma cortisol and oxytocin concentrations. Heart rate was recorded on all cows during milking in the familiar and novel environment. On all test days, the behavioral response of cows to milk cluster attachment was scored. On day 2 in the novel parlor, the oxytocin response, cortisol concentrations and heart rate were greater, and heart rate variability was lower than baseline values recorded in the familiar parlor. The results from this study suggest that oxytocin release is increased in response to exposure to a psychological stressor (novel environment) and that cows adapt to this stressor over time. After initial suppression, oxytocin levels increased over days of milking in a novel environment, whereas indicators of stress simultaneously decreased. Furthermore, the oxytocin increase was associated with habituation of the cortisol response in anticipation of milking in a novel environment, suggesting that oxytocin may be involved in habituation to a novel environment in dairy cows. This mechanism of habituation to novel environments may reflect an association between oxytocin and a “familiarization-habituation response” to repeated exposure to an initially novel environment that has previously been reported in humans. PMID:25228892

  19. Plasma Kallikrein and Angiotensin I-converting enzyme N- and C-terminal domain activities are modulated by the insertion/deletion polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Almeida, S S; Barros, C C; Moraes, M R; Russo, F J; Haro, A S; Rosa, T S; Alves, M F; Pesquero, J B; Carmona, A K; Bacurau, R F P; Araújo, R C

    2010-04-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is recognized as one of the main effector molecules involved in blood pressure regulation. In the last few years some polymorphisms of ACE such as the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism have been described, but their physiologic relevance is poorly understood. In addition, few studies investigated if the specific activity of ACE domain is related to the I/D polymorphism and if it can affect other systems. The aim of this study was to establish a biochemical and functional characterization of the I/D polymorphism and correlate this with the corresponding ACE activity. For this purpose, 119 male brazilian army recruits were genotyped and their ACE plasma activities evaluated from the C- and N-terminal catalytic domains using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides, specific for the C-domain (Abz-LFK(Dnp)OH), N-domain (Abz-SDK(Dnp)P-OH) and both C- and N-domains (Abz-FRK(Dnp)P-OH). Plasma kallikrein activity was measured using Z-Phe-Arg-AMC as substrate and inhibited by selective plasma kallikrein inhibitor (PKSI). Some physiological parameters previously described related to the I/D polymorphism such as handgrip strength, blood pressure, heart rate and BMI were also evaluated. The genotype distribution was II n=27, ID n=64 and DD n=28. Total plasma ACE activity of both domains in II individuals was significantly lower in comparison to ID and DD. This pattern was also observed for C- and N-domain activities. Difference between ID and DD subjects was observed only with the N-domain specific substrate. Blood pressure, heart rate, handgrip strength and BMI were similar among the genotypes. This polymorphism also affected the plasma kallikrein activity and DD group presents high activity level. Thus, our data demonstrate that the I/D ACE polymorphism affects differently both ACE domains without effects on handgrip strength. Moreover, this polymorphism influences the kallikrein-kinin system of normotensive individuals

  20. Possible Segregated Ice at the Phoenix Landing Site: Was Liquid Water Involved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, C.; Blaney, D.; Hecht, M.; Catling, D.; Pike, W. T.; Mellon, M.; Kounaves, S.; Lemmon, M.

    2008-12-01

    exposed in Goldilocks trench and left undisturbed for 79 sols. During this time, the brightness of the material slowly faded and, by sol 99, a sublimation lag covered the bright deposit with nearly the same spectral properties as soil. It was not possible to obtain a large enough sample of the lag to directly measure salt concentration with a wet chemistry cell. Instead, a small sample of the lag was examined with the Optical Microscope to look for morphological evidence of salts. The material was stickier and more cohesive than previous soil samples examined with the microscope, and a population of light colored particles up to 30 microns in diameter with evidence of angularity consistent with microcrystallinity was found. This observation is suggestive of possible salts more concentrated in this area. In conclusion, the microscopy results are consistent with a liquid water formation mechanism but inconclusive without a direct measurement of the composition of the material.

  1. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). These data are consistent with the hypothesized role of the thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  2. High fat diet alters lactation outcomes: possible involvement of inflammatory and serotonergic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Laura L; Grayson, Bernadette E; Yadav, Ekta; Seeley, Randy J; Horseman, Nelson D

    2012-01-01

    Delay in the onset of lactogenesis has been shown to occur in women who are obese, however the mechanism altered within the mammary gland causing the delay remains unknown. Consumption of high fat diets (HFD) has been previously determined to result decreased litters and litter numbers in rodent models due to a decrease in fertility. We examined the effects of feeding a HFD (60% kcal from fat) diet versus a low-fat diet (LFD; 10% kcal from fat) to female Wistar rats on lactation outcomes. Feeding of HFD diet resulted in increased pup weights compared to pups from LFD fed animals for 4 d post-partum. Lactation was delayed in mothers on HFD but they began to produce copious milk volumes beginning 2 d post-partum, and milk yield was similar to LFD by day 3. Mammary glands collected from lactating animals on HFD diet, displayed a disrupted morphologies, with very few and small alveoli. Consistently, there was a significant decrease in the mRNA expression of milk protein genes, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and keratin 5 (K5), a luminobasal cell marker in the mammary glands of HFD lactating animals. Expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), the rate-limiting enzyme in serotonin (5-HT) biosynthesis, and the 5-HT(7) receptor (HTR7), which regulates mammary gland involution, were significantly increased in mammary glands of HFD animals. Additionally, we saw elevation of the inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α). These results indicate that consumption of HFD impairs mammary parenchymal tissue and impedes its ability to synthesize and secrete milk, possibly through an increase in 5-HT production within the mammary gland leading to an inflammatory process. PMID:22403677

  3. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  4. Nitric oxide mediates cardiac protection of tissue kallikrein by reducing inflammation and ventricular remodeling after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the role of nitric oxide (NO) and the kinin B2 receptor in mediating tissue kallikrein’s actions in intramyocardial inflammation and cardiac remodeling after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adenovirus carrying the human tissue kallikrein gene was delivered locally into rat hearts 4 days prior to 30-minute ischemia followed by 24- hour or 7-day reperfusion with or without administration of icatibant, a kinin B2 receptor antagonist, or N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Kallikrein gene delivery improved cardiac contractility and diastolic function, reduced infarct size at 1 day after I/R without affecting mean arterial pressure. Kallikrein treatment reduced macrophage/monocyte and neutrophil accumulation in the infarcted myocardium in association with reduced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels. Kallikrein increased cardiac endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation and NO levels and decreased superoxide formation, TGF-β1 levels and Smad2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, kallikrein reduced I/R-induced JNK, p38MAPK, IκB-α phosphorylation and nuclear NF-κB activation. In addition, kallikrein improved cardiac performance, reduced infarct size and prevented ventricular wall thinning at 7 days after I/R. The effects of kallikrein on cardiac function, inflammation and signaling mediators were all blocked by icatibant and L-NAME. These results indicate that tissue kallikrein through kinin B2 receptor and NO formation improves cardiac function, prevents inflammation and limits left ventricular remodeling after myocardial I/R by suppression of oxidative stress, TGF-β1/Smad2 and JNK/p38MAPK signaling pathways and NF-κB activation. PMID:18068196

  5. [The effect of dopaminergic stimulation and inhibition on the urinary excretion of aldosterone and kallikrein in spontaneously hypertensive rats].

    PubMed

    Minuz, P; Gangi, F; Degan, M; Lechi, C; Delva, P; Lechi, A

    1983-10-30

    The effect on the electrolyte balance of a dopaminergic agonist (bromocriptine) and an antagonist (metoclopramide) and their effect on renal aldosterone and kallikrein excretion were investigated. Ten normotensive Wistar rats and ten spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-Wistar Kioto) were treated with BCR (4 mg/Kg weight b.i.d.) for 4 days; after a week of pharmacological wash-out they received MCP (0,5 mg/Kg weight b.i.d.) for 4 days. Before and after treatment and at the 2nd and 4th day of each treatment diuresis, urinary excretion of aldosterone, kallikrein, sodium, potassium and proteins were measured. During the 24-hour urine collections the rats were kept in separate metabolic cages with free access to food and water. Kallikrein urinary excretion was lower in SHR than in normotensive rats under basal conditions (p 0.05); urinary sodium, potassium, proteins and sodium/potassium rate were also reduced in SHR. After treatment with bromocriptine a further reduction in urinary kallikrein excretion was observed in SHR. After MCP all the parameters were unchanged both in normotensive rats and in SHR, but SHR showed a significant correlation between aldosterone and kallikrein excretion (p less than 0,001); in this condition it seems that in SHR the control exerted by aldosterone on kallikrein excretion is greater than the one exerted by dopamine. It may indicate a defect of the natriuretic and vasodilator dopaminergic system in spontaneously hypertensive rats. PMID:6559080

  6. Tissue expression of glandular kallikrein and its response to 17 beta-estradiol in the acclimatized carp.

    PubMed

    Haussmann, Denise; Vidal, Rene; Figueroa, Jaime

    2006-06-01

    Cyprinus carpio skeletal muscle kallikrein was isolated to apparent homogeneity, and a polyclonal antiserum against the purified protein was generated. Glandular kallikrein expression and tissue distribution were assessed using both Western blots and immunohistochemistry. A 39-kDa protein was detected in skeletal muscle, the gill, kidney, and pituitary gland, where an additional 72-kDa immunoreactive band was observed. Immunohistochemistry revealed immunoreactive kallikrein in the intermuscle tissue, epithelial gill cells, apical portion of distal and proximal tubular cells in the kidney, mucus and epithelial cells of the skin, intestinal tube, and prolactin-producing cells of the pituitary gland. In addition, the effect of 17beta-estradiol on kallikrein expression was analyzed in three different tissues of winter- and summer-acclimatized male carps. A 2.5-fold (p<0.05) increase in kallikrein immunoreactivity due to estrogen treatment was observed in winter-acclimatized carp muscle, but not in summer-acclimatized fish. In contrast, the gill responded differently, since a 2-fold (p<0.05) increase was found only in summer-acclimatized carps. Kallikrein immunoreactivity in the kidney increased both in summer- (2.5 fold) and in winter-acclimatized carps (1.5 fold). The signals obtained demonstrate the existence of tissue-specific variable responses to estrogen treatment in vivo, between winter and summer-acclimatized carp. PMID:16849838

  7. Structure of BbKI, a disulfide-free plasma kallikrein inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongwen; Hansen, Daiane; Shabalin, Ivan G; Gustchina, Alla; Vieira, Debora F; de Brito, Marlon V; Araújo, Ana Paula U; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    A serine protease inhibitor from Bauhinia bauhinioides (BbKI) belongs to the Kunitz family of plant inhibitors, which are common in plant seeds. BbKI does not contain any disulfides, unlike most other members of this family. It is a potent inhibitor of plasma kallikrein, in addition to other serine proteases, and thus exhibits antithrombotic activity. A high-resolution crystal structure of recombinantly expressed BbKI was determined (at 1.4 Å resolution) and was compared with the structures of other members of the family. Modeling of a complex of BbKI with plasma kallikrein indicates that changes in the local structure of the reactive loop that includes the specificity-determining Arg64 are necessary in order to explain the tight binding. An R64A mutant of BbKI was found to be a weaker inhibitor of plasma kallikrein, but was much more potent against plasmin, suggesting that this mutant may be useful for preventing the breakup of fibrin and maintaining clot stability, thus preventing excessive bleeding. PMID:26249699

  8. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane-specific antibody-induced nephritis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J; Chung, Sharon A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T; Gregersen, Peter K; Gilkeson, Gary G; Kimberly, Robert P; Vyse, Timothy J; Kim, Il; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B; Criswell, Lindsey A; Wakeland, Edward K; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that maybe responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family,which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms,some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  9. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane–specific antibody–induced nephritis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J.; Chung, Sharon A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary G.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Kim, Il; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that may be responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family, which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms, some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  10. Contact activation of kallikrein-kinin system by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Simberg, Dmitri; Zhang, Wan-Ming; Merkulov, Sergei; McCrae, Keith; Park, Ji-Ho; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2009-01-01

    Previously we reported that plasma kallikrein and high molecular weight kininogen attach to the surface of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) through the incompletely covered iron oxide core (Simberg et al., Biomaterials, 2009). Here we show that SPIONs also activate kallikrein-kinin system in vitro and in vivo. The serine protease activity of kallikrein was stably associated with SPIONs and could be detected on the nanoparticles even after extensive washing steps. The enzymatic activity was not detectable in kininogen-deficient and Factor XII-deficient plasma. The enzymatic activation could be blocked by precoating SPIONs with histidine-rich Domain 5 (D5) of kininogen. Importantly, the kallikrein activity was detectable in plasma of SPION-injected, but not of D5/SPION-injected mice. Tumor-targeted SPIONs when injected into kininogen-deficient and control mice, produced high levels of vascular clotting in tumors, suggesting that kallikrein activation is not responsible for the nanoparticle-induced thrombosis. These data could help in understanding the toxicity of nanomaterials and could be used in designing nanoparticles with controlled enzymatic activity. PMID:19508879

  11. A mannose-receptor is possibly involved in the phagocytosis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by seabream (Sparus aurata L.) leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Esteban, M A; Meseguer, J

    2003-05-01

    In this paper the possible involvement of the mannose-receptor on the non-specific recognition and phagocytosis of heat killed yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) by gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) head-kidney leucocytes was established by studying the ability of different sugars to inhibit the uptake of the yeast cells by leucocytes. Leucocytes were preincubated for 30min with different concentrations of sugar (alpha-mannan, d-mannose, d-fucose, l-fucose, d-glucose, d-glucosamine and n-acetyl-glucosamine, all of them described as specific ligands of the vertebrate mannose-receptor) and afterwards incubated with FITC-labelled yeast cells for phagocytosis assays. The phagocytic ability (percentage of cells with one or more ingested yeast cells within the total cell population) and capacity (number of ingested yeast cells per cell) of leucocytes was analysed by flow cytometry. The results demonstrate the potential existence of a specific receptor-sugar or receptor-yeast cell binding process, which was saturable, specific and dose-dependent. More specifically, when leucocytes were preincubated with appropriate doses of d-mannose, d- or l-fucose, d-glucose or n-acetyl-glucosamine the phagocytosis of yeast cells by head-kidney leucocytes was partially blocked. Seabream leucocytes were also preincubated with chloroquine, a lysosomotropic drug which downregulates (in a nonspecific manner) the expression of mannose-receptors in mammals, before phagocytosis assays were performed. The results demonstrated that the phagocytosis of yeast was completely blocked by this substance. The overall results seem to corroborate the presence of the mannose-receptor in seabream phagocytes, which is involved in the non-specific binding and phagocytosis of yeast cells by head-kidney leucocytes. PMID:12711272

  12. Cannabidiol blocks long-lasting behavioral consequences of predator threat stress: possible involvement of 5HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Ferreira, Frederico Rogério; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an incapacitating syndrome that follows a traumatic experience. Predator exposure promotes long-lasting anxiogenic effect in rodents, an effect related to symptoms found in PTSD patients. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychotomimetic component of Cannabis sativa with anxiolytic effects. The present study investigated the anti-anxiety actions of CBD administration in a model of PTSD. Male Wistar rats exposed to a predator (cat) received, 1 h later, singled or repeated i.p. administration of vehicle or CBD. Seven days after the stress animals were submitted to the elevated plus maze. To investigate the involvement of 5HT1A receptors in CBD effects animals were pre-treated with WAY100635, a 5HT1A receptor antagonist. To explore possible neurobiological mechanisms involved in these effects, 5HT1A receptor mRNA and BDNF protein expression were measured in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, amygdaloid complex and dorsal periaqueductal gray. Repeated administration of CBD prevented long-lasting anxiogenic effects promoted by a single predator exposure. Pretreatment with WAY100635 attenuated CBD effects. Seven days after predator exposure 5HT1A mRNA expression was up regulated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. CBD and paroxetine failed to prevent this effect. No change in BDNF expression was found. In conclusion, predator exposure promotes long-lasting up-regulation of 5HT1A receptor gene expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Repeated CBD administration prevents the long-lasting anxiogenic effects observed after predator exposure probably by facilitating 5HT1A receptors neurotransmission. Our results suggest that CBD has beneficial potential for PTSD treatment and that 5HT1A receptors could be a therapeutic target in this disorder. PMID:22979992

  13. Matriptase initiates activation of epidermal pro-kallikrein and disease onset in a mouse model of Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Masedunskas, Andrius; Bey, Alexandra L; Rasmussen, Amber L; Weigert, Roberto; List, Karin; Szabo, Roman; Overbeek, Paul A; Bugge, Thomas H

    2010-08-01

    Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI is the etiological origin of Netherton syndrome, which causes detachment of the stratum corneum and chronic inflammation. Here we show that the membrane protease matriptase initiates Netherton syndrome in a LEKTI-deficient mouse model by premature activation of a pro-kallikrein cascade. Auto-activation of pro-inflammatory pro-kallikrein-related peptidases that are associated with stratum corneum detachment was either low or undetectable, but they were efficiently activated by matriptase. Ablation of matriptase from LEKTI-deficient mice dampened inflammation, eliminated aberrant protease activity, prevented detachment of the stratum corneum, and improved the barrier function of the epidermis. These results uncover a pathogenic matriptase-pro-kallikrein pathway that could operate in several human skin and inflammatory diseases. PMID:20657595

  14. Cissus quadrangularis L. extract attenuates chronic ulcer by possible involvement of polyamines and proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    PubMed Central

    Jainu, Mallika; Vijaimohan, K.; Kannan, K.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether Cissus quandrangularis extract (CQE) had healing effects on gastric ulcer, through modulation of polyamines and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in rats. Administration of acetic acid (AA) was accompanied by reduced PCNA which was determined by immunohistochemical staining, 3H-thymidine incorporation using liquid scintillation spectrometry, mitochondrial marker enzymes, polyamine contents and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α) expression in gastric mucosa of rats. Administration of CQE after the application of AA to the stomach enhanced the reduction of ulcer area in a dose-dependent manner which was confirmed by histoarchitecture. Moreover, CQE significantly increased the 3H-thymidine incorporation and the levels of polyamines such as putrescine, spermine and spermidine in ulcerated rats. In addition, the extract offers gastroprotection in the ulcerated area by increased expression of TGF-α and also reversed the changes in the gastric mucosa of ulcerated rats with significant elevation in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes and PCNA levels. Based on these results, the healing effect of CQE on AA induced gastric mucosal injury in rats may be attributed to its growth promoting and cytoprotective actions, possibly involving an increase in tissue polyamine contents and cell proliferation. PMID:20931084

  15. Possible involvement of inefficient cleavage of preprovasopressin by signal peptidase as a cause for familial central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, M; Oiso, Y; Murase, T; Kondo, K; Saito, H; Chinzei, T; Racchi, M; Lively, M O

    1993-01-01

    A transition of G to A at nucleotide position 279 in exon 1 of the vasopressin gene has been identified in patients with familial central diabetes insipidus. The mutation predicts an amino acid substitution of Thr (ACG) for Ala (GCG) at the COOH terminus of the signal peptide in preprovasopression (preproVP). Translation in vitro of wild-type and mutant mRNAs produced 19-kD preproVPs. When translated in the presence of canine pancreatic rough microsomes, wild-type preproVP was converted to a 21-kD protein, whereas the mutant mRNA produced proteins of 21 kD and 23 kD. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the 21-kD proteins from the wild-type and the mutants were proVPs generated by the proteolytic cleavage of the 19-residue signal peptide and the addition of carbohydrate. Accordingly, mutant preproVP was cleaved at the correct site after Thr-19, but the efficiency of cleavage by signal peptidase was < 25% that observed for the wild-type preproVP, resulting in the formation of a predominant glycosylated but uncleaved 23-kD product. These data suggest that inefficient processing of preproVP produced by the mutant allele is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes insipidus in the affected individuals. Images PMID:8514868

  16. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) increases pain behavior and the blood glucose level: possible involvement of glucocorticoid system.

    PubMed

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kang, Yu-Jung; Jung, Jun-Sub; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Choi, Moon-Gi; Choi, Seong-Soo; Suh, Hong-Won

    2013-10-01

    The possible involvement of glucocorticoid system in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced nociception and the blood glucose level was studied in ICR mice. In the first experiment, mice were treated intrathecally (i.t.) with IL-1β (100 pg). Corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA (hypothalamus) and c-Fos mRNA (pituitary gland, spinal cord, and the adrenal gland) levels were measured at 30, 60 and 120 min after IL-1β administration. We found that i.t. injection with IL-1β increased CRH mRNA level in the hypothalamus. The IL-1β administered i.t. elevated c-Fos mRNA levels in the spinal cord, pituitary and adrenal glands. Furthermore, i.t. administration of IL-1β significantly increased the plasma corticosterone level up to 60 min. In addition, the adrenalectomy caused the reductions of the blood glucose level and pain behavior induced by IL-1β injected i.t. in normal and D-glucose-fed groups. Furthermore, intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment with RU486 (100mg/kg) attenuated the blood glucose level and pain behavior induced by IL-1β administered i.t. in normal and D-glucose-fed groups. Our results suggest that IL-1β administered i.t. increases the blood glucose level and pain behavior via an activation of the glucocorticoid system. PMID:23773309

  17. Trypsin-kallikrein isoinhibitor K (type Kunitz) from snails (Helix pomatia). Purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dietl, T; Tschesche, H

    1975-10-15

    A basic proteinase inhibitor, isoinhibitor K, was purified by SE-Sephadex C-25 column chromatography from the mixture of acid-stable and heat-stable isoinhibitors of the snail (Helix pomatia). Isoinhibitor K is homogeneous in polyacrylamide gel, cellulose acetate and polyacrylamide-dodecylsulfate electrophoresis. From the electrophoretic mobility in dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel and apparent molecular weight of 6500 +/- 200 was estimated. From the amino acid composition the inhibitor consists of 58 amino acid residues. It contains three disulfide bridges, a C-terminal valine and a lysine residue at the reactive site. Isoinhibitor K inhibits the enzymes: bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin, porcine plasmin and pancreatic kallikrein, the trypsin-like component of Streptomyces griseus proteinase-pronase E, and fungi proteinase K from Tritirachium album Limber, which is only inhibited very slightly in contrast to the effect of the mixture of isoinhibitors. The inhibitory effect of isoinhibitor K against these enzymes is compared to that of the mixture or of other isoinhibitors. The following enzymes are not inhibited by isoinhibitor K: Aspergillus proteinase P and alkaline bacillus proteinase 2231 (Röhm), which both are inhibited by the mixture of isoinhibitors. Porcine elastase, bacterial proteinase N (M) (Röhm), and a trypsin-like proteinase from wheat are not inhibited, porcine acrosin and porcine serum kallikrein only to a very minor extent by the mixture of isoinhibitors. Reactive-site peptide-bond cleavage during inhibition could not be detected. Thus, the inhibitory behaviour is just as broad in specificity and as unusual as that of the trypsin-kallikrein inhibitor (Kunitz) from bovine organs. The N-terminus is blocked by pyroglutamic acid. Isoinhibitor K is the main component of the isoinhibitors secreted into the mucus and amounts to 35-40% of the mixture. PMID:1081050

  18. Antimanic-like activity of candesartan in mice: Possible involvement of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    de Souza Gomes, Júlia Ariana; de Souza, Greicy Coelho; Berk, Michael; Cavalcante, Lígia Menezes; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa F; Budni, Josiane; de Lucena, David Freitas; Quevedo, João; Carvalho, André F; Macêdo, Danielle

    2015-11-01

    Activation of the brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) triggers pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory mechanisms which are involved in the neurobiology of bipolar disorder (BD). Candesartan (CDS) is an AT1 receptor antagonist with potential neuroprotective properties. Herein we investigated CDS effects against oxidative, neurotrophic inflammatory and cognitive effects of amphetamine (AMPH)-induced mania. In the reversal protocol adult mice were given AMPH 2 mg/kg i.p. or saline and between days 8 and 14 received CDS 0.1, 0.3 or 1 mg/kg orally, lithium (Li) 47.5 mg/kg i.p., or saline. In the prevention treatment, mice were pretreated with CDS, Li or saline prior to AMPH. Locomotor activity and working memory performance were assessed. Glutathione (GSH), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) and TNF-α levels were evaluated in the hippocampus (HC) and cerebellar vermis (CV). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK-3beta) levels were measured in the HC. CDS and Li prevented and reversed the AMPH-induced increases in locomotor activity. Only CDS prevented and reversed AMPH-induced working memory deficits. CDS prevented AMPH-induced alterations in GSH (HC and CV), TBARS (HC and CV), TNF-α (HC and CV) and BDNF (HC) levels. Li prevented alterations in BDNF and phospho-Ser9-GSK3beta. CDS reversed AMPH-induced alterations in GSH (HC and CV), TBARS (HC), TNF-α (CV) and BDNF levels. Li reversed AMPH-induced alterations in TNF-α (HC and CV) and BDNF (HC) levels. CDS is effective in reversing and preventing AMPH-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations, providing a rationale for the design of clinical trials investigating CDS׳s possible therapeutic effects. PMID:26321203

  19. Alterations in left ventricular function during intermittent hypoxia: Possible involvement of O-GlcNAc protein and MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xueling; Shang, Jin; Deng, Yan; Yuan, Xiao; Zhu, Die; Liu, Huiguo

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea, characterized by recurrent episodes of hypoxia [intermittent hypoxia (IH)], has been identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification (O-GlcNAcylation) of proteins has important regulatory implications on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disorders. In this study, we examined the role of O-GlcNAcylation in cardiac architecture and left ventricular function following IH. Rats were randomly assigned to a normoxia and IH group (2 min 21% O2; 2 min 6-8% O2). Left ventricular function, myocardial morphology and the levels of signaling molecules were then measured. IH induced a significant increase in blood pressure, associated with a gradually abnormal myocardial architecture. The rats exposed to 2 or 3 weeks of IH presented with augmented left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, which declined at week 4. Consistently, the O-GlcNAc protein and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) levels in the left ventricular tissues steadily increased following IH, reaching peak levels at week 3. The O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) phosphorylation levels were affected in an opposite manner. The phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) remained unaltered. In parallel, compared with exposure to normoxia, 4 weeks of IH augmented the O-GlcNAc protein, OGT, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK levels, accompanied by a decrease in OGA levels and an increase in the levels of myocardial nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), inflammatory cytokines, caspase-3 and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Taken together, our suggest a possible involvement of O-GlcNAc protein and MAPK signaling in the alterations of left ventricular function and cardiac injury following IH. PMID:25936416

  20. PPARβ/δ and γ in a rat model of Parkinson's disease: possible involvement in PD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Roberta; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Di Giacomo, Erica; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Cristiano, Loredana; Antonosante, Andrea; Fidoamore, Alessia; Massimi, Mara; Alecci, Marcello; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurologic disorder, affecting about 1-4% of persons older than 60 years. Among the proposed mechanisms of PD generation, free radical damage is believed to play a pivotal role in the development and/or progression of the disease. Recently, PPARs, a class of transcription factors involved in several pathways both in physiological and pathological conditions, have been linked by us and others to neurodegeneration. Particularly, PPARγ and its ligands have been indicated as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of several pathological conditions associated with neuroinflammation within the CNS. The anti-inflammatory function of PPARγ has attracted attention since agonists exert a broad spectrum of protective effects in several animal models of neurological diseases, including psychiatric diseases. On the other hand a detrimental role for PPARβ/δ has been proposed in Alzheimer, being closely related to the decrease of BDNF and Trkfl. On these bases, in this work we used a 6-OHDA hemi-lesioned rat model, inducing loss of dopaminergic neurons, to study the effects of the lesion at three time points from the lesion (1, 2, and 3 weeks), in relevant areas of PD motor symptoms, such as substantia nigra and globus pallidus and in the area of reward and mood control, the nucleus accumbens. In particular, it was studied: (i) the expression of BDNF and its downstream signals; (ii) the modulation of PPARs levels. The results obtained indicate the possible use of a dual PPARβ/δ antagonist/PPARγ agonist to counteract primary and secondary signs of PD neurodegeneration. PMID:25530507

  1. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity II. Possible involvement of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Horton, Robert A.; Hill, Dennis W.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Our recent investigations have focused on the possible involvement of glutathione-derived APAP metabolites in APAP nephrotoxicity and have demonstrated that administration of acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) potentiated APAP-induced renal injury with no effects on APAP-induced liver injury. Additionally, APAP-CYS treatment alone resulted in a dose-responsive renal GSH depletion. This APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion could interfere with intrarenal detoxification of APAP or its toxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) and may be the mechanism responsible for the potentiation of APAP nephrotoxicity. Renal-specific GSH depletion has been demonstrated in mice and rats following administration of amino acid {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor substrates for {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT). The present study sought to determine if APAP-CYS-induced renal glutathione depletion is the result of disruption of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle through interaction with {gamma}-GT. The results confirmed that APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion was antagonized by the {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) inhibitor acivicin. In vitro analysis demonstrated that APAP-CYS is a {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor for both murine and bovine renal {gamma}-GT. Analysis of urine from mice pretreated with acivicin and then treated with APAP, APAP-CYS, or acetaminophen-glutathione identified a {gamma}-glutamyl-cysteinyl-acetaminophen metabolite. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that APAP-CYS contributes to APAP nephrotoxicity by depletion of renal GSH stores through interaction with the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle.

  2. Possible Involvement of Hepatitis B Virus Infection of Hepatocytes in the Attenuation of Apoptosis in Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Haga, Yuki; Wu, Shuang; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background The induction of apoptosis in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy against hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatic fibrosis. The underlying mechanisms of apoptosis in HSCs, however, are unknown under consideration of HBV infection. In this study, the effects of HBV on apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling in HSCs were examined. Methods The effects of conditioned media (CM) from HepG2.2.15 on apoptosis induced by the proteasome inhibitor MG132 in LX-2 and HHSteC were studied in regard to c-Jun. In combination with c-Fos, c-Jun forms the AP-1 early response transcription factor, leading to AP-1 activation, signal transduction, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis. Results In LX-2 cells, MG132 treatment was associated with the phosphorylation of c-Jun, activation of AP-1 and apoptosis. However, in the presence of CM from HepG2.2.15, these phenomena were attenuated. In HHSteC cells, similar results were observed. HBV genomic DNA is not involved in the process of HSC apoptosis. It is possible that HBeAg has an inhibitory effect on MG132-induced apoptosis in LX-2. We also observed the upregulation of several ER stress-associated genes, such as cAMP responsive element binding protein 3-like 3, inhibin-beta A and solute carrier family 17-member 2, in the presence of CM from HepG2.2.15, or CM from PXB cells infected with HBV. Conclusions HBV inhibits the activation of c-Jun/AP-1 in HSCs, contributing to the attenuation of apoptosis and resulting in hepatic fibrosis. HBV also up-regulated several ER stress genes associated with cell growth and fibrosis. These mechanistic insights might shed new light on a treatment strategy for HBV-associated hepatic fibrosis. PMID:26731332

  3. Alterations in left ventricular function during intermittent hypoxia: Possible involvement of O-GlcNAc protein and MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    GUO, XUELING; SHANG, JIN; DENG, YAN; YUAN, XIAO; ZHU, DIE; LIU, HUIGUO

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea, characterized by recurrent episodes of hypoxia [intermittent hypoxia (IH)], has been identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification (O-GlcNAcylation) of proteins has important regulatory implications on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disorders. In this study, we examined the role of O-GlcNAcylation in cardiac architecture and left ventricular function following IH. Rats were randomly assigned to a normoxia and IH group (2 min 21% O2; 2 min 6–8% O2). Left ventricular function, myocardial morphology and the levels of signaling molecules were then measured. IH induced a significant increase in blood pressure, associated with a gradually abnormal myocardial architecture. The rats exposed to 2 or 3 weeks of IH presented with augmented left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, which declined at week 4. Consistently, the O-GlcNAc protein and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) levels in the left ventricular tissues steadily increased following IH, reaching peak levels at week 3. The O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) phosphorylation levels were affected in an opposite manner. The phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) remained unaltered. In parallel, compared with exposure to normoxia, 4 weeks of IH augmented the O-GlcNAc protein, OGT, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK levels, accompanied by a decrease in OGA levels and an increase in the levels of myocardial nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), inflammatory cytokines, caspase-3 and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Taken together, our suggest a possible involvement of O-GlcNAc protein and MAPK signaling in the alterations of left ventricular function and cardiac injury following IH. PMID:25936416

  4. Nitric oxide-dependent NAD linkage to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: possible involvement of a cysteine thiyl radical intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, M; Pietraforte, D; Di Stasi, A M; Mallozzi, C

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) undergoes NAD(H) linkage to an active site thiol when it comes into contact with .NO-related oxidants. We found that a free-radical generator 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH), which does not release either .NO or .NO-related species, was indeed able to induce the NAD(H) linkage to GAPDH. We performed spin-trapping studies with purified apo-GAPDH to identify a putative thiol intermediate produced by AAPH as well as by .NO-related oxidants. As .NO sources we used .NO gas and two .NO-donors, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine and 3-morpholinosydno-nimine hydrochloride (SIN-1). Because SIN-1 produces .NO and a superoxide radical simultaneously, we also tested the effects of peroxynitrite. All the .NO-related oxidants were able to induce the linkage of NAD(H) to GAPDH and the formation of a protein free-radical identified as a thiyl radical (inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide). .NO gas and the .NO-donors required molecular oxygen to induce the formation of the GAPDH thiyl radical, suggesting the possible involvement of higher nitrogen oxides. Thiyl radical formation was decreased by the reconstitution of GAPDH with NAD+. Apo-GAPDH was a strong scavenger of AAPH radicals, but its scavenging ability was decreased when its cysteine residues were alkylated or when it was reconstituted with NAD+. In addition, after treatment with AAPH, a thiyl radical of GAPDH was trapped at high enzyme concentrations. We suggest that the NAD(H) linkage to GAPDH is mediated by a thiyl radical intermediate not specific to .NO or .NO-related oxidants. The cysteine residue located at the active site of GAPDH (Cys-149) is oxidized by free radicals to a thiyl radical, which reacts with the neighbouring coenzyme to form Cys-NAD(H) linkages. Studies with the NAD+ molecule radio-labelled in the nicotinamide or adenine portion revealed that both portions of the NAD+ molecule are linked to GAPDH

  5. Kallikrein-related peptidase 8 is expressed in myocardium and induces cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Buqing; Yu, Qing; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Zhiping; Cong, Binghai; Du, Jiankui; Lu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Ni, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The tissue kallikrein-related peptidase family (KLK) is a group of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like serine proteases that share a similar homology to parent tissue kallikrein (KLK1). KLK1 is identified in heart and has anti-hypertrophic effects. However, whether other KLK family members play a role in regulating cardiac function remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that KLK8 was expressed in myocardium. KLK8 expression was upregulated in left ventricle of cardiac hypertrophy models. Both intra-cardiac adenovirus-mediated and transgenic-mediated KLK8 overexpression led to cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. In primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, KLK8 knockdown inhibited phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas KLK8 overexpression promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via a serine protease activity-dependent but kinin receptor-independent pathway. KLK8 overexpression increased epidermal growth factor (EGF) production, which was blocked by the inhibitors of serine protease. EGF receptor (EGFR) antagonist and EGFR knockdown reversed the hypertrophy induced by KLK8 overexpression. KLK8-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was also significantly decreased by blocking the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) or PAR2 pathway. Our data suggest that KLK8 may promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through EGF signaling- and PARs-dependent but a kinin receptor-independent pathway. It is implied that different KLK family members can subtly regulate cardiac function and remodeling. PMID:26823023

  6. Plasma kallikrein-bradykinin pathway promotes circulatory nitric oxide metabolite availability during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Padhy, Gayatri; Gangwar, Anamika; Sharma, Manish; Himashree, Gidugu; Singh, Krishan; Bhaumik, Gopinath; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an indispensible signalling molecule under hypoxic environment for both ethnic high altitude natives as well as lowland residents at high altitude. Several studies have reported higher levels of NO and bioactive NO products for both high altitude natives as well as healthy high altitude sojourners. But the metabolic pathways regulating the formation of NO and associated metabolites during hypoxia still remain elusive. In the present study, we profiled plasma proteomes of Ladakhi natives (3520 m) and lowland residents (post 1, 4 and 7 days stay) at the same altitude. This has resulted in the identification of 208 hypoxia responsive proteins (p < 0.05) and kininogen-plasma kallikrein-bradykinin as a major pathway regulating eNOS activity during hypoxia. In corroboration, we have also observed significant higher levels of plasma biomarkers for NO production (l-citrulline, nitrite, nitrate) for Ladakhi natives as compared to both lowland individuals healthy high altitude sojourners indicating higher NO availability. Since hypoxia-induced free radicals reduce NO availability, we also measured plasma levels of 8-isoprostanes, protein carbonyls and protein oxidation products in both Ladakhi natives and high altitude sojourners. Interestingly Ladakhi natives had significant lower levels of oxidative stress in comparison to high altitude sojourners but higher than lowland controls. These results suggest that plasma kallikrein-bradykinin-eNOS pathway along with moderate oxidative stress contributes to high altitude adaptation of Ladakhi natives. PMID:26952290

  7. Tissue Kallikrein Prevents Restenosis After Stenting of Severe Atherosclerotic Stenosis of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ruifeng; Zhang, Renliang; Yang, Fang; Lin, Min; Li, Min; Liu, Ling; Yin, Qin; Lin, Hang; Xiong, Yunyun; Liu, Wenhua; Fan, Xiaobing; Dai, Qiliang; Zhou, Lizhi; Lan, Wenya; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In-stent restenosis (ISR) following intracranial artery stenting affects long-term clinical outcome. This randomized controlled trial sought to identify the long-term efficacy of exogenous tissue kallikrein (TK) for preventing ISR after intracranial stenting of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) atherosclerotic stenosis. Sixty-one patients successfully treated with intracranial stenting for symptomatic MCA M1 segment stenosis (>70%) were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups: control group and TK group. Patients in the TK group received human urinary kallidinogenase for 7 days, followed by maintenance therapy of pancreatic kallikrein for 6 months. The primary end point was angiographically verified ISR at 6 months, and secondary end points included vascular events and death within 12 months. Endogenous TK plasma concentrations of patients were measured before stenting and at the 6-month follow-up time-point. Patients in the TK group had lower occurrence rates of ISR and vascular events than patients in the control group. There was no difference in endogenous TK levels in plasma at 6 months postoperatively between the TK and control groups. Further subgroup analysis revealed that patients without ISR had higher endogenous TK levels at baseline and lower concentrations at 6 months postoperatively compared with patients who underwent ISR. Exogenous TK is effective for the prevention of ISR after intracranial stenting. PMID:26871851

  8. The Extreme Anterior Domain Is an Essential Craniofacial Organizer Acting through Kinin-Kallikrein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jacox, Laura; Sindelka, Radek; Chen, Justin; Rothman, Alyssa; Dickinson, Amanda; Sive, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The extreme anterior domain (EAD) is a conserved embryonic region that includes the presumptive mouth. We show that the Kinin-Kallikrein pathway is active in the EAD and necessary for craniofacial development in Xenopus and zebrafish. The mouth failed to form and neural crest (NC) development and migration was abnormal after loss of function (LOF) in the pathway genes kng, encoding Bradykinin (xBdk), carboxypeptidase-N (cpn) that cleaves Bradykinin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Consistent with a role for nitric oxide (NO) in face formation, endogenous NO levels declined after LOF in pathway genes but these were restored and a normal face formed after medial implantation of xBdk-beads into LOF embryos. Facial transplants demonstrated that Cpn function from within the EAD is necessary for migration of first arch cranial NC into the face and to promote mouth opening. The study identifies the EAD as an essential craniofacial organizer acting through Kinin-Kallikrein signaling. PMID:25043181

  9. The contact activation and kallikrein/kinin systems: pathophysiologic and physiologic activities.

    PubMed

    Schmaier, A H

    2016-01-01

    The contact activation system (CAS) and kallikrein/kinin system (KKS) are older recognized biochemical pathways that include several proteins that skirt the fringes of the blood coagulation, fibrinolytic, complement and renin-angiotensin fields. These proteins initially were proposed as part of the hemostatic pathways because their deficiencies are associated with prolonged clinical assays. However, the absence of bleeding states with deficiencies of factor XII (FXII), prekallikrein (PK) and high-molecular-weight kininogen indicates that the CAS and KKS do not contribute to hemostasis. Since the discovery of the Hageman factor 60 years ago much has been learned about the biochemistry, cell biology and animal physiology of these proteins. The CAS is a pathophysiologic surface defense mechanism against foreign proteins, organisms and artificial materials. The KKS is an inflammatory response mechanism. Targeting their activation through FXIIa or plasma kallikrein inhibition when blood interacts with the artificial surfaces of modern interventional medicine or in acute attacks of hereditary angioedema restores vascular homeostasis. FXII/FXIIa and products that arise with PK deficiency also offer novel ways to reduce arterial and venous thrombosis without an effect on hemostasis. In summary, there is revived interest in the CAS and KKS due to better understanding of their activities. The new appreciation of these systems will lead to several new therapies for a variety of medical disorders. PMID:26565070

  10. True User Involvement by People Living With HIV is Possible: Description of a User-driven HIV Clinic in Norway.

    PubMed

    Berg, Rigmor C; Gamst, Are; Said, Maryan; Aas, Kristin Bårdsen; Songe, Solveig Helene; Fangen, Kim; Rysstad, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The Greater Involvement of People Living with or Affected by HIV principle highlights the various contributions HIV-infected people can make in HIV program development and implementation. We present a unique example of how service users' involvement led to a complete organizational redesign of an outpatient HIV clinic in Southern Norway. We applied a user-driven, case study method, which showed that establishing a user board laid the foundation for the redesign process, as the board provided a clear infrastructure of user involvement and developed a set of user-defined targets for services. The main targets-optimal health, holistic care and treatment, and empowerment-were operationalized as a set of action points, such as establishing HIV nurse coordinators. While there is no single method for user involvement, we offer useful ideas that can help others develop an involvement project that is effective and sustainable. PMID:26255897

  11. Ferritin binds to light chain of human H-kininogen and inhibits kallikrein-mediated bradykinin release.

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Narayanan; Torti, Suzy V; Torti, Frank M

    2002-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein that exists in both intracellular and extracellular compartments. We have previously identified H-kininogen (high-molecular-weight kininogen) as a ferritin-binding protein [Torti and Torti (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 13630-13635]. H-Kininogen is a precursor of the potent pro-inflammatory peptide bradykinin, which is released from H-kininogen following cleavage of H-kininogen by the serine protease kallikrein. In this report, we demonstrate that binding of ferritin to H-kininogen occurs via the modified light chain of H-kininogen, and that ferritin binds preferentially to activated H-kininogen. We further demonstrate that binding of ferritin to H-kininogen retards the proteolytic cleavage of H-kininogen by kallikrein and its subsequent release of bradykinin from H-kininogen. Ferritin does not interfere with the ability of kallikrein to digest a synthetic substrate, suggesting that ferritin specifically impedes the ability of kallikrein to digest H-kininogen, perhaps by steric hindrance. Based on these results, we propose a model of sequential H-kininogen cleavage and ferritin binding. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the binding of ferritin to H-kininogen may serve to modulate bradykinin release. PMID:12071855

  12. A genetically engineered human Kunitz protease inhibitor with increased kallikrein inhibition in an ovine model of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Ohri, S K; Parratt, R; White, T; Becket, J; Brannan, J J; Hunt, B J; Taylor, K M

    2001-05-01

    A recombinant human serine protease inhibitor known as Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) wild type has functional similarities to the bovine Kunitz inhibitor, aprotinin, and had shown a potential to reduce bleeding in an ovine model of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The aim of this study was to assess KPI-185, a modification of KPI-wild type that differs from KPI-wild type in two amino acid residues and which enhances anti-kallikrein activity in a further double-blind, randomized study in an ovine model of CPB, and to compare with our previous study of KPI-wild type and aprotinin in the same ovine model. Post-operative drain losses and subjective assessment of wound 'dryness' showed no significant differences between KPI-185 and KPI-wild type, despite the significant enhancement of kallikrein inhibition using KPI-185 seen in serial kallikrein inhibition assays. These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that kallikrein inhibition is not the major mechanism by which Kunitz inhibitors such as aprotinin reduce perioperative bleeding. PMID:11419655

  13. Association of Functional Kallikrein-1 Promoter Polymorphisms and Acute Kidney Injury: A Case-Control and Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Susantitaphong, Paweena; Perianayagam, Mary C.; Kang, Sun Woo; Zhang, Wenyi; Rao, Fangwen; O’Connor, Daniel T.; Jaber, Bertrand L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Kallikrein-1 (KLK1) is a highly conserved serine protease that is expressed in the kidney and involved in blood pressure regulation. The activity of this enzyme is diminished in acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods We first evaluated the potential role of functional multiallelic KLK1 promoter gene polymorphisms in a case-control study of 481 subjects (214 hospitalized patients with AKI of mixed causes and 267 healthy subjects). The complex, multiallelic G/C-rich repeat region of the proximal KLK1 promoter was determined by direct Sanger/capillary resequencing. Results 16 alleles were identified in a complex, polymorphic G/C-rich region of the KLK1 proximal promoter; 5 of these alleles (F, G, H, I, and K) were associated with development of AKI. Alleles I and G were classified as risk-alleles (unadjusted OR 1.86; 95% CI 1.23, 2.81; p = 0.003), whereas alleles F, H, and K were classified as protective-alleles (unadjusted OR 0.32; 95% CI 0.22, 0.46; p < 0.001) according to their directional association with development of AKI. After adjustment for sex, race, preexisting chronic kidney disease and APACHE II score, the KLK1 risk-allele (I or G) carrier state was associated with the composite of ≥ 2-fold increase in serum creatinine, oliguria, or dialysis requirement (adjusted OR 2.71; 95% CI 1.14, 6.44; p = 0.02). The KLK1 risk-allele carrier state was also marginally associated with the composite of ≥2-fold increase in serum creatinine, oliguria, dialysis requirement, or in-hospital death (adjusted OR 2.33; 95% CI 0.98, 5.52; p = 0.06). Conclusions KLK1 promoter polymorphisms are associated with development of AKI and adverse outcomes. Further studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:23635481

  14. Schistosoma mansoni: possible involvement of protein kinase C in linoleic acid-induced proteolytic enzyme release from cercariae.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Mitsui, Y; Sato, K; Sakamoto, M; Aoki, Y

    1991-04-01

    The possible involvement of protein kinase C and Ca2+ metabolism in the proteolytic enzyme release from schistosome cercariae was studied. Cercariae were placed in dechlorinated tap water containing 0.37 mM calcium in the small glass petri dish and exposed to the stimuli (linoleic acid, phorbol esters, and Ca2+ ionophore) with or without inhibitors of protein kinase C or Ca2+ metabolism. The proteolytic activity of incubation medium of cercariae thus treated was measured by the azocoll assay. The penetration response of cercariae induced by linoleic acid, a physiological stimulus, was mimicked by phorbol esters. When exposed to phorbol esters, 0.02 to 2 microM of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and 0.2 to 2 microM of phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), cercariae ceased the swimming movement, began a rhythmic thrusting of the anterior tip of the parasite, and released the proteolytic enzyme, but they did not shed the tails. Lowering Ca2+ in water by addition of 5 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), phorbol ester-induced release of enzyme was completely inhibited. Phorbol ester-induced release of enzyme was partially inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, at a concentration of 100 microM. H-7 alone, at a concentration of 100 microM, did not affect the swimming movement of cercariae. The cercariae were stimulated to release the enzyme by high concentrations (10 and 100 microM) of the Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, but enzyme was not released by low concentrations (0.5 and 1 microM) of this drug. Cercariae exposed to A23187 behaved differently from those exposed to phorbol esters. They ceased swimming, showed strong muscle contraction, and shed their tail. A23187 stimulated cercariae to release the enzyme in the water containing 5 mM EGTA. A23187-induced enzyme release was not inhibited by N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7), a calmodulin

  15. SPINK5 knockdown in organotypic human skin culture as a model system for Netherton syndrome: effect of genetic inhibition of serine proteases kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 7.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shirley; Olt, Sabine; Schoefmann, Nicole; Stuetz, Anton; Winiski, Anthony; Wolff-Winiski, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS; OMIM 256500) is a genetic skin disease resulting from defects in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5 (SPINK5) gene, which encodes the protease inhibitor lympho-epithelial Kazal type inhibitor (LEKTI). We established a SPINK5 knockdown skin model by transfecting SPINK5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) into normal human epidermal keratinocytes, which were used together with fibroblast-populated collagen gels to generate organotypic skin cultures. This model recapitulates some of the NS skin morphology: thicker, parakeratotic stratum corneum frequently detached from the underlying epidermis and loss of corneodesmosomes. As enhanced serine protease activity has been implicated in the disease pathogenesis, we investigated the impact of the kallikreins KLK5 [stratum corneum trypsin-like enzyme (SCTE)] and KLK7 [stratum corneum chymotrypsin-like enzyme (SCCE)] on the SPINK5 knockdown phenotype by generating double knockdowns in the organotypic model. Knockdown of KLK5 or KLK7 partially ameliorated the epidermal architecture: increased epidermal thickness and expression of desmocollin 1 (DSC1), desmoglein 1 (DSG1) and (pro)filaggrin. Thus, inhibition of serine proteases KLK5 and KLK7 could be therapeutically beneficial in NS. PMID:24848304

  16. Kallikrein Promotes Inflammation in Human Dental Pulp Cells Via Protease-Activated Receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tomomi; Kamio, Naoto; Okabe, Tatsu; Muromachi, Koichiro; Matsushima, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Plasma kallikrein (KLKB1), a serine protease, cleaves high-molecular weight kininogen to produce bradykinin, a potent vasodilator and pro-inflammatory peptide. In addition, KLKB1 activates plasminogen and other leukocyte and blood coagulation factors and processes pro-enkephalin, prorenin, and C3. KLKB1 has also been shown to cleave protease-activated receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells to regulate the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor. In this study, we investigated KLKB1-dependent inflammation and activation of protease-activated receptor-1 in human dental pulp cells. These cells responded to KLKB1 stimulation by increasing intracellular Ca(2+) , upregulating cyclooxygenase-2, and secreting prostaglandin E2 . Remarkably, SCH79797, an antagonist of protease-activated receptor-1, blocked these effects. Thus, these data indicate that KLKB1 induces inflammatory reactions in human dental tissues via protease-activated receptor 1. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1522-1528, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26566265

  17. Netherton syndrome: defective kallikrein inhibition in the skin leads to skin inflammation and allergy.

    PubMed

    Furio, Laetitia; Hovnanian, Alain

    2014-09-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is an orphan genetic skin disease with a profound skin barrier defect and severe allergic manifestations. NS is caused by loss of function mutations in SPINK5 encoding lympho-epithelial Kazal-type inhibitor (LEKTI), a secreted multi-domain serine protease inhibitor expressed in stratified epithelia. Studies in mouse models and in NS patients have established that unopposed kallikrein 5 activity triggers stratum corneum detachment and activates PAR-2 signaling, leading to the autonomous production of pro-allergic and pro-inflammatory mediators. This emerging knowledge on NS pathogenesis has highlighted a central role for protease regulation in skin homeostasis but also in the complexity of the disease, and holds the promise of new specific treatments. PMID:25153381

  18. Inhibition of kallikrein-related peptidases by the serine protease inhibitor of Kazal-type 6.

    PubMed

    Kantyka, Tomasz; Fischer, Jan; Wu, Zhihong; Declercq, Wim; Reiss, Karina; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf

    2011-06-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of serine proteases, expressed in several tissues. Their activity is regulated by inhibitors including members of the serine protease of Kazal-type (SPINK) family. Recently, we discovered that SPINK6 is expressed in human skin and inhibits KLK5, KLK7, KLK14 but not KLK8. In this study we tested whether SPINK6 inhibits other members of the KLK family and caspase-14. Using chromogenic substrates, SPINK6 exhibited inhibitory activity against KLK12 and KLK13 with K(i) around 1nM, KLK4 with K(i)=27.3nM, KLK6 with K(i)=140nM, caspase-14 with a K(i) approximating 1μM and no activity against KLK1, KLK3 and KLK11. Taken together, SPINK6 is a potent inhibitor of distinct KLKs members. PMID:21439340

  19. The therapeutic potential of a kallikrein inhibitor for treating hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jerrold H; O'Donnell, Penrose S

    2006-09-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) manifests as intermittent, painful attacks of submucosal oedema affecting the larynx, gastrointestinal tract or limbs. Currently, acute treatment is available in Europe but not USA, and requires intravenous administration of a pooled blood product. HAE is most likely caused by dysinhibition of the contact cascade, resulting in overproduction of bradykinin. DX-88 (ecallantide, Dyax Corp.) is a highly specific recombinant plasma kallikrein inhibitor that halts the production of bradykinin and can be dosed subcutaneously. In a placebo-controlled Phase II trial in patients with HAE, DX-88 resulted in significant improvement in symptoms compared with placebo. A Phase III trial is ongoing. This review explains the pathophysiology of HAE and the mechanism by which DX-88, a non-intravenous, nonplasma-derived therapy, might improve the disease, and discusses the clinical course of HAE and available treatments. Finally, it explores the potential value and efficacy of DX-88 in treating HAE. PMID:16916274

  20. Effects of the Demethylating Agent, 5-Azacytidine, on Expression of the Kallikrein-Kinin Genes in Carcinoma Cells of the Lung and Pleura

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua; Sia, Yee Yen; Misso, Neil L.; Aggarwal, Shashi; Ng, Angeline; Bhoola, Kanti D.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and plasma kallikrein (KLKB1) may regulate the growth and proliferation of tumours of the lung and pleura, through the generation of kinin peptides that signal through the kinin B1 (BDKRB1) and B2 (BDKRB2) receptors. The development and progression of cancer results from genetic mutations, as well as epigenetic changes that include methylation of DNA at CpG islands. The aim of this study was to assess whether expression of the kallikrein-kinin genes in lung cancer and mesothelioma cells is regulated by DNA methylation. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed differences in the basal expression of the kallikrein-kinin genes and proteins in lung carcinoma and mesothelioma cells, compared with non-malignant lung epithelial and mesothelial cells, respectively. Following treatment with the demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA), KLKB1 mRNA expression was consistently increased in both lung carcinoma and mesothelioma cells, whereas KLK1, BDKRB1 and BDKRB2 mRNA expression was decreased or unchanged. Increased expression of KLKB1 after 5-AZA treatment suggests it may function as a tumour suppressor gene in cancers of the lung and pleura. Studies on DNA methylation of the kallikrein-kinin genes will enhance understanding of their role in carcinogenesis and provide insights into the importance of kallikreins as tumour biomarkers. PMID:21904690

  1. Kallikrein kinin system activation in post-exercise hypotension in water running of hypertensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Francisco L; Bacurau, Reury F P; Moraes, Milton R; Navarro, Francisco; Casarini, Dulce E; Pesquero, Jorge L; Pesquero, João B; Araújo, Ronaldo C; Piçarro, Ivan C

    2008-02-01

    Previous studies demonstrated a reduction in blood pressure level immediately after different types of exercises, like running, cycling and resistance training, a phenomenon called post-exercise hypotension (PEH). Since PEH can persist for hours it could be suggested as a non-pharmacological therapy for hypertensive individuals. Unfortunately, usually running is not recommended due to the high impact caused by its practice. Therefore running in water treadmill should be a better option, since the environment is completely different and causes lower impact. However it is not known whether PEH occurs in this situation. The objective of this work was to evaluate the existence of PEH after water running and to compare PEH promoted by running in two different environments. In addition, changes in plasmatic concentrations of the kallikrein kinin system (KKS) components were also evaluated. Sixteen hypertensive subjects were submitted to two exercise sessions, conventional running and water running, in two different occasions. The pattern of heart rate, blood pressure and plasmatic concentrations of KKS components immediately after and one hour after exercise were investigated. Results showed a maximal reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure 30 min after both exercise models (P<0.001), indicating that moderate water running promotes PEH with similar magnitude as compared to conventional running. Plasma kallikrein activity and bradykinin concentration increased immediately after exercise (P<0.05), but these parameters were not different in both exercise models. In conclusion, our findings show that water running, similarly to conventional running, can also provoke PEH and alterations in the KKS components. PMID:18182237

  2. Indirect Back-Titration ELISA: A New Format for Estimation of Human Tissue Kallikreins.

    PubMed

    Nasim, Faiz-Ul-Hassan; Ejaz, Samina; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, Gulzar

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is either based on sandwich, competitive, or inhibition type of format. However, these formats need 2 or 3 monoclonal antibodies (moAB) to estimate 1 antigen. To get a cost-effective, high throughput, ELISA for estimation of human tissue kallikreins we have now developed an indirect, back-titration style, Time Resolved ImmunoFluorometric (TRIF) ELISA that uses only 1 antigen-specific moAB and a general polyclonal antibody. Polystyrene microtiter plate wells coated with a capture antibody, a mouse moAB prepared against a specific human tissue kallikrein are allowed to interact either with the corresponding pure antigen, as the calibrator, or with the corresponding antigen present in a biological fluid or tissue extract. The detection antibody, anti-mouse IgG conjugated with alkaline phosphatase, is added to find the antigen-free immobilized capture moAB. Conjugated enzyme is allowed to hydrolyze diflunisal phosphate to produce a highly fluorescent complex. The fluorescence measured in TRIF mode corresponds to the antigen-free immobilized capture moAB and is used to quantify antigen-bound capture moAB. The detection antibody binds with the antigen-free capture moAB and strength of the signal correlates inversely with the amount of antigen bound to the capture moAB. With a minimum detection level of 20 ng/L the assay has no cross-reactivity with several test molecules. The method is sensitive, specific, applicable to a variety of biological samples, and cost-effective as it uses only 1 moAB and a polyclonal antibody. Using this assay, a single epitope can be estimated without purification. PMID:26180936

  3. Plasma Kallikrein-Kinin system mediates immune-mediated renal injury in trichloroethylene-sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Jia-Xiang; Ye, Liang-Ping; Li, Shu-Long; Wang, Feng; Zha, Wan-Sheng; Shen, Tong; Wu, Changhao; Zhu, Qi-Xing

    2016-07-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a major environmental pollutant. An immunological response is a newly-recognized mechanism for TCE-induced kidney damage. However, the role of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) in immune-mediated kidney injury has never been examined. This study aimed to explore the role of the key components of the KKS, i.e. plasma kallikrein (PK), bradykinin (BK) and its receptors B1R and B2R, in TCE-induced kidney injury. A mouse model of skin sensitization was used to explore the mechanism of injury with or without a PK inhibitor PKSI. Kidney function was evaluated by measuring blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in conjunction with histopathologic characterization. Plasma BK was determined by ELISA; Renal C5b-9 membrane attack complex was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Expression of BK and PK in the kidney was detected by immunofluorescence. mRNA and protein levels of B1R and B2R were assessed by real-time qPCR and Western blot. As expected, numerous inflammatory cell infiltration and tubular epithelial cell vacuolar degeneration were observed in TCE-sensitized mice. Moreover, serum BUN and Cr and plasma BK were increased. In addition, deposition of BK, PK and C5b-9 were observed and B1R and B2R mRNA and proteins levels were up-regulated. Pre-treatment with PKSI, a highly selective inhibitor of PK, alleviated TCE-induced renal damage. In addition, PKSI attenuated TCE-induced up-regulation of BK, PK and its receptors and C5b-9. These results provided the first evidence that activation of the KKS contributed to immune-mediated renal injury induced by TCE and also helped to identify the KKS as a potential therapeutic target for mitigating chemical sensitization-induced renal damage. PMID:27027470

  4. Aldrin epoxidation in flathead mullet (Mugil cephalus): possible involvement of CYP1A and CYP3A.

    PubMed

    Bozcaarmutlu, Azra; Turna, Sema; Sapmaz, Canan; Arinc, Emel; Yenisoy-Karakaş, Serpil

    2014-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine specific cytochrome P450 isozyme(s) involved in the metabolism of aldrin to its toxic metabolite dieldrin in flathead mullet (Mugil cephalus) liver microsomes. To identify the cytochrome P450 isozyme responsible for the aldrin metabolism in mullet liver, the effects of mammalian-specific cytochrome P450 inhibitors and substrates were determined in the epoxidation reaction of aldrin. CYP3A-related inhibitors, ketoconazole, SKF-525A, and cimetidine, inhibited the metabolism of aldrin. The contribution of CYP1A to the aldrin metabolism was shown by the inhibition of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in the presence of aldrin. The results indicate that CY1A and CYP3A are the cytochrome P450s involved in aldrin epoxidase activity in mullet. In addition, the suitability of aldrin epoxidase activity for monitoring of environmental pollution was also assessed in the fish samples caught from four different locations of the West Black Sea coast of Turkey. PMID:24756956

  5. Rat epileptic seizures evoked by BmK {alpha}IV and its possible mechanisms involved in sodium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Zhifang; Bai Zhantao; Zhang Xuying; Liu Tong; Pang Xueyan; Ji Yonghua . E-mail: yhji@server.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-05-01

    This study showed that rat unilateral intracerebroventricular injection of BmK {alpha}IV, a sodium channel modulator derived from scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, induced clusters of spikes, epileptic discharges and convulsion-related behavioral changes. BmK {alpha}IV potently promoted the release of endogenous glutamate from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. In vitro examination of the effect of BmK {alpha}IV on intrasynaptosomal free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and sodium concentration [Na{sup +}]{sub i} revealed that BmK {alpha}IV-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was associated with an increase in Ca{sup 2+} and Na{sup +} influx. Moreover, BmK {alpha}IV-mediated glutamate release and ion influx was completely blocked by tetrodotoxin, a blocker of sodium channel. Together, these results suggest that the induction of BmK {alpha}IV-evoked epileptic seizures may be involved in the modulation of BmK {alpha}IV on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels located on the nerve terminal, which subsequently enhances the Ca{sup 2+} influx to cause an increase of glutamate release. These findings may provide some insight regarding the mechanism of neuronal action of BmK {alpha}IV in the central nervous system for understanding epileptogenesis involved in sodium channels.

  6. Polymorphisms in the interleukin-10 gene cluster are possibly involved in the increased risk for major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Traks, Tanel; Koido, Kati; Eller, Triin; Maron, Eduard; Kingo, Külli; Vasar, Veiko; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev

    2008-01-01

    Background Innate immune inflammatory response is suggested to have a role in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Interleukin (IL)-10 family cytokines IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 are all implicated in the inflammatory processes and polymorphisms in respective genes have been associated with various immunopathological conditions. This study was carried out to investigate whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes are also associated with MDD. Methods Case-control association study was performed with seven SNPs from the IL10 gene cluster. 153 patients with MDD and 277 healthy control individuals were recruited. Results None of the selected SNPs were individually associated with MDD. The linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis indicated the existence of two recombination sites in the IL10 gene cluster, thus confirming the formerly established LD pattern of this genomic region. This also created two haplotype blocks, both consisting of three SNPs. Additionally, the haplotype analysis detected a significantly higher frequency of block 2 (IL20 and IL24 genes) haplotype TGC in the patients group compared to healthy control individuals (P = 0.0097). Conclusion Our study established increased risk for MDD related to the IL20 and IL24 haplotype and suggests that cytokines may contribute to the pathogenesis of MDD. Since none of the block 2 SNPs were individually associated with MDD, it is possible that other polymorphisms linked to them contribute to the disease susceptibility. Future studies are needed to confirm the results and to find the possible functional explanation. PMID:19087313

  7. Cloning and Expression Analysis of Vvlcc3, a Novel and Functional Laccase Gene Possibly Involved in Stipe Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuanping; Wu, Guangmei; Lian, Lingdan; Guo, Lixian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhiyun; Miao, Juan; Chen, Bingzhi; Xie, Baogui

    2015-01-01

    Volvariella volvacea, usually harvested in its egg stage, is one of the most popular mushrooms in Asia. The rapid transition from the egg stage to elongation stage, during which the stipe stretches to almost full length leads to the opening of the cap and rupture of the universal veil, and is considered to be one of the main factors that negatively impacts the yield and value of V. volvacea. Stipe elongation is a common phenomenon in mushrooms; however, the mechanisms, genes and regulation involved in stipe elongation are still poorly understood. In order to study the genes related to the stipe elongation, we analyzed the transcription of laccase genes in stipe tissue of V. volvacea, as some laccases have been suggested to be involved in stipe elongation in Flammulina velutipes. Based on transcription patterns, the expression of Vvlcc3 was found to be the highest among the 11 laccase genes. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that VvLCC3 has a high degree of identity with other basidiomycete laccases. Therefore, we selected and cloned a laccase gene, named Vvlcc3, a cDNA from V. volvacea, and expressed the cDNA in Pichia pastoris. The presence of the laccase signature L1-L4 on the deduced protein sequence indicates that the gene encodes a laccase. Phylogenetic analysis showed that VvLCC3 clusters with Coprinopsis cinerea laccases. The ability to catalyze ABTS (2,2’-Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) oxidation proved that the product of the Vvlcc3 gene was a functional laccase. We also found that the expression of the Vvlcc3 gene in V. volvacea increased during button stage to the elongation stage; it reached its peak in the elongation stage, and then decreased in the maturation stage, which was similar to the trend in the expression of Fv-lac3 and Fv-lac5 in F. velutipes stipe tissue. The similar trend in expression level of these laccase genes of F. velutipes suggested that this gene could be involved in stipe elongation in V. volvacea. PMID

  8. Cloning and Expression Analysis of Vvlcc3, a Novel and Functional Laccase Gene Possibly Involved in Stipe Elongation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanping; Wu, Guangmei; Lian, Lingdan; Guo, Lixian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhiyun; Miao, Juan; Chen, Bingzhi; Xie, Baogui

    2015-01-01

    Volvariella volvacea, usually harvested in its egg stage, is one of the most popular mushrooms in Asia. The rapid transition from the egg stage to elongation stage, during which the stipe stretches to almost full length leads to the opening of the cap and rupture of the universal veil, and is considered to be one of the main factors that negatively impacts the yield and value of V. volvacea. Stipe elongation is a common phenomenon in mushrooms; however, the mechanisms, genes and regulation involved in stipe elongation are still poorly understood. In order to study the genes related to the stipe elongation, we analyzed the transcription of laccase genes in stipe tissue of V. volvacea, as some laccases have been suggested to be involved in stipe elongation in Flammulina velutipes. Based on transcription patterns, the expression of Vvlcc3 was found to be the highest among the 11 laccase genes. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that VvLCC3 has a high degree of identity with other basidiomycete laccases. Therefore, we selected and cloned a laccase gene, named Vvlcc3, a cDNA from V. volvacea, and expressed the cDNA in Pichia pastoris. The presence of the laccase signature L1-L4 on the deduced protein sequence indicates that the gene encodes a laccase. Phylogenetic analysis showed that VvLCC3 clusters with Coprinopsis cinerea laccases. The ability to catalyze ABTS (2,2'-Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) oxidation proved that the product of the Vvlcc3 gene was a functional laccase. We also found that the expression of the Vvlcc3 gene in V. volvacea increased during button stage to the elongation stage; it reached its peak in the elongation stage, and then decreased in the maturation stage, which was similar to the trend in the expression of Fv-lac3 and Fv-lac5 in F. velutipes stipe tissue. The similar trend in expression level of these laccase genes of F. velutipes suggested that this gene could be involved in stipe elongation in V. volvacea. PMID

  9. Characterization of an exported monoglyceride lipase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis possibly involved in the metabolism of host cell membrane lipids

    PubMed Central

    Côtes, Karen; Dhouib, Rabeb; Douchet, Isabelle; Chahinian, Henri; deCaro, Alain; Carrière, Frédéric; Canaan, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    The Rv0183 gene of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain, which has been implicated as a lysophospholipase, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified Rv0183 protein did not show any activity when lysophospholipid substrates were used, but preferentially hydrolysed monoacylglycerol substrates with a specific activity of 290 units·mg−1 at 37 °C. Rv0183 hydrolyses both long chain di- and triacylglycerols, as determined using the monomolecular film technique, although the turnover was lower than with MAG (monoacyl-glycerol). The enzyme shows an optimum activity at pH values ranging from 7.5 to 9.0 using mono-olein as substrate and is inactivated by serine esterase inhibitors such as E600, PMSF and tetrahydrolipstatin. The catalytic triad is composed of Ser110, Asp226 and His256 residues, as confirmed by the results of site-directed mutagenesis. Rv0183 shows 35% sequence identity with the human and mouse monoglyceride lipases and well below 15% with the other bacterial lipases characterized so far. Homologues of Rv0183 can be identified in other mycobacterial genomes such as Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and even Mycobacterium leprae, which is known to contain a low number of genes involved in the replication process within the host cells. The results of immunolocalization studies performed with polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified recombinant Rv0183 suggested that the enzyme was present only in the cell wall and culture medium of M. tuberculosis. Our results identify Rv0183 as the first exported lipolytic enzyme to be characterized in M. tuberculosis and suggest that Rv0183 may be involved in the degradation of the host cell lipids. PMID:17784850

  10. Identification of Proteins Possibly Involved in Glucosinolate Metabolism in L. agilis R16 and E. coli VL8.

    PubMed

    Luang-In, Vijitra; Narbad, Arjan; Cebeci, Fatma; Bennett, Mark; Rossiter, John T

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to identify sinigrin-induced bacterial proteins potentially involved in the metabolism of glucosinolate in two glucosinolate-metabolising bacteria Lactobacillus agilis R16 and Escherichia coli VL8. Sinigrin (2 mM) was used to induce the proteins in both bacteria under anaerobic incubation for 8 h at 30 °C for L. agilis R16 and 37 °C for E. coli VL8 and the controls without sinigrin were performed. Allyl isothiocyanate and allyl nitrile as two degradation products of sinigrin were detected in sinigrin-induced cultures of L. agilis R16 (27% total products) and E. coli VL8 (38% total products) from a complete sinigrin degradation in 8 h for both bacteria. 2D gel electrophoresis was conducted to identify induced proteins with at least twofold increased abundance. Sinigrin-induced L. agilis R16 and the control produced 1561 and 1543 protein spots, respectively. For E. coli VL8, 1363 spots were detected in sinigrin-induced and 1354 spots in the control. A combination of distinct proteins and upregulated proteins of 32 and 35 spots in L. agilis R16 and E. coli VL8, respectively were detected upon sinigrin induction. Of these, 12 and 16 spots from each bacterium respectively were identified by LC-MS/MS. In both bacteria most of the identified proteins are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, oxidoreduction system and sugar transport while the minority belong to purine metabolism, hydrolysis, and proteolysis. This indicated that sinigrin induction led to the expressions of proteins with similar functions in both bacteria and these proteins may play a role in bacterial glucosinolate metabolism. PMID:25805049

  11. Mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome with possible juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia but are not involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cavé, Hélène; Caye, Aurélie; Ghedira, Nehla; Capri, Yline; Pouvreau, Nathalie; Fillot, Natacha; Trimouille, Aurélien; Vignal, Cédric; Fenneteau, Odile; Alembik, Yves; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Blanchet, Patricia; Boute, Odile; Bouvagnet, Patrice; David, Albert; Dieux Coeslier, Anne; Doray, Bérénice; Dulac, Olivier; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Gérard, Marion; Héron, Delphine; Isidor, Bertrand; Lacombe, Didier; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Perrin, Laurence; Rio, Marlène; Roume, Joëlle; Sauvion, Sylvie; Toutain, Annick; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Willems, Marjorie; Baumann, Clarisse; Verloes, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Noonan syndrome is a heterogeneous autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in at least eight genes involved in the RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. Recently, RIT1 (Ras-like without CAAX 1) has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of some patients. We report a series of 44 patients from 30 pedigrees (including nine multiplex families) with mutations in RIT1. These patients display a typical Noonan gestalt and facial phenotype. Among the probands, 8.7% showed postnatal growth retardation, 90% had congenital heart defects, 36% had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (a lower incidence compared with previous report), 50% displayed speech delay and 52% had learning difficulties, but only 22% required special education. None had major skin anomalies. One child died perinatally of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. Compared with the canonical Noonan phenotype linked to PTPN11 mutations, patients with RIT1 mutations appear to be less severely growth retarded and more frequently affected by cardiomyopathy. Based on our experience, we estimate that RIT1 could be the cause of 5% of Noonan syndrome patients. Because mutations found constitutionally in Noonan syndrome are also found in several tumors in adulthood, we evaluated the potential contribution of RIT1 to leukemogenesis in Noonan syndrome. We screened 192 pediatric cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemias (96 B-ALL and 96 T-ALL) and 110 cases of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemias (JMML), but detected no variation in these tumoral samples, suggesting that Noonan patients with germline RIT1 mutations are not at high risk to developing JMML or ALL, and that RIT1 has at most a marginal role in these sporadic malignancies. PMID:26757980

  12. Single Muscle Immobilization Decreases Single-Fibre Myosin Heavy Chain Polymorphism: Possible Involvement of p38 and JNK MAP Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Derbré, Frédéric; Droguet, Mickaël; Léon, Karelle; Troadec, Samuel; Pennec, Jean-Pierre; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès; Rannou, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Muscle contractile phenotype is affected during immobilization. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms are the major determinant of the muscle contractile phenotype. We therefore sought to evaluate the effects of muscle immobilization on both the MHC composition at single-fibre level and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), a family of intracellular signaling pathways involved in the stress-induced muscle plasticity. Methods The distal tendon of female Wistar rat Peroneus Longus (PL) was cut and fixed to the adjacent bone at neutral muscle length. Four weeks after the surgery, immobilized and contralateral PL were dissociated and the isolated fibres were sampled to determine MHC composition. Protein kinase 38 (p38), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and c-Jun- NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylations were measured in 6- and 15-day immobilized and contralateral PL. Results MHC distribution in immobilized PL was as follows: I = 0%, IIa = 11.8 ± 2.8%, IIx = 53.0 ± 6.1%, IIb = 35.3 ± 7.3% and I = 6.1 ± 3.9%, IIa = 22.1 ± 3.4%, IIx = 46.6 ± 4.5%, IIb = 25.2 ± 6.6% in contralateral muscle. The MHC composition in immobilized muscle is consistent with a faster contractile phenotype according to the Hill’s model of the force-velocity relationship. Immobilized and contralateral muscles displayed a polymorphism index of 31.1% (95% CI 26.1–36.0) and 39.3% (95% CI 37.0–41.5), respectively. Significant increases in p38 and JNK phosphorylation were observed following 6 and 15 days of immobilization. Conclusions Single muscle immobilization at neutral length induces a shift of MHC composition toward a faster contractile phenotype and decreases the polymorphic profile of single fibres. Activation of p38 and JNK could be a potential mechanism involved in these contractile phenotype modifications during muscle immobilization. PMID:27383612

  13. Antinociceptive effects of maprotiline in a rat model of peripheral neuropathic pain: possible involvement of opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Banafshe, Hamid Reza; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Mesdaghinia, Azam; Abed, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuropathic pain remains a clinical problem and is poorly relieved by conventional analgesics. This study was designed to determine whether maprotiline administration was effective in alleviating symptoms of neuropathic pain and whether the antinociceptive effect of maprotiline mediated through the opioid system. Materials and Methods: Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats, which resulted in thermal hyperalgesia, and mechanical and cold allodynia. Maprotiline (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, IP) was administered on the 7th and 14th days after surgery. To study the role of the opioid system in the antinociceptive effects of maprotiline, maprotiline (20 mg/kg, IP) was administered in combination with naloxone (1 mg/kg, SC) on the 7th post-surgery day. Behavioral tests were done at 45 min after drug injections on the 7th and 14th days after surgery. Results: Systemic administration of maprotiline blocked heat hyperalgesia, cold allodynia and reduced mechanical allodynia. Also antihyperalgesic effect of maprotiline was reversed by pretreatment with naloxone. Conclusion: Our results suggest that maprotiline can be considered a potential therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain, and the opioid system may be involved in the antihyperalgesic effects of maprotiline. PMID:26557963

  14. Molecular cloning of a new laccase from the edible straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea: possible involvement in fruit body development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shicheng; Ge, Wei; Buswell, John A

    2004-01-30

    Cloning of a laccase-encoding cDNA from the edible straw mushroom, Volvariella volvacea, was performed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The cDNA of the putative laccase gene (lac4) consisted of 1689 bp, including an open reading frame encoding a 23-amino acid signal peptide at the N-terminal end and a 540-amino acid mature protein with a predicted molecular mass of 58173 Da and a pI value of 6.1. The 10 histidine residues and one cysteine residue required to co-ordinate the four copper atoms at the active site of the protein were all conserved. The amino acid sequence of V. volvacea lac4 has a high degree of identity with other basidiomycete laccases. Transcription of the laccase gene was analysed by RT-PCR and, unlike many other laccase genes, shown to be regulated independently of either copper or aromatic compounds under the test conditions. However, the laccase gene is strongly expressed during that part of the mushroom developmental cycle involving fruit body morphogenesis. PMID:14757236

  15. Identification of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Primary Cilia and Their Possible Involvement in Body Weight Control.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yoshihiro; Chaya, Taro; Yoshida, Satoyo; Irie, Shoichi; Tsujii, Toshinori; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that harbor various receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We analyzed subcellular localization of 138 non-odorant GPCRs. We transfected GPCR expression vectors into NIH3T3 cells, induced ciliogenesis by serum starvation, and observed subcellular localization of GPCRs by immunofluorescent staining. We found that several GPCRs whose ligands are involved in feeding behavior, including prolactin-releasing hormone receptor (PRLHR), neuropeptide FF receptor 1 (NPFFR1), and neuromedin U receptor 1 (NMUR1), localized to the primary cilia. In addition, we found that a short form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2S) is efficiently transported to the primary cilia, while a long form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2L) is rarely transported to the primary cilia. Using an anti-Prlhr antibody, we found that Prlhr localized to the cilia on the surface of the third ventricle in the vicinity of the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus. We generated the Npy2r-Cre transgenic mouse line in which Cre-recombinase is expressed under the control of the promoter of Npy2r encoding a ciliary GPCR. By mating Npy2r-Cre mice with Ift80 flox mice, we generated Ift80 conditional knockout (CKO) mice in which Npy2r-positive cilia were diminished in number. We found that Ift80 CKO mice exhibited a body weight increase. Our results suggest that Npy2r-positive cilia are important for body weight control. PMID:26053317

  16. Macrophages in Langerhans cell histiocytosis are differentiated toward M2 phenotype: their possible involvement in pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Sakashita, Naomi; Iyama, Ken-Ichi; Murayama, Toshihiko; Takeya, Motohiro

    2010-01-01

    Although numerous macrophages are found in the lesions of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), their activation phenotypes and their roles in the disease process have not been clarified. Paraffin-embedded LCH samples were examined on immunohistochemistry and it was found that CD163 can be used to distinguish infiltrated macrophages from neoplastic Langerhans cells (LC). The number of CD163-positve macrophages was positively correlated with the number of multinucleated giant cells (MGC), indicating that most MGC are derived from infiltrated macrophages. A significant number of CD163-positive macrophages were positive for interleukin (IL)-10 and phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3), an IL-10-induced signal transduction molecule. This indicates that these macrophages are polarized to anti-inflammatory macrophages of M2 phenotype. Tumor-derived macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) was considered to responsible for inducing M2 differentiation of infiltrated macrophages. The number of CD163-positive macrophages in different cases of LCH varied, and interestingly the density of CD163-positive macrophages was inversely correlated with the Ki-67-positivity of LC. Although the underlying mechanism is not fully elucidated, macrophage-derived IL-10 was considered to be involved in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation via activation of STAT3. PMID:20055949

  17. Trypsinlike enzymes from dormant and germinated spores of Bacillus cereus T and their possible involvement in germination.

    PubMed Central

    Boschwitz, H; Halvorson, H O; Keynan, A; Milner, Y

    1985-01-01

    Trypsin-like enzymes were studied in dormant, activated, and germinated spores of Bacillus cereus T. Dormant spores contained two heat-labile enzyme activities. One was extractable with 2 M KCl and hydrolyzed azo-albumin. The second, a trypsinlike activity, was not extractable with 2 M KCl and hydrolyzed benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide. Because of their heat instability, these two enzyme activities are probably not involved in the germination of heat-activated spores. Upon germination of heat-treated spores, a trypsinlike protease which was not detected in intact dormant spores was activated or exposed. This enzyme, when measured in intact germinated spores, hydrolyzed benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide but not azo-albumin and was inhibited in situ by sulfhydryl-blocking reagents such as p-chloromercuribenzoic acid and Hg2+. There was a correlation between the inhibition of germination and enzymatic activity by sulfhydryl-blocking reagents. The enzyme was also inhibited by leupeptin, tosyl-L-lysine chromoethyl ketone, and tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester. Good correlation existed between the inhibition of germination and enzymatic activity by these agents. Electron micrographs showed that in the presence of trypsin inhibitors, the spores did not lose their cortex. The protein extracts of the inhibited spores formed a somewhat different electrophoretic pattern in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis than the protein extracts of dormant or germinated spores. Images PMID:3930468

  18. The antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I: possible involvement of the oxidative stress system and the noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Liu, Fang; Yue, Rongcai; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jigang; Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Shoude; Wang, Rui; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Weidong

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I, a saponin compound present in the Bacopa monniera plant, was evaluated by behavioral and neurochemical methods. Bacopaside I (50, 15 and 5 mg/kg) was given to mice via oral gavage for 7 successive days. The treatment significantly decreased the immobility time in mouse models of despair tests, but it did not influence locomotor activity. Neurochemical assays suggested that treatment by bacopaside I (50, 15 and 5 mg/kg) improved brain antioxidant activity to varying degrees after the behavioral despair test. Bacopaside I (15 and 5 mg/kg) significantly reversed reserpine-induced depressive-like behaviors, including low temperature and ptosis. Conversely, bacopaside I did not affect either brain MAO-A or MAO-B activity after the behavioral despair test in mice. Additionally, 5-hydroxytryptophan (a precursor of 5-serotonin) was not involved in the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I. These findings indicated that the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I might be related to both antioxidant activation and noradrenergic activation, although the exact mechanism remains to be further elucidated. PMID:23872136

  19. Ionizing radiations sustain glioblastoma cell dedifferentiation to a stem-like phenotype through survivin: possible involvement in radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, P; Martinez Gala, J; Delmas, C; Monferran, S; Malric, L; Zentkowski, D; Lubrano, V; Toulas, C; Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, E; Lemarie, A

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are some bad prognosis brain tumors despite a conventional treatment associating surgical resection and subsequent radio-chemotherapy. Among these heterogeneous tumors, a subpopulation of chemo- and radioresistant GBM stem-like cells appears to be involved in the systematic GBM recurrence. Moreover, recent studies showed that differentiated tumor cells may have the ability to dedifferentiate and acquire a stem-like phenotype, a phenomenon also called plasticity, in response to microenvironment stresses such as hypoxia. We hypothesized that GBM cells could be subjected to a similar dedifferentiation process after ionizing radiations (IRs), then supporting the GBM rapid recurrence after radiotherapy. In the present study we demonstrated that subtoxic IR exposure of differentiated GBM cells isolated from patient resections potentiated the long-term reacquisition of stem-associated properties such as the ability to generate primary and secondary neurospheres, the expression of stemness markers and an increased tumorigenicity. We also identified during this process an upregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin and we showed that its specific downregulation led to the blockade of the IR-induced plasticity. Altogether, these results demonstrated that irradiation could regulate GBM cell dedifferentiation via a survivin-dependent pathway. Targeting the mechanisms associated with IR-induced plasticity will likely contribute to the development of some innovating pharmacological strategies for an improved radiosensitization of these aggressive brain cancers. PMID:25429620

  20. Genetic Evidence for Possible Involvement of the Calcium Channel Gene CACNA1A in Autism Pathogenesis in Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Weihua; Jia, Meixiang; Yu, Hao; Lu, Tianlan; Wu, Zhiliu; Ruan, Yanyan; Wang, Lifang; Zhang, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders. Recent studies suggested that calcium channel genes might be involved in the genetic etiology of ASD. CACNA1A, encoding an alpha-1 subunit of voltage-gated calcium channel, has been reported to play an important role in neural development. Previous study detected that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in CACNA1A confers risk to ASD in Central European population. However, the genetic relationship between autism and CACNA1A in Chinese Han population remains unclear. To explore the association of CACNA1A with autism, we performed a family-based association study. First, we carried out a family-based association test between twelve tagged SNPs and autism in 239 trios. To further confirm the association, the sample size was expanded to 553 trios by recruiting 314 additional trios. In a total of 553 trios, we identified association of rs7249246 and rs12609735 with autism though this would not survive after Bonferroni correction. Our findings suggest that CACNA1A might play a role in the etiology of autism. PMID:26566276

  1. Genetic Evidence for Possible Involvement of the Calcium Channel Gene CACNA1A in Autism Pathogenesis in Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; You, Yang; Yue, Weihua; Jia, Meixiang; Yu, Hao; Lu, Tianlan; Wu, Zhiliu; Ruan, Yanyan; Wang, Lifang; Zhang, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders. Recent studies suggested that calcium channel genes might be involved in the genetic etiology of ASD. CACNA1A, encoding an alpha-1 subunit of voltage-gated calcium channel, has been reported to play an important role in neural development. Previous study detected that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in CACNA1A confers risk to ASD in Central European population. However, the genetic relationship between autism and CACNA1A in Chinese Han population remains unclear. To explore the association of CACNA1A with autism, we performed a family-based association study. First, we carried out a family-based association test between twelve tagged SNPs and autism in 239 trios. To further confirm the association, the sample size was expanded to 553 trios by recruiting 314 additional trios. In a total of 553 trios, we identified association of rs7249246 and rs12609735 with autism though this would not survive after Bonferroni correction. Our findings suggest that CACNA1A might play a role in the etiology of autism. PMID:26566276

  2. Isolation of putative glycoprotein gene from early somatic embryo of carrot and its possible involvement in somatic embryo development.

    PubMed

    Takahata, Kiminori; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Fujita, Minoru; Azuma, Junichi; Kamada, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumihiko

    2004-11-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is a unique process in plant cells. For example, embryogenic cells (EC) of carrot (Daucus carota) maintained in a medium containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) regenerate whole plants via somatic embryogenesis after the depletion of 2,4-D. Although some genes such as C-ABI3 and C-LEC1 have been found to be involved in somatic embryogenesis, the critical molecular and cellular mechanisms for somatic embryogenesis are unknown. To characterize the early mechanism in the induction of somatic embryogenesis, we isolated genes expressed during the early stage of somatic embryogenesis after 2,4-D depletion. Subtractive hybridization screening and subsequent RNA gel blot analysis suggested a candidate gene, Carrot Early Somatic Embryogenesis 1 (C-ESE1). C-ESE1 encodes a protein that has agglutinin and S-locus-glycoprotein domains and its expression is highly specific to primordial cells of somatic embryo. Transgenic carrot cells with reduced expression of C-ESE1 had wide intercellular space and decreased polysaccharides on the cell surface and showed delayed development in somatic embryogenesis. The importance of cell-to-cell attachment in somatic embryogenesis is discussed. PMID:15574842

  3. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and docking studies of PAR2-AP-derived pseudopeptides as inhibitors of kallikrein 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    Severino, Beatrice; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Corvino, Angela; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Assis, Diego Magno; Oliveira, Juliana R; Juliano, Luiz; Manganelli, Serena; Benfenati, Emilio; Frecentese, Francesco; Perissutti, Elisa; Juliano, Maria Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    A series of protease activated receptor 2 activating peptide (PAR2-AP) derivatives (1-15) were designed and synthesized. The obtained compounds were tested on a panel of human kallikreins (hKLK1, hKLK2, hKLK5, hKLK6, and hKLK7) and were found completely inactive toward hKLK1, hKLK2, and hKLK7. Aiming to investigate the mode of interaction between the most interesting compounds and the selected hKLKs, docking studies were performed. The described compounds distinguish the different human tissue kallikreins with compounds 1 and 5 as the best hKLK5 and hKLK6 inhibitors, respectively. PMID:25153237

  4. [Kallikrein-Kinin System. Long History and Present. (To 90th Anniversary of Discovery of the System)].

    PubMed

    Yarovaya, G A; Neshkova, E A

    2015-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is the key proteolytic system participating in control of a wide spectrum of physiological functions and the development of many pathological conditions. This explains great interest in structures, functions and molecular biology of separate components of the system, molecular mechanisms of their interaction and relationship with other regulatory systems. The information in this field for the last two decades clarifies the role of KKS in morphogenesis of cells, regulation of smooth muscular contractility of some organs, decrease of blood pressure, increase of vascular permeability, the development of inflammation, transformation of cells and the other functions of both physiological and pathological processes. Essential progress in understanding of functions KKS was made by the discovery and study of bradykinin receptors, cloning of kininogen and kallikrein encoding genes, revealing of domain structure of kininogen, prekallikrein and some kininases and decoding of mechanisms of contact phase of proteolytic system activation in blood plasma. PMID:26502604

  5. Possible involvement of convergent nociceptive input to medullary dorsal horn neurons in intraoral hyperalgesia following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Ryuji; Tsuchiya, Hiroki; Omura, Shinji; Maruhama, Kotaro; Mizutani, Masahide; Iida, Seiji; Sugimoto, Tomosada

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the number of c-Fos protein-like immunoreactive (c-Fos-IR) neurons in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) evoked by noxious stimulation was increased after peripheral nerve injury, and such increase has been proposed to reflect the development of neuropathic pain state. The aim of this study was to examine the MDH for convergent collateral primary afferent input to second order neurons deafferented by peripheral nerve injury, and to explore a possibility of its contribution to the c-Fos hyperinducibility. Double immunofluorescence labeling for c-Fos and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) was performed to detect convergent synaptic input. c-Fos expression and the phosphorylation of ERK were induced by the intraoral application of capsaicin and by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), respectively. The number of c-Fos-IR neurons in the MDH induced by the intraoral application of capsaicin was increased after IAN injury, whereas the number of p-ERK immunoreactive neurons remained unchanged. The number of double-labeled neurons, that presumably received convergent primary afferent input from the lingual nerve and the IAN, was significantly increased after IAN injury. These results indicated that convergent primary nociceptive input through neighboring intact nerves may contribute to the c-Fos hyperinducibility in the MDH and the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain following trigeminal nerve injury. PMID:25407627

  6. Site-specific deletion in cauliflower mosaic virus DNA: possible involvement of RNA splicing and reverse transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Ubasawa, Aiko; Ikeda, Joh-E

    1985-01-01

    A frequent site-specific deletion was observed in the life cycle of cauliflower mosaic virus (S strain). Analysis of the sequence around the deletion site and the parental sequence implied that the deletion was promoted at sequences similar to the donor and acceptor consensus sequences of RNA splicing, designated as the deletion donor and acceptor sequences, respectively. To elucidate the mechanism of this site-specific deletion, point mutations were introduced into the deletion donor sequence (GT to GG or GA transversion). Deletion at the original deletion donor site did not occur in these mutants, instead, new (cryptic) donor sites were activated. All of these activated cryptic sites had sequences similar to the splicing consensus sequence. In all cases except one, the original deletion acceptor site was used. These results can be most readily explained by postulating that the site-specific deletion occurs by reverse transcription of spliced viral RNA. This frequent site-specific deletion was not observed in other strains. For a virus which replicates by reverse transcription, a mechanism to regulate the rate of splicing is required to ensure the intactness of the viral genome. We discuss the possibility that the S strain has a mutation in this regulatory mechanism. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 5.Fig. 7. PMID:16453624

  7. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Luis Armando; Monteiro, Vanessa Sâmia da Conçeição; Rabelo, Guilherme Rodrigues; Dias, Germana Bueno; Da Cunha, Maura; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Bastos, Gilmara de Nazareth Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies. PMID:24860820

  8. Hydroxytyrosol inhibits phosphatidylserine exposure and suicidal death induced by mercury in human erythrocytes: Possible involvement of the glutathione pathway.

    PubMed

    Officioso, Arbace; Alzoubi, Kousi; Lang, Florian; Manna, Caterina

    2016-03-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) is a phenolic antioxidant naturally occurring in virgin olive oil. In this study, we investigated the possible protective effects of HT on programmed suicidal death (eryptosis) induced by mercury (Hg) treatment in intact human erythrocytes (RBC). Our study confirms that the Hg-eryptosis is characterized by phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure at the cell surface, with cell shrinkage and ATP and glutathione depletion; calcium influx is also a key event that triggers eryptosis. Here we report that cell preconditioning with an optimal dose (1-5 μM) of HT prior to exposure to 2.5 μM HgCl2 causes a noteworthy decrease in PS-exposing RBC, almost restoring ATP and GSH content. Conversely, HT shows no effect against decrease in cell volume nor against influx of extracellular calcium. Taken together our data provide the first experimental evidence of the efficacy of HT in modulating the programmed suicidal death in non nucleated cells; the reported findings also confirm that the prevention of Hg toxicity should be regarded as an additional mechanism responsible for the health-promoting potential of this dietary phenol. Finally, virgin olive oil would appear to be a promising healthy food to reduce the adverse effects of chronic mercury exposure in humans. PMID:26774912

  9. Adult-onset hyperthyroidism impairs spatial learning: possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bitiktaş, Soner; Kandemir, Başak; Tan, Burak; Kavraal, Şehrazat; Liman, Narin; Dursun, Nurcan; Dönmez-Altuntaş, Hamiyet; Aksan-Kurnaz, Işil; Suer, Cem

    2016-08-01

    Given evidence that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation is part of the nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones, we investigated the possible consequences of hyperthyroidism for the cognitive functioning of adult rats. Young adult rats were treated with L-thyroxine or saline. Twenty rats in each group were exposed to Morris water maze testing, measuring their performance in a hidden-platform spatial task. In a separate set of rats not exposed to Morris water maze testing (untrained rats), the expression and phosphorylated levels of p38-MAPK and of its two downstream effectors, Elk-1 and cAMP response element-binding protein, were evaluated using quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Rats with hyperthyroidism showed delayed acquisition of learning compared with their wild-type counterparts, as shown by increased escape latencies and distance moved on the last two trials of daily training in the water maze. The hyperthyroid rats, however, showed no difference during probe trials. Western blot analyses of the hippocampus showed that hyperthyroidism increased phosphorylated p38-MAPK levels in untrained rats. Although our study is correlative in nature and does not exclude the contribution of other molecular targets, our findings suggest that the observed impairments in acquisition during actual learning in rats with hyperthyroidism may result from the increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK. PMID:27258653

  10. Hydroalcoholic extract of needles of Pinus eldarica enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep: possible involvement of GABAergic system

    PubMed Central

    Forouzanfar, Fatemeh; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Rakhshandeh, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Insomnia is accompanied by several health complications and the currently used soporific drugs can induce several side effects such as psychomotor impairment, amnesia, and tolerance. The present study was planned to investigate the sleep prolonging effect of Pinus eldarica. Materials and Methods: Hydroalcoholic extract (HAE) of P. eldarica, its water fraction (WF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) and n-butanol fraction (NBF) were injected (intraperitoneally) to mice 30 min before administration of pentobarbital. Then, the latent period and continuous sleeping time were recorded. Also, LD50 of P. eldarica extract was determined and the possible neurotoxicity of the extract was tested on neural PC12 cells. Results: The HAE and NBF decreased the latency of sleep (p<0.05) and significantly increased duration of sleep (p<0.05) induced by pentobarbital. These effects of P. eldarica were reversed by flumazenil. The LD50 value for HAE was found to be 4.8 g/Kg. HAE and its fractions did not show neurotoxic effects in cultured PC12-cell line. Conclusion: The present data indicate that P. eldarica potentiated pentobarbital hypnosis without major toxic effect. Most probably, the main components responsible for this effect are non-polar agents which are found in NBF of this plant. PMID:27516986

  11. Possible involvement of K+-conductance in the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid in the guinea-pig hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, M.; Matsuo, T.; Ogata, N.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the hippocampus was investigated using guinea-pig brain slices. GABA either superfused or applied directly by microiontophoresis produced a biphasic response in pyramidal cells, comprising hyperpolarizing and depolarizing components. When different concentrations of GABA were applied to the same neurone, the lower concentrations generally produced a hyperpolarization-predominant response, while higher concentrations resulted in a depolarization-predominant response. The depolarizing component of the response to GABA was augmented in a medium containing a low concentration of Cl-, relatively unaffected by a change in external K+ concentration, and blocked by picrotoxin (2 X 10(-5) M). The depolarizing response to GABA persisted in a Ca2+-free medium in which the concentration of Na+ was reduced to 13 mM. Combined application of low doses of picrotoxin and bicuculline eliminated the major part of the depolarizing component of the biphasic response to GABA and produced a relatively pure hyperpolarizing response. The reversal potential of this pharmacologically 'isolated' hyperpolarizing response to GABA was estimated, from the current-voltage relationships, to be about -90 mV and was the same as that of the hyperpolarization induced by baclofen. When the membrane was successively hyperpolarized by inward direct current (d.c.) injections, the reversal point of the 'pharmacologically isolated' hyperpolarizing response to GABA coincided with that of the post-burst hyperpolarization. Low concentrations of Cl- in the bathing medium had no noticeable effect on the hyperpolarizing component of the response to GABA, whereas it markedly increased the amplitude of the depolarizing component. These results suggest that the action of GABA in the hippocampus may involve an activation of K+ conductance. PMID:2413946

  12. Inhibition of Melanogenesis by the Pyridinyl Imidazole Class of Compounds: Possible Involvement of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bellei, Barbara; Pitisci, Angela; Izzo, Enzo; Picardo, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    While investigating the role of p38 MAPK in regulating melanogenesis, we found that pyridinyl imidazole inhibitors class compounds as well as the analog compound SB202474, which does not inhibit p38 MAPK, suppressed both α-MSH-induced melanogenesis and spontaneous melanin synthesis. In this study, we demonstrated that the inhibitory activity of the pyridinyl imidazoles correlates with inhibition of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Imidazole-treated cells showed a reduction in the level of Tcf/Lef target genes involved in the β-catenin signaling network, including ubiquitous genes such as Axin2, Lef1, and Wisp1 as well as cell lineage-restricted genes such as microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and dopachrome tautomerase. Although over-expression of the Wnt signaling pathway effector β-catenin slightly restored the melanogenic program, the lack of complete reversion suggested that the imidazoles interfered with β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity rather than with β-catenin expression. Accordingly, we did not observe any significant change in β-catenin protein expression. The independence of p38 MAPK activity from the repression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was confirmed by small interfering RNA knockdown of p38 MAPK expression, which by contrast, stimulated β-catenin-driven gene expression. Our data demonstrate that the small molecule pyridinyl imidazoles possess two distinct and opposite mechanisms that modulate β-catenin dependent transcription: a p38 inhibition-dependent effect that stimulates the Wnt pathway by increasing β-catenin protein expression and an off-target mechanism that inhibits the pathway by repressing β-catenin protein functionality. The p38-independent effect seems to be dominant and, at least in B16-F0 cells, results in a strong block of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:22427932

  13. Possible involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase in PGE1-induced synthesis of osteoprotegerin in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    KAINUMA, SHINGO; OTSUKA, TAKANOBU; KUROYANAGI, GEN; YAMAMOTO, NAOHIRO; MATSUSHIMA-NISHIWAKI, RIE; KOZAWA, OSAMU; TOKUDA, HARUHIKO

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is firmly established as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. We have previously reported that prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) stimulates the synthesis of osteoprotegerin through p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. The present study investigated the involvement of AMPK in PGE1-induced osteoprotegerin synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. The levels of osteoprotegerin were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, while the phosphorylation of AMPK, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, p38 MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK were analyzed by western blotting. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of osteoprotegerin were determined by a reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. It was revealed that PGE1 significantly induced the phosphorylation of the α and β subunits of AMPK in a time-dependent manner (P<0.05). In addition, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a direct substrate of AMPK, was significantly phosphorylated by PGE1 (P<0.05). Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, was revealed to suppress the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, which significantly reduced the release and mRNA expression levels of PGE1-stimulated osteoprotegerin (P<0.05). However, the PGE1-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK were not affected by compound C. The results of the present study indicated that AMPK may positively regulate PGE1-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis in osteoblasts; thus providing novel insight into the regulatory mechanisms underlying bone metabolism. PMID:27168848

  14. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy.

    PubMed

    House, Christopher H; Beal, Emily J; Orphan, Victoria J

    2011-01-01

    On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2) found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to release), a total

  15. Glycerophosphodiesterase GDE4 as a novel lysophospholipase D: a possible involvement in bioactive N-acylethanolamine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Okamoto, Yoko; Rahman, Iffat Ara Sonia; Uyama, Toru; Inoue, Tomohito; Tokumura, Akira; Ueda, Natsuo

    2015-05-01

    Bioactive N-acylethanolamines include anti-inflammatory palmitoylethanolamide, anorexic oleoylethanolamide, and an endocannabinoid arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide). In animal tissues, these molecules are biosynthesized from N-acylethanolamine phospholipids directly by phospholipase D-type enzyme or through multi-step routes via N-acylethanolamine lysophospholipids. We previously found that mouse brain has a lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity hydrolyzing N-acylethanolamine lysophospholipids to N-acylethanolamines and that this activity could be partially attributed to glycerophosphodiesterase (GDE) 1. In the present study, we examined catalytic properties of GDE4, another member of the GDE family. When overexpressed in HEK293 cells, murine GDE4 mostly resided in the membrane fraction. Purified GDE4 showed lysoPLD activity toward various lysophospholipids, including N-acylethanolamine lysophospholipids as well as lysophosphatidylethanolamine and lysophosphatidylcholine. When HEK293 cells were metabolically labeled with N-[(14)C]palmitoylethanolamine lysophospholipid, the transient expression of GDE4 increased the [(14)C]palmitoylethanolamide level, while the knockdown of endogenous GDE4 decreased this level. These results suggested that GDE4 functions as an N-acylethanolamine-generating lysoPLD in living cells. Moreover, the expression of GDE4 increased most species of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which can be produced from various lysophospholipids by the lysoPLD activity of GDE4. GDE4 mRNA was widely distributed among mouse tissues including brain, stomach, ileum, colon, and testis. In conclusion, GDE4 may act as a lysoPLD, which is involved in the generation of N-acylethanolamines and LPA. PMID:25596343

  16. DNase I and II present in avian oocytes: a possible involvement in sperm degradation at polyspermic fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Stepińska, Urszula; Olszańska, Bozenna

    2003-02-01

    During polyspermic fertilisation in birds numerous spermatozoa enter the eggs, in contrast to the situation in mammals where fertilisation is monospermic. However, in birds only one of the spermatozoa which have entered an egg participates in zygote nucleus formation, while the supernumerary spermatozoa degenerate at early embryogenesis. Our previous work has demonstrated the presence in preovulatory quail oocytes of DNase I and II activities able to digest naked lambdaDNA/HindIII substrate in vitro. In the present studies, the activities of both DNases in quail oocytes at different stages of oogenesis and in ovulated mouse oocytes were assayed in vitro using the same substrate. Degradation of quail spermatozoa by quail oocyte extracts was also checked. Digestion of the DNA substrate was evaluated by electrophoresis on agarose gels. The activities of DNase I and II in quail oocytes increased during oogenesis and were the highest in mature oocytes. The activities were present not only in germinal discs but also in a thin layer of cytoplasm adhering to the perivitelline layer surrounding the yolk. At all stages of oogenesis the activity of DNase II was much higher than that of DNase I. DNA contained in spermatozoa was also degraded by the quail oocyte extracts under conditions optimal for both DNases. In contrast to what is observed in quail oocytes, no DNase activities were detected in ovulated mouse eggs; this is logical as they would be useless or even harmful in monospermic fertilisation. The possible role of DNase activities in avian oocytes, in degradation of accessory spermatozoa during polyspermic fertilisation, is discussed. PMID:12625527

  17. Disruption of social cognition in the sub-chronic PCP rat model of schizophrenia: Possible involvement of the endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Seillier, Alexandre; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that social withdrawal in the phencyclidine (PCP) rat model of schizophrenia results from deficient endocannabinoid-induced activation of CB1 receptors. To understand the underlying cognitive mechanisms of the social deficit in PCP-treated rats, we examined the impact of pharmacological manipulation of the endocannabinoid system on sociability (i.e. social approach) and social novelty preference (which relies on social recognition). Control rats showed a clear preference for a "social" cage (i.e. unfamiliar stimulus rat placed under a wire mesh cage) versus an "empty" cage, and spent more time exploring a "novel" cage (i.e. new stimulus rat) versus a "familiar" cage. In contrast, rats receiving PCP (5 mg/kg, b.i.d. for 7 days, followed by a 7 day-washout period) showed intact sociability, but lacked social novelty preference. This PCP-induced deficit was due to increased activity at CB1 receptors as it was reversed by systemic administration of the CB1 antagonist AM251 (1 mg/kg). In agreement with this hypothesis, the cannabinoid agonist CP55,940 (0.003-0.03 mg/kg) dose-dependently suppressed social novelty preference in control animals without affecting sociability. Taken together, these data suggest that PCP-treated rats have a deficit in social cognition, possibly induced by increased stimulation of CB1 receptors. This deficit, however, is distinct from the social withdrawal previously observed in these animals, as the latter is due to deficient, rather than increased, CB1 stimulation. PMID:26706691

  18. Hydroxy-α sanshool induces colonic motor activity in rat proximal colon: a possible involvement of KCNK9.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kunitsugu; Ohtake, Nobuhiro; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Mase, Akihito; Imamura, Sachiko; Sudo, Yuka; Miyano, Kanako; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2015-04-01

    Various colonic motor activities are thought to mediate propulsion and mixing/absorption of colonic content. The Japanese traditional medicine daikenchuto (TU-100), which is widely used for postoperative ileus in Japan, accelerates colonic emptying in healthy humans. Hydroxy-α sanshool (HAS), a readily absorbable active ingredient of TU-100 and a KCNK3/KCNK9/KCNK18 blocker as well as TRPV1/TRPA1 agonist, has been investigated for its effects on colonic motility. Motility was evaluated by intraluminal pressure and video imaging of rat proximal colons in an organ bath. Distribution of KCNKs was investigated by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Current and membrane potential were evaluated with use of recombinant KCNK3- or KCNK9-expressing Xenopus oocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Defecation frequency in rats was measured. HAS dose dependently induced strong propulsive "squeezing" motility, presumably as long-distance contraction (LDC). TRPV1/TRPA1 agonists induced different motility patterns. The effect of HAS was unaltered by TRPV1/TRPA1 antagonists and desensitization. Lidocaine (a nonselective KCNK blocker) and hydroxy-β sanshool (a geometrical isomer of HAS and KCNK3 blocker) also induced colonic motility as a rhythmic propagating ripple (RPR) and a LDC-like motion, respectively. HAS-induced "LDC," but not lidocaine-induced "RPR," was abrogated by a neuroleptic agent tetrodotoxin. KCNK3 and KCNK9 were located mainly in longitudinal smooth muscle cells and in neural cells in the myenteric plexus, respectively. Administration of HAS or TU-100 increased defecation frequency in normal and laparotomy rats. HAS may evoke strong LDC possibly via blockage of the neural KCNK9 channel in the colonic myenteric plexus. PMID:25634809

  19. Protective effects of MCI-186 on cerebral ischemia: possible involvement of free radical scavenging and antioxidant actions.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Yuki, S; Egawa, M; Nishi, H

    1994-03-01

    The anti-ischemic effects and a possible mechanism of a new antistroke agent, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-pyrazolin-5-one (MCI-186), were studied. Preischemic treatment with MCI-186 (3 mg/kg i.v.) facilitated the recovery of electrocorticographic activity and prolonged survival time in global complete ischemia of rats; MCI-186 (1 and 3 mg/kg i.v.) also mitigated dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier and energy failure in hemispheric embolization of rats. Postischemic treatment with MCI-186 (3 mg/kg i.v.) decreased cortical infarction in focal embolization of rats. MCI-186 (0.6-2.4 mM) inhibited the OH.-induced hydroxylation of salicylate (maximal inhibition, 40.2%), but at 100 microM it did not influence O2- generation. MCI-186 inhibited the formation of linoleic acid-conjugated dienes caused by OH. (IC50 = 32.0 microM). Also, concurrent administration of MCI-186 (3-100 mg/kg i.v.) ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperlipopeoxidemia and degranulation of beta-cells in alloxan (40 mg/kg i.v.)-treated rats. In addition, MCI-186 inhibited iron-dependent peroxidation in rat brain homogenates and mitochondrial homogenates (IC50 = 15.0 and 2.3 microM, respectively) and prevented iron-dependent peroxidative disintegration of mitochondrial membranes (IC50 = 39.0 microM). These findings suggest that MCI-186 has potent anti-ischemic actions and that its mechanism may be closely associated with beneficial antioxidant activities. PMID:8138971

  20. Virus-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea-pig: possible involvement of histamine and inflammatory cells.

    PubMed Central

    Folkerts, G.; De Clerck, F.; Reijnart, I.; Span, P.; Nijkamp, F. P.

    1993-01-01

    histamine, twice a day (30 min) during 4 successive days, do not demonstrate an increased airway responsiveness, but instead show tachyphylaxis in response to histamine in vitro. In addition, no influx of inflammatory cells is found in these animals. 8. These results suggest that histamine does not directly increase the responsiveness of the guinea-pig trachea; however, histamine may be involved in a cascade of events leading to airway hyperresponsiveness after a viral infection, a process that could be related to an influx and/or an activation of broncho-alveolar cells after PI-3 virus stimulation. PMID:8097951

  1. Impairment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity in diethylnitrosamine-induced rat hepatomas: possible involvement of oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Boitier, E; Merad-Boudia, M; Guguen-Guillouzo, C; Defer, N; Ceballos-Picot, I; Leroux, J P; Marsac, C

    1995-07-15

    Alterations in the energy metabolism of cancer cells have been reported for many years. However, the deleterious mechanisms involved in these deficiencies have not yet been clearly proved. The main goal of this study was to decipher the harmful mechanisms responsible for the respiratory chain deficiencies in the course of diethylnitrosamine (DENA)-induced rat hepatocarcinogenesis, where mitochondrial DNA abnormalities had been previously reported. The respiratory activity of freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria, assessed by oxygen consumption experiments and enzymatic assays, presented a severe complex I deficiency 19 months after DENA treatment, and later on, in addition, a defective complex III activity. Since respiratory complex subunits are encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, we checked whether the respiratory chain defects were due to impaired synthesis processes. The specific immunodetection of complex I failed to show any alterations in the steady-state levels of both nuclear and mitochondrial encoded subunits in the hepatomas. Moreover, in vitro protein synthesis experiments carried out on freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria did not bring to light any modifications in the synthesis of the mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory complexes, whatever the degree of tumor progression. Finally, Southern blot analysis of mitochondrial DNA did not show any major mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in DENA-induced hepatomas. Because the synthetic processes of respiratory complexes did not seem to be implicated in the respiratory chain impairment, these deficiencies could be partly ascribed to a direct toxic impact of highly reactive molecules on these complexes, thus impairing their function. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is an important generator of noxious, reactive oxygen free radicals such as superoxide and H2O2, which are normally catabolized by powerful antioxidant scavengers. Nineteen months after DENA treatment, a general collapse of

  2. Possible involvement of hippocampal immediate-early genes in contextual fear memory deficit induced by cranial irradiation.

    PubMed

    Son, Yeonghoon; Kang, Sohi; Kim, Jinwook; Lee, Sueun; Kim, Jong-Choon; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Joong-Sun; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Youn, BuHyun; Shin, Taekyun; Yang, Miyoung; Moon, Changjong

    2016-09-01

    Cranial irradiation can trigger adverse effects on brain functions, including cognitive ability. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced cognitive impairments remain still unknown. Immediate-early genes (IEGs) are implicated in neuronal plasticity and the related functions (i.e., memory formation) in the hippocampus. The present study quantitatively assessed changes in the mRNA and protein levels of the learning-induced IEGs, including Arc, c-fos, and zif268, in the mouse hippocampus after cranial irradiation using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Mice (male, 8-week-old C57BL/6) received whole-brain irradiation with 0 or 10Gy of gamma-ray and, 2weeks later, contextual fear conditioning (CFC) was used to induce IEGs. In the CFC task, mice evaluated 2weeks after irradiation exhibited significant memory deficits compared with sham (0Gy)-irradiated controls. The levels of mRNA encoding IEGs were significantly upregulated in the hippocampus 10 and 30min after CFC training. The mRNA levels in the irradiated hippocampi were significantly lower than those in the sham-irradiated controls. The IEG protein levels were significantly increased in all hippocampal regions, including the hippocampal dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis (CA)1, and CA3, after CFC training. The CFC-induced upregulation of Arc and c-fos in 10Gy-irradiated hippocampi was significantly lower than that in sham-irradiated controls, although there were no significant differences in the protein levels of the learning-induced zif268 between sham-irradiated and 10Gy-irradiated hippocampi. Thus, cranial irradiation with 10Gy of gamma-ray impairs the induction of hippocampal IEGs (particularly Arc and c-fos) via behavioral contextual fear memory, and this disturbance may be associated with the memory deficits evident in mice after cranial irradiation, possibly through the dysregulation of neuronal

  3. Human kallikrein 14: a new potential biomarker for ovarian and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Borgoño, Carla A; Grass, Linda; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Yousef, George M; Petraki, Constantina D; Howarth, David H C; Fracchioli, Stefano; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2003-12-15

    Human kallikrein gene 14 (KLK14) is a recently discovered member of the tissue kallikrein family of secreted serine proteases, which includes hK3/prostate-specific antigen, the best cancer biomarker to date. Given that KLK14 is hormonally regulated, differentially expressed in endocrine-related cancers, and a prognostic marker for breast and ovarian cancer at the mRNA level, we hypothesize that its encoded protein, hK14, like hK3/prostate-specific antigen, may constitute a new biomarker for endocrine-related malignancies. The objective of this study was to generate immunological reagents for hK14, to develop an ELISA and immunohistochemical techniques to study its expression in normal and cancerous tissues and biological fluids. Recombinant hK14 was produced in Pichia pastoris, purified by affinity chromatography, and injected into mice and rabbits for polyclonal antibody generation. Using the mouse and rabbit antisera, a sandwich-type immunofluorometric ELISA and immunohistochemical methodologies were developed for hK14. The ELISA was sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 micro g/liter), specific for hK14, linear from 0 to 20 micro g/liter with between-run and within-run coefficients of variation of <10%. hK14 was quantified in human tissue extracts and biological fluids. Highest levels were observed in the breast, skin, prostate, seminal plasma, and amniotic fluid, with almost undetectable levels in normal serum. hK14 concentration was higher in 40% of ovarian cancer tissues compared with normal ovarian tissues. Serum hK14 levels were elevated in a proportion of patients with ovarian (65%) and breast (40%) cancers. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated strong cytoplasmic staining of hK14 by the epithelial cells of normal and malignant skin, ovary, breast, and testis. In conclusion, we report the first ELISA and immunohistochemical assays for hK14 and describe its distribution in tissues and biological fluids. Our preliminary data indicate that hK14 is a potential

  4. Tissue Kallikrein Alleviates Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Activating the B2R-ERK1/2-CREB-Bcl-2 Signaling Pathway in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kunxiong; Hu, Bin; Sang, Hongfei; Xie, Yi; Xu, Lili; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Lingling; Liu, Xinfeng; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Renliang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) substantially increases the risk of ischemic stroke and reduces the tolerance to ischemic insults. Tissue kallikrein (TK) has been demonstrated to protect neurons from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in orthoglycemic model by activating the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). Considering the differential effects of B2R or bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R) on cardioprotection and neuroprotection in I/R with or without diabetes, this study was designed to investigate the role of TK during cerebral I/R injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Intravenous injection of TK inhibited apoptosis in neurons, alleviated edema and inflammatory reactions after focal cerebral I/R, significantly reduced the infarct volume, and improved functional recovery. These beneficial effects were accompanied by activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), cAMP response element-binding (CREB), and Bcl-2 signal proteins. Inhibition of the B2R or ERK1/2 pathway abated the effects of TK, whereas an antagonist of B1R enhanced the effects. These findings reveal that the neuroprotective effect of TK against cerebral I/R injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats mainly involves the enhancement of B2R and ERK1/2-CREB-Bcl-2 signaling pathway activity.

  5. Purification and characterisation of blarinasin, a new tissue kallikrein-like protease from the short-tailed shrew Blarina brevicauda: comparative studies with blarina toxin.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masaki; Okumura, Yuushi; Ohdachi, Satoshi D; Oba, Yuichi; Yoshikuni, Michiyasu; Nakamura, Yasuo; Kido, Hiroshi; Uemura, Daisuke

    2005-02-01

    A new tissue kallikrein-like protease, blarinasin, has been purified from the salivary glands of the short-tailed shrew Blarina brevicauda. Blarinasin is a 32-kDa N-glycosylated protease with isoelectric values ranging between 5.3 and 5.7, and an optimum pH of 8.5 for enzyme activity. The cloned blarinasin cDNA coded for a pre-pro-sequence and a mature peptide of 252 amino acids with a catalytic triad typical for serine proteases and 43.7-54.0% identity to other mammalian tissue kallikreins. Blarinasin preferentially hydrolysed Pro-Phe-Arg-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (MCA) and N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-Val-Leu-Lys-MCA, and preferentially converted human high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK) to bradykinin. The activity of blarinasin was prominently inhibited by aprotinin (K(i) =3.4 nM). A similar kallikrein-like protease, the lethal venom blarina toxin, has previously been purified from the salivary glands of the shrew Blarina and shows 67.9% identity to blarinasin. However, blarinasin was not toxic in mice. Blarinasin is a very abundant kallikrein-like protease and represents 70-75% of kallikrein-like enzymes in the salivary gland of B. brevicauda. PMID:15843162

  6. Expression of kallikrein 4 (Klk4) in dental and non-dental tissues

    PubMed Central

    Simmer, James P.; Richardson, Amelia S.; Smith, Charles E.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2011-01-01

    Kallikrein 4 (Klk4) is critical for proper dental enamel formation. Klk4 null mice and persons with two defective KLK4 alleles have obvious enamel defects, with no other apparent phenotype. Klk4 mRNA or protein is reported to be in tissues besides teeth, including prostate, ovary, kidney, liver, and salivary gland. In this study we used the Klk4 knockout/NLS-lacZ knockin mouse to assay Klk4 expression using ß-galactosidase histochemistry. Incubations for 5 h were used to detect Klk4 expression with minimal endogenous background, while overnight incubations susceptible to false positives were used to look for trace Klk4 expression. Developing maxillary molars at postnatal days 5, 6, 7, 8, and 14, developing mandibular incisors at postnatal day 14, and selected non-dental tissues from adult wild-type and Klk4lacZ/lacZ mice were examined by X-gal histochemistry. After 5 h incubation, Xgal staining was observed specifically in the nuclei of maturation stage ameloblasts in molars and incisors from Klk4lacZ/lacZ mice and was detected weakly in nuclei of salivary gland ducts and patches of prostate epithelia. We conclude that Klk4 is predominantly a tooth-specific protease with low expression in submandibular salivary gland and prostate, and with no detectable expression in liver, kidney, testis, ovary, oviduct, epididymis, and vas deferens. PMID:22243250

  7. Prostate Cancer-Associated Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 4 Activates Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 and Thrombospondin-1.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman-Luck, Ruth A; Stansfield, Scott H; Stephens, Carson R; Loessner, Daniela; Clements, Judith A

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer metastasis to bone is terminal; thus, novel therapies are required to prevent end-stage disease. Kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) is a serine protease that is overproduced in localized prostate cancer and is abundant in prostate cancer bone metastases. In vitro, KLK4 induces tumor-promoting phenotypes; however, the underlying proteolytic mechanism is undefined. The protein topography and migration analysis platform (PROTOMAP) was used for high-depth identification of KLK4 substrates secreted by prostate cancer bone metastasis-derived PC-3 cells to delineate the mechanism of KLK4 action in advanced prostate cancer. Thirty-six putative novel substrates were determined from the PROTOMAP analysis. In addition, KLK4 cleaved the established substrate, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, thus validating the approach. KLK4 activated matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1), a protease that promotes prostate tumor growth and metastasis. MMP1 was produced in the tumor compartment of prostate cancer bone metastases, highlighting its accessibility to KLK4 at this site. KLK4 further liberated an N-terminal product, with purported angiogenic activity, from thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) and cleaved TSP1 in an osteoblast-derived matrix. This is the most comprehensive analysis of the proteolytic action of KLK4 in an advanced prostate cancer model to date, highlighting KLK4 as a potential multifunctional regulator of prostate cancer progression. PMID:27378148

  8. Transgenic kallikrein 5 mice reproduce major cutaneous and systemic hallmarks of Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Furio, Laetitia; de Veer, Simon; Jaillet, Madeleine; Briot, Anais; Robin, Aurelie; Deraison, Celine; Hovnanian, Alain

    2014-03-10

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a severe genetic skin disease in which absence of a key protease inhibitor causes congenital exfoliative erythroderma, eczematous-like lesions, and atopic manifestations. Several proteases are overactive in NS, including kallikrein-related peptidase (KLK) 5, KLK7, and elastase-2 (ELA2), which are suggested to be part of a proteolytic cascade initiated by KLK5. To address the role of KLK5 in NS, we have generated a new transgenic murine model expressing human KLK5 in the granular layer of the epidermis (Tg-KLK5). Transgene expression resulted in increased proteolytic activity attributable to KLK5 and its downstream targets KLK7, KLK14, and ELA2. Tg-KLK5 mice developed an exfoliative erythroderma with scaling, growth delay, and hair abnormalities. The skin barrier was defective and the stratum corneum was detached through desmosomal cleavage. Importantly, Tg-KLK5 mice displayed cutaneous and systemic hallmarks of severe inflammation and allergy with pruritus. The skin showed enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, infiltration of immune cells, and markers of Th2/Th17/Th22 T cell responses. Moreover, serum IgE and Tslp levels were elevated. Our study identifies KLK5 as an important contributor to the NS proteolytic cascade and provides a new and viable model for the evaluation of future targeted therapies for NS or related diseases such as atopic dermatitis. PMID:24534191

  9. Isomannide-based peptidomimetics as inhibitors for human tissue kallikreins 5 and 7.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jocelia P C; Freitas, Renato F; Melo, Leandro Silva de; Barros, Thalita G; Santos, Jorge A N; Juliano, Maria A; Pinheiro, Sérgio; Blaber, Michael; Juliano, Luiz; Muri, Estela M F; Puzer, Luciano

    2014-02-13

    Human kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and 7 (KLK7) are potential targets for the treatment of skin inflammation and cancer. Previously, we identified isomannide derivatives as potent and competitive KLK7 inhibitors. The introduction of N-protected amino acids into the isomannide-based scaffold was studied. Some KLK5 inhibitors with submicromolar affinity (K i values of 0.3-0.7 μM) were identified, and they were 6- to 13-fold more potent than our previous hits. Enzyme kinetics studies and the determination of the mechanism of inhibition confirmed that the new isomannide-based derivatives are competitive inhibitors of both KLK5 and KLK7. Molecular docking and MD simulations of selected inhibitors into the KLK5 binding site provide insight into the molecular mechanism by which these compounds interact with the enzyme. The promising results obtained in this study open new prospects on the design and synthesis of highly specific KLK5 and KLK7 inhibitors. PMID:24900785

  10. Ecallantide: a plasma kallikrein inhibitor for the treatment of acute attacks of hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Stolz, L E; Horn, P T

    2010-08-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a debilitating, potentially fatal disease characterized by variable and unpredictable acute attacks of swelling affecting the subcutaneous tissue and mucosa. It is an autosomal dominant disorder resulting from a genetic deficiency of functional C1-esterase inhibitor. Available treatments include long-term prophylaxis, short-term prophylaxis and treatment of acute attacks. Ecallantide is a novel, specific and potent inhibitor of plasma kallikrein that was recently approved in the United States for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE in patients aged 16 years and older. In two phase III clinical trials, the subcutaneous administration of 30 mg ecallantide resulted in significantly greater symptom improvement than placebo for acute attacks of HAE. Ecallantide was generally well tolerated throughout the clinical development program. The main safety concern following ecallantide treatment is hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. A Risk Evaluation and Management Strategy (REMS) has been implemented to minimize this risk and a long-term observational safety study is currently under way to collect more information about hypersensitivity and immunogenicity. Ecallantide represents a novel treatment option for patients with HAE. PMID:20830315

  11. A potential role for tissue kallikrein-related peptidases in human cervico-vaginal physiology.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julie L V; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2008-06-01

    Human tissue kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK) are a family of 15 genes located on chromosome 19q13.4 that encode secreted serine proteases with trypsin- and/or chymotrypsin-like activity. Relatively large levels of many KLKs are present in human cervico-vaginal fluid (CVF) and in the supernatant of cultured human vaginal epithelial cells. Many KLKs are also hormonally regulated in vaginal epithelial cells, particularly by glucocorticoids and estrogens. The physiological role of KLK in the vagina is currently unknown; however, analysis of the CVF proteome has revealed clues for potential KLK functions in this environment. Here, we detail potential roles for KLKs in cervico-vaginal physiology. First, we suggest that KLKs play a role in the vagina similar to their role in skin physiology: (1) in the desquamation of vaginal epithelial cells, similar to their activity in the desquamation of skin corneocytes; and (2) in their ability to activate antimicrobial proteins in CVF as they do in sweat. Consequently, we hypothesize that dysregulated KLK expression in the vagina could lead to the development of pathological conditions such as desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. Second, we propose that KLKs may play a role in premature rupture of membranes and pre-term birth through their cleavage of fetal membrane extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:18627298

  12. The possible involvement of copper-containing nitrite reductase (NirK) and flavohemoglobin in denitrification by the fungus Cylindrocarpon tonkinense.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Wan; Fushinobu, Shinya; Zhou, Shengmin; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of denitrification and nitrate respiration among eukaryotes has been established during the last few decades. However, denitrification-related eukaryotic genes have been isolated from only a few fungi, and eukaryotic denitrification (or nitrate respiration) is still inadequately understood. In this study, we identified genes that were up-regulated under denitrifying conditions in the fungus Cylindrocarpon tonkinense using the suppression subtraction hybridization technique, and the expression patterns of these genes were characterized by Northern analysis. We identified copper-containing nitrite reductase, cytochrome P450 nitric oxide reductase, flavohemoglobin (Fhb), and formate/nitrite transporter homolog genes as possibly involved in fungal denitrification. Our results concerning the involvement of Fhb and formate/nitrite transporter perhaps provide new insight into the fungal denitrification system. PMID:20622453

  13. T-antigen binding lectin with antibacterial activity from marine invertebrate, sea cucumber (Holothuria scabra): possible involvement in differential recognition of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Nagaraj M; Goswami, Usha; Khan, M Islam

    2008-10-01

    In invertebrates, cellular and humoral components are evolved to maintain their body immunity and integrity. Both these factors respond to different antigens such as microorganisms, vertebrate erythrocytes and foreign proteins. In this article, we report a study of a lectin (HSL) involved in immune response in the echinoderm, sea cucumber (Holothuria scabra). Correlative studies indicate that the expression of this defensive lectin is induced by bacterial challenge, wherein cell wall glycoconjugates of bacteria are involved in lectin induction. HSL showed strong broad spectrum antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Under in vitro conditions, purified HSL mediate agglutination of the test bacteria, there by indicating a possible mode of action in physiological situation. PMID:18501924

  14. Increased secretion of glandular-kallikrein in the bronchial washings induced by intravenous injection of leukotriene C4 in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H. Y.; Katori, M.; Majima, M.; Sunahara, N.

    1992-01-01

    1. Intravenous administration of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and LTD4 (1-10 nmol kg-1) caused a dose-dependent increase in secretion of glandular-kallikrein in the bronchial washings of guinea-pigs, as measured by cleavage of a synthetic substrate and the formation of kinin. LTC4 was more potent than LTD4 and pilocarpine was much less potent than peptide leukotrienes on a molecular basis. 2. The increases in levels of glandular-kallikrein in the bronchial washings that were induced by LTC4 (3 nmol kg-1, i.v.) were almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with an antagonist of leukotrienes (ONO-1078), with an antagonist of thromboxane (S-1452), with an inhibitor of thromboxane synthetase (OKY-046), with indomethacin, with atropine or with scopolamine. These results indicate that the LTC4-induced increase in levels of glandular-kallikrein may have been mediated by the formation of thromboxane and the release of acetylcholine. 3. The increases in levels of glandular-kallikrein in the bronchial washings induced by STA2 (20 pmol kg-1, i.v.), a stable analogue of thromboxane A2, were completely blocked by pretreatment with atropine, whereas increases induced by pilocarpine (41 mumol kg-1, i.v.) were not blocked by pretreatment with indomethacin, although such increases were inhibited by atropine. This result indicates that secretion of kallikrein stimulated by LTC4 may have been mediated by the successive formation of thromboxane A2 and release of acetylcholine. 4. Intravenous administration of bradykinin (3-30 nmol kg-1) caused a dose-dependent increase in levels of glandular-kallikrein in the bronchial washings. This increase was completely inhibited by pretreatment with atropine, with indomethacin or with an antagonist of thromboxane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1628150

  15. Kallistatin ameliorates influenza virus pathogenesis by inhibition of kallikrein-related peptidase 1-mediated cleavage of viral hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Leu, Chia-Hsing; Yang, Mei-Lin; Chung, Nai-Hui; Huang, Yen-Jang; Su, Yu-Chu; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Shieh, Gia-Shing; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Shainn-Wei; Chang, Yao; Chao, Julie; Chao, Lee; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2015-09-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus by host trypsin-like proteases is required for viral infectivity. Some serine proteases are capable of cleaving influenza virus HA, whereas some serine protease inhibitors (serpins) inhibit the HA cleavage in various cell types. Kallikrein-related peptidase 1 (KLK1, also known as tissue kallikrein) is a widely distributed serine protease. Kallistatin, a serpin synthesized mainly in the liver and rapidly secreted into the circulation, forms complexes with KLK1 and inhibits its activity. Here, we investigated the roles of KLK1 and kallistatin in influenza virus infection. We show that the levels of KLK1 increased, whereas those of kallistatin decreased, in the lungs of mice during influenza virus infection. KLK1 cleaved H1, H2, and H3 HA molecules and consequently enhanced viral production. In contrast, kallistatin inhibited KLK1-mediated HA cleavage and reduced viral production. Cells transduced with the kallistatin gene secreted kallistatin extracellularly, which rendered them more resistant to influenza virus infection. Furthermore, lentivirus-mediated kallistatin gene delivery protected mice against lethal influenza virus challenge by reducing the viral load, inflammation, and injury in the lung. Taking the data together, we determined that KLK1 and kallistatin contribute to the pathogenesis of influenza virus by affecting the cleavage of the HA peptide and inflammatory responses. This study provides a proof of principle for the potential therapeutic application of kallistatin or other KLK1 inhibitors for influenza. Since proteolytic activation also enhances the infectivity of some other viruses, kallistatin and other kallikrein inhibitors may be explored as antiviral agents against these viruses. PMID:26149981

  16. Inhibition of Plasma Kallikrein by a Highly Specific Active Site Blocking Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Kenniston, Jon A.; Faucette, Ryan R.; Martik, Diana; Comeau, Stephen R.; Lindberg, Allison P.; Kopacz, Kris J.; Conley, Gregory P.; Chen, Jie; Viswanathan, Malini; Kastrapeli, Niksa; Cosic, Janja; Mason, Shauna; DiLeo, Mike; Abendroth, Jan; Kuzmic, Petr; Ladner, Robert C.; Edwards, Thomas E.; TenHoor, Christopher; Adelman, Burt A.; Nixon, Andrew E.; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma kallikrein (pKal) proteolytically cleaves high molecular weight kininogen to generate the potent vasodilator and the pro-inflammatory peptide, bradykinin. pKal activity is tightly regulated in healthy individuals by the serpin C1-inhibitor, but individuals with hereditary angioedema (HAE) are deficient in C1-inhibitor and consequently exhibit excessive bradykinin generation that in turn causes debilitating and potentially fatal swelling attacks. To develop a potential therapeutic agent for HAE and other pKal-mediated disorders, we used phage display to discover a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (DX-2930) against pKal. In vitro experiments demonstrated that DX-2930 potently inhibits active pKal (Ki = 0.120 ± 0.005 nm) but does not target either the zymogen (prekallikrein) or any other serine protease tested. These findings are supported by a 2.1-Å resolution crystal structure of pKal complexed to a DX-2930 Fab construct, which establishes that the pKal active site is fully occluded by the antibody. DX-2930 injected subcutaneously into cynomolgus monkeys exhibited a long half-life (t½ ∼12.5 days) and blocked high molecular weight kininogen proteolysis in activated plasma in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, subcutaneous DX-2930 reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. A potent and long acting inhibitor of pKal activity could be an effective treatment option for pKal-mediated diseases, such as HAE. PMID:24970892

  17. Kallikrein 4 and matrix metalloproteinase-20 immunoexpression in malignant, benign and infiltrative odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crivelini, Marcelo Macedo; Oliveira, Denise Tostes; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; de Sousa, Suzana Cantanhede Orsini Machado; Loyola, Adriano Motta

    2016-01-01

    Context: Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) (enamelysin) and kallikrein 4 (KLK4) are enzymes secreted by ameloblasts that play an important role in enamel matrix degradation during amelogenesis. However, studies have shown that neoplastic cells can produce such enzymes, which may affect the tumor infiltrative and metastatic behaviors. Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the biological role of MMP20 and KLK4 in odontogenic tumors. Materials and Methods: The enzymes were analyzed immunohistochemically in ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, keratocystic odontogenic tumor with or without recurrence and odontogenic carcinoma. Statistical Analysis Used: Clinicopathological parameters were statistically correlated with protein expression using the Fisher's exact test. Kruskal–Wallis and Wilcoxon-independent methods were used to evaluate the differences in median values. Results: Positive Immunoexpression was detected in all benign lesions, with a prevalence of 75–100% immunolabeled cells. Patients were predominantly young, Caucasian, female, with slow-growing tumors located in the mandible causing asymptomatic swelling. No KLK4 expression was seen in carcinomas, and the amount of MMP20-positive cells varied between 20% and 80%. Rapid evolution, recurrence and age >60 years characterized the malignant nature of these lesions. Conclusions: Data showed that KLK4 and MMP20 enzymes may not be crucial to tumoral infiltrative capacity, especially in malignant tumors, considering the diversity and peculiarity of these lesions. The significant immunoexpression in benign lesions, remarkably in AOT, is likely associated with differentiated tumor cells that can produce and degrade enamel matrix-like substances. This would be expected since the histogenesis of odontogenic tumors commonly comes from epithelium that recently performed a secretory activity in tooth formation. PMID:27601817

  18. Plasma Kallikrein Mediates Retinal Vascular Dysfunction and Induces Retinal Thickening in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Clermont, Allen; Chilcote, Tamie J.; Kita, Takeshi; Liu, Jia; Riva, Priscilla; Sinha, Sukanto; Feener, Edward P.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Plasma kallikrein (PK) has been identified in vitreous fluid obtained from individuals with diabetic retinopathy and has been implicated in contributing to retinal vascular dysfunction. In this report, we examined the effects of PK on retinal vascular functions and thickness in diabetic rats. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated the effects of a selective PK inhibitor, ASP-440, and C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), the primary physiological inhibitor of PK, on retinal vascular permeability (RVP) and hemodynamics in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. The effect of intravitreal PK injection on retinal thickness was examined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography. RESULTS Systemic continuous administration of ASP-440 for 4 weeks initiated at the time of diabetes onset inhibited RVP by 42% (P = 0.013) and 83% (P < 0.001) at doses of 0.25 and 0.6 mg/kg per day, respectively. Administration of ASP-440 initiated 2 weeks after the onset of diabetes ameliorated both RVP and retinal blood flow abnormalities in diabetic rats measured at 4 weeks’ diabetes duration. Intravitreal injection of C1-INH similarly decreased impaired RVP in rats with 2 weeks’ diabetes duration. Intravitreal injection of PK increased both acute RVP and sustained focal RVP (24 h postinjection) to a greater extent in diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic control rats. Intravitreal injection of PK increased retinal thickness compared with baseline to a greater extent (P = 0.017) in diabetic rats (from 193 ± 10 μm to 223 ± 13 μm) compared with nondiabetic rats (from 182 ± 8 μm to 193 ± 9 μm). CONCLUSIONS These results show that PK contributes to retinal vascular dysfunctions in diabetic rats and that the combination of diabetes and intravitreal injection of PK in rats induces retinal thickening. PMID:21444925

  19. Human Tissue Kallikrein Activity in Angiographically Documented Chronic Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Estêvão Lanna; Magalhães, Carolina Antunes; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; Mandil, Ari; Garcia, José Carlos Faria; Araújo, Rosanã Aparecida; Figueiredo, Amintas Fabiano de Souza; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Background Human tissue kallikrein (hK1) is a key enzyme in the kallikrein–kinin system (KKS). hK1-specific amidase activity is reduced in urine samples from hypertensive and heart failure (HF) patients. The pathophysiologic role of hK1 in coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unclear. Objective To evaluate hK1-specific amidase activity in the urine of CAD patients Methods Sixty-five individuals (18–75 years) who underwent cardiac catheterism (CATH) were included. Random midstream urine samples were collected immediately before CATH. Patients were classified in two groups according to the presence of coronary lesions: CAD (43 patients) and non-CAD (22 patients). hK1 amidase activity was estimated using the chromogenic substrate D-Val-Leu-Arg-Nan. Creatinine was determined using Jaffé’s method. Urinary hK1-specific amidase activity was expressed as µM/(min · mg creatinine) to correct for differences in urine flow rates. Results Urinary hK1-specific amidase activity levels were similar between CAD [0.146 µM/(min ·mg creatinine)] and non-CAD [0.189 µM/(min . mg creatinine)] patients (p = 0.803) and remained similar to values previously reported for hypertensive patients [0.210 µM/(min . mg creatinine)] and HF patients [0.104 µM/(min . mg creatinine)]. CAD severity and hypertension were not observed to significantly affect urinary hK1-specific amidase activity. Conclusion CAD patients had low levels of urinary hK1-specific amidase activity, suggesting that renal KKS activity may be reduced in patients with this disease. PMID:26351984

  20. Crystal structures of human tissue kallikrein 4: activity modulation by a specific zinc binding site.

    PubMed

    Debela, Mekdes; Magdolen, Viktor; Grimminger, Valerie; Sommerhoff, Christian; Messerschmidt, Albrecht; Huber, Robert; Friedrich, Rainer; Bode, Wolfram; Goettig, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Human tissue kallikrein 4 (hK4) belongs to a 15-member family of closely related serine proteinases. hK4 is predominantly expressed in prostate, activates hK3/PSA, and is up-regulated in prostate and ovarian cancer. We have identified active monomers of recombinant hK4 besides inactive oligomers in solution. hK4 crystallised in the presence of zinc, nickel, and cobalt ions in three crystal forms containing cyclic tetramers and octamers. These structures display a novel metal site between His25 and Glu77 that links the 70-80 loop with the N-terminal segment. Micromolar zinc as present in prostatic fluid inhibits the enzymatic activity of hK4 against fluorogenic substrates. In our measurements, wild-type hK4 exhibited a zinc inhibition constant (IC50) of 16 microM including a permanent residual activity, in contrast to the zinc-independent mutants H25A and E77A. Since the Ile16 N terminus of wild-type hK4 becomes more accessible for acetylating agents in the presence of zinc, we propose that zinc affects the hK4 active site via the salt-bridge formed between the N terminus and Asp194 required for a functional active site. hK4 possesses an unusual 99-loop that creates a groove-like acidic S2 subsite. These findings explain the observed specificity of hK4 for the P1 to P4 substrate residues. Moreover, hK4 shows a negatively charged surface patch, which may represent an exosite for prime-side substrate recognition. PMID:16950394

  1. Informatic support for processing the data regarding the environment factors possibly involved in the etiopathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus ETIODIAB.

    PubMed

    Alecu, S; Dadarlat, V; Stanciu, E; Ionescu-Tirgoviste, C; Konerth, A M

    1997-01-01

    Diabetes represents a heterogeneous group of disturbances, which can have a different aetiology, but have in common glucidic, lipidic and proteinic metabolic disturbances. Insulin-dependent diabetes appears in genetically susceptible persons, as an autoimmune disease activated by environment factors. Epidemiological studies performed in different countries, notice the increasing of diabetes cases in the last decades. Therefore the informatic system EtioDiab (from Etiopathological diabetes) has been developed. The purpose of this system is to assist the medical research regarding the environment factors involved in the etiopathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes. The system offers the possibility of calculation of many statistic indicators, of graphic representation of the recorded data, of verification of the statistical hypotheses. PMID:10179563

  2. A protein kinase antigenically related to pp60v-src possibly involved in yeast cell cycle control: positive in vivo regulation by sterol.

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, C; Biemann, H P; Dahl, J

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ergosterol, yeast's natural sterol, on cell cycling and a protein kinase antigenically related to pp60v-src were examined in a sterol auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sterol-depleted cells accumulate in an unbudded, G1 state. Cell budding and proliferation are reinitiated upon addition of nonlimiting ergosterol or cholesterol with trace ergosterol, whereas cholesterol or trace ergosterol alone is less effective. Stimulation of a protein kinase associated with immune complexes of yeast protein and anti-pp60v-src shows a positive correlation with exit from the G1 phase following ergosterol addition. Ergosterol-stimulated cells also demonstrate an increase in phosphatidylinositol kinase activity. The data suggest that hormonal levels of ergosterol (effective concentration, approximately equal to 1 nM) participate in a signaling process associated with a protein kinase possibly involved in yeast cell cycle control. Images PMID:2438691

  3. Tissue Kallikrein Prevents Restenosis After Stenting of Severe Atherosclerotic Stenosis of the Middle Cerebral Artery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ruifeng; Zhang, Renliang; Yang, Fang; Lin, Min; Li, Min; Liu, Ling; Yin, Qin; Lin, Hang; Xiong, Yunyun; Liu, Wenhua; Fan, Xiaobing; Dai, Qiliang; Zhou, Lizhi; Lan, Wenya; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-02-01

    In-stent restenosis (ISR) following intracranial artery stenting affects long-term clinical outcome. This randomized controlled trial sought to identify the long-term efficacy of exogenous tissue kallikrein (TK) for preventing ISR after intracranial stenting of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) atherosclerotic stenosis.Sixty-one patients successfully treated with intracranial stenting for symptomatic MCA M1 segment stenosis (>70%) were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups: control group and TK group. Patients in the TK group received human urinary kallidinogenase for 7 days, followed by maintenance therapy of pancreatic kallikrein for 6 months. The primary end point was angiographically verified ISR at 6 months, and secondary end points included vascular events and death within 12 months. Endogenous TK plasma concentrations of patients were measured before stenting and at the 6-month follow-up time-point.Patients in the TK group had lower occurrence rates of ISR and vascular events than patients in the control group. There was no difference in endogenous TK levels in plasma at 6 months postoperatively between the TK and control groups. Further subgroup analysis revealed that patients without ISR had higher endogenous TK levels at baseline and lower concentrations at 6 months postoperatively compared with patients who underwent ISR.Exogenous TK is effective for the prevention of ISR after intracranial stenting. PMID:26871851

  4. The Role of Plasma Kallikrein-Kinin Pathway in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Abdulaal, Marwan; Haddad, Nour Maya N; Sun, Jennifer K; Silva, Paolo S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinal disease is characterized by a series of retinal microvascular changes and increases in retinal vascular permeability that lead to development of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME), respectively. Current treatment strategies for DR and DME are mostly limited to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors and laser photocoagulation. These treatment modalities are not universally effective in all patients, and potential side effects persist in a significant portion of patients. The plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is one of the pathways that has been identified in the vitreous in proliferative DR and DME. Preclinical studies have shown that the activation of intraocular KKS induces retinal vascular permeability, vasodilation, and retinal thickening. Proteomic analysis from vitreous of eyes with DME has shown that KKS and VEGF pathways are potentially independent biologic pathways. Furthermore, proteins associated with DME in the vitreous were significantly more correlated with the KKS pathway compared to VEGF pathway. Preclinical experiments on diabetic animals showed that inhibition of KKS components was found to be an effective approach to decrease retinal vascular permeability. An initial phase I human trial of a novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor for the treatment of DME is currently ongoing to test the safety of this approach and serves as an initial step in the translation of basic science discovery into an innovative clinical intervention. PMID:26959125

  5. Genomic organization of the Neurospora crassa gsn gene: possible involvement of the STRE and HSE elements in the modulation of transcription during heat shock.

    PubMed

    Freitas, F Zanolli; Bertolini, M C

    2004-12-01

    Glycogen synthase, an enzyme involved in glycogen biosynthesis, is regulated by phosphorylation and by the allosteric ligand glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). In addition, enzyme levels can be regulated by changes in gene expression. We recently cloned a cDNA for glycogen synthase ( gsn) from Neurospora crassa, and showed that gsn transcription decreased when cells were exposed to heat shock (shifted from 30 degrees C to 45 degrees C). In order to understand the mechanisms that control gsn expression, we isolated the gene, including its 5' and 3' flanking regions, from the genome of N. crassa. An ORF of approximately 2.4 kb was identified, which is interrupted by four small introns (II-V). Intron I (482 bp) is located in the 5'UTR region. Three putative Transcription Initiation Sites (TISs) were mapped, one of which lies downstream of a canonical TATA-box sequence (5'-TGTATAAA-3'). Analysis of the 5'-flanking region revealed the presence of putative transcription factor-binding sites, including Heat Shock Elements (HSEs) and STress Responsive Elements (STREs). The possible involvement of these motifs in the negative regulation of gsn transcription was investigated using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) with nuclear extracts of N. crassa mycelium obtained before and after heat shock, and DNA fragments encompassing HSE and STRE elements from the 5'-flanking region. While elements within the promoter region are involved in transcription under heat shock, elements in the 5'UTR intron may participate in transcription during vegetative growth. The results thus suggest that N. crassa possesses trans -acting elements that interact with the 5'-flanking region to regulate gsn transcription during heat shock and vegetative growth. PMID:15558319

  6. A Highly Sensitive Porous Silicon (P-Si)-Based Human Kallikrein 2 (hK2) Immunoassay Platform toward Accurate Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Wook; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kim, Soyoun; Jeong, Ok Chan; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas; Maeda, Mizuo

    2015-01-01

    Levels of total human kallikrein 2 (hK2), a protein involved the pathology of prostate cancer (PCa), could be used as a biomarker to aid in the diagnosis of this disease. In this study, we report on a porous silicon antibody immunoassay platform for the detection of serum levels of total hK2. The surface of porous silicon has a 3-dimensional macro- and nanoporous structure, which offers a large binding capacity for capturing probe molecules. The tailored pore size of the porous silicon also allows efficient immobilization of antibodies by surface adsorption, and does not require chemical immobilization. Monoclonal hK2 capture antibody (6B7) was dispensed onto P-Si chip using a piezoelectric dispenser. In total 13 × 13 arrays (169 spots) were spotted on the chip with its single spot volume of 300 pL. For an optimization of capture antibody condition, we firstly performed an immunoassay of the P-Si microarray under a titration series of hK2 in pure buffer (PBS) at three different antibody densities (75, 100 and 145 µg/mL). The best performance of the microarray platform was seen at 100 µg/mL of the capture antibody concentration (LOD was 100 fg/mL). The platform then was subsequently evaluated for a titration series of serum-spiked hK2 samples. The developed platform utilizes only 15 µL of serum per test and the total assay time is about 3 h, including immobilization of the capture antibody. The detection limit of the hK2 assay was 100 fg/mL in PBS buffer and 1 pg/mL in serum with a dynamic range of 106 (10−4 to 102 ng/mL). PMID:26007739

  7. Human kallikrein 5 as a novel prognostic biomarker for triple-negative breast cancer: tissue expression analysis and relationship with disease course.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Li, J Y; Yin, Q N; Yang, K; Dong, S N; Bai, L J; Liu, P; Tong, X W

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to analyze the expression and distribution of human kallikrein 5 (hK5) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) tissues, to establish a standard operating procedure (SOP) for its immunohistochemical assay, and to evaluate the possibility of hK5 being a prognostic biomarker for TNBC. Recombinant hK5 protein and specific antibody were prepared, and the expression and distribution of hK5 in TNBC tissues were detected using immunohistochemistry. An SOP for immunohistochemical staining of hK5 in TNBC tissues was established to allow automatic staining under optimized conditions. The resulting images were digitized for evaluation and statistical analysis via a human scoring system. Our results showed that expression of hK5 protein could predict the progression of TNBC. Pearson's chi-square test results showed that high hK5 expression in tumor stromal cells was significantly correlated with distal metastasis (P = 0.039). A high staining score for lymphocyte infiltration in tumor stroma was significantly correlated with low histological grade of tumor (P = 0.025). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses verified that the staining score for hK5 in tumor stromal cells may be a biomarker for poor prognosis in TNBC patients (univariate HR = 2.289, 95%CI = 1.362-3.848, P = 0.002; multivariate HR = 2.105, 95%CI = 1.189-3.727, P = 0.011). In conclusion, the expression level of hK5 in tumor stromal cells is a promising biomarker for poor prognosis in TNBC. Patients with high histological grade are more prone to distal metastasis and aggressive tumor progression. PMID:26345898

  8. Studies on the Interaction between Collagen and a Plasma Kallikrein-Like Activity EVIDENCE FOR A SURFACE-ACTIVE ENZYME SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, Peter C.

    1972-01-01

    This study has demonstrated that collagen particles, after exposure to platelet-poor human plasma and subsequent washing, generate a kinin-like agent when incubated with prekinin substrate. The binding of kinin-generating activity to collagen in the plasma collagen incubation mixture occurs rapidly, whereas the loss of this activity in the incubation mixture occurs relatively slowly. The Hageman factor appeared to be necessary for the surface-bound kinin-generating activity, as this activity was absent in collagen exposed to Hageman factor-deficient plasma. These studies have partially characterized the plasma-derived enzymatic activity bound to collagen. Incubation of collagen with plasma caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the kinin-producing activity which was generated by the addition of ellagic acid, a known activator of plasma kallikrein. The kinin-inducing activity bound to collagen is inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor, Trasylol, serum C1̄ inactivator and the plasma α2-macroglobulin, but not by lima bean trypsin inhibitor. An eluate prepared from plasma-treated collagen, when compared with purified plasma kallikrein, shared a similar inhibitor profile. Selective chemical blockage of the free carboxyl groups on the collagen molecule, or heat denaturation, inactivated the ability of the collagen to generate kinin-like activity after incubation with plasma. Removal of the collagen telopeptides or blockage of the free amino groups failed to affect the collagen-plasma interaction. The binding of partially purified plasma kallikrein to collagen was found to have similar structural and chemical requirements. These data indicate that there is a structural and chemical specificity for the activation and binding of plasma kallikrein-like activity by collagen. These studies suggest that a plasma kallikrein may function as a surface-bound enzyme system. PMID:4338122

  9. PF-04886847 (an inhibitor of plasma kallikrein) attenuates inflammatory mediators and activation of blood coagulation in rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - induced sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kolte, D; Bryant, JW; Gibson, GW; Wang, J; Shariat-Madar, Z

    2016-01-01

    The plasma kallikrein-mediated proteolysis regulates both thrombosis and inflammation. Previous study has shown that PF-04886847 is a potent and competitive inhibitor of kallikrein, suggesting that it might be useful for the treatment of kallikrein-kinin mediated inflammatory and thrombotic disorders. In the rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced sepsis used in this study, pretreatment of rats with PF-04886847 (1 mg/kg) prior to LPS (10 mg/kg) prevented endotoxin-induced increase in granulocyte count in the systemic circulation. PF-04886847 significantly reduced the elevated plasma 6-keto PGF1α levels in LPS treated rats, suggesting that PF-04886847 could be useful in preventing hypotensive shock during sepsis. PF-04886847 did not inhibit LPS-induced increase in plasma TNF-α level. Pretreatment of rats with PF-04886847 prior to LPS did not attenuate endotoxin-induced decrease in platelet count and plasma fibrinogen levels as well as increase in plasma D-dimer levels. PF-04886847 did not protect the animals against LPS-mediated acute hepatic and renal injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Since prekallikrein (the zymogen form of plasma kallikrein) deficient patients have prolonged aPPT without having any bleeding disorder, the anti-thrombotic property and mechanism of action of PF-04886847 was assessed. In a rabbit balloon injury model designed to mimic clinical conditions of acute thrombotic events, PF-04886847 reduced thrombus mass dose-dependently. PF-04886847 (1 mg/kg) prolonged both activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) in a dose-dependent manner. Although the findings of this study indicate that PF-04886847 possesses limited anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects, PF-04886847 may have therapeutic potential in other kallikrein-kinin mediated diseases. PMID:22352684

  10. Cell cycle alterations induced by urban PM2.5 in bronchial epithelial cells: characterization of the process and possible mechanisms involved

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study explores and characterizes cell cycle alterations induced by urban PM2.5 in the human epithelial cell line BEAS-2B, and elucidates possible mechanisms involved. Methods The cells were exposed to a low dose (7.5 μg/cm2) of Milan winter PM2.5 for different time points, and the cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Activation of proteins involved in cell cycle control was investigated by Western blotting and DNA damage by 32P-postlabelling, immunostaining and comet assay. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was quantified by flow cytometry. The role of PM organic fraction versus washed PM on the cell cycle alterations was also examined. Finally, the molecular pathways activated were further examined using specific inhibitors. Results Winter PM2.5 induced marked cell cycle alteration already after 3 h of exposure, represented by an increased number of cells (transient arrest) in G2. This effect was associated with an increased phosphorylation of Chk2, while no changes in p53 phosphorylation were observed at this time point. The increase in G2 was followed by a transient arrest in the metaphase/anaphase transition point (10 h), which was associated with the presence of severe mitotic spindle aberrations. The metaphase/anaphase delay was apparently followed by mitotic slippage at 24 h, resulting in an increased number of tetraploid G1 cells and cells with micronuclei (MN), and by apoptosis at 40 h. Winter PM2.5 increased the level of ROS at 2 h and DNA damage (8-oxodG, single- and double stand breaks) was detected after 3 h of exposure. The PM organic fraction caused a similar G2/M arrest and augmented ROS formation, while washed PM had no such effects. DNA adducts were detected after 24 h. Both PM-induced DNA damage and G2 arrest were inhibited by the addition of antioxidants and α-naphthoflavone, suggesting the involvement of ROS and reactive electrophilic metabolites formed via a P

  11. Transcriptional profiling analysis of Spodoptera litura larvae challenged with Vip3Aa toxin and possible involvement of trypsin in the toxin activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Chen, Chen; Wu, Songqing; Shao, Ensi; Li, Mengnan; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Vip proteins, a new group of insecticidal toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, are effective against specific pests including Spodoptera litura. Here, we report construction of a transcriptome database of S. litura by de novo assembly along with detection of the transcriptional response of S. litura larvae to Vip3Aa toxin. In total, 56,498 unigenes with an N50 value of 1,853 bp were obtained. Results of transcriptome abundance showed that Vip3Aa toxin provoked a wide transcriptional response of the S. litura midgut. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for immunity-related, metabolic-related and Bt-related genes. Twenty-nine immunity-related genes, 102 metabolic-related genes and 62 Bt-related genes with differential expression were found. On the basis of transcriptional profiling analysis, we focus on the functional validation of trypsin which potentially participated in the activation of Vip3Aa protoxin. Zymogram analysis indicated that the presence of many proteases, including trypsin, in S. litura larvae midgut. Results of enzymolysis in vitro of Vip3Aa by trypsin, and bioassay and histopathology of the trypsin-digested Vip3Aa toxin showed that trypsin was possibly involved in the Vip3Aa activation. This study provides a transcriptome foundation for the identification and functional validation of the differentially expressed genes in an agricultural important pest, S. litura. PMID:27025647

  12. Evidence that glucose metabolism is decreased in the cerebrum of aged female senescence-accelerated mouse; possible involvement of a low hexokinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, T; Sato, E; Inoue, A; Ishibashi, S

    1996-08-16

    d-Glucose metabolism in cerebral cells prepared from aged senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM), was investigated in consideration of a sex difference. The production of 14CO2 from 6-[14C]D-glucose was reduced in female senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) 8, a prone substrain, in comparison with that in female senescence-accelerated-resistant mouse (SAMR) 2, a control substrain, whereas there was no difference in males. The 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake into cerebral cells from female SAMP8 was also lower than that of control mice. But, the 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake in SAMP8 was higher than that of SAMR2, suggesting that the low hexokinase activity was involved in the decreased glucose metabolism in cerebrum of SAMP8 females irrespective of glucose transporter. This possibility was supported by the finding that the contents of glucose 6-phosphate produced from glucose added to cerebral cells from SAMP8 was lower than that in ICR mice. PMID:8873128

  13. Diclofenac-Induced Apoptosis in the Neuroblastoma Cell Line SH-SY5Y: Possible Involvement of the Mitochondrial Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Francesca; Iuliano, Annarita; Albano, Francesco; Zappelli, Claudia; Castellano, Immacolata; Grimaldi, Pasquale; Masullo, Mariorosario; De Vendittis, Emmanuele; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria

    2010-01-01

    Diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, induces apoptosis on the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y through a mitochondrial dysfunction, affecting some antioxidant mechanisms. Indeed, the time- and dose-dependent increase of apoptosis is associated to an early enhancement of the reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2) plays a crucial role in the defence against ROS, thus protecting against several apoptotic stimuli. Diclofenac decreased the protein levels and the enzymatic activity of SOD2, without any significant impairment of the corresponding mRNA levels in the SH-SY5Y extracts. When cells were incubated with an archaeal exogenous thioredoxin, an attenuation of the diclofenac-induced apoptosis was observed, together with an increase of SOD2 protein levels. Furthermore, diclofenac impaired the mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to a release of cytochrome c. These data suggest that mitochondria are involved in the diclofenac-induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells and point to a possible role of SOD2 in this process. PMID:20625417

  14. Anatomy of the antennal dorsal organ in female of Neodryinus typhlocybae (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae): A peculiar sensory structure possibly involved in perception of host vibration.

    PubMed

    Riolo, Paola; Isidoro, Nunzio; Ruschioni, Sara; Minuz, Roxana L; Bin, Ferdinando; Romani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Neodryinus typhlocybae (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae) is a natural enemy of the planthopper Metcalfa pruinosa, which was introduced from North America into Europe and has become established in various regions as a pest species. Vibrational signals play a crucial role in the communication of M. pruinosa, which appears to be exploited by N. typhlocybae. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy have shown that the antennae of N. typhlocybae females have peculiar and complex sensory structures: deep longitudinal grooves that house long sensilla trichodea, termed here "Antennal Dorsal Organs." Such structures were not present on male antennae. These sensilla extend for the length of the grooves, without contact with the groove cuticle. Their hair shaft is empty and aporous, and inserted into a specialized socket, underneath which there is a cuticular ampulla-like chamber. Each sensillum is associated with two sensory neurons: one terminates at the proximal end of the dendritic sheath; the other continues into the sensillum sinus and is enclosed in the dendritic sheath. This second sensory neuron then enters the ampulla-like chamber through the circular opening, and then terminates with a conspicuous tubular body at the shaft base. The possible involvement of this peculiar structure in the context of host recognition mechanism is discussed. PMID:26460191

  15. Possible Involvement of Nitric Oxide Modulatory Mechanisms in the Neuroprotective Effect of Centella asiatica Against Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety Like Behaviour, Oxidative Damage and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Chanana, Priyanka; Kumar, Anil

    2016-04-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) is an experience of inadequate or poor quality of sleep that may produce significant alterations in multiple neural systems. Centella asiatica (CA) is a psychoactive medicinal herb with immense therapeutic potential. The present study was designed to explore the possible nitric oxide (NO) modulatory mechanism in the neuroprotective effect of CA against SD induced anxiety like behaviour, oxidative damage and neuroinflammation. Male laca mice were sleep deprived for 72 h, and CA (150 and 300 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with NO modulators for 8 days, starting five days before 72-h SD exposure. Various behavioural (locomotor activity, elevated plus maze) and biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite levels and superoxide dismutase activity), neuroinflammation marker (TNF-alpha) were assessed subsequently. CA (150 and 300 mg/kg) treatment for 8 days significantly improved locomotor activity, anti-anxiety like effect and attenuated oxidative damage and TNF α level as compared to sleep-deprived 72-h group. Also while the neuroprotective effect of CA was increased by NO antagonists, it was diminished by NO agonists. The present study suggests that NO modulatory mechanism could be involved in the protective effect of CA against SD-induced anxiety-like behaviour, oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in mice. PMID:26848139

  16. Transcriptional profiling analysis of Spodoptera litura larvae challenged with Vip3Aa toxin and possible involvement of trypsin in the toxin activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Feifei; Chen, Chen; Wu, Songqing; Shao, Ensi; Li, Mengnan; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Vip proteins, a new group of insecticidal toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, are effective against specific pests including Spodoptera litura. Here, we report construction of a transcriptome database of S. litura by de novo assembly along with detection of the transcriptional response of S. litura larvae to Vip3Aa toxin. In total, 56,498 unigenes with an N50 value of 1,853 bp were obtained. Results of transcriptome abundance showed that Vip3Aa toxin provoked a wide transcriptional response of the S. litura midgut. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for immunity-related, metabolic-related and Bt-related genes. Twenty-nine immunity-related genes, 102 metabolic-related genes and 62 Bt-related genes with differential expression were found. On the basis of transcriptional profiling analysis, we focus on the functional validation of trypsin which potentially participated in the activation of Vip3Aa protoxin. Zymogram analysis indicated that the presence of many proteases, including trypsin, in S. litura larvae midgut. Results of enzymolysis in vitro of Vip3Aa by trypsin, and bioassay and histopathology of the trypsin-digested Vip3Aa toxin showed that trypsin was possibly involved in the Vip3Aa activation. This study provides a transcriptome foundation for the identification and functional validation of the differentially expressed genes in an agricultural important pest, S. litura. PMID:27025647

  17. Transferrin facilitates the formation of DNA double-strand breaks via transferrin receptor 1: the possible involvement of transferrin in carcinogenesis of high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, S; Toyoshima, M; Kitatani, K; Ishibashi, M; Usui, T; Yaegashi, N

    2016-07-01

    Fallopian tubal epithelium is a candidate for the origin of high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Transferrin-containing follicular fluid and/or retrograde menstrual blood are possible risk factors for carcinogenesis. Accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) in the fallopian tubal epithelium is considered to play an important role in the development of cancer. However, the mechanisms by which DNA-DSBs accumulate have not yet been fully elucidated. The hydroxyl radical, which is produced in a Fenton reaction catalyzed by an iron ion, serves as a potent DNA-DSB-inducing molecule, raising the potential of an iron ion transporter of transferrin in the formation of DNA-DSBs. We studied the potential involvement of transferrin in DNA damage and the development of ovarian cancer. Treatment with transferrin facilitated the formation of histone 2AX phosphorylated at Serine 139 (γH2AX), which is known as a DNA-DSB marker, in human fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. Knockdown of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), but not transferrin receptor 2, suppressed the transferrin uptake and consequent formation of γH2AX. As hydroxyl radicals in reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in DNA-DSBs, the formation of ROS was determined. Treatment with TfR1-specific small interference RNAs significantly diminished transferrin-induced formation of ROS. Moreover, TfR1-dependent uptake of transferrin was revealed to augment the formation of DNA-DSBs in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, which served as a substrate for the Fenton reaction. An ex vivo study with murine fallopian tubes further demonstrated that transferrin treatment introduced DNA-DSBs in the fallopian tubal epithelium. Collectively, these data suggested that the transferrin-TfR1 axis accounts for the induction of DNA-DSBs that potentially lead to DNA damage/genome instability. These findings also suggested that exposure to transferrin initiates and promotes the development of

  18. Possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of melatonin against sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Anant

    2009-08-01

    Sleep is an important physiological process responsible for the maintenance of physical, mental and emotional health of a living being. Sleep deprivation is considered risky for several pathological diseases such as anxiety and motor and cognitive dysfunctions. Sleep deprivation has recently been reported to cause oxidative damage. This study has been designed to explore the possible involvement of the GABAergic mechanism in protective effects of melatonin against 72-h sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice. Mice were sleep-deprived for a period of 72 h using the grid over water suspended method. Animals were divided into groups of 6-8 animals each. Melatonin (5 and 10 mg/kg), flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg), picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) and muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) were administered for 5 days starting 2 days before 72-h sleep deprivation. Various behavioural tests (plus maze, zero maze, mirror chamber, actophotometer) and body weight assessment followed by oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) were carried out. The 72-h sleep deprivation caused significant anxiety-like behaviour, weight loss, impaired locomotor activity and oxidative damage as compared with naïve (without sleep deprivation). Treatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved locomotor activity, weight loss and antianxiety effect as compared with control (sleep-deprived). Biochemically, melatonin treatment significantly restored reduced glutathione, catalase activity, attenuated lipid peroxidation and nitrite level as compared with control animals (72-h sleep-deprived). Flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) pretreatments with a lower dose of melatonin (5 mg/kg) significantly antagonized the protective effect of melatonin. However, muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) pretreatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg, ip) potentiated the protective effect of melatonin which was significant as compared with their

  19. Possible involvement of the CA1 GABAA receptors upon acquisition and expression of the ACPA-induced place preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Kamali-Dolatabadi, Leila; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-07-01

    A plethora of investigations has substantiated a close relationship between cannabinoidergic and GABAergic systems in hippocampal CA1. The crucial role of these two systems in regulation of the addictive behaviors is well described. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether the CA1 GABAA receptors are involved in ACPA (a selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist)-induced rewarding effects using the condition place preference (CPP) protocol. Moreover, the hole-board paradigm was used to measure the exploratory behaviors which may potentially influence this phenomenon. Results showed that ACPA (0.02mg/kg, i.p.) induced CPP. Applying a 3-day conditioning schedule, we found that the sole administration of the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol (0.125, 0.25 and 0.5μg/mouse; intra-CA1), or the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline (0.0635, 0.125 and 0.25μg/mouse; intra-CA1), fail to induce CPP or CPA (condition place aversion). Similarly, injection of the subthreshold dose of muscimol (0.125μg/mouse, intra-CA1) decreased the CPP acquisition induced by ACPA. Similar intervention with the subthreshold dose of bicuculline (0.125μg/mouse, intra-CA1) did not alter the CPP acquisition induced by ACPA. Furthermore, the sole intra-CA1 administration of muscimol (0.125, 0.25 and 0.5μg/mouse) and bicuculline (0.0635, 0.125 and 0.25μg/mouse; intra-CA1) prior to testing, did not induce CPP or CPA. Similar interventions revealed that muscimol and bicuculline increase and decrease CPP expression induced by ACPA, respectively. The ACPA- and muscimol-induced CPP could be blocked by bicuculline. Taken together, the CA1 GABAA receptors seem to be possibly involved in the modulation of acquisition or expression process upon ACPA-induced CPP. PMID:27090228

  20. Virtual Screening and X-ray Crystallography for Human Kallikrein 6 Inhibitors with an Amidinothiophene P1 Group

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A series of compounds with an amidinothiophene P1 group and a pyrrolidinone-sulphonamide scaffold linker was identified as potent inhibitors of human kallikrein 6 by structure-based virtual screening based on the union accessible binding space of serine proteases. As the first series of potent nonmechanism-based hK6 inhibitors, they may be used as tool compounds for target validation. An X-ray structure of a representative compound complexed with hK6, resolved at a resolution of 1.88 Å, revealed that the amidinothiophene moiety bound in the S1 pocket and the pyrrolidinone-sulphonamide linker projected the aromatic tail into the S′ pocket. PMID:24900446

  1. Improved prostate cancer detection with a human kallikrein 11 and percentage free PSA-based artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carsten; Meyer, Hellmuth-Alexander; Cammann, Henning; Nakamura, Terukazu; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Jung, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    Human kallikrein 11 (hK11) was evaluated in a percentage free PSA-based artificial neural network (ANN) to reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies. Serum samples from 357 patients with (n=132) and without (n=225) prostate cancer (PCa) were analyzed and ANN models were constructed and compared to all parameters. The discriminatory power of hK11 was lower than that of PSA, but receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses demonstrated significantly larger areas under the curves for the ANN compared to all other parameters. ANNs with hK11 may lead to a further reduction in unnecessary prostate biopsies, especially when analyzing patients with less than 15% free PSA. PMID:16800743

  2. Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2

    SciTech Connect

    Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan; Wen Fuqiang

    2010-05-15

    Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

  3. Possible involvement of brain prostaglandin E2 and prostanoid EP3 receptors in prostaglandin E2 glycerol ester-induced activation of central sympathetic outflow in the rat.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Tanaka, Kenjiro; Nakamura, Kumiko; Taniuchi, Keisuke; Yawata, Toshio; Higashi, Youichirou; Ueba, Tetsuya; Dimitriadis, Fotios; Shimizu, Shogo; Yokotani, Kunihiko; Saito, Motoaki

    2014-07-01

    We recently reported that intracerebroventricularly administered 2-arachidonoylglycerol elevated plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline by brain monoacylglycerol lipase- (MGL) and cyclooxygenase-mediated mechanisms in the rat. These results suggest that 2-arachidonoylglycerol is hydrolyzed by MGL to free arachidonic acid, which is further metabolized to prostaglandins (PGs) by cyclooxygenase in the brain, thereby elevating plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline. On the other hand, 2-arachidonoylglycerol can be also metabolized by cyclooxygenase to PG glycerol esters (PG-Gs), which seems to be hydrolyzed by MGL to free PGs. Here, we examined the involvement of brain PG-Gs in the elevation of plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline regarding PGE2-G and prostanoid EP receptors using anesthetized male Wistar rats. Intracerebroventricularly administered PGE2-G (1.5 and 3 nmol/animal) dose-dependently elevated plasma noradrenaline but not adrenaline. PGE2-G also elevated systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate. The PGE2-G-induced elevation of plasma noradrenaline was attenuated by JZL184 (MGL inhibitor). Intracerebroventricularly administered PGE2 (0.3 and 1.5 nmol/animal) and sulprostone (0.1 and 0.3 nmol/animal) (EP1/EP3 agonist) also elevated plasma noradrenaline but not adrenaline in a dose-dependent manner. The sulprostone-induced elevation was attenuated by L-798,106 (EP3 antagonist), but not by SC-51322 (EP1 antagonist). L-798,106 also attenuated the PGE2-G- and PGE2-induced elevation of plasma noradrenaline, while PF-04418948 (EP2 antagonist) and L-161,982 (EP4 antagonist) had no effect on the PGE2-G-induced response. These results suggest a possibility that brain PGE2-G produced from 2-arachidonoylglycerol can be hydrolyzed to free PGE2, thereby activating central sympathetic outflow by brain prostanoid EP3 receptor-mediated mechanisms in the rat. PMID:24657150

  4. In vitro screening of major neurotransmitter systems possibly involved in the mechanism of action of antibodies to S100 protein in released-active form

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunov, Evgeniy A; Ertuzun, Irina A; Kachaeva, Evgeniya V; Tarasov, Sergey A; Epstein, Oleg I

    2015-01-01

    Experimentally and clinically, it was shown that released-active form of antibodies to S100 protein (RAF of Abs to S100) exerts a wide range of pharmacological activities: anxiolytic, antiasthenic, antiaggressive, stress-protective, antihypoxic, antiischemic, neuroprotective, and nootropic. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of RAF of Abs to S100 on major neurotransmitter systems (serotoninergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and on sigma receptors as well) which are possibly involved in its mechanism of pharmacological activity. Radioligand binding assays were used for assessment of the drug influence on ligand–receptor interaction. [35S]GTPγS binding assay, cyclic adenosine monophosphate HTRF™, cellular dielectric spectroscopy assays, and assays based on measurement of intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ions were used for assessment of agonist or antagonist properties of the drug toward receptors. RAF of Abs to S100 increased radioligand binding to 5-HT1F, 5-HT2B, 5-HT2Cedited, 5-HT3, and to D3 receptors by 142.0%, 131.9%, 149.3%, 120.7%, and 126.3%, respectively. Also, the drug significantly inhibited specific binding of radioligands to GABAB1A/B2 receptors by 25.8%, and to both native and recombinant human sigma1 receptors by 75.3% and 40.32%, respectively. In the functional assays, it was shown that the drug exerted antagonism at 5-HT1B, D3, and GABAB1A/B2 receptors inhibiting agonist-induced responses by 23.24%, 32.76%, and 30.2%, respectively. On the contrary, the drug exerted an agonist effect at 5-HT1A receptors enhancing receptor functional activity by 28.0%. The pharmacological profiling of RAF of Abs to S100 among 27 receptor provides evidence for drug-related modification of major neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26604768

  5. Screening of UV-B-induced genes from apple peels by SSH: possible involvement of MdCOP1-mediated signaling cascade genes in anthocyanin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ting; Saito, Takanori; Honda, Chikako; Ban, Yusuke; Kondo, Satoru; Liu, Ji-Hong; Hatsuyama, Yoshimichi; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2013-07-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed to identify candidate genes involved in red coloration in apple peel with the ultraviolet (UV)-B-treated 'Mutsu'. After reverse Northern blotting verification, nearly 80 clones were successfully sequenced. Large portions of the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are well characterized anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes, such as chalcone synthase (11A5), flavonol synthase (12F3), anthocyanidin synthase (11H5) and UDP-glycosyl transferase (14A12) whose presence proved the success of SSH. Eight ESTs were selected for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and their expressions were all elevated in 'Induction', further confirming the reliability of the SSH library. One EST, 11F4 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1: COP1) with putative function in light signal relay was further analyzed in 'Mutsu' and 'Tsugaru', along with MdHY5 (ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5: the downstream target of COP1), MdMYB22 (a possible flavonol-specific activator under the regulation of HY5, belonging to the SG7/PRODUCTION OF FLAVONOL GLYCOSIDES family) and MdMYBA. Results showed that MdCOP1, MdHY5, MdMYB22 and MdMYBA were all UV-B inducible genes and anthocyanin accumulation occurred after their increased expressions. Moreover, their expressions and anthocyanin content were enhanced under UV-B plus 17°C treatment. The presence of G box, a known consensus binding site of HY5, in the MdMYBA promoter region implicated that it could be regulated by MdHY5, which was verified by the result of the yeast one-hybrid analysis. Our data suggested that UV-B irradiation would induce the utmost upstream light signaling factor, MdCOP1, which activates MdHY5 signaling by binding to the promoter regions of MdMYBs, and finally leads to the red coloration of apple peels. PMID:23171407

  6. A Single Glycan at the 99-Loop of Human Kallikrein-related Peptidase 2 Regulates Activation and Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shihui; Skala, Wolfgang; Magdolen, Viktor; Briza, Peter; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver; Kellermann, Josef; Brandstetter, Hans; Goettig, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 (KLK2) is a key serine protease in semen liquefaction and prostate cancer together with KLK3/prostate-specific antigen. In order to decipher the function of its potential N-glycosylation site, we produced pro-KLK2 in Leishmania tarentolae cells and compared it with its non-glycosylated counterpart from Escherichia coli expression. Mass spectrometry revealed that Asn-95 carries a core glycan, consisting of two GlcNAc and three hexoses. Autocatalytic activation was retarded in glyco-pro-KLK2, whereas the activated glyco-form exhibited an increased proteolytic resistance. The specificity patterns obtained by the PICS (proteomic identification of protease cleavage sites) method are similar for both KLK2 variants, with a major preference for P1-Arg. However, glycosylation changes the enzymatic activity of KLK2 in a drastically substrate-dependent manner. Although glyco-KLK2 has a considerably lower catalytic efficiency than glycan-free KLK2 toward peptidic substrates with P2-Phe, the situation was reverted toward protein substrates, such as glyco-pro-KLK2 itself. These findings can be rationalized by the glycan-carrying 99-loop that prefers to cover the active site like a lid. By contrast, the non-glycosylated 99-loop seems to favor a wide open conformation, which mostly increases the apparent affinity for the substrates (i.e. by a reduction of Km). Also, the cleavage pattern and kinetics in autolytic inactivation of both KLK2 variants can be explained by a shift of the target sites due to the presence of the glycan. These striking effects of glycosylation pave the way to a deeper understanding of kallikrein-related peptidase biology and pathology. PMID:26582203

  7. Transcriptional and Proteomic Analysis of a Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) Mutant of Shewanella oneidensis: Possible Involvement of Fur in Energy Metabolism, Transcriptional Regulation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Dorothea K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Giometti, Carol S.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Khare, Tripti; Lies, Douglas P.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Lim, Hanjo; Yates III, John; Brandt, Craig C.; Tiedje, James M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2002-01-01

    The iron-directed, coordinate regulation of genes depends on the fur (ferric uptake regulator) gene product, which acts as an iron-responsive, transcriptional repressor protein. To investigate the biological function of a fur homolog in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a fur knockout strain (FUR1) was generated by suicide plasmid integration into this gene and characterized using phenotype assays, DNA microarrays containing 691 arrayed genes, and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Physiological studies indicated that FUR1 was similar to the wild-type strain when they were compared for anaerobic growth and reduction of various electron acceptors. Transcription profiling, however, revealed that genes with predicted functions in electron transport, energy metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and oxidative stress protection were either repressed (ccoNQ, etrA, cytochrome b and c maturation-encoding genes, qor, yiaY, sodB, rpoH, phoB, and chvI) or induced (yggW, pdhC, prpC, aceE, fdhD, and ppc) in the fur mutant. Disruption of fur also resulted in derepression of genes (hxuC, alcC, fhuA, hemR, irgA, and ompW) putatively involved in iron uptake. This agreed with the finding that the fur mutant produced threefold-higher levels of siderophore than the wild-type strain under conditions of sufficient iron. Analysis of a subset of the FUR1 proteome (i.e., primarily soluble cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins) indicated that 11 major protein species reproducibly showed significant (P < 0.05) differences in abundance relative to the wild type. Protein identification using mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of two of these proteins (SodB and AlcC) correlated with the microarray data. These results suggest a possible regulatory role of S. oneidensis MR-1 Fur in energy metabolism that extends the traditional model of Fur as a negative regulator of iron acquisition systems. PMID:11823232

  8. Reducing effect of saikosaponin A, an active ingredient of Bupleurum falcatum, on alcohol self-administration in rats: Possible involvement of the GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Paola; Lorrai, Irene; Carai, Mauro A M; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Mugnaini, Claudia; Corelli, Federico; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2016-05-16

    Recent studies demonstrated that treatment with saikosaponin A (SSA) - an active ingredient of the medicinal herb, Bupleurum falcatum L. - selectively suppressed, likely via a GABAB receptor-mediated mechanism, intravenous self-administration of morphine and cocaine in rats [Yoon et al., 2012; 2013]. The present study was designed to investigate whether the capacity of SSA to suppress morphine and cocaine self-administration extends to oral alcohol self-administration. To this end, selectively bred Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats were trained to lever-respond on a Fixed Ratio (FR) 4 (FR4) schedule of reinforcement for alcohol (15%, v/v) in daily 30-min sessions. Once responding had stabilized, rats were tested under the FR4 (measure of alcohol reinforcing properties) and Progressive Ratio (PR; measure of alcohol motivational properties) schedules of reinforcement. The possible involvement of the GABAB receptor system was investigated testing the effect of (a) pretreatment with the GABAB receptor antagonist, SCH50911, and (b) combined treatment with the positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, GS39783. Treatment with SSA (0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1mg/kg, i.p.) markedly reduced lever-responding for alcohol, amount of self-administered alcohol, and breakpoint for alcohol (defined as the lowest response requirement not achieved in the PR experiment). Pretreatment with 2mg/kg SCH50911 (i.p.) resulted in a partial blockade of the reducing effect of 0.5mg/kg SSA on lever-responding for alcohol and amount of self-administered alcohol. Combination of per se ineffective doses of GS39783 (5mg/kg, i.g.) and SSA (0.1mg/kg, i.p.) reduced lever-responding for alcohol and amount of self-administered alcohol. These results (a) extend to alcohol self-administration the capacity of SSA to suppress morphine and cocaine self-administration in rats and (b) suggest that the GABAB receptor system is likely part of the neural substrate underlying the reducing effect of SSA on

  9. A common neoepitope is created when the reactive center of C1-inhibitor is cleaved by plasma kallikrein, activated factor XII fragment, C1 esterase, or neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed Central

    de Agostini, A; Patston, P A; Marottoli, V; Carrel, S; Harpel, P C; Schapira, M

    1988-01-01

    The reactive center of C1-inhibitor, a plasma protease inhibitor that belongs to the serpin superfamily, is located on a peptide loop which is highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. With plasma kallikrein, C1s and beta-Factor XIIa, this cleavage occurs at the reactive site residue P1 (Arg444); with neutrophil elastase, it takes place near P1, probably at residue P3 (Val442). After these cleavages, C1-inhibitor is inactivated and its conformation is modified. Moreover, in vivo, cleaved C1-inhibitor is removed from the blood stream more rapidly than the intact serpin, which suggests that proteolysis unmasks sites responsible for cellular recognition and the uptake of the cleaved inhibitor. In the study reported here, we show, using an MAb, that an identical neoepitope is created on C1-inhibitor after the cleavage of its exposed loop by plasma kallikrein, C1s, beta-Factor XIIa, and by neutrophil elastase. Images PMID:2457036

  10. Skin pH Is the Master Switch of Kallikrein 5-Mediated Skin Barrier Destruction in a Murine Atopic Dermatitis Model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyosun; Matsuda, Akira; Jung, Kyungsook; Karasawa, Kaoru; Matsuda, Kenshiro; Oida, Kumiko; Ishizaka, Saori; Ahn, Ginnae; Amagai, Yosuke; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho; Arkwright, Peter D; Takamori, Kenji; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2016-01-01

    Elevated skin surface pH has been reported in patients with atopic dermatitis. In this study, we explored the role of skin pH in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis using the NC/Tnd murine atopic dermatitis model. Alkalinization of the skin of asymptomatic NC/Tnd mice housed in specific pathogen-free conditions induced kallikrein 5 and activated protease-activated receptor 2, resulting in thymic stromal lymphopoietin secretion and a cutaneous T-helper 2 allergic response. This was associated with increased transepidermal water loss and development of eczematous lesions in these specific pathogen-free NC/Tnd mice, which normally do not suffer from atopic dermatitis. Injection of recombinant thymic stromal lymphopoietin also induced scratching behavior in the specific pathogen-free NC/Tnd mice. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin production and dermatitis induced by alkalinization of the skin could be blocked by the protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist ENMD-1068. In contrast, weak acidification of eczematous skin in conventionally housed NC/Tnd mice reduced kallikrein 5 activity and ameliorated the dermatitis. Onset of the dermatitis was associated with increased epidermal filaggrin expression and impaired activity of the sodium/hydrogen exchanger 1, a known regulator of skin pH. We conclude that alterations in skin pH directly modulate kallikrein 5 activity leading to skin barrier dysfunction, itch, and dermatitis via the protease-activated receptor 2-thymic stromal lymphopoietin pathway. PMID:26763432

  11. Systems Analysis of Immune Responses in Marek's Disease Virus-Infected Chickens Identifies a Gene Involved in Susceptibility and Highlights a Possible Novel Pathogenicity Mechanism▿†

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jacqueline; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Paton, Ian R.; Hocking, Paul M.; Salmon, Nigel; Fife, Mark; Nair, Venugopal; Burt, David W.; Kaiser, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly contagious oncogenic alphaherpesvirus that causes disease that is both a cancer model and a continuing threat to the world's poultry industry. This comprehensive gene expression study analyzes the host response to infection in both resistant and susceptible lines of chickens and inherent expression differences between the two lines following the infection of the host. A novel pathogenicity mechanism, involving the downregulation of genes containing HIC1 transcription factor binding sites as early as 4 days postinfection, was suggested from this analysis. HIC1 drives antitumor mechanisms, suggesting that MDV infection switches off genes involved in antitumor regulation several days before the expression of the MDV oncogene meq. The comparison of the gene expression data to previous QTL data identified several genes as candidates for involvement in resistance to MD. One of these genes, IRG1, was confirmed by single nucleotide polymorphism analysis to be involved in susceptibility. Its precise mechanism remains to be elucidated, although the analysis of gene expression data suggests it has a role in apoptosis. Understanding which genes are involved in susceptibility/resistance to MD and defining the pathological mechanisms of the disease gives us a much greater ability to try to reduce the incidence of this virus, which is costly to the poultry industry in terms of both animal welfare and economics. PMID:21865384

  12. Predicting High-Grade Cancer at Ten-Core Prostate Biopsy Using Four Kallikrein Markers Measured in Blood in the ProtecT Study

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Richard J.; Sjoberg, Daniel D.; Vickers, Andrew J.; Robinson, Mary C.; Kumar, Rajeev; Marsden, Luke; Davis, Michael; Scardino, Peter T.; Donovan, Jenny; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many men with elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in serum do not have aggressive prostate cancer and undergo unnecessary biopsy. Retrospective studies using cryopreserved serum suggest that four kallikrein markers can predict biopsy outcome. Methods: Free, intact and total PSA, and kallikrein-related peptidase 2 were measured in cryopreserved blood from 6129 men with elevated PSA (≥3.0ng/mL) participating in the prospective, randomized trial Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment. Marker levels from 4765 men providing anticoagulated plasma were incorporated into statistical models to predict any-grade and high-grade (Gleason score ≥7) prostate cancer at 10-core biopsy. The models were corrected for optimism by 10-fold cross validation and independently validated using markers measured in serum from 1364 men. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The four kallikreins enhanced prostate cancer detection compared with PSA and age alone. Area under the curve (AUC) for the four kallikreins was 0.719 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.704 to 0.734) vs 0.634 (95% CI = 0.617 to 0.651, P < .001) for PSA and age alone for any-grade cancer, and 0.820 (95% CI = 0.802 to 0.838) vs 0.738 (95% CI = 0.716 to 0.761) for high-grade cancer. Using a 6% risk of high-grade cancer as an illustrative cutoff, for 1000 biopsied men with PSA levels of 3.0ng/mL or higher, the model would reduce the need for biopsy in 428 men, detect 119 high-grade cancers, and delay diagnosis of 14 of 133 high-grade cancers. Models exhibited excellent discrimination on independent validation among men with only serum samples available for analysis. Conclusions: A statistical model based on kallikrein markers was validated in a large prospective study and reduces unnecessary biopsies while delaying diagnosis of high-grade cancers in few men. PMID:25863334

  13. Bradykinin in ischemic conditioning-induced tissue protection: Evidences and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Roohani; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-12-01

    Ischemic conditioning is an intrinsic protective mechanism in which repeated short episodes of reversible ischemia protects the tissue and increases its tolerance against a subsequent longer period of ischemia (index ischemia). Bradykinin is a physiologically and pharmacologically active peptide of the kallikrein-kinin system. Besides the involvement of bradykinin in a variety of physiological and pathological responses such as pain, inflammation and in cardiovascular system as a potent vasodilator, it also acts as an endogenous cytoprotective mediator in the ischemic tissue. Pretreatment with various pharmacological modulators of bradykinin has confirmed the involvement of bradykinin in ischemic conditioning-induced protection. The protective actions of bradykinin in three major paradigms of ischemic conditioning i.e. ischemic preconditioning, ischemic postconditioning and remote ischemic preconditioning involves activation and regulation of various endogenous signaling cascades to render the heart resistant to infarction. In ischemic preconditioning, bradykinin exerts cardioprotective effect via activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway and regulation of redox state via NO release. The role of bradykinin and its B2 receptors in ischemic-postconditioning induced neuroprotection has been described mainly due to its increased redox signaling cascade and activation of mitochondrial anti-apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, its cardioprotective role during remote ischemic preconditioning has been associated with activation of B2 receptors mediated neurogenic pathway and internalization of B2 receptors along with the formation of signalosomes that activates intracellular cytoprotective transduction pathways. The present review focuses on the potential role of bradykinin in mediating different forms of ischemic conditioning (pre/post/remote)-induced cardioprotection and neuroprotection along with the possible mechanisms. PMID:26499976

  14. Possible involvement of nitrergic and opioidergic systems in the modulatory effect of acute chloroquine treatment on pentylenetetrazol induced convulsions in mice.

    PubMed

    Hassanipour, Mahsa; Shirzadian, Armin; Boojar, Mahdi Mashhadi-Akbar; Abkhoo, Aminreza; Abkhoo, Alireza; Delazar, Sina; Amiri, Shayan; Rahimi, Nastaran; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-03-01

    Chloroquine has long been used for the treatment of malaria and rheumatological disorders. Accumulating evidence suggests potential use of chloroquine as a neuroprotective agent. Several studies have reported that endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) system mediate the chloroquine effects. In the present study, the involvements of endogenous opioids and NO in the modulatory effects of chloroquine on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures were assessed in mice. Chloroquine 5mg/kg significantly increased the seizure threshold, but this effect was reversed with naltrexone 1mg/kg. Acute co-administration of l-NAME (non-selective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 5mg/kg) or 7-NI (selective neuronal NOS inhibitor, 40mg/kg) with the effective dose of chloroquine completely inhibited its anticonvulsant effects. Acute single injection of a sub-effective dose of l-arginine (NO precursor, 60mg/kg) with a sub-effective dose of chloroquine 2.5mg/kg increased the seizure threshold but administration of l-arginine 60mg/kg with chloroquine 10mg/kg decreased the seizure threshold. Moreover, the combination of the lower doses of naltrexone (0.1mg/kg) and 7-NI (15mg/kg) showed additive effects in blocking the chloroquine-induced anticonvulsant properties. Chloroquine 5mg/kg enhanced the hippocampal nitrite levels. Chloroquine at the dose of 20mg/kg decreased the seizure threshold. This effect was inhibited through l-NAME (5mg/kg), 7-NI (40mg/kg) and naltrexone (1mg/kg) administration with this dose of chloroquine. In conclusion, NO signaling probably through neuronal NOS, but not inducible NOS could be involved in the opioid-dependent anticonvulsant effects of chloroquine in this model of seizures in mice. It seems that nitric oxide and opioid systems are involved in modulatory effect of chloroquine on seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol. PMID:26655695

  15. Possible Role of GADD45γ Methylation in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Does It Affect the Progression and Tissue Involvement?

    PubMed Central

    Barış, İkbal Cansu; Caner, Vildan; Şen Türk, Nilay; Sarı, İsmail; Hacıoğlu, Sibel; Doğu, Mehmet Hilmi; Çetin, Ozan; Tepeli, Emre; Can, Özge; Bağcı, Gülseren; Keskin, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma among adults and is characterized by heterogeneous clinical, immunophenotypic, and genetic features. Different mechanisms deregulating cell cycle and apoptosis play a role in the pathogenesis of DLBCL. Growth arrest DNA damage-inducible 45 (GADD45γ) is an important gene family involved in these mechanisms. The aims of this study are to determine the frequency of GADD45γ methylation, to evaluate the correlation between GADD45γ methylation and protein expression, and to investigate the relation between methylation status and clinicopathologic parameters in DLBCL tissues and reactive lymphoid node tissues from patients with reactive lymphoid hyperplasia. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six tissue samples of DLBCL and 40 nonmalignant reactive lymphoid node tissues were analyzed in this study. Methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting analysis was used for the determination of GADD45γ methylation status. The GADD45γ protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: GADD45γ methylation was frequent (50.0%) in DLBCL. It was also significantly higher in advanced-stage tumors compared with early-stage (p=0.041). In contrast, unmethylated GADD45γ was associated with nodal involvement as the primary anatomical site (p=0.040). Conclusion: The results of this study show that, in contrast to solid tumors, the frequency of GADD45γ methylation is higher and this epigenetic alteration of GADD45γ may be associated with progression in DLBCL. In addition, nodal involvement is more likely to be present in patients with unmethylated GADD45γ. PMID:25912017

  16. Molecular characterisation and chromosomal mapping of transcripts having tissue-specific expression in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae: possible involvement in visual or olfactory processes.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Irene; Santolamazza, Federica; Costantini, Carlo; Favia, Guido

    2002-01-01

    We have compared the transcriptional activity of heads, antennae + palps, and carcasses in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae by means of differential display PCR (DD-PCR). Three transcripts specifically or preferentially expressed in the heads and in the antennae + palps have been selected. All are very similar to genes related to visual and olfactory mechanisms of several different organisms. They have been named Ag arrestin, Ag rLDL, and Ag dynamin. The potential of the DD-PCR technique in identifying genes involved in mosquito behaviour and the usefulness of the molecular characterisation of these transcripts are discussed. PMID:11822731

  17. Effects of Controlled Atmospheres on Production of Sesquiterpenoid Stress Metabolites by White Potato Tuber: Possible Involvement of Cyanide-resistant Respiration.

    PubMed

    Alves, L M; Heisler, E G; Kissinger, J C; Patterson, J M; Kalan, E B

    1979-02-01

    Levels of katahdinone (solavetivone), lubimin, rishitin, and phytuberin, sesquiterpenoid stress metabolites of white potato (Solanum tuberosum), were monitored in tuber slices which were challenged with an extract of Phytophthora infestans and incubated under controlled atmospheres. A mixture of ethylene in air enhanced stress metabolite production. This enhancement was amplified by higher partial pressures of oxygen. Stress metabolite production was inhibited by salicylhydroxamic acid. These results suggest the involvement of cyanide-resistant respiration in the production of potato stress metabolites, compounds which may serve as phytoalexins. PMID:16660728

  18. Possible involvement of toluene-2,3-dioxygenase in defluorination of 3-fluoro-substituted benzenes by toluene-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain T-12

    SciTech Connect

    Renganathan, V. )

    1989-02-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain T-12 cells in which the toluene-degradative pathway enzymes have been induced can transform many 3-fluoro-substituted benzenes to the corresponding 2,3-catechols with simultaneous elimination of the fluorine substituent as inorganic fluoride. Substrates for this transformation included 3-fluorotoluen, 3-fluorotrifluorotuluene, 3-fluorohalobenzenes, 3-fluoroanisole, and 3-fluorobenzonitrile. While 3-fluorotoluene and 3-fluoroaniole produced only defluorinated catechols, other substrates generated catechol products with and without the fluorine substituent. The steric size of the C-1 substituent affected the ratio of defluorinated to fluorinated catechols formed from a substrate. A mechanism for the defluorination reaction involving toluene-2,3-dioxygenase is proposed.

  19. The Plant-Derived Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein Proteinase Inhibitor (rBbKI) Attenuates Elastase-Induced Emphysema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Martins-Olivera, Bruno Tadeu; Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Theodoro-Júnior, Osmar Aparecido; Oliva, Leandro Vilela; Neto Dos Santos Nunes, Natalia; Olivo, Clarice Rosa; Vilela de Brito, Marlon; Prado, Carla Máximo; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Martins, Mílton de Arruda; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Righetti, Renato Fraga; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elastase mediates important oxidative actions during the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, few resources for the inhibition of elastase have been investigated. Our study evaluated the ability of the recombinant plant derived Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein proteinase Inhibitor (rBbKI) to modulate elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation. Methods. C57Bl/6 mice were given intratracheal elastase (ELA group) or saline (SAL group) and were treated intraperitoneally with rBbKI (ELA-rBbKI and SAL-rBbKI groups). At day 28, the following analyses were performed: (I) lung mechanics, (II) exhaled nitric oxide (ENO), (III) bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and (IV) lung immunohistochemical staining. Results. In addition to decreasing mechanical alterations and alveolar septum disruption, rBbKI reduced the number of cells in the BALF and decreased the cellular expression of TNF-α, MMP-9, MMP-12, TIMP-1, eNOS, and iNOS in airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. rBbKI decreased the volume proportion of 8-iso-PGF2α, collagen, and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. A reduction in the number of MUC-5-positive cells in the airway walls was also observed. Conclusion. rBbKI reduced elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling. rBbKI may be a potential pharmacological tool for COPD treatment. PMID:27528793

  20. The Plant-Derived Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein Proteinase Inhibitor (rBbKI) Attenuates Elastase-Induced Emphysema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Olivera, Bruno Tadeu; Theodoro-Júnior, Osmar Aparecido; Oliva, Leandro Vilela; Neto dos Santos Nunes, Natalia; Olivo, Clarice Rosa; Vilela de Brito, Marlon; Prado, Carla Máximo; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Martins, Mílton de Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elastase mediates important oxidative actions during the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, few resources for the inhibition of elastase have been investigated. Our study evaluated the ability of the recombinant plant derived Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein proteinase Inhibitor (rBbKI) to modulate elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation. Methods. C57Bl/6 mice were given intratracheal elastase (ELA group) or saline (SAL group) and were treated intraperitoneally with rBbKI (ELA-rBbKI and SAL-rBbKI groups). At day 28, the following analyses were performed: (I) lung mechanics, (II) exhaled nitric oxide (ENO), (III) bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and (IV) lung immunohistochemical staining. Results. In addition to decreasing mechanical alterations and alveolar septum disruption, rBbKI reduced the number of cells in the BALF and decreased the cellular expression of TNF-α, MMP-9, MMP-12, TIMP-1, eNOS, and iNOS in airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. rBbKI decreased the volume proportion of 8-iso-PGF2α, collagen, and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. A reduction in the number of MUC-5-positive cells in the airway walls was also observed. Conclusion. rBbKI reduced elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling. rBbKI may be a potential pharmacological tool for COPD treatment. PMID:27528793

  1. Association between kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) and macroscopic indicators of semen analysis: their relation to sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Emami, Nashmil; Scorilas, Andreas; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Earle, Tammy; Mullen, Brendan; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2009-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a family of proteases, the majority of which are found in seminal plasma and have been implicated in semen liquefaction. Here, we examined the clinical value of seminal KLKs in the evaluation of semen quality and differential diagnosis and etiology of abnormal liquefaction and/or viscosity. KLK1-3, 5-8, 10, 11, 13, and 14 were analyzed, using highly specific ELISA assays. Samples were categorized into four clinical groups, according to their state of liquefaction and viscosity. Data were compared between the clinical groups and in association with other parameters of sperm quality, including number of motile sperms, straight line speed, sperm concentration, volume, pH, and patient age. Seminal KLKs were found to be differentially expressed in the four clinical groups. Combination of KLK2, 3, 13, and 14 and KLK1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, and 14 showed very strong discriminatory potential for semen liquefaction and viscosity, respectively. Liquefaction state was associated with several parameters of sperm motility. Finally, KLK14 was differentially expressed in asthenospermic cases. In conclusion, the expression level of several seminal plasma KLKs correlates with liquefaction and viscosity indicators of semen quality and may aid in their differential diagnosis and etiology. PMID:19558318

  2. Correlation of the antimicrobial activity of salicylaldehydes with broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton. Possible involvement of proton exchange processes in the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Elo, Hannu; Kuure, Matti; Pelttari, Eila

    2015-03-01

    Certain substituted salicylaldehydes are potent antibacterial and antifungal agents and some of them merit consideration as potential chemotherapeutic agents against Candida infections, but their mechanism of action has remained obscure. We report here a distinct correlation between broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton of salicylaldehydes and their activity against several types of bacteria and fungi. When proton NMR spectra of the compounds were determined using hexadeuterodimethylsulfoxide as solvent and the height of the OH proton signal was measured, using the signal of the aldehyde proton as an internal standard, it was discovered that a prerequisite of potent antimicrobial activity is that the proton signal is either unobservable or relatively very low, i.e. that it is extremely broadened. Thus, none of the congeners whose OH proton signal was high were potent antimicrobial agents. Some congeners that gave a very low OH signal were, however, essentially inactive against the microbes, indicating that although drastic broadening of the OH signal appears to be a prerequisite, also other (so far unknown) factors are needed for high antimicrobial activity. Because broadening of the hydroxyl proton signal is related to the speed of the proton exchange process(es) involving that proton, proton exchange may be involved in the mechanism of action of the compounds. Further studies are needed to analyze the relative importance of different factors (such as electronic effects, strength of the internal hydrogen bond, co-planarity of the ring and the formyl group) that determine the rates of those processes. PMID:25621992

  3. Signaling pathway of nitric oxide production induced by ginsenoside Rb1 in human aortic endothelial cells: a possible involvement of androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Eto, Masato; Akishita, Masahiro; Kaneko, Akiyo; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Okabe, Tetsuro

    2007-02-16

    Ginsenosides have been shown to stimulate nitric oxide (NO) production in aortic endothelial cells. However, the signaling pathways involved have not been well studied in human aortic endothelial cells. The present study was designed to examine whether purified ginsenoside Rb1, a major active component of ginseng could actually induce NO production and to clarify the signaling pathway in human aortic endothelial cells. NO production was rapidly increased by Rb1. The rapid increase in NO production was abrogated by treatment with nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor, L-NAME. Rb1 stimulated rapid phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473), ERK1/2 (Thr202/Thr204) and eNOS (Ser1177). Rapid phosphorylation of eNOS (Ser1177) was prevented by SH-5, an Akt inhibitor or wortmannin, PI3-kinase inhibitor and partially attenuated by PD98059, an upstream inhibitor for ERK1/2. Interestingly, NO production and eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 by Rb1 were abolished by androgen receptor antagonist, nilutamide. The results suggest that PI3kinase/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways and androgen receptor are involved in the regulation of acute eNOS activation by Rb1 in human aortic endothelial cells. PMID:17196933

  4. Generation of lysophosphatidylinositol by DDHD domain containing 1 (DDHD1): Possible involvement of phospholipase D/phosphatidic acid in the activation of DDHD1.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Atsushi; Kumazawa, Tsukasa; Koga, Hiroki; Suzuki, Naotaka; Oka, Saori; Sugiura, Takayuki

    2010-07-01

    GPR55 is a seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptor that has been proposed as a novel type of cannabinoid receptor. Previously, we identified lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), in particular 2-arachidonoyl-LPI, as an agonist for GPR55. In the present study, we examined whether intracellular phospholipase A1 (DDHD domain containing 1, or DDHD1), previously identified as phosphatidic acid (PA)-preferring PLA1 (PA-PLA1), is involved in the formation of 2-arachidonoyl-LPI. HEK293 cells expressing DDHD1 produced [(3)H]arachidonic acid-containing LPI after prelabeling with [(3)H]arachidonic acid and subsequent activation by ionomycin; the formation of [(3)H]LPI was inhibited by n-butanol and the overexpression of an inactive PLD1 mutant PLD1K898R. DDHD1 was translocated from the cytosol to membranes upon ionomycin treatment. A purified recombinant DDHD1 formed [(3)H]LPI when incubated with [(3)H]PI; the V(max) and apparent K(m) were 190 micromol/min/mg protein and 10 mol% PI, respectively. DDHD1 binds PA, and the addition of PA to DDHD1 increased the affinity for PI (K(m) ; 3 mol%) and augmented the PI-PLA1 activity. DDHD1 activated by PA was returned to a basal state by its own PA-hydrolytic activity. These results implicate DDHD1 in the formation of 2-arachidonoyl-LPI and indicate that the process is modulated by PA released by phospholipase D. Similar observations for the production of arachidonic acid-containing LPI in neuroblastoma cells suggest the DDHD1-LPI-GPR55 axis to be involved in functions in the brain. PMID:20359546

  5. Identification of domains on the extrinsic 23 kDa protein possibly involved in electrostatic interaction with the extrinsic 33 kDa protein in spinach photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Tohri, Akihiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Ohta, Hisataka; Inoue, Yasunori; Enami, Isao

    2004-03-01

    To elucidate the domains on the extrinsic 23 kDa protein involved in electrostatic interaction with the extrinsic 33 kDa protein in spinach photosystem II, we modified amino or carboxyl groups of the 23 kDa protein to uncharged methyl ester groups with N-succinimidyl propionate or glycine methyl ester in the presence of a water-soluble carbodiimide, respectively. The N-succinimidyl propionate-modified 23 kDa protein did not bind to the 33 kDa protein associated with PSII membranes, whereas the glycine methyl ester-modified 23 kDa protein completely bound. This indicates that positive charges on the 23 kDa protein are important for electrostatic interaction with the 33 kDa protein associated with the PSII membranes. Mapping of the N-succinimidyl propionate-modified sites of the 23 kDa protein was performed using Staphylococcus V8 protease digestion of the modified protein followed by determination of the mass of the resultant peptide fragments with MALDI-TOF MS. The results showed that six domains (Lys11-Lys14, Lys27-Lys38, Lys40, Lys90-Lys96, Lys143-Lys152, Lys166-Lys174) were modified with N-succinimidyl propionate. In these domains, Lys11, Lys13, Lys33, Lys38, Lys143, Lys166, Lys170 and Lys174 were wholly conserved in the 23 kDa protein from 12 species of higher plants. These positively charged lysyl residues on the 23 kDa protein may be involved in electrostatic interactions with the negatively charged carboxyl groups on the 33 kDa protein, the latter has been suggested to be important for the 23 kDa binding [Bricker, T.M. & Frankel, L.K. (2003) Biochemistry42, 2056-2061]. PMID:15009208

  6. Possible involvement of the long terminal repeat of transposable element 17.6 in regulating expression of an insecticide resistance-associated P450 gene in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, L C; Zelhof, A C; Shaw, B J; Ch'ang, L Y

    1992-01-01

    P450-A and P450-B are electrophoretically defined subsets of cytochrome P450 enzymes in Drosophila melanogaster. P450-A is present among all strains tested, whereas expression of P450-B is associated with resistance to insecticides. Monoclonal antibodies were used to obtain cDNA clones for an enzyme from each P450 subset (i.e., P450-A1 and P450-B1). The P450-B1 cDNA was sequenced and shown to code for a P450 of 507 amino acids. Its gene has been named CYP6A2. Comparative molecular analyses of a pair of susceptible, 91-C, and resistant, 91-R, Drosophila strains were made. There was 20-30 times more P450-B1 mRNA in 91-R than in 91-C, and the small amount of P450-B1 mRNA in 91-C was significantly larger in size than that in 91-R. The P450-B1 gene in 91-R was structurally different from that in 91-C but was not amplified. The P450-B1 gene in 91-C contained a solitary long terminal repeat of transposable element 17.6 in its 3' untranslated region. It was absent in the P450-B1 gene of 91-R. On the basis of features of the long terminal repeat and its location in the gene of the susceptible fly, we propose that a posttranscriptional mechanism involving mRNA stability could be involved in regulating P450-B1 gene expression. Images PMID:1317576

  7. Increased chromosomal breakage in Tourette syndrome predicts the possibility of variable multiple gene involvement in spectrum phenotypes: Preliminary findings and hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gericke, G.S.; Simonic, I.; Cloete, E.; Buckle, C.

    1995-10-09

    Increased chromosomal breakage was found in 12 patients with DSM-IV Tourette syndrome (TS) as compared with 10 non-TS control individuals with respect to untreated, modified RPM1-, and BrdU treated lymphocyte cultures (P < 0.001 in each category). A hypothesis is proposed that a major TS gene is probably connected to genetic instability, and associated chromosomal marker sites may be indicative of the localization of secondary genes whose altered expression could be responsible for associated comorbid conditions. This concept implies that genes influencing higher brain functions may be situated at or near highly recombigenic areas allowing enhanced amplification, duplication and recombination following chromosomal strand breakage. Further studies on a larger sample size are required to confirm the findings relating to chromosomal breakage and to analyze the possible implications for a paradigmatic shift in linkage strategy for complex disorders by focusing on areas at or near unstable chromosomal marker sites. 32 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Involvement of medial prefrontal cortex alpha-2 adrenoceptors on memory acquisition deficit induced by arachidonylcyclopropylamide, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, in rats; possible involvement of Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Afsaneh; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Moghaddasi, Mehrnoush

    2016-09-01

    Functional interactions between cannabinoid and alpha-2 adrenergic systems in cognitive control in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) seem possible. The present study evaluated the possible role of alpha-2 adrenoceptors of the prefrontal cortex on effect of arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA), a cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) agonist, in adult male Wistar rats. The animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the mPFC, trained in a step-through task, and tested 24 h after training to measure step-through latency. Results indicate that pre-training microinjection of ACPA (0.05 and 0.5 μg/rat) and clonidine (alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist; 1 and 2 μg/rat) reduce memory acquisition. Pre-training subthreshold dose of clonidine (0.5 µg/rat) restored memory-impairing effect of ACPA (0.05 and 0.5 µg/rat). On the other hand, pre-training administration of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine in all doses used (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/rat) did not affect memory acquisition by itself, while a subthreshold dose of yohimbine (2 µg/rat) potentiated memory impairment induced by ACPA (0.005 µg/rat). Finally, a subthreshold dose of SKF96365 (a Ca(2+) channel blocker) blocked clonidine and yohimbine effect of memory responses induced by ACPA. In conclusion, these data indicate that mPFC alpha-2 adrenoceptors play an important role in ACPA-induced amnesia and Ca(2+) channels have a critical role this phenomenon. PMID:27317021

  9. Identification of a novel aminopeptidase P-like gene (OnAPP) possibly involved in Bt toxicity and resistance in a major corn pest (Ostrinia nubilalis).

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Chitvan; Buschman, Lawrent L; Chen, Ming-Shun; Siegfried, Blair D; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2011-01-01

    Studies to understand the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) resistance mechanism in European corn borer (ECB, Ostrinia nubilalis) suggest that resistance may be due to changes in the midgut-specific Bt toxin receptor. In this study, we identified 10 aminopeptidase-like genes, which have previously been identified as putative Bt toxin receptors in other insects and examined their expression in relation to Cry1Ab toxicity and resistance. Expression analysis for the 10 aminopeptidase-like genes revealed that most of these genes were expressed predominantly in the larval midgut, but there was no difference in the expression of these genes in Cry1Ab resistant and susceptible strains. This suggested that altered expression of these genes was unlikely to be responsible for resistance in these ECB strains. However, we found that there were changes in two amino acid residues of the aminopeptidase-P like gene (OnAPP) involving Glu(305) to Lys(305) and Arg(307) to Leu(307) in the two Cry1Ab-resistant strains as compared with three Cry1Ab-susceptible strains. The mature OnAPP contains 682 amino acid residues and has a putative signal peptide at the N-terminus, a predicted glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol (GPI)-anchor signal at the C-terminal, three predicted N-glycosylation sites at residues N178, N278 and N417, and an O-glycosylation site at residue T653. We used a feeding based-RNA interference assay to examine the role of the OnAPP gene in Cry1Ab toxicity and resistance. Bioassays of Cry1Ab in larvae fed diet containing OnAPP dsRNA resulted in a 38% reduction in the transcript level of OnAPP and a 25% reduction in the susceptibility to Cry1Ab as compared with larvae fed GFP dsRNA or water. These results strongly suggest that the OnAPP gene could be involved in binding the Cry1Ab toxin in the ECB larval midgut and that mutations in this gene may be associated with Bt resistance in these two ECB strains. PMID:21887358

  10. Localization of a carboxylic residue possibly involved in the inhibition of vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase by N, N'-dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, S J; Jiang, S S; Kuo, S Y; Hung, S H; Tam, M F; Pan, R L

    1999-01-01

    A vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.1) that catalyses PP(i) hydrolysis and the electrogenic translocation of protons from the cytosol to the vacuole lumen, was purified from etiolated hypocotyls of mung bean seedlings (Vigna radiata L.). Group-specific modification was used to identify a carboxylic residue involved in the inhibition of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase. Carbodi-imides, such as N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide (DCCD) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylamino-propyl)carbodi-imide, and Woodward's reagent K caused a progressive decline in the enzymic activity of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of labelling of the vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase by [(14)C]DCCD determined that DCCD modifies one carboxylic residue per subunit of the enzyme. Protection studies suggest that the DCCD-reactive carboxylic residue resides at or near the substrate-binding site. Furthermore, peptide mapping analysis reveals that Asp(283), located in the putative loop V of a tentative topological model of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase on the cytosolic side, was labelled by radioactive [(14)C]DCCD. Cytosolic loop V contains both DCCD-sensitive Asp(283) and a conserved motif sequence, rendering it a candidate for the catalytic site of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase. A topological picture of the active domain of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase is tentatively proposed. PMID:10477275