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Sample records for post infective bowel

  1. Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome: mechanistic insights into chronic disturbances following enteric infection.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Jennifer K; Bhargava, Amol; Buret, Andre G

    2014-04-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a commonly encountered chronic functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder. Approximately 10% of IBS patients can trace the onset of their symptoms to a previous a bout of infectious dysentery. The appearance of new IBS symptoms following an infectious event is defined as post-infectious-IBS. Indeed, with the World Health Organization estimating between 2 and 4 billion cases annually, infectious diarrheal disease represents an incredible international healthcare burden. Additionally, compounding evidence suggests many commonly encountered enteropathogens as unique triggers behind IBS symptom generation and underlying pathophysiological features. A growing body of work provides evidence supporting a role for pathogen-mediated modifications in the resident intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier integrity, effector cell functions, and innate and adaptive immune features, all proposed physiological manifestations that can underlie GI abnormalities in IBS. Enteric pathogens must employ a vast array of machinery to evade host protective immune mechanisms, and illicit successful infections. Consequently, the impact of infectious events on host physiology can be multidimensional in terms of anatomical location, functional scope, and duration. This review offers a unique discussion of the mechanisms employed by many commonly encountered enteric pathogens that cause acute disease, but may also lead to the establishment of chronic GI dysfunction compatible with IBS. PMID:24744587

  2. Preinduction of heat shock protein 70 protects mice against post-infection irritable bowel syndrome via NF-κB and NOS/NO signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuchun; Dong, Liwei; Yang, Bo; He, Zhoutao; Chen, Yiyao; Deng, Taozhi; Huang, Baili; Lan, Cheng

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of preinduction of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on Trichinella spiralis infection-induced post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) in mice. Trichinella spiralis infection significantly reduced HSP70 abundance, ileal villus height and crypt depth, expression of tight junctions, serum lysine and arginine concentrations, and ileal SCL7A6 and SCL7A7 mRNA levels, induced inflammatory response, and activated NF-κB signaling pathway. Meanwhile, the heat treatment upregulated HSP70 expression, and then reversed intestinal dysfunction and inflammatory response. Preinduction of HSP70 enhanced serum arginine and intestinal SCL7A7 expression and inhibited NF-κB activation compared with PI-IBS model. Treatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-κB inhibitor) and N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NOS) further demonstrated that preinduction of HSP70 might inhibit NF-κB and activated NOS/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathways. In conclusion, preinduction of HSP70 by heat treatment may confer beneficial effects on Trichinella spiralis infection-induced PI-IBS in mice, and the protective effect of HSP70 may be associated with inhibition of NF-κB and stimulation of NOS/NO signaling pathways. PMID:26215736

  3. Clostridium difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Biesiada, Grażyna; Perucki, William; Mach, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium widely distributed in the human environment. In the last decade the incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection has grown, particularly in Europe and North America, making it one of the more common nosocomial infections. A group particularly susceptible to Clostridium difficile infection are patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially those with involvement of the colon. This paper presents relevant data on Clostridium difficile infections in inflammatory bowel disease patients, including epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25097707

  4. Preventing infective complications in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Justine; Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This is due to the increasing use of immunosuppressives and in particular the biological agents, which are being used earlier in the course of disease, and for longer durations, as these therapies result in better clinical outcomes for patients. This, however, has the potential to increase the risk of opportunistic and serious infections in these patients, most of which are preventable. Much like the risk for potential malignancy resulting from the use of these therapies long-term, a balance needs to be struck between medication use to control the disease with minimization of the risk of an opportunistic infection. This outcome is achieved by the physician’s tailored use of justified therapies, and the patients’ education and actions to minimize infection risk. The purpose of this review is to explore the evidence and guidelines available to all physicians managing patients with IBD using immunomodulating agents and to aid in the prevention of opportunistic infections. PMID:25110408

  5. [Post-operative bowel obstruction. Part 2: Mechanical post-operative small bowel obstruction by bands and adhesions].

    PubMed

    Duron, J J

    2003-12-01

    Small Bowel obstruction due to post-operative adhesions is a common problem in a general surgical practice. Any laparotomy initiates the lifelong risk of this complication. Mortality rates have improved dramatically in the last three decades. The basic evaluation and treatment of small bowel obstruction is well defined but many individual strategies may result from the variety of clinical presentations and from techniques and equipment available to a local surgical practice. Recent advances in surgical techniques and preventive strategies may improve overall results. Results will remain linked to the continuous aging of the populations of Western countries. PMID:14978440

  6. Infections and inflammatory bowel disease: challenges in Asia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Siew C; Chan, Francis Kl

    2013-11-01

    The diagnosis and management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Asia can be challenging as certain infections can mimic IBD and lead to a misdiagnosis. Colitis can be caused by bacterial infections, ileitis can result from Yersinia and Salmonella infections and ileocolonic ulcers can be seen in intestinal tuberculosis and amebiasis. In addition, cytomegalovirus and Clostridium difficile infection may mimic a flare of IBD and their presence is associated with an increased risk of colectomy and mortality. Because of the increasing use of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and biological agents the risk of opportunistic infection and the reactivation of latent infection including tuberculosis and hepatitis B, are also higher in IBD patients. Screening and prevention of infection, timely vaccination and the education of the patient is paramount before initiating immunosuppressive drugs. The role of the physician lies not only in the diagnosis and management of IBD but also in the ability to prevent, recognize and treat infections. PMID:23875824

  7. Adenovirus infection of the large bowel in HIV positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, A.; Francis, N.; Moss, J.; Blanshard, C.; Gazzard, B.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To describe the microscopic appearance of adenovirus infection in the large bowel of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients with diarrhoea. METHODS: Large bowel biopsy specimens from 10 HIV positive patients, eight of whom were also infected with other gastrointestinal pathogens, with diarrhoea were examined, together with six small bowel biopsy specimens from the same group of patients. Eight of the patients had AIDS. The biopsy specimens were examined by light microscopy performed on haematoxylin and eosin stained and immunoperoxidase preparations, the latter using a commercially available antibody (Serotec MCA 489). Confirmation was obtained with electron microscopy. RESULTS: The morphological appearance of cells infected with adenovirus showed characteristic nuclear and cellular changes, although the inflammatory reaction was non-specific. Immunoperoxidase staining for adenovirus was sensitive and specific, and the presence of viral inclusions consistent with adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: The light microscopic features of adenovirus infection are distinctive and immunocytochemistry with a commercially available antibody is a sensitive and specific means of confirming the diagnosis. Further studies of the role of adenovirus in causing diarrhoea in these patients are indicated. Images PMID:1401177

  8. Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Nancy; Wong, Titus

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is now the leading cause of nosocomial infection. There has been an upsurge of CDI in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients with CDI have increased morbidity and mortality. The establishment, proliferation, and recurrence of CDI in IBD patients form a complex interplay of microbial, environmental, and host-susceptibility factors. Different risk factors have been found predisposing IBD patients to CDI. Vancomycin performs better than metronidazole in treating IBD patients with CDI. Fecal microbiota transplantation continues to be a very effective therapy. New therapeutic modalities such as vaccinations and bile salts are currently being investigated. PMID:27137789

  9. Nocardia infections among immunomodulated inflammatory bowel disease patients: A review.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida; Rocha-Pereira, Nuno; Sarmento, António; Magro, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    Human nocardiosis, caused by Nocardia spp., an ubiquitous soil-borne bacteria, is a rare granulomatous disease close related to immune dysfunctions. Clinically can occur as an acute life-threatening disease, with lung, brain and skin being commonly affected. The infection was classically diagnosed in HIV infected persons, organ transplanted recipients and long term corticosteroid treated patients. Currently the widespread use of immunomodulators and immunossupressors in the treatment of inflammatory diseases changed this scenario. Our purpose is to review all published cases of nocardiosis in immunomodulated patients due to inflammatory diseases and describe clinical and laboratory findings. We reviewed the literature concerning human cases of nocardiosis published between 1980 and 2014 in peer reviewed journals. Eleven cases of nocardiosis associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) prescription (9 related with infliximab and 2 with adalimumab) were identified; 7 patients had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 4 had rheumatological conditions; nocardia infection presented as cutaneous involvement in 3 patients, lung disease in 4 patients, hepatic in one and disseminated disease in 3 patients. From the 10 cases described in IBD patients 7 were associated with anti-TNF and 3 with steroids and azathioprine. In conclusion, nocardiosis requires high levels of clinical suspicion and experience of laboratory staff, in order to establish a timely diagnosis and by doing so avoid worst outcomes. Treatment for long periods tailored by the susceptibility of the isolated species whenever possible is essential. The safety of restarting immunomodulators or anti-TNF after the disease or the value of prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole is still debated. PMID:26074688

  10. Long-term Clinical Course of Post-infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome After Shigellosis: A 10-year Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Young Hoon; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Lim, Hyun Chul; Park, Jae Jun; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims A limited number of studies are available regarding the long-term natural history of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). We aimed to investigate the long-term clinical course of PI-IBS. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted from a 2001 shigellosis outbreak in a Korean hospital with about 2000 employees. A cohort of 124 hospital employees who were infected by Shigella sonnei due to contaminated food in the cafeteria, and 105 sex- and age-matched, non-infected, controls were serially followed for their bowel symptoms by questionnaire surveys for 10 years. Results The Shigella-infected cohort showed significantly higher odds ratio for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) at 1-year (11.90; 95% CI, 1.49–95.58) and 3-year (3.93; 95% CI, 1.20–12.86) follow-up, compared to their controls. However, corresponding odds ratio for PI-IBS was not significantly increased at 5-year (1.88; 95% CI, 0.64–5.54) and 8-year (1.87; 95% CI, 0.62–5.19) follow-up. At 10-year follow-up survey, the prevalence of IBS was similar for the Shigella-infected cohort and their controls (23.3% versus 19.7%, P = 0.703). Risk factors which were independently associated with PI-IBS among the Shigella-infected cohort included younger age, previous history of functional bowel disorder, and longer duration of diarrhea at baseline. Conclusions Patients who were infected by Shigella sonnei experienced significantly increased risk of IBS until 3 years after shigellosis, and modestly increased risk until 8 years, but showed similar risk of IBS with uninfected controls at 10 years post-infection. PI-IBS is quite a chronic disorder, and follows a long-term natural course. PMID:26908484

  11. A rabbit model for mucosal immunity in the bowel. II. Local cellular reactivity to virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, A J; Holmes, M J

    1990-01-01

    An animal model was used to examine local and systemic cellular reactivity against virus infection of bowel mucosa. Firstly, existing techniques for extracting lymphoid cells from the dispersed populations of the bowel mucosa were adapted for use in rabbits and viable lymphocytes were isolated from the lapine ileal mucosa in numbers suitable for assay. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) showed a strong blastogenic response to T-cell mitogens but intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IEL) responded poorly, even in the presence of splenic accessory cells. Next, chronically isolated ileal loops in rabbits were infected with parainfluenzavirus type 3 (PI-3) and isolates from the organized and dispersed lymphoid tissues associated with infected ileal mucosae and those from systemic lymphoid sites were used in in vitro assays of virus-specific lympho-proliferation. A T-cell-mediated immune response against PI-3 was mounted in lymphoid tissues associated with the infected loops, appearing first in loop Peyer's patches (PP) at Day 4 and in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and lamina propriae at Day 7 after infection. The response in PP had waned by 21 days but was sustained in the other sites for at least 42 days. Epithelial lymphocytes were consistently anergic and there was no evidence of specific reactivity at systemic lymphoid sites or elsewhere in the bowel. Thus, a highly localized T-cell-mediated response was sustained, not only in organized lymphoid tissues but also in the bowel wall itself, following infection with a novel antigen. PMID:2155872

  12. Surgical Site Infection 18 Months Following Intrathecal Pump Placement Secondary to an Asymptomatic Bowel Injury.

    PubMed

    Deibert, Christopher P; Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Forsythe, Raquel M; Moossy, John J

    2015-09-01

    Surgical site infections following the implantation of intrathecal drug delivery systems typically present during the first 1 to 2 months following surgery. Surgical site infections occurring outside of this window are rare entities and require special attention to identify the source or underlying cause. In this report, we present a case of pump pocket infection 18 months following implantation due to an asymptomatic and unrecognized bowel injury associated with the catheter. This case highlights the need for a thorough evaluation in a patient with suspected infections more than 2 months after surgery to ensure adequate treatment. PMID:26009935

  13. Cytomegalovirus Infection in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is Not Associated with Worsening of Intestinal Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    do Carmo, Alexandre Medeiros; Santos, Fabiana Maria; Ortiz-Agostinho, Carmen Lucia; Nishitokukado, Iêda; Frota, Cintia S.; Gomes, Flavia Ubeda; de Arruda Leite, André Zonetti; Pannuti, Claudio Sérgio; Boas, Lucy Santos Vilas; Teixeira, Magaly Gemio; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus. Aim Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations. Methods Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient. Results Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine) Conclusion The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV

  14. Reactive arthritis or post-infective arthritis?

    PubMed

    Keat, Andrew

    2002-09-01

    Infective mechanisms probably underlie a wide range of inflammatory arthropathies. There appears to be a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from the frankly septic, through low-grade infection with very small numbers of microorganisms in the joint to arthritides in which no hard evidence for an infective cause exists. In the midst of the spectrum lie 'post-infective' and 'reactive' arthritides, characterized clinically, genetically and by epidemiological links with infection. Identification of bacterial components within joint material from such patients suggested that the causes of the arthritis had been found. It is now clear that many bacteria are present in inflamed joints; establishing their significance will be of crucial importance, but not easy. PMID:12406424

  15. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infected cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.

  16. Bag and loop small bowel contouring strategies differentially estimate small bowel dose for post-hysterectomy women receiving pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Melody J; Kirk, Maura; Zhai, Huifang; Lin, Lilie L

    2016-07-01

    Background Small bowel (SB) dose-volume relationships established during initial computed tomography (CT) simulations may change throughout therapy due to organ displacement and motion. We investigated the impact of organ motion on SB dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in women with gynecologic malignancies treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and compared PBS SB DVHs to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods Post-hysterectomy patients (n = 11) treated for gynecologic cancers were enrolled on an image-guided proton therapy protocol involving CT simulation with full (CTF) and empty (CTE) bladders and weekly/biweekly on-treatment scans. IMRT plans were generated for comparative analysis. SB was contoured as bowel loops or bowel bag. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for matched-pair comparisons of SB, bladder, and rectum dose-volumes between CT scans and between PBS and IMRT plans. Results In PBS loops analysis, on-treatment DVH was significantly higher than CTF for doses <45 Gy (p < 0.05), and not significantly different than CTE. Specifically, V15 for loops was higher on-treatment (median 240 cm(3)) compared to CTF (median 169 cm(3), p = 0.03). In PBS bag analysis, on-treatment DVH was not significantly different from CTF across all dose ranges. Bowel bag V45 was not significantly different between on-treatment (median 540 cm(3)) and CTF (median 499 cm(3), p = 0.53). Decreasing bladder volume was associated with increasing V15 for loops and V45 for bowel bag (p < 0.005, both). Comparing PBS and IMRT, PBS resulted in significantly lower DVHs at low dose regions (<38 Gy) and higher DVHs at high dose regions (42.5-45.5 Gy) in both loops and bag analysis. IMRT plans demonstrated higher on-treatment SB loop DVHs and only minimal differences in bowel bag DVHs compared to CTF. Conclusions SB DVHs were well estimated by CTF bowel bag and underestimated by CTF loops in the setting of inconsistent

  17. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infectedmore » cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.« less

  18. Post-transplantation Infections in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Arze, S; Arze, L; Abecia, C

    2016-03-01

    Over 26 years, we found 46 infectious episodes in 350 kidney transplant recipients. Fifteen were urinary tract infections, recurrent in 4 patients. There were 8 cytomegalovirus infections, three of them fatal when intravenous (IV) ganciclovir was not available. Seven patients had a reactivation of tuberculosis (TB) in the pleura, cervical spine, lumbar spine, knee, ankle, skin and peritoneum, respectively, and were all resolved satisfactorily with conventional anti-TB therapy. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of acyclovir developed an extensive herpes zoster infection in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was resolved with the use of oral acyclovir, and 1 had a disseminated herpes simplex infection resolved with the use of IV acyclovir. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with trimethoprim sulfa developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was fatal in one of them. In 2 patients, we found a Nocardia infection, confined to the lung, which was cured in one of the cases and systemic and fatal in the other. Two patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of nystatin developed esophageal candidiasis in the 1st 6 months after transplantation. One patient developed infective endocarditis in a stenotic bicuspid aortic valve and died 10 years later after another incident of infective endocarditis at the prosthetic aortic valve. Two patients developed an extensive condyloma at the penis, perianal region, and perineum owing to human papillomavirus, requiring extensive surgical resection and podophyllin applications. Another patient developed fatal post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease due to Epstein-Barr virus infection 15 years after transplantation. One patient developed a severe and fatal mucocutaneous leishmaniasis with no response to conventional antimonial therapy. It is interesting to note that despite Chagas disease being endemic

  19. Oh my aching gut: irritable bowel syndrome, Blastocystis, and asymptomatic infection

    PubMed Central

    Boorom, Kenneth F; Smith, Huw; Nimri, Laila; Viscogliosi, Eric; Spanakos, Gregory; Parkar, Unaiza; Li, Lan-Hua; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Ok, Ülgen Z; Leelayoova, Saovanee; Jones, Morris S

    2008-01-01

    Blastocystis is a prevalent enteric protozoan that infects a variety of vertebrates. Infection with Blastocystis in humans has been associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, fatigue, skin rash, and other symptoms. Researchers using different methods and examining different patient groups have reported asymptomatic infection, acute symptomatic infection, and chronic symptomatic infection. The variation in accounts has lead to disagreements concerning the role of Blastocystis in human disease, and the importance of treating it. A better understanding of the number of species of Blastocystis that can infect humans, along with realization of the limitations of the existing clinical laboratory diagnostic techniques may account for much of the disagreement. The possibility that disagreement was caused by the emergence of particular pathogenic variants of Blastocystis is discussed, along with the potential role of Blastocystis infection in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Findings are discussed concerning the role of protease-activated receptor-2 in enteric disease which may account for the presence of abdominal pain and diffuse symptoms in Blastocystis infection, even in the absence of fever and endoscopic findings. The availability of better diagnostic techniques and treatments for Blastocystis infection may be of value in understanding chronic gastrointestinal illness of unknown etiology. PMID:18937874

  20. Relevance of fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin in the post-operative management of inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Caccaro, Roberta; Angriman, Imerio; D’Incà, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The role of fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin has been extensively studied in many areas of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients’ management. The post-operative setting in both Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients has been less investigated although few promising results come from small, cross-sectional studies. Therefore, the current post-operative management still requires endoscopy 6-12 mo after intestinal resection for CD in order to exclude endoscopic recurrence and plan the therapeutic strategy. In patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy, endoscopy is required whenever symptoms includes the possibility of pouchitis. There is emerging evidence that fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin are useful surrogate markers of inflammation in the post-operative setting, they correlate with the presence and severity of endoscopic recurrence according to Rutgeerts’ score and possibly predict the subsequent clinical recurrence and response to therapy in CD patients. Similarly, fecal markers show a good correlation with the presence of pouchitis, as confirmed by endoscopy in operated UC patients. Fecal calprotectin seems to be able to predict the short-term development of pouchitis in asymptomatic patients and to vary according to response to medical treatment. The possibility of both fecal markers to used in the routine clinical practice for monitoring IBD patients in the post-operative setting should be confirmed in multicentric clinical trial with large sample set. An algorithm that can predict the optimal use and timing of fecal markers testing, the effective need and timing of endoscopy and the cost-effectiveness of these as a strategy of care would be of great interest. PMID:27022446

  1. Relevance of fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin in the post-operative management of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Caccaro, Roberta; Angriman, Imerio; D'Incà, Renata

    2016-03-27

    The role of fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin has been extensively studied in many areas of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients' management. The post-operative setting in both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients has been less investigated although few promising results come from small, cross-sectional studies. Therefore, the current post-operative management still requires endoscopy 6-12 mo after intestinal resection for CD in order to exclude endoscopic recurrence and plan the therapeutic strategy. In patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy, endoscopy is required whenever symptoms includes the possibility of pouchitis. There is emerging evidence that fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin are useful surrogate markers of inflammation in the post-operative setting, they correlate with the presence and severity of endoscopic recurrence according to Rutgeerts' score and possibly predict the subsequent clinical recurrence and response to therapy in CD patients. Similarly, fecal markers show a good correlation with the presence of pouchitis, as confirmed by endoscopy in operated UC patients. Fecal calprotectin seems to be able to predict the short-term development of pouchitis in asymptomatic patients and to vary according to response to medical treatment. The possibility of both fecal markers to used in the routine clinical practice for monitoring IBD patients in the post-operative setting should be confirmed in multicentric clinical trial with large sample set. An algorithm that can predict the optimal use and timing of fecal markers testing, the effective need and timing of endoscopy and the cost-effectiveness of these as a strategy of care would be of great interest. PMID:27022446

  2. POST-INFECTIOUS IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: A LONG TERM CONSEQUENCE OF BACTERIAL GASTROENTERITIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a commonly diagnosed disease characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms often associated with psychological illness and emotional problems. The prevalence rate world-wide for IBS ranges from 10 to 20% and is higher for women than for men. Irritable bowel disease ...

  3. The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease based on meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gisbert, JP; Niv, Y; O’Morain, C

    2015-01-01

    Background In humans there are epidemiological data suggesting a protective effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection against the development of autoimmune diseases and in addition, there are laboratory data illustrating H. pylori’s ability to induce immune tolerance and limit inflammatory responses. Thus, numerous observational studies have examined the association between H. pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with various results. Objective We performed a meta-analysis of available studies to better define the association of H. pylori infection and IBD. Methods Medical literature searches for human studies were performed through September 2014, using suitable keywords. In each study the risk ratio (RR) of H. pylori infection in IBD patients vs controls was calculated and pooled estimates were obtained using fixed- or random-effects models as appropriate. Heterogeneity between studies was evaluated using Cochran Q test and I2 statistics, whereas the likelihood of publication bias was assessed by constructing funnel plots. Results Thirty-three studies were eligible for meta-analysis, including 4400 IBD patients and 4763 controls. Overall 26.5% of IBD patients were positive for H. pylori infection, compared to 44.7% of individuals in the control group. There was significant heterogeneity in the included studies (Q = 137.2, df (Q) =32, I2 = 77%, p < 0.001) and therefore the random-effects model of meta-analysis was used. The obtained pool RR estimation was 0.62 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55–0.71, test for overall effect Z = –7.04, p < 0.001). There was no evidence of publication bias. Conclusion The results of this meta-analysis showed a significant negative association between H. pylori infection and IBD that supports a possible protective benefit of H. pylori infection against the development of IBD. PMID:26668747

  4. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn's disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A(+)B(+) strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  5. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A+B+ strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  6. What is the best way to manage screening for infections and vaccination of inflammatory bowel disease patients?

    PubMed

    Andrisani, Gianluca; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Marzo, Manuela; Felice, Carla; Pugliese, Daniela; Papa, Alfredo; Guidi, Luisa

    2016-08-01

    The use of biological agents and immunomodulators for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections, in particular of viral or bacterial etiology. Despite the existence of international guidelines, many gastroenterologists have not adopted routine screening and vaccination in those patients with IBD, which are candidate for biologic therapy. Available strategies to screen, diagnose and prevent bacterial and viral infections in patients with IBD prior to start biological therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:27602239

  7. What is the best way to manage screening for infections and vaccination of inflammatory bowel disease patients?

    PubMed Central

    Andrisani, Gianluca; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Marzo, Manuela; Felice, Carla; Pugliese, Daniela; Papa, Alfredo; Guidi, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of biological agents and immunomodulators for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections, in particular of viral or bacterial etiology. Despite the existence of international guidelines, many gastroenterologists have not adopted routine screening and vaccination in those patients with IBD, which are candidate for biologic therapy. Available strategies to screen, diagnose and prevent bacterial and viral infections in patients with IBD prior to start biological therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:27602239

  8. Giardia lamblia infection in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Grazioli, Barbara; Matera, Giovanni; Laratta, Costanza; Schipani, Giuseppina; Guarnieri, Giovanni; Spiniello, Ester; Imeneo, Maria; Amorosi, Andrea; Focà, Alfredo; Luzza, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of Giardia lamblia (G. lamblia) infection in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and dyspepsia and to establish which is the most accurate test to diagnose the infection in this setting. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-seven patients who consecutively attended the Outpatient Gastroenterology Clinic for the first time between January 2002 and December 2003 due to symptoms of IBS and/or dyspepsia were recruited. All patients underwent clinical evaluation, first-step haematology and chemistry tests, serologic assays for celiac disease, lactose-H2 breath test, abdominal ultrasonography, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Helicobacter pylori status was evaluated. In patients with symptoms of IBS older than 45 years, colonoscopy was also performed. In all patients, duodenal biopsies and stool samples were examined for trophozoites and cysts of G. lamblia by several methods. RESULTS: G. lamblia was identified in 9 patients. The following diagnoses were also made: IBS (100/137, 73%), functional dyspepsia (62/137, 45%), organic dyspepsia (33/137, 24%), and lactose intolerance (75/137, 55%). A significant association was found between giardiasis and H pylori infection (χ2 = 6.632, OR = 12.4, CI = 1.5-68.1). There were no symptoms that reliably allowed the recognition of giardiasis. Direct search of the parasite in duodenal biopsy and stool sample examinations gave concordant results in all cases while histological examination of duodenal biopsies displayed a low sensitivity (e.g., 22.2%). CONCLUSION: In this consecutive series, diagnosis of G. lamblia infection accounted for 6.5% of patients with IBS and dyspepsia. Duodenal biopsies for diagnosis of giardiasis may be unnecessary if stool sample examination is performed. PMID:16610003

  9. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishna; Higgins, Peter D R

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for the U.S. health care system and frequently complicates the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients with IBD are more likely to be colonized with C. difficile and develop active infection than the general population. They are also more likely to have severe CDI and develop subsequent complications such as IBD flare, colectomy, or death. Even after successful initial treatment and recovery, recurrent CDI is common. Management of CDI in IBD is fraught with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges because the clinical presentations of CDI and IBD flare have considerable overlap. Fecal microbiota transplantation can be successful in curing recurrent CDI when other treatments have failed, but may also trigger IBD flare and this warrants caution. New experimental treatments including vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile offer promise but are not yet available for clinicians. A better understanding of the complex relationship between the gut microbiota, CDI, and IBD is needed. PMID:27120571

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease: an immunity-mediated condition triggered by bacterial infection with Helicobacter hepaticus.

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, R J; Foltz, C J; Fox, J G; Dangler, C A; Powrie, F; Schauer, D B

    1997-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is thought to result from either an abnormal immunological response to enteric flora or a normal immunological response to a specific pathogen. No study to date has combined both factors. The present studies were carried out with an immunologically manipulated mouse model of IBD. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mutation develop IBD with adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells expressing high levels of CD45RB (CD45RB(high) CD4+ T cells). These mice do not develop IBD in germfree conditions, implicating undefined intestinal flora in the pathogenesis of lesions. In controlled duplicate studies, the influence of a single murine pathogen, Helicobacter hepaticus, in combination with the abnormal immunological response on the development of IBD was assessed. The combination of H. hepaticus infection and CD45RB(high) CD4+ T-cell reconstitution resulted in severe disease expression similar to that observed in human IBD. This study demonstrates that IBD develops in mice as a consequence of an abnormal immune response in the presence of a single murine pathogen, H. hepaticus. The interaction of host immunity and a single pathogen in this murine system provides a novel model of human IBD, an immunity-mediated condition triggered by bacterial infection. PMID:9234764

  11. Lactase persistence, NOD2 status and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection associations to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), which includes both Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is caused by a complex interplay involving genetic predisposition, environmental factors and an infectious agent. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is a promising pathogen candidate since it produces a chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in ruminants that resembles CD in humans. MAP is a ubiquitous microorganism, although its presence in the food chain, especially in milk from infected animals, is what made us think that there could be an association between lactase persistence (LP) and IBD. The LCT mutation has brought adaptation to dairy farming which in turn would have increased exposure of the population to infection by MAP. NOD2 gene mutations are highly associated to CD. Methods In our study, CD and UC patients and controls from the North of Spain were genotyped for the lactase gene (LCT) and for three NOD-2 variants, R702W, G908R and Cins1007fs. MAP PCR was carried out in order to assess MAP infection status and these results were correlated with LCT and NOD2 genotypes. Results As for LP, no association was found with IBD, although UC patients were less likely to present the T/T−13910 variant compared to controls, showing a higher C-allele frequency and a tendency to lactase non-persistence (LNP). NOD2 mutations were associated to CD being the per-allele risk higher for the Cins1007fs variant. MAP infection was more extended among the healthy controls (45.2%) compared to CD patients (21.38%) and UC patients (19.04%) and this was attributed to therapy. The Asturian CD cohort presented higher levels of MAP prevalence (38.6%) compared to the Basque CD cohort (15.5%), differences also attributed to therapy. No interaction was found between MAP infection and LCT or NOD2 status. Conclusions We conclude that LP is not significantly associated with IBD, but that MAP infection and NOD2 do show not mutually interacting associations

  12. Perforation of the bowel due to cytomegalovirus infection in a man with AIDS: surgery is not always necessary!

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, Katie Tharshana; Morgan, Andrew Roger; Yoganathan, Kathir G

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common viral opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients and is a rare cause of bowel perforation. It invariably requires surgical intervention and is often fatal. We report a 50-year-old Caucasian man with AIDS, presented 3 weeks after developing abdominal pain and distension. He was treated for CMV retinitis in the past. His adherence to antiretroviral therapy was poor. Examination revealed a recurrence of active CMV retinitis. His abdomen was tender and distended. The plain X-ray of the abdomen revealed a double wall sign (Rigler's sign), indicating pneumoperitoneum due to the bowel perforation. The upper endoscopy was normal. His CD4 count was 30 cells/mm(3) He was treated with cidofovir infusion. He made a full recovery, without requiring any form of surgery. However, he died of adult respiratory distress syndrome 14 months later, due to iatrogenic acute pancreatitis. PMID:27440845

  13. Post partum infections: A review for the non-OBGYN

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, E

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of infections in the puerperium (post partum period) is not well understood and remains underestimated because surveillance systems are often limited to the acute care setting. The most common source of persistent fever after delivery is genital tract infection for which diagnosis remains mostly clinical and antibiotic treatment empiric. This review will emphasize surgical site infections (SSIs) and endometritis. Septic thrombo-phlebitis, mastitis, urinary tract infections and rare infections will be covered in less detail. Puerperal sepsis will not be reviewed.

  14. Helicobacter hepaticus infection in mice: Models for understanding lower bowel inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fox, JG; Ge, Z; Whary, MT; Erdman, SE; Horwitz, BH

    2014-01-01

    Pioneering work in the 1990’s first linked a novel microaerobic bacterium, Helicobacter hepaticus, with active chronic hepatitis and IBD in several murine models. Targeted H. hepaticus infection experiments subsequently demonstrated its ability to induce colitis, colorectal cancer, and extra-intestinal diseases in a number of mouse strains with defects in immune function and/or regulation. Helicobacter hepaticus is now widely utilized as a model system to dissect how intestinal microbiota interact with the host to produce both inflammatory and tolerogenic responses. This model has been used to make important advances in understanding factors that regulate both acquired and innate immune response within the intestine. Further, it has been an effective tool to help define the function of regulatory T cells, including their ability to directly inhibit the innate inflammatory response to gut microbiota. The complete genomic sequence of H. hepaticus has advanced the identification of several virulence factors and aided in the elucidation of H. hepaticus pathogenesis. Delineating targets of H. hepaticus virulence factors could facilitate novel approaches to treating microbially induced lower bowel inflammatory diseases. PMID:20944559

  15. Combined therapy for post-irradiation infection

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, T.B.; Madonna, G.S.; Ledney, G.D.; Brook, I.

    1989-01-01

    Increased susceptibility to bacterial infection, probably by translocation from the intestinal flora, can be a lethal complication for 2-3 weeks after exposure to ionizing radiation. Antibiotics alone do not provide adequate therapy for induced infections in neutropenic mice. Because some substances that are derived from bacterial cell walls activate macrophages and stimulate nonspecific resistance to infection, such agents might be used to prevent or treat postirradiation infections. In this study, a cell-wall glycolipid, trehalose dimycolate (TDM), was evaluated together with a third-generation cephalosporin, ceftriaxone, for their separate and combined effects on survival of B6D2F1 female mice that were exposed to the sublethal dose of 7.0 Gy Co radiation and challenged s.c. with lethal doses of Klebsiella pneumoniae. A single injection of TDM inoculated i.p. 1 hr postirradiation increased 30-day survival to 80% after a lethal challenge by K. pneumoniae 4 days later. When the challenge dose of K. pneumoniae was increased to 5000 Ld 50/30 on Day 4, all mice died.

  16. Microbial signatures in post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome – toward patient stratification for improved diagnostics and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jalanka, Jonna; Salonen, Anne; Fuentes, Susana; de Vos, Willem M

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial and heterogeneous disorder estimated to affect over 10% of the Western population. A subset of the patients reports the start of the disease after an episode of gastroenteritis. The alterations in the intestinal microbiota of the post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) patients were recently investigated in a British cohort and shown to differentiate from the healthy controls and resemble that of diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) patients. The altered 27 genus-like groups created a microbial signature, which could be used to objectively stratify patients and healthy controls. In this addendum, we combine the microbiota data derived from the British cohort with that of a recently reported Swedish PI-IBS cohort. Remarkably, robust and reproducible microbiota signatures were observed in these PI-IBS patients. We discuss these results with attention on the emerging role of microbiota in the classification, development and treatment of PI-IBS. PMID:26512631

  17. The prevalence and risk factors of cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease in Wuhan, Central China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not clear and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is often associated with IBD patients. The etiologic link between IBD and CMV infection needs to be studied. The objective of the present study is to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CMV in a cohort of IBD patients from Central China. Methods Two hundred and twenty six IBD patients (189 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 37 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD)), and 290 age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited. CMV DNA was detected by nested PCR, while serum anti-CMV IgG and anti-CMV IgM was determined by ELISAs. Colonoscopy/enteroscopy with biopsy of diseased tissues and subsequent H&E stain were then conducted in IBD patients with positive anti-CMV IgM. Finally, we analyzed the prevalence and clinical risk factors of CMV infection in IBD patients. Results The prevalence of CMV DNA and anti-CMV IgG positive rate in IBD patients were 84.07% and 76.11%, respectively, higher than those in healthy controls (59.66% and 50.69%, respectively, P < 0.05), However, anti-CMV IgM positive rate was no different with healthy controls (1.77% vs 0.34%, P = 0.235). In univariate analysis of risk factors, the recent use of corticosteroid was associated with increase of CMV DNA and IgM positive rate in UC (P = 0.035 and P = 0.015, respectively), aminosalicylic acid drug therapy was correlated with positivity of CMV DNA and IgG in UC and CMV DNA in CD (P = 0.041, P < 0.001 and P = 0.014, respectively), the treatment of immunosuppresent was correlated with CMV IgM (P < 0.001). Furthermore, patients with severe UC were significantly associated with CMV DNA and IgM (P = 0.048 and P = 0.031, respectively). Malnutrition (albumin < 35 G/L) was also found to be related with CMV recent infection (P = 0.031). In multivariate analysis of risk factors in UC, pancolitis was significantly associated with CMV DNA positivity

  18. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Gastrointestinal Parasite Infection in a Developing Nation Environment

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Douglas R.; Benshoff, Matthew; Cáceres, Mercedes; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Cortes, Loreto; Martin, Christopher F.; Schmulson, Max; Peña, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    Postinfectious IBS is defined in the industrialized world as IBS onset following a sentinel gastrointestinal infection. In developing nations, where repeated bacterial and parasitic gastrointestinal infections are common, the IBS pathophysiology may be altered. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between intestinal parasite infection and IBS in the “nonsterile” developing world environment. IBS subjects were identified from a population-based sample of 1624 participants using the Rome II Modular Questionnaire. Stool samples from cases and randomly selected controls were examined for ova and parasites. Logistic regression models explored the relationship between IBS and parasite infection. The overall IBS prevalence among participants was 13.2% (9.3% males, 15.9% females). There was no difference in parasite carriage between IBS cases and controls, 16.6% versus 15.4% (P = 0.78), nor among IBS subtypes. The pathophysiology of post-infectious IBS may be altered in the developing world as compared to industrialized nations and warrants investigation. PMID:22474433

  19. Tinidazole in the prophylaxis of post-appendicectomy infections.

    PubMed

    Salo, J; Silvennoinen, E; Hulkko, A; Ervasti, E; Holopainen, O

    1981-01-01

    A total of 223 consecutive suspected appendicitis patients were treated preoperatively with parenteral tinidazole or physiological saline (control group). An infusion of 500 mg tinidazole was given to 110 patients over 30 minutes beginning about 30 minutes before the start of the operation, the control group comprised 111 patients. Postoperative infections were diagnosed in three patients in the group receiving tinidazole (3%) and in 17 patients in the control group (15%). The difference was statistically significant. There were no side-effects due to the drugs. Tinidazole appears to be well suited to the prophylaxis of post-appendicectomy infections. PMID:7032413

  20. Bowel retraining

    MedlinePlus

    ... be used by people to help improve their bowel movements. Conditions that it may help include: Fecal incontinence ... includes several steps to help you have regular bowel movements. Most people are able to have regular bowel ...

  1. Lack of Association Found between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Multicenter Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Feng; Xiong, Man; Ma, Zonghui; Huang, Senxiong; Li, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) is still controversial. Here we performed a retrospective study to explore this issue. Methods. A total of 502 inpatients with Rome III confirmed IBS-D and known H. pylori status from 8 hospitals were enrolled. H. pylori-positive patients, hospitalized in the recent year, were followed up to evaluate the effects of H. pylori eradication on IBS-D clinical course. Results. Of the 502 IBS-D patients, 206 were H. pylori-positive, with an infection rate that has no significant difference with that of the general population in Guangdong province (p = 0.348). For patients followed up, no significant differences were noted as to overall symptoms (p = 0.562), abdominal pain/discomfort (p = 0.777), bloating (p = 0.736), stool frequency (p = 0.835), or stool characteristics (p = 0.928) between the H. pylori-eradicated group and the control group. The results were the same in long-term follow-up patients except the improvement of bloating, which showed that the bloating score in the H. pylori-eradicated group was significantly lower (p = 0.047). Conclusions. No significant correlation between H. pylori infection and IBS-D was noted. Overall, IBS-D patients may not benefit from H. pylori eradication. PMID:27493660

  2. Association Between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Jay; Dave, Maneesh; Higgins, Peter D.R.; Kao, John Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic data suggest a protective effect of Helicobacter pylori infection against the development of autoimmune disease. Laboratory data illustrate H. pylori's ability to induce immune tolerance and limit inflammatory responses. Numerous observational studies have investigated the association between H. pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our aim was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of this association. Methods Medline, EMBASE, bibliographies, and meeting abstracts were searched by 2 independent reviewers. Of 369 abstracts reviewed, 30 promising articles were reviewed in detail. Twenty-three studies met our inclusion criteria (subject N = 5903). Metaanalysis was performed with the metan command in Stata 10.1. Results Overall, 27.1% of IBD patients had evidence of infection with H. pylori compared to 40.9% of patients in the control group. The estimated relative risk of H. pylori infection in IBD patients was 0.64 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.54–0.75). There was significant heterogeneity in the included studies that could not be accounted for by the method of IBD and H. pylori diagnosis, study location, or study population age. Conclusions These results suggest a protective benefit of H. pylori infection against the development of IBD. Heterogeneity among studies and the possibility of publication bias limit the certainty of this finding. Further studies investigating the effect of eradication of H. pylori on the development of IBD are warranted. Because environmental hygiene and intestinal microbiota may be strong confounders, further mechanistic studies in H. pylori mouse models are also necessary to further define the mechanism of this negative association. PMID:19760778

  3. Modulation of inflammatory bowel disease in a mouse model following infection with Trichinella spiralis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of mice with Trichinella spiralis redirects the mucosal immune system from a Th1 to a protective Th2 response with a reduction in the severity of trinitrobenzesulfonic acid-induced colonic damage. T. spiralis infection induced IL-10 production in a dose-dependent manner in oxazolone (OXZ)-...

  4. Herbal prescription Chang'an II repairs intestinal mucosal barrier in rats with post-inflammation irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-yun; Su, Min; Zheng, Yong-qiu; Wang, Xiao-ge; Kang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Zhu, En-lin; Bian, Zhao-xiang; Tang, Xu-dong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The herbal prescription Chang'an II is derived from a classical TCM formula Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang for the treatment of liver-qi stagnation and spleen deficiency syndrome of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study we investigated the effects of Chang'an II on the intestinal mucosal immune barrier in a rat post-inflammation IBS (PI-IBS) model. Methods: A rat model of PI-IBS was established using a multi-stimulation paradigm including early postnatal sibling deprivation, bondage and intrarectal administration of TNBS. Four weeks after TNBS administration, the rats were treated with Chang'an II (2.85, 5.71 and 11.42 g·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 14 d. Intestinal sensitivity was assessed based on the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores and fecal water content. Open field test and two-bottle sucrose intake test were used to evaluate the behavioral changes. CD4+ and CD8+ cells were counted and IL-1β and IL-4 levels were measured in intestinal mucosa. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate ultrastructural changes of the intestinal mucosal barrier. Results: PI-IBS model rats showed significantly increased AWR reactivity and fecal water content, and decreased locomotor activity and sucrose intake. Chang'an II treatment not only reduced AWR reactivity and fecal water content, but also suppressed the anxiety and depressive behaviors. Ultrastructural study revealed that the gut mucosal barrier function was severely damaged in PI-IBS model rats, whereas Chang'an II treatment relieved intestinal mucosal inflammation and repaired the gut mucosal barrier. Furthermore, PI-IBS model rats showed a significantly reduced CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in lamina propria and submucosa, and increased IL-1β and reduced IL-4 expression in intestinal mucosa, whereas Chang'an II treatment reversed PI-IBS-induced changes in CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio and expression of IL-1β and IL-4. Conclusion: Chang'an II treatment protects the intestinal mucosa against PI-IBS through anti

  5. Human infection by acanthocephalan parasites belonging to the genus Corynosoma found from small bowel endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoki; Waga, Eriko; Kitaoka, Keisuke; Imagawa, Takayuki; Komatsu, Yuuya; Takanashi, Kunihiro; Anbo, Fumie; Anbo, Tomonori; Katuki, Shinichi; Ichihara, Shin; Fujimori, Shunji; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Katahira, Hirotaka

    2016-10-01

    A 73-year-old man with a suspected ileus in January 2013 and subsequently suffered melena in February 2014 was endoscopically examined. As a result of the examinations, unidentified species of Corynosoma sp. and Corynosoma villosum were recovered from the small intestine, further endoscopic diagnosis suggested relevance between abdominal pain and the present infections in the small intestine. The recovered worms were composed of gravid females with developed eggs, suggesting that these parasites can survive for a long time in the intestine after infection. In this case, the short interval between infections appears to be due to the individual's eating habits which consist of regularly consuming uncooked seafood. PMID:27396515

  6. Quality of Life after Post-Prostatectomy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Pelvic Nodal Irradiation Is Not Associated with Worse Bladder, Bowel, or Sexual Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Melotek, James M.; Liao, Chuanhong; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited data exist regarding toxicity and quality of life (QOL) after post-prostatectomy intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and whether pelvic nodal RT influences these outcomes. Methods 118 men were treated with curative-intent RT after radical prostatectomy. 69 men (58%) received pelvic nodal RT. QOL data and physician-assigned toxicity were prospectively collected. Changes in QOL from baseline were assessed with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and risk factors associated with each domain were identified with generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Late freedom from (FF) toxicity was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and comparisons were tested using the log-rank test. Results Urinary irritation/obstruction, bowel, and sexual domain scores declined at 2 months (all P ≤ 0.01) but were no different than baseline at subsequent visits through 4 years of follow-up. At 4 years, FF grade 2+ GI toxicity was 90% and FF grade 2+ GU toxicity was 89%. On GEE analysis, pelvic nodal RT was associated with decreased bowel function (P = 0.09) and sexual function (P = 0.01). On multivariate analysis, however, there was no significant association with either decreased bowel (P = 0.31) or sexual (P = 0.84) function. There was also no association with either FF grade 2+ GI toxicity (P = 0.24) or grade 2+ GU toxicity (P = 0.51). Conclusions Receipt of pelvic nodal RT was not associated with inferior QOL or toxicity compared to prostate bed alone RT. For the entire cohort, RT was associated with only temporary declines in patient-reported urinary, bowel, or sexual QOL. PMID:26512986

  7. Autonomic hyper-vigilance in post-infective fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yumiko; Cooper, Gavin; Burton, Alexander R; Lemon, Jim; Schall, Ulrich; Lloyd, Andrew; Vollmer-Conna, Ute

    2010-09-01

    This study examined whether post-infective fatigue syndrome (PIFS) is associated with a disturbance in bidirectional autonomic signalling resulting in heightened perception of symptoms and sensations from the body in conjunction with autonomic hyper-reactivity to perceived challenges. We studied 23 patients with PIFS and 25 healthy matched control subjects. A heartbeat discrimination task and a pressure pain threshold test were used to assess interoceptive sensitivity. Cardiac response was assessed over a 4-min Stroop task. PIFS was associated with higher accuracy in heartbeat discrimination and a lower pressure pain threshold. Increased interoceptive sensitivity correlated strongly with current symptoms and potentiated differences in the cardiac response to the Stroop task, which in PIFS was characterized by insensitivity to task difficulty and lack of habituation. Our results provide the first evidence of heightened interoceptive sensitivity in PIFS. Together with the distinct pattern in cardiac responsivity these findings present a picture of physiological hyper-vigilance and response inflexibility. PMID:20678991

  8. [Two Cases of Overwhelming Post-Splenectomy Infection].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yutaro; Izumi, Kazuyoshi; Kawanishi, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    In this report, we describe two cases of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI). The first case was in a 70-year-old man who received a splenectomy in 2012 due to pancytopenia induced by hepatic cirrhosis. He presented with fever and fatigue. A blood test and abdominal ultrasonography were performed. However, these examinations did not indicate any abnormal findings. He unexpectedly suffered from septic shock and acute renal failure the following day. Treatment consisted of mechanical ventilation, broad-spectrum antibiotics and continuous hemodiafiltration. Despite intensive treatment, he died 3 days after the initial visit. The second case was in a 55-year-old man with end-stage renal failure who started hemodialysis in 2004 and received a splenectomy in 2005 because of splenic artery aneurysm rupture. He presented with headache and nausea. A blood test indicated bacterial infection. We suspected OPSI and treated him with broad-spectrum antibiotics, continuous hemodiafiltration and mechanical ventilation. Despite treatment, his general condition gradually deteriorated, and he died 15 days after the initial visit. In view of the high mortality rate, prevention through vaccination and provision of proper information regarding OPSI is important. PMID:27320116

  9. Bowel incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Uncontrollable passage of feces; Loss of bowel control; Fecal incontinence; Incontinence - bowel ... and weaken, leading to diarrhea and stool leakage. Fecal impaction . It is usually caused by chronic constipation. ...

  10. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  11. Association between tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors and risk of serious infections in people with inflammatory bowel disease: nationwide Danish cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Björn; Friis-Møller, Nina; Andersson, Mikael; Jess, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether people with inflammatory bowel disease treated with tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors are at increased risk of serious infections. Design Nationwide register based propensity score matched cohort study. Setting Denmark, 2002-12. Participants The background cohort eligible for matching comprised 52 392 people with inflammatory bowel disease, aged 15 to 75 years, of whom 4300 were treated with TNF-α inhibitors. To limit confounding, a two stage matching method was applied; firstly matching on age, sex, disease duration, and inflammatory bowel disease subtype, and secondly matching on propensity scores (1:1 ratio); this yielded 1543 people treated with TNF-α inhibitors and 1543 untreated to be included in the analyses. Main outcome measures The main outcome was any serious infection, defined as a diagnosis of infection associated with hospital admission. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for two risk periods (90 and 365 days after the start of TNF-α inhibitor treatment). Hazard ratios of site specific serious infections were obtained solely for the 365 days risk period. Results Within the 90 days risk period, 51 cases of infection were observed in users of TNF-α inhibitors (incidence rate 14/100 person years), compared with 33 cases in non-users (9/100 person years), yielding a hazard ratio of 1.63 (95% confidence interval 1.01 to 2.63). Within the risk period of 365 days, the hazard ratio was 1.27 (0.92 to 1.75). In analyses of site specific infections, the hazard ratio was above 2 for several of the subgroups but only reached statistical significance for skin and soft tissue infections (2.51, 1.23 to 5.12). Conclusions This nationwide propensity score matched cohort study suggests an increased risk of serious infections associated with use of TNF-α inhibitors within the first 90 days of starting treatment and a subsequent decline in risk. This calls for increased clinical awareness of potential

  12. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection in inflammatory bowel disease: Need for mucosal viral load measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Racca, Francesca; Paolucci, Stefania; Campanini, Giulia; Pozzi, Lodovica; Betti, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the best diagnostic technique and risk factors of the human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A cohort of 40 IBD patients (17 refractory) and 40 controls underwent peripheral blood and endoscopic colonic mucosal sample harvest. Viral infection was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and correlations with clinical and endoscopic indexes of activity, and risk factors were investigated. RESULTS: All refractory patients carried detectable levels of HCMV and/or EBV mucosal load as compared to 13/23 (56.5%) non-refractory and 13/40 (32.5%) controls. The median DNA value was significantly higher in refractory (HCMV 286 and EBV 5.440 copies/105 cells) than in non-refractory (HCMV 0 and EBV 6 copies/105 cells; P < 0.05 and < 0.001) IBD patients and controls (HCMV and EBV 0 copies/105 cells; P < 0.001 for both). Refractory patients showed DNA peak values ≥ 103 copies/105 cells in diseased mucosa in comparison to non-diseased mucosa (P < 0.0121 for HCMV and < 0.0004 for EBV), while non-refractory patients and controls invariably displayed levels below this threshold, thus allowing us to differentiate viral colitis from mucosal infection. Moreover, the mucosal load positively correlated with the values found in the peripheral blood, whilst no correlation with the number of positive cells at immunohistochemistry was found. Steroid use was identified as a significant risk factor for both HCMV (P = 0.018) and EBV (P = 0.002) colitis. Finally, a course of specific antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was successful in all refractory patients with HCMV colitis, whilst refractory patients with EBV colitis did not show any improvement despite steroid tapering and discontinuation of the other medications. CONCLUSION: Viral colitis appeared to contribute to mucosal lesions in refractory IBD, and its correct diagnosis and management require

  13. Diagnosis of early infection and post chemotherapeutic treatment by copro-DNA detection in experimental opisthorchiasis.

    PubMed

    Duenngai, Kunyarat; Boonmars, Thidarut; Sithithaworn, Jiraporn; Sithithaworn, Paiboon

    2013-01-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini is considered as a carcinogenic parasite which is responsible for cholangiocarcinoma in Southeast Asia. Effective treatment and control of the parasite to reduce the risk of cancer requires efficient diagnostic methods. Because of the limitations involved in human studies, the present work is aimed at comparing diagnostic performance of copro-DNA detection by PCR and fecal examination by formalin-ethyl acetate concentration technique (FECT) during the course of O. viverrini infection and postcurative chemotherapy in experimentally infected hamsters. A manual method of DNA preparation from fecal specimens previously established in human studies was used in PCR analysis. Following infection with varying doses of metacercariae (5, 10, 25, and 50 cysts/animal), PCR analyses were positive as early as 3 weeks post-infection while FECT were negative. PCR tests were comparable to FECT regardless of intensity of infection beginning from 4 to 12 weeks post infection. In chemotherapeutic experiments, with reference to the presence of worm in liver, treatment failures were detected by PCR but not FECT in a group of hamsters infected with 10 cysts/animal. PCR and FECT both detected residual infection at 1 and 2 weeks post-treatment in the group of animals infected with five cysts per animal. High concordant results between diagnoses by PCR, FECT, and worm burden indicated that PCR is suitable for an early diagnosis, evaluation of drug efficacy, and also re-infection post-treatment. PMID:23052766

  14. Pandemic and post-pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) infection in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a vast amount of information published regarding the impact of 2009 pandemic Influenza A (pH1N1) virus infection. However, a comparison of risk factors and outcome during the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period has not been described. Methods A prospective, observational, multi-center study was carried out to evaluate the clinical characteristics and demographics of patients with positive RT-PCR for H1N1 admitted to 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs). Data were obtained from the 2009 pandemic and compared to the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period. Results Nine hundred and ninety-seven patients with confirmed An/H1N1 infection were included. Six hundred and forty-eight patients affected by 2009 (pH1N1) virus infection and 349 patients affected by the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period were analyzed. Patients during the post-pandemic period were older, had more chronic comorbid conditions and presented with higher severity scores (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)) on ICU admission. Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period received empiric antiviral treatment less frequently and with delayed administration. Mortality was significantly higher in the post-pandemic period. Multivariate analysis confirmed that haematological disease, invasive mechanical ventilation and continuous renal replacement therapy were factors independently associated with worse outcome in the two periods. HIV was the only new variable independently associated with higher ICU mortality during the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period. Conclusion Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period had an unexpectedly higher mortality rate and showed a trend towards affecting a more vulnerable population, in keeping with more typical seasonal viral infection. PMID:22126648

  15. Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gore, Richard M; Silvers, Robert I; Thakrar, Kiran H; Wenzke, Daniel R; Mehta, Uday K; Newmark, Geraldine M; Berlin, Jonathan W

    2015-11-01

    Small bowel obstruction and large bowel obstruction account for approximately 20% of cases of acute abdominal surgical conditions. The role of the radiologist is to answer several key questions: Is obstruction present? What is the level of the obstruction? What is the cause of the obstruction? What is the severity of the obstruction? Is the obstruction simple or closed loop? Is strangulation, ischemia, or perforation present? In this presentation, the radiologic approach to and imaging findings of patients with known or suspected bowel obstruction are presented. PMID:26526435

  16. Mechanisms of Immunity in Post-Exposure Vaccination against Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bradfute, Steven B.; Anthony, Scott M.; Stuthman, Kelly S.; Ayithan, Natarajan; Tailor, Prafullakumar; Shaia, Carl I.; Bray, Mike; Ozato, Keiko; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever that is characterized by rapid viral replication, coagulopathy, inflammation, and high lethality rates. Although there is no clinically proven vaccine or treatment for Ebola virus infection, a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine is effective in mice, guinea pigs, and non-human primates when given pre-infection. In this work, we report that VLPs protect Ebola virus-infected mice when given 24 hours post-infection. Analysis of cytokine expression in serum revealed a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in mice given VLPs post-exposure compared to infected, untreated mice. Using knockout mice, we show that VLP-mediated post-exposure protection requires perforin, B cells, macrophages, conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), and either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Protection was Ebola virus-specific, as marburgvirus VLPs did not protect Ebola virus-infected mice. Increased antibody production in VLP-treated mice correlated with protection, and macrophages were required for this increased production. However, NK cells, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha were not required for post-exposure-mediated protection. These data suggest that a non-replicating Ebola virus vaccine can provide post-exposure protection and that the mechanisms of immune protection in this setting require both increased antibody production and generation of cytotoxic T cells. PMID:25785602

  17. Mechanisms of immunity in post-exposure vaccination against Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bradfute, Steven B; Anthony, Scott M; Stuthman, Kelly S; Ayithan, Natarajan; Tailor, Prafullakumar; Shaia, Carl I; Bray, Mike; Ozato, Keiko; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever that is characterized by rapid viral replication, coagulopathy, inflammation, and high lethality rates. Although there is no clinically proven vaccine or treatment for Ebola virus infection, a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine is effective in mice, guinea pigs, and non-human primates when given pre-infection. In this work, we report that VLPs protect Ebola virus-infected mice when given 24 hours post-infection. Analysis of cytokine expression in serum revealed a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in mice given VLPs post-exposure compared to infected, untreated mice. Using knockout mice, we show that VLP-mediated post-exposure protection requires perforin, B cells, macrophages, conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), and either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Protection was Ebola virus-specific, as marburgvirus VLPs did not protect Ebola virus-infected mice. Increased antibody production in VLP-treated mice correlated with protection, and macrophages were required for this increased production. However, NK cells, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha were not required for post-exposure-mediated protection. These data suggest that a non-replicating Ebola virus vaccine can provide post-exposure protection and that the mechanisms of immune protection in this setting require both increased antibody production and generation of cytotoxic T cells. PMID:25785602

  18. Bowel Movement

    MedlinePlus

    A bowel movement is the last stop in the movement of food through your digestive tract. Your stool passes out ... rectum and anus. Another name for stool is feces. It is made of what is left after ...

  19. Infection post-total knee replacement: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Alijanipour, Pouya; Parvizi, Javad

    2014-06-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection is a hot topic for investigation because it represents a challenging clinical problem with considerable burden for patients, institutions, and health systems. Despite our substantial knowledge, many details in prevention, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious complications following total knee arthroplasty remain to be controversial with the available evidence being insufficient and at times conflictive. This manuscript is an attempt to approach the most recently published literature regarding the aforementioned details and aims to provide the reader with an updated perspective in the management of periprosthetic joint infection of the knee. PMID:24706155

  20. [Parasitosis and irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Catalina; Herrera, Valentina; Pérez de Arce, Edith; Gil, Luis Carlos; Madrid, Ana María; Valenzuela, Lucía; Beltrán, Caroll J

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract characterised by multi-factorial aetiology. In IBS physiopathology are involved diverse factors between them biological, psychosocial, and environmental components which affect the immune activation status of gut mucosa. Among these factors is recognized the intestinal parasitosis. Post-infection IBS (PI-IBS) is recognised as a subgroup of functional disorders whose symptoms onset appear after a symptomatic intestinal infection caused by microbial agents. There are few studies regarding of relationship between IBS and intestinal parasitosis in Chile. However, is has been well described a positive association between IBS and Blastocystis hominis infections, one of prevalent parasites in Chile. In other countries, is also described a relationship between IBS and amebiasis and giardiasis. Both, characterized by a common mode of transmission through water as well as contaminated food. Because the high prevalence of parasitosis in our country it is necessary to expand the association studies to clarify the strength of the parasites ethiology in IBS. PMID:27598274

  1. Case 7: highly infected post-surgical wound.

    PubMed

    von Hallern, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Following treatment with antibiotics and surgical incision, which resulted in the release of putrid exudate, the wound was rinsed thoroughly with octenisept and covered with an antimicrobial dressing. This regimen successfully eradicated the infection, with full healing occurring in 6 weeks. PMID:26949851

  2. Post-infectious glomerulonephritis following infective endocarditis: Amenable to immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Mantan, M.; Sethi, G. R.; Batra, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis develops in about 20% patients with infective endocarditis (IE), but is mostly asymptomatic. Heavy proteinuria or derangement of kidney functions is uncommon. We report here a child with IE and proliferative glomerulonephritis who manifested as significant proteinuria that recovered on treatment with immunosupressants. PMID:24049276

  3. Muscle strength, endurance and recovery in the post-infection fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, A R; Hales, J P; Gandevia, S C

    1988-01-01

    A test of muscle strength and "fatiguability" was administered to 20 normal subjects and 20 patients suffering from post-infection fatigue syndrome. Maximal isometric torque for the elbow flexors was measured before, during and after an endurance sequence of 18 maximal static contractions (10 s duration, 10 s rest interval). The maximal isometric strength was not significantly different between the patient and control groups. The relative torque produced at the end of the series of 18 static contractions did not differ significantly between patients and normal subjects. In the patients with post-infection fatigue syndrome there was impairment of the recovery of peak torque at 10 minutes after the endurance sequence (p less than 0.02). The prominent subjective complaint of muscle fatigue in patients with post-infection fatigue syndrome contrasts with the relatively normal behaviour of their muscles during a controlled test of fatigue. The syndrome may include a disordered perception of achieved force and exertion. PMID:2852211

  4. Potential Vaccines and Post-Exposure Treatments for Filovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Brian M.; Trefry, John C.; Biggins, Julia E.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Honko, Anna N.; Smith, Darci R.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2012-01-01

    Viruses of the family Filoviridae represent significant health risks as emerging infectious diseases as well as potentially engineered biothreats. While many research efforts have been published offering possibilities toward the mitigation of filoviral infection, there remain no sanctioned therapeutic or vaccine strategies. Current progress in the development of filovirus therapeutics and vaccines is outlined herein with respect to their current level of testing, evaluation, and proximity toward human implementation, specifically with regard to human clinical trials, nonhuman primate studies, small animal studies, and in vitro development. Contemporary methods of supportive care and previous treatment approaches for human patients are also discussed. PMID:23170176

  5. [Review and guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of post-natal cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Alarcón Allen, A; Baquero-Artigao, F

    2011-01-01

    Postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in the newborn can occur from exposure to maternal cervical secretions during birth, ingestion of breast milk, transfusion of blood products or transmission by body fluids of infected people. Breast milk is the main source of infection, given the high rate of CMV-positive mothers excreting CMV in milk. Freezing reduces the risk of CMV transmission by breastfeeding, although it does not eliminate it completely. Pasteurisation prevents such transmission, but it can alter the immunological properties of breast milk. Postnatal CMV infection is usually asymptomatic, as it normally results from viral reactivation in the mother, and the neonate is born with protective antibodies. However, in the very low birth weight premature infant the amount of transferred antibodies is smaller and a symptomatic infection can occur. Symptomatic post-natal CMV infection in the newborn typically causes hepatitis, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia or sepsis-like syndrome. Pneumonitis and enteritis are less common, but very characteristic. Diagnosis is based on urine virus detection at the time of onset of symptoms. Postnatal CMV infection in the newborn generally resolves spontaneously without antiviral treatment. Ganciclovir should be reserved for severe cases. Unlike congenital CMV disease, post-natal CMV infection in the preterm infant does not seem to be associated with hearing loss or abnormal neuro-development in long term follow-up. PMID:20630814

  6. Latent tuberculosis screening tests and active tuberculosis infection rates in Turkish inflammatory bowel disease patients under anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Çekiç, Cem; Aslan, Fatih; Vatansever, Sezgin; Topal, Firdevs; Yüksel, Elif Sarıtaş; Alper, Emrah; Dallı, Ayşe; Ünsal, Belkıs

    2015-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors increase the risk of tuberculosis (TB). The objective of the present study was to determine the rate of active TB infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients receiving anti-TNF therapy and to determine the results of their latent TB infection (LTBI) screening tests during the follow up. Methods This is a retrospective observational study of IBD patients receiving anti-TNF therapy. Tuberculin skin test (TST), interferon-γ release assay (IGRA), and chest radiography were used to determine LTBI. Active TB infection rate during anti-TNF treatment was determined. Results Seventy-six IBD patients (25 with ulcerative colitis, 51 with Crohn’s disease; 53 male; mean age 42.0±12.4 years) were included. Forty-four (57.9%) patients received infliximab and 32 (42.1%) adalimumab. Their median duration of anti-TNF therapy was 15 months. Forty-five (59.2%) patients had LTBI and received isoniazid (INH) prophylaxis. During the follow-up period, active TB was identified in 3 (4.7%) patients who were not receiving INH prophylaxis. There was a moderate concordance between the TST and the IGRA (kappa coefficient 0.44, 95% CI 0.24-0.76). Patients with or without immunosuppressive therapy did not differ significantly with respect to TST (P=0.318) and IGRA (P=0.157). Conclusion IBD patients receiving anti-TNF therapy and prophylactic INH have a decreased risk of developing active TB infection. However, despite LTBI screening, the risk of developing active TB infection persists. PMID:25831138

  7. Impact of pretransplant rifaximin therapy on early post-liver transplant infections.

    PubMed

    Esfeh, Jamak Modaresi; Hanouneh, Ibrahim A; Koval, Christine E; Kovacs, Christopher; Dalal, Deepan S; Ansari-Gilani, Kianoush; Confer, Bradley D; Eghtesad, Bijan; Zein, Nizar N; Menon, K V Narayanan

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections are major causes of morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation (LT). The role of intestinal decontamination in the prevention of post-LT infections is controversial. Rifaximin is widely used for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. The effect of rifaximin on post-LT infections is unknown. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of rifaximin therapy in the pretransplant period on early bacterial infections (EBIs) and fungal infections within the first 30 days after LT. All adult patients who underwent LT at our institution (January 2009 to July 2011) were included in this retrospective cohort study. Patients receiving antibiotics other than pretransplant protocol antibiotics were excluded. Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on the presence or absence of rifaximin therapy for at least 2 days before LT. Infections were defined by the isolation of any bacterial or fungal organisms within 30 days of LT. Multivariate regression analysis, Student t tests, and Pearson's chi-square tests were used to compare the 2 groups. Two hundred sixty-eight patients were included, and 71 of these patients (26.5%) were on rifaximin at the time of LT. The 2 groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, race, and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. There were no significant differences in the rates of EBIs (30% for the non-rifaximin group and 25% for the rifaximin group, P = 0.48) or fungal infections between the 2 groups. There was no increase in antimicrobial resistance among the infecting organisms. There was no difference in survival between the rifaximin and non-rifaximin groups (98% versus 97%, P = 0.36). In conclusion, the use of rifaximin in the pre-LT period was not associated with an increased risk of bacterial or fungal infections in the early post-LT period. PMID:24493238

  8. A rabbit osteomyelitis model for the longitudinal assessment of early post-operative implant infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Implant infection is one of the most severe complications within the field of orthopaedic surgery, associated with an enormous burden for the healthcare system. During the last decades, attempts have been made to lower the incidence of implant-related infections. In the case of cemented prostheses, the use of antibiotic-containing bone cement can be effective. However, in the case of non-cemented prostheses, osteosynthesis and spinal surgery, local antibacterial prophylaxis is not a standard procedure. For the development of implant coatings with antibacterial properties, there is a need for a reliable animal model to evaluate the preventive capacity of such coatings during a specific period of time. Existing animal models generally present a limited follow-up, with a limited number of outcome parameters and relatively large animal numbers in multiple groups. Methods To represent an early post-operative implant infection, we established an acute tibial intramedullary nail infection model in rabbits by contamination of the tibial nail with 3.8 × 105 colony forming units of Staphylococcus aureus. Clinical, haematological and radiological parameters for infection were weekly assessed during a 6-week follow-up with post-mortem bacteriological and histological analyses. Results S. aureus implant infection was confirmed by the above parameters. A saline control group did not develop osteomyelitis. By combining the clinical, haematological, radiological, bacteriological and histological data collected during the experimental follow-up, we were able to differentiate between the control and the infected condition and assess the severity of the infection at sequential timepoints in a parameter-dependent fashion. Conclusion We herein present an acute early post-operative rabbit implant infection model which, in contrast to previously published models, combines improved in-time insight into the development of an implant osteomyelitis with a relatively low

  9. Cytokine Response after Stimulation with Key Commensal Bacteria Differ in Post-Infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome (PI-IBS) Patients Compared to Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Sundin, Johanna; Rangel, Ignacio; Repsilber, Dirk; Brummer, Robert-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background Microbial dysbiosis and prolonged immune activation resulting in low-grade inflammation and intestinal barrier dysfunction have been suggested to be underlying causes of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in cytokine response between mucosal specimens of PI-IBS patients and healthy controls (HC) after ex vivo stimulation with key anaerobic bacteria. Methods Colonic biopsies from 11 PI-IBS patients and 10 HC were stimulated ex vivo with the commensal bacteria Bacteroides ovatus, Ruminococcus gnavus, Akkermansia muciniphila, Subdoligranulum variabile and Eubacterium limosum, respectively. The cytokine release (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, TNF-α and IFN-γ) in stimulation supernatants was analyzed using the LUMINEX assay. Comparison of cytokine release between PI-IBS patients and healthy controls was performed taking both unstimulated and bacterially stimulated mucosal specimens into account. Key Results IL-13 release from mucosal specimens without bacterial stimulation was significantly lower in PI-IBS patients compared to HC (p < 0.05). After stimulation with Subdoligranulum variabile, IL-1β release from PI-IBS patients was significantly increased compared to HC (p < 0.05). Stimulation with Eubacterium limosum resulted in a significantly decreased IL-10 release in HC compared to PI-IBS patients (p < 0.05) and a tendency to decreased IL-13 release in HC compared to PI-IBS patients (p = 0.07). Conclusions & Inferences PI-IBS patients differ from HC with regard to cytokine release ex vivo after stimulation with selected commensal bacteria. Hence, our results support that the pathogenesis of PI-IBS comprises an altered immune response against commensal gut microbes. PMID:26366730

  10. Post Eclosion Age Predicts the Prevalence of Midgut Trypanosome Infections in Glossina

    PubMed Central

    Walshe, Deirdre P.; Lehane, Michael J.; Haines, Lee R.

    2011-01-01

    The teneral phenomenon, as observed in Glossina sp., refers to the increased susceptibility of the fly to trypanosome infection when the first bloodmeal taken is trypanosome-infected. In recent years, the term teneral has gradually become synonymous with unfed, and thus fails to consider the age of the newly emerged fly at the time the first bloodmeal is taken. Furthermore, conflicting evidence exists of the effect of the age of the teneral fly post eclosion when it is given the infected first bloodmeal in determining the infection prevalence. This study demonstrates that it is not the feeding history of the fly but rather the age (hours after eclosion of the fly from the puparium) of the fly when it takes the first (infective) bloodmeal that determines the level of fly susceptibility to trypanosome infection. We examine this phenomenon in male and female flies from two distinct tsetse clades (Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina palpalis palpalis) infected with two salivarian trypanosome species, Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei brucei and Trypanosoma (Nannomonas) congolense using Fisher's exact test to examine differences in infection rates. Teneral tsetse aged less than 24 hours post-eclosion (h.p.e.) are twice as susceptible to trypanosome infection as flies aged 48 h.p.e. This trend is conserved across sex, vector clade and parasite species. The life cycle stage of the parasite fed to the fly (mammalian versus insect form trypanosomes) does not alter this age-related bias in infection. Reducing the numbers of parasites fed to 48 h.p.e., but not to 24 h.p.e. flies, increases teneral refractoriness. The importance of this phenomenon in disease biology in the field as well as the necessity of employing flies of consistent age in laboratory-based infection studies is discussed. PMID:22087240

  11. [Selective bowel decontamination].

    PubMed

    Szántó, Zoltán; Pulay, István; Kotsis, Lajos; Dinka, Tibor

    2006-04-01

    Infective complications play major role in mortality of high risk patients demanding intensive care. Selective Bowel Decontamination prevents endogenous infections by reducing the number of potentially pathogen microbes (aerobic bacteria, fungi) in the oropharynx and gastrointestinal tract, saving anaerobic bacteria. It had been used 20 years ago for the first time. Authors survey it's literature ever since. Selective Bowel Decontamination is performed by the mixture of antibiotics and antimycotic drug, administered orally in hydrogel, and suspension form in nasojejunal tube. The number of Gram negative optional aerobic bacteria and fungi decrease significantly in the gut, and the microbial translocation is following this tendency. Foreign authors achieved good results in acute necrotizing pancreatitis, after liver transplant, in polytrauma, in serious burn and in haematological malignancies. According to the literature Selective Bowel Decontamination shows advantages in selected groups of high risk surgical patients. In some studies the administration took few months, but the minimum time was one week. There was no report of increasing MRSA appearance. Regular bacteriological sampling is highly recommended in order to recognize any new antibiotic resistance in time. PMID:16711371

  12. The Impact of Azathioprine-Associated Lymphopenia on the Onset of Opportunistic Infections in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vögelin, Marius; Biedermann, Luc; Frei, Pascal; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Zeitz, Jonas; Sulz, Michael C.; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Thiopurines are known to cause lymphopenia (<1,500 lymphocytes/μl). As severe lymphopenia (<500C/μl) is associated with opportunistic infections, we investigated severity of thiopurine-related lymphopenia and development of opportunistic infections in our tertiary referral centre. Methods We retrospectively screened medical records of 1,070 IBD patients and identified 100 individuals that developed a total of 161 episodes of lymphopenia during thiopurine treatment between 2002 and 2014. Occurrence of opportunistic infections was documented. A control group consisted of IBD patients receiving thiopurines but without developing lymphopenia. Results Of a total of 161 episodes of lymphopenia, 23% were severe (<500C/μl). In this subgroup, thiopurine dosing was modified in 64% (dosage reduction: 32%, medication discontinued: 32%). We identified 9 cases (5.5%) of opportunistic infections, of which only two occurred during severe lymphopenia. One opportunistic infection (4.5%) was identified in the control group. No association was found between opportunistic infections and severity of lymphopenia. All patients who suffered from opportunistic infections were receiving additional immunosuppressive medication. Conclusion Our patients treated with thiopurines rarely developed severe lymphopenia and opportunistic infections did not occur more often than in the control group. A careful monitoring of lymphocytes and prophylactic adjustment of thiopurine therapy might contribute to this low incidence. PMID:27214202

  13. Post-caesarean section surgical site infections at a Tanzanian tertiary hospital: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    De Nardo, P; Gentilotti, E; Nguhuni, B; Vairo, F; Chaula, Z; Nicastri, E; Nassoro, M M; Bevilacqua, N; Ismail, A; Savoldi, A; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G

    2016-08-01

    Few data are available on the determinants and characteristics of post-caesarean section (CS) surgical site infections (SSIs) in resource-limited settings. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study to evaluate the rates, determinants, and microbiological characteristics of post-CS SSI at the Dodoma Regional Referral Hospital (DRRH) Gynaecology and Obstetrics Department in Tanzania. Spanning a three-month period, all pregnant women who underwent CS were enrolled and followed up for 30 days. SSI following CS occurred in 224 (48%) women. Only 10 (2.1%) women received pre-incision antibiotic prophylaxis. Urgent intervention is needed to prevent and control infections and contain the rising rate of post-CS SSI at the DRRH. PMID:27125664

  14. A review of the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease with a focus on diet, infections and antibiotic exposure.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James D

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic debilitating diseases that occur in populations around the world. The underlying etiology is thought to be multifactorial. There is a well-defined genetic contribution to the diseases, but this does not fully explain the epidemiology. Environmental factors, including the composition of the gut microbiota, are also important. There is wide geographic variability in the incidence and prevalence of IBD. High incidence rates have been observed in the United Kingdom, Northern Europe, Canada, and the United States. Globally, there is evidence of increasing incidence of CD and UC over time. The rising incidence of IBD in Western countries has generally predated that in developing nations, supporting the hypothesis that 'Westernization' of our lifestyle has led to the increased incidence of IBD. Smoking, antibiotic use, and diet are potentially reversible risk factors for IBD. Recommendations to avoid smoking are appropriate for all people, for numerous reasons. Antibiotic use should be limited to appropriate indications, a recommendation that too is appropriate for all populations. Detangling the relationship between diet, the gut microbiome and IBD raises the potential to reduce the incidence of IBD through dietary modification, an approach that might be considered among those at the highest risk. PMID:25227291

  15. Post-harvest proteomics of grapes infected by Penicillium during withering to produce Amarone wine.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Marilinda; Mainente, Federica; Zapparoli, Giacomo; Cecconi, Daniela; Simonato, Barbara

    2016-05-15

    The study of withered grape infection by Penicillium, a potentially toxigenic fungus, is relevant to preserve grape quality during the post-harvest dehydration process. This report describes the first proteomic analysis of Amarone wine grapes, infected by two strains of Penicillium expansum (Pe1) and Penicillium crustosum (Pc4). Protein identification by MS analysis allowed a better understanding of physiological mechanisms underlying the pathogen attack. The Pe1 strain had a major impact on Vitis vinifera protein expression inducing pathogenesis-related proteins and other protein species involved in energy metabolism. A greater expression of new Penicillium proteins involved in energy metabolism and some protein species related to redox homeostasis has been observed on grapes infected by Pc4 strain. Moreover, the new induced proteins in infected grapes could represent potential markers in withered grapes, thus creating the chance to develop case-sensitive prevention strategies to inhibit fungal growth. PMID:26776019

  16. History of Depressive and Anxiety Disorders and Paroxetine Response in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Post Hoc Analysis From a Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David M.; Han, Changsu; Krulewicz, Stan; Pae, Chi-Un; Peindl, Kathleen; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Masand, Prakash S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Although irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is highly comorbid with depressive and anxiety disorders, information on the clinical implications of this comorbidity is limited. We investigated whether a history of depressive and/or anxiety disorders was associated with response to treatment in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release (CR) in IBS. Method: Seventy-two IBS subjects (diagnosed using Rome II criteria) were recruited from August 2003 to November 2005 and randomly assigned to receive flexibly dosed paroxetine CR (dose, 12.5–50 mg/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI-Plus version) was used to ascertain current (exclusionary) or past diagnoses of depressive and anxiety disorders. Subjective depression, anxiety, and stress were assessed at entry and throughout the trial using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Severity of IBS symptoms was determined by the Composite Pain Score (CPS), administered via Interactive Voice Response System, and the Clinical Global Impressions scale (CGI). The primary outcome was treatment response defined as ≥ 25% reduction in CPS from randomization to end of treatment. A post hoc analysis (multivariate logistic regression) was done to evaluate whether a history of depressive and/or anxiety disorder was associated with response to medication. Results: Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics (CPS, BDI, BAI, PSS, CGI scores) were similar between groups (history of depressive/anxiety disorder vs. no history). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, treatment response was not predicted by history of depressive and/or anxiety disorder (OR = 0.58, CI = 0.29 to 1.68, p = .32) or drug status (paroxetine CR vs. placebo) (OR = 1.26, CI = 0.68 to 3.21, p = .19). Drug status was significantly associated with the secondary outcome variable of treatment response

  17. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus administered post-exposure averts the lethal sequelae of respiratory virus infection.

    PubMed

    Percopo, Caroline M; Rice, Tyler A; Brenner, Todd A; Dyer, Kimberly D; Luo, Janice L; Kanakabandi, Kishore; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Domachowske, Joseph B; Keicher, Jesse D; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2015-09-01

    We reported previously that priming of the respiratory tract with immunobiotic Lactobacillus prior to virus challenge protects mice against subsequent lethal infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM). We present here the results of gene microarray which document differential expression of proinflammatory mediators in response to PVM infection alone and those suppressed in response to Lactobacillus plantarum. We also demonstrate for the first time that intranasal inoculation with live or heat-inactivated L. plantarum or Lactobacillus reuteri promotes full survival from PVM infection when administered within 24h after virus challenge. Survival in response to L. plantarum administered after virus challenge is associated with suppression of proinflammatory cytokines, limited virus recovery, and diminished neutrophil recruitment to lung tissue and airways. Utilizing this post-virus challenge protocol, we found that protective responses elicited by L. plantarum at the respiratory tract were distinct from those at the gastrointestinal mucosa, as mice devoid of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10, exhibit survival and inflammatory responses that are indistinguishable from those of their wild-type counterparts. Finally, although L. plantarum interacts specifically with pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and NOD2, the respective gene-deleted mice were fully protected against lethal PVM infection by L. plantarum, as are mice devoid of type I interferon receptors. Taken together, L. plantarum is a versatile and flexible agent that is capable of averting the lethal sequelae of severe respiratory infection both prior to and post-virus challenge via complex and potentially redundant mechanisms. PMID:26145728

  18. Current Concepts in the Management of Unique Post-keratoplasty Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schallhorn, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    As corneal transplantation has evolved, the spectrum of post-surgical infection has changed and often presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Lamellar techniques hold the potential of improved outcomes and decreased post-operative complications, however, they create a lamellar interface, which is a potential space for sequestration of infectious organisms. In addition, while keratoprosthesis offers vision to patients who are poor candidates for traditional keratoplasty, infectious complications can be severe and sight threatening. Although antimicrobials remain the mainstay of treatment, definitive management often requires surgical intervention. PMID:26618075

  19. Living with Bowel Control Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Living with Bowel Control Problems Resources Bowel Control Awareness Campaign Home Resources for Health Care Providers ... Living with Bowel Control Problems Living with Bowel Control Problems Living with a bowel control problem can ...

  20. Wolf's post-herpetic isotopic response: Infections, tumors, and immune disorders arising on the site of healed herpetic infection.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Vincenzo; Ruocco, Eleonora; Brunetti, Giampiero; Russo, Teresa; Gambardella, Alessio; Wolf, Ronni

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV-1/HSV-2) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) have several characteristics in common. Both are epidermoneurotropic, cause skin eruptions accompanied by sensory symptoms (itch, pain), damage peripheral sensory nerve fibers and cutaneous nerve endings, and interfere with neuromediator release, which can alter local mechanisms of immune control. For this reason, herpes-infected areas may become a preferential location for the subsequent onset of immunity-related skin disorders (infections, tumors, and dysimmune reactions), an event first reported by a neurologist and focused on by two brothers, a dermatologist and a pediatrician. The phenomenon therefore named Wolf's post-herpetic isotopic response (PHIR) refers to the occurrence of a new skin disorder at the site of a previous and already healed herpetic eruption (herpes zoster in most cases). Until now, we have been able to gather 189 well-documented cases of PHIR (all reported in the reference section), but our list is far from being complete. Some of the most emblematic cases are briefly described here. In some circumstances, the opposite of PHIR occurs, with diffuse skin disorders or eruptions that selectively spare herpes-infected areas (Wolf's post-herpetic isotopic nonresponse). Experimental investigations with patch testing have been performed in seven patients who were sensitized to nickel and had had herpes zoster in the past years. The tests were carried out bilaterally on the affected dermatomes and on the unaffected contralateral ones. The uneven immune responses we obtained have shown that the immune behavior of an herpes zoster-affected dermatome can be different from that of the corresponding contralateral dermatome, thus supporting the existence of immune dysregulation in herpes-infected areas. PMID:25160097

  1. Viability and infectivity of Ichthyophonus sp. in post-mortem Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, Richard M.; Hart, Lucas M.; Lewandowski, Naomi; Hershberger, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyophonus-infected Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, were allowed to decompose in ambient seawater then serially sampled for 29 days to evaluate parasite viability and infectivity for Pacific staghorn sculpin, Leptocottus armatus. Ichthyophonus sp. was viable in decomposing herring tissues for at least 29 days post-mortem and could be transmitted via ingestion to sculpin for up to 5 days. The parasite underwent morphologic changes during the first 48 hr following death of the host that were similar to those previously reported, but as host tissue decomposition progressed, several previously un-described forms of the parasite were observed. The significance of long-term survival and continued morphologic transformation in the post-mortem host is unknown, but it could represent a saprozoic phase of the parasite life cycle that has survival value for Ichthyophonus sp.

  2. Surgical site infection after caesarean section: space for post-discharge surveillance improvements and reliable comparisons.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Federica; Piselli, Pierluca; Pittalis, Silvia; Ruscitti, Luca E; Cimaglia, Claudia; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Puro, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) after caesarean section (CS) represent a substantial health system concern. Surveying SSI has been associated with a reduction in SSI incidence. We report the findings of three (2008, 2011 and 2013) regional active SSI surveillances after CS in community hospital of the Latium region determining the incidence of SSI. Each CS was surveyed for SSI occurrence by trained staff up to 30 post-operative days, and association of SSI with relevant characteristics was assessed using binomial logistic regression. A total of 3,685 CS were included in the study. A complete 30 day post-operation follow-up was achieved in over 94% of procedures. Overall 145 SSI were observed (3.9% cumulative incidence) of which 131 (90.3%) were superficial and 14 (9.7%) complex (deep or organ/space) SSI; overall 129 SSI (of which 89.9% superficial) were diagnosed post-discharge. Only higher NNIS score was significantly associated with SSI occurrence in the regression analysis. Our work provides the first regional data on CS-associated SSI incidence, highlighting the need for a post-discharge surveillance which should assure 30 days post-operation to not miss data on complex SSI, as well as being less labour intensive. PMID:27196552

  3. The role of biofilm on orthopaedic implants: the "Holy Grail" of post-traumatic infection management?

    PubMed

    Mauffrey, C; Herbert, B; Young, H; Wilson, M L; Hake, M; Stahel, P F

    2016-08-01

    The development of post-traumatic infection is potentially a limb threatening condition. The orthopaedic trauma literature lags behind the research performed by our arthroplasty colleagues on the topic of implant-related infections. Surgical site infections in the setting of a recent ORIF are notoriously hard to eradicate due to biofilm formation around the implant. This bacteria-friendly, dynamic, living pluri-organism structure has the ability to morph and adapt to virtually any environment with the aim to maintain the causative organism alive. The challenges are twofold: establishing an accurate diagnosis with speciation/sensitivity and eradicating the infection. Multiple strategies have been researched to improve diagnostic accuracy, to prevent biofilm formation on orthopaedic implants, to mobilize/detach or weaken the biofilm or to target specifically bacteria embedded in the biofilm. The purpose of our paper is to review the patho-physiology of this mysterious pluri-cellular structure and to summarize some of the most pertinent research performed to improve diagnostic and treatment strategies in biofilm-related infections. PMID:27262848

  4. West Nile virus IgM and IgG antibodies three years post- infection

    PubMed Central

    Papa, A; Anastasiadou, A; Delianidou, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: West Nile virus (WNV) causes to humans a variety of symptoms, from asymptomatic infection to severe neuroinvasive disease. In a previous study, it was shown that WNV IgM antibodies persisted in three of 26 (12%) patients, nine months after onset of the symptoms. The aim of the present study was to test 10 of these patients, three years post-infection for probable persistence of IgM antibodies and to investigate their IgG antibody patterns. Material and Methods: In summer 2013 serum samples were collected from 10 persons who were infected with WNV in 2010; 6 of them had a neuroinvasive disease. The three persons with detectable WNV IgM antibodies, nine months after onset of the symptoms, were included in the study. All samples were tested by ELISA in parallel with their stored paired samples taken in 2011. The positive results were confirmed by neutralization test. Results: WNV IgM antibodies were still detectable in the three persons, while high levels of WNV IgG and neutralizing antibodies were present in nine of the 10 persons, regardless the involvement of the nervous system. Conclusions: WNV IgM antibodies persist for more than three years in 12% of patients with WNV infection, while WNV IgG antibodies persist and even increase their levels, regardless the involvement of the nervous system, suggesting that the immune response in the symptomatic WNV infections is strong and long-lasting. Hippokratia 2015, 19 (1): 34-36. PMID:26435644

  5. Identification and transcriptional profile of multiple genes in the posterior kidney of Nile tilapia at 6h post bacterial infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in response of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to bacterial infection, suppression subtractive cDNA hybridization technique was used to identify upregulated genes in the posterior kidney of Nile tilapia at 6h post infection with Aeromonas hydrophi...

  6. Increased Immunoendocrine Cells in Intestinal Mucosa of Postinfectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients 3 Years after Acute Shigella Infection - An Observation in a Small Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Sun; Lim, Jung Hyun; Lee, Sang In

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Postinfectiously irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) develops in 3-30% of individuals with bacterial gastroenteritis. Recent studies demonstrated increases in inflammatory components in gut mucosa of PI-IBS patients even after complete resolution of infection. We aimed to investigate histological changes in colon and rectum of PI-IBS subjects after long term period of infection. Materials and Methods We recruited PI-IBS subjects who had been diagnosed IBS after complete resolution of enteritis caused by shigellosis outbreak 3 years earlier. We compared unmatched four groups, PI-IBS (n = 4), non PI-IBS (n = 7), D-IBS (n = 7, diarrhea predominant type) and healthy controls (n = 10). All of them underwent colonoscopic biopsy at three areas, including descending colon (DC), sigmoid colon (SC) and rectum, which were assessed for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)/peptide YY (PYY)-containing enterochromaffin (EC) cell, intraepithelial (IEL) and lamina propria T lymphocyte (CD3), CD8 lymphocytes, mast cells and CD68/calprotectin+ macrophages. Results All subjects had no structural or gross abnormalities at colonoscopy. In PI-IBS, 5-HT containing EC cells, PYY containing EC cells, IELs, CD3 lymphocytes, CD8 lymphocytes, mast cells, and CD68 + macrophages were increased compared to control (p < 0.05). In D-IBS, PYY containing EC cells, IELs, and CD3 lymphocytes were increased compared to control (p < 0.05). In PI-IBS, 5-HT containing EC cells tended to increase and PYY containing EC cells, CD8 lymphocytes, mast cells, and CD68+ macrophages were increased compared to non PI-IBS (p < 0.05). Calprotectin + marcrophages were decreased in PI-IBS, non PI-IBS and IBS compared to control. Conclusion The immunoendocrine cells were sporadically increased in PI-IBS, non PI-IBS and D-IBS compared with control. Our findings in a very small number of patients suggest that mucosal inflammation may play a role in long-term PI-IBS, and that other sub-groups of IBS and larger scale studies are

  7. Post Liposuction Mycobacterium Abscessus Surgical Site Infection in a Returned Medical tourist Complicated by a Paradoxical Reaction During Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Siong H.; Noonan, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacterial skin and soft tissue infections are known to complicate cosmetic surgical procedures. Treatment consists of more surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing. Paradoxical reactions occurring during antibiotic therapy can further complicate treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist and occurrence of paradox during treatment. PMID:26753088

  8. Cryptosporidium suis infection in post-weaned and adult pigs in Shaanxi province, northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing; Wang, Xing-Ye; Chen, Jian-Wen; Ding, Ling; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2015-02-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., ubiquitous enteric parasitic protozoa of vertebrates, recently emerged as an important cause of economic loss and zoonosis. The present study aimed to determine the distribution and species of Cryptosporidium in post-weaned and adult pigs in Shaanxi province, northwestern China. A total of 1,337 fresh fecal samples of post-weaned and adult pigs were collected by sterile disposable gloves from 8 areas of Shaanxi province. The samples were examined by Sheather's sugar flotation technique and microscopy at × 400 magnification for Cryptosporidium infection, and the species in positive samples was further identified by PCR amplification of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. A total of 44 fecal samples were successfully amplified by the nested PCR of the partial SSU rRNA, with overall prevalence of 3.3%. The average prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in each pig farms ranged from 0 to 14.4%. Species identification by sequencing of SSU rRNA gene revealed that 42 (3.1%) samples were Cryptosporidium suis and 2 (0.15%) were Cryptosporidium scrofarum. C. suis had the highest prevalence (7.5%) in growers and the lowest in breeding pigs (0.97%). C. suis was the predominant species in pre-weaned and adult pigs, while C. scrofarum infected pigs older than 3 months only. A season-related difference of C. suis was observed in this study, with the highest prevalence in autumn (5.5%) and the lowest (1.7%) in winter. The present study provided basic information for control of Cryptosporidium infection in pigs and assessment of zoonotic transmission of pigs in Shaanxi province, China. PMID:25748718

  9. Cryptosporidium suis Infection in Post-Weaned and Adult Pigs in Shaanxi Province, Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Wang, Xing-Ye; Chen, Jian-Wen; Ding, Ling; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., ubiquitous enteric parasitic protozoa of vertebrates, recently emerged as an important cause of economic loss and zoonosis. The present study aimed to determine the distribution and species of Cryptosporidium in post-weaned and adult pigs in Shaanxi province, northwestern China. A total of 1,337 fresh fecal samples of post-weaned and adult pigs were collected by sterile disposable gloves from 8 areas of Shaanxi province. The samples were examined by Sheather’s sugar flotation technique and microscopy at×400 magnification for Cryptosporidium infection, and the species in positive samples was further identified by PCR amplification of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. A total of 44 fecal samples were successfully amplified by the nested PCR of the partial SSU rRNA, with overall prevalence of 3.3%. The average prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in each pig farms ranged from 0 to 14.4%. Species identification by sequencing of SSU rRNA gene revealed that 42 (3.1%) samples were Cryptosporidium suis and 2 (0.15%) were Cryptosporidium scrofarum. C. suis had the highest prevalence (7.5%) in growers and the lowest in breeding pigs (0.97%). C. suis was the predominant species in pre-weaned and adult pigs, while C. scrofarum infected pigs older than 3 months only. A season-related difference of C. suis was observed in this study, with the highest prevalence in autumn (5.5%) and the lowest (1.7%) in winter. The present study provided basic information for control of Cryptosporidium infection in pigs and assessment of zoonotic transmission of pigs in Shaanxi province, China. PMID:25748718

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D.; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A.; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain–gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain-gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  12. Memory T cell responses targeting the SARS coronavirus persist up to 11 years post-infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Chia, Adeline; Tan, Anthony T; Jadi, Ramesh S; Leong, Hoe Nam; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-04-12

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious infectious disease which first emerged in late 2002, caused by a then novel human coronavirus, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The virus is believed to have originated from bats and transmitted to human through intermediate animals such as civet cats. The re-emergence of SARS-CoV remains a valid concern due to the continual persistence of zoonotic SARS-CoVs and SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs) in bat reservoirs. In this study, the screening for the presence of SARS-specific T cells in a cohort of three SARS-recovered individuals at 9 and 11 years post-infection was carried out, and all memory T cell responses detected target the SARS-CoV structural proteins. Two CD8(+) T cell responses targeting the SARS-CoV membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins were characterized by determining their HLA restriction and minimal T cell epitope regions. Furthermore, these responses were found to persist up to 11 years post-infection. An absence of cross-reactivity of these CD8(+) T cell responses against the newly-emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was also demonstrated. The knowledge of the persistence of SARS-specific celullar immunity targeting the viral structural proteins in SARS-recovered individuals is important in the design and development of SARS vaccines, which are currently unavailable. PMID:26954467

  13. Post-vaccination MDEM associated with MOG antibody in a subclinical Chlamydia infected boy.

    PubMed

    Azumagawa, Kohji; Nomura, Shohei; Shigeri, Yasushi; Jones, Leslie Sargent; Sato, Douglas Kazutoshi; Nakashima, Ichiro; Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Tanabe, Takuya; Shimakawa, Shuichi; Nakajima, Hideto; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of post-vaccination acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) has been hypothesized as resulting from vaccination-injected antigens cross-reacting with myelin components, however, a precise etiology has been uncertain. In this report, we describe the case of a 6-year-old Japanese boy who had multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis (MDEM), and was positive for both anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies and Chlamydophila pneumoniae antibodies. After vaccinations that were the second one for measles and rubella, and the booster immunization for Japanese encephalitis, the patient presented with fever, headache, vomiting, and a change in personality. He was treated with a high-dose of intravenous methylprednisolone in the diagnosis of ADEM. However, these symptoms recurred with different magnetic resonance imaging lesion, and he was diagnosed as MDEM. Retrospective testing for pathogens revealed C. pneumoniae IgM and IgG antibodies, and it was considered that he was infected with C. pneumoniae subclinically. The patient's serum indicated a positive response for the anti-MOG antibody from the onset of the ADEM diagnosis and in all recurrent episodes. Chlamydia species infection has been known to play a role in demyelinating diseases. It is also known that the anti-MOG antibody may be present but not exhibit its pathogenesis in the absence of a cell-mediated inflammatory response; however, the precise mechanism of action of the anti-MOG antibodies is not yet determined. We propose the possibility that post-vaccination demyelinating disease may result from the synergistic effects of a preceding anti-MOG antibody, possibly produced in response to a subclinical Chlamydia species infection. PMID:26922251

  14. Large bowel resection - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100089.htm Large bowel resection - Series To use the sharing features ... 6 out of 6 Normal anatomy Overview The large bowel [large intestine or the colon] is part ...

  15. Irritable bowel syndrome - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be a lifelong condition. You may be suffering from cramping and loose stools, diarrhea, ... Ferri FF. Irritable bowel syndrome. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's ... . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:pages 669-70. What I ...

  16. Prevention of post-operative infections after surgical treatment of bite wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Frank, Matthias; Bender, Claudia; Hinz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the literature about the microbial spectrum, the risk factors of post-operative infections, and the results of surgical interventions, the following recommendation can be made for the management of bite wounds: fresh, open wounds: surgical debridement, if appropriate, then an antiseptic lavage with a fluid consisting of povidone iodine and ethanol (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics, primary wound closure nearly closed fresh wounds (e.g., cat bites): surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics older wounds after ~4 hours: surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress or bandage for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), at the same time intravenous or dose-adapted oral antibiotics (Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid) older wounds after ~24 hours: surgical debridement, then antiseptic lavage (Betaseptic®), in case of clinically apparent infection or inflammation surgical revision with opening of wound and treatment with antibiotics according to resistogram (empirical start with Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid). For each kind of bite wound, the patient’s tetanus immunization status as well as the risk of exposure to rabies have to be assessed. Similarly, the possibility of other infections, such as lues (Syphilis), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HBC), hepatitis D (HDV) and HIV, in the rare case of a human bite wound, has to be taken into account. PMID:20941334

  17. Kidney Allograft Telomere Length Is Not Associated with Sex, Recipient Comorbid Conditions, Post-Transplant Infections, or CMV Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Kłoda, Karolina; Domański, Leszek; Kwiatkowska, Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Drozd, Arleta; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immunosenescence is closely linked to chromosome telomere erosion and telomerase activity alterations. The aim of this study was to analyze the associations of relative telomere length (RTL) of a graft with sex, comorbid conditions, post-transplant infections, and CMV reactivation among transplanted kidney recipients. Additionally, the associations of donor and recipient hTERT, BICD1 genes and chromosome 18 polymorphisms with post-transplant infections were analyzed, including the analysis of donor-recipient genotype pairs. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study enrolled 119 white Polish kidney allograft recipients (64M/55F, mean age 47.3±14.0). The RTL was assessed by modification of a method developed by Cawthon, using a qPCR system. To identify genotypes of the studied polymorphisms, real-time PCR was performed. RESULTS There were no significant associations between graft RTL and sex of donor and recipient, comorbid DM and AH, as well as post-transplant infections and CMV reactivation. There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of hTERT, BICD1 genes and chromosome 18 graft and recipient polymorphisms genotypes between individuals with post-transplant infection and those without infection. The rs2735940 CX-TT hTERT gene donor-recipient genotypes combination was associated with higher risk of post-transplant infection on the border of statistical significance (OR=4.632, 95%CI (0.853-25.14); p=0.067). CONCLUSIONS Assessment of kidney allograft RTL does not show its association with sex, DM, AH, post-transplant infection, or CMV reactivation in the recipients, suggesting that other factors, probably directly related to the transplantation procedure, have a greater effect on telomere length. PMID:27350315

  18. Infections in patients undergoing craniotomy: risk factors associated with post-craniotomy meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kourbeti, Irene S; Vakis, Antonis F; Ziakas, Panayiotis; Karabetsos, Dimitris; Potolidis, Evangelos; Christou, Silvana; Samonis, George

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The authors performed a prospective study to define the prevalence and microbiological characteristics of infections in patients undergoing craniotomy and to clarify the risk factors for post-craniotomy meningitis. METHODS Patients older than 18 years who underwent nonstereotactic craniotomies between January 2006 and December 2008 were included. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and microbiological data were systemically recorded. Patient characteristics, craniotomy type, and pre- and postoperative variables were evaluated as risk factors for meningitis RESULTS Three hundred thirty-four procedures were analyzed (65.6% involving male patients). Traumatic brain injury was the most common reason for craniotomy. Almost 40% of the patients developed at least 1 infection. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) was the most common infection recorded (22.5%) and Acinetobacter spp. were isolated in 44% of the cases. Meningitis was encountered in 16 procedures (4.8%), and CSF cultures were positive for microbial growth in 100% of these cases. Gram-negative pathogens (Acinetobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter cloaceae, Proteus mirabilis) represented 88% of the pathogens. Acinetobacter and Klebsiella spp. demonstrated a high percentage of resistance in several antibiotic classes. In multivariate analysis, the risk for meningitis was independently associated with perioperative steroid use (OR 11.55, p = 0.005), CSF leak (OR 48.03, p < 0.001), and ventricular drainage (OR 70.52, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Device-related postoperative communication between the CSF and the environment, CSF leak, and perioperative steroid use were defined as risk factors for meningitis in this study. Ventilator-associated pneumonia was the most common infection overall. The offending pathogens presented a high level of resistance to several antibiotics. PMID:25343179

  19. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  20. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  1. Localization of Ascaridia galli larvae in the jejunum of chickens 3 days post infection.

    PubMed

    Luna-Olivares, Luz Adilia; Ferdushy, Tania; Kyvsgaard, Niels Christian; Nejsum, Peter; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Roepstorff, Allan; Iburg, Tine Moesgaard

    2012-04-30

    The normal habitat of the parasitic stages of Ascaridia galli is in the small intestine of poultry but the exact localization is poorly understood. Therefore, a histological study was conducted in order to localize the larvae during the early phase of infection. Six layer pullets seven-week old were infected orally with 20,000 embryonated A. galli eggs each, whereas four chickens were left as un-infected controls. At necropsy 3 days after infection the first half of jejunum/ileum was divided into two equally sized sections (J1 and J2). After taking samples for histology from the middle of J1 and J2 and the junction between these determined JX, the two sections were subjected to parasitological examination. A higher number of A. galli larvae were recovered from section J2 than J1 and the majority of larvae were recovered from the most profound layers. Based on histology 144 larvae were identified and their location was noted. The highest number of larvae was observed in the JX sample as compared to J1 and J2 (P<0.001). Most of them were located in the profound crypt zone of the mucosa (51%) as compared to the other zones (P<0.05). The number of larvae was higher in the lumen (63%) compared to the epithelium (32%) and lamina propria (5%) (P<0.001). A significantly higher number of eosinophils were found in lamina propria of the infected group compared to the control group (P<0.001). This experiment clearly showed that only few larvae had penetrated the epithelium and were positioned in the lamina propria at 3 days post infection. It was far more common that the larvae were localized within the epithelium or in the lumen of the crypts. It is therefore suggested that at least in this early phase "mucosal phase" is a more appropriate term to be used for the A. galli larval localization as compared to the term "histotrophic phase" currently used in many textbooks. PMID:22133491

  2. Previous reproductive history and post-natal family planning among HIV-infected women in Ukraine†

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, J.; Malyuta, R.; Semenenko, I.; Pilipenko, T.; Tereshenko, R.; Kulakovskaya, E.; Adejnova, I.; Kvasha, L.; Thorne, C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ukraine has the highest antenatal HIV prevalence in Europe. The national prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) programme has reduced the MTCT rate, but less attention has been given to the prevention of unintended pregnancy among HIV-positive women. Our objectives were to describe the reproductive health, condom use and family planning (FP) practices of HIV-positive childbearing Ukrainian women and to identify factors associated with different methods of post-natal contraception. METHODS HIV-infected childbearing women, diagnosed before or during pregnancy, were enrolled prospectively in a post-natal cohort study in four regional HIV/AIDS centres in Ukraine from December 2007. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with post-natal FP practices. RESULTS Data were available for 371 women enrolled by March 2009; 82% (n = 303) were married or cohabiting, 27% (97 of 363) reported a current HIV-negative sexual partner and 69% were diagnosed with HIV during their most recent pregnancy. Overall, 21% (75 of 349) of women were not using contraception post-natally (of whom 80% reported no current sexual activity), 50% (174 of 349) used condoms, 20% (74 of 349) relied solely/partially on coitus interruptus and 4% used hormonal methods or intrauterine device. Among married/cohabiting women, consistent use of condoms in the previous pregnancy [AOR 1.96 (95%CI 1.06–3.62)], having an HIV-positive partner [AOR 0.42 (0.20–0.87)], current sexual activity [AOR 4.53 (1.19–17.3)] and study site were significantly associated with post-natal condom use; 16% of those with HIV-negative partners did not use condoms. Risk factors for non-use of FP were lack of affordability [AOR 6.34 (1.73–23.2)] and inconsistent use of condoms in the previous pregnancy [AOR 7.25 (1.41–37.2)]. CONCLUSIONS More than 40% of HIV-positive women in this population are at risk of unintended pregnancy and the one in six women in HIV-discordant couples not

  3. Post-discharge surveillance to identify colorectal surgical site infection rates and related costs.

    PubMed

    Tanner, J; Khan, D; Aplin, C; Ball, J; Thomas, M; Bankart, J

    2009-07-01

    A growing number of surveillance studies have highlighted concerns with relying only on data from inpatients. Without post-discharge surveillance (PDS) data, the rate and burden of surgical site infections (SSIs) are underestimated. PDS data for colorectal surgery in the UK remains to be published. This is an important specialty to study since it is considered to have the highest SSI rate and is among the most expensive to treat. This study of colorectal SSI used a 30 day surveillance programme with telephone interviews and home visits. Each additional healthcare resource used by patients with SSI was documented and costed. Of the 105 patients who met the inclusion criteria and completed the 30 day follow-up, 29 (27%) developed SSI, of which 12 were diagnosed after discharge. The mean number of days to presentation of SSI was 13. Multivariable logistic analysis identified body mass index as the only significant risk factor. The additional cost of treating each infected patient was pound sterling 10,523, although 15% of these additional costs were met by primary care. The 5 month surveillance programme cost pound sterling 5,200 to run. An analysis of the surveillance nurse's workload showed that the nurse could be replaced by a healthcare assistant. PDS to detect SSI after colorectal surgery is necessary to provide complete data with accurate additional costs. PMID:19446918

  4. Tissue laser biostimulation promotes post-extraction neoangiogenesis in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Halon, Agnieszka; Donizy, Piotr; Dziegala, Mateusz; Dobrakowski, Rafal; Simon, Krzysztof

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the rate of neoangiogenesis in extraction wound healing following exposure to biostimulating laser therapy and to analyze the correlation between parameters of neoangiogenesis as reflected by the number and surface area of newly formed blood vessels and clinical parameters such as gender, position of a tooth in the oral cavity, and CD4 lymphocyte count. Twenty-seven patients with confirmed HIV infection were enrolled in the study (6 women, 21 men). Eighty-nine teeth were extracted; 45 sockets were exposed to 6 J laser radiation (laser parameters were set as follows: wavelength, 820 nm; output, 200 mW; dose, 6 J/cm(2); spot size, 38 mm(2); continuous radiation) for five consecutive days following tooth extraction, and the remaining extraction wounds were left to heal spontaneously without laser irradiation. Antigen CD34 was assessed by immunohistochemistry as a marker of angiogenesis, and its expression was examined by computer-assisted histomorphometric image analysis. As a result, we report that biostimulating laser therapy in HIV-infected patients of varying degrees of immunodeficiency greatly accelerated post-extraction neoangiogenesis, regardless of the patient's gender, tooth position, number of roots, or number of CD4 lymphocytes in the blood. Application of low-level laser therapy for the treatment of tooth extraction wounds in HIV(+) patients greatly enhanced the formation of new blood vessels, which in turn promoted wound healing. PMID:23917415

  5. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  6. Large bowel injuries during gynecological laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ülker, Kahraman; Anuk, Turgut; Bozkurt, Murat; Karasu, Yetkin

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopy is one of the most frequently preferred surgical options in gynecological surgery and has advantages over laparotomy, including smaller surgical scars, faster recovery, less pain and earlier return of bowel functions. Generally, it is also accepted as safe and effective and patients tolerate it well. However, it is still an intra-abdominal procedure and has the similar potential risks of laparotomy, including injury of a vital structure, bleeding and infection. Besides the well-known risks of open surgery, laparoscopy also has its own unique risks related to abdominal access methods, pneumoperitoneum created to provide adequate operative space and the energy modalities used during the procedures. Bowel, bladder or major blood vessel injuries and passage of gas into the intravascular space may result from laparoscopic surgical technique. In addition, the risks of aspiration, respiratory dysfunction and cardiovascular dysfunction increase during laparoscopy. Large bowel injuries during laparoscopy are serious complications because 50% of bowel injuries and 60% of visceral injuries are undiagnosed at the time of primary surgery. A missed or delayed diagnosis increases the risk of bowel perforation and consequently sepsis and even death. In this paper, we aim to focus on large bowel injuries that happen during gynecological laparoscopy and review their diagnostic and management options. PMID:25516859

  7. [Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a connection?].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2009-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders and is that with the greatest socioeconomic impact worldwide. Diagnosis of IBS is based on clinical criteria that have been modified over time, the Rome II criteria being those that are currently followed. Some of the symptoms of IBS are similar to those in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which can hamper or delay diagnosis. The use of inflammatory markers in stools (such as calprotectin) may help to distinguish between these two entities. A possible connection between IBS and IBD could be based on five points: (i) both disorders have similar symptoms; (ii) symptoms often overlap in the same patients; (iii) IBS and IBD have a common familial aggregation; (iv) some predisposing factors, such as a history of acute gastroenteritis, play a role in both disorders, and (v) importantly, signs of microinflammation are found in the bowels of patients with IBS. With regard to this latter point, an increase in inflammatory cells has been found in the intestinal mucosa of patients with IBS and, more specifically, mastocytes have been found to be increased in the jejunum and colon while CD3 and CD25 intraepithelial lymphocytes have be observed to be increased in the colon. Moreover, activated mastocytes are increased near to nerve endings in patients with IBS and this finding has been correlated with the intensity of both intestinal symptoms (abdominal pain) and psychological symptoms (depression and fatigue). A good model of microinflammation is post-infectious IBS, since the timing of the onset of the infectious process is known. In patients with post-infectious IBS, an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes and enterochromaffin cells is initially found, which is reduced over time; consequently, although the symptoms of IBS persist, after 3 years no differences are detected in the number of inflammatory cells between IBS patients and controls. Among the various

  8. Sexual risk of HIV infection among expatriates posted in AIDS endemic areas.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, R; van Zessen, G; Houweling, H; Ligthelm, R J; van den Akker, R

    1997-07-15

    A survey conducted among 864 Dutch expatriates returning home from assignment in AIDS-endemic areas in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and South and South East Asia revealed a low rate of HIV infection, despite widespread high-risk sexual practices. During an average stay out of the country of 26 months in 1991-96, 41% of the 634 male respondents reported sex with casual or steady local partners and 11% with casual or steady expatriate partners. Among the 230 female expatriates, these rates were 31% and 24%, respectively. 58% of men with casual local partners paid for sex at least once. Among men, consistent condom use was practiced in 69% of encounters with casual local partners and 63% of the time with casual expatriate partners. Among women, these rates were 64% and 48%, respectively. The prevalence of consistent condom use with casual local partners in this study was three times greater than that identified in a study conducted among Dutch expatriates in 1987-89. Condom use with regular local or expatriate partners was substantially lower (16.1-27.8%), however. Inconsistent condom use with casual partners was significantly associated, among men, with being abroad for a longer period of time, failure to bring condoms with them from the Netherlands, posting in an Asian country, and a relatively low estimated HIV prevalence in the local population. Among women, these risk factors were failure to take condoms to their destination and lack of intention at departure to have sex abroad. Only one case of HIV infection was detected in the 847 respondents who underwent serologic testing. Since expatriates function as a bridge between areas with high and low HIV prevalence, educational campaigns that prepare departing workers for differences between the sexual culture at home and abroad and encourage them to take a supply of condoms are recommended. PMID:9233466

  9. Small bowel radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Antes, G.; Eggemann, F.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals mainly with technique, experiences and results of the biphasic small bowel enema (enteroclysis) with barium and methyl cellulose. The method allows the evaluation of both morphology and function of the small bowel. The introduction describes the examination technique, basic patterns, interpretation and indications, while the atlas shows a broad spectrum of small bowel diseases (Crohn's disease, other inflammatory diseases, tumors, motility disorders, obstructions and malformations). The possibilities of small bowel radiology are demonstrated with reference to clinical findings and differential diagnoses.

  10. Dynamic changes in circulating and antigen-responsive T-cell subpopulations post-Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, J M; Pollock, D A; Campbell, D G; Girvin, R M; Crockard, A D; Neill, S D; Mackie, D P

    1996-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is a threat to animal and human health in several countries. Greater understanding of the immunology of the disease is required to develop improved tests and vaccines. This study has used a model of bovine tuberculosis, established in the natural host, to investigate the dynamic changes that occur in the circulating T-cell subpopulations after infection. When the phenotypic composition of the peripheral blood lymphocytes was determined pre- and post-experimental infection, the response to disease comprised three phases. Firstly, the WC1/gamma delta T cells decreased and then increased, suggesting localization to developing lesions and clonal expansion. Secondly, the CD4:CD8 ratio increased. Thirdly, the CD4:CD8 ratio decreased to less than pre-infection measurements. The latter changes suggested sequential involvement of CD4 and then CD8 T cells. The proportion of cells expressing interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) also increased. Panels of T-cell clones were established at various stages post-infection and all clones that exhibited antigen responsiveness were phenotyped. T-cell clones from early infection were WC1/gamma delta and CD4 in phenotype, while CD8 clones appeared later in infection, eventually becoming dominant. Therefore, from in vivo and in vitro evidence, it was suggested that there is a dynamic progression in the T-cell subpopulations involved dominantly in responses to mycobacteria. PMID:8698385

  11. A young man with bowel obstruction and cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Pavlidis, Polychronis; Riley, Catherine; Mylona, Evangelia; Vijaynagar, Badri

    2009-01-01

    A young man from Jamaica was admitted with cachexia, postprandial epigastric pain and vomiting. His abdominal examination revealed a soft abdomen with hyperactive bowel sounds, the laboratory investigations showed mild anaemia and hypoalbuminaemia, and abdominal x ray showed dilated and oedematous bowel loops. A duodenal biopsy revealed larvae and eggs in the epithelium consisted with Strongyloides infection. In retrospect the patient was found to be HTLV-1 positive. Helminthic infections can present with bowel obstruction even in the absence of eosinophilia or diarrhoea, and should be considered in patients with the appropriate epidemiological background. PMID:21686778

  12. Post-translational modifications are key players of the Legionella pneumophila infection strategy

    PubMed Central

    Michard, Céline; Doublet, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are widely used by eukaryotes to control the enzymatic activity, localization or stability of their proteins. Traditionally, it was believed that the broad biochemical diversity of the PTMs is restricted to eukaryotic cells, which exploit it in extensive networks to fine-tune various and complex cellular functions. During the last decade, the advanced detection methods of PTMs and functional studies of the host–pathogen relationships highlight that bacteria have also developed a large arsenal of PTMs, particularly to subvert host cell pathways to their benefit. Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of the severe pneumonia legionellosis, is the paradigm of highly adapted intravacuolar pathogens that have set up sophisticated biochemical strategies. Among them, L. pneumophila has evolved eukaryotic-like and rare/novel PTMs to hijack host cell processes. Here, we review recent progress about the diversity of PTMs catalyzed by Legionella: ubiquitination, prenylation, phosphorylation, glycosylation, methylation, AMPylation, and de-AMPylation, phosphocholination, and de-phosphocholination. We focus on the host cell pathways targeted by the bacteria catalyzed PTMs and we stress the importance of the PTMs in the Legionella infection strategy. Finally, we highlight that the discovery of these PTMs undoubtedly made significant breakthroughs on the molecular basis of Legionella pathogenesis but also lead the way in improving our knowledge of the eukaryotic PTMs and complex cellular processes that are associated to. PMID:25713573

  13. Low serum levels of interleukin-6 in children with post-infective acute thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, S; Romano, V; Munda, S E; Sciotto, A; Schilirò, G

    1995-08-01

    Interleukin-6 plays an important role in host defense mechanisms and it appears to be a major mediator of the acute-phase response. IL-6 is also an important thrombocytopoietic factor. High serum levels of IL-6 are present in reactive thrombocytosis. The number and function of circulating platelets are the major factors that affect megakaryocytopoiesis by thrombopoietin. High levels of thrombopoietin have been observed in patients with thrombocytopenic purpura. To evaluate a possible thrombopoietin-like function of IL-6, we measured IL-6 levels in the serum of patients affected by post-infective acute thrombocytopenic purpura using a sensitive ELISSA assay. As controls, we studied normal subjects and patients with reactive thrombocytosis. No significant difference was observed between thrombocytopenic patients and normal controls. High IL-6 levels were present in patients with reactive thrombocytosis. In conclusion, we had not observed high levels of IL-6 in acute thrombocytopenic purpura and, very probably, IL-6 is not involved in the regulation of platelet mass for the hemostatic function. The thrombocytopoietic activity of IL-6 is another acute-phase response and it is consistent with the other functions of this cytokine. This suggests an active participation of platelets in host defense mechanisms. PMID:7628586

  14. Capnocytophaga canimorsus: an emerging cause of sepsis, meningitis, and post-splenectomy infection after dog bites.

    PubMed

    Butler, T

    2015-07-01

    Newly named in 1989, Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a bacterial pathogen found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats, and is transmitted to humans principally by dog bites. This review compiled all laboratory-confirmed cases, animal sources, and virulence attributes to describe its epidemiology, clinical features, and pathogenesis. An estimated 484 patients with a median age of 55 years were reported, two-thirds of which were male. The case-fatality rate was about 26%. Its clinical presentations included severe sepsis and fatal septic shock, gangrene of the digits or extremities, high-grade bacteremia, meningitis, endocarditis, and eye infections. Predispositions were prior splenectomy in 59 patients and alcoholism in 58 patients. Dog bites before illness occurred in 60%; additionally, in 27%, there were scratches, licking, or other contact with dogs or cats. Patients with meningitis showed more advanced ages, higher male preponderance, lower mortality, and longer incubation periods after dog bites than patients with sepsis (p < 0.05). Patients with prior splenectomy presented more frequently with high-grade bacteremia than patients with intact spleens (p < 0.05). The organism possesses virulence attributes of catalase and sialidase production, gliding motility, cytotoxin production, and resistance to killing by serum complement due to its unique lipopolysaccharide. Penicillin is the drug of choice, but some practitioners prefer third-generation cephalosporins or beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations. C. canimorsus has emerged as a leading cause of sepsis, particularly post-splenectomy sepsis, and meningitis after dog bites. PMID:25828064

  15. Post-mortem findings in a patient with avian influenza A (H5N6) virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gao, R; Pan, M; Li, X; Zou, X; Zhao, X; Li, T; Yang, H; Zou, S; Bo, H; Xu, J; Li, S; Zhang, M; Li, Z; Wang, D; Zaki, S R; Shu, Y

    2016-06-01

    Avian influenza A (H5N6) has been found to infect humans, and has resulted in ten cases with six deaths in China since 2014. Here, we describe the systematic post-mortem pathology of a patient fatally infected with H5N6 virus and evaluate the associated pathogenesis compared with H1N1 pdm09 fatal cases. The most prominent histopathological features were diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary vasculitis in the lungs of the patient. The virus disseminated to extrapulmonary organs, including the brain. Compared with H1N1 pdm09 fatal infection, H5N6 infection induced a more exacerbated immune response involving overt pulmonary inflammation, which led to alveolar damage and respiratory failure. PMID:27040806

  16. Prevention of infection caused by immunosuppressive drugs in gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Orlicka, Katarzyna; Barnes, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy is frequently used to treat gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune hepatitis, IgG4-related disease (autoimmune pancreatitis and sclerosing cholangitis) and in the post-transplantation setting. These drugs interfere with the immune system. The main safety concern with their use is the risk of infections. Certain infections can be prevented or their impact minimized. Physicians must adopt preventative strategies and should have a high degree of suspicion to recognize infections early and treat appropriately. This article reviews the risk factors for infections, the mechanism of action of immunosuppressive therapy and proposes preventive strategies. PMID:23819020

  17. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Or if a kid sees his or her parents fighting and begins to feel worried — that's stress, too. A kid in this situation can learn ... 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON ... Bowel Disease Five Steps for Fighting Stress Are Your Bowels Moving? What's a Fart? Your ...

  18. Virus-Like Particles Activate Type I Interferon Pathways to Facilitate Post-Exposure Protection against Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ayithan, Natarajan; Bradfute, Steven B.; Anthony, Scott M.; Stuthman, Kelly S.; Bavari, Sina; Bray, Mike; Ozato, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a severe hemorrhagic disease with high fatality. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine candidate against EBOV. We recently showed that VLPs protect mice from lethal EBOV infection when given before or after viral infection. To elucidate pathways through which VLPs confer post-exposure protection, we investigated the role of type I interferon (IFN) signaling. We found that VLPs lead to accelerated induction of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs) in liver and spleen of wild type mice, but not in Ifnar-/- mice. Accordingly, EBOV infected Ifnar-/- mice, unlike wild type mice succumbed to death even after VLP treatment. The ISGs induced in wild type mice included anti-viral proteins and negative feedback factors known to restrict viral replication and excessive inflammatory responses. Importantly, proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression was much higher in WT mice without VLPs than mice treated with VLPs. In EBOV infected Ifnar-/- mice, however, uninhibited viral replication and elevated proinflammatory factor expression ensued, irrespective of VLP treatment, supporting the view that type I IFN signaling helps to limit viral replication and attenuate inflammatory responses. Further analyses showed that VLP protection requires the transcription factor, IRF8 known to amplify type I IFN signaling in dendritic cells and macrophages, the probable sites of initial EBOV infection. Together, this study indicates that VLPs afford post-exposure protection by promoting expeditious initiation of type I IFN signaling in the host. PMID:25719445

  19. Post-translational Modification of LipL32 during Leptospira interrogans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Witchell, Timothy D.; Eshghi, Azad; Nally, Jarlath E.; Hof, Rebecca; Boulanger, Martin J.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Ko, Albert I.; Haake, David A.; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis, a re-emerging disease of global importance caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp., is considered the world's most widespread zoonotic disease. Rats serve as asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic Leptospira and are critical for disease spread. In such reservoir hosts, leptospires colonize the kidney, are shed in the urine, persist in fresh water and gain access to a new mammalian host through breaches in the skin. Methodology/Principal Findings Previous studies have provided evidence for post-translational modification (PTM) of leptospiral proteins. In the current study, we used proteomic analyses to determine the presence of PTMs on the highly abundant leptospiral protein, LipL32, from rat urine-isolated L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni compared to in vitro-grown organisms. We observed either acetylation or tri-methylation of lysine residues within multiple LipL32 peptides, including peptides corresponding to regions of LipL32 previously identified as epitopes. Intriguingly, the PTMs were unique to the LipL32 peptides originating from in vivo relative to in vitro grown leptospires. The identity of each modified lysine residue was confirmed by fragmentation pattern analysis of the peptide mass spectra. A synthetic peptide containing an identified tri-methylated lysine, which corresponds to a previously identified LipL32 epitope, demonstrated significantly reduced immunoreactivity with serum collected from leptospirosis patients compared to the peptide version lacking the tri-methylation. Further, a subset of the identified PTMs are in close proximity to the established calcium-binding and putative collagen-binding sites that have been identified within LipL32. Conclusions/Significance The exclusive detection of PTMs on lysine residues within LipL32 from in vivo-isolated L. interrogans implies that infection-generated modification of leptospiral proteins may have a biologically relevant function during the course of infection. Although

  20. Substantial variation in post-engraftment infection prophylaxis and revaccination practice in autologous stem cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, H Y; Grigg, A

    2016-03-01

    There is a paucity of evidence supporting the necessity or duration of Pneumocystis jirovecii and antiviral prophylaxis as well as revaccination following autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). A survey aimed at evaluating these policies was distributed to 34 ASCT centres across Australasia. The 26 survey respondents demonstrated significant heterogeneity in their infection prophylaxis and revaccination strategy post-transplant despite the availability of consensual guidelines. PMID:26968596

  1. Longer red blood cell storage duration is associated with increased post-operative infections in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cholette, Jill M.; Pietropaoli, Anthony P.; Henrichs, Kelly F.; Alfieris, George M.; Powers, Karen S.; Phipps, Richard; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Swartz, Michael; Gensini, Francisco; Daugherty, L. Eugene; Nazarian, Emily; Rubenstein, Jeffrey S.; Sweeney, Dawn; Eaton, Michael; Blumberg, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Infants and children undergoing open heart surgery routinely require multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Children receiving greater numbers of RBC transfusions have increased post-operative complications and mortality. Longer RBC storage age is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Whether the association of increased transfusions and worse outcomes can be ameliorated by use of fresh RBCs in pediatric cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease is unknown. Methods 128 consecutively transfused children undergoing repair or palliation of congenital heart disease with cardiopulmonary bypass who were participating in a randomized trial of washed v. standard RBC transfusions were evaluated for an association of RBC storage age and clinical outcomes. To avoid confounding with dose of transfusions and timing of infection versus timing of transfusion, a subgroup analysis of patients only transfused 1–2 units on the day of surgery was performed. Results Mortality was low (4.9%) with no association between RBC storage duration and survival. The post-operative infection rate was significantly higher in children receiving the oldest blood (25–38 days) compared to those receiving the freshest RBCs (7–15 days); (34% v. 7%; p = 0.004). Subgroup analysis of subjects receiving only 1–2 RBC transfusions on the day of surgery (n=74) also demonstrates a greater incidence of infections in subjects receiving the oldest RBC units [0 of 33 (0%) with 7–15 day storage, 1 of 21 (5%) with 16–24 day storage and 4 of 20 (20%) with 25–38 day storage; (p=0.01)]. In multivariate analysis, RBC storage age and corticosteroid administration were the only predictors of post-operative infection. Washing the oldest RBCs (>27 days) was associated with a higher infection rate and increased morbidity compared with unwashed RBCs. Discussion Longer RBC storage duration was associated with increased postoperative nosocomial

  2. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction. PMID:27403104

  3. Short bowel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... feeding is not supplying enough nutrients Small bowel transplantation in some cases Outlook (Prognosis) The condition may ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  4. Large bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... large bowel). You may also have had a colostomy . ... have diarrhea. You may have problems with your colostomy. ... protect it if needed. If you have a colostomy, follow care instructions from your provider. Sitting on ...

  5. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical procedures that create a loop of small intestine where excess bacteria can grow. An example is a Billroth II type of stomach removal ( gastrectomy ). Some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Symptoms The most common symptoms are: Abdominal ...

  6. Are Your Bowels Moving?

    MedlinePlus

    ... how to prevent accidents in the future. continue Diarrhea Diarrhea means you have to move your bowels often, ... eat or if you're taking certain medicines. Diarrhea also can happen when you don't wash ...

  7. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine surgery; Bowel resection - small intestine; Resection of part of the small intestine; Enterectomy ... her hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment. Your belly is ...

  8. Daily bowel care program

    MedlinePlus

    ... a brain or spinal cord injury. People with multiple sclerosis also have problems with their bowels. Symptoms may ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 17. Read More Multiple sclerosis Recovering after stroke Patient Instructions Constipation - self-care ...

  9. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs. PMID:26456301

  10. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B.; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs. PMID:26456301

  11. Infants' Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Composition Reflects Both Maternal and Post-Natal Infection with Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Ibitokou, Samad; Vianou, Bertin; Houngbegnon, Parfait; Ezinmegnon, Sem; Borgella, Sophie; Akplogan, Carine; Cottrell, Gilles; Varani, Stefania; Massougbodji, Achille; Moutairou, Kabirou; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Deloron, Philippe; Luty, Adrian J. F.; Fievet, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Maternal parasitoses modulate fetal immune development, manifesting as altered cellular immunological activity in cord blood that may be linked to enhanced susceptibility to infections in early life. Plasmodium falciparum typifies such infections, with distinct placental infection-related changes in cord blood exemplified by expanded populations of parasite antigen-specific regulatory T cells. Here we addressed whether such early-onset cellular immunological alterations persist through infancy. Specifically, in order to assess the potential impacts of P. falciparum infections either during pregnancy or during infancy, we quantified lymphocyte subsets in cord blood and in infants' peripheral blood during the first year of life. The principal age-related changes observed, independent of infection status, concerned decreases in the frequencies of CD4+, NKdim and NKT cells, whilst CD8+, Treg and Teff cells' frequencies increased from birth to 12 months of age. P. falciparum infections present at delivery, but not those earlier in gestation, were associated with increased frequencies of Treg and CD8+ T cells but fewer CD4+ and NKT cells during infancy, thus accentuating the observed age-related patterns. Overall, P. falciparum infections arising during infancy were associated with a reversal of the trends associated with maternal infection i.e. with more CD4+ cells, with fewer Treg and CD8+ cells. We conclude that maternal P. falciparum infection at delivery has significant and, in some cases, year-long effects on the composition of infants' peripheral blood lymphocyte populations. Those effects are superimposed on separate and independent age- as well as infant infection-related alterations that, respectively, either match or run counter to them. PMID:26580401

  12. Infants' Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Composition Reflects Both Maternal and Post-Natal Infection with Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Nouatin, Odilon; Gbédandé, Komi; Ibitokou, Samad; Vianou, Bertin; Houngbegnon, Parfait; Ezinmegnon, Sem; Borgella, Sophie; Akplogan, Carine; Cottrell, Gilles; Varani, Stefania; Massougbodji, Achille; Moutairou, Kabirou; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Deloron, Philippe; Luty, Adrian J F; Fievet, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Maternal parasitoses modulate fetal immune development, manifesting as altered cellular immunological activity in cord blood that may be linked to enhanced susceptibility to infections in early life. Plasmodium falciparum typifies such infections, with distinct placental infection-related changes in cord blood exemplified by expanded populations of parasite antigen-specific regulatory T cells. Here we addressed whether such early-onset cellular immunological alterations persist through infancy. Specifically, in order to assess the potential impacts of P. falciparum infections either during pregnancy or during infancy, we quantified lymphocyte subsets in cord blood and in infants' peripheral blood during the first year of life. The principal age-related changes observed, independent of infection status, concerned decreases in the frequencies of CD4+, NKdim and NKT cells, whilst CD8+, Treg and Teff cells' frequencies increased from birth to 12 months of age. P. falciparum infections present at delivery, but not those earlier in gestation, were associated with increased frequencies of Treg and CD8+ T cells but fewer CD4+ and NKT cells during infancy, thus accentuating the observed age-related patterns. Overall, P. falciparum infections arising during infancy were associated with a reversal of the trends associated with maternal infection i.e. with more CD4+ cells, with fewer Treg and CD8+ cells. We conclude that maternal P. falciparum infection at delivery has significant and, in some cases, year-long effects on the composition of infants' peripheral blood lymphocyte populations. Those effects are superimposed on separate and independent age- as well as infant infection-related alterations that, respectively, either match or run counter to them. PMID:26580401

  13. Weaning and Post-Weaning Performance of Fall-Born Calves Weaned on Different Dates from Endophyte-Infected Tall Fescue Pastures Managed with Two Different Rotation Frequencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of studies have reported performance by spring-calving cows grazing Neotyphodium - infected fescue [E+, Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh.], but post-weaning calf performance from the majority of those studies is limited. Furthermore, both pre- and post-weaning information pertaining t...

  14. Patient Perspectives on Post-Discharge Surgical Site Infections: Towards a Patient-Centered Mobile Health Solution

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Patrick C.; Hartzler, Andrea; Han, Sarah M.; Armstrong, Cheryl A. L.; Stewart, Mark R.; Lordon, Ross J.; Lober, William B.; Evans, Heather L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-discharge surgical site infections (SSI) are a major source of morbidity, expense and anxiety for patients. However, patient perceptions about barriers experienced while seeking care for post-discharge SSI have not been assessed in depth. We explored patient experience of SSI and openness to a mobile health (mHealth) wound monitoring “app” as a novel solution to address this problem. Methods Mixed method design with semi-structured interviews and surveys. Participants were patients who had post-discharge surgical wound complications after undergoing operations with high risk of SSI, including open colorectal or ventral hernia repair surgery. The study was conducted at two affiliated teaching hospitals, including an academic medical center and a level 1 trauma center. Results From interviews with 13 patients, we identified 3 major challenges that impact patients' ability to manage post-discharge surgical wound complications, including required knowledge for wound monitoring from discharge teaching, self-efficacy for wound monitoring at home, and accessible communication with their providers about wound concerns. Patients found an mHealth wound monitoring application highly acceptable and articulated its potential to provide more frequent, thorough, and convenient follow-up that could reduce post-discharge anxiety compared to the current practice. Major concerns with mHealth wound monitoring were lack of timely response from providers and inaccessibility due to either lack of an appropriate device or usability challenges. Conclusions Our findings reveal gaps and frustrations with post-discharge care after surgery which could negatively impact clinical outcomes and quality of life. To address these issues, we are developing mPOWEr, a patient-centered mHealth wound monitoring application for patients and providers to collaboratively bridge the care transition between hospital and home. PMID:25436912

  15. Acute abdomen due to small bowel anisakiasis.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, M; Occhini, R; Tordini, G; Vindigni, C; Russo, S; Marzocca, G

    2005-01-01

    The popularity in Western countries of dishes based on raw fish has led to an increased incidence of anisakiasis, a human parasitic disease caused by the ingestion of live anisakid larvae. The entire digestive tract may be involved, but the stomach and the small intestine are the most frequently affected sites. We report a case of acute abdomen due to Anisakis simplex infection that caused small bowel obstruction. PMID:15702863

  16. Endemic infection of the amphibian chytrid fungus in a frog community post-decline.

    PubMed

    Retallick, Richard W R; McCallum, Hamish; Speare, Rick

    2004-11-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has been implicated in the decline and extinction of numerous frog species worldwide. In Queensland, Australia, it has been proposed as the cause of the decline or apparent extinction of at least 14 high-elevation rainforest frog species. One of these, Taudactylus eungellensis, disappeared from rainforest streams in Eungella National Park in 1985-1986, but a few remnant populations were subsequently discovered. Here, we report the analysis of B. dendrobatidis infections in toe tips of T. eungellensis and sympatric species collected in a mark-recapture study between 1994 and 1998. This longitudinal study of the fungus in individually marked frogs sheds new light on the effect of this threatening infectious process in field, as distinct from laboratory, conditions. We found a seasonal peak of infection in the cooler months, with no evidence of interannual variation. The overall prevalence of infection was 18% in T. eungellensis and 28% in Litoria wilcoxii/jungguy, a sympatric frog that appeared not to decline in 1985-1986. No infection was found in any of the other sympatric species. Most importantly, we found no consistent evidence of lower survival in T. eungellensis that were infected at the time of first capture, compared with uninfected individuals. These results refute the hypothesis that remnant populations of T. eungellensis recovered after a B. dendrobatidis epidemic because the pathogen had disappeared. They show that populations of T. eungellensis now persist with stable, endemic infections of B. dendrobatidis. PMID:15502873

  17. Endemic Infection of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus in a Frog Community Post-Decline

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has been implicated in the decline and extinction of numerous frog species worldwide. In Queensland, Australia, it has been proposed as the cause of the decline or apparent extinction of at least 14 high-elevation rainforest frog species. One of these, Taudactylus eungellensis, disappeared from rainforest streams in Eungella National Park in 1985–1986, but a few remnant populations were subsequently discovered. Here, we report the analysis of B. dendrobatidis infections in toe tips of T. eungellensis and sympatric species collected in a mark-recapture study between 1994 and 1998. This longitudinal study of the fungus in individually marked frogs sheds new light on the effect of this threatening infectious process in field, as distinct from laboratory, conditions. We found a seasonal peak of infection in the cooler months, with no evidence of interannual variation. The overall prevalence of infection was 18% in T. eungellensis and 28% in Litoria wilcoxii/jungguy, a sympatric frog that appeared not to decline in 1985–1986. No infection was found in any of the other sympatric species. Most importantly, we found no consistent evidence of lower survival in T. eungellensis that were infected at the time of first capture, compared with uninfected individuals. These results refute the hypothesis that remnant populations of T. eungellensis recovered after a B. dendrobatidis epidemic because the pathogen had disappeared. They show that populations of T. eungellensis now persist with stable, endemic infections of B. dendrobatidis. PMID:15502873

  18. Probiotics and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bai, A‐P; Ouyang, Q

    2006-01-01

    Enteric microflora profiles vary considerably between active inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and healthy conditions. Intestinal microflora may partake in the pathogenesis of IBD by one or some ways: specific pathogenic infection induces abnormal intestinal mucosal inflammation; aberrant microflora components trigger the onset of IBD; abnormal host immune response loses normal immune tolerance to luminal components; luminal antigens permeate through the defective mucosal barrier into mucosal lamina propria and induce abnormal inflammatory response. Preliminary studies suggest that administration of probiotics may be benefit for experimental colitis and clinical trials for IBD. Researches have been studying the function of probiotics. Introduction of probiotics can balance the aberrant enteric microflora in IBD patients, and reinforce the various lines of intestinal defence by inhibiting microbial pathogens growth, increasing intestinal epithelial tight junction and permeability, modulating immune response of intestinal epithelia and mucosal immune cells, secreting antimicrobial products, decomposing luminal pathogenic antigens. PMID:16754706

  19. Ischemia, Immunosuppression and Infection--Tackling the Predicaments of Post-Stroke Complications.

    PubMed

    Shim, Raymond; Wong, Connie H Y

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of stroke has risen over the past decade and will continue to be one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. While a large portion of immediate death following stroke is due to cerebral infarction and neurological complications, the most common medical complication in stroke patients is infection. In fact, infections, such as pneumonia and urinary tract infections, greatly worsen the clinical outcome of stroke patients. Recent evidence suggests that the disrupted interplay between the central nervous system and immune system contributes to the development of infection after stroke. The suppression of systemic immunity by the nervous system is thought to protect the brain from further inflammatory insult, yet this comes at the cost of increased susceptibility to infection after stroke. To improve patient outcome, there have been attempts to lessen the stroke-associated bacterial burden through the prophylactic use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. However, preventative antibiotic treatments have been unsuccessful, and therefore have been discouraged. Additionally, with the ever-rising obstacle of antibiotic-resistance, future therapeutic options to reverse immune impairment after stroke by augmentation of host immunity may be a viable alternative option. However, cautionary steps are required to ensure that collateral ischemic damage caused by cerebral inflammation remains minimal. PMID:26742037

  20. [Small-Bowel Cancer].

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Yuka; Sakamoto, Hirotsugu; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis of small-bowel cancer has become easier thanks to the development of both balloon-assisted endoscopy and capsule endoscopy. Balloon-assisted endoscopy allows not only for observation of the deep intestine but also for biopsies and for establishing a histological diagnosis. Although endoscopic diagnosis is reported to improve the prognosis of small-bowel cancer by early detection, it is still difficult and the prognosis in general is poor. Surgery and chemotherapy protocols for this disease are similar to those for colon cancer. At present, the response rate to chemotherapy for small-bowel cancer is low. There is an urgent need in this patient population to establish a new diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm using balloon-assisted endoscopy and capsule endoscopy. PMID:27210079

  1. A Journey to Zero: Reduction of Post-Operative Cesarean Surgical Site Infections over a Five-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically. Methods: A risk-based approach to incision management was developed and implemented for all cesarean deliveries at our institution. A number of incremental interventions for low-risk and high-risk patients including pre-operative skin preparations, standardized pre- and post-operative protocols, post-operative nanocrystalline silver anti-microbial barrier dressings, and incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) were implemented sequentially over a 5-y period. A systematic clinical chart review of 4,942 patients spanning all cesarean deliveries between 2007–2012 was performed to determine what effects the interventions had on the rate of SSI for cesarean deliveries. Results: The percentage of SSI was reduced from 2.13% (2007) to 0.10% (2012) (p<0.0001). There were no substantial changes in the patient population risk factors over this time. As a result of the changes in incision management practice, a total of 92 cesarean post-operative SSIs were avoided: A total cost saving of nearly $5,000,000. Conclusion: Applying a clinical algorithm for assessing the risk of surgical site complication and making recommendations on pre-operative and post-operative incision management can result in a substantial and sustainable reduction in cesarean SSI. PMID:25826622

  2. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity on peanut infection by Sclerotinia minor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. minor. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DOE), and five were closed for d...

  3. [Case report of a female patient with post-infection depression].

    PubMed

    Soldatović-Stajić, B; Drezgić-Vukić, S

    1996-01-01

    In this article the authors present a case of a secondary depression in woman, 75 years old, without previous psychiatric anamnesis or heredity. She had post-herpetic intercostal neuralgia and developed symptoms of depression. This case is an example which points to necessity of cooperation of other medical branches with psychiatry. PMID:8643074

  4. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity (RH) on peanut infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. sclerotiorum, isolated from pumpkin. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DO...

  5. EFFECTS OF NORMAL GUT MICROFLORA ADMINISTRATION ON POST-WEANING ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTION IN SWINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the proposed research was to evaluate the effects of porcine- derived normal gut microflora (RPCF) on an experimental enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) infection in weaned pigs. The litters of eighteen sows, split into 3 studies, were used. Piglets in the RPCF group received the RPCF...

  6. Post-pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection in pregnant women in Ceará, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, Anne C B; Araújo, Fernanda M C; Melo, Maria E L; Lemos, Daniele R Q; Cavalcanti, Luciano P; Ramalho, Izabel L C; Araújo, Lia C; Sousa, Deborah M; Siqueira, Marilda M; Guedes, Maria I F

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to present results of the post-pandemic phase of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in pregnant women in Ceará, Brazil, during the January–June 2012 influenza season. Results One hundred and fifty-four nasopharyngeal swab samples were collected from pregnant women admitted to hospitals with suspected severe acute respiratory infection (SARI). Fifty-three (34·4%) had laboratory-confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection with 15 (28·3%) outpatients and 38 (71·7%) hospitalized. Five (9·4%) women were in the first trimester of pregnancy, 20 (37·7%) in the second trimester of pregnancy, and 24 (45·2%) in the third trimester of pregnancy. Three had no information about the time of pregnancy. Six samples from newborns were also analyzed, of which three were nasopharyngeal swab positive for A(H1N1)pdm09. These swabs were collected immediately after birth, with the exception of one that was collected on the day after birth. Conclusion Our findings suggest that transplacental transfer of influenza viruses could occur as a result of severe illness in pregnancy. It is therefore important to encourage women to be vaccinated against influenza in order to avoid pregnancy complications. PMID:26290133

  7. Post-Vaccination Disseminated Bacillus Calmette Guerin Infection Among Children in Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aelami, Mohammad Hasan; Alborzi, Abdolvahab; Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Geramizadeh, Bita; Pourabbas, Bahman; Mardaneh, Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disseminated bacillus calmette guerin (BCG) infection is a rare but life threatening complication of BCG vaccination. It has been mainly seen in severe immune deficiency. A precise and rapid diagnosis is crucial for prompt initiation of an aggressive anti-mycobacterial treatment. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is directly applicable to smear-positive clinical specimens, proven to be a rapid and specific diagnostic test. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate disseminated BCG infection among 34 children in southern Iran, mainly confirmed by PCR. Patients and Methods: We included all the patients hospitalized with disseminated BCG infection at a referral teaching hospital in southern Iran between years 1990 and 2007. The clinical and laboratory data including the immunological workups were obtained through a review of the medical files. We recalled all pathology samples from pathology specimen banks and used an in-house PCR specific for Mycobacterium bovis BCG substrain to confirm the diagnosis. Results: From the total of 34 children hospitalized with disseminated BCG infection, 21 were categorized as definite and 13 probable. Thirty-one patients (91%) were under two years of age and 41% were male. The most common clinical findings were fever in 31 (91.2%), axillary’s lymphadenopathy in 26 (76.5%), hepatosplenomegaly in 25 (73.5%), stunted growth in 21 (61.8%), and distant lymphadenopathy in 16 (47.1%). Polymerase Chain Reaction positivity rate was 100% (9 of 9) in bone marrow smear slides and 84.2% (16 of 19) for formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue specimens. Immunodeficiency state was detected in 50% and the overall mortality rate was 58.8% (20 of 34). Conclusions: Disseminated BCG infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants and young children with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and history of BCG vaccination. The PCR method has a high positivity rate and can serve as a useful tool for

  8. Elderly Diabetic Patient with Surgical Site Mucormycosis Extending to Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Atul K; Vora, Himanshu J; Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Bhavin

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is rare in clinical practice. Most infections are acquired by inhalation; other portals of entry are traumatic implantation and ingestion in immunocompromised host. Mucormycosis is life threatening infection in immunocompromised host with variable moratlity ranging from 15-81% depending upon site of infection. General treatment principles include early diagnosis, correction of underlying immunosuppression and metabolic disturbances, adequate surgical debridement along with amphotericin therapy. We describe surgical site mucormycosis extended to involve large bowel in elderly diabetic patient. PMID:20606975

  9. Elderly diabetic patient with surgical site mucormycosis extending to bowel.

    PubMed

    Patel, Atul K; Vora, Himanshu J; Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Bhavin

    2010-05-01

    Mucormycosis is rare in clinical practice. Most infections are acquired by inhalation; other portals of entry are traumatic implantation and ingestion in immunocompromised host. Mucormycosis is life threatening infection in immunocompromised host with variable moratlity ranging from 15-81% depending upon site of infection. General treatment principles include early diagnosis, correction of underlying immunosuppression and metabolic disturbances, adequate surgical debridement along with amphotericin therapy. We describe surgical site mucormycosis extended to involve large bowel in elderly diabetic patient. PMID:20606975

  10. Benign small bowel tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Melvin, D B; Gray, G; Thorbjarnarson, B

    1975-01-01

    The clinical record and histologic sections of 84 cases of benign small bowel tumor are reviewed. Manifestations of systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, and lesions of either the ileocecal valve or periampullary region were excluded. In the same time span there were 96 small bowel malignancies. Clinical presentation, pathologic findings, management and result are compared to the collected published experience of about 2000 cases. There were 36 leiomyomas, 22 lipomas, 9 angiomas, 6 neurofibromas and 4 fibromas. Thirty-six men and 48 women were affected; the majority in their fifth and sixth decade. Seventy-eight were operative and 6 autopsy diagnoses. The most common symptom was obstruction (42%) followed by hemorrhage (34%) and pain (22%), relative frequency differing for the various specific tumors. There were rarely significant physical findings. A diagnosis of small bowel tumor was made radiologically in 30 patients. Because of the nonspecificity of other signs and symptoms, an acute awareness of the possibility of small bowel tumor is mandatory for preoperative anticipation of the diagnosis. Local resection was performed in all with no deaths or significant postoperative complications. PMID:1078626

  11. Subcutaneous infection caused by Blastoschizomyces capitatus post allogeneic hematopoietic transplant and its successful treatment with voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Devadas, S K; Bhat, V; Khattry, N

    2015-08-01

    We describe a 33-year-old man with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia who developed subcutaneous nodules >6 months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. These nodules were caused by Blastoschizomyces capitatus. The lesions progressed after treatment with a posaconazole suspension. The lesions resolved after switching to voriconazole, which was given for 21 weeks. B. capitatus is a rare infection affecting immunocompromised patients, which responds to azoles. PMID:26012493

  12. Ileo-ileal Intussusception and Bowel Obstruction Caused by Plasmablastic Lymphoma of Small Bowel- A Rare Entity in Rare Location

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    Intussusception of small bowel is considered a rare cause of bowel obstruction in adults accounting for only about 1% of bowel obstruction in adults. Intussusception in adults is uncommon with 95% cases of intussusceptions occurring in children. Adult intussusception from small intestinal lymphoma is also rare with only 36 cases reported in the literature between 2000 and 2011. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is an aggressive lymphoid neoplasm usually seen in the oral cavity in the clinical setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Plasmablastic lymphoma of the small intestine is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of plasmablastic lymphoma of small bowel with ileoileal intussusception in an HIV-negative immunocompetent male patient. PMID:27134931

  13. Metalworking defects in surgery screws as a possible cause of post-surgical infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, Mario; Peretti, Leandro E.; Romero, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    In the first phase of this work, surface defects (metalworking) in stainless steel implantable prostheses and their possible relation to infections that can be generated after surgery was studied. In a second phase, the results obtained in the aforementioned stage were applied to knee cruciate ligaments surgery screws, considering the fact that a substantial number of Mucormycetes infections have been reported after arthroscopic surgery in Argentina since the year 2005. Two types of screws, transverse and interference screws, were analyzed. The Allen heads presented defects such as burrs and metalworking bending as a result of the machining process. These defects allow the accumulation of machining oil, which could be contaminated with fungal spores. When this is the case, the gaseous sterilization by ethylene oxide may be jeopardized. Cortical screws were also analyzed and were found to present serious metalworking defects inside their heads. To reduce the risk of infection in surgery, the use of screws with metalworking defects on the outer surface, analyzed with stereomicroscope and considering the inside part of the Allen as an outer surface, should be avoided altogether.

  14. "Spiral intestinal lenghtening and tailoring (SILT)" for a child with severely short bowel.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Daniele; Boroni, Giovanni; Giannotti, Giulia; Parolini, Filippo; Armellini, Andrea; Morabito, Antonino; Bianchi, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    We report a child with post-surgical short bowel state who underwent bowel expansion followed by spiral intestinal lengthening and tailoring (SILT) at 10 months of age. Growth at 1-year follow-up is along the 15-25th centile on 82 % oral calories as normal diet and 18 % as parenteral nutrition, and he is passing 2-3 semisolid motions daily. SILT is a versatile technique for reconstructing dilated bowel towards improved propulsion and absorption, and has a role in the management of the short bowel state. PMID:25119303

  15. Pediatric Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Ariel U.; Neaga, Andreea; West, Brady; Safran, Jared; Brown, Pamela; Btaiche, Imad; Kuzma-O'Reilly, Barbara; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine predictors of survival and of weaning off parenteral nutrition (PN) in pediatric short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients. Summary Background Data: Pediatric SBS carries extensive morbidity and high mortality, but factors believed to predict survival or weaning from PN have been based on limited studies. This study reviews outcomes of a large number of SBS infants and identifies predictors of success. Methods: Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted on 80 pediatric SBS patients. Primary outcome was survival; secondary outcome was ability to wean off PN. Nonsignificant covariates were eliminated. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Over a mean of 5.1 years of follow-up, survival was 58 of 80 (72.5%) and 51 weaned off PN (63.8%). Cholestasis (conjugated bilirubin ≥2.5 mg/dL) was the strongest predictor of mortality (relative risk [RR] 22.7, P = 0.005). Although absolute small bowel length was only slightly predictive, percentage of normal bowel length (for a given infant's gestational age) was strongly predictive of mortality (if <10% of normal length, RR of death was 5.7, P = 0.003) and of weaning PN (if ≥10% of normal, RR of weaning PN was 11.8, P = 0.001). Presence of the ileocecal valve (ICV) also strongly predicted weaning PN (RR 3.9, P < 0.0005); however, ICV was not predictive of survival. Conclusions: Cholestasis and age-adjusted small bowel length are the major predictors of mortality in pediatric SBS. Age-adjusted small bowel length and ICV are the major predictors of weaning from PN. These data permit better prediction of outcomes of pediatric SBS, which may help to direct future management of these challenging patients. PMID:16135926

  16. Helminth co-infection in Helicobacter pylori infected INS-GAS mice attenuates gastric premalignant lesions of epithelial dysplasia and glandular atrophy and preserves colonization resistance of the stomach to lower bowel microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Whary, Mark T.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Lofgren, Jennifer; Shi, Hai Ning; Taylor, Nancy S.; Correa, Pelayo; Versalovic, James; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Higher prevalence of helminth infections in H. pylori infected children was suggested to potentially lower the life-time risk for gastric adenocarcinoma. In rodent models, helminth co-infection does not reduce Helicobacter-induced inflammation but delays progression of pre-malignant gastric lesions. Because gastric cancer in INS-GAS mice is promoted by intestinal microflora, the impact of Heligmosomoides polygyrus co-infection on H. pylori-associated gastric lesions and microflora were evaluated. Male INS-GAS mice co-infected with H. pylori and H. polygyrus for 5 months were assessed for gastrointestinal lesions, inflammation-related mRNA expression, FoxP3+ cells, epithelial proliferation, and gastric colonization with H. pylori and Altered Schaedler Flora. Despite similar gastric inflammation and high levels of proinflammatory mRNA, helminth co-infection increased FoxP3+ cells in the corpus and reduced H. pylori-associated gastric atrophy (p<0.04), dysplasia (p<0.02) and prevented H. pylori-induced changes in the gastric flora (p<0.05). This is the first evidence of helminth infection reducing H. pylori-induced gastric lesions while inhibiting changes in gastric flora, consistent with prior observations that gastric colonization with enteric microbiota accelerated gastric lesions in INS-GAS mice. Identifying how helminths reduce gastric premalignant lesions and impact bacterial colonization of the H. pylori infected stomach could lead to new treatment strategies to inhibit progression from chronic gastritis to cancer in humans. PMID:24513446

  17. Post-exposure antiviral treatment of norovirus infections effectively protects against diarrhea and reduces virus shedding in the stool in a mortality mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Joana; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Verbeken, Eric; Wobus, Christiane E; Neyts, Johan

    2016-08-01

    Noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis across the world in all age groups and are linked to increased hospitalization and mortality in children, the elderly and immunocompromised. The development of specific antiviral treatment for norovirus gastroenteritis is urgently needed. We explored in a mouse model whether an inhibitor of norovirus replication could be used therapeutically post murine norovirus (MNV)-infection of mice. Using the MNV, we previously discovered that the viral polymerase inhibitor 2'-C-methylcytidine (2CMC) is able to protect against diarrhea and mortality in mice when used prophylactically and to block the transmission of MNV between mice. Here, we investigated whether 2CMC could be used therapeutically, starting treatment between 12 h and 3 days post-infection with 2CMC. Post-exposure treatment of MNV-infected mice with 2CMC was efficient up to 2 days after infection, preventing norovirus-induced diarrhea, delaying and reducing MNV shedding in stool of treated mice. Rehydration of 2CMC-treated animals did not result in a further improvement of the disease evolution compared to antiviral treatment only. The presence of MNV antigens and inflammation in the small intestine of infected mice inversely correlated with the effectiveness of delayed antiviral treatment. Anti-MNV IgGs were detected in re-challenged mice 10 weeks after the first contact, these protected the mice from re-infection. We here demonstrate the benefit of antiviral treatment in ongoing norovirus infections. PMID:27252124

  18. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Dolapcioglu, Can; Dolapcioglu, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications or manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic mechanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mechanisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebrovascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26600970

  19. Feline Leukemia Virus Infection Requires a Post-Receptor Binding Envelope-Dependent Cellular Component▿

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R.; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S.

    2011-01-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (101 to 102 CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (104 to 106 CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells. PMID:21917946

  20. Molecular cloning of NCCRP-1 gene from orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) and characterization of NCCRP-1(+) cells post Cryptocaryon irritans infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xia-Zi; Li, Yan-Wei; Mai, Yong-Zhan; Luo, Xiao-Chun; Dan, Xue-Ming; Li, An-Xing

    2014-10-01

    Nonspecific cytotoxic cells (NCCs) are an important cytotoxic cell population in the innate teleost immune system. The receptor designated "NCC receptor protein 1" (NCCRP-1) has been reported to be involved in the recognition and activation of NCCs. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Epinephelus coioides NCCRP-1 (ecnccrp-1) was cloned. The open reading frame (ORF) of ecnccrp-1 is 699 bp, encoding a 232 amino acid protein that includes proline-rich motifs at the N-terminus and is related to the F-box associated family. Although a bioinformatics analysis showed that EcNCCRP-1 had no signal peptide or transmembrane helices, a polyclonal antibody directed against recombinant EcNCCRP-1 efficiently labeled a membrane protein in the head kidney, detected with Western blot analysis, which indicated that the protein localized to the cell surface. RT-PCR showed that the constitutive expression of ecnccrp-1 was higher in the lymphoid organs, such as the trunk kidney, spleen, head kidney, and thymus, and lower in brain, heart, fat, liver, muscle, and skin. After infection with Cryptocaryon irritans, the transcription of ecnccrp-1 was analyzed at the infected sites (skin and gills) and in the systemic immune organs (head kidney and spleen). At the infected sites, especially the skin, ecnccrp-1 expression was upregulated at 6h post infection, reaching peak expression on day 3 post the primary infection. However, the expression patterns differed in the systemic immune organs. In the spleen, ecnccrp-1 was gradually increased in the early infection period and decreased sharply on day 3 post the primary infection, whereas in the head kidney, the transcription of ecnccrp-1 was depressed during almost the whole course of infection. An immunohistochemical analysis showed that EcNCCRP-1(+) cells accumulated at the sites of infection with C. irritans. These results suggested that NCCs were involved in the process of C. irritans infection in E. coioides. PMID:24844613

  1. Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of Mice from Lethal Rabies Infection.

    PubMed

    Terryn, Sanne; Francart, Aurélie; Rommelaere, Heidi; Stortelers, Catelijne; Van Gucht, Steven

    2016-08-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently. Previously, we generated potent virus-neutralising VHH, also called Nanobodies, against the rabies glycoprotein that are effectively preventing lethal disease in an in vivo mouse model. The VHH domain is the smallest antigen-binding functional fragment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies that can be manufactured in microbial expression systems. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of half-life extended anti-rabies VHH in combination with vaccine for PEP in an intranasal rabies infection model in mice. The PEP combination therapy of systemic anti-rabies VHH and intramuscular vaccine significantly delayed the onset of disease compared to treatment with anti-rabies VHH alone, prolonged median survival time (35 versus 14 days) and decreased mortality (60% versus 19% survival rate), when treated 24 hours after rabies virus challenge. Vaccine alone was unable to rescue mice from lethal disease. As reported also for immune globulins, some interference of anti-rabies VHH with the antigenicity of the vaccine was observed, but this did not impede the synergistic effect. Post exposure treatment with vaccine and human anti-rabies immune globulins was unable to protect mice from lethal challenge. Anti-rabies VHH and vaccine act synergistically to protect mice after rabies virus exposure, which further validates the possible use of anti-rabies VHH for rabies PEP. PMID:27483431

  2. Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of Mice from Lethal Rabies Infection

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Sanne; Francart, Aurélie; Rommelaere, Heidi; Stortelers, Catelijne; Van Gucht, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently. Previously, we generated potent virus-neutralising VHH, also called Nanobodies, against the rabies glycoprotein that are effectively preventing lethal disease in an in vivo mouse model. The VHH domain is the smallest antigen-binding functional fragment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies that can be manufactured in microbial expression systems. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of half-life extended anti-rabies VHH in combination with vaccine for PEP in an intranasal rabies infection model in mice. The PEP combination therapy of systemic anti-rabies VHH and intramuscular vaccine significantly delayed the onset of disease compared to treatment with anti-rabies VHH alone, prolonged median survival time (35 versus 14 days) and decreased mortality (60% versus 19% survival rate), when treated 24 hours after rabies virus challenge. Vaccine alone was unable to rescue mice from lethal disease. As reported also for immune globulins, some interference of anti-rabies VHH with the antigenicity of the vaccine was observed, but this did not impede the synergistic effect. Post exposure treatment with vaccine and human anti-rabies immune globulins was unable to protect mice from lethal challenge. Anti-rabies VHH and vaccine act synergistically to protect mice after rabies virus exposure, which further validates the possible use of anti-rabies VHH for rabies PEP. PMID:27483431

  3. Low Prevalence of Leishmania Infection in Post-Epidemic Areas of Libo Kemkem, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Sordo, Luis; Gadisa, Endalamaw; Custodio, Estefanía; Cruz, Israel; Simón, Fernando; Abraham, Zelalem; Moreno, Javier; Aseffa, Abraham; Tsegaye, Hailu; Nieto, Javier; Chicharro, Carmen; Cañavate, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    In Libo Kemkem (a district of Amhara region, Ethiopia), no cases of kala-azar had ever been reported until 2005 when an outbreak occurred. Over one-third of those cases were children under 15 years of age. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Leishmania infection in children aged 4–15 years. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009. Children participating in the survey were selected using a three-stage cluster sampling method. A total of 386 children were included in the study. The overall prevalence of Leishmania infection (direct agglutination test- and/or rK39 immunochromatographic test- and/or leishmanin skin test-positive subjects) in this population was 1.02% (95% confidence interval = 0–4.54), and prevalence was higher in boys and children older than 12 years. Only one case of active disease was encountered. The results suggest that the conditions responsible for the outbreak no longer reign. However, active surveillance remains necessary. PMID:22665599

  4. Staphylococcus-related glomerulonephritis and poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis: why defining "post" is important in understanding and treating infection-related glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Glassock, Richard J; Alvarado, Anthony; Prosek, Jason; Hebert, Courtney; Parikh, Samir; Satoskar, Anjali; Nadasdy, Tibor; Forman, John; Rovin, Brad; Hebert, Lee A

    2015-06-01

    A spate of recent publications describes a newly recognized form of glomerulonephritis associated with active staphylococcal infection. The key kidney biopsy findings, glomerular immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposits dominant or codominant with IgG deposits, resemble those of IgA nephritis. Many authors describe this condition as "postinfectious" and have termed it "poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis." However, viewed through the prism of poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, the prefix "post" in poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis is historically incorrect, illogical, and misleading with regard to choosing therapy. There are numerous reports describing the use of high-dose steroids to treat poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis. The decision to use steroid therapy suggests that the treating physician believed that the dominant problem was a postinfectious glomerulonephritis, not the infection itself. Unfortunately, steroid therapy in staphylococcus-related glomerulonephritis can precipitate severe staphylococcal sepsis and even death and provides no observable benefits. Poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis is an authentic postinfectious glomerulonephritis; poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis is not. Making this distinction is important from the perspective of history, pathogenesis, and clinical management. PMID:25890425

  5. A case report of bacteremia manifesting as an overwhelming postsplenectomy infection due to Streptococcus pneumoniae post vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Kosuke; Okabe, Hirohisa; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Ikegami, Toru; Harimoto, Norifumi; Itoh, Shinji; Kimura, Koichi; Baba, Hideo; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted for acute epigastralgia and high-grade fever of over 39 °C. The patient had undergone splenectomy for idiopathic portal hypertension 1 year ago and vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae immediately post operation. She developed localized peritoneal irritation and abdominal distension. Her serum creatinine had increased to 1.5 mg/dL and procalcitonin was 12.5 ng/ml. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed edematous large intestine and increased ascites. From these results, the patient was considered to have spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). Vancomycin (VCM) and doripenem (DRPM) were administered to control the infection. Unexpectedly, S. pneumoniae was detected in the blood culture. Hence, ampicillin/sulbactam was administered after discontinuing VCM. The patient recovered without any life-threatening complications and was discharged after 10 days. In conclusion, overwhelming postsplenectomy infection (OPSI) due to S. pneumoniae could develop in patient with splenectomy even after vaccination. Although the bacteremia probably due to SBP and acute renal dysfunction was accompanied by OPSI, our patient recovered rapidly. PMID:27221131

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation response plays an important role in host survival, and it also leads to acute and chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, bowel diseases, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and various neurodegenerative diseases. During the course of inflammation, the ROS level increases. In addition to ROS, several inflammatory mediators produced at the site lead to numerous cell-mediated damages. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a chronic intestinal disorder resulting from a dysfunctional epithelial, innate and adaptive immune response to intestinal microorganisms. The methods involving indomethacin-induced enterocolitis in rats with macroscopic changes of IBD, myeloperoxidase assay, microscopic (histologic) characters and biochemical parameters are discussed. PMID:26939275

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beck, E; Hurwitz, B

    1992-12-01

    1. Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional disorder of the lower intestinal tract affecting approximately 10% of the population and causing a wide range of symptoms. 2. Most cases of irritable bowel syndrome can be diagnosed in general practice on the basis of the presenting history and clinical examination but some patients may need to be referred to a gastro-enterologist for further assessment including sigmoidoscopy and barium enema. 3. The clinical picture may include symptoms of abdominal pain and/or distension and altered bowel habit. Nausea, dyspepsia, gynaecological or bladder symptoms are also common. About a third of patients may give a family history of recurrent abdominal pain. 4. Clinical signs include general anxiety, scars on the abdomen (from previous laparotomies for severe abdominal pain), a palpable and tender left colon or generalized abdominal tenderness, and loud borborygmi. 5. Absolute indications for a specialist assessment are: weight loss rectal bleeding onset of symptoms after the age of 40 a mass. Even in the absence of any of these findings referral is frequently necessary to allay patient anxiety and reinforce the diagnosis. 6. Blood tests are usually non-contributory. Stool specimens should be sent if diarrhoea is a feature. 7. A full explanation emphasizing the benign and often recurrent nature of the condition should be given to help patients understand the nature of their symptoms. Only after review of lifestyle and advice about diet have been provided should drug therapy be tried. PMID:1345152

  8. [Post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders: from the acute episode to chronicity].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Balboa, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) form a major part of gastroenterology practice. Several studies have reported the development of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) after acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Non-gastrointestinal (GI) infections may increase the risk of developing IBS. There are also data showing that a GI infection may trigger functional dyspepsia (PI-FD). The possible development of PI-IBS or PI-FD depends on factors related to both the infection and the host. Microinflammation has been found in patients with post-infectious FGID. Studies performed in animal models show that infection and acute inflammation permanently change gastrointestinal motility and sensitivity. The role of AGE in the development of FGID is important not only because this entity provides an excellent natural model for pathogenic study but also because it provides an opportunity for preventive action. PMID:21641686

  9. Biobased silver nanocolloid coating on silk fibers for prevention of post-surgical wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dhas, Sindhu Priya; Anbarasan, Suruthi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibers are an important biomaterial and are used in surgical sutures due to their remarkable biocompatibility. The major drawback to the application of biomaterials is the risk of bacterial invasion, leading to clinical complications. We have developed an easy and cost-effective method for fabrication of antibacterial silk fibers loaded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by an in situ and ex situ process using an aqueous extract of Rhizophora apiculata leaf. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that well dispersed nanoparticles impregnated the silk fibers both in situ and ex situ. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs in the silk fibers was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. The thermal and mechanical properties of the silk fibers were enhanced after they were impregnated with AgNPs. The silver-coated silk fibers fabricated by the in situ and ex situ method exhibited more than 90% inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Silk fibers doped with AgNPs were found to be biocompatible with 3T3 fibroblasts. The results obtained represent an important advance towards the clinical application of biocompatible AgNP-loaded silk fibers for prevention of surgical wound infections. PMID:26491317

  10. Butyricimonas virosa bacteraemia and bowel disease: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Enemchukwu, C U; Ben-Faras, H; Gialanella, P; Szymczak, W A; Nosanchuk, J D; Madaline, T F

    2016-09-01

    Only two cases of human infection with the anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus Butyricimonas virosa have been previously reported. We describe the case of a 69-year-old man with B. virosa and diverticulitis, further supporting an association of bacteraemia with this pathogen to bowel disease. We also summarize the characteristics of the previously described cases. PMID:27408738

  11. [Irritable bowel syndrome: a functional disorder?].

    PubMed

    Man, Fernando; Bustos Fernández, Luis María

    2013-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a highly prevalent condition responsible for almost one third of visits to the gastroenterologist and huge expenses for diagnosis, treatment and loss of working days. A unique pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated yet and several possibilities have been proposed such as senso-perception and motor disturbances, the effect of stress and anxiety, serotonin receptor failures, activation of abnormal brain areas and pain modulation differences, among others. The absence of a biological marker has led the investigators to consider this syndrome as an exclusion diagnostic condition, once the organic diseases have been discarded The changes in gut microbiota have recently raised great interest among gastroenterologists. The study of the small intestinal bowel overgrowth syndrome, the effect of antibiotics upon the flora, the recognition of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome and the action of probiotics, together with the effect of malabsortion of diet carbohydrates have brought some new light in our knowledge. The present update will focus on the published evidence about the subject, bearing in mind that the mechanisms elicited here are only suitable for a subgroup of patients. PMID:24516961

  12. Short Bowel Syndrome in the Nicu

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sachin C.; Pappas, Cleo; Iyengar, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is the most common cause of intestinal failure in infants. In neonates and young infants, necrotizing enterocolitis, gastroschisis, intestinal atresia and intestinal malrotation/volvulus are the leading causes of SBS. Following an acute post-surgical phase, the residual gastrointestinal tract adapts with reorganization of the crypt-villus histoarchitecture and functional changes in nutrient absorption and motility. A cohesive, multidisciplinary approach can allow most neonates with SBS to transition to full enteral feeds and achieve normal growth and development. In this article, we review the clinical features, management, complications, and prognostic factors in SBS. PMID:23415263

  13. Video capsule endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has evolved to become an important tool for the non-invasive examination of the small bowel, which hitherto had been relatively inaccessible to direct visualisation. VCE has been shown to play a role in monitoring the activity of small bowel Crohn’s disease and can be used to assess the response to anti-inflammatory treatment in Crohn’s disease. For those patients with Crohn’s disease who have undergone an intestinal resection, VCE has been assessed as a tool to detect post-operative recurrence. VCE may also aid in the reclassification of patients with a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unclassified to Crohn’s disease. The evolution of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has expanded the application of this technology further. The use of CCE to assess the activity of ulcerative colitis has been described. This advance in capsule technology has also fuelled interest in its potential role as a minimally invasive tool to assess the whole of GI tract opening the possibility of its use for the panenteric assessment of Crohn’s disease. VCE is a safe procedure. However, the risk of a retained capsule is higher in patients with suspected or confirmed Crohn’s disease compared with patients having VCE examination for other indications. A retained video capsule is rare after successful passage of a patency capsule which may be utilised to pre-screen patients undergoing VCE. This paper describes the use of VCE in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27499830

  14. Molecular epidemiology of influenza A virus infection among hospitalized children in Vietnam during post-pandemic period.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dinh Nguyen; Pham, Thi Minh Hong; Ha, Manh Tuan; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    Genetic variability makes influenza virus to escape the immunity and causes yearly epidemics. Monitoring those changes is necessary for vaccine selection. In addition, H3N2 viruses were considered to be seeded from Southeast Asia before spreading globally. This study described the molecular epidemiology of influenza A during the post-pandemic season 2010-2011 in Vietnam. Nasopharyngeal samples were collected from children with respiratory infections at Children's Hospital 2, Ho Chi Minh City. The HA, NA, M genes were amplified, sequenced and analyzed. Thirty-five of 1,082 (3.2%) patients were positive for influenza A, including 14 pandemic H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm09) and 21 H3N2 infections. H3N2 was dominant in the rainy season (May-October 2010) while H1N1pdm09 was dominant in the dry season (November 2010-April 2011). Phylogenetic analysis showed that Vietnamese H1N1pdm09 sequences in 2010-2011 formed the distinct cluster, with other contemporary Asian and 2012-American sequences, suggesting a possible common ancestor. All were oseltamivir-sensitive except two strains carrying S247N and D199N in NA which reduced the neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility. The Vietnamese H3N2 viruses in mid-2010 belonged to the emerging subclade Perth10/2010, which then spread worldwide in 2011. The Vietnamese influenza viruses were well matched with the Southern Hemisphere vaccine formulation. Mutations at antigenic sites were also identified in these viruses. Surveillance of influenza viruses in tropical countries is important not only for development of their prevention and control strategies but also for earlier identification of the newly emerged strains that may be selected for future vaccine. PMID:25648607

  15. Treatment of Dientamoeba fragilis in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Engsbro, Anne Line; Stensvold, C. Rune; Nielsen, Henrik V.; Bytzer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The role of Dientamoeba fragilis in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is incompletely known. We aimed to investigate whether eradication of D. fragilis alleviates symptoms in IBS. Twenty-five D. fragilis-positive IBS patients were treated with Metronidazole (MZ) or Tetracycline. The patients were mostly female (89%), and mean age (SD) was 35.1 (8.2) years. Microbiological response, evaluated 2 weeks post-treatment, was observed in 15 of 25 patients (60%), all by MZ. Clinical response, defined as adequate relief of symptoms, was observed in 7 of 22 patients (32%), all by MZ. In a logistic regression analysis, we found no significant association between clinical and microbiological response. This case study did not support our hypothesis of a simple association between D. fragilis and IBS. Some D. fragilis-infections were insufficiently treated by MZ. Further studies into the prevalence and effect of eradication of D. fragilis in IBS and into efficient treatments of D. fragilis are warranted. PMID:23091195

  16. X4 and R5 HIV-1 have distinct post-entry requirements for uracil DNA glycosylase during infection of primary cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kate L; Roche, Michael; Gantier, Michael P; Begum, Nasim A; Honjo, Tasuku; Caradonna, Salvatore; Williams, Bryan R G; Mak, Johnson

    2010-06-11

    It has been assumed that R5 and X4 HIV utilize similar strategies to support viral cDNA synthesis post viral entry. In this study, we provide evidence to show that R5 and X4 HIV have distinct requirements for host cell uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG2) during the early stage of infection. UNG2 has been previously implicated in HIV infection, but its precise role remains controversial. In this study we show that, although UNG2 is highly expressed in different cell lines, UNG2 levels are low in the natural host cells of HIV. Short interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous UNG2 in primary cells showed that UNG2 is required for R5 but not X4 HIV infection and that this requirement is bypassed when HIV enters the target cell via vesicular stomatitis virus envelope-glycoprotein-mediated endocytosis. We also show that short interfering RNA knockdown of UNG2 in virus-producing primary cells leads to defective R5 HIV virions that are unable to complete viral cDNA synthesis. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that endogenous UNG2 levels are transiently up-regulated post HIV infection, and this increase in UNG2 mRNA is approximately 10-20 times higher in R5 versus X4 HIV-infected cells. Our data show that both virion-associated UNG2 and HIV infection-induced UNG2 expression are critical for reverse transcription during R5 but not X4 HIV infection. More importantly, we have made the novel observation that R5 and X4 HIV have distinct host cell factor requirements and differential capacities to induce gene expression during the early stages of infection. These differences may result from activation of distinct signaling cascades and/or infection of divergent T-lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:20371602

  17. X4 and R5 HIV-1 Have Distinct Post-entry Requirements for Uracil DNA Glycosylase during Infection of Primary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kate L.; Roche, Michael; Gantier, Michael P.; Begum, Nasim A.; Honjo, Tasuku; Caradonna, Salvatore; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Mak, Johnson

    2010-01-01

    It has been assumed that R5 and X4 HIV utilize similar strategies to support viral cDNA synthesis post viral entry. In this study, we provide evidence to show that R5 and X4 HIV have distinct requirements for host cell uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG2) during the early stage of infection. UNG2 has been previously implicated in HIV infection, but its precise role remains controversial. In this study we show that, although UNG2 is highly expressed in different cell lines, UNG2 levels are low in the natural host cells of HIV. Short interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous UNG2 in primary cells showed that UNG2 is required for R5 but not X4 HIV infection and that this requirement is bypassed when HIV enters the target cell via vesicular stomatitis virus envelope-glycoprotein-mediated endocytosis. We also show that short interfering RNA knockdown of UNG2 in virus-producing primary cells leads to defective R5 HIV virions that are unable to complete viral cDNA synthesis. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that endogenous UNG2 levels are transiently up-regulated post HIV infection, and this increase in UNG2 mRNA is ∼10–20 times higher in R5 versus X4 HIV-infected cells. Our data show that both virion-associated UNG2 and HIV infection-induced UNG2 expression are critical for reverse transcription during R5 but not X4 HIV infection. More importantly, we have made the novel observation that R5 and X4 HIV have distinct host cell factor requirements and differential capacities to induce gene expression during the early stages of infection. These differences may result from activation of distinct signaling cascades and/or infection of divergent T-lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:20371602

  18. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Emeran A.

    2013-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presents with a 7-month history of recurrent, crampy pain in the left lower abdominal quadrant, bloating with abdominal distention, and frequent, loose stools. She reports having had similar but milder symptoms since childhood. She spends long times in the bathroom because she is worried about uncontrollable discomfort and fecal soiling if she does not completely empty her bowels before leaving the house. She feels anxious and fatigued and is frustrated that her previous physician did not seem to take her distress seriously. Physical examination is unremarkable except for tenderness over the left lower quadrant. How should her case be evaluated and treated? PMID:18420501

  19. Optimal Bowel Preparation for Video Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Joo; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shim, Ki-Nam

    2016-01-01

    During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), several factors, such as air bubbles, food material in the small bowel, and delayed gastric and small bowel transit time, influence diagnostic yield, small bowel visualization quality, and cecal completion rate. Therefore, bowel preparation before VCE is as essential as bowel preparation before colonoscopy. To date, there have been many comparative studies, consensus, and guidelines regarding different kinds of bowel cleansing agents in bowel preparation for small bowel VCE. Presently, polyethylene glycol- (PEG-) based regimens are given primary recommendation. Sodium picosulphate-based regimens are secondarily recommended, as their cleansing efficacy is less than that of PEG-based regimens. Sodium phosphate as well as complementary simethicone and prokinetics use are considered. In this paper, we reviewed previous studies regarding bowel preparation for small bowel VCE and suggested optimal bowel preparation of VCE. PMID:26880894

  20. Optimal Bowel Preparation for Video Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Joo; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shim, Ki-Nam

    2016-01-01

    During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), several factors, such as air bubbles, food material in the small bowel, and delayed gastric and small bowel transit time, influence diagnostic yield, small bowel visualization quality, and cecal completion rate. Therefore, bowel preparation before VCE is as essential as bowel preparation before colonoscopy. To date, there have been many comparative studies, consensus, and guidelines regarding different kinds of bowel cleansing agents in bowel preparation for small bowel VCE. Presently, polyethylene glycol- (PEG-) based regimens are given primary recommendation. Sodium picosulphate-based regimens are secondarily recommended, as their cleansing efficacy is less than that of PEG-based regimens. Sodium phosphate as well as complementary simethicone and prokinetics use are considered. In this paper, we reviewed previous studies regarding bowel preparation for small bowel VCE and suggested optimal bowel preparation of VCE. PMID:26880894

  1. The role of small bowel endoscopy in small bowel Crohn's disease: when and how?

    PubMed

    Kim, Mikang; Jang, Hyun Joo

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopy has a crucial role in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It contributes in supporting the diagnosis of IBD with the clinical history, physical examination, laboratory findings, and targeted biopsies. Furthermore, endoscopy has a significant role in assessing disease activity and distribution in treatment efficacy evaluation, post-surgical recurrence risk, and cancer surveillance in patients with long-lasting illness. Endoscopy also provides therapeutic potential for the treatment of IBD, especially with stricture dilatation and treatment of bleeding. Small bowel (SB) endoscopy (capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy) and cross-sectional radiologic imaging (computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography) have become important diagnostic options to diagnose and treat patients with SB Crohn's disease. We reviewed the present role of SB endoscopy in patients with SB Crohn's disease. PMID:27433142

  2. The role of small bowel endoscopy in small bowel Crohn's disease: when and how?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mikang

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy has a crucial role in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It contributes in supporting the diagnosis of IBD with the clinical history, physical examination, laboratory findings, and targeted biopsies. Furthermore, endoscopy has a significant role in assessing disease activity and distribution in treatment efficacy evaluation, post-surgical recurrence risk, and cancer surveillance in patients with long-lasting illness. Endoscopy also provides therapeutic potential for the treatment of IBD, especially with stricture dilatation and treatment of bleeding. Small bowel (SB) endoscopy (capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy) and cross-sectional radiologic imaging (computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography) have become important diagnostic options to diagnose and treat patients with SB Crohn's disease. We reviewed the present role of SB endoscopy in patients with SB Crohn's disease. PMID:27433142

  3. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mosab; Karimi Torshizi, M. Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Dennehy, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic) and route (oral gavage or vent lip) of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration. PMID:27555842

  4. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mosab; Karimi Torshizi, M Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Dennehy, John J

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic) and route (oral gavage or vent lip) of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration. PMID:27555842

  5. [Urinary infection in the pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Delcroix, M; Zone, V; Cheront, C; Adam, M H; Duquesne, G; Noel, A M

    1994-05-01

    Urinary tract infections are common during pregnancy. When unrecognized, they can be responsible for complications such as threatened premature labour and impaired intra-uterine development. Detection and appropriate treatment are thus essential. This article reviews the pathophysiology of urinary tract infections during pregnancy and the three major entities involved--different but related to each other--are detailed (significant asymptomatic bacteriuria or SAB, acute cystitis and acute pyelonephritis), together with their specific treatment. SAB tends to persist during pregnancy, then leading in the absence of treatment to a potentially serious complication (acute pyelonephritis) in approximately one woman in five. SAB should be sought at the first prenatal visit by microscopic and bacteriological examination of a properly obtained urine specimen. Lower genital infections should also be sought and treated, without forgetting to remind the patient of preventive measures (adequate hygiene, sufficient urine output, post-coital micturition, regular bowel habit). PMID:8036390

  6. Postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Pallotti, Francesca; De Giorgio, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2009-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits, not sustained by structural changes. There is now consistent evidence indicating that IBS may be the adverse outcome of an acute episode of infectious gastroenteritis, the so-called postinfectious (PI) IBS. The infectious agents involved in the development of PI-IBS include pathogenic bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Abdominal pain and diarrhea are the most common symptoms of PI-IBS. Several studies identified a number of risk factors increasing the susceptibility for PI-IBS development. These include the virulence of the pathogen, the severity, and duration of the acute enteritis, younger age, female sex, and psychological disturbances. Several mucosal abnormalities in the colon or ileum of patients who develop PI-IBS have been described. These changes include increased mucosal permeability, an increased amount of intraepithelial lymphocytes, lamina propria T cells, and mast cells, as well as serotonin-containing enteroendocrine cells. The mediators released by these activated cells may evoke enteric nervous system responses, excite sensory afferent pathways, and induce visceral hyperalgesia. Little is known about the prognosis of PI-IBS, although it is likely better than that of nonspecific IBS. There is little evidence about a specific treatment for PI-IBS. Although probiotics and antibiotics may be promising in the prevention of PI-IBS, the efficacy of these treatments should be assessed in an ad hoc designed study. PMID:19300138

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in patients with small bowel transplantation: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Sait Murat; Kılınç, Selçuk; Kebapçı, Eyüp; Tuğmen, Cem; Gürkan, Alp; Baran, Maşallah; Kurtulmuş, Yusuf; Ölmez, Mustafa; Karaca, Cezmi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy on the prevention of acute rejection and graft vs host disease following small bowel transplantation. METHODS: In our transplantation center, 6 isolated intestinal transplants have been performed with MSC therapy since 2009. The primary reasons for transplants were short gut syndrome caused by surgical intestine resection for superior mesenteric artery thrombosis (n = 4), Crohn’s disease (n = 1) and intestinal aganglionosis (n = 1). Two of the patients were children. At the time of reperfusion, the first dose of MSCs cultured from the patient’s bone marrow was passed into the transplanted intestinal artery at a dose of 1000000 cells/kg. The second and third doses of MSCs were given directly into the mesenteric artery through the arterial anastomosis using an angiography catheter on day 15 and 30 post-transplant. RESULTS: The median follow-up for these patients was 10.6 mo (min: 2 mo-max: 30 mo). Three of the patients developed severe acute rejection. One of these patients did not respond to bolus steroid therapy. Although the other two patients did respond to anti-rejection treatment, they developed severe fungal and bacterial infections. All of these patients died in the 2nd and 3rd months post-transplant due to sepsis. The remaining patients who did not have acute rejection had good quality of life with no complications observed during the follow-up period. In addition, their intestinal grafts were functioning properly in the 13th, 25th and 30th month post-transplant. The patients who survived did not encounter any problems related to MSC transplantation. CONCLUSION: Although this is a small case series and not a randomized study, it is our opinion that small bowel transplantation is an effective treatment for intestinal failure, and MSC therapy may help to prevent acute rejection and graft vs host disease following intestinal transplantation. PMID:25009395

  8. In ovo delivery of Toll-like receptor 2 ligand, lipoteichoic acid induces pro-inflammatory mediators reducing post-hatch infectious laryngotracheitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Thapa, S; Nagy, E; Abdul-Careem, M F

    2015-04-15

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands are pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognized by the TLRs resulting in induction of host innate immune responses. One of the PAMPs that binds to TLR2 and cluster of differentiation (CD) 14 is lipotechoic acid (LTA), which activates downstream signals culminating in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we investigated whether in ovo LTA delivery leads to the induction of antiviral responses against post-hatch infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) infection. We first delivered the LTA into embryo day (ED)18 eggs via in ovo route so that the compound is available at the respiratory mucosa. Then the LTA treated and control ED18 eggs were allowed to hatch and the hatched chicken was infected with ILTV intratracheally on the day of hatch. We found that in ovo delivered LTA reduces ILTV infection post-hatch. We also found that in ovo delivery of LTA significantly increases mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in pre-hatch embryo lungs as well as mononuclear cell infiltration, predominantly macrophages, in lung of post-hatch chickens. Altogether, the data suggest that in ovo delivered LTA could be used to reduce ILTV infection in newly hatched chickens. PMID:25764942

  9. Bacterial Intestinal Superinfections in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Beyond Clostridum difficile.

    PubMed

    Lobatón, Triana; Domènech, Eugeni

    2016-07-01

    Besides genetics and environmental factors, intestinal microbiota seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. For many decades, it has been said that some enteropathogens may even trigger both inflammatory bowel disease development and disease flares. For this reason, stool testing had been performed in inflammatory bowel disease flares but current guidelines only recommend to rule out Clostridium difficile infection and there is no clear advice for other enteropathogens given that the scarce available evidence points at a low prevalence of this sort of intestinal superinfections with no clear impact on disease course. The present article reviews the current knowledge about the role of bacterial enteropathogens on disease pathogenesis and flares beyond C. difficile. PMID:27104824

  10. Vaccines and recommendations for their use in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Tembleque, María Dolores; Corella, Carmen; Pérez-Calle, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    The patient with inflammatory bowel disease will be predisposed to numerous infections due their immune status. It is therefore important to understand the immune and serologic status at diagnosis and to put the patient into an adapted vaccination program. This program would be applied differently according to two patient groups: the immunocompromised and the non-immunocom-promised. In general, the first group would avoid the use of live-virus vaccines, and in all cases, inflammatory bowel disease treatment would take precedence over vaccine risk. It is important to individualize vaccination schedules according to the type of patient, the treatment used and the disease pattern.In addition, patient with inflammatory bowel disease should be considered for the following vaccines: varicella vaccine, human papilloma virus, influenza, pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and hepatitis B vaccine. PMID:23538680

  11. Post-operative infection with fresh frozen allograft: reported outcomes of a hospital-based bone bank over 14 years.

    PubMed

    Man, Wing Yum; Monni, Toni; Jenkins, Ruth; Roberts, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Femoral head bone allografts have traditionally been used to provide mechanical stability to areas of bony deficiency, or for its osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties. Concerns have been raised over increased infection rates following the use of fresh-frozen graft tissue. This retrospective study aims to investigate the outcomes of fresh frozen femoral heads kept in a regulated, non-commercial bone bank at a university teaching hospital.The local bone bank database was used to identify released femoral heads during a 14 year study period (September 1999-December 2013) whereby a retrospective review of patient records was undertaken to determine clinical outcome. During the observed study period, 427 femoral heads were released from cold storage. Of these, 270 femoral heads had a mean follow-up of 347 days. 157 femoral heads were excluded due to insufficient follow-up data (n = 132) or discarded due to breaks in the cold chain prior to use (n = 25). Of the 270 included femoral heads, 231 (85.6 %) had no reported complications with good graft incorporation. In the remaining 39 with reported complications, only 5 (2.6 %) developed a postoperative infection. Our findings suggest that the use of fresh frozen allograft does not materially increase the risk of post-operative bacterial infection. Our reported post-operative infection rates are comparable with infection rates of other similar studies on fresh frozen allograft use. PMID:26910111

  12. Etiology and pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease--environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Andus, T; Gross, V

    2000-01-01

    Environmental factors play an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease. There is a strong and consistent association between smoking and Crohn's disease, and between nonsmoking and ulcerative colitis. Despite extensive research, the exact pathophysiological mechanisms for these associations remain unclear. In spite of this, some clinical trials with nicotine-patches showed beneficial effects for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Associations of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis with other environmental factors are weaker like the association with use of oral contraceptives or those less well investigated such as the association with childhood hygiene. Most studies suggesting a potential pathogenetic role of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis or an effect of tuberculostatic therapy in Crohn's disease could not be reproduced by others. Perinatal or childhood infections by viruses like measles are heavily debated, but not proven to be causal for inflammatory bowel disease. Coagulation disorders have been described as protecting from inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting hypercoagulability to be a pathogenetic factor. Some studies described that appendectomy may prevent the onset of ulcerative colitis in man and mice. Other environmental factors such as hydrogen sulfide, tonsillectomy, diet, blood transfusions, and Listeria also require confirmation. There are, however, convincing data from genetic animal models and twin studies that environmental factors as the intestinal bacterial flora interact with susceptible hosts to cause inflammatory bowel disease. Inflammatory bowel diseases have multifactorial etiologies, which require a differentiated approach for treatment and prevention. PMID:10690583

  13. Does stress induce bowel dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ming; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Kao, John Y

    2014-08-01

    Psychological stress is known to induce somatic symptoms. Classically, many gut physiological responses to stress are mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is, however, a growing body of evidence of stress-induced corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) release causing bowel dysfunction through multiple pathways, either through the HPA axis, the autonomic nervous systems, or directly on the bowel itself. In addition, recent findings of CRF influencing the composition of gut microbiota lend support for the use of probiotics, antibiotics, and other microbiota-altering agents as potential therapeutic measures in stress-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:24881644

  14. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Arthur; Zeissig, Sebastian; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Insights into inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are advancing rapidly owing to immunologic investigations of a plethora of animal models of intestinal inflammation, ground-breaking advances in the interrogation of diseases that are inherited as complex genetic traits, and the development of culture-independent methods to define the composition of the intestinal microbiota. These advances are bringing a deeper understanding to the genetically determined interplay between the commensal microbiota, intestinal epithelial cells, and the immune system and the manner in which this interplay might be modified by relevant environmental factors in the pathogenesis of IBD. This review examines these interactions and, where possible, potential lessons from IBD-directed, biologic therapies that may allow for elucidation of pathways that are central to disease pathogenesis in humans. PMID:20192811

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Szigethy, Eva; McLafferty, Laura; Goyal, Alka

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews the etiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and associated psychological sequelae in children and adolescents with this lifelong disease. Pediatric-onset IBD, consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, has significant medical morbidity and in many young persons is also associated with psychological and psychosocial challenges. Depression and anxiety are particularly prevalent and have a multifaceted etiology, including IBD-related factors such as cytokines and steroids used to treat IBD and psychosocial stress. A growing number of empirically supported interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis, and educational resources, help youth and their parents cope with IBD as well as the psychological and psychosocial sequelae. While there is convincing evidence that such interventions can help improve anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life, their effects on IBD severity and course await further study. PMID:20478501

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Szigethy, Eva; McLafferty, Laura; Goyal, Alka

    2011-08-01

    This article reviews the etiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and associated psychological sequelae in children and adolescents with this lifelong disease. Pediatric-onset IBD, consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, has significant medical morbidity and in many young persons is also associated with psychological and psychosocial challenges. Depression and anxiety are particularly prevalent and have a multifaceted etiology, including IBD-related factors such as cytokines and steroids used to treat IBD and psychosocial stress. A growing number of empirically supported interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis, and educational resources, help youth and their parents cope with IBD as well as the psychological and psychosocial sequelae. While there is convincing evidence that such interventions can help improve anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life, their effects on IBD severity and course await further study. PMID:21855713

  17. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection. PMID:26875963

  18. Multivisceral and Small Bowel Transplantation at Shiraz Organ Transplant Center

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, S.; Mehdi, S. H.; Aliakbarian, M.; Kazemi, K.; Shamsaeefar, A.; Bahreini, A.; Mansoorian, M. R.; Malekhosseini, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multivisceral transplantations were initially done in animal models to understand the immunological effects. Later on, in human beings, it has been considered a salvage procedure for unresectable complex abdominal malignancies. With advancement in surgical techniques, availability of better immunosuppressive drugs, and development of better post-operative management protocols, outcomes have been improved after these complex surgical procedures. Objective: To analyze and report results of multivisceral, modified multivisceral, and small bowel transplantations done at Shiraz Organ Transplant Center, Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: Medical records of all patients who underwent multivisceral, modified multivisceral, and small bowel transplants were retrospectively analyzed. Results: There were 18 patients. The most common indications for the procedure in our series were unresectable carcinoma of pancreas followed by short bowel syndrome. 10 patients were alive after a median follow-up of 8.7 (range: 3–32) months. The remaining 8 patients died post-operatively, mostly from septicemia. Conclusion: Multivisceral and small bowel transplantations are promising treatments for complex abdominal pathologies. PMID:25013680

  19. Routine pre-and post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant computed tomography of the abdomen for detecting invasive fungal infection has limited value

    PubMed Central

    Kaste, Sue C.; Kaufman, Robert A.; Sunkara, Anusha; Kang, Guolian; Morris, Cynthia; Leung, Wing; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of obtaining chest and abdomen CT evaluating for invasive fungal infection (IFI) pre-and post-HSCT remains unclear. The study was conducted as a Quality Improvement project. Chest and abdomen CT of patients who underwent an allogeneic HSCT over a 13 month period were reviewed. Scans included those done pre-transplant in all patients, and day 0–100 post-transplant in selected patients. There were 66 patients with chest and abdomen CT scans pre-transplant. Chest CT was suggestive of IFI in 9 (13.6%) patients including 3 patients with prior history of IFI. After transplant, 37 patients had initial chest CT, and 14 patients had initial abdominal CT. The first chest CT post-transplant was suggestive of IFI in 3 patients; all had an abnormal CT pre-transplant. Following the initial post-transplant evaluation 15 patients had 28 additional CT scans of the chest, and 12 patients had 19 additional CT scans of the abdomen. An abnormal chest CT with proven evidence of IFI was seen in only one patient. None of the 99 abdominal CT scans performed pre-or post-transplant had evidence of IFI. There is little benefit in obtaining abdominal CT scans in HSCT patients for detecting IFI either pre-or post-transplant. PMID:25748273

  20. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  1. Post-exposure treatment with whole inactivated H5N1 avian influenza virus protects against lethal homologous virus infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Mable; Ranadheera, Charlene; Audet, Jonathan; Morin, Jocelyn; Leung, Anders; Kobasa, Darwyn

    2016-01-01

    Concerns with H5N1 influenza viruses include their prevalence in wild and domestic poultry, high mortality rate (~60%) in humans with some strains, lack of pre-existing immunity in humans, and the possibility that these viruses acquire mutations that enable efficient transmission between humans. H5 subtype viruses of Eurasian origin have recently appeared in wild and domestic bird populations in North America, and have led to the generation of new virus strains that are highly pathogenic in poultry. These new H5 HA containing viruses with their ability to evolve rapidly represent an unknown threat to humans in contact with infected poultry, and vaccination with an off-the-shelf vaccine may be impractical to provide protection to at-risk individuals. Instead, we have evaluated the efficacy of a formalin-inactivated vaccine, which could be derived directly from a circulating virus, to provide post-exposure protection. This strategy was evaluated using a prototypic highly pathogenic avian H5N1 strain, A/Vietnam/1203/2004, and demonstrated rapid induction of adaptive immune responses providing protection in a mammalian model of lethal infection. Additionally, this post-exposure vaccine was highly efficacious when administered 24 hours after exposure. This study offers a platform for developing effective post-exposure vaccines for treatment of highly virulent influenza infections. PMID:27405487

  2. Post-exposure treatment with whole inactivated H5N1 avian influenza virus protects against lethal homologous virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Mable; Ranadheera, Charlene; Audet, Jonathan; Morin, Jocelyn; Leung, Anders; Kobasa, Darwyn

    2016-01-01

    Concerns with H5N1 influenza viruses include their prevalence in wild and domestic poultry, high mortality rate (~60%) in humans with some strains, lack of pre-existing immunity in humans, and the possibility that these viruses acquire mutations that enable efficient transmission between humans. H5 subtype viruses of Eurasian origin have recently appeared in wild and domestic bird populations in North America, and have led to the generation of new virus strains that are highly pathogenic in poultry. These new H5 HA containing viruses with their ability to evolve rapidly represent an unknown threat to humans in contact with infected poultry, and vaccination with an off-the-shelf vaccine may be impractical to provide protection to at-risk individuals. Instead, we have evaluated the efficacy of a formalin-inactivated vaccine, which could be derived directly from a circulating virus, to provide post-exposure protection. This strategy was evaluated using a prototypic highly pathogenic avian H5N1 strain, A/Vietnam/1203/2004, and demonstrated rapid induction of adaptive immune responses providing protection in a mammalian model of lethal infection. Additionally, this post-exposure vaccine was highly efficacious when administered 24 hours after exposure. This study offers a platform for developing effective post-exposure vaccines for treatment of highly virulent influenza infections. PMID:27405487

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... rcom ing any disease, especially inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There can be many causes of inadequate nutrition in children and adolescents with IBD. First, a child’s appetite may decrease during a “ ...

  4. An Unusual Case of Small Bowel Volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, Srinidhi; Balasubramanya, Kanakapura Srinivasamurthy; Nanjaiah, Basavaraju

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel volvulus is a rare and life threatening surgical emergency. Nearly 75% of volvulus occurs in colon and 25% occurs in small bowel. Small bowel volvulus is abnormal twisting of bowel loops around the axis of its own mesentry leading to twisting and occlusion of mesenteric vessels causing intestinal obstruction, venous engorgement, gangrene and perforation. Small bowel volvulus is more common in neonates and young adults and very rare in adults. We are reporting a first case of small bowel volvulus and gangrene caused by herniation of ovarian cyst through mesenteric defect and twisting of small bowel around the axis of ovarian cyst leading to closed loop obstruction, small bowel volvulus and gangrene. Outcome of the disease is mainly based on the early diagnosis and intervention. Mortality is about 5.8 - 8% in nongangrenous SBV which increases drastically to 20 – 100% in gangrenous bowel. PMID:26676224

  5. Laparoscopic Surgery is Useful for Preventing Recurrence of Small Bowel Obstruction After Surgery for Postoperative Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Sato, Takeo; Naito, Masanori; Ogura, Naoto; Yamanashi, Takahiro; Miura, Hirohisa; Tsutsui, Atsuko; Yamashita, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Risk factors for recurrence postoperative small bowel obstruction in patients who have postoperative abdominal surgery remain unclear. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 123 patients who underwent surgery for ileus that developed after abdominal surgery from 1999 through 2013. There were 58 men (47%) and 65 women (53%), with a mean age of 63 years (range, 17 to 92 y). The following surgical procedures were performed: lower gastrointestinal surgery in 47 patients (39%), gynecologic surgery in 39 (32%), upper gastrointestinal surgery in 15 (12%), appendectomy in 9 (7%), cholecystectomy in 5 (4%), urologic surgery in 5 (4%), and repair of injuries caused by traffic accidents in 3 (2%). Laparoscopic surgery was performed in 75 patients (61%), and open surgery was done in 48 (39%). We examined the following 11 potential risk factors for recurrence of small bowel obstruction after surgery for ileus: sex, age, body mass index, the number of episodes of ileus, the number of previously performed operations, the presence or absence of radiotherapy, the previously used surgical technique, the current surgical technique (laparoscopic surgery, open surgery), operation time, bleeding volume, and the presence or absence of enterectomy. Results: The median follow-up was 57 months (range, 7 to 185 mo). Laparoscopic surgery was switched to open surgery in 11 patients (18%). The reason for surgery for postoperative small bowel obstruction was adhesion to the midline incision in 36 patients (29%), band formation in 30 (24%), intrapelvic adhesion in 23 (19%), internal hernia in 13 (11%), small bowel adhesion in 20 (16%), and others in 1 (1%). Postoperative complications developed in 35 patients (28%): wound infection in 12 (10%), recurrence of postoperative small bowel obstruction in 12 (10%), paralytic ileus in 4 (3%), intra-abdominal abscess in 3 (2%), suture failure in 1 (1%), anastomotic bleeding in 1 (1%), enteritis in 1 (1%), and dysuria in 1 (1

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome: diagnosis and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-10-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome: Diagnosis and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  8. A potential association between exposure to hepatitis B virus and small bowel adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    DeFilippis, Ersilia M; Mehta, Mamta; Ludwig, Emmy

    2016-06-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) has never been described as a risk factor for small bowel adenocarcinoma, although infection is a known risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. From May 2009 to December 2014, we implemented an institution-wide screening program for hepatitis B viral serologies prior to starting chemotherapy. Evidence of exposure [hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) positivity in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity] was highest in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (21.1%), followed by small bowel cancer (12.5%). The small bowel adenocarcinoma cases with anti-HBc positivity were reviewed. Special attention was paid to known risk factors for small bowel cancers. One patient had a diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). However, the other patients had no genetic syndromes, history of inflammatory bowel disease or other chronic inflammation to explain their risk. We postulate exposure to bile acids, tumorigenesis of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and/or damage to the intestinal mucosa secondary to HBV exposure/infection as potential mechanisms for development of small bowel adenocarcinoma. More research is warranted to further elucidate this association. PMID:27284484

  9. A potential association between exposure to hepatitis B virus and small bowel adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DeFilippis, Ersilia M.; Mehta, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) has never been described as a risk factor for small bowel adenocarcinoma, although infection is a known risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. From May 2009 to December 2014, we implemented an institution-wide screening program for hepatitis B viral serologies prior to starting chemotherapy. Evidence of exposure [hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) positivity in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity] was highest in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (21.1%), followed by small bowel cancer (12.5%). The small bowel adenocarcinoma cases with anti-HBc positivity were reviewed. Special attention was paid to known risk factors for small bowel cancers. One patient had a diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). However, the other patients had no genetic syndromes, history of inflammatory bowel disease or other chronic inflammation to explain their risk. We postulate exposure to bile acids, tumorigenesis of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and/or damage to the intestinal mucosa secondary to HBV exposure/infection as potential mechanisms for development of small bowel adenocarcinoma. More research is warranted to further elucidate this association. PMID:27284484

  10. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ozisler, Zuhal; Koklu, Kurtulus; Ozel, Sumru; Unsal-Delialioglu, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efficacy of bowel program on gastrointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-five spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysreflexia) and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral medication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation) were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identified in 44 (80%) of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55) and incontinence (42%, 23/55) were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55) and after (73%, 40/55) bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were significantly decreased and constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were significantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26330842

  11. Routine pre- and post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant computed tomography of the abdomen for detecting invasive fungal infection has limited value.

    PubMed

    Kaste, Sue C; Kaufman, Robert A; Sunkara, Anusha; Kang, Guolian; Morris, Cynthia; Leung, Wing; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2015-06-01

    The diagnostic utility of obtaining chest and abdomen computed tomography (CT) to evaluate for invasive fungal infection (IFI) before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) remains unclear. The study was conducted as a quality improvement project. Chest and abdomen CT of patients who underwent an allogeneic HSCT over a 13-month period were reviewed. Scans included those performed pretransplant in all patients and days 0 to 100 post-transplant in selected patients. Sixty-six patients had chest and abdomen CT scans pretransplant. Chest CT was suggestive of IFI in 9 patients (13.6%), including 3 patients with prior history of IFI. After transplant, 37 patients had an initial chest CT and 14 patients an initial abdominal CT. The first chest CT post-transplant was suggestive of IFI in 3 patients; all had an abnormal CT pretransplant. After the initial post-transplant evaluation, 15 patients had 28 additional CT scans of the chest and 12 patients 19 additional CT scans of the abdomen. An abnormal chest CT with proven evidence of IFI was seen in only 1 patient. None of the 99 abdominal CT scans performed pre- or post-transplant had evidence of IFI. There is little benefit in obtaining abdominal CT scans in HSCT patients for detecting IFI either pre- or post-transplant. PMID:25748273

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease: Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas. PMID:24415861

  13. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 18 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron); 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod); antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]); antispasmodics (including peppermint oil); cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT); hypnotherapy; soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation; and loperamide. PMID:21718578

  14. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 27 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron), 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]), antispasmodics (including peppermint oil), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), hypnotherapy, loperamide, and soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation. PMID:22296841

  15. Overview of pediatric short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duro, Debora; Kamin, Daniel; Duggan, Christopher

    2008-08-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a malabsorptive state occuring as a result of surgical resection or congenital disease of a significant portion of the small intestine . The amount of resection or remaining bowel generally dictates the degree of malabsorption and consequentely the need for specialized enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition (PN). Intestinal failure in the context of SBS is defined as a dependence on PN to maintain minimal energy and fluid requirement for growth in children. Common causes of SBS in infants and children include necrotizing enterocolitis, midgut volvulus, intestinal atresia, and gastroschisis. Early identification of patients at risk for long-term PN dependency is the first step toward avoiding severe complications. Close monitoring of nutritional status, steady and early introduction of enteral nutrition, and aggressive prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infections such as central venous catheter sepsis and bacterial overgrowth can significantly improve the prognosis. Intestinal transplantation is an emerging treatment that may be considered when intestinal failure is irreversible and children are experiencing serious complications related to TPN administration. PMID:18667916

  16. Preparing the bowel for colonoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Abubakar, K; Goggin, N; Gormally, S; Durnin, M; Drumm, B

    1995-01-01

    Bowel preparation methods for total colonoscopy in children generally involve whole gut irrigation with electrolyte lavage solutions, which in most children will require hospitalisation for nasogastric tube administration. The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of oral bisacodyl combined with a single phosphate enema as a bowel preparation regimen in children. In an open prospective trial, 30 children (aged 18 months-15 years) were given oral bisacodyl on each morning of the two days before colonoscopy. The children were maintained on a normal diet. A phosphate enema was administered on the morning of the procedure. The adequacy of bowel preparation was graded as grade I if no faecal material was encountered, grade II if small amounts of faecal material were present in scattered locations, and grade III if there was poor preparation with faecal material precluding satisfactory visualisation of the bowel mucosa. Eight children (26.6%) had minor abdominal cramps when taking bisacodyl, but all had a previous history of similar pain. Five children (16.6%), all under 5 years of age, cried during the administration of phosphate enema. Bowel preparation was considered excellent (grade I) in 26 (86.6%) and good (grade II) in four (13.3%). In all patients adequate visualisation of the bowel mucosa was obtained. Oral bisacodyl combined with a single phosphate enema provides an ideal method of preparing the bowel for total colonoscopy. This preparation allows colonoscopy to be carried out as a day case procedure in children while maintaining them on a normal diet. PMID:8554368

  17. [NEWS IN ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS OF IRRITATED BOWEL SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Sheptulin, A A; Vize-Khripunova, M A

    2016-01-01

    The concept of irritated bowel syndrome as a complex of functional disorders that can not be explained by organic changes and are totally due to intestinal motility and visceral sensitivity needs revision. The development of this syndrome also depends on a number of pathogenetic and etiological factors, such as inflammation of intestinal mucosa, changes of its permeability, previous infection, altered microflora, gene polymorphism, and food hypersensitivity. PMID:27459756

  18. Complex Primary Total Knee Replacement (TKR) Using Prophylactic Gastrocnemius Flap and Rotating-Hinge Knee in Post-traumatic, Infective Arthritis of the Knee – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Sanjeev; Nayak, Biswaranjan; Mishra, Laxmikanta; Sahoo, Akshaya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Prophylactic gastrocnemius flap with primary rotating hinge knee is technically demanding in a case of neglected post-traumatic, infective arthritis of the knee, with challenges of compromised skin and soft tissues, articular bone defect, limb mal-alignment, gross instability, retained hardware and a contracted extensor mechanism with the patella fixed in the lateral gutter all in combination, is rarely reported. We report such a complex case in this study. Case Report: We report a 48 year male patient with a history of fracture lateral femoral condyle of right knee due to road traffic accident 10 years back, for which he got operated with open reduction and internal fixation with cancellous screws, which subsequently got infected. Primary procedure undertaken was removal of implants, debridement, placement of antibiotic-cement spacer followed by prophylactic medial gastrocnemius flap and a temporary joint spanning external fixator. Definitive procedure undertaken, after clearance of infection in 12 weeks was conversion to a rotating hinge TKR using a lateral para-patellar arthrotomy & tibial tubercle osteotomy to address the challenges of fixed patella in the lateral gutter and contracted ligamentum patellae. At one year follow up, the knee was painless, stable, with satisfactory range of motion and improved function without any infection or aseptic lysis. Conclusion: Prophylactic Gastrocnemius flap cover along with rotating hinge knee arthroplasty using a lateral para-patellar approach and tibial tubercle osteotomy in a case of neglected post-traumatic, infective arthritis of knee with the complexities of limb mal-alignment, compromised skin and soft tissue, articular bone loss and ligamentous instability is a satisfactory bail out option in such a highly complex joint scenario. PMID:27299096

  19. Afferent hypersensitivity in a mouse model of post-inflammatory gut dysfunction: role of altered serotonin metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Christopher; Beyak, Michael; Foley, Stephen; Singh, Gulzar; Marsden, Charles; Spiller, Robin; Grundy, David

    2008-01-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important clinical feature associated with irritable bowel syndrome which in some patients has been linked to prior infection. Here we employ an animal model in which transient infection leads to persistent gut dysfunction to investigate the role of altered 5-HT metabolism upon afferent mechanosensensitivity in the post-infected gut. Jejunal segments isolated from Trichinella spiralis-infected mice were used to assess 5-HT metabolism whilst afferent activity in T. spiralis-infected mice was studied by extracellular recordings from jejunal mesenteric afferent bundles and patch clamp recordings of isolated nodose ganglion neurons (NGNs). During acute infection, intestinal 5-HT content and release increased, 5-HT turnover decreased and afferent discharge in response to mechanical stimulation was attenuated. By day 28 post infection (PI), 5-HT turnover had normalized, but 5-HT content and release were still elevated. This was associated with afferent mechano-hypersensitivity, which persisted for 8 weeks PI and was susceptible to 5-HT3 receptor blockade. NGNs from post-infected animals were more excitable than controls but their current densities in response to 2-methyl-5-HT were lower. T. spiralis infection increased mucosal 5-HT bioavailability and affected the spontaneous activity and mechanosensitivity of gastrointestinal sensory nerves. This involved an initial hyposensitivity occurring during acute infection followed by long-term hypersensitivity in the post-infectious period that was in part mediated by 5-HT acting via 5-HT3 receptors. Functional down-regulation of 5-HT3 receptors also occurs in the post-infected animals, which may represent an adaptive response to increased mucosal 5-HT bioavailability. PMID:18653657

  20. [Irritable bowel syndrome in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Shimada, A; Takano, M

    1992-11-01

    We studied seventy patients, 23 males and 47 females with irritable bowel syndrome in adolescence aged 13-19 yrs, who visited the department of psychosomatic medicine in Takano Hospital during about six year period of April, 1986-July, 1992. Takano Hospital is a coloproctological center in Kumamoto. In the clinical pattern of adolescent patients with irritable bowel syndrome the "gas" pattern was dominant (51.4%). Patients with the gas pattern have severe symptoms of flatus, fullness, rumbling sound and abdominal pain as well as bowel dysfunction, constipation and diarrhea in a classroom. Next, the diarrheal pattern occurred in 20.0%. Diarrheal patients complained of frequent bowel movements and retention feelings before attending school. Recurrent abdominal pain-like pattern was found in 7.1% patients. Clinical symptoms in the adolescent patients seem to derived from a mental tension and stress in a close classroom or before attending school. Many adolescenct patients (67.1%) with irritable bowel syndrome are embarrassed in school-maladjustment; leaving class early, late coming, a long absence, and a withdrawal. PMID:1363122

  1. Xanthogranulomatous cystitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Doreen E.; Carr, Lesley K.; Sugar, Linda; Hladunewich, Michelle; Deane, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous inflammation is a benign condition characterized by the presence of multinucleated giant cells, chronic inflammatory cells and lipid-laden macrophages, known as xanthoma cells. Only 22 cases of xanthogranulomatous cystitis (XGC) have been reported in the Japanese and English literature. In this report, we describe the twenty-third case of XGC and the third case associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A 50-year-old woman with quiescent Crohn’s disease was incidentally found to have a bladder mass on ultrasound. The lesion was resected through a transurethral approach. Pathology demonstrated XGC. At 3 months post-resection, there was no evidence of recurrence adjacent to the previous resection scar. PMID:20694091

  2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Symptoms include abdominal ... become pregnant? Women with ulcerative colitis and inactive Crohn’s disease are as likely to become pregnant as women ...

  3. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-02-21

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine and thioguanine. We will briefly summarize dose recommendations, indications for thiopurine therapy and side effects which are relevant in clinical practice. We discuss some currently debated topics, including the combination of azathioprine and allopurinol, switching of thiopurine therapy in case of side effects, the use of azathioprine in pregnancy, the infection risk using thiopurines and the evidence when to stop thiopurines. Excellent reviews have been published on the thiopurine metabolic pathway which will not be discussed here in detail. PMID:23467510

  4. Environmental risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  5. Pulmonary manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms are examples of variable extraintestinal manifestations of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These complications of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) seem to be underrecognized by both pulmonary physicians and gastroenterologists. The objective of the present review was to gather and summarize information on this particular matter, on the basis of available up-to-date literature. Tracheobronchial involvement is the most prevalent respiratory presentation, whereas IBD-related interstitial lung disease is less frequent. Latent and asymptomatic pulmonary involvement is not unusual. Differential diagnosis should always consider infections (mainly tuberculosis) and drug-induced lung pathology. The common link between intestinal disease and lung pathology is unknown, but many hypotheses have been proposed. It is speculated that environmental pollution, common immunological mechanisms and predisposing genetic factors may play a role. PMID:26788078

  6. Pulmonary manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Sebastian; Piotrowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-10

    Bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms are examples of variable extraintestinal manifestations of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These complications of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) seem to be underrecognized by both pulmonary physicians and gastroenterologists. The objective of the present review was to gather and summarize information on this particular matter, on the basis of available up-to-date literature. Tracheobronchial involvement is the most prevalent respiratory presentation, whereas IBD-related interstitial lung disease is less frequent. Latent and asymptomatic pulmonary involvement is not unusual. Differential diagnosis should always consider infections (mainly tuberculosis) and drug-induced lung pathology. The common link between intestinal disease and lung pathology is unknown, but many hypotheses have been proposed. It is speculated that environmental pollution, common immunological mechanisms and predisposing genetic factors may play a role. PMID:26788078

  7. Cytomegalovirus in inflammatory bowel disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Römkens, Tessa EH; Bulte, Geert J; Nissen, Loes HC; Drenth, Joost PH

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify definitions of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and intestinal disease, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), to determine the prevalence associated with these definitions. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and interrogated PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane for literature on prevalence and diagnostics of CMV infection and intestinal disease in IBD patients. As medical headings we used “cytomegalovirus” OR “CMV” OR “cytomegalo virus” AND “inflammatory bowel disease” OR “IBD” OR “ulcerative colitis” OR “colitis ulcerosa” OR “Crohn’s disease”. Both MeSH-terms and free searches were performed. We included all types of English-language (clinical) trials concerning diagnostics and prevalence of CMV in IBD. RESULTS: The search strategy identified 924 citations, and 52 articles were eligible for inclusion. We identified 21 different definitions for CMV infection, 8 definitions for CMV intestinal disease and 3 definitions for CMV reactivation. Prevalence numbers depend on used definition, studied population and region. The highest prevalence for CMV infection was found when using positive serum PCR as a definition, whereas for CMV intestinal disease this applies to the use of tissue PCR > 10 copies/mg tissue. Most patients with CMV infection and intestinal disease had steroid refractory disease and came from East Asia. CONCLUSION: We detected multiple different definitions used for CMV infection and intestinal disease in IBD patients, which has an effect on prevalence numbers and eventually on outcome in different trials. PMID:26811669

  8. Effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection on post-transcriptional regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is suggested to increase the risk of atherothrombotic disease by inducing dyslipidemia. Recently, we demonstrated that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), which is known to play a critical role in the regulation of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, is elevated in periodontitis patients. However, the underlying mechanisms of elevation of PCSK9 in periodontitis patients are largely unknown. Here, we explored whether Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative periodontopathic bacterium, -induced inflammatory response regulates serum PCSK9 and cholesterol levels using animal models. Methods We infected C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally with Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative strain of periodontopathic bacteria, and evaluated serum PCSK9 levels and the serum lipid profile. PCSK9 and LDL receptor (LDLR) gene and protein expression, as well as liver X receptors (Lxrs), inducible degrader of the LDLR (Idol), and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor (Srebf)2 gene expression, were examined in the liver. Results P. gingivalis infection induced a significant elevation of serum PCSK9 levels and a concomitant elevation of total and LDL cholesterol compared with sham-infected mice. The LDL cholesterol levels were significantly correlated with PCSK9 levels. Expression of the Pcsk9, Ldlr, and Srebf2 genes was upregulated in the livers of the P. gingivalis-infected mice compared with the sham-infected mice. Although Pcsk9 gene expression is known to be positively regulated by sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)2 (human homologue of Srebf2), whereas Srebf2 is negatively regulated by cholesterol, the elevated expression of Srebf2 found in the infected mice is thought to be mediated by P. gingivalis infection. Conclusions P. gingivalis infection upregulates PCSK9 production via upregulation of Srebf2, independent of cholesterol levels. Further studies are required to

  9. Post-bariatric abdominoplasty resulting in wound infection and dehiscence—Conservative treatment with medical grade honey: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Dina Jarjis, Reem; Thomas Crewe, Bjørn; Henrik Matzen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wound complications in post-bariatric patients undergoing body-contouring surgery after massive weight loss are not uncommon and often, surgical debridement or conservative management is necessary. Honey is one of the most ancient remedies for wound care and it is also considered to possess debriding effects. Current research has demonstrated promising results showing that honey can improve wound granulation and epithelialization, reduce exudate and shorten healing times. Methods This case report has been reported in line with the CARE criteria. Presentation of case A 40 year-old female suffered wound infection and dehiscence after undergoing post-bariatric abdominoplasty. The patient was not interested in surgical revision and split skin grafting. Therefore, conservative wound treatment with topical Manuka honey was instituted resulting in significant clinical improvement and effective healing concurrently with good patient satisfaction. Discussion Surgical wound complications in post-bariatric patients undergoing abdominoplasty are common and often require surgical revision or conservative wound treatment. No previous publication has addressed outpatient treatment of post-bariatric abdominoplasty wound complications with medical grade honey. Conclusion Although more research is needed for definitive conclusions of honey’s efficacy, it is safe and as presented in our case, it may under certain circumstances reduce the need of surgical wound debridement and serve as a remedy for conservative treatment. PMID:26773204

  10. Characterization Based on the 56-Kda Type-Specific Antigen Gene of Orientia tsutsugamushi Genotypes Isolated from Leptotrombidium Mites and the Rodent Host Post-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Takhampunya, Ratree; Tippayachai, Bousaraporn; Promsathaporn, Sommai; Leepitakrat, Surachai; Monkanna, Taweesak; Schuster, Anthony L.; Melendrez, Melanie C.; Paris, Daniel H.; Richards, Allen L.; Richardson, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of the 56-kDa type-specific antigen (TSA) genes of Orientia tsutsugamushi (OT) from three naturally infected, laboratory-reared mite colonies comprising three species (Leptotrombidium deliense [Ld], Leptotrombidium imphalum [Li], and Leptotrombidium chiangraiensis [Lc]) has revealed the presence of single and coexisting OT genotypes found in individual chiggers. The Karp genotype was found in all of the chiggers examined, whereas Gilliam and UT302 genotypes were only observed in combination with the Karp genotype. From analysis of these OT genotypes after transmission from chiggers to mice it was determined that with the Lc and Li mites, the OT genotype composition in the rodent spleens post-infection had not changed and therefore resembled that observed in the feeding chiggers. However, only the Karp genotype was found in rodents after feeding by Ld chiggers carrying Karp and Gilliam genotypes. The current findings reveal a complex association among the host, pathogen, and vector. PMID:24297814

  11. Impact of the post-weaning nutritional history on the response to an experimental Haemonchus contortus infection in Creole goats and Black Belly sheep.

    PubMed

    Ceï, W; Salah, N; Paut, C; Dumoulin, P-J; Arquet, R; Félicité, Y; Alexandre, G; Archimède, H; Bambou, J-C

    2016-03-15

    In small ruminants, the response against gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infections is influenced not only by the host genotype and the physiological stage but also by environmental factors, particularly the nutritional status at the time of infection. In this study we evaluated the long-term effect and the interaction between the host species and the nutritional history on the response to GIN infection in two animal models differing in their phenotypic growth and their level of GIN resistance: Black Belly sheep and Creole goats. Lambs and kids were subjected to three distinct nutritional conditions at weaning: low dietary conditions (100% of the theoretical energy requirement for maintenance, corresponding to 548v. 484KJ/Kg BW(0.75) for lambs and kids respectively and 6% of crude protein, CP), medium dietary conditions (150% of the theoretical energy requirement for maintenance and 13% CP) and high dietary conditions (200% of the theoretical energy requirement for maintenance and 20% CP). This 3-months period was followed by a 1-month period on the medium dietary conditions for all the animals before an experimental Haemonchus contortus infection. We monitored the impact of the nutritional history (nutritional condition after weaning), on the intensity of the GIN infection by measuring individual faecal egg counts (FEC), growth rate (ADG), blood eosinophil counts and other pathophysiological parameters. The FEC, growth rate and blood eosinophil counts were significantly affected by the nutritional history in lambs but not in kids. The lowest FEC was found for lambs placed in high dietary conditions, however during the same period body weight loss was observed in this group. In low dietary conditions, kids were more resistant than lambs and the ADG was higher in lambs. However, the anaemia and the level of serum pepsinogen, marker of the abomasal mucosa integrity, were higher in kids. Our data suggest that the impact of the post-weaning nutritional history on the

  12. Small Bowel Imaging: an Update.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Jordi; Panés, Julián

    2016-07-01

    Bowel imaging had experienced relevant technical advances during the last decade. The developments in the field of cross-sectional imaging had a particular impact on the assessment of Crohn's disease. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a review of the main progress of cross-sectional imaging in the assessment of Crohn's disease and other small bowel diseases with relevance in clinical practice and in research. Also, we outline the technical advances, trends, and potential contributions of new technological cross-sectional imaging improvements that may have potential impact and contribution in the near future. PMID:27315216

  13. Cold atmospheric plasma for local infection control and subsequent pain reduction in a patient with chronic post-operative ear infection

    PubMed Central

    Isbary, G; Shimizu, T; Zimmermann, J L; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E; Stolz, W

    2013-01-01

    Following surgery of cholesteatoma, a patient developed a chronic infection of the external auditory canal, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, which caused severe pain. The application of cold atmospheric plasma resulted in a significant reduction in pain and clearance of bacterial carriage, allowing antibiotics and analgesics to be ceased. PMID:25356328

  14. Effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating intestinal hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Long, Yanqin; Liu, Ying; Tong, Jingjing; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiaohua

    2010-06-25

    Trimebutine maleate, which modulates the calcium and potassium channels, relieves abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. However, its effect on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome is not clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating colonic hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Mice infected up to 8 weeks with T. spiralis underwent abdominal withdrawal reflex to colorectal distention to evaluate the visceral sensitivity at different time points. Tissues were examined for histopathology scores. Colonic longitudinal muscle strips were prepared in the organ bath under basal condition or to be stimulated by acetylcholine and potassium chloride, and consecutive concentrations of trimebutine maleate were added to the bath to record the strip responses. Significant inflammation was observed in the intestines of the mice infected 2 weeks, and it resolved in 8 weeks after infection. Visceral hyperalgesia and colonic muscle hypercontractility emerged after infection, and trimebutine maleate could effectively reduce the colonic hyperreactivity. Hypercontractility of the colonic muscle stimulated by acetylcholine and high K(+) could be inhibited by trimebutine maleate in solution with Ca(2+), but not in Ca(2+) free solution. Compared with 8-week postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome group, 2-week acute infected strips were much more sensitive to the stimulators and the drug trimebutine maleate. Trimebutine maleate was effective in reducing the colonic muscle hypercontractility of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome mice. The findings may provide evidence for trimebutine maleate to treat postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome patients effectively. PMID:20371236

  15. Baker's yeast β-glucan supplementation increases monocytes and cytokines post-exercise: implications for infection risk?

    PubMed

    Carpenter, K C; Breslin, W L; Davidson, T; Adams, A; McFarlin, B K

    2013-02-14

    Strenuous aerobic exercise is known to weaken the immune system, and while many nutritional supplements have been proposed to boost post-exercise immunity, few are known to be effective. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether 10 d of supplementation with a defined source of baker's yeast β-glucan (BG, Wellmune WGP®) could minimise post-exercise immunosuppression. Recreationally active men and women (n 60) completed two 10 d trial conditions using a cross-over design with a 7 d washout period: placebo (rice flour) and baker's yeast BG (250 mg/d of β-1,3/1,6-glucans derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae) before a bout of cycling (49 ± 6 min) in a hot (38 ± 2°C), humid (45 ± 2 % relative humidity) environment. Blood was collected at baseline (before supplement), pre- (PRE), post- (POST) and 2 h (2H) post-exercise. Total and subset monocyte concentration was measured by four-colour flow cytometry. Plasma cytokine levels and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cytokine production were measured using separate multiplex assays. Total (CD14⁺) and pro-inflammatory monocyte concentrations (CD14⁺/CD16⁺) were significantly greater at POST and 2H (P<0·05) with BG supplementation. BG supplementation boosted LPS-stimulated production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) at PRE and POST (P<0·05). Plasma IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-γ concentrations were greater at 2H following BG supplementation. It appears that 10 d of supplementation with BG increased the potential of blood leucocytes for the production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-γ. The key findings of the present study demonstrate that BG may have potential to alter immunity following a strenuous exercise session. PMID:22575076

  16. Comparison of Diverting Colostomy and Bowel Management Catheter Applications in Fournier Gangrene Cases Requiring Fecal Diversion.

    PubMed

    Eray, Ismail Cem; Alabaz, Omer; Akcam, Atilgan Tolga; Ulku, Abdullah; Parsak, Cem Kaan; Sakman, Gurhan; Seydaoglu, Gulsah

    2015-12-01

    In some patients of Fournier gangrene originated from perianal region, it is important to prevent fecal contamination in order to provide healing without wound infection. For this purposes, diverting colostomy or bowel management catheter methods were performed. In this study, it is aimed to carry out a comparison of prognosis and cost efficiency between diverting colostomy and bowel management catheter methods applied for preventing fecal contamination in Fournier's gangrene patients. Fourty-eight patients with diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene, serious perianal infections, and preserved sphincters and without rectum injury after debridement were included in the study. The cases were divided into two groups as patients who were subjected to colostomy for fecal diversion and who were subjected to bowel management catheter without colostomy. Then, the groups were compared in terms of age, predisposing factors, duration of hospital stay, mortality, additional surgery requirements, and cost. Fourty-eight patients were included the study. Sixteen patients were treated without colostomy. Decreased duration of total hospital stay, additional surgery requirements, and hospital expense in bowel management catheter group has determined. It is thought that preferring bowel management catheter method instead of colostomy in patients without rectum injury, who require diverting colostomy and have undamaged anal sphincters, can relieve patients, patients' relatives, healthcare organizations, and the national economy of a serious burden. In addition, although patients' satisfaction and workforce loss factors are not taken into consideration in this study, the bowel management catheter method is thought to have positive effects also on these parameters. PMID:26730041

  17. Lymphoproliferative disorders in inflammatory bowel disease patients on immunosuppression: Lessons from other inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Grace Y; Halloran, Brendan P; Peters, Anthea C; Fedorak, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents, such as thiopurines, methotrexate, and biologics, have revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, a number of case reports, case control studies and retrospective studies over the last decade have identified a concerning link between immunosuppression and lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), the oncological phenomenon whereby lymphocytes divide uncontrollably. These LPDs have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the virus provides the impetus for malignant transformation while immunosuppression hampers the immune system’s ability to detect and clear these malignant cells. As such, the use of immunosuppressive agents may come at the cost of increased risk of developing LPD. While little is known about the LPD risk in IBD, more is known about immunosuppression in the post-transplantation setting and the development of EBV associated post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). In review of the PTLD literature, evidence is available to demonstrate that certain immune suppressants such as cyclosporine and T-lymphocyte modulators in particular are associated with an increased risk of PTLD development. As well, high doses of immunosuppressive agents and multiple immunosuppressive agent use are also linked to increased PTLD development. Here, we discuss these findings in context of IBD and what future studies can be taken to understand and reduce the risk of EBV-associated LPD development from immunosuppression use in IBD. PMID:26600976

  18. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  19. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  20. Occurrence and infection of Cladosporium, Fusarium, Epicoccum and Aureobasidium in withered rotten grapes during post-harvest dehydration.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Marilinda; Zapparoli, Giacomo

    2015-11-01

    Fungi like Cladosporium, Fusarium, Epicoccum and Aureobasidium can occur on withered grapes causing spoilage of passito wine. There is little or no information on the pathogenic role of these fungi. This study describes the isolation, incidence and identification of several isolates from different withered rotten grapes. Representative isolates grouped in several phenotypes were identified by phylogenetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer, actin or elongation factor gene sequences. Isolates of Cladosporium and Fusarium were ascribed to different species, of these C. ramotenellum, C. halotolerans and F. graminearum were isolated from Vitis vinifera for the first time. All Epicoccum and Aureobasidium isolates belonged to E. nigrum and A. pullulans, respectively. Random amplified DNA polymorphism analysis showed high level of heterogenicity among Epicoccum and Fusarium isolates. Infection assays were carried out to evaluate infectivity in some strains under different withering conditions. Fusarium spp. strains had similar infectivity, while significant variability was observed among Cladosporium spp. and E. nigrum strains. A. pullulans resulted particularly infective. This study provided insights into the occurrence and infection of these fungi in fruit-drying rooms with important implications towards control management during the withering. PMID:26459338

  1. A Single HIV-1 Cluster and a Skewed Immune Homeostasis Drive the Early Spread of HIV among Resting CD4+ Cell Subsets within One Month Post-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Nembot, Georges; Mélard, Adeline; Blanc, Catherine; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Slama, Laurence; Allegre, Thierry; Allavena, Clotilde; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Duvivier, Claudine; Katlama, Christine; Goujard, Cécile; Seksik, Bao Chau Phung; Leplatois, Anne; Molina, Jean-Michel; Meyer, Laurence; Autran, Brigitte; Rouzioux, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing therapeutic strategies for an HIV cure requires better understanding the characteristics of early HIV-1 spread among resting CD4+ cells within the first month of primary HIV-1 infection (PHI). We studied the immune distribution, diversity, and inducibility of total HIV-DNA among the following cell subsets: monocytes, peripheral blood activated and resting CD4 T cells, long-lived (naive [TN] and central-memory [TCM]) and short-lived (transitional-memory [TTM] and effector-memory cells [TEM]) resting CD4+T cells from 12 acutely-infected individuals recruited at a median 36 days from infection. Cells were sorted for total HIV-DNA quantification, phylogenetic analysis and inducibility, all studied in relation to activation status and cell signaling. One month post-infection, a single CCR5-restricted viral cluster was massively distributed in all resting CD4+ subsets from 88% subjects, while one subject showed a slight diversity. High levels of total HIV-DNA were measured among TN (median 3.4 log copies/million cells), although 10-fold less (p = 0.0005) than in equally infected TCM (4.5), TTM (4.7) and TEM (4.6) cells. CD3−CD4+ monocytes harbored a low viral burden (median 2.3 log copies/million cells), unlike equally infected resting and activated CD4+ T cells (4.5 log copies/million cells). The skewed repartition of resting CD4 subsets influenced their contribution to the pool of resting infected CD4+T cells, two thirds of which consisted of short-lived TTM and TEM subsets, whereas long-lived TN and TCM subsets contributed the balance. Each resting CD4 subset produced HIV in vitro after stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28+IL-2 with kinetics and magnitude varying according to subset differentiation, while IL-7 preferentially induced virus production from long-lived resting TN cells. In conclusion, within a month of infection, a clonal HIV-1 cluster is massively distributed among resting CD4 T-cell subsets with a flexible inducibility, suggesting that

  2. Post-Pandemic Seroprevalence of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Infection (Swine Flu) among Children <18 Years in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Wirth, Stephan; Kaiser, Petra; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Schroten, Horst; Streng, Andrea; Liese, Johannes; Shai, Sonu; Niehues, Tim; Girschick, Hermann; Kuscher, Ellen; Sauerbrey, Axel; Peters, Jochen; Wirsing von König, Carl Heinz; Rückinger, Simon; Hampl, Walter; Michel, Detlef; Mertens, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background We determined antibodies to the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus in children to assess: the incidence of (H1N1) 2009 infections in the 2009/2010 season in Germany, the proportion of subclinical infections and to compare titers in vaccinated and infected children. Methodology/Principal Findings Eight pediatric hospitals distributed over Germany prospectively provided sera from in- or outpatients aged 1 to 17 years from April 1st to July 31st 2010. Vaccination history, recall of infections and sociodemographic factors were ascertained. Antibody titers were measured with a sensitive and specific in-house hemagglutination inhibition test (HIT) and compared to age-matched sera collected during 6 months before the onset of the pandemic in Germany. We analyzed 1420 post-pandemic and 300 pre-pandemic sera. Among unvaccinated children aged 1–4 and 5–17 years the prevalence of HI titers (≥1∶10) was 27.1% (95% CI: 23.5–31.3) and 53.5% (95% CI: 50.9–56.2) compared to 1.7% and 5.5%, respectively, for pre-pandemic sera, accounting for a serologically determined incidence of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 during the season 2009/2010 of 25,4% (95% CI : 19.3–30.5) in children aged 1–4 years and 48.0% (95% CI: 42.6–52.0) in 5–17 year old children. Of children with HI titers ≥1∶10, 25.5% (95% CI: 22.5–28.8) reported no history of any infectious disease since June 2009. Among vaccinated children, 92% (95%-CI: 87.0–96.6) of the 5–17 year old but only 47.8% (95%-CI: 33.5–66.5) of the 1–4 year old children exhibited HI titers against influenza A virus (H1N1) 2009. Conclusion Serologically determined incidence of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 infections in children indicates high infection rates with older children (5–17 years) infected twice as often as younger children. In about a quarter of the children with HI titers after the season 2009/2010 subclinical infections must be assumed. Low HI titers in young children after vaccination with the AS03

  3. Imaging for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, Melanie S; Chu, Daniel I

    2015-12-01

    Multiple imaging modalities exist for inflammatory bowel disease. This article explores the use of plain radiographs, contrast radiologic imaging, computed tomography, MRI, ultrasound, and capsule endoscopy. History, technique, indications for use, limitations, and future directions are discussed for each modality. PMID:26596919

  4. Neoplasms of the Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Howard; Crichlow, Robert W.; Caplan, Howard S.

    1974-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are unusual lesions exhibiting nonspecific clinical features often diagnosed at an advanced stage. In the cases studied at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania nearly all the 32 patients with malignancies were symptomatic whereas in the 34 patients with benign lesions the condition was discovered as an incidental finding in about half of the patients. Weight loss, palpable mass or anemia usually indicated malignancy. Small bowel radiography was the most useful diagnostic aid in the present series. While the etiology of these lesions is unknown, villous adenomas probably bear a relationship to carcinoma. The association between chronic regional enteritis and small bowel tumors is unestablished but suggestive. An analysis of reported series reveals a disproportionate incidence of additional primary tumors in patients with small bowel neoplasms. Surgical extirpation is indicated for curative treatment. In the present series, resection in hope of cure was carried out in 25 of 32 malignant tumors resulting in eight five-year survivals. One of these latter lived nine years with disseminated malignant carcinoid reflecting the occasional indolent course of this tumor. PMID:4842978

  5. Ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for treatment of post- renal transplant hepatitis C infection: A case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jha, R.; Fatima, R.; Lakhtakia, S.; Jha, A.; Srikant, P.; Narayan, G.

    2016-01-01

    Liver disease due to hepatitis C infection in renal transplant recipients is difficult to treat and often associated with reduced patient survival. A 43-year-old male, a renal allograft recipient, presented at 6 years follow-up with significant weight loss over 3 months. He was detected to have new onset diabetes mellitus together with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (genotype 1). His HCV load remained high despite the change of immuno-suppression from tacrolimus to cyclosporine. A decision to treat with a new anti-viral combination of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for 12 weeks was taken. Within 3 weeks, his raised serum transaminases levels normalized and viral load became undetectable. At the end of 16 weeks, he continues to do well with normal renal function, has sustained remission from hepatitis C infection and resolution of diabetes. PMID:27194839

  6. Ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for treatment of post- renal transplant hepatitis C infection: A case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jha, R; Fatima, R; Lakhtakia, S; Jha, A; Srikant, P; Narayan, G

    2016-01-01

    Liver disease due to hepatitis C infection in renal transplant recipients is difficult to treat and often associated with reduced patient survival. A 43-year-old male, a renal allograft recipient, presented at 6 years follow-up with significant weight loss over 3 months. He was detected to have new onset diabetes mellitus together with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (genotype 1). His HCV load remained high despite the change of immuno-suppression from tacrolimus to cyclosporine. A decision to treat with a new anti-viral combination of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for 12 weeks was taken. Within 3 weeks, his raised serum transaminases levels normalized and viral load became undetectable. At the end of 16 weeks, he continues to do well with normal renal function, has sustained remission from hepatitis C infection and resolution of diabetes. PMID:27194839

  7. Early gene expression changes by Epstein-Barr virus infection of B-cells indicate CDKs and survivin as therapeutic targets for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Michele; Ueda, Seigo; Krukowski, Patricia; Bornhauser, Beat C; Ladell, Kristin; Dorner, Marcus; Sigrist, Juerg A; Campidelli, Cristina; Aslandogmus, Roberta; Alessi, Davide; Berger, Christoph; Pileri, Stefano A; Speck, Roberto F; Nadal, David

    2013-11-15

    Lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs) associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection cause significant morbidity and mortality in bone marrow and solid organ transplant recipients. To gain insight into LPD pathogenesis and to identify potential effective therapeutic approaches, we investigated early molecular events leading to B-cell transformation by gene expression profiling of EBV-infected B-cells from tonsils by Affymetrix microarray 72 hr postinfection when the B-cells hyperproliferation phase starts. Cell cycle and apoptosis were the most significantly affected pathways and enriched gene sets. In particular, we found significantly increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)1 and CCNB1 (cyclin B1) and of one of their downstream targets BIRC5 (survivin). Importantly, the strong upregulation of the antiapoptotic protein survivin was confirmed in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and 71% of EBV-positive post-transplant EBV-LPD lesions scored positive for survivin. The validity of early transforming events for the identification of therapeutic targets for EBV-LPD was confirmed by the marked antiproliferative effect of the CDK inhibitor flavopiridol on LCLs and by the strong induction of apoptosis by survivin inhibition with YM155 or terameprocol. Our results suggest that targeting of CDKs and/or survivin in post-transplant EBV-LPD by specific inhibitors might be an important approach to control and eliminate EBV-transformed B-cells that should be further considered. PMID:23640782

  8. Extra-intestinal and long term consequences of Giardia duodenalis infections.

    PubMed

    Halliez, Marie C M; Buret, André G

    2013-12-21

    Giardiasis is the most common waterborne parasitic infection of the human intestine worldwide. The etiological agent, Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia), is a flagellated, binucleated protozoan parasite which infects a wide array of mammalian hosts. Human giardiasis is a true cosmopolitan pathogen, with highest prevalence in developing countries. Giardiasis can present with a broad range of clinical manifestations from asymptomatic, to acute or chronic diarrheal disease associated with abdominal pain and nausea. Most infections are self-limiting, although re-infection and chronic infection can occur. Recent evidence indicating that Giardia may cause chronic post-infectious gastrointestinal complications have made it a topic of intense research. The causes of the post-infectious clinical manifestations due to Giardia, even after complete elimination of the parasite, remain obscure. This review offers a state-of-the-art discussion on the long-term consequences of Giardia infections, from extra-intestinal manifestations, growth and cognitive deficiencies, to post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome. The discussion also sheds light on some of the novel mechanisms recently implicated in the production of these post-infectious manifestations. PMID:24379622

  9. Extra-intestinal and long term consequences of Giardia duodenalis infections

    PubMed Central

    Halliez, Marie CM; Buret, André G

    2013-01-01

    Giardiasis is the most common waterborne parasitic infection of the human intestine worldwide. The etiological agent, Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia), is a flagellated, binucleated protozoan parasite which infects a wide array of mammalian hosts. Human giardiasis is a true cosmopolitan pathogen, with highest prevalence in developing countries. Giardiasis can present with a broad range of clinical manifestations from asymptomatic, to acute or chronic diarrheal disease associated with abdominal pain and nausea. Most infections are self-limiting, although re-infection and chronic infection can occur. Recent evidence indicating that Giardia may cause chronic post-infectious gastrointestinal complications have made it a topic of intense research. The causes of the post-infectious clinical manifestations due to Giardia, even after complete elimination of the parasite, remain obscure. This review offers a state-of-the-art discussion on the long-term consequences of Giardia infections, from extra-intestinal manifestations, growth and cognitive deficiencies, to post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome. The discussion also sheds light on some of the novel mechanisms recently implicated in the production of these post-infectious manifestations. PMID:24379622

  10. Unusual outbreak of post-weaning porcine diarrhea caused by single and mixed infections of rotavirus groups A, B, C, and H.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Bruna Letícia Domingues; Possatti, Flávia; Lorenzetti, Elis; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo

    2016-09-25

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a major cause of severe diarrhea in humans and animals. Five of the nine RV groups (RVA, RVB, RVC, RVE, and RVH) have been previously detected in pigs; however, in pig herds worldwide, most studies highlight diarrhea outbreaks caused by RVA. In the present study, we describe detection and characterization of RV groups A, B, C, and H in fecal samples from pigs with single and mixed infections during a post-weaning diarrhea outbreak. The outbreak occurred in a single pig herd routinely vaccinated with an inactivated commercial vaccine for neonatal diarrhea control that included the RVA OSU (G5P[7]) strain. RVC (78%) was the most prevalent group found in single (34%) and mixed (44%) infections, followed by RVA (46%), RVB (32%), and RVH (18%). Phylogenetic analysis of three RVA strains allowed the characterization of two distinct G/P genotypes represented by G5P[13] and G9P[23], different from G5P[7] found in vaccines. Regardless of the RV group, mixed infections (54%) were more prevalent than single infections. Detection of RVB or RVH was associated with the presence of other RV groups, suggesting a secondary action of these RV groups in the reported outbreak. The detection of RV groups B, C, and H in the same pig herd suggests that these RVs act as causative agents of diarrhea and should be included in the diagnostic tests of porcine enteric diseases. These data provide new epidemiological information on RV diversity that need to be addressed in future studies for a better understanding and prevention of RV infections. PMID:27599939