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Sample records for post-bariatric surgery patients

  1. Psychosocial Interventions Pre and Post Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Marcus, Marsha D

    2015-11-01

    Despite positive results overall, a substantial number of patients experience poor long-term outcomes following bariatric surgery. One reason for variability in weight loss may be difficulty in making and sustaining changes in dietary intake and physical activity; post-surgery binge eating has also been associated with poorer weight outcomes. In this paper, we review available evidence on adjunctive psychosocial interventions for bariatric surgery patients. Although the literature is limited, evidence suggests that bariatric surgery patients may benefit from a comprehensive approach targeting diet, activity and psychological factors. We think the optimal time to initiate adjunctive intervention is after surgery, but before significant weight regain has occurred. Adaptive interventions incorporating advances in technology may prove to be effective for promoting behavioural self-management and psychosocial adjustment following bariatric surgery. For some patients, pharmacotherapy and reoperation may also play a role in a personalized approach to post-surgery care. PMID:26364715

  2. POST-BARIATRIC SURGERY WEIGHT REGAIN: EVALUATION OF NUTRITIONAL PROFILE OF CANDIDATE PATIENTS FOR ENDOSCOPIC ARGON PLASMA COAGULATION

    PubMed Central

    CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; MARCHESINI, Simone Dallegrave; BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is effective treatment for weight loss, but demand continuous nutritional care and physical activity. They regain weight happens with inadequate diets, physical inactivity and high alcohol consumption. Aim To investigate in patients undergoing Roux-Y-of gastroplasty weight regain, nutritional deficiencies, candidates for the treatment with endoscopic argon plasma, the diameter of the gastrojejunostomy and the size of the gastric pouch at the time of treatment with plasma. Methods A prospective 59 patients non-randomized study with no control group undergoing gastroplasty with recurrence of weight and candidates for the endoscopic procedure of argon plasma was realized. The surgical evaluation consisted of investigation of complications in the digestive system and verification of the increased diameter of the gastrojejunostomy. Nutritional evaluation was based on body mass index at the time of operation, in the minimum BMI achieved after and in which BMI was when making the procedure with plasma. The laboratory tests included hemoglobin, erythrocyte volume, ferritin, vitamin D, B12, iron, calcium, zinc and serum albumin. Clinical analysis was based on scheduled follow-up. Results Of the 59 selected, five were men and 51 women; were included 49 people (four men and 44 women) with all the complete data. The exclusion was due to the lack of some of the laboratory tests. Of this total 19 patients (38.7%) had a restrictive ring, while 30 (61.2%) did not. Iron deficiency anemia was common; 30 patients (61.2%) were below 30 with ferritin (unit); 35 (71.4%) with vitamin B12 were below 300 pg/ml; vitamin D3 deficiency occurred in more than 90%; there were no cases of deficiency of protein, calcium and zinc; glucose levels were above 99 mg/dl in three patients (6.12%). Clinically all had complaints of labile memory, irritability and poor concentration. All reported that they stopped treatment with the multidisciplinary team in the first year after

  3. [Post bariatric body contouring.

    PubMed

    Winge, Rikke; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Printzlau, Andreas; Hülmich, Lisbet

    2014-03-17

    Post bariatric body contouring in Denmark is currently a field under development. The scope of this article is to give an overview of existing plastic surgery techniques being used to treat patients with massive weight loss, as well as the current indications for patient referral. Furthermore, we describe how to optimise the preoperative evaluation of the patient and give a brief description of potential surgical adverse effects and their prevalence. Further research can provide this field with invaluable data regarding the post-operative effects on patient rehabilitation and quality of life. PMID:25096208

  4. Physical Activity and Physical Function in Individuals Post-bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Josbeno, Deborah A.; Kalarchian, Melissa; Sparto, Patrick J.; Otto, Amy D.; Jakicic, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A better understanding of the physical activity behavior of individuals who undergo bariatric surgery will enable the development of effective post-surgical exercise guidelines and interventions to enhance weight loss outcomes. This study characterized the physical activity profile and physical function of 40 subjects 2–5 years post-bariatric surgery and examined the association between physical activity, physical function, and weight loss after surgery. Methods Moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) was assessed with the BodyMedia SenseWear® Pro (SWPro) armband, and physical function (PF) was measured using the physical function subscale of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey instrument (SF-36PF). Height and weight were measured. Results Percent of excess weight loss (%EWL) was associated with MVPA (r = 0.44, p = 0.01) and PF (r = 0.38, p = 0.02); MVPA was not associated with PF (r = 0.24, p = 0.14). Regression analysis demonstrated that MVPA was associated with %EWL (β = 0.38, t = 2.43, p = 0.02). Subjects who participated in ≥150 min/week of MVPA had a greater %EWL (68.2 ± 19, p = 0.01) than those who participated in <150 min/week (52.5 ± 17.4). Conclusions Results suggest that subjects are capable of performing most mobility activities. However, the lack of an association between PF and MVPA suggests that a higher level of PF does not necessarily correspond to a higher level of MVPA participation. Thus, the barriers to adoption of a more physically active lifestyle may not be fully explained by the subjects’ physical limitations. Further understanding of this relationship is needed for the development of post-surgical weight loss guidelines and interventions. PMID:21153567

  5. Evaluation of an In Silico PBPK Post-Bariatric Surgery Model through Simulating Oral Drug Bioavailability of Atorvastatin and Cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Darwich, A S; Pade, D; Rowland-Yeo, K; Jamei, M; Åsberg, A; Christensen, H; Ashcroft, D M; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2013-01-01

    An increasing prevalence of morbid obesity has led to dramatic increases in the number of bariatric surgeries performed. Altered gastrointestinal physiology following surgery can be associated with modified oral drug bioavailability (Foral). In the absence of clinical data, an indication of changes to Foral via systems pharmacology models would be of value in adjusting dose levels after surgery. A previously developed virtual “post-bariatric surgery” population was evaluated through mimicking clinical investigations on cyclosporine and atorvastatin after bariatric surgery. Cyclosporine simulations displayed a reduced fraction absorbed through gut wall (fa) and Foral after surgery, consistent with reported observations. Simulated atorvastatin Foral postsurgery was broadly reflective of observed data with indications of counteracting interplay between reduced fa and an increased fraction escaping gut wall metabolism (FG). Inability to fully recover observed atorvastatin exposure after biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch highlights the current gap regarding the knowledge of associated biological changes. PMID:23903405

  6. Post-bariatric abdominoplasty: our experience.

    PubMed

    Grignaffini, Eugenio; Grieco, Michele P; Bertozzi, Nicolo'; Gandolfi, Marco; Palli, Dante; Cinieri, Francesco Giovanni; Gardani, Marco; Raposio, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    The fast increase in obesity has been followed by the growth in the demand for plastic surgery in formerly obese patients. The weight loss is accompanied by new dysfunctions and disorders of the outline of the body that affects the quality of life of the patient. Abdominoplasty is a cosmetic surgery procedure that aims to remove the excess of skin and the redundant fat. The aim of this paper was to analyze our experience in this field and to test how functional abdominoplasty improved quality of life in the operated patients. In our Unit from January 2012 to December 2014, 25 patients (18 women and 7 men, age: 24 - 79 years, mean: 51 years) underwent abdominoplastic surgery. Only at least six months after bariatric surgery the patients were eligible for functional abdominoplasty. Average weight of the patients before surgery was 83.5 kg (range 58 - 163 Kg); averege BMI was 31 (range 24.77 - 57). The average quantity of tissue removed was 1.765 Kg (range 250 g - 11,5 Kg). Minor complications rate was in agreement with the percentages reported in literature. No mortality and major complications have occurred in our series. The majority of patients undergoing post-bariatric abdominoplasty reported an improvement in the quality of life and psychological well-being. In our opinion, however, only a multidisciplinary (surgical, psychological, dietological) approach of the post-bariatric patient allows to maintain long-term aesthetic and functional results. PMID:26694156

  7. Evaluation of an In Silico PBPK Post-Bariatric Surgery Model through Simulating Oral Drug Bioavailability of Atorvastatin and Cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Darwich, A S; Pade, D; Rowland-Yeo, K; Jamei, M; Asberg, A; Christensen, H; Ashcroft, D M; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2013-01-01

    An increasing prevalence of morbid obesity has led to dramatic increases in the number of bariatric surgeries performed. Altered gastrointestinal physiology following surgery can be associated with modified oral drug bioavailability (Foral). In the absence of clinical data, an indication of changes to Foral via systems pharmacology models would be of value in adjusting dose levels after surgery. A previously developed virtual "post-bariatric surgery" population was evaluated through mimicking clinical investigations on cyclosporine and atorvastatin after bariatric surgery. Cyclosporine simulations displayed a reduced fraction absorbed through gut wall (fa) and Foral after surgery, consistent with reported observations. Simulated atorvastatin Foral postsurgery was broadly reflective of observed data with indications of counteracting interplay between reduced fa and an increased fraction escaping gut wall metabolism (FG). Inability to fully recover observed atorvastatin exposure after biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch highlights the current gap regarding the knowledge of associated biological changes.CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology (2013) 2, e47; doi:10.1038/psp.2013.23; advance online publication 12 June 2013. PMID:23903405

  8. Post-Bariatric Surgery Changes in Quinolinic and Xanthurenic Acid Concentrations Are Associated with Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pigeyre, Marie; Caiazzo, Robert; Raverdy, Violeta; Verkindt, Hélène; Leloire, Audrey; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Yengo, Loïc; Allorge, Delphine; Froguel, Philippe; Pattou, François

    2016-01-01

    Background An increase of plasma kynurenine concentrations, potentially bioactive metabolites of tryptophan, was found in subjects with obesity, resulting from low-grade inflammation of the white adipose tissue. Bariatric surgery decreases low-grade inflammation associated with obesity and improves glucose control. Objective Our goal was to determine the concentrations of all kynurenine metabolites after bariatric surgery and whether they were correlated with glucose control improvement. Design Kynurenine metabolite concentrations, analysed by liquid or gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, circulating inflammatory markers, metabolic traits, and BMI were measured before and one year after bariatric surgery in 44 normoglycemic and 47 diabetic women with obesity. Associations between changes in kynurenine metabolites concentrations and in glucose control and metabolic traits were analysed between baseline and twelve months after surgery. Results Tryptophan and kynurenine metabolite concentrations were significantly decreased one year after bariatric surgery and were correlated with the decrease of the usCRP in both groups. Among all the kynurenine metabolites evaluated, only quinolinic acid and xanthurenic acid were significantly associated with glucose control improvement. The one year delta of quinolinic acid concentrations was negatively associated with the delta of fasting glucose (p = 0.019) and HbA1c (p = 0.014), whereas the delta of xanthurenic acid was positively associated with the delta of insulin sensitivity index (p = 0.0018). Conclusion Bariatric surgery has induced a global down-regulation of kynurenine metabolites, associated with weight loss. Our results suggest that, since kynurenine monoxygenase diverts the kynurenine pathway toward the synthesis of xanthurenic acid, its inhibition may also contribute to glucose homeostasis. PMID:27327770

  9. Objective Assessment of Changes in Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: Pre-through 3-Years Post- Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy C; Chen, Jia-Yuh; Bond, Dale S; Belle, Steven H; Courcoulas, Anita P; Patterson, Emma J; Mitchell, James E; Inabnet, William B; Dakin, George F; Flum, David R; Cook, Brian; Wolfe, Bruce M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate change in sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity (PA) over three years following bariatric surgery. Methods A subset of participants in an observational study (n=473 of 2458; 79% female, median body mass index 45kg/m2) wore an activity monitor pre-surgery and at 1–3 annual post-surgery assessments. Results Over the first year, on average, sedentary time decreased from 573 (95%CI 563–582) to 545 (95%CI 534–555) min/d and moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) increased from 77 (95%CI: 71–84) to 106 (95%CI: 98–116) min/wk, or 7 (95%CI: 5–10) to 24 (95%CI: 18–29) min/wk in MVPA bouts ≥10 minutes. There were no changes in these parameters from years 1 to 3 (P for all>.05). The percentage of participants achieving ≥150 min/wk of bout-related MVPA was not different at year 3 [6.5% (95%CI: 3.1–12.7)] vs. pre-surgery [3.4% (95%CI: 1.8–5.0); p=.45]. Most participants followed SB and PA trajectories that paralleled mean change and were consistent with their pre-surgery position in relation to the group. Conclusions On average, bariatric surgical patients make small reductions in SB and increases in PA during the first post-surgery year, which are maintained through 3 years. Still, post-surgery PA levels fall short of PA guidelines for general health or weight control. PMID:26010326

  10. Post-Bariatric Body Contouring Surgery After Weight Loss: Lessons Learned From an Obesity Epidemic in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    With the rise in obesity in the United States, there has been a similar increase in bariatric surgery. This has resulted in numerous patients losing significant weight with accompanying circumferential body contouring issues. This has led to an amazing increase in the number of body contouring procedures performed, both traditional excisional techniques as well as new emerging techniques emphasizing tissue preservation, rearrangement, and dermal reshaping. Although China's rates of obesity lag behind the United States, there is a recipe for obesity that will eventually surpass the United States. Thus, China has the opportunity to learn from the United States experience with regards to obesity treatment and contouring procedures after significant weight loss. Time will tell whether China will choose to use similar tissue preservation techniques to address issues of soft tissue ptosis and volume deficiency seen after significant weight loss, make refinements of these techniques, or develop new uniquely Chinese solutions. PMID:27414005

  11. A Surgical Model in Male Obese Rats Uncovers Protective Effects of Bile Acids Post-Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Setchell, Kenneth DR; Kirby, Michelle; Myronovych, Andriy; Ryan, Karen K.; Ibrahim, Samar H.; Berger, Jose; Smith, Kathi; Toure, Mouhamadoul; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery elevates serum bile acids. Conjugated bile acid administration, such as tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), improves insulin sensitivity, whereas short-circuiting bile acid circulation through ileal interposition surgery in rats raises TUDCA levels. We hypothesized that bariatric surgery outcomes could be recapitulated by short circuiting the normal enterohepatic bile circulation. We established a model wherein male obese rats underwent either bile diversion (BD) or Sham (SH) surgery. The BD group had a catheter inserted into the common bile duct and its distal end anchored into the middistal jejunum for 4–5 weeks. Glucose tolerance, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response, hepatic steatosis, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were measured. Rats post-BD lost significantly more weight than the SH rats. BD rats gained less fat mass after surgery. BD rats had improved glucose tolerance, increased higher postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 response and serum bile acids but less liver steatosis. Serum bile acid levels including TUDCA concentrations were higher in BD compared to SH pair-fed rats. Fecal bile acid levels were not different. Liver ER stress (C/EBP homologous protein mRNA and pJNK protein) was decreased in BD rats. Bile acid gavage (TUDCA/ursodeoxycholic acid [UDCA]) in diet-induced obese rats, elevated serum TUDCA and concomitantly reduced hepatic steatosis and ER stress (C/EBP homologous protein mRNA). These data demonstrate the ability of alterations in bile acids to recapitulate important metabolic improvements seen after bariatric surgery. Further, our work establishes a model for focused study of bile acids in the context of bariatric surgery that may lead to the identification of therapeutics for metabolic disease. PMID:23592746

  12. Post-bariatric abdominoplasty resulting in wound infection and dehiscence—Conservative treatment with medical grade honey: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Dina Jarjis, Reem; Thomas Crewe, Bjørn; Henrik Matzen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wound complications in post-bariatric patients undergoing body-contouring surgery after massive weight loss are not uncommon and often, surgical debridement or conservative management is necessary. Honey is one of the most ancient remedies for wound care and it is also considered to possess debriding effects. Current research has demonstrated promising results showing that honey can improve wound granulation and epithelialization, reduce exudate and shorten healing times. Methods This case report has been reported in line with the CARE criteria. Presentation of case A 40 year-old female suffered wound infection and dehiscence after undergoing post-bariatric abdominoplasty. The patient was not interested in surgical revision and split skin grafting. Therefore, conservative wound treatment with topical Manuka honey was instituted resulting in significant clinical improvement and effective healing concurrently with good patient satisfaction. Discussion Surgical wound complications in post-bariatric patients undergoing abdominoplasty are common and often require surgical revision or conservative wound treatment. No previous publication has addressed outpatient treatment of post-bariatric abdominoplasty wound complications with medical grade honey. Conclusion Although more research is needed for definitive conclusions of honey’s efficacy, it is safe and as presented in our case, it may under certain circumstances reduce the need of surgical wound debridement and serve as a remedy for conservative treatment. PMID:26773204

  13. Your diet after gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the post-bariatric surgery patient: An Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and ... et al. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; Obesity ... Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery. American Association ...

  14. Post-bariatric body contouring: oue experience.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Michele; Grignaffini, Eugenio; Simonacci, Francesco; Di Mascio, Donatello; Raposio, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a growing socio-economic problem especially in the western population. Patients who are undergoing bariatric surgery after a significant weight loss have an altered body profile which may have an important psychological impact. These patients may be candidates for surgical body-lifting. The aim of body-lifting is to obtain a firmer, tighter, rejuvenated appearance for patients who have lax, ptotic tissues. In this paper we describe our experience with two techniques currently practiced by our team, brachioplasty and thigh lift, reporting the indications, the surgical technique and possible complications. PMID:27163898

  15. Zinc-deficiency acrodermatitis in a patient with chronic alcoholism and gastric bypass: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Dariush; Ahmed, Zubair; Karikkineth, Ajoy; Williams, Richard; Zigel, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Acquired adult-onset zinc deficiency is occasionally reported in patients with malnutrition states, such as alcoholism, or malabsorptive states, such as post-bariatric surgery. The defining symptoms of hypozincemia include a classic triad of necrolytic dermatitis, diffuse alopecia, and diarrhea. We report a case of zinc deficiency in a 39-year-old man with history of gastric bypass surgery and alcoholism. For this patient, severe hypozincemia confirmed acrodermatitis, and zinc supplementation was met with gradual improvement. PMID:25147643

  16. Body Contouring After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Jo M; Steffen, Kristine J; Sarwer, David B

    2015-11-01

    Individuals who undergo bariatric surgery generally experience rapid and dramatic weight loss. While the weight loss typically confers significant health benefits, an undesirable consequence is often excessive quantities of hanging, surplus skin. Some patients undergo body-contouring surgery (BCS) in order to improve health, mobility, appearance and psychological adjustment. While the majority of post-bariatric patients desire BCS in one or more body regions, a small percentage of patients receive such surgeries. Lack of knowledge about procedures, cost and (in the USA and several other countries) difficulty obtaining insurance reimbursement likely prevents many patients from undergoing BCS. Those who do undergo BCS appear to be at heightened risk for wound-healing complications. Despite these complications, the majority of patients report satisfactory BCS outcomes. The extant literature in this area provides a great deal of information about these issues; nevertheless, additional research is needed to further inform clinical management and improve patient outcomes. PMID:26395601

  17. Plastic Surgery for Ethnic Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Briefing Papers > Plastic Surgery for Ethnic Patients Briefing Paper: Plastic Surgery for Ethnic Patients More than 3. ... 2067-2071. Share Related Links Plastic Surgery Briefing Papers Menu Cosmetic Reconstructive Patient Safety Before & After Find ...

  18. Patient Safety in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Makary, Martin A.; Sexton, J Bryan; Freischlag, Julie A.; Millman, E Anne; Pryor, David; Holzmueller, Christine; Pronovost, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Improving patient safety is an increasing priority for surgeons and hospitals since sentinel events can be catastrophic for patients, caregivers, and institutions. Patient safety initiatives aimed at creating a safe operating room (OR) culture are increasingly being adopted, but a reliable means of measuring their impact on front-line providers does not exist. Methods: We developed a surgery-specific safety questionnaire (SAQ) and administered it to 2769 eligible caregivers at 60 hospitals. Survey questions included the appropriateness of handling medical errors, knowledge of reporting systems, and perceptions of safety in the operating room. MANOVA and ANOVA were performed to compare safety results by hospital and by an individual's position in the OR using a composite score. Multilevel confirmatory factor analysis was performed to validate the structure of the scale at the operating room level of analysis. Results: The overall response rate was 77.1% (2135 of 2769), with a range of 57% to 100%. Factor analysis of the survey items demonstrated high face validity and internal consistency (α = 0.76). The safety climate scale was robust and internally consistent overall and across positions. Scores varied widely by hospital [MANOVA omnibus F (59, 1910) = 3.85, P < 0.001], but not position [ANOVA F (4, 1910) = 1.64, P = 0.16], surgeon (mean = 73.91), technician (mean = 70.26), anesthesiologist (mean = 71.57), CRNA (mean = 71.03), and nurse (mean = 70.40). The percent of respondents reporting good safety climate in each hospital ranged from 16.3% to 100%. Conclusions: Safety climate in surgical departments can be validly measured and varies widely among hospitals, providing the opportunity to benchmark performance. Scores on the SAQ can serve to evaluate interventions to improve patient safety. PMID:16632997

  19. [Ambulatory surgery. Patients and patient education].

    PubMed

    Bredland, T; Duesund, R

    1996-02-20

    This article reviews the concept of day surgery and shows how the treatment can be organized pre-, per- and post-operatively. It can be established in a hospital-integrated unit, a unit separate from the hospital, but connected with it, or a satellite ambulatory facility. Because the patient spends only a short time in hospital it is necessary to have structured preparations before admission, for the benefit of both patient and staff. It should be easy to identify patients suitable for day surgery from the waiting lists, and preparations should be directed at treatment by day surgery right from the start. Rules must be worked out for selecting patients, as well as guidelines for information to patients. It is also necessary to plan the operation programme, and to agree how nurses and doctors should take care of the patient during the different steps of treatment. PMID:8658453

  20. Patient perceptions of orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Flanary, C M; Barnwell, G M; Alexander, J M

    1985-08-01

    A retrospective study of ninety orthognathic surgery patients was conducted to investigate (1) their presurgical concerns and motivations, (2) their preoperative preparation for surgery, and (3) their perceptions of the postsurgical outcome. All subjects completed a twenty-three-item questionnaire and Rotter's Locus of Control Inventory. Statistical date analyses were performed by means of frequency distributions, chi-square, Spearman's r, and Fisher's exact probability tests. The results are presented as thirteen tentative conclusions categorized into three broad areas: motivations and concerns, presurgical preparation, and postsurgical outcome. In the area of motivations and concerns, those with primarily esthetic motivations have less initial reticence toward having orthognathic surgery and less difficulty adjusting to their new appearance than those with strong functional incentives. Younger patients and those patients with strong cosmetic motivations are less concerned about surgical risks. Under the category of presurgical preparation, more females than males desire to speak to a previous orthognathic surgery patient. Patients who receive inadequate explanation of the surgical procedure are more likely to be emotionally unprepared. One of the leading factors in patient dissatisfaction with surgery is the patient's experience of postoperative "surprises." In the area of postsurgical outcome, two-jaw operations precipitate more pain complaints than single-arch procedures. With time, however, patients tend to forget the degree of postoperative pain. Maxillary surgical procedures lead to less severe pain complaints than mandibular procedures, but there are more initial complaints of breathing difficulties and sinus problems following maxillary procedures. Surgical goal fulfillment does not guarantee that a patient would re-elect to have the treatment. PMID:3861099

  1. Patient Safety: Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Consumer Information > Patient Safety Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery Patient Safety More Resources Choose a surgeon ... Important facts about the safety and risks of plastic surgery Questions to ask my plastic surgeon Choose ...

  2. Cataract Surgery in the Glaucoma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Jennifer S.; Choi, Daniel Y.; Cheema, Anjum S.; Singh, Kuldev

    2015-01-01

    To summarize the role of cataract surgery in the glaucoma patient, in terms of the effect on intraocular pressure (IOP) as well as diagnostic and therapeutic considerations for those with both conditions. Recent evidence suggests that cataract extraction may produce a significant and sustained IOP reduction in individuals with open-angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and angle-closure glaucoma. Cataract removal may improve the practitioner's ability to interpret perimetric testing, and re-establishing perimetric and optic nerve imaging baselines is recommended after cataract surgery. The sequence of cataract surgery relative to glaucoma surgery impacts the likelihood of complications and surgical success. There are multiple benefits to perform cataract surgery prior to glaucoma surgery while cataract surgery after trabeculectomy increases the risk of subsequent filtration failure. As “minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries” continue to improve in terms of efficacy, there is an evolving role for combined cataract and glaucoma surgery in patients with early to moderate stages of glaucoma. PMID:25624668

  3. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Michael; Wharton, Sean; Macpherson, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to complete an elective questionnaire between February 2013 and April 2014. Results. A total of 371 patients (72% female) completed the questionnaire. Only 87 of 371 (23%) participants were interested in bariatric surgery. Individuals interested in bariatric surgery had a higher BMI (48.0 versus 46.2 kg/m2, P = 0.03) and believed that they would lose more weight with surgery (51 versus 44 kg, P = 0.0069). Those who scored highly on past weight loss success and financial concerns were less likely to be interested in bariatric surgery, whereas those who scored highly on high receptivity to surgery and positive social support were more likely to be interested in bariatric surgery. Conclusion. Although participants overestimated the effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss, most were still not interested in bariatric surgery. PMID:27516900

  4. Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158689.html Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients Study found those ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older lung cancer patients are surviving longer when they have lung ...

  5. Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158689.html Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients Study found those ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older lung cancer patients are surviving longer when they have lung ...

  6. Older Patients' Unexpressed Concerns About Orthopaedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hudak, Pamela L.; Armstrong, Kristy; Braddock, Clarence; Frankel, Richard M.; Levinson, Wendy

    2008-01-01

    Background: As the U.S. population ages, orthopaedic surgeons will increasingly be required to counsel older patients about major surgical procedures. Understanding patient concerns or worries about surgery could help orthopaedic surgeons to assist their patients in making these decisions. The objectives of this study were to explore the nature of patient concerns regarding orthopaedic surgery and to describe how patients raise concerns during visits with orthopaedic surgeons and how orthopaedic surgeons respond. Methods: As part of a study involving audiotaping of 886 visits between patients and orthopaedic surgeons, fifty-nine patients sixty years of age or older who were considering surgery were recruited to participate in semistructured telephone interviews at five to seven days and one month after the visit. Patients were asked about their perceptions of the visit and how they made their decision about surgery. These interviews were analyzed to identify patients' concerns with the use of qualitative content analysis and then compared with the audiotaped visits to determine whether these concerns were actually raised during the visit and, if so, how well the orthopaedic surgeons responded. Analyses based on patient race (black or white) were also performed. Results: One hundred and sixty-four concerns pertaining to (1) the surgery (anticipated quality of life after the surgery, the care facility, the timing of the operation, and the patient's capacity to meet the demands of the surgery) and (2) the surgeons (their competency, communication, and professional practices) were identified. Patients raised only 53% of their concerns with the orthopaedic surgeons and were selective in what they disclosed; concerns about the timing of the operation and about the care facility were frequently raised, but concerns about their capacity to meet the demands of the surgery and about the orthopaedic surgeons were not. Orthopaedic surgeons responded positively to 66% of the

  7. Surgery in a Patient with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rakesh; Nagral, Sanjay; Nagral, Aabha

    2012-01-01

    Surgery is often needed in patients with concurrent liver disease. The multiple physiological roles of the liver places these patients at an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Diseases necessitating surgery like gallstones and hernia are more common in patients with cirrhosis. Assessment of severity of liver dysfunction before surgery is important and the risk benefit of the procedure needs to be carefully assessed. The disease severity may vary from mild transaminase rise to decompensated cirrhosis. Surgery should be avoided if possible in the emergency setting, in the setting of acute and alcoholic hepatitis, in a patient of cirrhosis who is child class C or has a MELD score more than 15 or any patient with significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction. In this subset of patients, all possible means to manage these patients conservatively should be attempted. Modified Child–Pugh scores and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores can predict mortality after surgery fairly reliably including nonhepatic abdominal surgery. Pre-operative optimization would include control of ascites, correction of electrolyte imbalance, improving renal dysfunction, cardiorespiratory assessment, and correction of coagulation. Tests of global hemostasis like thromboelastography and thrombin generation time may be more predictive of the risk of bleeding compared with the conventional tests of coagulation in patients with cirrhosis. Correction of international normalized ratio with fresh frozen plasma does not necessarily mean reduction of bleeding risk and may increase the risk of volume overload and lung injury. International normalized ratio liver may better reflect the coagulation status. Recombinant factor VIIa in patients with cirrhosis needing surgery needs further study. Intra-operatively, safe anesthetic agents like isoflurane and propofol with avoidance of hypotension are advised. In general, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) and benzodiazepines should

  8. Patient reported outcome measures in septorhinoplasty surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, LR; Ward, MJ; Sunkaraneni, VS; Harries, PG; Salib, RJ

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical procedures incorporating a cosmetic element such as septorhinoplasty and otoplasty are currently under threat in the National Health Service (NHS) as they are deemed to be procedures of ‘limited clinical benefit’ by many primary care providers. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs), which assess the quality of care delivered from the patients’ perspective, are becoming increasingly important in documenting the effectiveness of such procedures. Methods The Rhinoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (ROE) questionnaire, a validated PROM tool, was used to assess patient satisfaction in 141 patients undergoing septorhinoplasty surgery over a 90-month period at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust. Results Overall, 100 patients with a mean follow-up period of 36 months completed the study. The mean ROE score was 73.3%. In addition, 75% of patients questioned were happy with the final result of their operation and 83% would undergo the procedure again if required. These benefits occurred irrespective of age, sex and primary versus revision surgery, and were maintained for up to 71 months following surgery. Conclusions This study has shown that patients are generally satisfied with their functional and cosmetic outcomes following septorhinoplasty surgery. These results help support the case for septorhinoplasty surgery to continue being funded as an NHS procedure. PMID:25519270

  9. General Surgery in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Haimov, M.; Glabman, S.; Schupak, E.; Neff, M.; Burrows, L.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the experience with 66 patients on chronic hemodialysis who underwent 67 major surgical procedures is presented. There were 58 general surgical procedures, and nine major cardiovascular procedures including four emergency cardiac valve replacements. The preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative management of these patients is discussed as well as the morbidity and mortality encountered. It is concluded that patients on well-managed chronic dialysis will tolerate minor and major surgery well and renal failure should no longer be regarded as a relative contraindication for appropriate elective or emergency surgery. PMID:4275820

  10. Scar Revision Surgery: The Patient's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Anna Y; Butler, Daniel P; Cussons, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Background Insufficient satisfaction outcome literature exists to assist consultations for scar revision surgery; such outcomes should reflect the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate scar revision patient satisfaction outcomes, according to specified patient-selection criteria. Methods Patients (250) were randomly selected for telephone contacting regarding scar revisions undertaken between 2007-2011. Visual analogue scores were obtained for scars pre- and post-revision surgery. Surgery selection criteria were; 'presence' of sufficient time for scar maturation prior to revision, technical issues during or wound complications from the initial procedure that contributed to poor scarring, and 'absence' of site-specific or patient factors that negatively influence outcomes. Patient demographics, scar pathogenesis (elective vs. trauma), underlying issue (functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic) and revision surgery details were also collected with the added use of a real-time, hospital database. Results Telephone contacting was achieved for 211 patients (214 scar revisions). Satisfaction outcomes were '2% worse, 16% no change, and 82% better'; a distribution maintained between body sites and despite whether surgery was functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic. Better outcomes were reported by patients who sustained traumatic scars vs. those who sustained scars by elective procedures (91.80% vs. 77.78%, P=0.016) and by females vs. males (85.52% vs. 75.36%, P<0.05), particularly in the elective group where males (36.17%) were more likely to report no change or worse outcomes versus females (16.04%) (P<0.01). Conclusions Successful scar revision outcomes may be achieved using careful patient selection. This study provides useful information for referring general practitioners, and patient-surgeon consultations, when planning scar revision. PMID:26618120

  11. Patients' anxieties with third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Earl, P

    1994-10-01

    There has been little study of patients' anxieties about third molar surgery despite its widespread practice. 105 patients were invited to complete questionnaires preoperatively to assess anxieties about the procedure and to assess how well it was explained. They were also asked post operatively to assess differences from expectations, accuracy of the preoperative explanation and which aspect would worry them most should the procedure be repeated. Patients generally found their worries as expected or even better. Few found events worse with only pain (12%) and paraesthesia (13%) of note. Although 88% of patients assessed pain as better than or as expected, 43% would fear it most if the procedure was repeated. Pain is the single most feared factor despite evidence that it is usually no worse than originally feared. Reassurance and adequate pain control are the most important factors to patients in third molar surgery, and this reassurance should start at operation booking rather than on admission. PMID:7999736

  12. The Intestinal Microbiome in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Christine M.; Kleiman, Susan C.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Carroll, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    With nearly 39% of the worldwide adult population classified as obese, much of the globe is facing a serious public health challenge. Increasing rates of obesity, coupled with the failure of many behavioral and pharmacological interventions, have contributed to a rise in popularity of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity. Surgery-mediated weight loss was initially thought to be a direct result of mechanical alterations causing restriction and calorie malabsorption. However, the mounting evidence suggests that indirect factors influence the accumulation and storage of fat in patients that have undergone this procedure. Given the established impact the intestinal microbiota has on adiposity, it is likely that this complex enteric microbial community contributes to surgery-mediated weight loss and maintenance of weight loss post-surgery. In this review, we discuss the physiological and psychological traits exhibited by bariatric surgery candidates that can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Additionally, we detail the studies that investigated the impact of bariatric surgery on the intestinal microbiota in humans and mouse models of this procedure. PMID:26426680

  13. Preoperative optimization of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Henry T; Purcell, Seth T; Bush, Ruth L

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that patients who suffer from peripheral (noncardiac) vascular disease often have coexisting atherosclerotic diseases of the heart. This may leave the patients susceptible to major adverse cardiac events, including death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and pulmonary edema, during the perioperative time period, in addition to the many other complications they may sustain as they undergo vascular surgery procedures, regardless of whether the procedure is performed as an open or endovascular modality. As these patients are at particularly high risk, up to 16% in published studies, for postoperative cardiac complications, many proposals and algorithms for perioperative optimization have been suggested and studied in the literature. Moreover, in patients with recent coronary stents, the risk of non-cardiac surgery on adverse cardiac events is incremental in the first 6 months following stent implantation. Just as postoperative management of patients is vital to the outcome of a patient, preoperative assessment and optimization may reduce, and possibly completely alleviate, the risks of major postoperative complications, as well as assist in the decision-making process regarding the appropriate surgical and anesthetic management. This review article addresses several tools and therapies that treating physicians may employ to medically optimize a patient before they undergo noncardiac vascular surgery. PMID:26170688

  14. Relaxation strategies for patients during dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Patient stress and anxiety are common preoperatively and during dermatologic procedures and surgeries. Stress and anxiety can occasionally interfere with performance of procedures or surgery and can induce hemodynamic instability, such as elevated blood pressure or syncope, as well as producing considerable discomfort for some patients. Detection of excess stress and anxiety in patients can allow the opportunity for corrective or palliative measures. Slower breathing, biofeedback, progressive muscular relaxation, guided imagery, hypnosis, meditation and music can help calm and rebalance the patient's autonomic nervous system and immune functioning. Handheld miniaturized heart rate variability biofeedback devices are now available. The relaxation response can easily be taught. Guided imagery can be recorded or live. Live rapid induction hypnosis followed by deepening and then self-guided imagery requires no experience on the part of the patient but does require training and experience on the part of a provider. Recorded hypnosis inductions may also be used. Meditation generally requires more prior experience and training, but is useful when the patient already is skilled in it. Live, guided meditation or meditation recordings may be used. Relaxing recorded music from speakers or headphones or live performance music may also be employed to ease discomfort and improve the patient's attitude for dermatologic procedures and surgeries. PMID:20677535

  15. Patient selection for obesity surgery.

    PubMed

    Grace, D M

    1987-09-01

    Patients selected for gastroplasty should be at least 45 kg above ideal weight, between the ages of 18 and 50, and operated on in a center with good results, where team assessment and long-term follow-up is emphasized. Referral by a family doctor who provides local care and support is important. Medical complications need not be present because the idea is to prevent them, but problems such as sleep apnea, adult onset diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and infertility, which may be corrected by weight loss, increase the indication for gastroplasty. Patients should have social support and be intelligent enough to understand the postoperative diet and the need for regular follow-up. Those with a history of psychiatric admission require careful preoperative assessment by psychiatrist or psychologist and close follow-up and support. Patients should have made a good supervised attempt at dieting, have had stable weight for 3 to 5 years preoperatively, and have stopped smoking at least 6 weeks prior to operation. Tests to assess personality factors, eating habits, and motivation are developing, but more precise methods of selecting patients for gastroplasty and predicting successful and uncomplicated weight loss are still needed. PMID:3325422

  16. Prevention of VTE in Orthopedic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Charles W.; Johanson, Norman A.; Curley, Catherine; Dahl, Ola E.; Schulman, Sam; Ortel, Thomas L.; Pauker, Stephen G.; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a serious, but decreasing complication following major orthopedic surgery. This guideline focuses on optimal prophylaxis to reduce postoperative pulmonary embolism and DVT. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: In patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, we recommend the use of one of the following rather than no antithrombotic prophylaxis: low-molecular-weight heparin; fondaparinux; dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban (total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty but not hip fracture surgery); low-dose unfractionated heparin; adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist; aspirin (all Grade 1B); or an intermittent pneumatic compression device (IPCD) (Grade 1C) for a minimum of 10 to 14 days. We suggest the use of low-molecular-weight heparin in preference to the other agents we have recommended as alternatives (Grade 2C/2B), and in patients receiving pharmacologic prophylaxis, we suggest adding an IPCD during the hospital stay (Grade 2C). We suggest extending thromboprophylaxis for up to 35 days (Grade 2B). In patients at increased bleeding risk, we suggest an IPCD or no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). In patients who decline injections, we recommend using apixaban or dabigatran (all Grade 1B). We suggest against using inferior vena cava filter placement for primary prevention in patients with contraindications to both pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2C). We recommend against Doppler (or duplex) ultrasonography screening before hospital discharge (Grade 1B). For patients with isolated lower-extremity injuries requiring leg immobilization, we suggest no thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2B). For patients undergoing knee arthroscopy without a history

  17. The Intestinal Microbiome in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Peat, Christine M; Kleiman, Susan C; Bulik, Cynthia M; Carroll, Ian M

    2015-11-01

    With nearly 39% of the worldwide adult population classified as obese, much of the globe is facing a serious public health challenge. Increasing rates of obesity, coupled with the failure of many behavioural and pharmacological interventions, have contributed to a rise in popularity of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity. Surgery-mediated weight loss was initially thought to be a direct result of mechanical alterations causing restriction and calorie malabsorption. However, the mounting evidence suggests that indirect factors influence the accumulation and storage of fat in patients that have undergone this procedure. Given the established impact the intestinal microbiota has on adiposity, it is likely that this complex enteric microbial community contributes to surgery-mediated weight loss and maintenance of weight loss postsurgery. In this review, we discuss the physiological and psychological traits exhibited by bariatric surgery candidates that can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Additionally, we detail the studies that investigated the impact of bariatric surgery on the intestinal microbiota in humans and mouse models of this procedure. PMID:26426680

  18. Predictors of Patient Satisfaction With Mohs Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Maryam M.; Warton, E. Margaret; Neugebauer, Romain; Chren, Mary-Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables that predict higher short- and long-term patient satisfaction with Mohs surgery. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting A university-based dermatology practice and the affiliated Veterans Affairs medical center dermatology clinic. Patients A total of 339 consecutive patients treated with Mohs surgery in 1999 and 2000. Main Outcome Measures Short-term satisfaction at 1 week and long-term satisfaction at 1 year. We used directed acyclic graphs to determine appropriate confounding adjustment for preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables that influence satisfaction with Mohs surgery in logistic regression models. Results Better preoperative skin-related quality of life (measured using Skindex) and more intraoperative Mohs stages were the most salient predictors of higher short- and long-term satisfaction; these odds ratios (ORs) were 2.33 (95% CI, 1.01–5.35) and 5.19 (1.66–16.29), respectively, for preoperative skin-related quality of life and 7.06 (2.02–24.67) and 5.30 (1.24–22.64), respectively, for more intraoperative Mohs stages. Patients not bothered by postoperative bleeding were more likely to be satisfied short term (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.25–4.05), as were those who considered themselves involved in decision making about their treatment (3.05; 1.52–6.10). Higher long-term satisfaction with Mohs surgery was observed among patients who were married (2.36; 1.10–5.09). Conclusions Higher short- and long-term satisfaction with Mohs surgery is predicted by better preoperative skin-related quality of life and by more intraoperative Mohs stages. The effect of postoperative variables wanes over time, suggesting that factors influencing satisfaction can vary depending on the time frame when satisfaction is measured. Our results may help clinicians identify patients who are at higher risk of dissatisfaction following Mohs surgery. PMID:22184760

  19. Assessing Sexual Abuse/Attack Histories with Bariatric Surgery Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahony, David

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed sexual abuse/attack histories in 537 bariatric surgery patients using the PsyBari. The prevalence rates found were lower (15.5%, 19.3% of women, 5.2% of men) than other studies that used bariatric surgery patients but consistent with studies that used nonbariatric obese subjects. Furthermore, bariatric surgery patients who…

  20. Pregnancy management following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Uzoma, A; Keriakos, R

    2013-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is gaining in popularity, due to globally increasing rates of obesity. In the UK, this has manifested as a 14-fold increase in bariatric surgery between 2004 and 2010, making it necessary to develop strategies to manage women who become pregnant following bariatric surgery. This review paper has explored all the current evidence in the literature and provided a comprehensive management strategy for pregnant women following bariatric surgery. The emphasis is on a multidisciplinary team approach to all aspects of care. Adequate pre-conception and antenatal and postnatal care is essential to good pregnancy outcomes with emphasis on appropriate nutritional supplementation. This is especially important following malabsorptive procedures. There is no evidence to suggest that pregnancy outcome is worse after bariatric surgery, though women who remain obese are prone to obesity-related risks in pregnancy. Neonatal outcome post-bariatric surgery is no different from the general population. PMID:23445128

  1. Prospective Demographic Study of Cosmetic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlessinger, Daniel; Schlessinger, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The authors sought to examine and assess cosmetic surgery patient demographics as well as age in relation to partner, in a prospective manner, analyzing data for any significant correlations. Design: The authors conducted a prospective study utilizing a survey. Setting: The study was conducted in a private, nonacademic dermatological practice. Participants: Three hundred thirty-six patients participated in this study. Results: Demographics of onabotulinumtoxinA/abobotulinumtoxinA (neurotoxins), fillers, and laser hair removal users were studied. The data show that the average private practice cosmetic surgery patient in this study is a married (67.5%), college-educated or greater (66.9%), employed (74.3%), mother (74.5%). In the fillers category, 50 percent of women were older than their partners, as opposed to 14.8 percent in 2008 Census data. Additionally, women were more educated and employed to a higher percentage than similar women in 2008 Census data. Data on motivations were statistically not significant. Conclusion: Data from this study show potential correlations with Census data norms in marital status and motherhood status categories, but not in the age in relation to partner, education, and employment level categories. Motivations of individuals undergoing cosmetic surgery will need further analysis in future studies. PMID:21103314

  2. Review of nutritional guidelines for patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Cheri Rebecca; Luning, Alyssa

    2015-08-01

    Health care providers often supply patients who are undergoing bariatric surgery with varying and sometimes conflicting information regarding nutrition before and after surgery. Nurses and other care providers can benefit from applying current nutritional guidelines to increase patients' understanding, compliance, nutrition, hydration, protein needs, and satisfaction. This article summarizes basic recommendations to help health care providers understand the patients' nutritional requirements and diet recommendations from two weeks before bariatric surgery to four to six weeks after surgery. PMID:26227519

  3. Trends in oral drug bioavailability following bariatric surgery: examining the variable extent of impact on exposure of different drug classes

    PubMed Central

    Darwich, Adam S; Henderson, Kathryn; Burgin, Angela; Ward, Nicola; Whittam, Janet; Ammori, Basil J; Ashcroft, Darren M; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To identify the most commonly prescribed drugs in a bariatric surgery population and to assess existing evidence regarding trends in oral drug bioavailability post bariatric surgery. METHODS A retrospective audit was undertaken to document commonly prescribed drugs amongst patients undergoing bariatric surgery in an NHS hospital in the UK and to assess practice for drug administration following bariatric surgery. The available literature was examined for trends relating to drug permeability and solubility with regards to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) and main route of elimination. RESULTS No significant difference in the ‘post/pre surgery oral drug exposure ratio’ (ppR) was apparent between BCS class I to IV drugs, with regards to dose number (Do) or main route of elimination. Drugs classified as ‘solubility limited’ displayed an overall reduction as compared with ‘freely soluble’ compounds, as well as an unaltered and increased ppR. CONCLUSION Clinical studies establishing guidelines for commonly prescribed drugs, and the monitoring of drugs exhibiting a narrow therapeutic window or without a readily assessed clinical endpoint, are warranted. Using mechanistically based pharmacokinetic modelling for simulating the multivariate nature of changes in drug exposure may serve as a useful tool in the further understanding of postoperative trends in oral drug exposure and in developing practical clinical guidance. PMID:22463107

  4. Nutrition support to patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ward, Nicola

    2003-12-01

    Nutritional depletion has been demonstrated to be a major determinant of the development of post-operative complications. Gastrointestinal surgery patients are at risk of nutritional depletion from inadequate nutritional intake, surgical stress and the subsequent increase in metabolic rate. Fears of postoperative ileus and the integrity of the newly constructed anastomosis have led to treatment typically entailing starvation with administration of intravenous fluids until the passage of flatus. However, it has since been shown that prompt postoperative enteral feeding is both effective and well tolerated. Enteral feeding is also associated with specific clinical benefits such as reduced incidence of postoperative infectious complications and an improved wound healing response. Further research is required to determine whether enteral nutrition is also associated with modulation of gut function. Studies have indicated that significant reductions in morbidity and mortality associated with perioperative Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) are limited to severely malnourished patients with gastrointestinal malignancy. Meta-analyses have shown that enteral nutrition is associated with fewer septic complications compared with parenteral feeding, reduced costs and a shorter hospital stay, so should be the preferred option whenever possible. Evidence to support pre-operative nutrition support is limited, but suggests that if malnourished individuals are adequately fed for at least 7-10 days preoperatively then surgical outcome can be improved. Ongoing research continues to explore the potential benefits of the action of glutamine on the gut and immune system for gastrointestinal surgery patients. To date it has been demonstrated that glutamine-enriched parenteral nutrition results in reduced length of stay and reduced costs in elective abdominal surgery patients. Further research is required to determine whether the routine supplementation of glutamine is warranted. A

  5. Substance misuse following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Reslan, Summar; Saules, Karen K; Greenwald, Mark K; Schuh, Leslie M

    2014-03-01

    Post-bariatric surgery patients are overrepresented in substance abuse treatment, particularly those who have had the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) procedure. The severity of the substance use disorder (SUD; i.e., warranting inpatient treatment) and related consequences necessitate a better understanding of the variables associated with post-RYGB SUDs. This investigation assessed factors associated with post-RYGB substance misuse. Post-RYGB patients (N = 141; at least 24 months postsurgery) completed an online survey assessing variables hypothesized to contribute to post-RYGB SUDs. Fourteen percent of participants met criteria for postoperative substance misuse. Those with a lower percent total weight loss (%TWL) were more likely to endorse substance misuse. Family history of substance misuse was strongly associated with postoperative substance misuse. Eating-related variables including presurgical food addiction and postsurgical nocturnal eating, subjective hunger, and environmental responsiveness to food cues were also associated with a probable postoperative SUD. These findings have clinical utility in that family history of substance misuse can be easily assessed, and at-risk patients can be advised accordingly. In addition, those who endorse post-RYGB substance misuse appear to have stronger cognitive and behavioral responses to food, providing some support for the theory of behavioral substitution (or "addiction transfer"). PMID:24102253

  6. Patients' perceptions of music during surgery.

    PubMed

    Stevens, K

    1990-09-01

    Music, as an aesthetic and symbolic medium, has the ability to dispel much of the fear and anxiety associated with facing the unknown alone. As such it is an ideal support for patients undergoing surgery where a non-general anaesthetic is administered. However, it is important to consider whether, from the patient's perspective, the inclusion of music in such a situation is considered to be helpful. A pilot study conducted at an acute hospital involved interviewing 25 patients who, through an attitudinal scale and their interview responses, revealed positive support for the music that they listened to during their operation. Their remarks focused on the ability of the music, as a familiar personal and cultural medium, to ease their anxiety, to act as a distractor and to increase their threshold of pain. From a nursing perspective, such an application of music as therapy to reduce fear and anxiety may be viewed as being highly relevant to the work of the anaesthetic nurse, with regard to a more individualized and holistic approach to patient care. PMID:2229703

  7. Sham surgery trial controls: perspectives of patients and their relatives.

    PubMed

    Swift, Teresa L

    2012-07-01

    This study reports on qualitative research conducted in the UK with people with Parkinson's Disease and their relatives on the subject of "sham surgery." It explores attitudes toward sham surgery and reasoning about hypothetical participation in a sham-controlled trial. Results showed that attitudes toward sham surgery may not necessarily predict trial participation behavior. A small majority of interviewees deemed sham surgery ethically acceptable with certain provisos, but hypothetical participation was driven primarily by disease severity and a lack of standard treatment options, with a preference for receiving the real surgery over sham. Ethical implications for patient equipoise and the autonomy of patients' research participation decisions are discussed. PMID:22850140

  8. Pica patient, status post gastric bypass, improves with change in medication regimen.

    PubMed

    Tabaac, Burton J; Tabaac, Vanessa

    2015-02-01

    The causes and origins of pica remain unknown and are the source of speculation and heated debate. Bariatric surgery patients are increasingly being observed in eating disorders treatment programs. Often associated with pregnancy, iron deficiency anemia, early development and mental retardation, pica has only recently been noted in post bariatric surgery patients, all of whom presented with pagophagia (eating of ice). Although there is literature detailing the presence of bezoars in gastric bypass patients, the association of pica, bezoars and abnormal eating behavior after bariatric surgery is still not understood completely. We present the case of a patient diagnosed with pica who underwent bariatric surgery due to a specific bezoar causing obstruction, followed by a treatment plan aimed at curbing the impulses. The patient was diagnosed to have a cardboard and paper bezoar causing gastric obstruction, which was removed endoscopically. After incomplete improvement of pica symptoms with treatment including ziprasidone, lorazepam and behavioral therapy, Saphris (asenapine) was introduced resulting in significant and complete resolution. PMID:25653830

  9. Vestibular Disorders after Stapedial Surgery in Patients with Otosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    de Vilhena, Ditza; Gambôa, Inês; Duarte, Delfim; Lopes, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives. Vertigo is a described complication of stapedial surgery. Many studies have been conducted to assess the improvement of hearing loss, but there are few studies that assess vestibular function after stapedial surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence and characterize the vertigo after stapedial surgery. Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study. Patients undergoing stapedial surgery in our hospital between October 2013 and December 2014 were invited to participate. The vertigo was assessed before and 4 months after surgery, using the Dizziness Handicap Inventory. Results. We included 140 patients in the study. 12 patients (8.6%) reported vertigo before surgery, and all of them denied vertigo after surgery. 36 patients (25.7%) reported vertigo four months after surgery, and none of them had vertigo before surgery. Postoperative total scores in patients with vertigo ranged between 2 and 18 points. Conclusion. The study shows that vestibular disorders may remain after the immediate postoperative period and reinforces the need for clarification of the patient in the informed consent act. PMID:26904127

  10. Do Too Many Lung Cancer Patients Miss Out on Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_159488.html Do Too Many Lung Cancer Patients Miss Out on Surgery? Study evaluates treatment ... 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with advanced lung cancer might live longer if treated surgically, but few ...

  11. [Clinical Outcomes of Cardiovascular Surgery in Jehovah's Witness Patients].

    PubMed

    Mukaihara, Kosuke; Yamashita, Masafumi; Toyohira, Hitoshi; Yotsumoto, Goichi; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Kazuhisa; Moriyama, Yukinori; Imoto, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular surgery in Jehovah's Witness is challenging for surgeons on the ground that they refuse blood transfusion. We report 11 cases of cardiovascular surgery. All of the patients underwent elective surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Two cases underwent minimally invasive procedures. The mean preoperative hemoglobin level was 13.0 g/dl, and hematopoietic medicines were preoperatively administrated in 4 patients. Although 10 patients recovered satisfactory without blood transfusion, 1 surgical case was lost due to uncontrollable postoperative bleeding. The clinical outcomes of the Jehovah's Witness patients are considered to be satisfactory. However, careful indication is recommended in high risk cases. PMID:27075280

  12. [Robotic surgery for colorectal cancer in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingping; Wei, Ye; Xu, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    The outstanding advantages of robotic surgery include the stable and three-dimension image and the convenience of surgery manipulation. The disadvantages include the lack of factile feedback, high cost and prolonged surgery time. It was reported that robotic surgery was associated with less trauma stress and faster recovery in elderly patients(≥75 years old) when compared with open surgery. Elderly people have a higher incidence of carcinogenesis and also have more comorbidities and reduced functional reserve. Clinical data of patients over 75 years old treated by robotic surgery in Zhongshan Hospital affiliated to Fudan University from March 2011 to October 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 24 consecutive patients were included with a median age of 77.8 years old. There were 18 male and 6 female patients. Among them, 14 patients were diagnosed with descending and sigmoid colon cancers while 10 with rectal cancers; 19 had tumor size larger than 5 cm; 16 were diagnosed with ulcerative adenocarcinoma. Fourteen patients were complicated with hypertension, 6 with cardiopulmonary diseases, 4 with diabetes mellitus and 3 with cerebrovascular diseases. Twenty-two patients underwent low anterior resection and 2 abdominoperineal resection. The estimated blood loss was 85 ml; the median operation time was (123.1±45.2) min; the median number of retrieved lymph node was 12.4. Postoperative pathologic results showed that 3 patients were stage I, 10 stage II, and 11 stage III. Postoperative complication was observed in 3 patients: urinary infection in 1 case, intraperitoneal infection in 1 case and atria fibrillation in 1 case, respectively. Median time to first postoperative flatus was 2.8 days. Our results indicated that robotic surgery is safe and feasible in the elderly patients. The next generation of robotic system may make up for these deficiencies through new technologies. With the advantage of more advanced surgical simulator, robotic surgery will play a

  13. Orthopaedic surgery in patients with von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Siboni, S M; Biguzzi, E; Solimeno, L P; Pasta, G; Mistretta, C; Mannucci, P M; Peyvandi, F

    2014-01-01

    Patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) may need orthopaedic surgery because of disabling chronic arthropathy due to recurrent joint bleeding. They may also require this surgery independently of their haemostasis disorder. Knowledge regarding the management of orthopaedic surgery in VWD is limited. Description of management of orthopaedic surgery in patients with VWD, based upon retrospective data collection and analysis of 32 orthopaedic procedures carried out over a period of 33 years in 23 patients was the aim of this study. Of 32 procedures, six were minor (three hand surgery, one foot surgery, two others) and 26 were major (seven joint replacements, nine arthroscopic procedures, two foot surgery, eight others). Twenty-two procedures were performed using replacement therapy with plasma-derived concentrates containing both factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (VWF). Two procedures in patients with acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AWVS) were performed using FVIII-VWF concentrates associated with intravenous immunoglobulins, or desmopressin plus tranexamic acid. Seven procedures were performed using desmopressin alone and one using intravenous immunoglobulins in AVWS. Bleeding complications occurred in seven procedures (22%). In one patient, an anti-VWF antibody was diagnosed after surgery. Anticoagulant prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism was implemented in four cases only and in two instances there was excessive bleeding. In conclusion, control of surgical haemostasis was achieved in most patients with VWD undergoing orthopaedic surgery. The control of haemostasis combined with an adequate surgical technique and early post-operative rehabilitation are warranted for the successful performance of orthopaedic surgery in VWD, which requires the involvement of specialized haemophilia centres. PMID:23992395

  14. Outcome of cervical spine surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Asselt, K M; Lems, W; Bongartz, E; Hamburger, H; Drossaers-Bakker, K; Dijkmans, B; van Soesbergen, R M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Cervical spine instability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may lead to cervical myelopathy or occipital neuralgia, or both. Morbidity and mortality in patients with RA treated with cervical spine surgery during two years of follow up were evaluated.
METHODS—Between 1992 and 1996 55 patients with RA underwent cervical spine surgery because of occipital neuralgia or cervical myelopathy, or both. Patients were classified according to the Ranawat criteria for pain and neurological assessment before operation and three months and two years postoperatively. For occipital neuralgia a successful operation was defined as complete relief of pain and for cervical myelopathy as neurological improvement.
RESULTS—Occipital neuralgia was present in 17 patients, cervical myelopathy in 14 patients, and 24 had both. Surgical treatment in the patients with symptoms of occipital neuralgia who were still alive two years after surgery was successful in 18/29 (62%). In the surviving patients with cervical myelopathy neurological improvement of at least one Ranawat class was seen in 16/24 (67%). Postoperative mortality within six weeks was 3/51 (6%). Within two years after the operation 14 /51 (27%) of the patients had died; in most patients the cause of death was not related to surgery. The highest mortality (50%) was found in the group of six patients with quadriparesis and very poor functional capacity (Ranawat IIIB).
CONCLUSION—Cervical spine surgery in patients with RA performed because of occipital neuralgia or cervical myelopathy, or both, is successful in most patients who are alive two years after surgery. However, the mortality rate during these two years is relatively high, which seems to be largely related to the severity of the underlying disease and not to the surgery itself.

 PMID:11302865

  15. Portosystemic Shunt Surgery in Patients with Idiopathic Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Karagul, Servet; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Tardu, Ali; Ertugrul, Ismail; Kirmizi, Serdar; Sumer, Fatih; Isik, Burak; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH) is a rare disease characterized by increased portal venous pressure in the absence of cirrhosis and other causes of liver diseases. The aim of the present study was to present our results in using portosystemic shunt surgery in patients with INCPH. MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients who had been referred to our Liver Transplantation Institute for liver transplantation and who had undergone surgery from January 2010 to December 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with INCPH who had undergone portosystemic shunt procedure were included in the study. Age, sex, symptoms and findings, type of portosystemic shunt, and postoperative complications were assessed. RESULTS A total of 1307 patients underwent liver transplantation from January 2010 to December 2015. Eleven patients with INCPH who did not require liver transplantation were successfully operated on with a portosystemic shunt procedure. The mean follow-up was 30.1±19 months (range 7-69 months). There was no mortality in the perioperative period or during the follow-up. Two patients underwent surgery again due to intra-abdominal hemorrhage; one had bleeding from the surgical site except the portacaval anastomosis and the other had bleeding from the h-graft anastomosis. No patient developed encephalopathy and no patient presented with esophageal variceal bleeding after portosystemic shunt surgery. Shunt thrombosis occurred in 1 patient (9.9%). Only 1 patient developed ascites, which was controlled medically. CONCLUSIONS Portosystemic shunt surgery is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of patients with INCPH. PMID:27194018

  16. Radiation Enterocolitis Requiring Surgery in Patients With Gynecological Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Iraha, Shiro; Ogawa, Kazuhiko . E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Moromizato, Hidehiko; Shiraishi, Masayuki; Nagai, Yutaka; Samura, Hironori; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Adachi, Genki; Tamaki, Wakana; Hirakawa, Makoto; Kamiyama, Kazuya; Inamine, Morihiko; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Aoki, Yoichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To identify the characteristics, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The records of 1,349 patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The majority of the patients (88%) were treated with 50 Gy or 50.4 Gy pelvic irradiation in conventional fractionations with anteroposterior fields. Results: Forty-eight patients (3.6%) developed radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery. Terminal ileum was the most frequent site (50%) and most of the lesions had stenosis or perforation. On univariate analysis, previous abdominopelvic surgery, diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking and primary site had an impact on the complications, and on multivariate analysis, abdominopelvic surgery, DM, and smoking were independent predictors of the complications requiring surgery. After the surgical intervention, the frequency of Grade 2 or more bleeding was significantly lower in patients treated with intestinal resection in addition to decompression than those treated with intestinal decompression alone. Conclusions: Severe radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery usually occurred at the terminal ileum and was strongly correlated with previous abdominopelvic surgery, DM, and smoking. Concerning the management, liberal resection of the affected bowel appears to be the preferable therapy.

  17. Urological surgery in elderly patients: results and complications

    PubMed Central

    Brodak, Milos; Tomasek, Jan; Pacovsky, Jaroslav; Holub, Lukas; Husek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Owing to the large aging population, a growing number of elderly patients are undergoing surgical treatment. Surgical procedures in elderly patients are associated with a higher risk of complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of urological surgeries in old patients. Methods The authors carried out a retrospective study, evaluating results and early postoperative complications in patients aged 75 years and older. The cohort of patients included 221 patients who underwent surgical procedures in the department of urology between January 2011 and December 2012. The average age of patients was 78. The results and complications were categorized based on the type of surgery performed, and the Dindo–Clavien scale. Results The median follow-up was 18 months. All surgeries for malignant tumors were performed successfully with no residual disease. Totally, 48 (22%) complications were recorded. The most serious were as follows: one patient (<0.5%) died; and four (<2%) patients underwent reoperation. The most common complications involved infection, mainly sepsis and surgical site infections. Other complications included mild respiratory insufficiency, delirium, bleeding, etc. Conclusion Surgeries in elderly patients were effective and safe. The cornerstone of safety is careful preparation and treatment of comorbidities. Complications occurred mainly as a result of emergency procedures during emergency procedures and in major surgeries such as cystectomy and nephrectomy. The standard use of low molecular-weight heparin caused no incidence of thromboembolic disease. PMID:25673978

  18. Results of coronary surgery after failed elective coronary angioplasty in patients with prior coronary surgery.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, W S; Cohen, C L; Curling, P E; Jones, E L; Craver, J M; Guyton, R; King, S B; Douglas, J S

    1990-11-01

    The results of coronary artery bypass surgery after failed elective coronary angioplasty in patients who have undergone prior coronary surgery are unknown. Coronary angioplasty may be performed to relieve angina after surgery either to the native coronary vessels or to grafts. Failure of attempted coronary angioplasty may mandate repeat coronary surgery, often in the setting of acute ischemia. From 1980 to 1989, 1,263 patients with prior coronary bypass surgery underwent angioplasty; of these patients, 46 (3.6%) underwent reoperation for failed angioplasty during the same hospital stay. Of the 46 patients who underwent reoperation, 33 had and 13 did not have acute ischemia. In the group with ischemia, 3 patients (9.1%) died and 14 (42.4%) died or had a Q wave myocardial infarction in the hospital compared with no deaths (p = NS) and no deaths or Q wave myocardial infarction (p = 0.005) in the group without ischemia. At 3 years, the actuarial survival rate was 88 +/- 6% in the group with ischemia, whereas there were no deaths in the group without ischemia (p = NS), and freedom from death or myocardial infarction was 51 +/- 10% in the group with ischemia, versus no events in the group without ischemia (p = 0.006). In most patients with prior coronary bypass surgery, coronary angioplasty was performed without the need for repeat coronary bypass surgery. Should coronary angioplasty fail, reoperation in patients without acute ischemia can be performed with overall patient survival comparable to that of elective reoperative coronary bypass without coronary angioplasty.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2229784

  19. Flu Shot Safe for Surgery Patients in Hospital: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157754.html Flu Shot Safe for Surgery Patients in Hospital: Study ... increased risk for complications if they receive a flu shot in the hospital, a new study suggests. ...

  20. Psychosocial Factors in Patients Indicated for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nechanicka, Nina; Barsa, Pavel; Harsa, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    In the context of the interdisciplinary care of patients with chronic back pain, surgery is an option for those who do not benefit from conservative treatment. Psychological assessment prior to back surgery aims to identify suitable candidates for surgery and predict possible complications or poor treatment effects. The literature suggests that psychosocial factors are important outcome predictors of lumbar spinal surgery; however, there is not enough empirical evidence to show that early identification and treatment of these factors help improve surgical outcome. This review discusses the possible psychosocial risk factors in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis who are undergoing decompression or stabilization surgery, shows the association between presurgical psychological parameters and surgical treatment outcome, and describes the characteristics of our pilot study to implement presurgical psychological assessment in routine clinical practice. PMID:27144540

  1. Acute Abdominal Pain in the Bariatric Surgery Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle D; Takenaka, Katrin Y; Luber, Samuel D

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is present in epidemic proportions in the United States, and bariatric surgery has become more common. Thus, emergency physicians will undoubtedly encounter many patients who have undergone one of these procedures. Knowledge of the anatomic changes specific to these procedures aids the clinician in understanding potential complications and devising an organized differential diagnosis. This article reviews common bariatric surgery procedures, their complications, and the approach to acute abdominal pain in these patients. PMID:27133251

  2. Reconstructive surgery in immunocompromised patients: evaluation and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dunda, Sebastian E.; Bozkurt, Ahmet; Pallua, Norbert; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of patients undergoing reconstructive surgery are immunocompromised due to different reasons and different medical treatments. Some of the used immunosuppressive drugs may affect the process of wound healing and thereby, impair the long-term success of surgical treatment. Therefore, this retrospective analysis aimed at the evaluation of the perioperative treatment and surgical outcome of immunocompromised patients undergoing different reconstructive procedures. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 8 immunocompromised patients with different primary diseases who needed reconstructive surgery: 2 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with an acute myeloid leukemia, 1 patient with colitis ulcerosa, 1 patient with liver cirrhosis, 1 patient with chronic polyarthritis, and 2 patients with malignant melanoma. Results: In 7 of our 8 presented cases, multiple operations with wound debridements have been necessary to optimize the granulation of the wound bed before reconstructive surgery. 3 out of these 7 patients required further operations due to wound dehiscence or necrosis, with 2 of them as a result of increased immunosuppressive therapy. 5 out of 8 patients needed no further surgical treatment. Conclusions: Both the perioperative drug therapy and the reconstructive surgery concept need to be determined carefully in each individual case of the immunocompromised patients. Thus, the appropriate point in time of operation to achieve the best possible wound healing as well as the complexity of the procedure will require the consideration of a ‘less is more’ strategy in selected cases. PMID:26734539

  3. Optimal perioperative medical management of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saket; Maldonado, Yasdet; Taylor, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Perioperative medical management of patients undergoing vascular surgery can be challenging because they represent the surgical population at highest risk. β-Blockers should be continued perioperatively in patients already taking them preoperatively. Statins may be used in the perioperative period in patients who are not on statin therapy preoperatively. Institutional guidelines should be used to guide insulin replacement. Recent research suggests that measurement of troponins may provide some risk stratification in clinically stable patients following vascular surgery. Multimodal pain therapy including nonopioid strategies is necessary to improve the efficacy of pain relief and decrease the risk of side effects and complications. PMID:25113724

  4. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Salvatore; Victorzon, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness and safety of bariatric/metabolic surgery in elderly patients. We performed a systematic review on this issue in patients aged 60 years or older. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched until August 2015 for studies on outcomes of bariatric surgery in elderly patients. The results were expressed as pooled proportions (%) with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity across the studies was evaluated by the I2 test, and a random-effects model was used. Twenty-six articles encompassing 8,149 patients were pertinent with this issue and included data on bariatric surgery outcomes in elderly population. Fourteen patients died during the 30-day postoperative period, with a pooled mortality of 0.01%. Pooled overall complication rate was 14.7%. At 1-year follow-up, pooled mean excess weight loss was 53.77%, pooled diabetes resolution was 54.5%, and pooled hypertension resolution was 42.5%, while pooled lipid disorder resolution was 41.2%. Outcomes and complication rates of bariatric surgery in patients older than 60 years are comparable to those in a younger population, independent of the type of procedure performed. Patients should not be denied bariatric surgery because of their age alone. PMID:26508845

  5. News media reports of patient deaths following 'medical tourism' for cosmetic surgery and bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Turner, Leigh

    2012-04-01

    Contemporary scholarship examining clinical outcomes in medical travel for cosmetic surgery identifies cases in which patients traveled abroad for medical procedures and subsequently returned home with infections and other surgical complications. Though there are peer-reviewed articles identifying patient deaths in cases where patients traveled abroad for commercial kidney transplantation or stem cell injections, no scholarly publications document deaths of patients who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Drawing upon news media reports extending from 1993 to 2011, this article identifies and describes twenty-six reported cases of deaths of individuals who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Over half of the reported deaths occurred in two countries. Analysis of these news reports cannot be used to make causal claims about why the patients died. In addition, cases identified in news media accounts do not provide a basis for establishing the relative risk of traveling abroad for care instead of seeking elective cosmetic surgery at domestic health care facilities. Acknowledging these limitations, the case reports suggest the possibility that contemporary peer-reviewed scholarship is underreporting patient mortality in medical travel. The paper makes a strong case for promoting normative analyses and empirical studies of medical travel. In particular, the paper argues that empirically informed ethical analysis of 'medical tourism' will benefit from rigorous studies tracking global flows of medical travelers and the clinical outcomes they experience. The paper contains practical recommendations intended to promote debate concerning how to promote patient safety and quality of care in medical travel. PMID:22420449

  6. Sham Surgery Trial Controls: Perspectives of Patients and Their Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Teresa L.

    2012-01-01

    THIS STUDY REPORTS ON QUALITATIVE research conducted in the UK with people with Parkinson’s Disease and their relatives on the subject of “sham surgery.” It explores attitudes toward sham surgery and reasoning about hypothetical participation in a sham-controlled trial. Results showed that attitudes toward sham surgery may not necessarily predict trial participation behavior. A small majority of interviewees deemed sham surgery ethically acceptable with certain provisos, but hypothetical participation was driven primarily by disease severity and a lack of standard treatment options, with a preference for receiving the real surgery over sham. Ethical implications for patient equipoise and the autonomy of patients’ research participation decisions are discussed. PMID:22850140

  7. NUTRITIONAL REPERCUSSIONS IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    SILVEIRA-JÚNIOR, Sérgio; de ALBUQUERQUE, Maurício Mendes; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis; da ROSA, Luisa Salvagni; HYGIDIO, Daniel de Andrade; ZAPELINI, Raphaela Mazon

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies evaluated the association between nutritional disorders, quality of life and weight loss in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Aim To identify nutritional changes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and correlate them with weight loss, control of comorbidities and quality of life. Method A prospective cohort, analytical and descriptive study involving 59 patients undergoing bariatric surgery was done. Data were collected preoperatively at three and six months postoperatively, evaluating nutritional aspects and outcomes using BAROS questionnaire. The data had a confidence interval of 95%. Results The majority of patients was composed of women, 47 (79.7%), with 55.9% of the series with BMI between 40 to 49.9 kg/m². In the sixth month after surgery scores of quality of life were significantly higher than preoperatively (p<0.05) and 27 (67.5 %) patients had comorbidities resolved, 48 (81.3 %) presented BAROS scores of very good or excellent. After three and six months of surgery 16 and 23 presented some nutritional disorder, respectively. There was no relationship between the loss of excess weight and quality of life among patients with or without nutritional disorders. Conclusions Nutritional disorders are uncommon in the early postoperative period and, when present, have little or no influence on quality of life and loss of excess weight. PMID:25861070

  8. Life saving surgery in polytrauma patients.

    PubMed

    Broos, P L; Janzing, H M; Vandermeeren, L A; Klockaerts, K S

    2000-01-01

    Life saving surgery is the surgery which has to be performed during the acute or reanimation period (1 to 3 h) and during the primary or stabilisation period (first day surgery). During the reanimation period lifethreatening conditions are identified and management is begun simultaneously. Many trauma surgeons talk about the first "golden hours" as the time interval starting immediately after the injury when rapid intervention will save lives and a lack of intervention will result in life loss. Most common, these critical conditions are exsanguinating hemorrhage, acute pump failure, obstruction of airways, mechanical failure of ventilation or severe brain damage with tentorial herniation. During this period, the following acts are necessary: surgical access to live support systems (airway, veins), life saving decompression of body cavities, resuscitative thoracotomy, control of exsanguinating external hemorrhage and control of exsanguinating hemorrhage into the body cavities. The primary or stabilisation period starts when vital functions stabilise. This period consists of further diagnostic procedures and treatment of injuries that are not directly life-threatening, but which may become life endangering or severely disabling if not treated promptly. The priorities of the surgical treatment are: brain injuries, eye- and facial injuries, progressive compression of the spinal cord, visceral injuries, musculoskeletal injuries. By improving prehospital care, rapid transport and last but not least immediate life saving surgical treatment preventable deaths can be reduced from 20-30% to 2-9% (5). PMID:11202271

  9. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Berkan; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Adam, Gurhan; Akbas, Alpaslan; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    Urinary tract stone disease is seen at a level of 1%-2% in childhood (< 18 years). In recent years, however, there has been a marked increased in pediatric stone disease, particularly in adolescence. A carbohydrate- and salt-heavy diet and a more sedentary lifestyle are implicated in this increase. Although stone disease is rare in childhood, its presence is frequently associated with metabolic or anatomical disorders or infectious conditions, for which reason there is a high possibility of post-therapeutic recurrence. Factors such as a high possibility of recurrence and increasing incidence further enhance the importance of minimally invasive therapeutic options in children, with their expectations of a long life. In children in whom active stone removal is decided on, the way to achieve the highest level of success with the least morbidity is to select the most appropriate treatment modality. Thanks to today's advanced technology, renal stones that were once treated only by surgery can now be treated with minimally invasive techniques, from invasion of the urinary system in an antegrade (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or retrograde (retrograde intrarenal surgery) manner or shock wave lithotripsy to laparoscopic stone surgery. This compilation study examined studies involving the RIRS procedure, the latest minimally invasive technique, in children and compared the results of those studies with those from other techniques. PMID:25374812

  10. Step activity monitoring in lumbar stenosis patients undergoing decompressive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Tim; Winter, Corinna; Brandes, Mirko; Hackenberg, Lars; Wassmann, Hansdetlef; Liem, Dennis; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Bullmann, Viola

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic degenerative central lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a frequent indication for decompressive spinal surgery, to reduce spinal claudication. No data are as yet available on the effect of surgery on the level of activity measured with objective long-term monitoring. The aim of this prospective, controlled study was to objectively quantify the level of activity in central LSS patients before and after surgery, using a continuous measurement device. The objective data were correlated with subjective clinical results and the radiographic degree of stenosis. Forty-seven patients with central LSS and typical spinal claudication scheduled for surgery were included. The level of activity (number of gait cycles) was quantified for 7 consecutive days using the StepWatch Activity Monitor (SAM). Visual analogue scales (VAS) for back and leg pain, Oswestry disability index and Roland–Morris score were used to assess the patients’ clinical status. The patients were investigated before surgery and 3 and 12 months after surgery. In addition, the radiographic extent of central LSS was measured digitally on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography. The following results were found preoperatively: 3,578 gait cycles/day, VAS for back pain 5.7 and for leg pain 6.5. Three months after surgery, the patients showed improvement: 4,145 gait cycles/day, VAS for back pain 4.0 and for leg pain 3.0. Twelve months after surgery, the improvement continued: 4,335 gait cycles/day, VAS for back pain 4.1 and for leg pain 3.3. The clinical results and SAM results showed significant improvement when preoperative data were compared with data 3 and 12 months after surgery. The results 12 months after surgery did not differ significantly from those 3 months after surgery. The level of activity correlated significantly with the degree of leg pain. The mean cross-sectional area of the spinal canal at the central LSS was 94 mm2. The radiographic results did not

  11. Preparing the patient for surgery to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Levett, Denny Z H; Edwards, Mark; Grocott, Mike; Mythen, Monty

    2016-06-01

    The time between contemplation of surgery and the procedure offers a window of opportunity to optimize patients' nutritional, functional and psychological state prior to surgery. Traditionally, preoperative pathways have focused on the underlying disease process and 'fitness for surgery' with physical pre-assessment and risk counselling late in the pathway when little time is available to intervene. With an increasingly elderly and co-morbid surgical population, early physiological assessment and multidisciplinary collaborative decision-making is increasingly important. Multimodal prehabilitation programmes may improve surgical outcome, facilitating rapid recovery from surgery and limiting post-operative functional dependence. Patient education and engagement is important if compliance with behavioural change is to be achieved and maintained. To date, there has been evidence supporting preoperative exercise training, smoking cessation, reduction in alcohol intake, anaemia management and psychosocial support. Further research is needed to identify the most effective elements of these complex preoperative interventions, as well as their optimum timing and duration. PMID:27396803

  12. Challenges of valve surgeries in post-renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Kishore, Kolkebaile Sadanand; Maheshwarappa, Nandakumar Neralakere; Pasarad, Ashwini Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation remains a mainstay of therapy for the end-stage renal disease. Cardiac disease has a high prevalence in this patient population. Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death among kidney transplantation patients. The cardiac disease accounts for 43% of all-cause mortality among dialysis patients and for ≈38% of all-cause mortality after transplantation. In this article, we review the factors and outcomes associated with valve surgeries in renal transplant recipients and evaluate the strategy for open heart surgery after renal transplantation performed. PMID:26440255

  13. [Trends in orthopaedic surgery for patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-12-01

    Significant advancement in pharmacological treatment including biological agents has gradually changed the role and content of surgical treatments for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The number of joint replacements in the large joints of lower limbs has decreased, while the number of surgeries in the small joints of hand and feet has increased. Favorable disease control by pharmacological treatment has changed the needs of patients for surgeries and expanded the options of operative procedures for surgeons. The changing needs of patients demanding the higher level of quality of life may seek a change in the surgical treatments. PMID:26608856

  14. Genital Reconstruction After Weight Loss in Adipose Male Patients: A Case report

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Daniel Robert Arno; Altmann, Silke; Infanger, Manfred; Abuagela, Nauras; Schneegans, Sarah Maj; Damert, Hans-Georg; Kraus, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We introduce our surgical technique in two male genital reconstruction cases out of 15 post-bariatric patients. Methods: At our Department for Plastic Surgery at the University Hospital Magdeburg, 15 patients, 6 male and 9 female, underwent a surgical abdominoplasty after weight loss in 2009. Results: The average weight of the 15 patients was preoperatively 197.2 kg and the average hospital stay was of 14 days. In 2 cases, a second procedure for male genital reconstruction was necessary. After primary dietary measures and weight loss, we performed genital reconstruction in a second step with a sleeve-, Z-, VY-plasty and a “bilobed flap” to restore function and appearance of the male genitalia. In these patients, the average weight was 207.5 kg and hospital stay lasted 32 days. Conclusion: The increase of patients with obesity-related genital deformities will be expected in the future. Therefore, more controlled long-term studies should be published to develop guidelines for genital reconstruction techniques in plastic surgery. PMID:24741385

  15. Orthognathic surgery: is patient information on the Internet valid?

    PubMed

    Aldairy, T; Laverick, S; McIntyre, G T

    2012-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the quality and reliability of UK websites providing information on orthognathic and jaw surgery to patients. An Internet search engine (www.google.com) was used to identify websites containing medical information on 'orthognathic surgery' and 'jaw surgery'. Of over 144,000 links for orthognathic surgery and 700,000 for jaw surgery, the first 100 were examined in detail. After excluding discussion groups, news and video feeds, and removing duplicate sites, only 25 relevant websites remained which were then evaluated using the DISCERN instrument (www.discern.org.uk/discern_instrument.php). Through the 16 questions assessing the reliability and quality of the consumer information which are scored from 1 to 5, a relative index of the quality of the information is produced. The maximum score attainable for an excellent website is 80. Of the 25 websites that were scored, DISCERN indicated the majority of websites fell well below the maximum score. The highest score achieved by one of the websites according to the DISCERN tool was 64 of 80 and the lowest score achieved was 21 of 80. The websites achieving maximum and minimum score were Wikipedia and qualitydentistry.com, respectively. By directing patients to validated websites, clinicians can ensure patients find appropriate information; however, further development of websites relating to orthognathic surgery is required. Internet information should be updated on a regular basis to account for improvements in orthodontic and surgical care. PMID:21459834

  16. Cutaneous oncologic and cosmetic surgery in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah; Yu, Thomas; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Gordon, Marsha; Silapunt, Sirunya; Norman, Robert A; Alam, Murad

    2004-01-01

    A wide array of surgical procedures is available to geriatric patients. These interventions can enhance the appearance of patients and facilitate the removal of skin cancers. Pre-existing medical conditions of geriatric patients must be considered comprehensively when selecting and performing cutaneous surgical procedures. Many older patients suffer from a variety of diseases and take a variety of medications and herbal supplements to ameliorate the consequences of such diseases. In general, skin surgery can be performed safely on even very old patients, provided precautions are followed. The biopsychosocial well-being and essence of patients must also be addressed when performing dermatologic surgery. If patients are treated holistically and comprehensively, their surgical experience can be enhanced and their health and appearance improved. PMID:15018014

  17. Transient Tear Film Dysfunction after Cataract Surgery in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tongsheng; Mashaghi, Alireza; Liu, Qinghuai; Hong, Jiaxu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common systemic disease. Many diabetic patients seek cataract surgery for a better visual acuity. Unlike in the general population, the influence of cataract surgery on tear film function in diabetic patients remains elusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tear function in diabetic and nondiabetic patients following cataract surgery. Methods In this prospective, interventional case series, 174 diabetic patients without dry eye syndrome (DES) and 474 age-matched nondiabetic patients as control who underwent phacoemulsification were enrolled at two different eye centers between January 2011 and January 2013. Patients were followed up at baseline and at 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Ocular symptom scores (Ocular Surface Disease Index, OSDI) and tear film function including tear film stability (tear film break-up time, TBUT), corneal epithelium integrity (corneal fluorescein staining, CFS), and tear secretion (Schirmer’s I test, SIT) were evaluated. Results In total, 83.9% of the diabetic patients (146 cases with 185 eyes) and 89.0% of the nondiabetic patients (422 cases with 463 eyes) completed all check-ups after the interventions (P = 0.095). The incidence of DES was 17.1% in the diabetic patients and 8.1% in the nondiabetic patients at 7 days after cataract surgery. In the diabetic patients, the incidence of DES remained 4.8% at 1 month postoperatively and decreased to zero at 3 months after surgery. No DES was diagnosed in nondiabetic patients at either the 1-month or 3-month follow-up. Compared with the baseline, the diabetic patients had worse symptom scores and lower TBUT values at 7 days and 1 month but not at 3 months postoperatively. In the nondiabetic patients, symptom scores and TBUT values had returned to preoperative levels at 1-month check-up. CFS scores and SIT values did not change significantly postoperatively in either group (P = 0.916 and P = 0.964, respectively

  18. Patient Expectations of Bariatric and Body Contouring Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Anne; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Pusic, Andrea; Roessler, Kirsten K.; Rose, Michael; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient expectations are important in bariatric and body contouring surgery because the goals include improvements in health-related quality of life, appearance, and body image. The aim of this study was to identify patient expectations along the weight loss journey and/or body contouring surgery. Methods: This qualitative study took an interpretive description approach. Between September 2009 and February 2012, 49 patients were interviewed postbody contouring surgery. Data were analyzed using a line-by-line approach whereby expectations were identified and labeled as expected, unexpected, or neutral. Constant comparison was used to ensure coding was done consistently. Interviews continued until no new themes emerged. Results: Participants described expectations according to appearance, health-related quality of life, and patient experience of care. Two areas stood out in terms of unmet expectations and included appearance and physical health, ie, recovery from body contouring surgery. Most participants, who underwent bariatric surgery, expected neither the extent of excess skin after weight loss nor how the excess skin would make them look and feel. For recovery, participants did not expect that it would be as long or as hard as it was in reality. Conclusions: A full understanding of outcomes and expectations for this patient population is needed to enhance patient education and improve shared medical decision making. Education materials should be informed by the collection of evidence-based patient-reported outcome information using measures such as the BODY-Q. A patient-reported outcome scale measuring patient expectations is needed for obese and bariatric patients. PMID:27200256

  19. Foot massage: effectiveness on postoperative pain in breast surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Ucuzal, Meral; Kanan, Nevin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of foot massage on pain after breast surgery, and provide guidance for nurses in nonpharmacologic interventions for pain relief. This was a quasiexperimental study with a total of 70 patients who had undergone breast surgery (35 in the experimental group and 35 in the control group). Patients in the control group received only analgesic treatment, whereas those in the experimental group received foot massage in addition to analgesic treatment. Patients received the first dose of analgesics during surgery. As soon as patients came from the operating room, they were evaluated for pain severity. Patients whose pain severity scored ≥4 according to the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were accepted into the study. In the experimental group, pain and vital signs (arterial blood pressure, pulse, and respiration) were evaluated before foot massage at the time patients complained about pain (time 0) and then 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after foot massage. In the control group, pain and vital signs were also evaluated when the patients complained about pain (time 0) and again at 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes, in sync with the times when foot massage was completed in the experimental group. A patient information form was used to collect descriptive characteristics data of the patients, and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire was used to determine pain severity. Data were analyzed for frequencies, mean, standard deviation, chi-square, Student t, Pillai trace, and Bonferroni test. The results of the statistical analyses showed that patients in the experimental group experienced significantly less pain (p ≤ .001). Especially notable, patients in the experimental group showed a decrease in all vital signs 5 minutes after foot massage, but patients in the control group showed increases in vital signs except for heart rate at 5 minutes. The data obtained showed that foot massage in breast surgery patients was

  20. Critical care of obese patients during and after spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Elgafy, Hossein; Hamilton, Ryan; Peters, Nicholas; Paull, Daniel; Hassan, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is one of the most prevalent health problems facing the United States today, with a recent JAMA article published in 2014 estimating the prevalence of one third of all adults in the United States being obese. Also, due to technological advancements, the incidence of spine surgeries is growing. Considering these overall increases in both obesity and the performance of spinal surgeries, it can be inferred that more spinal surgery candidates will be obese. Due to this, certain factors must be taken into consideration when dealing with spine surgeries in the obese. Obesity is closely correlated with additional medical comorbidities, including hypertension, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. The pre-operative evaluation may be more difficult, as a more extensive medical evaluation may be needed. Also, adequate radiographic images can be difficult to obtain due to patient size and equipment limitations. Administering anesthesia becomes more difficult, as does proper patient positioning. Post-operatively, the obese patient is at greater risk for reintubation, difficulty with pain control, wound infection and deep vein thrombosis. However, despite these concerns, appropriate clinical outcomes can still be achieved in the obese spine surgical candidate. Obesity, therefore, is not a contraindication to spine surgery, and appropriate patient selection remains the key to obtaining favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:26855897

  1. Role of endoscopy in the bariatric surgery of patients.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Forestieri, Pietro

    2014-06-28

    Obesity is an increasingly serious health problem in nearly all Western countries. It represents an important risk factor for several gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, hiatal hernia, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, Helicobacter pylori infection, colorectal polyps and cancer, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Surgery is the most effective treatment to date, resulting in sustainable and significant weight loss, along with the resolution of metabolic comorbidities in up to 80% of cases. Many of these conditions can be clinically relevant and have a significant impact on patients undergoing bariatric surgery. There is evidence that the chosen procedure might be changed if specific pathological upper gastrointestinal findings, such as large hiatal hernia or Barrett's esophagus, are detected preoperatively. The value of a routine endoscopy before bariatric surgery in asymptomatic patients (screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy) remains controversial. The common indications for endoscopy in the postoperative bariatric patient include the evaluation of symptoms, the management of complications, and the evaluation of weight loss failure. It is of critical importance for the endoscopist to be familiar with the postoperative anatomy and to work in close collaboration with bariatric surgery colleagues in order to maximize the outcome and safety of endoscopy in this setting. The purpose of this article is to review the role of the endoscopist in a multidisciplinary obesity center as it pertains to the preoperative and postoperative management of bariatric surgery patients. PMID:24976715

  2. Critical care of obese patients during and after spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elgafy, Hossein; Hamilton, Ryan; Peters, Nicholas; Paull, Daniel; Hassan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is one of the most prevalent health problems facing the United States today, with a recent JAMA article published in 2014 estimating the prevalence of one third of all adults in the United States being obese. Also, due to technological advancements, the incidence of spine surgeries is growing. Considering these overall increases in both obesity and the performance of spinal surgeries, it can be inferred that more spinal surgery candidates will be obese. Due to this, certain factors must be taken into consideration when dealing with spine surgeries in the obese. Obesity is closely correlated with additional medical comorbidities, including hypertension, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. The pre-operative evaluation may be more difficult, as a more extensive medical evaluation may be needed. Also, adequate radiographic images can be difficult to obtain due to patient size and equipment limitations. Administering anesthesia becomes more difficult, as does proper patient positioning. Post-operatively, the obese patient is at greater risk for reintubation, difficulty with pain control, wound infection and deep vein thrombosis. However, despite these concerns, appropriate clinical outcomes can still be achieved in the obese spine surgical candidate. Obesity, therefore, is not a contraindication to spine surgery, and appropriate patient selection remains the key to obtaining favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:26855897

  3. [Treatment of anemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency in patients with morbid obesity can occur before bariatric surgery due to its inflammatory component and after surgery as the result of implementing the malabsorptive techniques. For patients with morbid obesity, micronutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, iron and folate, should be suspected. Iron deficiency and other hematinics should be corrected, even when anemia has not been established. Normal ferritin levels do not allow us to rule out a possible iron deficiency, given that ferritin can increase due to the chronic inflammatory condition of obesity. After bariatric surgery, patients should take iron supplements; however, these supplements are frequently poorly tolerated. Rapid and effective correction of hemoglobin levels might require the intravenous administration of iron preparations. PMID:26320349

  4. Medanta insulin protocols in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Beena; Mithal, Ambrish; Carvalho, Pravin; Mehta, Yatin; Trehan, Naresh

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and is associated with poor outcomes. This is a review of the perioperative insulin protocol being used at Medanta, the Medicity, which has a large volume cardiac surgery setup. Preoperatively, patients are usually continued on their preoperative outpatient medications. Intravenous insulin infusion is intiated postoperatively and titrated using a column method with a choice of 7 scales. Insulin dose is calculated as a factor of blood glucose and patient's estimated insulin sensitivity. A comparison of this protocol is presented with other commonly used protocols. Since arterial blood gas analysis is done every 4 hours for first two days after cardiac surgery, automatic data collection from blood gas analyzer to a central database enables collection of glucose data and generating glucometrics. Data auditing has helped in improving performance through protocol modification. PMID:25143899

  5. Why Are Spine Surgery Patients Lost to Follow-up?

    PubMed Central

    Daffner, Scott D.; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Long-term outcome studies are frequently hindered by a decreasing frequency of patient follow-up with the treating surgeon over time. Whether this attrition represents a “loss of faith” in their index surgeon or the realities of a geographically mobile society has never been assessed in a population of patients undergoing spinal surgery. The purpose of this article is to determine the frequency with which patients who have undergone prior surgery and develop new problems attempt to follow-up with their index spine surgeon. The study design was a population survey. All patients seen at two university-based spine centers over a 3-month period were surveyed regarding prior spine surgery. The questionnaire asked details of the previous operation, whether the patient had sought follow-up with their index surgeon, why the patient did not continue treatment with that surgeon, and whether the patient was satisfied with their prior treatment. Sixty-nine patients completed the survey. Prior operations were lumbar (53 patients) and cervical (16). When asked the reason for not seeing their prior surgeon, 10 patients (15%) stated that they (the patient) had moved and 16 (23%) responded that their surgeon no longer practiced in the area. Thirteen (19%) were unhappy with their previous care, 22 (32%) were seeking a second opinion, and 7 (10%) were told they needed more complex surgery. Thirty-seven (54%) discussed their symptoms with their original surgeon before seeking another surgeon. Although 32 patients (46%) had not discussed their new complaints with their index surgeon, only 3 patients (4%) chose not to return to their prior surgeon despite having the opportunity to do so. Forty-nine patients (71%) were satisfied with their prior surgical care, and 42 patients (61%) would undergo the index operation again. Most of the patients seen at the authors' practices after undergoing prior spine surgery elsewhere failed to follow up with their prior spine surgeon for

  6. Discharge information needs of patients after surgery.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Sieggreen, Mary; Freeland, Barbara; Kulwicki, Pauline; Frattaroli, Madelyn; Sidor, Deborah; Palleschi, Maria Teresa; Burns, Jerry; Bednarski, Donna; Garretson, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Patients who have undergone surgical procedures often have self-care concerns in their preparation for discharge from the hospital. This article examines the research literature about information needs of postoperative patients prior to their discharge. The most common concerns were the incision/wound care, pain management, activity level, monitoring for complications, symptom management, elimination, and quality of life. Because of their clinical knowledge of the perioperative experience, wound, ostomy, and continence nurses and other advanced practice nurses have a critical role in the development of discharge-educational programs for postoperative patients and caregivers. Because unmet discharge needs can contribute to poor patient outcomes and readmission, it is critical that wound, ostomy, and continence nurses, advanced practice nurses, and clinical staff nurses accurately identify patients' informational needs and find ways to meet these needs especially with the aging population, new/advanced surgical procedures, vulnerability/poverty, and literacy level of patients. PMID:16717518

  7. Psychiatric conditions in cosmetic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Ritvo, Eva C; Melnick, Ilan; Marcus, Gina R; Glick, Ira D

    2006-08-01

    Beauty is important. As psychiatrists, we see the interface of beauty with mental health, self-esteem, and mental illness. As physicians who enhance cosmetic appearance, you encounter a broad spectrum of patients ranging from those with a healthy pursuit of enhanced appearance to those whose behavior is extremely maladaptive. This article provides some examples of unhealthy pursuit and how to recognize patients who may be inappropriate for cosmetic procedures. Patients with body dysmorphic disorder and narcissistic and histrionic personality disorders are suffering from psychiatric illnesses that interfere with their judgment and can lead them to make poor choices when considering cosmetic procedures. Clinicians who acquire a basic understanding of these psychiatric conditions can properly screen their patients and enhance their understanding of their patients' goals, both realistic and unrealistic, thus saving them from performing inappropriate procedures that cause frustration to both the clinician and the patient. PMID:17048160

  8. Early Assessment of Delirium in Elderly Patients after Hip Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Jin; Hwang, Deuk Soo; Wang, Seong Keun; Chee, Ik Seung; Baeg, Sengmi

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study is intended to identify predictive factors of delirium, including risk factors and prodromal symptoms. Methods This study included sixty-five patients aged 65 years or older who had undergone hip surgery. Baseline assessments included age; gender; admission type (acute/elective); reason for surgery (fracture/replacement); C-reactive protein (CRP); Acute Physiology, Age, Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE III); and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The Korean version of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (K-DRS-98) was used to assess prodromal symptoms daily before the onset of delirium. Results Almost 28% (n=18) of the 65 patients developed delirium after surgery. Delirium in elderly patients after hip surgery was observed more often in older patients and those with acute admission, hip fracture, higher APACHE III score, lower MMSE score, and higher CRP levels within early days after the operation. Sleep-wake cycle disturbances, thought process abnormalities, orientation, and long-term memory in symptom items of K-DRS-98 were showed significant difference on 4 days before delirium, lability of affect on 3 days before, perceptual disturbances and hallucination, and visuo-spatial ability on 2 days before, and delusion, motor agitation, and short-term memory on the day before the occurrence of delirium. CRP levels within 24 hours and 72 hours after hospitalization were significantly higher in the delirium group. Conclusion Medical professionals must pay attention to behavioral, cognitive changes and risk factors in elderly patients undergoing hip surgery and to the prodromal phase of delirium. K-DRS-98 may help in identifying the prodromal symptoms of delirium in elderly patients after hip surgery. PMID:22216044

  9. Surgery: a patient's perspective and lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, R

    2016-02-12

    This article discusses a hospital experience from the point of view of a patient, in this case a healthcare worker herself - a dental student. The author relates her experience of a three-day hospital stay and appendectomy, during which time she experienced the breaking of bad news, the consent process, and the importance of good communication - all from the patient's viewpoint. PMID:26868793

  10. Factors Affecting Patients Undergoing Cosmetic Surgery in Bushehr, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Salehahmadi, Zeinab; Rafie, Seyyed Reza

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although, there have been extensive research on the motivations driving patient to undergo cosmetic procedures, there is still a big question mark on the persuasive factors which may lead individuals to undergo cosmetic surgery. The present study evaluated various factors affecting patients undergoing cosmetic surgery in Bushehr, Southern Iran. METHODS From 24th March 2011 to 24th March 2012, eighty-one women and 20 men who wished to be operated in Fatemeh Zahra Hospital in Bushehr, Southern Iran and Pars Clinic, Iran were enrolled by a simple random sampling method. They all completed a questionnaire to consider reasons for cosmetic procedures. The collected data were statistically analyzed. RESULTS Demographical, sociological and psychological factors such as age, gender, educational level, marital status, media, perceived risks, output quality, depression and self-improvement were determined as factors affecting tendency of individuals to undergo cosmetic surgery in this region. Trend to undergo cosmetic surgery was more prevalent in educational below bachelor degree, married subjects, women population of 30-45 years age group. Education level, age, marital status and gender were respectively the influential factors in deciding to undergo cosmetic surgery. Among the socio-psychological factors, self-improvement, finding a better job opportunity, rivalry, media, health status as well as depression were the most persuasive factors to encourage people to undergo cosmetic surgery too. Cost risk was not important for our samples in decision making to undergo cosmetic surgery. CONCLUSION We need to fully understand the way in which the combination of demographic, social and psychological factors influence decision-making to undergo cosmetic surgery. PMID:25734051

  11. Postoperative care for the robotic surgery bowel resection patient.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Zara R; Salathiel, Mary; Macey, Barbara A; Krenzer, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    A new surgical method is available for colon and rectal surgery. Robotic surgery, using the daVinci Si HD Surgical System, offers surgical advances compared with the traditional open or laparoscopic surgical methods. The potential advantages of robotic technology continue to be explored and its most appropriate functions are yet to be determined. In clinical experience, the use of this surgical method has resulted in changes to postoperative nursing care management. This article describes changes in the management of postoperative patient care including fluid and electrolyte balance, and patient and staff education. Modifications were instituted in the clinical pathway to facilitate an accelerated standard of care. New discharge strategies were implemented to ensure ongoing fluid and electrolyte balance by the patient. A true team effort from a multitude of disciplines was required for the changes in patient care routine to be effective. Outcomes including length of stay and patient satisfaction are presented. PMID:21814060

  12. Complications Following Colon Rectal Surgery in the Obese Patient

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Timothy M.; Muldoon, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    It is well recognized that obesity contributes to multiple co-morbidities, and it would seem intuitive that obese patients experience an increase in post-operative complications after colorectal surgery. Overall, the data examining postoperative morbidity and mortality in the obese colorectal patient is inconsistent. Studies have shown a trend for obese patients have a higher post-operative risk of pulmonary embolism, atelectasis, cardiac complications, and thromboembolic disease. However, even with multiple large trials concluding this, there are also many studies showing no difference. The literature has shown that using laparoscopic techniques is safe and feasible, but there is a higher rate of conversion to open, and longer operative times. In addition, obese patients might have a higher leak rate for distal anastomosis as compared with normal weight patients. These patients also have a higher post-operative rate of stomal complications and fascial dehiscense. In reviewing the literature, at best, the complication rate in obese patients is the same as non-obese patients after colorectal surgery, but there are significant trends that suggest a negative effect of obesity after colorectal surgery. PMID:23204943

  13. Patients' need for information prior to colonic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Lisbeth; Hellström, Renee; Stomberg, Margareta Warrén

    2011-01-01

    Perioperative information and communication between patients and health professionals is central to the quality of care and patient involvement for elective colon surgery. Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) means that the care process is accelerated with comprehensive information and additional requirements on an individual. The purpose of this study was to identify nurses' and doctors' experience of patients' need for information before intraoperative care. Nurses (n = 39) with different specialties and professional experience were interviewed in focus groups. Ten anesthesiologists with differing professional experience were interviewed individually. Data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. The result shows the need to provide information to reduce anxiety, to make the patient feel safe, to explain postoperative pain management, and to provide a comprehensive care pathway. There was no difference between the informants' perception of patients' information needs. All respondents agreed that patients generally have a great need for information. The perioperative information should be repeated at different points in time. The patients' need for information on diagnosis is recurrent. Knowledge, good communication, and attitude from a multiprofessional perspective support the patient's feeling comfortable and involved in the care prior to surgery. PMID:21979401

  14. Outcomes of abdominal surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Ballus, Josep; Esteve, Francisco; Betancur-Zambrano, Nelson L; Corral-Velez, Vicente; Mañez, Rafael; Betbese, Antoni J; Roncal, Joan A; Javierre, Casimiro

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering from liver cirrhosis (LC) frequently require non-hepatic abdominal surgery, even before liver transplantation. LC is an important risk factor itself for surgery, due to the higher than average associated morbidity and mortality. This high surgical risk occurs because of the pathophysiology of liver disease itself and to the presence of contributing factors, such as coagulopathy, poor nutritional status, adaptive immune dysfunction, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and renal and pulmonary dysfunction, which all lead to poor outcomes. Careful evaluation of these factors and the degree of liver disease can help to reduce the development of complications both during and after abdominal surgery. In the emergency setting, with the presence of decompensated LC, alcoholic hepatitis, severe/advanced LC, and significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction conservative management is preferred. A multidisciplinary, individualized, and specialized approach can improve outcomes; preoperative optimization after risk stratification and careful management are mandatory before surgery. Laparoscopic techniques can also improve outcomes. We review the impact of LC on surgical outcome in non-hepatic abdominal surgeries required in this cirrhotic population before, during, and after surgery. PMID:26973406

  15. [Nursing diagnoses in cardiac surgery patients].

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Luciana Alves; Maia, Ticiane Fernandes; da Silva, Lúcia de Fátima

    2006-01-01

    Exploratory and transversal research accomplished with postoperative patients outgoing coronary bypass. It was aimed at identifying nursing diagnoses according to Taxonomy II of NANDA and nursing interventions according to Nursing Interventions Classification, associating with the results of Nursing Outcomes Classification. The data were collected fom 22 patients using formularies and physical examination. The information made possible the identification of fifteen nursing diagnosis, according to Taxonomy II of NANDA. Among them, stand out: risk of infection; Risk of constipation; Deficit in self-care intimate hygiene and integrity of harmed skin. The study revealed being fundamental to develop studies about nursing diagnoses to direct analyses of problems that concern to the demanding patients of specific nursing actions, that contribute to the devepoment of the profession. PMID:17175721

  16. Review of Postoperative Delirium in Geriatric Patients Undergoing Hip Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Paul; Morris, William; Oladeji, Philip; Huo, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative delirium is a serious complication following hip surgery in elderly patients that can adversely affect outcomes in both hip fracture and arthroplasty surgery. Recently, the incidence of hip fracture in the Medicare population was estimated at approximately 500 000 patients per year, with the majority treated surgically. The annual volume of total hip arthroplasty is nearly 450 000 patients and is projected to increase over the next 15 to 20 years. Subsequently, the incidence of postoperative delirium will rise. The incidence of postoperative delirium after hip surgery in the elderly patients ranges between 4% and 53%, and it is identified as the most common surgical complication of older patients. The most common risk factors include advanced age, hip fracture surgery (vs elective hip surgery), and preoperative delirium/cognitive impairment. Exact pathophysiology has not been fully defined. It is hypothesized that imbalances in cortical neurotransmitters or inflammatory cytokine pathway mechanisms contribute to delirium. Development of postoperative delirium is associated with longer hospital stay, increased medical complications, and poorer short-term functional outcome. Patients who develop postoperative delirium are also at increased risk for cognitive decline beyond the acute phase. Following acute care, postoperative delirium is associated with the need for a higher level of care, an additional cost. Management of postoperative delirium centers on prevention and early recognition. Medical prophylaxis has been demonstrated to have limited utility. Utilization of delirium detection methods contributed to early recognition. The most effective means of prevention involved a multidisciplinary team focused on adequate hydration, optimization of analgesia, reduction in polypharmacy, aggressive physiotherapy, and early recognition of the delirium symptoms. PMID:27239384

  17. Effect of Massage on Pain Management for Thoracic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza; Rodgers, Nancy; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Cordes, Mary Ellen; Bauer, Brent; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cha, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Integrative therapies such as massage have gained support as interventions that improve the overall patient experience during hospitalization. Thoracic surgery patients undergo long procedures and commonly have postoperative back, neck, and shoulder pain. Purpose: Given the promising effects of massage therapy for alleviation of pain, we studied the effectiveness and feasibility of massage therapy delivered in the postoperative thoracic surgery setting. Methods: Patients who received massage in the postoperative setting had pain scores evaluated pre and post massage on a rating scale of 0 to 10 (0 = no pain, 10 = worst possible pain). Results: In total, 160 patients completed the pilot study and received massage therapy that was individualized. Patients receiving massage therapy had significantly decreased pain scores after massage (p ≤ .001), and patients’ comments were very favorable. Patients and staff were highly satisfied with having massage therapy available, and no major barriers to implementing massage therapy were identified. Conclusions: Massage therapy may be an important additional pain management component of the healing experience for patients after thoracic surgery. PMID:21847428

  18. The experience of teasing in elective cosmetic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alun C; Dowling, Nicki A; Honigman, Roberta J; Francis, Kate L; Kalus, Allan M

    2012-01-01

    The role of teasing as a motivator for patients undertaking elective cosmetic surgery was investigated. Pre-operative data were collected, using a range of standardized tests in addition to open ended questions about their experience of teasing, from 449 patients aged 18 to 70 undergoing elective cosmetic surgery in Australia. Just under half of the sample indicated that they had been teased or bullied about their appearance. Teased patients showed significantly higher levels of anxiety, depression and dysmorphic concern; lower levels of physical attractiveness and appearance satisfaction; and lower levels of satisfaction with discrete aspects of their appearance than nonteased patients. Teasing also contributed to longer periods of considering surgery as an answer to body dissatisfaction concerns, even when controlling for age. Prevention education initiatives on appearance-related teasing should be targeted at school students. This, along with earlier detection of the psychological impacts of weight and appearance-related teasing, fewer people, if offered strategies for coping through counseling, may contemplate surgery as a response to this teasing. PMID:23121210

  19. Hemostatic management of patients undergoing ear-nose-throat surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Thomas; Kaftan, Holger; Hosemann, Werner; Greinacher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative hemostatic management is increasingly important in the field of otolaryngology. This review summarizes the key elements of perioperative risk stratification, thromboprophylaxis and therapies for bridging of antithrombotic treatment. It gives practical advice based on the current literature with focus on patients undergoing ENT surgery. PMID:26770281

  20. Analysis of surgeries for Degenerative lumbarstenosis in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bin; Li, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the effect of decompression alone and combined decompression, fusion and internal fixation procedure for degenerative lumbar stenosis in elderly patients. Methods: We reviewed 168 lumbar stenosis patients treated using decompression alone or with combined procedures in the department of orthopaedics of Tianjin 4th Centre Hospital from October 2010 to January 2014. The clinical data including age, gender, procedure type, operation time, follow-up period, blood loss, preoperative and postoperative JOA and ODI scores were recorded. The patients were divided into decompression alone group and combined surgeries group according to the procedure type. Results: The combined surgeries group presented with larger blood loss (p<0.05) and more operation time (p<0.05), compared with the group of decompression alone. The preoperative and postoperative JOA scores were significantly higher (p<0.05), and the ODI scores significantly lower in the decompression alone group (P<0.05), but at the final follow-up, there were no significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). The complication rate was lower in the group of decompression alone, but there was no significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Both the decompression alone and combined surgeries can result in a satisfactory effects in elderly patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, but the combined surgeries presented with a relatively higher complication rate. PMID:27022361

  1. [Follow-up of patients at home after outpatient surgery].

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The patient's discharge and return home are important stages in outpatient surgery. In addition to the call the following day and the support of a family caregiver, a visit by a private practice nurse and a healthcare network can offer extra safeguards. PMID:25065192

  2. Predictors of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Handerson Nunes; Magedanz, Ellen Hettwer; Guaragna, João Carlos Vieira da Costa; dos Santos, Natalia Nunes; Albuquerque, Luciano Cabral; Goldani, Marco Antonio; Petracco, João Batista; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk factors related to the development of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods A historical cohort study. We included 4626 patients aged > 18 years who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, heart valve replacement surgery alone or heart valve surgery combined with coronary artery bypass grafting between January 1996 and December 2011. The relationship between risk predictors and stroke was assessed by logistic regression model with a significance level of 0.05. Results The incidence of stroke was 3% in the overall sample. After logistic regression, the following risk predictors for stroke were found: age 50-65 years (OR=2.11 - 95% CI 1.05-4.23 - P=0.036) and age >66 years (OR=3.22 - 95% CI 1.6-6.47 - P=0.001), urgent and emergency surgery (OR=2.03 - 95% CI 1.20-3.45 - P=0.008), aortic valve disease (OR=2.32 - 95% CI 1.18-4.56 - P=0.014), history of atrial fibrillation (OR=1.88 - 95% CI 1.05-3.34 - P=0.032), peripheral artery disease (OR=1.81 - 95% CI 1.13-2.92 - P=0.014), history of cerebrovascular disease (OR=3.42 - 95% CI 2.19-5.35 - P<0.001) and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes (OR=1.71 - 95% CI 1.16-2.53 - P=0.007). Mortality was 31.9% in the stroke group and 8.5% in the control group (OR=5.06 - 95% CI 3.5-7.33 - P<0.001). Conclusion The study identified the following risk predictors for stroke after cardiac surgery: age, urgent and emergency surgery, aortic valve disease, history of atrial fibrillation, peripheral artery disease, history of cerebrovascular disease and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes. PMID:25140462

  3. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions when using different patient education methods.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Katja; Salanterä, Sanna; Leppänen, Tiina; Vahlberg, Tero; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2012-07-01

    A randomised controlled trial was used to evaluate elective ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions during internet-based patient education or face-to-face education with a nurse. The internet-based patient education was designed for this study and patients used websites individually based on their needs. Patients in the control group participated individually in face-to-face patient education with a nurse in the ambulatory surgery unit. The theoretical basis for both types of education was the same. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients scored their emotions rather low at intervals throughout the whole surgical process, though their scores also changed during the surgical process. Emotion scores did not decrease after patient education. No differences in patients' emotions were found to result from either of the two different patient education methods. PMID:22919767

  4. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  5. Ultra fast-track extubation in heart transplant surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Kianfar, Amir Abbas; Ahmadi, Zargham Hossein; Mirhossein, Seyed Mohsen; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Kashani, Babak Sharif; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Firoozi, Ehsan; Salehi, Farshid; Radmand, Golnar; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heart transplant surgeries using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) typically requires mechanical ventilation in intensive care units (ICU) in post-operation period. Ultra fast-track extubation (UFE) have been described in patients undergoing various cardiac surgeries. Aim: To determine the possibility of ultra-fast-track extubation instead of late extubation in post heart transplant patients. Materials and Methods: Patients randomly assigned into two groups; Ultra fast-track extubation (UFE) group was defined by extubation inside operating room right after surgery. Late extubation group was defined by patients who were not extubated in operating room and transferred to post operation cardiac care unit (CCU) to extubate. Results: The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 136.8 ± 25.7 minutes in ultra-fast extubation and 145.3 ± 29.8 minutes in late extubation patients (P > 0.05). Mechanical ventilation duration (days) was 0 days in ultra-fast and 2.31 ± 1.8 days in late extubation. Length of ICU stay was significantly higher in late extubation group (4.2 ± 1.2 days) than the UFE group (1.72 ± 1.5 days) (P = 0.02). In survival analysis there was no significant difference between ultra-fast and late extubation groups (Log-rank test, P = 0.9). Conclusions: Patients undergoing cardiac transplant could be managed with “ultra-fast-track extubation”, without increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:26157651

  6. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Block, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified "risk" factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact of risk factors such as demoralization can be mitigated by psychosocial "maximizing" factors-characteristics that propel the patient towards positive surgical results. One of these maximizing factors, patient activation, is discussed in depth. The patient activation measure (PAM), an inventory assessing the extent to which patients are active and engaged in their health care, is associated not only with improved spine surgery results, but with better outcomes across a broad range of medical conditions. Other maximizing factors are discussed in this article. The author concludes that the past research focus on psychosocial risk factors has limited the value of presurgical psychological screening, and that future research, as well as clinical assessment, should recognize that the importance of evaluating patients' strengths as well as their vulnerabilities. PMID:27417599

  7. Orthognathic Surgery in Patients With Large Condylar Destructions.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ana, Eduardo; Dias-Ribeiro, Eduardo; de Lima, Valthierre Nunes; Correa, Ana Paula Simões; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Nogueira, Renato Luiz Maia

    2016-03-01

    Condylar resorption is understood as changes in shape and volume of the condylar bone, due to local, systemic, and iatrogenic factors. The occurrence of condylar resorption after orthognathic surgery can occur when the condylar repositioning in mandibular fossa is performed improperly. In addition, systemic diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis seem to influence this process. The aim of this study was to report 3 cases of patients with severe condylar alterations, submitted to orthognathic surgery for treatment of dentofacial deformities. Considerations regarding the diagnosis, surgical planning (counterclockwise rotation), surgical techniques (bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, bimaxillary osteotomies, rigid fixation, maxillomandibular fixation period), and results (short terms) are discussed. PMID:26890460

  8. Care of the pediatric patient in ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, K A

    1997-06-01

    Caring for the pediatric and adolescent patient in the ambulatory surgery unit is challenging for several reasons. The first 18 years are a period of rapid physical, cognitive, and psychosocial growth. Psychological preparation is very important to ensure the readiness of the child and family for surgery; however, the efficacy of the different methods of preparation varies. Teaching should be geared to the developmental level of the child, and specific information on the process, sights, smells, and sensations the child will experience should be given to allay parental anxiety and fears. Appropriate tools must be available for the nurse to assess and implement the physical plan of care. PMID:9115488

  9. The evolution of brain surgery on awake patients.

    PubMed

    Surbeck, Werner; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of modern neurological surgery, the inconveniences and potential dangers of general anesthesia by chloroform and ether using the so-called "open-drop technique" led to the quest for alternative methods of anesthesia. Besides preventing the feared side effects, the introduction of regional anesthesia revealed another decisive advantage over general anesthesia in neurosurgery: While intraoperative direct cortical stimulation under general anesthesia could only delineate the motor area (by evocation of contralateral muscular contraction), now, the awake patients were able to report sensations elicited by this method. These properties advanced regional anesthesia to the regimen of choice for cranial surgeries in the first half of the 20th century. While technical advances and new drugs led to a progressive return to general anesthesia for neurosurgical procedures, the use of regional anesthesia for epilepsy surgery has only decreased in recent decades. Meanwhile, awake craniotomies regained popularity in oncologically motivated surgeries, especially in craniotomies for diffuse low-grade gliomas. Intraoperative mapping of brain functions using electrical stimulation in awake patients enables not only for increased tumor removal while preserving the functional status of the patients but also opens a window to cognitive neuroscience. Observations during such interventions and their correlation with both pre - and postoperative neuropsychological examinations and functional neuroimaging is progressively leading to new insights into the complex functional anatomy of the human brain. Furthermore, it broadens our knowledge on cerebral network reorganization in the presence of disease-with implications for all disciplines of clinical neuroscience. PMID:25352088

  10. Raising the issue of DNAR orders in vascular surgery patients.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Rachel; Webb, Hannah; Hartley, Matthew; Brooks, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    The Tracey Report has recently raised the status of Do Not Attempt Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) orders in the hospital setting.[1] Guidelines are in place both nationally and locally to provide advice to clinicians on when to discuss DNACPR, and the approach to be taken. There was concern that on a busy regional vascular surgery unit, discussion of resuscitation status was not regular practice. Consequently, some patients were at risk of being inappropriately resuscitated, particularly out of hours. The North Bristol Somerset and Gloucester DNAR decision tree[2] was the tool used to decide whether a patient should have a documented discussion and/or a DNACPR form completed. We correlated the outcome of the decision tree with the presence of a DNACPR form or documented resuscitation discussion. Baseline measurements from all vascular inpatients on the vascular surgery unit demonstrated that only 27% had a DNACPR form or documented discussion in concordance with the DNACPR Decision Tree outcome. The aim of this project was to increase the proportion of patients with concordance of the DNACPR decision tree outcome with documented discussion or DNACPR form. The following three simple interventions raised concordance from 27% to 64% of patients on the vascular surgery unit. 1. Including resuscitation status of each patient as a column in the doctors daily handover. 2. Posters in staff only areas to highlight the meaning of DNACPR and raise awareness of the DNACPR decision tree. 3. Educational meeting surrounding DNACPR with the vascular surgery consultants, led by a care of the elderly consultant . This project has highlighted how raising awareness around DNACPR increases discussion amongst the clinical team surrounding resuscitation status of a patient. Consequently, this enables discussion to be had with patient and their family. PMID:26893897

  11. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. PMID:24794266

  12. Simultaneous surgery in patients with both cardiac and noncardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Xiao, Feng; Wang, Jin; Song, Bo; Li, Xi-Hui; Li, Jian; He, Zhi-Song; Zhang, Huan; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the possibility and feasibility of simultaneous cardiac and noncardiac surgery. Methods From August 2000 to March 2015, 64 patients suffering from cardiac and noncardiac diseases have been treated by simultaneous surgeries. Results Two patients died after operations in hospital; thus, the hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. One patient with coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, and a recurrence of bladder cancer accepted emergency simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), bladder cystectomy, and ureterostomy. He died of acute cerebral infarction complicated with multiple organ failure on the 153rd day after operation. The other patient with chronic constrictive pericarditis and right lung cancer underwent pericardial stripping and right lung lower lobectomy, which resulted in multiple organ failure, and the patient died on the tenth day postoperatively. The remaining 62 patients recovered and were discharged. The total operative morbidity was 17.2%: postoperative hemorrhage (n, % [1, 1.6%]), pulmonary infection and hypoxemia (2, 3.1%), hemorrhage of upper digestive tract (1, 1.6%), incisional infection (3, 4.7%), subphrenic abscess (1, 1.6%), and postoperative acute renal failure and hemofiltration (3, 4.7%). Of the 62 patients discharged, 61 patients were followed up. Eleven patients died with 10 months to 10 years during the follow-up. The mean survival time is 116.2±12.4 months. The cumulative survival rate is 50.8%. Conclusion Simultaneous surgeries in patients suffering from both cardiac and noncardiac benign or malignant diseases are safe and possible with satisfactory short-term and long-term survival. PMID:27486311

  13. Cardiac surgery and catheterization in patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    MacKinlay, N; Taper, J; Renisson, F; Rickard, K

    2000-03-01

    The present study summarizes the results of 12 cardiac surgical procedures performed in a carrier of Haemophilia B and in six patients with Haemophilia A at a single centre from 1979 to 1998. The median age of the patients at the time of intervention was 56 years ranging from 18 years to 73 years. The six patients with Haemophilia A ranged in severity from moderately to mildly affected. Three patients were hepatitis C antibody positive. No patients were HIV antibody or hepatitis B surface antigen positive. The cardiac procedures included cardiac catheterization (n=4), coronary artery bypass surgery (n=2), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (n=1), cardiac valve replacement (AVR n=1 and AVR/MVR n=2), and closure of an atrial septal defect and subsequent drainage of a pericardial effusion (n=1). No patients had demonstrable inhibitors at the time of surgery. Haemostasis was achieved with AHF in 10/11 procedures and high purity factor IX (Immunine) in one procedure. The initial procedures involved intermittent bolus factor therapy while more recently, AHF was administered by continuous intravenous infusion. All patients demonstrated excellent intra- and post-operative haemostasis. These results, although from a small and varied group of patients, demonstrate that cardiac surgical procedures can be performed safely in patients with Haemophilia. PMID:10781193

  14. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Block, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified “risk” factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact of risk factors such as demoralization can be mitigated by psychosocial “maximizing” factors—characteristics that propel the patient towards positive surgical results. One of these maximizing factors, patient activation, is discussed in depth. The patient activation measure (PAM), an inventory assessing the extent to which patients are active and engaged in their health care, is associated not only with improved spine surgery results, but with better outcomes across a broad range of medical conditions. Other maximizing factors are discussed in this article. The author concludes that the past research focus on psychosocial risk factors has limited the value of presurgical psychological screening, and that future research, as well as clinical assessment, should recognize that the importance of evaluating patients’ strengths as well as their vulnerabilities. PMID:27417599

  15. Surgery for Patients With Spontaneous Deep Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; Zhao, He-Xiang; Guo, Rui; Lin, Sen; Dong, Wei; Ma, Lu; Fang, Yuan; Tian, Meng; Liu, Ming; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) is one of the most dangerous cerebrovascular diseases, especially when in deep brain. The treatment of spontaneous deep supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We conducted a retrospective case-control study using propensity score matching to compare the efficacy of surgery and conservative treatment for patients with deep surpatentorial hemorrhage. We observed the outcomes of consecutive patients with spontaneous deep supratentorial hemorrhage retrospectively from December 2008 to July 2013. Clinical outcomes of surgery and conservative treatments were compared in patients with deep sICH using propensity score matching method. The primary outcome was neurological function status at 6 months post ictus. The second outcomes included mortality at 30 days and 6 months, and the incidence of complications. Subgroup analyses of 6-month outcome were conducted. Sixty-three (22.66%) of the 278 patients who received surgery had a favorable neurological function status at 6 months, whereas in the conservative group, 66 of 278 (23.74%) had the same result (P = 0.763). The 30-day mortality in the surgical group was 19.06%, whereas 30.58% in the conservative group (P = 0.002). There was significant difference in the mortality at 6 months after ictus as well (23.38% vs 36.33%, P = 0.001). The subgroup analyses showed significantly better outcomes for the surgical group when hematoma was >40 mL (13.33% vs 0%, P = 0.005) or complicated with intraventricular hemorrhage (16.67% vs 7.27%, P = 0.034). For complications, the risk of pulmonary infection, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, urinary infection, pulmonary embolus, and need for tracheostomy/long term ventilation in the surgical group was higher than the conservative group (31.29% vs 15.47%, P < 0.001; 6.83% vs 3.96%, P = 0.133; 2.88% vs 1.80%, P = 0.400; 1.80% vs 1.08%, P = 0.476; 32.73% vs 23.38%, P = 0

  16. Preoperative Preparation and Patient Selection for Cytoreductive Surgery and HIPEC.

    PubMed

    Ashvin, Rangole; Nikhilesh, Jain

    2016-06-01

    Peritoneal dissemination is a significant variable affecting long term survival of abdominal cancer patients. A generally accepted clinical point of view is that peritoneal dissemination is tantamount to distant organ metastases. This implies it to be a terminal condition. Current practice dictates that if peritoneal dissemination is observed intraoperatively, the curative therapeutic options are deferred and comprehensive systemic chemotherapy remains the only option with a dismal prognosis. The past few years have generated lot of interest in management of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Prof Paul Sugarbaker has researched, validated and fine-tuned the concept of cytoreductive surgery with peritonectomy procedure (Sugarbaker technique) and perioperative chemotherapy as HIPEC & EPIC. Recognition of a HIPEC centre is based on an infrastructure equipped with basic knowledge of the tumor biology, oncosurgical techniques, technical knowhow for HIPEC administration, intensive care unit etc. There are some aspects which need to be accorded special consideration. Comprehensive therapy of Cytoreduction surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is initiated with exploration and cytoreductive surgery and includes visceral resections and peritonectomy procedure when achieved optimally results in complete, visible resection of all cancer within the abdomen and pelvis. Subsequent to CRS, HIPEC forms an integral part of the surgical procedure. This approach involves conceptual changes in both the route and timing of chemotherapy administration. Patient selection is of utmost importance. The greatest impediment to lasting benefits from intraperitoneal chemotherapy remains an improper patient selection. Currently, there are four important clinical assessments of peritoneal metastasis that need to be used to select patients ie; histopathological type of tumour, radiological distribution of disease, peritoneal cancer index and completeness of cytoreduction

  17. Preoperative evaluation of the cardiac patient for noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, L. A.; Barash, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    Perioperative cardiac events continue to represent a significant cause of morbidity in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. The evaluation of the high risk patient should begin with an assessment of the probability of coronary artery disease and exercise tolerance. Decisions to undergo further evaluation, including noninvasive testing, should be based upon the perioperative morbidity and mortality rate for the planned surgical procedure. In patients with significant coronary artery stenoses and a high probability of perioperative cardiac morbidity, coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and preoperative optimization of hemodynamics in an intensive care unit have all been advocated as means of reducing risk. PMID:7825340

  18. Body Contouring Surgery in the Massive Weight Loss Patient.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Dennis J; Ayeni, Omodele

    2016-08-01

    Plastic surgeons subspecializing in body contouring are meeting the challenge of postbariatric surgery massive weight loss patients. With an appreciation of the magnitude of the surface deformity, and altered metabolism, nutrition, and psychological makeup of these patients, innovative plastic surgeons have forged an organized approach to preparation, operative technique, and postoperative care. Patients at greatest risk for complications are identified, appraised, and either their condition improved or they are counselled to reduce expectations. Beyond the removal of excess skin and adipose tissue, advanced gender-specific techniques have improved aesthetics. PMID:27473807

  19. Attitudes toward cosmetic surgery patients: the role of culture and social contact.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kim-Pong; Ng, Henry Kin-Shing; Kim, Young-Hoon; Yeung, Victoria Wai-Lan; Cheung, Francis Yue-Lok

    2012-01-01

    Cosmetic surgery is increasingly popular globally, but how cosmetic surgery patients are socially evaluated is largely unknown. The present research documents attitudes toward these patients in multiple cultures (Hong Kong, Japan, and the United States). Across these cultures, attitudes toward cosmetic surgery patients were predominantly negative: Participants ascribed more negative attributes to cosmetic surgery patients and found cosmetic surgery not acceptable. Also, participants in Hong Kong and Japan were not willing to form social relationships, particularly intimate ones, with these patients. These attitudes were less negative in the United States than in Hong Kong and Japan, partly because social contact, which reduced negativity in attitudes toward cosmetic surgery patients, was more prevalent in the United States. These findings bear important implications for the subjective well-being of cosmetic surgery patients, who very often expect improvement in their social relationships through the surgery. PMID:22822685

  20. Spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage: Does surgery benefit comatose patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Cem; Kabatas, Serdar; Gulsen, Salih; Cansever, Tufan; Gurkanlar, Doga; Caner, Hakan; Altinors, Nur

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Treatment of spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) is still controversial. We therefore analyzed the comatose patients diagnosed as having spontaneous SICH and treated by surgery. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the collected data of 25 comatose patients with initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤ 8 diagnosed as having spontaneous SICH and they had been treated by surgical evacuation between 1996 and 2008. The outcome was assessed using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). The side and location of the hematoma and ventricular extension of the hematoma were recorded. The hematoma volume was graded as mild (<30 cc), moderate (30–60 cc) and massive (>60 cc). Results: Age of the patients ranged from 25 to 78 years (mean: 59.6 ± 15.14 years). Among the 25 patients studied, 11 (44%) were females and 14 (56%) were males. GCS before surgery was <5 in 8 (32%) patients and between 5 and 8 in 17 (68%) patients. The hematoma volume was less than 30 cc in 2 patients, between 30 and 60 cc in 9 patients and more than 60 cc in 14 patients. Fourteen of the patients had no ventricular connection and 11 of the hematomas were connected to ventricle. All the 25 patients were treated with craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma was done within an average of 2 hours on admission to the emergency department. Postoperatively, no rebleeding occurred in our patients. The most important complication was infection in 14 of the patients. The mortality of our surgical series was 56%. GCS before surgery was one of the strongest factors affecting outcome GCS (oGCS) (P = 0.017). Income GCS (iGCS), however, did not affect GOS (P = 0.64). The volume of the hematoma also affected the outcome (P = 0.037). Ventricular extension of the hematoma did affect the oGCS and GOS (P = 0.002), but not the iGCS of the patients (P = 0.139). Conclusion: Our data suggest that being surgically oriented is very important to achieve successful outcomes in a select group

  1. Perioperative coagulation assessment of patients undergoing major elective orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Spiezia, Luca; Vasques, Francesco; Behr, Astrid; Campello, Elena; Maggiolo, Sara; Berizzi, Antonio; Gavasso, Sabrina; Woodhams, Barry; Biancari, Fausto; Simioni, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Traditional coagulative parameters are of limited use in identifying perioperative coagulopathy occurring in patients undergoing major elective orthopedic surgery (MEOS). The aim of our study was to evaluate the coagulation changes in patients undergoing MEOS and to facilitate an early detection of perioperative coagulopathy in patients experiencing major intraoperative bleeding. We enrolled 40 consecutive patients (M/F 10/30, age range 34-90 years) who underwent MEOS at the Orthopedic Unit of the Padua University Hospital, Italy, between January 2014 and January 2015. Blood samples were obtained at the following time points: T0-pre: 30 min before surgery; T0-post: 30 min after the end of the procedure; T1: morning of the first postoperative day; T2: 7 ± 2 days after surgery. Patients who experienced an intraoperative blood loss ≥250 mL/h were considered as cases. Routine coagulative parameters, thromboelastometry and thrombin generation (TG) profiles were evaluated. At baseline, a significantly lower platelet count and FIBTEM MCF/AUC were observed in patents with excessive bleeding (p < 0.05 and 0.02/0.01, respectively). At T0-post and T1 intervals, cases showed hypocoagulation characterized by a significantly low platelet count (p = 0.001), prolonged CFT INTEM/EXTEM, reduction of alpha-angle and MaxV INTEM/EXTEM, MCF and AUC INTEM/EXTEM/FIBTEM (p < 0.05 in all comparisons). The only TG parameter standing out between study groups was time to peak at T0-pre. A low platelet count and fibrinogen activity were associated with significant intraoperative bleeding in patients undergoing MEOS. Thromboelastometry performed by ROTEM(®) identifies patients with coagulopathy. PMID:26951189

  2. Predicting postoperative mortality in patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Slim, Karem; Panis, Yves; Alves, Arnaud; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Mathieu, Pierre; Mantion, Georges

    2006-01-01

    Well-known and suitable instruments for surgical audit are the POSSUM and P-POSSUM scoring systems. But these scores have not been well validated across the countries. The objective of the present study was to assess the predictive value of scores for colorectal surgery in France. Patients operated on for colorectal malignant or diverticular diseases, whether electively or on emergency basis, within a 4-month period were included in a prospective multicenter study conducted by the French Association for Surgery (Association Française de Chirurgie, AFC). The main outcome measure was postoperative in-hospital mortality. Independent factors leading to death were assessed by multivariate logistic regression analysis (AFC-index). The ratio of expected versus observed deaths was calculated, and the predictive value of the POSSUM and P-POSSUM scores were analyzed by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A total of 1426 patients were included. The in-hospital death rate was 3.4%. Four independent preoperative factors (AFC-index) have been found: emergency surgery, loss of more than 10% of weight, neurological disease history, and age > 70 years. POSSUM had a poor predictive value; it overestimated postoperative death in all cases. P-POSSUM had a good predictive value, except for elective surgery, where it overestimated postoperative death twofold. The predictive value of the AFC-index was also good. It had the same sensitivity and specificity as the P-POSSUM. POSSUM has not been validated in France in the field of colorectal surgery. P-POSSUM was as predictive as the AFC-index which is a simpler instrument based on four clinical parameters (without any mathematical formulas). PMID:16369701

  3. Delayed awakening in dystonia patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Carlos; Deogaonkar, Anupa; Deogaonkar, Milind; Ebrahim, Zeyd; Rezai, Ali; Machado, Andre; Farag, Ehab

    2010-07-01

    We aimed to identify the incidence, duration and causes of delayed emergence from anesthesia in patients with dystonia undergoing surgery for deep brain stimulation (DBS) placement. A retrospective review of patients with dystonia who underwent DBS placement was conducted and the following characteristics were noted: age, gender, comorbid conditions, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, anesthetic agents used, amount of initial dose, amount of infusion dose, duration of the infusion and the time needed for emergence. Twenty-four patients underwent 33 DBS procedures for dystonia. Propofol was administered to 21 patients, in 29 of the 33 procedures. Dexmedetomidine was administered to three patients, in four procedures. The average propofol loading dose was 0.7mg/kg, and the infusion rate was 80microg/kg per minute (min), for an average duration of 89min. The average time of emergence was 36min. Only 31% of patients emerged from propofol anesthesia during the expected time frame, 69% of patients had some degree of delayed emergence, and 24% had a significant delay in emergence. Delayed emergence was more common in younger patients due to the higher loading doses these patients received. This study shows a 69% incidence of delayed emergence in dystonia patients undergoing DBS surgery. It also suggests an association between delayed emergence and younger patients who receive higher loading doses. A possible cause of delayed emergence is excessive anesthetic potentiation of the low output pallidal state in dystonia which may depress the pallido-thalamo-cortical circuitry. Delayed emergence could also result from depression of the previously affected ventral pallidal inputs to the septo-hippocampal system that mediates general anesthesia and awareness. Complex neurotransmitter disturbances may also be involved. PMID:20466547

  4. Acute effects of surgery on emotion and personality of brain tumor patients: surgery impact, histological aspects, and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Fabio; Fabbro, Franco; Ius, Tamara; Shallice, Tim; Skrap, Miran

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive effects of brain surgery for the removal of intracranial tumors are still under investigation. For many basic sensory/motor or language-based functions, focal, albeit transient, cognitive deficits have been reported low-grade gliomas (LGGs); however, the effects of surgery on higher-level cognitive functions are still largely unknown. It has recently been shown that, following brain tumors, damage to different brain regions causes a variety of deficits at different levels in the perception and interpretation of emotions and intentions. However, the effects of different tumor histologies and, more importantly, the effects of surgery on these functions have not been examined. Methods The performance of 66 patients affected by high-grade glioma (HGG), LGG, and meningioma on 4 tasks tapping different levels of perception and interpretations of emotion and intentions was assessed before, immediately after, and (for LGG patients) 4 months following surgery. Results Results showed that HGG patients were generally already impaired in the more perceptual tasks before surgery and did not show surgery effects. Conversely, LGG patients, who were unimpaired before surgery, showed a significant deficit in perceptual tasks immediately after surgery that was recovered within few months. Meningioma patients were substantially unimpaired in all tasks. Conclusions These results show that surgery can be relatively safe for LGG patients with regard to the higher-level, more complex cognitive functions and can provide further useful information to the neurosurgeon and improve communication with both the patient and the relatives about possible changes that can occur immediately after surgery. PMID:25921022

  5. A Review of Psychosocial Outcomes for Patients Seeking Cosmetic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Honigman, Roberta J.; Phillips, Katharine A.; Castle, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The authors reviewed the literature on psychological and psychosocial outcomes for individuals undergoing cosmetic surgery, to address whether elective cosmetic procedures improve psychological well-being and psychosocial functioning and whether there are identifiable predictors of an unsatisfactory psychological outcome. They conducted a search of appropriate computerized databases for studies that evaluated psychological and psychosocial status both before and after elective cosmetic surgery. They identified 37 relevant studies of varying cosmetic procedures that utilized disparate methodologies. Overall, patients appeared generally satisfied with the outcome of their procedures, although some exhibited transient and some exhibited longer-lasting psychological disturbance. Factors associated with poor psychosocial outcome included being young, being male, having unrealistic expectations of the procedure, previous unsatisfactory cosmetic surgery, minimal deformity, motivation based on relationship issues, and a history of depression, anxiety, or personality disorder. Body dysmorphic disorder was also recognized by some studies as a predictor of poor outcome, a finding reinforced by reference to the psychiatric literature. The authors conclude that although most people appear satisfied with the outcome of cosmetic surgical procedures, some are not, and attempts should be made to screen for such individuals in cosmetic surgery settings. PMID:15083026

  6. Postoperative Adiponectin Levels in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Open Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, A.; Kanety, H.; Avni, T.; Mishali, D.; Hemi, R.; Yissaschar, E.; Pariente, C.; Paret, G.; Modan-Moses, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Adipose tissue is an important endocrine organ that secretes cytokines, including adiponectin, levels of which are negatively correlated with the severity of the inflammatory process. Aim. To assess the time course of adiponectin levels following open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and its correlation with early postoperative outcomes. Materials and Methods. Blood samples were obtained from 24 children undergoing cardiac surgery and analyzed for adiponectin, C-reactive protein, and other inflammatory markers. Results. Baseline adiponectin levels were negatively correlated with patients' preoperative weight and age. Postoperative adiponectin levels decreased compared to baseline (P = 0.01) and correlated negatively with duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (r = −0.438, P = 0.037), length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit (r = −0.457, P = 0.025), and the inotropic score (r = −0.471, P = 0.02). Adiponectin levels were positively correlated with sVCAM 1 levels; however, there was no correlation between adiponectin levels and sP selectin, tPA, MCP1, and sCD40. Conclusions. The inflammatory response after open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with a reduction in adiponectin levels. Prolonged or more complicated surgery induced a more substantial inflammatory process characterized by a significant reduction in adiponectin levels over time and a delayed return to baseline levels. PMID:24224162

  7. Subcutaneous Venous Port Implantation in Patients with Bilateral Breast Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora Arslan, E. Bengi; Cil, Barbaros E.; Geyik, Serdar; Hazirolan, Tuncay; Konan, Ali; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2007-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term follow-up results of subcutaneous venous ports implanted in patients with bilateral mastectomies. We retrospectively reviewed the hospital charts and the electronic database of 17 patients with bilateral mastectomies whom had venous port implantation in our interventional radiology suit. A total of 17 ports were implanted to the paramedian (n = 3) and anterolateral (standard; n = 12) chest wall, on the trapezius muscle (n = 1), and to the antecubital fossa (n = 1). The mean age was 48.29 years (range: 35-60 years). The mean time interval from time of surgery to port implantation was 34 months (range: 1-84 months). The mean follow-up time was 15 months (range: 7-39 months). Follow-up parameters and classification of the complications was defined according to the SIR guidelines. No procedure-related complication occurred. A single case of mild late infection was noted and the infection rate was 0.19/1000 catheter days. Infusion chemotherapy administration was still going on in eight patients. Two patients died during the follow-up and four patients were lost after 6 months. Port removal was performed in three patients at follow-up because of the end of treatment. One trapezius port and one paramedian port weres among the removed ports without any problem. Although we have a limited number of patients, port placement to the anterior chest wall, either paramedian or anterolateral, on the trapezius muscle or to the antecubital fossa depending on the extent of the bilateral breast surgeries that can be performed with low complication rates by a careful patient and anatomical location selection by involving the patients in the decision-making process. We believe that patient education and knowledge of possible complications have high importance in follow-up.

  8. Prediction of cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Morise, A.P.; McDowell, D.E.; Savrin, R.A.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabrielle, O.F.; Oliver, F.N.; Nullet, F.R.; Bekheit, S.; Jain, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to determine whether noninvasive cardiac testing could be used to assess cardiac risk in patients undergoing surgery for vascular disease, the authors studied 96 patients. Seventy-seven patients eventually underwent major vascular surgery with 11 (14%) experiencing a significant cardiac complication. Thallium imaging was much more likely to be positive (p less than 0.01) in patients with a cardiac complication; however, there was a significant number of patients with cardiac complications who had a positive history or electrocardiogram for myocardial infarction. When grouped by complication and history of infarction, thallium imaging, if negative, correctly predicted low cardiac risk in the group with a history of infarction. Thallium imaging, however, did not provide a clear separation of risk in those without a history of infarction. Age and coronary angiography, on the other hand, did reveal significant differences within the group without a history of infarction. The resting radionuclide ejection fraction followed a similar pattern to thallium imaging. It is concluded that a positive history of myocardial infarction at any time in the past is the strongest risk predictor in this population and that the predictive value of noninvasive testing is dependent on this factor. Considering these findings, a proposed scheme for assessing risk that will require further validation is presented.

  9. Involvement of multiple signaling pathways in the post-bariatric induction of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA and release in human visceral adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Fain, John N; Bahouth, Suleiman W; Madan, Atul K

    2005-05-01

    The present studies were designed to determine the site of and the mechanism for the rapid increase in IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA observed in human visceral adipose tissue after removal during laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Upregulation of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA as well as their release were seen within 3h whether one intact piece of tissue or minced pieces of adipose tissue were incubated in vitro. Most of the IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA content of visceral adipose tissue after 3h of incubation was in the non-fat cells. Actinomcyin D markedly reduced the upregulation of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA. Incubation of adipose tissue explants with a soluble TNFalpha receptor (etanercept) plus a blocking antibody against IL-lbeta reduced by 55% the increase in IL-6 mRNA and by 42% that of IL-8 mRNA seen between 1 and 5h of incubation. The upregulation of IL-8 and IL-6 mRNA accumulation as well as their release over a 2 or 4h incubation was reduced by around 50% in the presence of an inhibitor of the p38 MAPK or an inhibitor of the NFkappaB pathway and by 85% in the presence of both inhibitors. The data suggest that the relative trauma and/or hypoxia that occurs when adipose tissue is removed results in the release of TNFalpha and IL-1beta. These cytokines, and probably other factors as well, enhance IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA accumulation in human adipose tissue explants through mechanisms involving the p38 MAPK and NFkappaB pathways. PMID:15826602

  10. Predictors of Postoperative Aftercare Attrition among Gastric Bypass Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khorgami, Zhamak; Zhang, Chi; Messiah, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor adherence to post-bariatric surgery aftercare continues to challenge surgical practices. The objective of this study was to identify factors that predict poor aftercare attendance among patients who underwent Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) surgery. Method: A retrospective medical chart review of patients who underwent RYGB from 2002 to 2011 was conducted. Patients with four visits or more in the first 2 years (>50%) were categorized as “acceptable follow-up” and with ≤50% as “poor follow-up.” Demographics, presurgical body mass index (BMI), and comorbidities were compared using multivariate analysis. Results: Out of 2,658 patients, 1,092 (41.1%) had acceptable follow-up. Preoperative factors that predicted acceptable follow-up included female gender (odds ratio [OR] 1.41 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15–1.72]), older age (OR 1.03 [95% CI 1.03–1.04]), higher BMI at surgery (OR 1.02 [95% CI 1.01–1.03]), and Hispanic ethnicity (OR 1.40 [95% CI 1.15–1.72]). Conversely, presence of diabetes mellitus (OR 0.58 [95% CI 0.39–0.88]), hypertension (OR 0.53 [95% CI 0.39–0.72]), and obstructive sleep apnea (OR 0.39 [95% CI 0.26–0.57]) predicted less adherence to RYGB aftercare. Conclusion: These findings suggest RYGB patients' age, gender, ethnicity, preoperative BMI, and certain comorbidities should be considered to maximize postoperative aftercare attendance. PMID:26155436

  11. Health State Utility Values in Patients Undergoing Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Zachary M.; Wittenberg, Eve; Schlosser, Rodney J.; Mace, Jess C.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS The primary study goal was to measure health state utility values in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) before and after undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). A secondary goal was to assess the meaning of these values by comparing them with other chronic disease processes and currently available medical or surgical treatments. STUDY DESIGN Prospective, observational cohort study METHODS Adults with CRS were enrolled after electing ESS and observed over a 5-year period. Baseline demographic and medical comorbidities were recorded for each patient, as well as computed tomography (CT), endoscopy, olfaction, and disease-specific quality of life scores. Utility values were derived using the Short-Form 6D (SF-6D) at baseline and again after surgery. RESULTS The mean SF-6D utility value for the baseline health state of all patients with CRS (n=232) was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.63–0.66). Baseline utility values correlated with disease-specific QOL as measured by the Rhinosinusitis Disability Index (RSDI) (r=−0.660; P<0.001), but not baseline CT, endoscopy, or olfactory scores. Follow-up utility values (≥6 months) after ESS improved by 0.087 (95% CI: 0.06–0.12; P<0.001) in patients with no history of sinus surgery and 0.062 (95% CI: 0.04–0.09; P<0.001) in those undergoing a revision procedure. CONCLUSIONS Patients with CRS who failed medical therapy and elected to undergo ESS report health state utility values which are significantly lower than the United States population norm. Utility values showed improvement after ESS which was statistically and clinically significant. These results provide the initial data necessary for formal cost-effectiveness analyses incorporating ESS. PMID:22034223

  12. Respiratory management of the obese patient undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Luke E; Murphy, Patrick B; Hart, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    As a reflection of the increasing global incidence of obesity, there has been a corresponding rise in the proportion of obese patients undergoing major surgery. This review reports the physiological effect of these changes in body composition on the respiratory system and discusses the clinical approach required to maximize safety and minimize the risk to the patient. The changes in respiratory system compliance and lung volumes, which can adversely affect pulmonary gas exchange, combined with upper airways obstruction and sleep-disordered breathing need to be considered carefully in the peri-operative period. Indeed, these challenges in the obese patient have led to a clear focus on the clinical management strategy and development of peri-operative pathways, including pre-operative risk assessment, patient positioning at induction and under anesthesia, modified approach to intraoperative ventilation and the peri-operative use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and continuous positive airways pressure. PMID:26101653

  13. [Nursing care in patients undergoing radiological surgery. A case report].

    PubMed

    Armero-Barranco, David; Ruiz-Mateos, María; Alcaraz-Baños, Miguel; Bernal-Páez, Fernando Luis

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old man with medical diagnoses of long-standing diabetes mellitus, chronic ischemia of the lower limbs and intermittent claudication, for which the patient had been treated with minimally invasive radiological surgery. On arrival at the radiology unit, the patient had nursing diagnoses of anxiety and fear. Intraoperatively, the client had nursing diagnoses of pain, urine retention and infection risk. At discharge, a collaboration problem was detected and hemorrhagic risk. The patient received individualized nursing care. Interventions were planned following the nursing intervention classification (NIC) and the expected results for these interventions followed the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) taxonomy. The application of an appropriate nursing care plan contributes to making the patient's hospital stay easier, more comfortable and less traumatic. PMID:17915125

  14. Respiratory management of the obese patient undergoing surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Luke E.; Murphy, Patrick B.

    2015-01-01

    As a reflection of the increasing global incidence of obesity, there has been a corresponding rise in the proportion of obese patients undergoing major surgery. This review reports the physiological effect of these changes in body composition on the respiratory system and discusses the clinical approach required to maximize safety and minimize the risk to the patient. The changes in respiratory system compliance and lung volumes, which can adversely affect pulmonary gas exchange, combined with upper airways obstruction and sleep-disordered breathing need to be considered carefully in the peri-operative period. Indeed, these challenges in the obese patient have led to a clear focus on the clinical management strategy and development of peri-operative pathways, including pre-operative risk assessment, patient positioning at induction and under anesthesia, modified approach to intraoperative ventilation and the peri-operative use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and continuous positive airways pressure. PMID:26101653

  15. [Respiratory preparation before surgery in patients with chronic respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Delay, Jean-Marc; Jaber, Samir

    2012-03-01

    Scheduled and/or thoracic, abdominal surgeries increase the risk of respiratory postoperative complications. In patients with chronic respiratory failure, preoperative evaluation should be performed to evaluate respiratory function in aim to optimize perioperative management. Preoperative gas exchange abnormalities (hypoxemia or hypercapnia) are associated with respiratory postoperative complications. Respiratory physiotherapy and prophylactic non-invasive ventilation should be integrated in a global rehabilitation management for cardiothoracic or abdominal surgery procedures, which are at high risk of postoperative respiratory dysfunction. Stopping tobacco consummation should be benefit, but decease risk of postoperative complications is relevant only after a period for 6 to 8 weeks of cessation. Bronchodilatator aerosol therapy (beta-agonists and atropinics) and inhaled corticotherapy allow a rapid preparation for 24 to 48 h. Systematic preoperative antibiotherapy should not be recommended. PMID:22004791

  16. Patient Positioning and Port Placement for Robot-Assisted Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Charles; Steinberg, Zoe; Shah, Anup

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The introduction of robotic surgical systems and their integration into minimally invasive procedures have changed the landscape of laparoscopic surgery dramatically. Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci Surgical System was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration for cardiothoracic procedures in the late 1990s. This trend quickly spread through other surgical specialties, with urologists as one of the frontrunners in adoption. Subsequently, pediatric urologists have adopted robot-assisted procedures in selected centers, performing procedures such as pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction, partial and complete nephrectomy, and both intravesical and extravesical ureteral reimplantation. In this article, we will discuss technical considerations related to patient positioning and port placement in pediatric robot-assisted surgery. PMID:24548088

  17. Topical Anesthesia for Cataract Surgery: The Patients' Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Apil, Aytekin; Ekinci, Metin; Cagatay, Halil Huseyin; Keles, Sadullah; Ceylan, Erdinc; Cakici, Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of 0.5% propacaine hydrochloride as topical anesthesia during phacoemulsification surgery. Methods. Intraoperative pain intensity was assessed using a 5-category verbal rating scale during each of three surgical stages. Pain scores from each surgical stage and total pain scores were compared for the factors of patient age, gender, cataract laterality, and type. Results. In comparison of cataract type subgroups, the mean total pain scores and mean stage 2 pain scores in both white mature cataract (WMC) and corticonuclear plus posterior subcapsular cataract (CN + PSC) groups were significantly higher than in the PSC-only (PSC) group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Phacoemulsification with topical anesthesia is not a completely painless procedure. Pain intensity varies with cataract type and stage of surgery. PMID:25050180

  18. Effectiveness of a Surgery Admission Unit for patients undergoing major elective surgery in a tertiary university hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The increasing demand on hospitalisation, either due to elective activity from the waiting lists or due to emergency admissions coming from the Emergency Department (ED), requires looking for strategies that lead to effective bed management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a surgery admission unit for major elective surgery patients who were admitted for same-day surgery. Methods We included all patients admitted for elective surgery in a university tertiary hospital between the 1st of September and the 31st of December 2006, as well as those admitted during the same period of 2008, after the introduction of the Surgery Admission Unit. The main outcome parameters were global length of stay, pre-surgery length of stay, proportion of patients admitted the same day of the surgery and number of cancellations. Differences between the two periods were evaluated by the T-test and Chi-square test. Significance at P < 0.05 was assumed throughout. Results We included 6,053 patients, 3,003 during 2006 and 3,050 patients during 2008. Global length of stay was 6.2 days (IC 95%:6.4-6) in 2006 and 5.5 days (IC 95%:5.8-5.2) in 2008 (p < 0.005). Pre-surgery length of stay was reduced from 0.46 days (IC 95%:0.44-0.48) in 2006 to 0.29 days (IC 95%:0.27-0.31) in 2008 (p < 0.005). The proportion of patients admitted for same-day surgery was 67% (IC 95%:69%-65%) in 2006 and 76% (IC 95%:78%-74%) in 2008 (p < 0.005). The number of cancelled interventions due to insufficient preparation was 31 patients in 2006 and 7 patients in 2008. Conclusions The implementation of a Surgery Admission Unit for patients undergoing major elective surgery has proved to be an effective strategy for improving bed management. It has enabled an improvement in the proportion of patients admitted on the same day as surgery and a shorter length of stay. PMID:20096114

  19. Bariatric surgery: three surgical techniques, patient care, risks, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Carrie A; Wool, Daniel B

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States is a serious health concern. Bariatric surgery is a recognized and accepted approach for addressing weight loss and health conditions that occur as a result of morbid or severe obesity. Lifestyle changes, dietary modifications, and regular exercise are required for optimal and lasting surgical weight loss. Perioperative care of bariatric patients requires the use of interventions that differ from those used for nonobese patients, including bariatric-specific equipment, intraoperative monitoring of blood glucose, and postoperative monitoring for respiratory compromise. This articles outlines the risks and typical outcomes associated with three common bariatric procedures-laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass-to help perioperative nurses and other health care providers successfully advise patients and monitor their care for optimal outcomes. PMID:26227518

  20. Ossicular Erosion in Patients Requiring Surgery for Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Ghodrat; Naderpour, Masoud; Mousaviagdas, Mehrnoosh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the condition of the ossicular chain in patients requiring surgery for cholesteatoma. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective analysis, the destruction of the individual and combined bony structures of the ear was described in 166 patients with cholesteatoma who went through surgery in our Otology Center between 2003 and 2009. Results: Total (55.4%) or partial (30.7%) erosion of the incus was the most common pathology. In some cases, the long process (25.9%) and the body of incus (4.8%) were also involved. Erosion of the stapes superstructure occurred more commonly than a total loss of the bone (40.9% vs. 25.9%). Erosion of the malleus was least common. Completely intact ossicles were present in 5.5% of cases. Total ossicular erosion with an intact footplate (18.7%) and incudostapedial erosion (18%) was the most common combination of ossicular erosion. All patients with incudostapedial erosion had advanced disease (85% with multiple site involvement). Conclusion: Widespread cholesteatoma results in greater ossicular erosion and poor hearing outcomes. PMID:24303397

  1. Baropodometric analyses of patients before and after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bacha, Ivan Leo; Benetti, Fernanda Antico; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the vertical component of the ground reaction force, plantar pressure, contact area of the feet and double-support time using static and dynamic (gait) baropodometry before and after bariatric surgery. METHODS: Sixteen individuals with a body mass index of between 35 and 55 were evaluated before and after bariatric surgery. Thirteen patients (81.3%) were female and three (18.8%) male and their average age was 46±10 (21-60) years. An FSCAN system (version 3848) was used for baropodometric analyses (1 km/h and 3 km/h). The peak plantar pressure and ground reaction force were measured for the rear foot and forefoot. The double-support time and foot contact area were measured during gait. RESULTS: There were reductions in the ground reaction force in the forefoot and rear foot and in the foot contact area in all evaluations and of the double-support time at 3 km/h, as well as a significant reduction in the body mass index at six months post-surgery. The peak pressure did not vary at 1 km/h and at 3 km/h, reductions in peak pressure were observed in the left and right rear feet and left forefoot. CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss after bariatric surgery resulted in decreases in the ground reaction force and contact area of the foot. Plantar pressure was decreased at 3 km/h, especially in the forefoot. There was an increase in rhythm because of a reduction in the double-support time at 3 km/h. PMID:26602521

  2. Substance P and Acute Pain in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lisowska, Barbara; Siewruk, Katarzyna; Lisowski, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a limited information about the role of Substance P (SP) in acute pain nociception following surgical stimulation in patients with a chronic inflammatory state not to mention the link between this neuropeptide level changes and intensity of pain. The goal of the research was to find the correlation between SP level changes and acute pain intensity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. Material and Methods Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were enrolled in the study. The correlation between acute pain intensity and concentration of SP in serum as well as in drainage fluid from postoperative wound was assessed in patients with RA who underwent Total Knee Replacement (TKA) under spinal anesthesia. Results In patients with RA a correlation between intensity of acute pain and serum SP was found postoperatively, whereas there was no correlation between intensity of acute pain and concentration of SP in drainage fluid. Conclusions 1. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP serum concentration was found postoperatively in patients with RA. 2. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP concentration in drainage fluid was not found postoperatively in patients with RA. PMID:26731421

  3. Comparison of postoperative complications in advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery versus surgery alone

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Poonam; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar; Noronha, Vanita; Chaturvedi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Head and neck cancer is the third most common cancer in India with 60% presenting in advanced stages. There is the emerging role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in the management of these advanced cancers. There is a general perception that complication rates are higher with the use of NACT. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospectively collected data of head and neck cancer patients operated at our hospital from March 2013 to September 2014. A total of 205 patients were included in the study. These patients were studied in two groups. Group 1 included 153 patients who underwent surgery alone, and Group 2 included 52 patients who received 2-3 cycles of NACT followed by surgery. Results: The mean age of the population was 51 years in the Group 1 and 45 years in Group 2. The hospital stay and readmissions in postoperative period were similar in the two groups. In this study, the complication rate was 37.9% in the surgery patients and 30.8% in the NACT patients (P = 0.424). Conclusion: The postoperative complication rates in patients who received NACT followed by surgery were not significantly different from those who underwent surgery. PMID:26811595

  4. [THE COGNITIVE STATUS OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AFTER CORONARY BYPASS SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Trubnikova, O A; Mamontova, A S; Syrova, I D; Kukhareva, I N; Maleva, O V; Barbarash, O L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the neuropsychological status of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) before and I year after coronary bypass surgery performed under conditions of artificial circulation. It included 114 patients (54 with and 60 without DM2). Prior to surgery, the patients with DM2 had positive characteristics of neurodynamics and attention. They deteriorated 1 year after coronary bypass surgery, but improved in the patients without DM2. PMID:26669030

  5. Gynaecological Prolapse Surgery in Very Old Female Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mothes, A. R.; Lehmann, T.; Kwetkat, A.; Radosa, M. P.; Runnebaum, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to compare very elderly female patients with a younger control group after prolapse surgery with regard to co-morbidity and complications. Method: In a case-control design, the consecutive data of patients after prolapse surgery at the age of over 80 years and those of a control group were analysed by means of the Clavien-Dindo (CD) classification of surgical complications, the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale Geriatrics (CIRS-G). Statistics: Studentʼs t, Fisherʼs exact and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The analysis comprised n = 57 vs. n = 60 operations. In the very elderly patients there was often a grade IV prolapse (p < 0.001), apical fixations were more frequent (p < 0.001), but the operating times were not different. In the very elderly patients 21 % CD II+III complications were observed, in the control group 6.6 % (p = 0.031). No CD IV and V complications occurred in either group, the duration of inpatient stay amounted to 5 (± 1) vs. 4.1 (± 0.8; p < 0.001) days, the very elderly patients needed an inpatient follow-up more frequently (p < 0.001). The co-morbidities of the very elderly patients differed from those of the control group in number (median 2.0 vs. 1.5; p < 0.001), in CIRS-G (4.1 ± 2.2 vs. 2.4 ± 1.7; p < 0.01) and in Charlson Index (1.6 ± 1.6 vs. 0.5 ± 0.7; p < 0.001). Conclusions: A prolapse in very elderly women can be safely managed by surgery. In no case did the complications require intensive care treatment nor were they life-threatening, but they did lead to a longer duration of hospital stay and more frequently to further treatment geriatric or inpatient internal medicine facilities. PMID:27582580

  6. A Social Evaluation of Perception on Body Contouring Surgery by Turkish Male Aesthetic Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Bora; Sezgin, Billur; Guney, Kirdar; Latifoglu, Osman; Celebi, Cemallettin

    2015-02-01

    Although aesthetic procedures are known to have a higher impact on women, men are becoming more inclined toward such procedures since the last decade. To determine the reason behind the increase in demand for male aesthetic procedures and to learn about the expectations and inquietude related to body contouring surgery, a prospective questionnaire study was conducted on 200 Turkish males from January 1, 2011-May 31, 2012. Demographic information, previous aesthetic procedures and thoughts on body contouring procedures with given reasons were questioned. The results of the study showed that 53 % of all participants considered undergoing body contouring surgery with the given reason that they believed their current body structure required it. For those who did not consider contouring operations, 92.5 % said they felt that they did not need such a procedure. The results of the statistical analysis showed that BMI was a significant factor in the decision making process for wanting to undergo body contouring procedures. The results of the study showed that men's consideration for aesthetic operations depends mainly on necessity and that the most considered region was the abdominal zone in regard to contouring. We can conclude that men are becoming more interested in body contouring operations and therefore different surgical procedures should be refined and re-defined according to the expectations of this new patient group. PMID:25519035

  7. Analysis of subsequent surgery rates among endometriosis patients who underwent surgery with and without concomitant leuprolide acetate therapy.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ahmed M; Bonafede, Machaon; Farr, Amanda M; Castelli-Haley, Jane; Winkel, Craig

    2016-06-01

    Objective To compare subsequent endometriosis-related surgery following initial laparoscopy among women treated with leuprolide acetate (LA) or other endometriosis therapies versus women who received no pharmacotherapy. Research design and methods This retrospective cohort analysis utilized MarketScan Commercial claims data. Women with endometriosis aged 18-49 who underwent laparoscopy between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2011 were identified using diagnosis and procedures codes and were categorized into four cohorts based on claims within 90 days of laparoscopy: surgery plus adherent LA, surgery plus non-adherent LA, surgery plus other therapy, and surgery alone. Patients with proportion of days covered ≥0.80 in the 6 months after laparoscopy were considered adherent to LA. Main outcome measures Subsequent endometriosis-related surgery (laparoscopy, laparotomy or other excision/ablation/fulguration of endometriosis lesions, oophorectomy, or hysterectomy) was measured in the 6 and 12 months following initial laparoscopy. Risk of subsequent surgery was compared using multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results Most women were treated with surgery only (n = 9865); fewer were treated with LA (adherent: n = 202; non-adherent: n = 490) or other therapies (n = 230). The proportion of patients with subsequent surgery ranged from 2.0% to 10.0% during the 6 month follow-up (12 month: 9.7% to 13.5%). Adherent LA use was associated with significantly lower risk of surgery compared to surgery alone (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.31, p = 0.020) while use of other therapies was associated with significantly higher risk (HR = 1.51, p = 0.045) over the 6 month follow-up. There was no significant difference between the surgery plus non-adherent LA and surgery only cohort over 6 months (p = 0.247). The association between adherent LA and subsequent surgery was not significant over the 12 month follow-up. Conclusion Therapy with LA after

  8. Outpatient Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Policymakers | Members | Patients | News Media Anesthesia 101 Patient Safety Stories Resources About Home » Patients » Preparing For Surgery » Types of Surgery » Outpatient Surgery Share this Page Preparing For ...

  9. Patients' experience of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery: a phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, Cheryl; Davison, Jean

    2016-09-12

    Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional curvature of the spine of unknown cause that occurs in often otherwise fit young people. A complex surgical procedure is required for the most severe curves. Quantitative literature suggests scoliosis surgery improves patients' lives, while qualitative literature focuses on patients' concerns rather than their experience. Aims To explore how adolescents interpret their perioperative experience. Method Six participants, aged 15-18, were interviewed and transcripts were analysed. Findings Four themes were identified: shock, fears and worries; parental interaction; coping; and motivation and positivity. Conclusion Participants were reluctant to share concerns, however those they shared related more to fear of the unknown and lack of control than specific issues such as pain. Participants depended on their parents, especially their mothers, during the perioperative period, and they recognised their parents' stress. Participants coped well, were motivated and had a positive outlook. PMID:27615585

  10. Telephone follow-up for day surgery patients: patient perceptions and nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Anne; Scott, Jan; Muir, Janice

    2004-08-01

    This article is an analysis of qualitative data collected from telephone interviews by a nurse researcher with patients recovering from day surgery. The nurse researcher used a standard protocol to telephone 238 recovering day surgery patients. While answering their questions and providing advice, the researcher found that patients held many biases and misconceptions about pain and pain management. Many of these misconceptions were not apparent preoperatively nor at discharge because patients are anxious, still recovering from the surgical experience, and not always able to absorb information or anticipate future issues. This article discusses those misconceptions and the necessity that follow-up occurs over a time period, as the patient's need for advice and support changes throughout the recovery process. PMID:15293174

  11. Baseline cerebral oximetry values in cardiac and vascular surgery patients: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aim This study was conducted to evaluate baseline INVOS values and identify factors influencing preoperative baseline INVOS values in carotid endarterectomy and cardiac surgery patients. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 157 patients (100 cardiac surgery patients, 57 carotid endarterectomy patients). Data were collected on factors potentially related to baseline INVOS values. Data were analyzed with student's t-test, Chi-square, Pearson's correlation or Linear Regression as appropriate. Results 100 cardiac surgery patients and 57 carotid surgery patients enrolled. Compared to cardiac surgery, carotid endarterectomy patients were older (71.05 ± 8.69 vs. 65.72 ± 11.04, P < 0.001), with higher baseline INVOS (P < 0.007) and greater stroke frequency (P < 0.002). Diabetes and high cholesterol were more common in cardiac surgery patients. Right side INVOS values were strongly correlated with left-side values in carotid (r = 0.772, P < 0.0001) and cardiac surgery patients (r = 0.697, P < 0.0001). Diabetes and high cholesterol were associated with significantly (P < 0.001) lower INVOS and smoking was associated with higher INVOS values in carotid, but not in cardiac surgery patients. Age, sex, CVA history, Hypertension, CAD, Asthma, carotid stenosis side and surgery side were not related to INVOS. Multivariate analysis showed that diabetes is strongly associated with lower baseline INVOS values bilaterally (P < 0.001) and explained 36.4% of observed baseline INVOS variability in carotid (but not cardiac) surgery. Conclusion Compared to cardiac surgery, carotid endarterectomy patients are older, with higher baseline INVOS values and greater stroke frequency. Diabetes and high cholesterol are associated with lower baseline INVOS values in carotid surgery. Right and left side INVOS values are strongly correlated in both patient groups. PMID:20497559

  12. Results of cataract surgery in renal transplantation and hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li-Hua; Xiong, Shi-Hong; Wang, Yan-Ling

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare the effect of cataract surgery in renal transplantation and hemodialysis patients. METHODS We evaluated 51 eyes of 31 renal transplantation patients, 41 eyes of 29 hemodialysis patients and 45 eyes of 32 normal control patients who received phacoemulsification and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation from January, 2000 to August, 2014 in the Beijing Friendship Hospital. Each individual underwent a blood routine and a kidney function examination. Routine ophthalmologic examination included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), a slit-lamp examination to detect cataract type, determination of intraocular pressure, a corneal endothelial count, and fundus examination. All patients received phacoemulsification and an IOL implantation. RESULTS For the types of cataract in the three groups, transplantation group was significantly different from normal control group (P=0.04), the most kind is posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) in transplantation group 33 (64.7%), hemodialysis group had no significantly difference from normal control group (P=0.43), and the difference between transplantation group and hemodialysis group also had significantly difference (P=0.02). For postoperative BCVA in the three groups, transplantation group had significantly difference from normal control group (P=0.03), hemodialysis group was significantly different from normal control group (P=0.00), and the difference between transplantation group and hemodialysis group also had significantly difference (P=0.00). The multiple linear regression equation is Y=0.007 hemoglobin (Hb)-0.000233 serum creatinine (Cr), R2=0.898. Postoperative fundus examination showed that hemorrhage, exudation, and macular degeneration were greater in the hemodialysis group. CONCLUSION This study showed that the PSC was more in the renal transplantation patients. BCVA was better and fundus lesions were less frequent in the renal transplantation group than in the hemodialysis group after cataract surgery. The

  13. Corneal Graft and Cataract Surgery in Patients with Moderate to Severe Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, C. A.; Frazer, D. G.; Jackson, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Intraocular surgery in patients with intellectual disability can be hazardous. Our aim was to determine the outcomes of surgery on all such patients seen in a consultant-led service, and to assess the overall risks and benefits. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients with moderate to severe intellectual…

  14. Postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis and posterior spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Florian; Mutlak, Haitham; Tizi, Karima; Senft, Christian; Setzer, Matthias; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The value of postoperative epidural analgesia after major spinal surgery is well established. Thus far, the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been denied to patients undergoing debridement and instrumentation in spondylodiscitis, with the risk of increased postoperative pain resulting in prolonged recovery. The value of PCEA with special regard to infectious complications remains to be clarified. The present study examined the value of postoperative PCEA in comparison with intravenous analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis undergoing posterior spinal surgery. METHODS Thirty-two patients treated surgically for spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine were prospectively included in a database and retrospectively reviewed for this study. Postoperative antibiotic treatment, functional capacity, pain levels, side effects, and complications were documented. Sixteen patients were given patient-demanded intravenous analgesia (PIA) followed by 16 patients assigned to PCEA. If PCEA was applied, the insertion of an epidural catheter was performed under the direct visual guidance of the surgeon at the end of the surgery. RESULTS Three patients intended for PCEA treatment were excluded due to predefined exclusion criteria. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in the PCEA group during the first 48 hours after surgery (p = 0.03). As determined by the trunk control test conducted at 8 (p < 0.001), 24 (p = 0.004), 48 (p = 0.015), 72 (p = 0.0031), and 96 hours (p < 0.001), patients in the PCEA treatment group displayed significantly increased mobilization capacity compared with those of the PIA group. Time until normal accomplishment of all mobilization maneuvers was reduced in the PCEA group compared with that in the PIA group (p = 0.04). No differences in complication rates were observed between the 2 groups (p = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS PCEA may reduce postoperative pain and lead to earlier achievement of functional capacity at a low

  15. Perfusion Scintigraphy and Patient Selection for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Reilly, John J.; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Objectives: To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. Methods: We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non–high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Measurements and Main Results: Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Conclusions: Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung. PMID:20538961

  16. Problems in Communications with Patients in General Surgery Outpatient Practice

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Tonguc Utku; Gumus, Enes; Salman, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Communication between the patient and physician is central to medical care. However communication skills in Turkey haven’t been gained so much concern. This situation effect the national quality of health care. Here, we tried to perform some basic communication skills and to find the problems with the possible solution suggestions. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted for a month in general surgery outpatient department located in the slum part of Ankara with low socio-economic population. Basic communication skills were performed. The age, sex, education levels of the patients were obtained. Total symptom expression and interview time were recorded. Previous medical histories were asked. Interruptions including telephone, door knocking were noted. The questions of the patients at the end of the interview classified as hospital setting, nutrition and treatment. Results: Total 410 interviews were analysed. Mean symptom expression and interview times were 22.9 sec and 7.05 min, respectively. Educated patients, males and young patients expressed symptoms longer than the others (p<0.05). There were 174 interruptions in which total interview time signifantly increased than the non interrupted ones (p<0.05). Final questions about hospital setting were signifantly higher in illiterate patients than the educated ones (p<0.05). Awareness of medical history is higher in educated and young patients. Conclusion: Basic communications skills can be performed whether in rural regions. Much more concern should be given to the education of communication skills. The obstacles in communication in medicine are low education levels, and unorganised health system. PMID:26644767

  17. Lacrimal drainage surgery in a patient with dry eyes.

    PubMed

    Rose, Geoffrey E

    2008-01-01

    The dry-eyed patient has both inadequate surface wetting, and a severe inability to clear the ocular surface of extrinsic debris, lid-margin bacteria (and their toxins), and the intrinsic inflammatory mediators secreted from the inflamed conjunctival surface. Tear evaporation compounds the problem of impaired production, this leading to significant concentration of inflammatory mediators on the abnormal ocular surface - this concentration being even greater where tear drainage is impaired. Nasolacrimal duct obstruction is, moreover, associated with a backwash of toxic debris from the lacrimal sac and, in the patient with dry eye, this backwash exacerbates an already compromised ocular surface. Surgery to re-establish tear drainage and eliminate the reservoir within the lacrimal sac may, therefore, improve the ocular status of patients with dry eye: many patients will benefit from external dacryocystorhinostomy, this being combined with retrograde canaliculostomy where there is proximal canalicular blockage. Secondary placement of a canalicular bypass tube may be required where these procedures have failed and tear drainage is needed. Where there is no risk of ocular surface toxicity due to complete stasis of the tear lake, the canaliculi can be ablated with thermal coagulation or canalicular excision. Rarely required as a primary procedure, dacryocystectomy may be used where dacryocystitis occurs in the presence of long-established canalicular occlusion. PMID:18453765

  18. Laparoscopic Antireflux Surgery in Patients with Connective Tissue Diseases.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mariano A; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2016-04-01

    Different connective tissue diseases (CTDs), such as dermatomyositis, mixed CTD, rheumatoid arthritis, polymyositis, lupus, and Behçet's, may affect the esophagus, impairing its motor function. The muscular atrophy and fibrosis caused by the autoimmune vasculitis and neuronal dysfunction affect the esophageal body and the lower esophageal sphincter, leading to a clinical presentation of dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The belief that the impaired esophageal motility may negatively affect surgical outcome has led to the common recommendation of avoiding laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) for fear of creating or worsening dysphagia. This review focuses on the evaluation of the outcome of LARS in patients with CTD. Specifically, this review shows that the literature on LARS and CTDs is scarce and most studies have a small number of patients and a short follow-up. Furthermore, a subanalysis of the outcome based on the type of CTD or the manometric profile is still elusive. In the setting of these limitations, it appears that results are good and comparable to those of patients with GERD and without a CTD. Morbidity and mortality are insignificant even considering the systemic manifestations of the CTD. LARS should not be denied to patients with CTD and GERD. PMID:27027697

  19. Cataract surgery in patients with ocular surface disease: An update in clinical diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Afsharkhamseh, Neda; Movahedan, Asadolah; Motahari, Hooman; Djalilian, Ali R

    2014-07-01

    In this article we review essentials of diagnosis and management of ocular surface disease in patients who undergo cataract surgery. It is clearly shown that dry eye disease worsens following the cataract surgery in patients with prior history of ocular surface disease, Also new cases of dry eye might appear. Current strategies for the timely diagnosis and proper management of dry eye syndrome in the face of cataract surgery patients are mainly emphasized. To achieve the best outcome in cataract surgery, a healthy ocular surface is crucial. While ocular surface preparation is indispensable in patients with established ocular surface disease, it is also helpful in those with minimal signs or symptoms of surface disease. The current approach begins with early diagnosis and drastic management of ocular surface disease before cataract surgery using a stepwise regimen customized to each patient and disease severity. These measures are continued throughout and after the surgery. PMID:25278791

  20. Markers of Perioperative Bowel Complications in Colorectal Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hyšpler, Radomír; Tichá, Alena; Kaška, Milan; Žaloudková, Lenka; Plíšková, Lenka; Havel, Eduard; Zadák, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a clinical condition whose treatment often involves intestinal resection. Such treatment frequently results in two major gastrointestinal complications after surgery: anastomotic leakage and prolonged ileus. Anastomotic leakage is a serious complication which, more often than not, is diagnosed late; to date, C-reactive protein is the only available diagnostic marker. A monocentric, prospective, open case-control study was performed in patients (n = 117) undergoing colorectal surgery. Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP), citrulline, D-lactate, exhaled hydrogen, Escherichia coli genomic DNA, and ischemia modified albumin (IMA) were determined preoperatively, postoperatively, and on the following four consecutive days. Bacterial DNA was not detected in any sample, and i-FABP and D-lactate lacked any distinct potential to detect postoperative bowel complications. Exhaled breath hydrogen content showed unacceptably low sensitivity. However, citrulline turned out to be a specific marker for prolonged ileus on postoperative days 3-4. Using a cut-off value of 20 μmol/L, a sensitivity and specificity of ~75% was achieved on postoperative day 4. IMA was found to be an efficient predictor of anastomosis leak by calculating the difference between preoperative and postoperative values. This test had 100% sensitivity and 80% specificity and 100% negative and 20% positive predictive value. PMID:26788017

  1. Impact of commissioning weight-loss surgery for bariatric patients.

    PubMed

    Petty, Natasha

    Obesity is a major UK public health issue that is increasingly costly to an individual's personal health, the NHS and society. It requires an immediate intervention, as well as a long-term strategy to decrease the rising rates of obesity. NHS England (2013) has published a policy to commission bariatric surgery for carefully selected individuals according to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines (NICE, 2006). This has been shown to be a clinically and cost effective weight-loss treatment option (Picot et al, 2009), but is invasive and expensive compared with non-surgical weight-loss programmes. In addition, there remains inequality in access to bariatric care services across England, thereby preventing potentially eligible patients from getting the treatment they need. Further clarity is required regarding the commissioning responsibilities across the four tiers of the obesity care services. This clarity would help to achieve a more 'joined-up' clinical pathway that is focused at a local level to improve access. However, there is criticism that too much funding is currently being invested in the provision of bariatric surgery when it could be better spent on national roll-out programmes for intensive lifestyle interventions that promote more sustainable weight loss across England. PMID:26266444

  2. Phacoemulsification versus small incision cataract surgery in patients with uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Rahul; Kumar, Prachi; Sharma, Shiv Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Kaur, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare the safety and efficacy of phacoemulsification and small incision cataract surgery (SICS) in patients with uveitic cataract. METHODS In a prospective, randomized multi-centric study, consecutive patients with uveitic cataract were randomized to receive phacoemulsification or manual SICS by either of two surgeons well versed with both the techniques. A minimum inflammation free period of 3mo (defined as less than 5 cells per high power field in anterior chamber) was a pre-requisite for eligibility for surgery. Superior scleral tunnel incisions were used for both techniques. Improvement in visual acuity post-operatively was the primary outcome measure and the rate of post-operative complications and surgical time were secondary outcome measures, respectively. Means of groups were compared using t-tests. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used when there were more than two groups. Chi-square tests were used for proportions. Kaplan Meyer survival analysis was done and means for survival time was estimated at 95% confidence interval (CI). A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS One hundred and twenty-six of 139 patients (90.6%) completed the 6-month follow-up. Seven patients were lost in follow up and another six excluded due to either follow-up less than six months (n=1) or inability implant an intraocular lens (IOL) because of insufficient capsular support following posterior capsule rupture (n=5). There was significant improvement in vision after both the procedures (paired t-test; P<0.001). On first postoperative day, uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) was 20/63 or better in 31 (47%) patients in Phaco group and 26 (43.3%) patients in SICS group (P=0.384). The mean surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) was 0.86±0.34 dioptres (D) in the phacoemulsification group and 1.16±0.28 D in SICS group. The difference between the groups was significant (t-test, P=0.002). At 6mo, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) was

  3. Morbidities of Lung Cancer Surgery in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Binod; Eastwood, Daniel; Sukumaran, Sunitha; Hassler, George; Tisol, William; Gasparri, Mario; Choong, Nicholas; Santana-Davila, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for increased peri-operative morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. There have been limited studies to correlate the morbidity of lung cancer resection with obesity. Methods We performed a retrospective study of patients who underwent surgical resection for lung cancer at the Medical College of Wisconsin from 2006 to 2010. Data on patient demographics, weight, pathology findings and hospital course were abstracted after appropriate IRB approval. Peri-operative morbidity was defined as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, respiratory failure, pulmonary embolism or any medical complications arising within 30 days after surgery. Fisher’s exact test was used to test the association between BMI and peri-operative morbidities. Results Between 2006 and 2010,320 lung resections were performed for lung cancer. Median age was 67(IQR 59–75) years and 185(57.8%) were females.121 (37.8%) patients had a BMI<25 and 199(62.18%) patients had a BMI≥25. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.8 % (n=6) in the whole group; only 2 of these patients had a BMI ≥ 25. Peri-operative morbidity occurred in 28(23.14%) of normal BMI patients and in 47(23.61%) of BMI ≥ 25 patients (p=0.54). Specific morbidities encountered by patients with normal vs. BMI ≥ 25 were: atrial fibrillation 11(9.09%) vs. 24(12.06%) (p=0.46), Pulmonary embolism 1(0.83%) vs. 3(1.51%) (p=1.0), congestive heart failure 2(1.65%) vs. 2(1.01%) (p=0.63), renal failure 4(3.3%) vs.2 (1.0%)(p=0.29), respiratory failure 12(9.92%) vs. 17(8.54%) (p=0.69) and acute respiratory distress syndrome 2(1.65%) vs. 1(0.50%) (p=0.55). Median hospital stay was 5 days in the lower BMI group and 4 days in the BMI ≥25 groups (p=0.52). Conclusions Overweight and normal weight patients do not differ significantly in rates of perioperative morbidities, 30-day mortality and length of stay. Our study indicates that potential curative surgical resections can be offered to even significantly overweight

  4. Impact of Type of Surgery on Survival Outcome in Patients With Early Gallbladder Cancer in the Era of Minimally Invasive Surgery: Oncologic Safety of Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jin-Young; Heo, Jin Seok; Han, Youngmin; Chang, Jihoon; Kim, Jae Ri; Kim, Hongbeom; Kwon, Wooil; Kim, Sun-Whe; Choi, Seong Ho; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Kyoungbun; Jang, Kee-Taek; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-05-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been widely accepted as a feasible and safe treatment modality in many cancers of the gastrointestinal tract. However, most guidelines on gallbladder cancer (GBC) regard laparoscopic surgery as a contraindication, even for early GBC. This study aims to evaluate and compare recent surgical outcomes of laparoscopic and open surgery for T1(a,b) GBC and to determine the optimal surgical strategy for T1 GBC.The study enrolled 197 patients with histopathologically proven T1 GBC and no history of other cancers who underwent surgery from 2000 to 2014 at 3 major tertiary referral hospitals with specialized biliary-pancreas pathologists and optimal pathologic handling protocols. Median follow-up was 56 months. The effects of depth of invasion and type of surgery on disease-specific survival and recurrence patterns were investigated.Of the 197 patients, 116 (58.9%) underwent simple cholecystectomy, including 31 (15.7%) who underwent open cholecystectomy and 85 (43.1%) laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The remaining 81 (41.1%) patients underwent extended cholecystectomy. Five-year disease-specific survival rates were similar in patients who underwent simple and extended cholecystectomy (96.7% vs 100%, P = 0.483), as well as being similar in patients in the simple cholecystectomy group who underwent open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (100% vs 97.6%, P = 0.543). Type of surgery had no effect on recurrence patterns.Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for T1 gallbladder cancer can provide similar survival outcomes compared to open surgery. Considering less blood loss and shorter hospital stay with better cosmetic outcome, laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be justified as a standard treatment for T1b as well as T1a gallbladder cancer when done by well-experienced surgeons based on exact pathologic diagnosis. PMID:27258495

  5. Is LASIK for Me? A Patient's Guide to Refractive Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... were developed with the help of the Federal Trade Commission and the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. For the complete guidelines, see: www.aao.org/about/policy/upload/Guidelines-for-Refractive-Surgery- Advertising-3-26- ...

  6. Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Han, Jun; Jin, Dong San; Suh, Hyunseok; Chung, Yoon-Sok

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity among patients who underwent orthopedic surgery (OS). Methods A total of 222 patients were reviewed immediately after or prior to OS. In the control group, 364 patients from outpatient departments (OPDs) who did not have any OS were enrolled. Whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to analyze body composition. Skeletal muscle mass was adjusted for height squared, total body weight, and height and fat mass (residuals). Obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) > 25.0 kg/m2. Results The prevalence of sarcopenia in the OS group was 25.7%, 44.1%, and 26.6%, respectively, according to the 3 different criteria. The prevalence was significantly lower in the OPD group (6.0%, 33.1%, and 14.8%, respectively). The highest rates of sarcopenia with height-adjusted definition were seen in patients with a femoral neck fracture. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with sarcopenia were male gender, older age, and lower BMI (odds ratio [OR]: 28.38, 1.03, and 1.83, respectively) when muscle mass was adjusted for height, whereas male gender, older age, and higher BMI were associated with sarcopenia (OR: 1.04, 2.57, and 1.83, respectively) when adjusted for weight. When residuals were used as a cutoff, decreased BMI and total hip bone mineral density (0.1 g/cm2) were independent risk factors associated with sarcopenia (OR: 1.09 and 1.05). The prevalence of sarcopenic obesity ranged from 1.8% to 21.2%. Conclusions Our study demonstrated a high prevalence of sarcopenia among OS patients. PMID:27247746

  7. Vancomycin Dosing and Pharmacokinetics in Postoperative Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Benefield, Emily C.; Hagemann, Tracy M.; Allen, H. Christine; Farmer, Kevin; Burton, Michael E.; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study compared vancomycin trough concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery (CTS) patients versus those in controls receiving 20 mg/kg/dose, intravenously, every 8 hours. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in children <18 years of age, following CTS, versus an age-and sex-matched control group. The primary objective was to determine differences in trough concentrations between groups. Secondary objectives included comparisons of pharmacokinetics between groups and development of vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI), defined as a doubling in serum creatinine from baseline. Also dosing projections were developed to target an area-under-the-curve-to-minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC:MIC) ratio of ≥400. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients in each group were evaluated. Mean trough concentrations were significantly different between groups (CTS: 18.4 mg/L; control: 8.8 mg/L; p < 0.01). Vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury AKI was significantly higher in the CTS group than in controls (25.9% versus 0%, respectively, p<0.01). There were significant differences in vancomycin elimination rates, with a high degree of variability, but no statistical differences in other parameters. Based on dosing projections, CTS patients would require 21 to 88 mg/kg/day, with a dosage interval determined by the child's glomerular filtration rate to achieve the target AUC:MIC ≥400. CONCLUSIONS: Vancomycin dosage of 20 mg/kg/dose intravenously every 8 hours achieved significantly higher trough concentrations in CTS patients than in controls. Pharmacokinetic parameters were highly variable in CTS patients, indicating more individualization of dosage is needed. A future prospective study is needed to determine whether the revised dosage projections achieve the AUC:MIC target and to determine whether these regimens are associated with less vancomycin-associated AKI. PMID:26997930

  8. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Program in Patients Undergoing Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Junjie; Szatmary, Peter; Huang, Wei; de la Iglesia-Garcia, Daniel; Nunes, Quentin M.; Xia, Qing; Hu, Weiming; Sutton, Robert; Liu, Xubao; Raraty, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) pathways are multimodal, evidence-based approaches to optimize patient outcome after surgery. However, the use of ERAS protocols to improve morbidity and recovery time without compromising safety following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) remains to be elucidated. We conducted a systemic review and meta-analysis to assess the safety and efficacy of ERAS protocols compared with conventional perioperative care (CPC) in patients following PD. PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Science Citation Index Expanded and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library were searched between January 2000 and June 2015. The patients who underwent PD with ERAS protocols or CPC were eligible. The studies that compared postoperative length of hospital stay (PLOS), postoperative complications, or in-hospital costs in the 2 groups were included. A meta-analysis, meta-regression, sensitivity analysis, and subgroup analysis were performed to estimate the postoperative outcomes between the 2 groups and identified the potential confounders. We used the methodological index for nonrandomized studies checklist to assess methodological qualities. Weighted mean differences (WMD) or odds ratios (OR) were calculated with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). The publication bias tests were also performed through the funnel plots. In total, 14 nonrandomized comparative studies with 1409 ERAS cases and 1310 controls were analyzed. Implementation of an ERAS protocol significantly reduced PLOS (WMD: −4.17 days; 95%CI: −5.72 to −2.61), delayed gastric emptying (OR: 0.56; 95%CI: 0.44–0.71), overall morbidity (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.54–0.74), and in-hospital costs compared to CPC (all P < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in other postoperative outcomes. Age, gender, and ERAS component implementation did not significantly contribute to heterogeneity for PLOS as shown by meta

  9. Adjuvant treatment modalities to control macular edema in diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Ebru Nevin; Yıldırım, Cem

    2013-10-01

    Cataract surgical outcomes in diabetic patients has been subject to changes with the advances in the surgical techniques. Recent studies suggest that cataract surgery does not cause the progression of diabetic retinopathy and intravitreal bevacizumab and/or triamcinolone injections combined with cataract surgery may contribute in short term improvement of macular edema in diabetic patients. This article reviews the progression of diabetic retinopathy after cataract surgery with phacoemulsification and the use of adjuvant intravitreal treatments combined with phacoemusification in diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery. PMID:23248073

  10. Positioning of the anaesthetised patient during robotically assisted laparoscopic surgery: perioperative staff experiences.

    PubMed

    Mangham, M

    2016-03-01

    Safe, patient centred care is a large part of our trust values at the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust. Robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) is still in its infancy within our trust, and we decided to look at what we have learned so far regarding patient positioning during robotic surgery for gynae-oncology and uro-gynae procedures. We also considered what we believe needs to be achieved in order to deliver high standards of care in positioning patients during robotic surgery, not only now, but also for the future of robotic surgery. PMID:27149834

  11. Quality of Life After Bypass Surgery in Patients with Chest Pain and Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bypass Surgery in Patients With Chest Pain and Heart Failure The full report is titled “Quality-of-Life ... in patients who have coronary artery disease plus heart failure, which can cause additional symptoms, such as shortness ...

  12. Robotic and Navigation Systems in Orthopaedic Surgery: How Much Do Our Patients Understand?

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin-Laing, Harry; Douglas, Stephen L; Haddad, Fares S

    2014-01-01

    Background Technology in orthopaedic surgery has become more widespread in the past 20 years, with emerging evidence of its benefits in arthroplasty. Although patients are aware of benefits of conventional joint replacement, little is known on patients' knowledge of the prevalence, benefits or drawbacks of surgery involving navigation or robotic systems. Methods In an outpatient arthroplasty clinic, 100 consecutive patients were approached and given questionnaires to assess their knowledge of navigation and robotics in orthopaedic surgery. Participation in the survey was voluntary. Results Ninety-eight patients volunteered to participate in the survey, mean age 56.2 years (range, 19 to 88 years; 52 female, 46 male). Forty percent of patients thought more than 30% of National Health Service (NHS) orthopaedic operations involved navigation or robotics; 80% believed this was the same level or less than the private sector. One-third believed most of an operation could be performed independently by a robotic/navigation system. Amongst perceived benefits of navigation/robotic surgery was more accurate surgery (47%), quicker surgery (50%), and making the surgeon's job easier (52%). Sixty-nine percent believed navigation/robotics was more expensive and 20% believed it held no benefit against conventional surgery, with only 9% believing it led to longer surgery. Almost 50% would not mind at least some of their operation being performed with use of robotics/navigation. Conclusions Although few patients were familiar with this new technology, there appeared to be a strong consensus it was quicker and more accurate than conventional surgery. Many patients appear to believe navigation and robotics in orthopaedic surgery is largely the preserve of the private sector. This study demonstrates public knowledge of such new technologies is limited and a need to inform patients of the relative merits and drawbacks of such surgery prior to their more widespread implementation. PMID

  13. Short-term outcomes after laparoscopic colorectal surgery in patients with previous abdominal surgery: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Cecconello, Ivan; Panis, Yves

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review focusing on short-term outcomes after colorectal surgery in patients with previous abdominal open surgery (PAOS). METHODS: A broad literature search was performed with the terms “colorectal”, “colectomy”, “PAOS”, “previous surgery” and “PAOS”. Studies were included if their topic was laparoscopic colorectal surgery in patients with PAOS, whether descriptive or comparative. Endpoints of interest were conversion rates, inadvertent enterotomy and morbidity. Analysis of articles was made according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. RESULTS: From a total of 394 citations, 13 full-texts achieved selection criteria to be included in the study. Twelve of them compared patients with and without PAOS. All studies were retrospective and comparative and two were case-matched. The selected studies comprised a total of 5005 patients, 1865 with PAOS. Among the later, only 294 (16%) had history of a midline incision for previous gastrointestinal surgery. Conversion rates were significantly higher in 3 of 12 studies and inadvertent enterotomy during laparoscopy was more prevalent in 3 of 5 studies that disclosed this event. Morbidity was similar in the majority of studies. A quantitative analysis (meta-analysis) could not be performed due to heterogeneity of the studies. CONCLUSION: Conversion rates were slightly higher in PAOS groups, although not statistical significant in most studies. History of PAOS did not implicate in higher morbidity rates. PMID:27462396

  14. [Angiological and neurological problems after shunt surgery in haemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Brittinger, W D

    2005-06-01

    Vascular access induced complications contribute to the morbidity of patients on regular dialysis treatment. Impaired peripheral perfusion, cardiac stress and nerve lesions are the most common of these complications. In the first part of this paper, angiological problems caused by creating arterio-venous shunts are described. Shunt volumes, blood circulation in the shunt arm and shunt-induced alterations of the circulatory blood volume are discussed as well as the conditions under which these parameters gain pathogenic importance. After describing the different shunt-specific circulatory disturbances in detail, the whole spectrum of preventive interventions are discussed. Based on the author's experience during more than four decades in this field, it is strongly recommended to treat even slight but clinically relevant circulatory disorders caused by arterio-venous shunts. The second part of this paper deals with neurological complications in access surgery for dialysis. The pathogenesis of these complications and the measures necessary to avoid them are discussed. Depending on the skin incision, 5 to 20 % of the patients with fistulas between the radial artery and the cephalic vein at the wrist show lesions of the superficial branch of the radial nerve or of the lateral forearm nerve branches. Fistulas with the ulnar artery at the dorsal aspect of the lower forearm frequently cause irritations of the ulnar nerve's superficial palmar branch. Fistulas with the basilic vein in the upper arm often are associated with lesions of the medial cutaneous nerve of the forearm, especially when the vein is "subcuticularized". Aside from these rather benign lesions, sometimes severe sensomotoric functional losses of the median, radial, and ulnar nerves occur, predominantly after implantation of vascular graft shunts in the upper arm. Similar nerve damage can also be observed in association with severe impairment of the peripheral perfusion caused by this type of shunt. Nerve

  15. Effects of orthognathic surgery on psychological status of patients with jaw deformities.

    PubMed

    Takatsuji, H; Kobayashi, T; Kojima, T; Hasebe, D; Izumi, N; Saito, I; Saito, C

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of orthognathic surgery on psychological status. The subjects were 119 patients (38 males and 81 females, mean age 25.5±9.4 years) who underwent orthognathic surgery. They were divided into class III (84 patients), class II (20 patients), and class I (15 patients) groups according to the anteroposterior skeletal pattern, and they were also divided into an asymmetry group (51 patients) and a symmetry group (68 patients). We assessed psychological status using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) before surgery and at more than 6 months after surgery. The MMPI scores for the depression, hysteria, psychasthenia, and social introversion scales were significantly higher than standard values before surgery, and the hypomania scale significantly lower. The cannot say scale, depression scale, and hysteria scale decreased significantly after surgery. A comparison of MMPI scores among the groups showed the depression scale in the class III group to be higher than those in the class I and II groups; there was no significant difference between the asymmetry and symmetry groups. In conclusion, orthognathic surgery has a positive influence on the psychological status of patients with jaw deformities, especially patients with skeletal class III malocclusion. PMID:26004311

  16. The Night Eating Syndrome (NES) in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    de Zwaan, Martina; Marschollek, Michael; Allison, Kelly C

    2015-11-01

    The night eating syndrome (NES) has been included into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 as an example of an 'other-specified feeding or eating disorder'. The prevalence of NES has found to be higher in obese populations than in the general population and seems to rise with increasing body mass index. Recent studies suggest a prevalence of 2%-20% in bariatric surgery samples. Given that the core feature of this eating disorder may involve a shift in the circadian pattern of eating that disrupts sleep, and not the ingestion of objectively large amounts of food, it is a pattern that can continue after bariatric surgery. Nonetheless, symptoms of NES appear to decrease after weight loss surgery, and there is no evidence that pre-surgery NES negatively impacts weight loss following surgery. Prospective and longitudinal studies of the course of night eating symptoms are warranted using clear criteria and standardized assessment instruments. PMID:26395455

  17. Albumin Kinetics in Patients Undergoing Major Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Segersvärd, Ralf; Wernerman, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background The drop in plasma albumin concentration following surgical trauma is well known, but the temporal pattern of the detailed mechanisms behind are less well described. The aim of this explorative study was to assess changes in albumin synthesis and transcapillary escape rate (TER) following major surgical trauma, at the time of peak elevations in two well-recognized markers of inflammation. Methods This was a clinical trial of radiolabeled human serum albumin for the study of TER and plasma volume. Ten patients were studied immediately preoperatively and on the 2nd postoperative day after major pancreatic surgery. Albumin synthesis rate was measured by the flooding dose technique employing incorporation of isotopically labelled phenylalanine. Results Fractional synthesis rate of albumin increased from 11.7 (95% CI: 8.9, 14.5) to 15.0 (11.7, 18.4) %/day (p = 0.027), whereas the corresponding absolute synthesis rate was unchanged, 175 (138, 212) versus 150 (107, 192) mg/kg/day (p = 0.21). TER was unchanged, 4.9 (3.1, 6.8) %/hour versus 5.5 (3.9, 7.2) (p = 0.63). Plasma volume was unchanged but plasma albumin decreased from 33.5 (30.9, 36.2) to 22.1 (19.8, 24.3) g/L. (p<0.001). Conclusion Two days after major abdominal surgery, at the time-point when two biomarkers of generalised inflammation were at their peak and the plasma albumin concentration had decreased by 33%, we were unable to show any difference in the absolute synthesis rate of albumin, TER and plasma volume as compared with values obtained immediately pre-operatively. This suggests that capillary leakage, if elevated postoperatively, had ceased at that time-point. The temporal relations between albumin kinetics, capillary leakage and generalised inflammation need to be further explored. Trial Registration clinicaltrialsregister.eu: EudraCT 2010-08529-21 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01194492 PMID:26313170

  18. When Mood Worsens after Gastric Bypass Surgery: Characterization of Bariatric Patients with Increases in Depressive Symptoms Following Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression levels generally decrease substantially following bariatric surgery; however, little is known about bariatric patients who might experience increases in depression following surgery. We examined the frequency of bariatric patients who experienced discernible increases in depression levels following surgery and explored their correlates. Methods Participants were 107 patients with extreme obesity who underwent gastric bypass surgery and were followed up at 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Participants completed self-report questionnaires about depression (BDI), eating disorder psychopathology (EDE-Q), self-esteem (RSES), and social functioning (SF-36) at baseline and again at 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Results Fourteen (13.1 %) participants reported discernible increases (BDI-Increase), 14 (13.1 %) reported discernible decreases (BDI-Decrease), and 79 (73.8 %) did not report discernible changes (no change) in BDI scores from 6 to 12 months postsurgery. Presurgically, there were no differences between the three groups. By 12 months postsurgery, the BDI-Increase group had significantly higher depression scores and significantly lower self-esteem and SF-36 mental component scores than did the other groups. For the BDI-Increase group, BDI Change was significantly associated with body mass index, self-esteem, and SF-36 physical component scores. Conclusions Findings highlight that a subgroup of individuals report discernible increases in depressive scores postsurgery and may differ in potentially clinically meaningful ways from those who do not report discernible increases in depressive symptoms. Future research is needed to better understand the long-term trajectory of patients with discernible worsening mood following gastric bypass surgery. PMID:25190520

  19. Epilepsy Surgery: Factors That Affect Patient Decision-Making in Choosing or Deferring a Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher Todd; Mani, Ram; Lawler, Kathy; Pollard, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Surgical resection for well-selected patients with refractory epilepsy provides seizure freedom approximately two-thirds of the time. Despite this, many good candidates for surgery, after a presurgical workup, ultimately do not consent to a procedure. The reasons why patients decline potentially effective surgery are not completely understood. We explored the socio cultural, medical, personal, and psychological differences between candidates who chose (n = 23) and those who declined surgical intervention (n = 9). We created a novel questionnaire addressing a range of possible factors important in patient decision making. We found that patients who declined surgery were less bothered by their epilepsy (despite comparable severity), more anxious about surgery, and less likely to listen to their doctors (and others) and had more comorbid psychiatric disease. Patients who chose surgery were more embarrassed by their seizures, more interested in being “seizure-free”, and less anxious about specific aspects of surgery. Patient attitudes, beliefs, and anxiety serve as barriers to ideal care. These results can provide opportunities for education, treatment, and intervention. Additionally, patients who fit a profile of someone who is likely to defer surgery may not be appropriate for risky and expensive presurgical testing. PMID:24159385

  20. The impact of marketing language on patient preference for robot-assisted surgery.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Peter R; Grant, Robert C; Urbach, David R

    2015-02-01

    Robot-assisted surgery is gaining momentum as a new trend in minimally invasive surgery. With limited evidence supporting its use in place of the far less expensive conventional laparoscopic surgery, it has been suggested that marketing pressure is partly responsible for its widespread adoption. The impact of phrases that promote the novelty of robot-assisted surgery on patient decision making has not been investigated. We conducted a discrete choice experiment to elicit preference of partial colectomy technique for a hypothetical diagnosis of colon cancer. A convenience sample of 38 participants in an ambulatory general surgery clinic consented to participate. Each participant made 2 treatment decisions between robot-assisted surgery and conventional laparoscopic surgery, with robot-assisted surgery described as "innovative" and "state-of-the-art" in one of the decisions (marketing frame), and by a disclosure of the uncertainty of available evidence in the other (evidence-based frame). The magnitude of the framing effect was large with 12 of 38 subjects (31.6%, P = .005) selecting robot-assisted surgery in the marketing frame and not the evidence-based frame. This is the first study to our knowledge to demonstrate that words that highlight novelty have an important influence on patient preference for robot-assisted surgery and that use of more neutral language can mitigate this effect. PMID:24902683

  1. Pre-Operative History of Depression and Cognitive Changes in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Obesity associated cognitive impairments may be partially reversible through bariatric surgery. Depression, a prevalent comorbidity in bariatric surgery candidates, is linked with cognitive impairment and poorer surgical outcomes in other populations. No study has examined the effects of pre-operative depression on cognitive changes in bariatric surgery patients. 67 bariatric surgery patients completed a computerized cognitive test battery prior to surgery and 12-months post-operatively. The Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I disorders assessed Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Pre-surgery history of MDD was found in 47.8% of patients, but was not associated with greater baseline cognitive impairments. Repeated measures revealed improved cognitive abilities 12-months after surgery. Pre-surgery history of MDD did not influence post-operative cognitive function. Pre-operative history of MDD did not limit post-operative cognitive improvements. Larger studies with extended follow-ups are needed to clarify our findings and identify factors (e.g., older age) that may modify cognitive changes following surgery. PMID:25222138

  2. Quality of life in rectal cancer patients after radical surgery: a survey of Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the impact of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in disease-free survivors after radical surgery for rectal cancer in a Chinese mainland population. Methods We performed a cross-sectional survey from August 2002 to February 2011 by use of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38 questionnaires of 438 patients who underwent curative surgery for rectal cancer. Patients who were followed up for a minimum of 6 months, had no relevant major comorbidities and whose disease had not recurred were asked to complete both questionnaires. The impact of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on HRQoL were compared by univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results In total, 285 patients responded to the survey (response rate, 65.1%). Psychological-related HRQoL variables such as emotional function (P = 0.021) and future perspectives (P = 0.044) were poorer for younger patients than for older patients; and physiological-related HRQoL was reflected by physical function (P = 0.039), which was poorer for older patients than for younger patients. In terms of physiologic function and symptoms concerning HRQoL, such as pain (P = 0.002) and insomnia (P = 0.018), females had lower values than males. Low education and unemployment were associated with a worse HRQoL. HRQoL was worse for patients with stomas compared to those without, especially in psychosocial areas such as role function (P = 0.025), social function (P <0.001) and body image (P = 0.004). Financial HRQoL was worse for younger patients and patients with stoma. Conclusions HRQoL aspects and degrees to which they were impaired after curative surgery for rectal cancer were different when compared by many sociodemographic and clinical factors in Chinese mainland patients. PMID:24886668

  3. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Morbidly Obese Patients Treated with Bariatric Surgery: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Erik P.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Browne, James A.; Trousdale, Robert T.; Sarr, Michael; Lewallen, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to compare outcomes (anesthesia time, total operative time, tourniquet time, duration of hospital stay, 90-day complication rate and transfusion rates) of patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) who underwent bariatric surgery before or after TKA. One-hundred-twenty-five patients were included: TKA before bariatric surgery (group 1; n=39); TKA within two years of bariatric surgery (group 2; n=25); and TKA more than 2 years after bariatric surgery (group 3; n=61). Patients with TKA more than 2 years after bariatric surgery had shorter anesthesia, total operative and tourniquet times than other groups; differences were significant between groups. Ninety-day complication and transfusion rates approached but did not meet statistical significance. Ninety-day complication rates and duration of hospital stay did not differ significantly between the three groups. PMID:22554730

  4. Cardiac surgery for patients with heart failure due to structural heart disease in Uganda: access to surgery and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Antonio; Ammirati, Enrico; Vermi, Anna Chiara; De Concilio, Annalisa; Trucco, Giorgio; Aloi, Francesco; Arioli, Francesco; Figini, Filippo; Ferrarello, Santo; Maria Sacco, Francesco; Grottola, Renato; D’Arbela, Paul G; Marijon, Eloi; Mirabel, Mariana; Alfieri, Ottavio; Karam, Nicole; Freers, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Few data are available on heart failure (HF) in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to provide a current picture of HF aetiologies in urban Uganda, access to heart surgery, and outcomes. Methods We prospectively collected clinical and echocardiographic data from 272 consecutive patients referred for suspected heart disease to a tertiary hospital in Kampala during seven non-governmental organisation (NGO) missions from 2009 to 2013. We focused the analysis on 140 patients who fulfilled standardised criteria of HF by echocardiography. Results Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) was the leading cause of HF in 44 (31%) patients. Among the 50 children included (age ≤ 16 years), congenital heart disease (CHD) was the first cause of HF (30 patients, 60%), followed by RHD (16 patients, 32%). RHD was the main cause of HF (30%) among the 90 adults. All 85 patients with RHD and CHD presented with an indication for heart surgery, of which 74 patients were deemed fit for intervention. Surgery was scheduled in 38 patients with RHD [86%, median age 19 years (IQR: 12–31)] and in 36 patients with CHD [88%, median age 4 years (IQR 1–5)]. Twenty-seven candidates (32%) were operated on after a median waiting time of 10 months (IQR 6–21). Sixteen (19%) had died after a median of 38 months (IQR 5–52); 19 (22%) were lost to follow up. Conclusions RHD still represents the leading cause of HF in Uganda, in spite of cost-efficient prevention strategies. The majority of surgical candidates, albeit young, do not have access to treatment and present high mortality rates. PMID:25073490

  5. A Study of Patients and Nurses’ Perception of the Quality of Pain Management in the Patients Undergoing Surgery in the Departments of Surgery of Rasht Hospitals in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Tahereh Khalkhali; Sayad, Shirin; Baghaei, Maryam; Hossini, Shahla Mola; Salahshorian, Asieh; Zare, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose & Field: More than one hundred million people around the world undergo a surgery annually. Although, the surgery itself is a treatment method to relieve pain and discomfort, it can be considered as one of the important factors to make a pain too. Perception and diagnosis of the pain is the most important duty of nurses. Effective pain management after surgery facilitates the patient’s recovery, decreases the length of hospitalization and increases the patient satisfaction. This study aims to investigate the patients and nurses’ perception of the quality of pain management in the patients undergoing an abdominal surgery. Methods & Materials: The current study is a descriptive research that has been conducted on 204 candidate patients for the abdominal surgery and the nurses who care them in the departments of surgery of Rasht hospitals by using the Simple Random Sampling method. The necessary tools in gathering data for the questionnaire consist of demographic characteristics. Idval, E et al’s Questionnaire for evaluation and pain perception, numerical and visual evaluation tools for the patient and nurse satisfaction with pain relief. Statistical analysis has been made through the 16 version of SPSS software by using descriptive statistics, average and standard deviation. Findings: The results show that the level of patient satisfaction with providing necessary care to relieve pain was 29.1% (maximum), 20.8% (minimum) and 78.7% to the confidence, environment and all areas, respectively. For the nurses, this level was 32.4% (maximum), 16.4% (minimum) and 77.1% to the performance, environment and all areas, respectively. The maximum level of patient perception of satisfaction with pain relief was 49.1% and for the nurses, it was 37.7% (good level). Conclusions: The results indicated that the patients’ perception of providing necessary cares to relieve pain and their satisfaction with the pain relief are more than the nurses and in a good level. PMID

  6. Single-site Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery Provides Similar Clinical Outcomes Compared to Standard Laparoscopic Surgery: An Analysis of 626 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sangster, William; Messaris, Evangelos; Berg, Arthur S.; Stewart, David B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Compared to standard laparoscopy, single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgerymay potentially offer advantages by creating fewer surgical incisions and providing a multi-functional trocar. Previous comparisons, however, have been limited by small sample sizes and selection bias. OBJECTIVE To compare 60-day outcomes between standard laparoscopic and single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgery patients undergoing elective and urgent surgeries. DESIGN This was an unselected retrospective cohort study comparing patients who underwent elective and unplanned standard laparoscopic or single-site laparoscopic colorectal resections for benign and malignant disease between 2008 and 2014. Outcomes were compared using univariate analyses. SETTING This study was conducted at a single institution. PATIENTS A total of 626 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Morbidity and mortality within 60 postoperative days. RESULTS 318 (51%) and 308 (49%) patients underwent standard laparoscopic and single-site laparoscopic procedures, respectively. No significant difference was noted in mean operative time (Standard laparoscopy 182.1 ± 81.3 vs. Single-site laparoscopy 177±86.5, p=0.30) and postoperative length of stay (Standard laparoscopy 4.8±3.4 vs. Single-site laparoscopy 5.5 ± 6.9, p=0.14). Conversions to laparotomy and 60-day readmissions were also similar for both cohorts across all procedures performed. A significant difference was identified in the number of patients who developed postoperative complications (Standard laparoscopy 19.2% vs. Single-site laparoscopy 10.7%, p=0.004), especially with respect to surgical-site infections (Standard laparoscopy 11.3% vs. Single-site laparoscopy 5.8%, p=0.02). LIMITATIONS This was a retrospective, single institution study. CONCLUSIONS Single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgery demonstrates similar results to standard laparoscopic colorectal surgery in regards to

  7. Blood glucose management in the patient undergoing cardiac surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Pingle; Duggar, Brian; Butterworth, John

    2014-01-01

    Both diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia per se are associated with negative outcomes after cardiac surgery. In this article, we review these associations, the possible mechanisms that lead to adverse outcomes, and the epidemiology of diabetes focusing on those patients requiring cardiac surgery. We also examine outpatient and perioperative management of diabetes with the same focus. Finally, we discuss our own efforts to improve glycemic management of patients undergoing cardiac surgery at our institution, including keys to success, results of implementation, and patient safety concerns. PMID:25429332

  8. Bentall Surgery in a Patient with Cold Agglutinin and Antiphospholipid Antibody: Double Trouble.

    PubMed

    Raut, Monish S; Rohra, Gulshan; Shivnani, Ganesh; Maheshwari, Arun; Dubey, Sumir; Bhathiwal, Rajpal Singh; Sharma, Deevakar

    2016-06-01

    Cold agglutinin disease is an uncommon disease with potential to cause hemolysis and thrombosis during hypothermic cardiac surgery. Antiphospholipid syndrome is also rare disease with hypercoagulation tendacy. Perioperative management of both these diseases is challenging. We present successful perioperative management of high risk Bentall surgery in patient with both these dreadful diseases. PMID:27578899

  9. Patient Positioning and Skin Sequelae: Ischemic Epidermal Necrosis from Tight Padding During Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sadeghpour, Mona; Au, Jeremiah; Ho, Jonhan; Hyman, Jaime; Patton, Timothy

    2016-05-15

    Careful positioning and padding of pressure points during surgery are recommended to prevent pressure ulcers, vascular injury, and nerve damage in an immobilized patient. However, overpadding may have unintended consequences. We report a case of ischemia-induced full-thickness epidermal necrosis secondary to tight foam padding during a cardiac surgery. PMID:26934606

  10. [Palliative surgery for malignant bowel obstruction in patients with advanced and recurrent gastroenterological cancer].

    PubMed

    Kitani, Kotaro; Yukawa, Masao; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Tsujie, Masanori; Hara, Joji; Ikeda, Mitsunori; Sato, Katsuaki; Isono, Sayuri; Kawai, Kenji; Miura, Ken; Watatani, Masahiro; Inoue, Masatoshi

    2013-11-01

    We report the outcomes of palliative surgery for the treatment of malignant bowel obstruction in patients with advanced gastroenterological cancer. We studied 20 patients who had undergone palliative surgery over 3 years. We analyzed the clinical findings, surgical procedure, postoperative clinical course, and prognosis. The origin of the patients was colorectal cancer( 9 cases), gastric cancer( 4 cases), uterine cancer( 3 cases), pancreatic cancer( 2 cases), bladder( 1 case), and anal cancer (1 case). Small bowel obstruction was noted in 8 cases and colorectal obstruction was noted in 14 cases. Colostomy was performed in 13 cases, resection and reconstruction were performed in 6 cases, and bypass was performed in 4 cases. Ninety percent of the patients were able to eat solid food following the surgery, but 20% of the patients were forced to have bowel obstruction. The median survival time after palliative surgery was 3 (range, 0-15) months, and 6 patients (30%) died within 2 months. We concluded that palliative surgery for the treatment of malignant bowel obstruction could improve the patients' quality of life. The decision for performing palliative surgery should be made while considering the patient's prognosis, wishes, and potential for symptom improvement. PMID:24393893

  11. Surgery is an essential component of multimodality therapy for patients with locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Correa, Arlene M.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Welsh, James W.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CXRT) has raised questions regarding the additional benefit of surgery after locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma patients achieve a clinical response to CXRT. We sought to quantify the value of surgery by comparing the overall (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of trimodality eligible patients treated with definitive CXRT versus CXRT followed by esophagectomy. Methods We identified 143 clinical stage III esophageal adenocarcinoma patients that were eligible for trimodality therapy. All patients successfully completed neoadjuvant CXRT and were considered appropriate candidates for resection. Patients that were medically inoperable were excluded. Cox regression models were used to identify significant predictors of survival. Results Among the 143 patients eligible for surgery after completing CXRT, 114 underwent resection and 29 did not. Poorly differentiated tumors (HR=2.041, 95% CI 1.235–3.373) and surgical resection (HR=0.504, 95% CI 0.283–0.899) were the only independent predictors of OS. Patients treated with surgery had a 50% and 54% risk reduction in overall and cancer-specific mortality, respectively. Median OS (41.2 months vs. 20.3 months, p=0.012) and DFS (21.5 months vs. 11.4 months, p=0.007) were significantly improved with the addition of surgery compared to definitive CXRT. Conclusions Surgery provides a significant survival benefit to trimodality-eligible esophageal adenocarcinoma patients with locally advanced disease. PMID:23715646

  12. Comparison between Subjective Sensations during First and Second Phacoemulsification Eye Surgeries in Patients with Bilateral Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji-guo; Ye, Ting; Huang, Qing; Feng, Yi-fan; Wang, Jue; Fu, Xun-an; Xiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate and compare the subjective sensations reported by patients during first and second cataract extractions. Methods. Consecutive patients undergoing bilateral sequential cataract extraction using phacoemulsification were recruited. Following cataract surgery, patients completed questionnaires designed to evaluate subjective sensations, including anxiety, eye bulges, pain, and light sensitivity. Changes in painful sensations experienced by patients between the two surgeries were also recorded. Comparisons were also performed for each subjective sensation between different age groups (<50, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and >79 years). Results. A total of 127 patients were included in the final evaluation. Statistical comparison of the results showed that there were significant differences in perception of anxiety, eye bulges, and pain scores between the first and second cataract surgeries (P < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant difference for light sensitivity scores between the two surgeries (P = 0.555). The differences in anxiety, perception of eye bulges, pain, and light sensitivity scores between both the surgeries showed no correlation with age (P > 0.05 for all). Conclusions. Our research confirms the common observation that patients with bilateral cataracts often report more ocular discomfort during the second surgery. There are, therefore, additional factors that should be considered upon treating patients with bilateral cataracts, and the provision of preoperative counseling could play an important role in providing adequate patient care. PMID:27239336

  13. Comparison between Subjective Sensations during First and Second Phacoemulsification Eye Surgeries in Patients with Bilateral Cataract.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Guo; Ye, Ting; Huang, Qing; Feng, Yi-Fan; Wang, Jue; Fu, Xun-An; Xiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate and compare the subjective sensations reported by patients during first and second cataract extractions. Methods. Consecutive patients undergoing bilateral sequential cataract extraction using phacoemulsification were recruited. Following cataract surgery, patients completed questionnaires designed to evaluate subjective sensations, including anxiety, eye bulges, pain, and light sensitivity. Changes in painful sensations experienced by patients between the two surgeries were also recorded. Comparisons were also performed for each subjective sensation between different age groups (<50, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, and >79 years). Results. A total of 127 patients were included in the final evaluation. Statistical comparison of the results showed that there were significant differences in perception of anxiety, eye bulges, and pain scores between the first and second cataract surgeries (P < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant difference for light sensitivity scores between the two surgeries (P = 0.555). The differences in anxiety, perception of eye bulges, pain, and light sensitivity scores between both the surgeries showed no correlation with age (P > 0.05 for all). Conclusions. Our research confirms the common observation that patients with bilateral cataracts often report more ocular discomfort during the second surgery. There are, therefore, additional factors that should be considered upon treating patients with bilateral cataracts, and the provision of preoperative counseling could play an important role in providing adequate patient care. PMID:27239336

  14. Improved Outcomes Associated with Higher Surgery Rates for Older Patients with Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Stacy W.; Landrum, Mary Beth; Lamont, Elizabeth B.; McNeil, Barbara J.; Jaklitsch, Michael T.; Keating, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although surgery offers the greatest chance of cure for patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), older and sicker patients often fail to undergo resection. The benefits of surgery in older patients and patients with multiple co-morbidities are uncertain. Methods We identified a national cohort of 17,638 Medicare beneficiaries, aged ≥66 years living in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) areas who were diagnosed with stage I or II NSCLC during 2001–2005. We compared areas with high and low rates of curative surgery for early-stage lung cancer to estimate the effectiveness of surgery in older and sicker patients. We used logistic regression models to assess mortality by quintile of area-level surgery rates, adjusting for potential confounders. Findings Fewer than 63% of patients underwent surgery in low-surgery areas while >79% underwent surgery in high-surgery areas. High-surgery areas operated on more patients with advanced age and COPD than low-surgery areas. Adjusted all-cause one year mortality was 18.0% in high-surgery areas vs. 22.8% in low-surgery areas (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.86–0.93) for each 10% increase in surgery rates). One year lung-cancer-specific mortality was similarly lower in high-versus low-surgery areas (12.0% versus 16.9%), adjusted OR=0.86 (95% CI 0.82–0.91) for each 10% increase in surgery rates. Interpretations Higher rates of surgery for stage I/II NSCLC are associated with improved survival, even when older patients and sicker patients undergo resection. More work is needed to identify and reduce barriers to surgery for early-stage NSCLC. PMID:21800285

  15. Assessing Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Orthognathic Surgery and Osseous Genioplasty.

    PubMed

    Schwitzer, Jonathan A; Albino, Frank P; Mathis, Ryan K; Scott, Amie M; Gamble, Laurie; Baker, Stephen B

    2015-11-01

    Primary outcomes for orthognathic surgery and genioplasty patients include satisfaction with appearance, improved motor function, and enhanced quality of life. The goal of this study was to assess outcomes among patients undergoing these procedures, and to highlight the potential use of FACE-Q instrument for use in patients with dentofacial deformities. A total of 56 patients presenting for orthognathic surgery and/or osseous genioplasty completed the FACE-Q during preoperative and/or at postoperative visits. FACE-Q scores increased following surgery in satisfaction with facial appearance overall (+24.5, P < 0.01), satisfaction with lower face and jawline (+40.7, P < 0.01), and in all satisfaction with chin items (profile, prominence, shape, and overall). Patients also demonstrated increased social confidence (+8.9, P = 0.29). There was no improvement in psychologic well-being (-0.8, P = 0.92). All 3 surgical groups of patients experienced gains in satisfaction with appearance following surgery. Patients who underwent orthognathic surgery either alone or in combination with genioplasty demonstrated statistically significant improvements in satisfaction with facial appearance overall (P < 0.01 for both groups), whereas patients who underwent genioplasty alone did not (P = 0.13). In addition, patients who underwent orthognathic surgery combined with genioplasty demonstrated greater improvement in satisfaction with chin than patients who underwent genioplasty alone. In conclusion, patients who underwent orthognathic surgery and/or genioplasty demonstrated improvement in appearance and social confidence. The use of this model supports the successful outcomes possible for patients undergoing these procedures. PMID:26501967

  16. Interest, views and perceived barriers to bariatric surgery in patients with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Wharton, S; Serodio, K J; Kuk, J L; Sivapalan, N; Craik, A; Aarts, M-A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the interest, views and patient-perceived barriers to bariatric surgery among surgery-eligible patients. Surveys were completed at a weight management clinic and local hospital in Ontario, Canada. Patients were ≥18 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) >40 kg m(-2) or BMI > 35 kg m(-2) with ≥1 comorbidity. The sample included 105 participants, 73.3% female, with a mean BMI of 46.6 ± 7.1 kg m(-2) . Only 33.3% of participants were interested in surgery; 50.5% of participants were not interested and 16.2% had mixed feelings. Participants identified risks (69.5%) and side effects (57.1%) as significant surgical barriers. Interested participants were more likely to perceive themselves as obese, were unhappy with their current weight loss method and were less likely to fear surgery (P < 0.05). The prevalence of comorbidities was not different by surgical interest (P = 0.17). Despite the effectiveness of bariatric surgery, the majority of qualified patients are not interested in surgery mainly due to the perceived risk of surgery in general and satisfaction with current non-surgical weight loss efforts. The self-perception of obesity, as opposed to medical comorbidities, may be a stronger driver of the decision to have bariatric surgery. It is unclear if patients are aware of the effectiveness of bariatric surgery to help improve comorbidities or if bariatric surgery is perceived as being more cosmetic in nature. PMID:26910303

  17. The Body Image Dissatisfaction and Psychological Symptoms among Invasive and Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Y. Yazdandoost, Rokhsareh; Hayatbini, Niki; Asgharnejad Farid, Ali Asghar; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Latifi, Noor Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elective aesthetic surgeries are increasing in the Iranian population with reasons linked to body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms. This study compared the body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms among invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery patients and a control group. METHODS Data from 90 participants (invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, minimally invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, and control group=30 Ss) were included. Subjects were assessed on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms to provide an evidence for a continuum of body image dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity in invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery clients. RESULTS Between the three groups of invasive, minimally invasive aesthetic surgeries and control on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms (anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity), there was a significant difference. CONCLUSION These findings have implications for pre-surgical assessment as well as psychological interventions rather than invasive medical interventions at first step.

  18. Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 August 2013 (historical) Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients Many ... arthroscopic partial meniscectomy that involves surgically removing the torn part of the meniscus and stabilizing it, or ...

  19. Self-perception and self-esteem of patients seeking cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, G A; Rossano, F; D'Andrea, F

    2005-01-01

    Cosmetic surgery represents a particular application of plastic surgery, in which the operative competence of the discipline is focused not on the correction of pathological disorders, but on the correction of some morphologic traits not accepted by the patients, or not adherent with the aesthetic canons of the time, although they are absolutely compatible with the norm. As a consequence, cosmetic surgery recognizes subjective indications. According to a particular literature on the subject, patients seeking these interventions would live a dualism between (their own) body image and inner self-image. Very psychotic case histories would come out of this. A base psychological approach adopted by the surgeon, competent both in the surgical and the psychological level, is absolutely needed. In this study, the psychological features of patients seeking cosmetic surgery were explored in an attempt to define common profiles or prevalent characteristics, and to isolate major psychiatric disorders. Patient self-esteem and physical self-perception also were investigated. PMID:15959689

  20. Secondary pouchitis in a pediatric patient successfully treated by salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yoshiki; Araki, Toshimitsu; Uchida, Keiichi; Matsushita, Kohei; Kawamura, Mikio; Koike, Yuhki; Otake, Kohei; Inoue, Mikihiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Ohi, Masaki; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2016-07-01

    Apart from primary pouchitis, patients with secondary pouchitis caused by surgical complications require surgical management. The use of abdomino-anal salvage surgery to treat secondary pouchitis caused by surgical complications in pediatric patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) has not been reported in detail. A girl was diagnosed with UC at 8 years old. She underwent restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) at 9 years old. She presented at 12 years old because of chronic antibiotic-refractory pouchitis. The fistula and stricture failed to improve despite multiple local salvage surgeries and ileostomy construction. At 15 years old, she underwent redo IPAA. The patient was well at 20 years old with no signs of pouchitis. Early treatment by abdomino-anal salvage surgery might be indicated to improve quality of life in pediatric patients with secondary pouchitis caused by surgical complication unresponsive to defunctioning and local salvage surgery. PMID:27097567

  1. The Role of Surgery in the Management of Patients With Refractory Chronic Granulomatous Disease Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Downing, Melissa M.; Kamal, Natasha; Inchauste, Suzanne M.; Khangura, Sajneet K.; Malech, Harry L.; Holland, Steven M.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Heller, Theo; Sherry, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic granulomatous disease is a rare immunodeficiency complicated by dysregulated inflammation and granulomatous complications of the gastrointestinal tract. The management of chronic granulomatous disease colitis presents the dilemma of an immunocompromised host requiring immunosuppressive therapy which can potentiate fatal infections. Objective To identify the types of gastrointestinal surgery performed in patients and determine the role of surgery in the management of refractory colitis. Design and Settings A retrospective single institution chart review was performed. Patients Of 268 patients with chronic granulomatous disease treated at the National Institutes of Health between 1985 and 2011, 98 (37%) were identified as having colitis; 27 (10%) had a history of gastrointestinal luminal surgery. Main outcome measures Patient characteristics, type of gastrointestinal surgery and clinical outcomes were documented. Results A total of 62 gastrointestinal luminal surgeries were performed in 27 patients with chronic granulomatous disease and colitis. All 27 had a history of perineal disease requiring intervention. Four (15%) had additional surgery performed for reasons other than colitis. Otherwise, 12 (44%) had surgery limited to the perineum, 2 (7%) had a segmental resection and 13 (48%) underwent fecal diversion with ileostomy or colostomy. Despite local procedures, 7 (58%) patients in the perineal only group remained symptomatic. Both patients with a segmental resection had persistent perineal disease and 1 had a recurrent colovesicular fistula. Of the 13 ostomy patients, 11 initially received a diverting ostomy. Eight (73%) of these ultimately required additional procedures for refractory disease and 4 (36%) developed peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum. Four patients who underwent proctocolectomy with end ileostomy, either initially (2) or as a definitive procedure (2), experienced resolution of colitis and perineal disease. Limitations This study is

  2. Oral surgery under local anesthesia with dexmedetomidine sedation in a morbidly obese patient with aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a morbidly obese man with an aortic aneurysm, in whom dental surgery was performed before elective cardiac surgery. His aortic aneurysm required emergency surgery. However, because of his morbid obesity, elective cardiac surgery was planned. Considering the high risk of infective endocarditis, dental surgery was required. Our patient was at a high risk of aortic rupture caused by hypertension and breathing difficulty in the supine position. Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is an anti-anxiety, sedative, and analgesic medicine that can stabilize circulatory dynamics and minimize blood pressure fluctuations. We administered intravenous DEX for sedation of the patient in Fowler's position. In conclusion, our understanding of the risk factors of DEX enabled us to perform safe invasive oral treatment. PMID:27429939

  3. Post-Cataract Surgery Visual Disturbance in a Retinitis Pigmentosa Patient with Asteroid Hyalosis

    PubMed Central

    Jingami, Yoko; Otani, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Makiyama, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2011-01-01

    A patient with retinitis pigmentosa showed visual disturbances following successful cataract surgery. He had a dense asteroid hyalosis in the eye before cataract surgery. After the surgery he noticed that his vision became worse. The visual disturbance was explained as being caused by the progression of retinal degeneration. Although the electroretinogram was non-recordable, the degeneration of macular area appeared relatively small. We considered that dense asteroid hyalosis was responsible for his visual disturbances, and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed to remove the asteroid hyalosis. After the PPV, rapid improvement of his visual acuity was observed. Cataract surgery may affect the status of asteroid hyalosis and cause rapid visual loss. PPV should be considered for retinitis pigmentosa patients with dense asteroid hyalosis, especially when a large decrease in visual acuity is noted shortly after cataract surgery. PMID:21941506

  4. Association Between Patient-Reported Measures of Psychological Distress and Patient Satisfaction Scores in a Spine Surgery Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, A.M.; Brodke, D.S.; Lawrence, B.D.; Zhang, C.; Spiker, W.R.

    2015-01-01

    Update This article was updated on June 10, 2015, because of previous errors. The title had previously read “Association Between Patient-Reported Measures of Psychological Distress and Patient Satisfaction Scores After Spine Surgery.” It has been changed to “Association Between Patient-Reported Measures of Psychological Distress and Patient Satisfaction Scores in a Spine Surgery Patient Population” to reflect the fact that not all patients had undergone surgery when they completed their questionnaires. The last sentence in the Background paragraph of the Abstract had previously read “The goal of this study was to determine whether psychological distress influences outpatient satisfaction scores following spine surgery.” It now reads “The goal of this study was to determine whether psychological distress influences outpatient satisfaction scores in a spine surgery patient population.” The last sentence before the Materials and Methods section, which previously read “Our aim in conducting this study was to determine whether psychological distress, as measured with the Distress and Risk Assessment Method (DRAM) questionnaire, influences outpatient satisfaction scores following spine surgery,” now reads: “Our aim in conducting this study was to determine whether psychological distress, as measured with the Distress and Risk Assessment Method (DRAM) questionnaire, influences outpatient satisfaction scores in a spine surgery patient population.” Finally, the second sentence in the Materials and Methods section, “Every patient who completed both a patient satisfaction survey and a DRAM questionnaire for the same encounter at any point during the study period was included in this study,” has been changed to “Every patient who completed both a patient satisfaction survey and a DRAM questionnaire for the same encounter, before or after the surgery, at any point during the study period was included in this study.” An erratum has been published

  5. Postoperative Risk of Hepatic Decompensation after Orthopedic Surgery in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Eric M.; Batech, Michael; Cheetham, T. Craig; Pio, Jose R.; Caparosa, Susan L.; Chocas, Mary Alice; Singh, Anshuman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Previous studies have shown increased hepatic decompensation in patients with cirrhosis undergoing surgery. However, there are little data available in cirrhotics undergoing orthopedic surgery compared to cirrhotics who did not undergo surgery. The aim of this study was to examine the demographics, comorbid conditions, and clinical factors associated with hepatic decompensation within 90 days in cirrhotics who underwent orthopedic surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective matched cohort study. Inclusion criteria were cirrhosis diagnosis, age > 18 years, ≥ 6 months continuous health plan membership, and a procedure code for orthopedic surgery. Up to five cirrhotic controls without orthopedic surgery were matched on age, gender, and cirrhosis diagnosis date. Data abstraction was performed for demographics, socioeconomics, clinical, and decompensation data. Chart review was performed for validation. Multivariable analysis estimated relative risk of decompensation. Results: Eight hundred fifty-three orthopedic surgery cases in cirrhotics were matched with 4,263 cirrhotic controls. Among the cases and matched controls, the mean age was 60.5 years, and 52.2% were female. Within 90 days after surgery, cases had more decompensation compared to matched controls (12.8% vs 4.9%). Using multivariable analysis, orthopedic surgery, a 0.5 g/dL decrease in serum albumin, and a 1-unit increase in Charlson Comorbidity Index were associated with a significant increase in decompensation within 90 days of surgery. Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and chronic kidney disease were seen with increased frequency in cases vs. matched controls. Conclusions: Cirrhotics who underwent orthopedic surgery had a significant increase in hepatic decompensation within 90 days of surgery compared to matched controls. An incremental decrease in serum albumin and an incremental increase in the Charlson Comorbidity Index were significantly associated with

  6. Alveolar recruitment maneuver and perioperative ventilatory support in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Forgiarini Júnior, Luiz Alberto; Rezende, Juliana Castilhos; Forgiarini, Soraia Genebra Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The development of abdominal surgery represents an alternative therapy for the morbidly obese; however, patients undergoing this surgical procedure often experience postoperative pulmonary complications. The use of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and/or perioperative ventilatory strategies is a possible alternative to reduce these complications, focusing on the reduction of postoperative pulmonary complications. In this review, the benefits of perioperative ventilatory strategies and the implementation of alveolar recruitment maneuvers in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery are described. PMID:24553513

  7. Alveolar recruitment maneuver and perioperative ventilatory support in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Forgiarini Júnior, Luiz Alberto; Rezende, Juliana Castilhos; Forgiarini, Soraia Genebra Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The development of abdominal surgery represents an alternative therapy for the morbidly obese; however, patients undergoing this surgical procedure often experience postoperative pulmonary complications. The use of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and/or perioperative ventilatory strategies is a possible alternative to reduce these complications, focusing on the reduction of postoperative pulmonary complications. In this review, the benefits of perioperative ventilatory strategies and the implementation of alveolar recruitment maneuvers in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery are described. PMID:24553513

  8. Incidence and Impact of Patient-Prosthesis Mismatch in Isolated Aortic Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dumani, Selman; Likaj, Ermal; Kacani, Andi; Dibra, Laureta; Petrela, Elizana; Beca, Vera; Refatllari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The mains topics of this work are the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch and the influence in the early results of isolated aortic valve surgery. METHODS: In 193 patients isolated aortic valve surgery was performed. The study population was divided in three subgroups: 20 patients with severe, 131 patients with moderate and 42 patients without patient-prosthesis mismatch. The indexed effective orifice area was used to define the subgroups. Operative mortality and perioperative complications were considered the indicators of the early results of aortic valve surgery. RESULTS: The incidence of severe and moderate patient-prosthesis mismatch was respectively 10.3% and 67.8%. Hospital mortality and perioperative complications were: mortality 5% vs. 3.1% vs. 2.4% (p = 0.855), low cardiac output 5% vs. 6.9% vs. 4.8% (p = 0.861); pulmonary complications 5% vs. 3.1 vs. 0.0% (p = 0.430); exploration for bleeding 5% vs. 0.8% vs. 2.4% (p = 0.319); atrial fibrillation 30% vs. 19.8% vs. 11.9% (p = 0.225); wound infection 5% vs. 0.8% vs. 0.00% (p = 0.165), respectively for the group with severe, moderate and without patient-prosthesis mismatch. CONCLUSIONS: Patient-prosthesis mismatch is a common occurrence in aortic valve surgery. This phenomenon does not affect the early results of aortic valve surgery.

  9. Reducing neck incision length during thyroid surgery does not improve satisfaction in patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Mo; Chun, Ki Won; Chang, Ho Jin; Kim, Bup-Woo; Lee, Yong Sang; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative neck cosmesis is a major concern of patients undergoing thyroid surgery. Patients will likely be more satisfied with the long-term cosmetic appearance of smaller than larger thyroidectomy scars. We, therefore, investigated the relationship between scar length following conventional thyroid surgery and patient satisfaction. An anonymous scar-assessment questionnaire was administered to patients who underwent conventional thyroid surgery. The 2,041 patients were asked to rate their satisfaction with their scars on a ten-point Likert scale, with one being very unsatisfied and ten being very satisfied. The mean satisfaction score was significantly lower in the benign condition than in malignancy (6.9 ± 2.5 vs. 7.4 ± 2.5; p = 0.021), whereas there were no differences in satisfaction score among subgroups of patients with benign condition (p = 0.837). In patients with thyroid cancer, the mean satisfaction scores were similar among subgroups according to operation type and scar length (p = 0.820). Incision length was not associated with patient satisfaction in thyroid surgery patients and therefore may not be critical in decision making for thyroid cancer surgery. PMID:24993659

  10. Overuse of surgery in patients with pancreatic cancer. A nationwide analysis in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Balzano, Gianpaolo; Capretti, Giovanni; Callea, Giuditta; Cantù, Elena; Carle, Flavia; Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Background According to current guidelines, pancreatic cancer patients should be strictly selected for surgery, either palliative or resective. Methods Population-based study, including all patients undergoing surgery for pancreatic cancer in Italy between 2010 and 2012. Hospitals were divided into five volume groups (quintiles), to search for differences among volume categories. Results There were 544 hospitals performing 10 936 pancreatic cancer operations. The probability of undergoing palliative/explorative surgery was inversely related to volume, being 24.4% in very high-volume hospitals and 62.5% in very low-volume centres (adjusted OR 5.175). Contrarily, the resection rate in patients without metastases decreased from 86.9% to 46.1% (adjusted OR 7.429). As for resections, the mortality of non-resective surgery was inversely related to volume (p < 0.001). Surprisingly, mortality of non-resective surgery was higher than that for resections (8.2% vs. 6.7%; p < 0.01). Approximately 9% of all resections were performed on patients with distant metastases, irrespective of hospital volume group. The excess cost for the National Health System from surgery overuse was estimated at 12.5 million euro. Discussion. Discrepancies between guidelines on pancreatic cancer treatment and surgical practice were observed. An overuse of surgery was detected, with serious clinical and economic consequences. PMID:27154812

  11. Paediatric cardiac surgery in a patient with cold agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomomi; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Maruo, Ayako; Matsuhisa, Hironori

    2012-03-01

    Cold agglutinins (CAs) lead to organ thrombosis or haemolysis due to increased blood viscosity and red blood cell clumping when blood temperature drops below the thermal amplitude for haemagglutination. Although it is well known that CAs are particularly relevant to adult cardiac surgery with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), paediatric cardiac surgery with congenital heart disease and with CAs has been reported very rarely. We present here a case of paediatric cardiac surgery to repair atrial septal defect with pulmonary stenosis in an 11-month old infant with a family history of CAs. She was detected to have a high titre of CAs preoperatively, and underwent an intracardiac repair with normothermic CPB using temporary electrical fibrillation for added safety. Her post-operative course was uneventful without any complications. PMID:22184466

  12. Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery in Pediatric Patients: The Taiwan Experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Kai; Chou, Chieh; Li, Chung-Liang; Chiu, Hui-Gin; Chang, Yu-Tang

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive technology or laparoscopic surgery underwent a major breakthrough over the past two decades. The first experience of thoracoscopy in children was reported around 1980 for diagnosis of intrathoracic pathology and neoplasia. Up until the middle of the 1990s, the surgical community in Taiwan was still not well prepared to accept the coming era of minimally invasive surgery. In the beginning, laparoscopy was performed in only a few specialties and only relatively short or simple surgeries were considered. But now, the Taiwan's experiences over the several different clinical scenarios were dramatically increased. Therefore, we elaborated on the experience about pectus excavatum: Nuss procedure, primary spontaneous hemopneumothorax, thoracoscopic thymectomy, and empyema in Taiwan. PMID:23819123

  13. Postpancreatectomy Hemorrhage After Pancreatic Surgery in Patients Receiving Anticoagulation or Antiplatelet Agents.

    PubMed

    Mita, Kazuhito; Ito, Hideto; Takahashi, Koudai; Hashimoto, Masatoshi; Nagayasu, Kiichi; Murabayashi, Ryo; Asakawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Kazuya; Hayashi, Takashi; Fujino, Keiichi

    2016-06-01

    Background Postpancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH) is a serious complication after pancreatic surgery. In this study, we evaluated PPH and thromboembolic complications after pancreatic surgery in patients with perioperative antithrombotic treatment. Methods Medical records of patients undergoing pancreatic surgery were reviewed retrospectively. Patients receiving thromboprophylaxis were given either bridging therapy with unfractionated heparin or continued on aspirin as perioperative antithrombotic treatment according to clinical indications and published recommendations. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery definition of PPH was used. Risk factors associated with PPH were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results Thirty-four of 158 patients received perioperative antithrombotic treatment; this group had a significantly higher PPH rate (29.4% vs 6.5%, P = .001) and mortality (11.8% vs 2.4%, P = .039) than patients not receiving thromboprophylaxis. Multivariate analysis revealed that perioperative antithrombotic treatment was the only independent risk factor for PPH after pancreatic surgery (odds ratio 4.77; 95% CI 1.61-14.15; P = .005). Conclusions Perioperative antithrombotic treatment is an independent risk factor for PPH in patients undergoing pancreatic surgery, although this treatment effectively prevents postoperative thromboembolic events. PMID:26611788

  14. The Physiologic and Anesthetic Considerations in Elderly Patients Undergoing Robotic Renal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vasdev, Nikhil; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Gowrie-Mohan, S; Lane, Tim; Boustead, Gregory; Hanbury, Damian; Adshead, James M

    2014-01-01

    A number of patients are diagnosed with renal malignancies incidentally worldwide. Once a diagnosis of a renal malignancy is established, after a careful evaluation, patients can be offered a robotic nephrectomy or partial nephrectomy. We present a review of the physiologic and anesthetic considerations in elderly patients who are being considered for robotic renal surgery. PMID:24791150

  15. Single-port versus multi-port laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Tokuoka, Masayoshi; Ide, Yoshihito; Takeda, Mitsunobu; Hirose, Hajime; Hashimoto, Yasuji; Matsuyama, Jin; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Fukushima, Yukio; Sasaki, Yo

    2016-01-01

    The safety of single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SLS) in elderly patients with colorectal cancer has not been established. The aim of the current study was to compare the outcomes of SLS and multi-port laparoscopic surgery (MLS) and to assess the feasibility of SLS in colorectal cancer patients aged ≥70 years. A retrospective case-control study of colon cancer patients undergoing elective surgical intervention between 2011 and 2014 was conducted. A total of 129 patients with colon cancer underwent surgery and were included in the analysis. Data regarding patient demographics, surgical variables, oncological outcomes and short-term outcomes were evaluated for statistical significance to compare MLS (n=79) and SLS (n=50) in colon cancer patients. No significant differences were observed in patient characteristics. No case required re-admission within 30 days post surgery. The mean surgery times were similar for the MLS and SLS groups when cases with left and right hemicolectomies were combined (207.7 and 215.9 min, respectively; P=0.47). In addition, overall perioperative outcomes, including blood loss, number of lymph nodes harvested, size of the surgical margin and complications, were similar between these groups. Thus, we suggest that SLS can be performed safely in elderly patients with colon cancer. PMID:27446454

  16. Gender Reassignment Surgery in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-An; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that surgery on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is dangerous and should be avoided due to the possibility of postoperative infection of the patients or HIV occupational transmission to the medical staff. We discuss here the preparations and measures needed to conduct surgery safely on HIV-positive patients, based on our experience. We performed sex reassignment surgery on two HIV-positive patients from January 2013 to January 2015. Both of them were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy and were asymptomatic, with a normal CD4 count (>500 cells/µL). The HIV-RNA was undetectable within the bloodstream. All the staff wore protective clothing, glasses, and three pairs of protective gloves in the operating room because of the possibility of transmission. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered to the patients, and antiviral therapy was performed during their perioperative course. Neither of the patients had postoperative complications, and none of the medical staff experienced accidental exposure. Both patients had satisfactory surgery outcomes without complications. HIV-positive patients can undergo surgery safely without increased risk of postoperative complications or HIV transmission to the staff through the proper use of antibiotics, active antiretroviral therapy, and supplemental protective measures with post-exposure prophylaxis for the staff in case of HIV exposure. PMID:26618127

  17. Gender Reassignment Surgery in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Kwun; Choi, Ji-An; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2015-11-01

    It is believed that surgery on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is dangerous and should be avoided due to the possibility of postoperative infection of the patients or HIV occupational transmission to the medical staff. We discuss here the preparations and measures needed to conduct surgery safely on HIV-positive patients, based on our experience. We performed sex reassignment surgery on two HIV-positive patients from January 2013 to January 2015. Both of them were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy and were asymptomatic, with a normal CD4 count (>500 cells/µL). The HIV-RNA was undetectable within the bloodstream. All the staff wore protective clothing, glasses, and three pairs of protective gloves in the operating room because of the possibility of transmission. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered to the patients, and antiviral therapy was performed during their perioperative course. Neither of the patients had postoperative complications, and none of the medical staff experienced accidental exposure. Both patients had satisfactory surgery outcomes without complications. HIV-positive patients can undergo surgery safely without increased risk of postoperative complications or HIV transmission to the staff through the proper use of antibiotics, active antiretroviral therapy, and supplemental protective measures with post-exposure prophylaxis for the staff in case of HIV exposure. PMID:26618127

  18. Obese patients have similar short-term outcomes to non-obese in laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Manish; De’Ath, Henry D; Siddiqui, Muhammed; Mehta, Chetanya; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Bromilow, James; Qureshi, Tahseen

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether obese patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery within an enhanced recovery program had worse short-term outcomes. METHODS: A prospective study of consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection was carried out between 2008 and 2011 in a single institution. Patients were divided in groups based on body mass index (BMI). Short-term outcomes including operative data, length of stay, complications and readmission rates were recorded and compared between the groups. Continuous data were analysed using t-test or one-way Analysis of Variance. χ2 test was used to compare categorical data. RESULTS: Two hundred and fifty four patients were included over the study period. The majority of individuals (41.7%) recruited were of a healthy weight (BMI < 25), whilst 50 patients were classified as obese (19.6%). Patients were matched in terms of the presence of co-morbidities and previous abdominal surgery. Obese patients were found to have a statistically significant difference in The American Society of Anesthesiologists grade. Length of surgery and intra-operative blood loss were no different according to BMI. CONCLUSION: Obesity (BMI > 25) does not lead to worse short-term outcomes in laparoscopic colorectal surgery and therefore such patients should not be precluded from laparoscopic surgery. PMID:26527560

  19. Risks of packed red blood cell transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David R

    2012-12-01

    Packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion is common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Evidence has accumulated demonstrating that such patients can tolerate relatively low hemoglobins, and an extensive body of literature has developed demonstrating that patients undergoing such surgery who receive PRBC are at risk for several adverse outcomes including increased mortality, atrial fibrillation, and more postoperative infections, as well as numerous other complications. The PubMed database was searched for the English language literature on the topic of PRBC transfusion and outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, as well as alternatives to this intervention. Data were reviewed to assess the impact of transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery on mortality, cardiac, infectious, and pulmonary, as well as a variety of miscellaneous complications. Patients receiving PRBC were consistently identified as being at higher risk for complications in all categories. The limited prospective data were consistent with the retrospective data, which comprised most of the literature. The preponderance of the literature suggests that patients undergoing cardiac surgery can tolerate lower hemoglobin/hematocrit values than traditionally appreciated. Most published data also indicate that PRBC transfusion should be reserved for patients with an identifiable clinical/physiologic indication fir this intervention, consistent with recent specialty society guidelines. PMID:22762927

  20. Laparoscopic surgery for patients with colorectal cancer produces better short-term outcomes with similar survival outcomes in elderly patients compared to open surgery.

    PubMed

    Moon, Soo Yun; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Soo Young; Han, Eon Chul; Kang, Sung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The number of operations on elderly colorectal cancer (CRC) patients has increased with the aging of the population. The aim of this study was to evaluate surgical outcomes in elderly patients who underwent laparoscopic or open surgery for CRC. We analyzed the data of 280 patients aged 80 or over who underwent surgery for CRC between January 2001 and December 2010. Seventy-one pairs were selected after propensity score matching for laparoscopic or open surgery. Operative time, return to normal bowel function, length of hospital stay, postoperative complications, overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and prognostic factors affecting survival were investigated. In matched cohorts, operative time in the laparoscopic group was longer than in the open group (P < 0.001). In the laparoscopic group, time to flatus passage (P < 0.001) and length of postoperative hospital stay (P = 0.037) were shorter than in the open group. The rate of operation-related morbidity was higher in the open group (P = 0.019). There was no difference in OS and RFS between two groups. This study suggests that laparoscopic surgery for CRC in elderly patients may be safe and feasible, with better short-term outcomes. OS and RFS, however, were not different in both groups. PMID:26923309

  1. Ocular risk management in patients undergoing general anesthesia: an analysis of 39,431 surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Kara-Junior, Newton; de Espindola, Rodrigo França; Filho, Joao Valverde; Rosa, Christiane Pellegrino; Ottoboni, Andre; Silva, Enis Donizete

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study sought to describe and analyze ocular findings associated with nonocular surgery in patients who underwent general anesthesia. METHODS: The authors retrospectively collected a series of 39,431 surgeries using standardized data forms. RESULTS: Ocular findings were reported in 9 cases (2.3:10,000), which involved patients with a mean age of 58.9±19.5 years. These cases involved patients classified as ASA I (33%), ASA II (55%) or ASA III (11%). General anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil was used in 4 cases, balanced general anesthesia was used in 4 cases, and regional block was used in combination with balanced general anesthesia in one case. Five patients (55%) underwent surgery in the supine position, one patient (11%) underwent surgery in the lithotomy position, two patients (22%) underwent surgery in the prone position, and one patient (11%) underwent surgery in the lateral position. Ocular hyperemia was detected in most (77%) of the 9 cases with ocular findings; pain/burning of the eyes, visual impairment, eye discharge and photophobia were observed in 55%, 11%, 11% and 11%, respectively, of these 9 cases. No cases involved permanent ocular injury or vision loss. CONCLUSION: Ophthalmological findings after surgeries were uncommon, and most of the included patients were relatively healthy. Minor complications, such as dehydration or superficial ocular trauma, should be prevented by following systematic protocols that provide appropriate ocular occlusion with a lubricating ointment and protect the eye with an acrylic occluder. These procedures will refine the quality of anesthesia services and avoid discomfort among patients, surgeons and anesthesia staff. PMID:26247665

  2. Reconstructive foot and ankle surgeries in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Ajit Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic foot and ankle deformities are secondary to long-standing diabetes and neglected foot care. The concept of surgical correction for these deformities is quite recent. The primary objective of reconstructive foot and ankle surgery is the reduction of increased plantar pressures, reduction of pain and the restoration of function, stability and proper appearance. Foot and ankle deformities can result in significant disability, loss of life style, employment and even the loss of the lower limb. Therefore, restoration of normal, problem free foot function and activities will have a significant impact on peoples’ lives. Reconstructive surgical procedures are complex and during reconstruction, internal and external fixation devices, including pins, compression screws, staples, and wires, may be used for repair and stabilization. The surgeries performed depend on the type and severity of the condition. Surgery can involve any part of the foot and ankle, and may involve tendon, bone, joint, tissue or skin repair. Corrective surgeries can at times be performed on an outpatient basis with minimally invasive techniques. Recovery time depends on the type of condition being treated. PMID:22279270

  3. Do Too Many Lung Cancer Patients Miss Out on Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... clear from the study that a more aggressive approach to surgery would in fact lead to longer survivals. "It is easy to imagine that surgeons were selecting out those in each stage which they thought would do better based upon variables not included in this study," he noted. It's " ...

  4. Cognitive Investigation Study of Patients Admitted for Cosmetic Surgery: Information, Expectations, and Consent for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cogliandro, Annalisa; La Monaca, Giuseppe; Tambone, Vittoradolfo; Persichetti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background In all branches of medicine, it is the surgeon's responsibility to provide the patient with accurate information before surgery. This is especially important in cosmetic surgery because the surgeon must focus on the aesthetic results desired by the patient. Methods An experimental protocol was developed based on an original questionnaire given to 72 patients. The nature of the responses, the patients' motivation and expectations, the degree of patient awareness regarding the planned operation, and the patients' perceptions of the purpose of the required consent for cosmetic surgery were all analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Results Candidates for abdominal wall surgery had significantly more preoperative psychological problems than their counterparts did (P=0.035). A significantly different percentage of patients under 40 years of age compared to those over 40 years of age searched for additional sources of information prior to the operation (P=0.046). Only 30% of patients with a lower educational background stated that the preoperative information had been adequate, whereas 92% of subjects with secondary schooling or a postsecondary degree felt that the information was sufficient (P=0.001). A statistically significant difference was also present between patients according to their educational background regarding expected improvements in their quality of life postoperatively (P=0.008). Conclusions This study suggests that patients require more attention in presurgical consultations and that clear communication should be prioritized to ensure that the surgeon understands the patient's expectations. PMID:25606489

  5. A Systematic Review of Applying Patient Satisfaction Outcomes in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, Philip J.; Pushman, Allison G.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background We performed a systematic review of patient satisfaction studies in the Plastic Surgery literature. The specific aim was to evaluate the status of satisfaction research that has been undertaken to date and to identify areas for improvement. Methods Four medical databases were searched using satisfaction and Plastic Surgery related search terms. Quality of selected articles was assessed by two trained reviewers. Results Out of the total of 2,936 articles gleaned by the search, 178 were included in the final review. The majority of the articles (58%) in our review examined patient satisfaction in breast surgery populations. Additionally, 53% of the articles were limited in scope and only measured features of care in one or two domains of satisfaction. Finally, the majority of the studies (68%) were based solely on the use of ad-hoc satisfaction measurement instruments that did not undergo a formal development. Conclusion Given the important policy implications of patient satisfaction data within Plastic Surgery, we found a need to further refine research on patient satisfaction in Plastic Surgery. The scarcity of satisfaction research in the craniofacial, hand, and other reconstructive specialties, as well as the narrow scope of satisfaction measurement and the use of unvalidated instruments are current barriers preventing Plastic Surgery patient satisfaction studies from producing meaningful results. PMID:20517109

  6. Single-Incision Single-Instrument Adnexal Surgery in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Loux, Tara; Falk, Gavin A.; Gaffley, Michaela; Ortega, Stephanie; Ramos, Carmen; Malvezzi, Leopoldo; Knight, Colin G.; Burnweit, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pediatric surgeons often practice pediatric gynecology. The single-incision single-instrument (SISI) technique used for appendectomy is applicable in gynecologic surgery. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the records of patients undergoing pelvic surgery from 2008 to 2013. SISI utilized a 12 mm transumbilical trocar and an operating endoscope. The adnexa can be detorsed intracorporeally or extracorporealized via the umbilicus for lesion removal. Results. We performed 271 ovarian or paraovarian surgeries in 258 patients. In 147 (54%), the initial approach was SISI; 75 cases (51%) were completed in patients aged from 1 day to 19.9 years and weighing 4.7 to 117 kg. Conversion to standard laparoscopy was due to contralateral oophoropexy, solid mass, inability to mobilize the adnexa, large mass, bleeding, adhesions, or better visualization. When SISI surgery was converted to Pfannenstiel, the principal reason was a solid mass. SISI surgery was significantly shorter than standard laparoscopy. There were no major complications and the overall cohort had an 11% minor complication rate. Conclusion. SISI adnexal surgery is safe, quick, inexpensive, and effective in pediatric patients. SISI was successful in over half the patients in whom it was attempted and offers a scarless result. If unsuccessful, the majority of cases can be completed with standard multiport laparoscopy. PMID:26557994

  7. Telephone follow-up for cataract surgery: feasibility and patient satisfaction study.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jeremy J S L; Pelosini, Lucia

    2016-05-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of telephone follow-up (TFU) after uncomplicated cataract surgery in low-risk patients and patient satisfaction with this alternative clinical pathway. Design/methodology/approach - Prospective, non-randomised cohort study. A ten-point subjective ophthalmic assessment questionnaire and a six-point patient satisfaction questionnaire were administered to patients following routine cataract surgery at two to three weeks post-procedure. All patients were offered a further clinic review if required. Exclusion criteria comprised ophthalmic co-morbidities, hearing/language impairment and high risk of post-operative complications. Patient notes were retrospectively reviewed over the study period to ensure no additional emergency attendances took place. Findings - Over three months, 50 eyes of 50 patients (mean age: 80; age range 60-91; 66 per cent second eye surgery) underwent uncomplicated phacoemulsification surgery received a TFU at 12-24 days (mean: 16 days) post-operatively. Subjective visual acuity was graded as good by 92 per cent of patients; 72 per cent patients reported no pain and 20 per cent reported mild occasional grittiness. Patient satisfaction was graded 8.9 out of 10; 81.6 per cent defined TFU as convenient and 75.5 per cent of patients preferred TFU to routine outpatient review. No additional visits were required. Research limitations/implications - Non-randomised with no control group; small sample size. One patient was unable to be contacted. Practical implications - Post-operative TFU can be suitably targeted to low-risk patients following uncomplicated cataract surgery. This study demonstrated a high patient satisfaction. A larger, randomised study is in progress to assess this further. Originality/value - This is the first study reporting TFU results and patient satisfaction to the usual alternative two-week outpatient review. PMID:27142949

  8. Patients Having Bariatric Surgery: Surgical Options in Morbidly Obese Patients with Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Braghetto, I; Csendes, A

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the currently knowledge and results observed in patients with obesity and Barrett's esophagus which were presented and discussed during the IFSO 2014 held in Montreal. In this meeting, the surgical options for the management after bariatric surgery were discussed. For this purpose, a complete revision of the available literature was done including Pubmed, Medline, Scielo database, own experience, and experts opinion. A total of 49 publications were reviewed and included in the present paper. The majority of authors agree that gastric bypass is the procedure of choice. Sleeve gastrectomy is not an absolute contraindication. Up to now, gastric bypass appears to be the best procedure for treatment of obese patients with Barrett's esophagus. Future investigations should give the definitive consensus. PMID:27167837

  9. Frequency & specificity of RBC alloantibodies in patients due for surgery in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Reyhaneh, Khademi; Ahmad, Gharehbaghian; Gharib, Karimi; Vida, Vafaiyan; Raheleh, Khademi; Mehdi, Tabrizi Namini

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Red blood cell alloimmunization is common in patients receiving multiple blood transfusions. Since the probability of repeat transfusion increases with longer life expectancy, it is important to study to which extent alloimmunized patients with a history of transfusion are prone to form alloantibodies after transfusion events. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the alloimmunization against RBCs among transfused patients who were to undergo elective surgery in Tehran, Iran. Methods: A total of 3092 occasionally transfused patients, who were to undergo elective surgery, in four hospitals in Tehran were included in the study. For patients with alloantibodies, the data about sex, date of birth, history of transfusion, surgery, abortion and alloantibody specificity were collected. Results: Clinically significant alloantibodies were found in 30 patients. The presence of positive antibodies in the patients for whom cross-match had been done was one per cent. Most of them had surgery history or transfusion record during the preceding year. The three most frequent alloantibodies were anti-K (23.53%), anti- E (20.59%) and anti-c (17.56%). Interpretation & conclusions: The most common clinically significant alloantibodies identified in men and women were anti-K and anti-E, respectively. The most common causes of alloimmunization for men were surgery history and transfusion record and for women pregnancy. PMID:24056603

  10. Effects of Parasternal Block on Acute and Chronic Pain in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Surgery.

    PubMed

    Doğan Bakı, Elif; Kavrut Ozturk, Nilgün; Ayoğlu, Rauf Umut; Emmiler, Mustafa; Karslı, Bilge; Uzel, Hanife

    2016-09-01

    Background Sternotomy causes considerable postoperative pain and postoperative pain management encompasses different analgesic regimens. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of peroperative parasternal block with levobupivacaine on acute and chronic pain after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Materials and Methods A total of 81 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery were included in this study. Patients were randomly allocated by opening an envelope to receive either parasternal block with pharmacologic analgesia (group P; before sternal wire placement: sternotomy and mediastinal tube sites were infiltrated with local anesthetics) or pharmacologic analgesia alone (group C) for postoperative pain relief. All patients received intravenous tramadol with patient-controlled analgesia at the end of the surgery. Demographic characteristics, vital signs, tramadol consumption, analgesic intake, and intensity of pain with a visual analogue scale were recorded for each patient. Six months after surgery, the patients' type of chronic pain was evaluated using the Leeds Assessment Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale questionnaire. Results Patients who received parasternal block experienced less pain and needed less opioid analgesic (125.75 ± 28.9 mg in group P vs 213.17 ± 61.25 mg in group C) for 24 hours postoperatively (P < .001). There was no significant difference in nociceptive and neuropathic pain between the groups. Conclusion Parasternal block had a benefical effect on the management of postoperative acute pain and decreased opioid consumption after surgery but had no significant effect in chronic post surgical pain. PMID:25900900

  11. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery: Informing healthcare practitioners and providers while improving patient safety.

    PubMed

    Jeevan, R; Birch, J; Armstrong, A P

    2011-02-01

    Travelling abroad for surgery is a phenomenon reported internationally. It is particularly likely for aesthetic procedures not undertaken routinely by national health services. We assessed the impact of these patients presenting to the UK National Health Service (NHS) with concerns or complications on their return. All 326 UK consultant members of the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS) were asked to complete a short questionnaire about patients that had presented to the NHS with complications or concerns following surgery abroad. The results were subsequently presented to the Department of Health (DH). 203 (62%) UK consultant plastic surgeons responded. 76 (37%) of the 203 respondents had seen such patients in their NHS practice, most commonly following breast or abdominal procedures. A quarter underwent emergency surgery, a third out-patient treatment and a third elective surgical revision. In response to these findings, the DH clarified that NHS teams should provide emergency care to such patients but should not undertake any elective revision procedures. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery may reduce its cost. However, aesthetic procedures have high minor complication rates, and peri-operative travel is associated with increased risks. Fully informed consent is unlikely when patients do not meet their surgeon prior to paying and travelling for surgery, and national health services are used to provide a free safety net on their return. To help minimise the potential risks, BAPRAS has clarified the responsibilities of the NHS and is acting to better inform UK patients considering travelling abroad. PMID:20462822

  12. Myenteric plexitis: A frequent feature in patients undergoing surgery for colonic diverticular disease

    PubMed Central

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Sidoni, Angelo; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Dore, Maria P; Binda, Gian A; Bandelloni, Roberto; Salemme, Marianna; Del Sordo, Rachele; Cadei, Moris; Manca, Alessandra; Bernardini, Nunzia; Maurer, Christoph A; Cathomas, Gieri

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticular disease of the colon is frequent in clinical practice, and a large number of patients each year undergo surgical procedures worldwide for their symptoms. Thus, there is a need for better knowledge of the basic pathophysiologic mechanisms of this disease entity. Objectives Because patients with colonic diverticular disease have been shown to display abnormalities of the enteric nervous system, we assessed the frequency of myenteric plexitis (i.e. the infiltration of myenteric ganglions by inflammatory cells) in patients undergoing surgery for this condition. Methods We analyzed archival resection samples from the proximal resection margins of 165 patients undergoing left hemicolectomy (60 emergency and 105 elective surgeries) for colonic diverticulitis, by histology and immunochemistry. Results Overall, plexitis was present in almost 40% of patients. It was subdivided into an eosinophilic (48%) and a lymphocytic (52%) subtype. Plexitis was more frequent in younger patients; and it was more frequent in those undergoing emergency surgery (50%), compared to elective (28%) surgery (p = 0.007). All the severe cases of plexitis displayed the lymphocytic subtype. Conclusions In conclusion, myenteric plexitis is frequent in patients with colonic diverticular disease needing surgery, and it might be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26668745

  13. Anesthetic challenges of patients with cardiac comorbidities undergoing major urologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac patient undergoing major urologic surgery is a complex case requiring a great attention by the anesthesiologist. Number of this group of patients having to go through this procedure is constantly increasing, due to prolonged life, increased agressiveness of surgery and increased anesthesia’s safety. The anesthesiologist usually has to deal with several problems of the patient, such as hypertension, chronic heart failure, coronary artery disease, rhythm disturbances, intraoperative hemodymanic changes, intraoperative bleeding, perioperative fluid imbalance, and metabolic disturbances. A cardiac patient undergoing major urologic surgery is a complex case requiring a great attention by the anesthesiologist. The scope of this review article is to present the most frequent issues encountered with this group of patients, and to synthetically discuss the respective strategies and maneuvers during perioperative period, which is the major challenge for the anesthesiologist. PMID:24791166

  14. Heart valve surgery in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease: A management strategy

    PubMed Central

    Moutaouekkil, El Mehdi; Najib, Abdelmalek; Ajaja, Rida; Arji, Moha; Slaoui, Anas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with the homozygous sickle cell disease have increased perioperative mortality. Some indications like heart valve surgery, may justify an exchange blood transfusion to reduce the proportion of hemoglobin S (HbS) and complications. Subjects and Methods: We report two female cases aged 20 and 27, of African origin with homozygous sickle cell anemia who underwent heart valve surgery to treat mitral valve regurgitation. This presentation describes the perioperative considerations including anesthesia and postoperative care. Results: A partial exchange blood transfusion decreased HbS levels from respectively, 90% and 84%, 9% to 27% and 34%, and simultaneously treated the anemia. Neither sickling crisis nor acidosis occurred in any patient, and no special postoperative complication occurred. Average hospital stay was 10 days. Currently, the two patients remain alive and free of cardiac symptoms. Discussion: Although the presence of sickle cell disorders is associated with increased risk of sickling and thus vaso-occlusive complications, they should not be taken as a contraindication for heart valve surgery. Nevertheless, monitoring of certain parameters such as venous, arterial oxygen content, pH, and body temperature is mandatory for a better outcome. Furthermore, preoperative exchange transfusion has a positive influence on the outcome of surgery and on the survival of patients undergoing heart valves surgery. Avoiding intraoperative hypoxia, hypothermia, and vaso-constrictive agents, minimizing HbS levels with preoperative exchange transfusion, and ensuring a stress-free environment with the judicious use of sedatives made surgery relatively safe in these cases. PMID:26139741

  15. Patient draping and endotracheal tube positioning during facelift surgery.

    PubMed

    Dobryansky, Michael; Morrison, Colin M; Zins, James E

    2009-07-01

    A comprehensive approach to facial rejuvenation often requires facelift surgery combined with ancillary facial procedures. This may require prolonged operating time under general anesthesia or conscious sedation. When general anesthesia is used, secure endotracheal tube fixation and ready access to the face is essential. We describe an anesthetic technique that assures secure tube placement, rapid intubation, and ready access to the entire face. A fiber-reinforced tube is placed orotracheally, wired to the mandibular dentition, and brought over the head in the fashion similar to a nasotracheal tube. The reinforced nature of the tube prevents kinking and allows rapid repositioning inferiorly to allow access to the upper face. In over 400 rhytidectomies, this technique has allowed rapid intubation and surgical preparation. There have been no airway-related problems or other related complications. This is a safe, effective, and rapid means of securing orotracheal intubation during facial esthetic surgery allowing ready access to the face. PMID:19546664

  16. Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanasono, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible. PMID:26556426

  17. Physical Therapy Management for Adult Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Canadian Practice Survey

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cathy M.; Jackson, Jennifer; Lucy, S. Deborah; Prendergast, Monique; Sinclair, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine current Canadian physical therapy practice for adult patients requiring routine care following cardiac surgery. Methods: A telephone survey was conducted of a selected sample (n=18) of Canadian hospitals performing cardiac surgery to determine cardiorespiratory care, mobility, exercises, and education provided to patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Results: An average of 21 cardiac surgeries per week (range: 6–42) were performed, with an average length of stay of 6.4 days (range: 4.0–10.6). Patients were seen preoperatively at 7 of 18 sites and on postoperative day 1 (POD-1) at 16 of 18 sites. On POD-1, 16 sites performed deep breathing and coughing, 7 used incentive spirometers, 13 did upper-extremity exercises, and 12 did lower-extremity exercises. Nine sites provided cardiorespiratory treatment on POD-3. On POD-1, patients were dangled at 17 sites and mobilized out of bed at 13. By POD-3, patients ambulated 50–120 m per session 2–5 times per day. Sternal precautions were variable, but the lifting limit was reported as ranging between 5 lb and 10 lb. Conclusions: Canadian physical therapists reported the provision of cardiorespiratory treatment after POD-1. According to current available evidence, this level of care may be unnecessary for uncomplicated patients following cardiac surgery. In addition, some sites provide cardiorespiratory treatment techniques that are not supported by evidence in the literature. Further research is required. PMID:21629599

  18. IMMUNOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS SUBMITTED TO METABOLIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    BORGES, Marisa de Carvalho; TERRA, Guilherme Azevedo; TAKEUTI, Tharsus Dias; RIBEIRO, Betânia Maria; SILVA, Alex Augusto; TERRA-JÚNIOR, Júverson Alves; RODRIGUES-JÚNIOR, Virmondes; CREMA, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background : Immunological and inflammatory mechanisms play a key role in the development and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Aim : To raise the hypothesis that alterations in immunological parameters occur after duodenojejunal bypass surgery combined with ileal interposition without gastrectomy, and influences the insulin metabolism of betacells. Methods : Seventeen patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus under clinical management were submitted to surgery and blood samples were collected before and six months after surgery for evaluation of the serum profile of proinflammatory (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17A) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10). In addition, anthropometric measures, glucose levels and insulin use were evaluated in each patient. Results : No changes in the expression pattern of proinflammatory cytokines were observed before and after surgery. In contrast, there was a significant decrease in IL-10 expression, which coincided with a reduction in the daily insulin dose, glycemic index, and BMI of the patients. Early presentation of food to the ileum may have induced the production of incretins such as GLP-1 and PYY which, together with glycemic control, contributed to weight loss, diabetes remission and the consequent good surgical prognosis of these patients. In addition, the control of metabolic syndrome was responsible for the reduction of IL-10 expression in these patients. Conclusion : These findings suggest the presence of low-grade inflammation in these patients during the postoperative period, certainly as a result of adequate glycemic control and absence of obesity, contributing to a good outcome of surgery. PMID:26734798

  19. Anaesthesia Management of a Patient with Incidentally Diagnosed Diaphragmatic Hernia During Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Mehtap; Yanlı, Pınar Yonca; Tomruk, Şenay Göksu; Bakan, Nurten

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is usually congenital. However, it is rarely traumatic and can stay asymptomatic. In this report, we aimed to present the anaesthetic management of a patient with diaphragmatic hernia due to previous trauma (14 years ago), which was diagnosed incidentally during surgery for rectal cancer. The patient (53 years, 56 kg, 165 cm, American Society of Anaesthesiologist (ASA) II), to whom laparoscopic surgery was planned because of rectal cancer, had a history of falling from a height 14 years ago. Preoperatively, the patient did not have any sign except small right diaphragmatic elevation on the chest x-ray. After induction, maintenance of anaesthesia was continued with sevoflurane and O2/N2O. The patient was given a 30° Trendelenburg position. When the trochars were inserted by the surgeon, the diaphragmatic hernia was seen on the right part of the diaphragm, which was hidden by the liver. The surgery was continued laparoscopically but with low pressure (12 mmHg), because the patient did not have any haemodynamic and respiratory instability. The patient, who had stable haemodynamic parameters and no respiratory complications during the operation, was transferred to the ward for monitorised care. Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias can be detected incidentally after a long period of acute event. In our case, it was diagnosed during laparoscopic surgery. The surgery was completed with appropriate and careful haemodynamic monitoring and low intra-abdominal pressure under inhalational anaesthesia without any impairment in the patient’s haemodynamic and respiratory parameters. PMID:27366465

  20. Risk factors associated with outcomes of hip fracture surgery in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Yoo, Byunghoon; Lee, Woo Yong; Lim, Yunhee; Kim, Mun-Cheol; Yon, Jun Heum

    2015-01-01

    Background Hip fracture surgery on elderly patients is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to identify the risk factors related to the postoperative mortality and complications following hip fracture surgery on elderly patients. Methods In this retrospective study, the medical records of elderly patients (aged 65 years or older) who underwent hip fracture surgery from January 2011 to June 2014 were reviewed. A total of 464 patients were involved. Demographic data of the patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, preoperative comorbidities, type and duration of anesthesia and type of surgery were collected. Factors related to postoperative mortality and complications; as well as to intensive care unit admission were analyzed using logistic regression. Results The incidence of postoperative mortality, cardiovascular complications, respiratory complications and intensive care unit (ICU) admission were 1.7, 4.7, 19.6 and 7.1%, respectively. Postoperative mortality was associated with preoperative respiratory comorbidities, postoperative cardiovascular complications (P < 0.05). Postoperative cardiovascular complications were related to frequent intraoperative hypotension (P <0.05). Postoperative respiratory complications were related to age, preoperative renal failure, neurological comorbidities, and bedridden state (P < 0.05). ICU admission was associated with the time from injury to operation, preoperative neurological comorbidities and frequent intraoperative hypotension (P < 0.05). Conclusions Adequate treatment of respiratory comorbidities and prevention of cardiovascular complications might be the critical factors in reducing postoperative mortality in elderly patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. PMID:26634079

  1. [Incidence of conduction disorders in patients who underwent surgery for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Martini, B; Buja, G F; Bassan, L; Rizzardo, P; Canciani, B; Nava, A

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen non-consecutive patients, aging 7 to 61 (average 27) years, underwent left ventricular myotomy-myectomy for a severely symptomatic idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS). In all patients the resting ECG before surgery showed P-R less than 0.18 sec, QRS duration less than 0.11 sec, QRS axis ranging from +10 to +80 degrees. In the immediate post-surgical period 3 patients has complete heart block and 1 had 2nd degree type 2 atrio ventricular block. Lesion was infra-Hisian in 3 patients and intra-Hisian in 1 patient. In the remaining 9 patients an immediate post-surgical left bundle branch block appeared; in 3 out of these patients ECG and an electrophysiologic study documented severe infra-Hisian conduction impairments after an average period of 4 years from surgery. During follow-up 3 patients died suddenly. PMID:2747944

  2. Intraocular surgery in a large diabetes patient population: risk factors and surgical results.

    PubMed

    Ostri, Christoffer

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in developed countries. Accordingly, the prevention and treatment of vision-threatening diabetic eye complications is assuming greater importance. The overall aim of this thesis is to analyse risk factors for intraocular surgery in a large diabetes population and to report surgical results. The specific objectives are to (1) estimate the incidence of diabetic vitrectomy and analyse risk factors (Study I), (2) report long-term results, prognostic factors and incidence of cataract surgery after diabetic vitrectomy (Study II), (3) report results and prognostic factors after cataract surgery in diabetes patients (Study III) and (4) analyse risk factors for diabetic papillopathy with emphasis on metabolic control variability (Study IV). All studies are based on a close-to-complete national surgery register and a large, closely followed diabetic retinopathy screening population. Study I (cohort study, 3980 type 1 diabetes patients) illustrates that diabetic vitrectomy is rarely required in a diabetes patient population with varying degrees of diabetic retinopathy. The risk of reaching diabetic vitrectomy increases fourfold with poor metabolic control, defined as glycosylated haemoglobin A1c > 75 mmol/mol (~9%), which points to good metabolic control as an important preventive measure. Study II (cohort study, 167 diabetes patients) shows that most diabetic vitrectomy patients stand to gain visual acuity ≥0.3 after surgery. Visual acuity is stable after 1 year, and the stability is maintained through 10 years of follow-up. The use of silicone oil for endotamponade is a consistent long-term predictor of low vision after surgery. The risk of requiring cataract surgery after diabetic vitrectomy is substantial, and the risk increases if silicone oil is used. Study III (cohort study, 285 diabetes patients) shows, on the other hand, that diabetes patients can expect a significant improvement in visual acuity after cataract

  3. Tumor regrowth between surgery and initiation of adjuvant therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pirzkall, Andrea; McGue, Colleen; Saraswathy, Suja; Cha, Soonmee; Liu, Raymond; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Berger, Mitchel S; Chang, Susan M; Nelson, Sarah J

    2009-12-01

    To assess incidence and degree of regrowth in glioblastoma between surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate regrowth with presurgical imaging and survival, we examined images of 32 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who underwent MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) prior to surgery, after surgery, and prior to RT/temozolomide. Contrast enhancement (CE) in the pre-RT MR image was compared with postsurgical DWI to differentiate tumor growth from postsurgical infarct. MRSI and PWI parameters were analyzed prior to surgery and pre-RT. Postsurgical MRI indicated that 18 patients had gross total and 14 subtotal resections. Twenty-one patients showed reduced diffusion, and 25 patients showed new or increased CE. In eight patients (25%), the new CE was confined to areas of postsurgical reduced diffusion. In the other 17 patients (53%), new CE was found to be indicative of tumor growth or a combination of tumor growth and surgical injury. Higher perfusion and creatine within nonenhancing tumor in the presurgery MR were associated with subsequent tumor growth. High levels of choline and reduced diffusion in pre-RT CE suggested active metabolism and tumor cell proliferation. Median survival was 14.6 months in patients with interim tumor growth and 24 months in patients with no growth. Increased volume or new onset of CE between surgery and RT was attributed to tumor growth in 53% of patients and was associated with shorter survival. This suggests that reducing the time between surgery and adjuvant therapy may be important. The acquisition of metabolic and physiologic imaging data prior to adjuvant therapy may also be valuable in assessing regions of new CE and nonenhancing tumor. PMID:19229057

  4. Tumor regrowth between surgery and initiation of adjuvant therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pirzkall, Andrea; McGue, Colleen; Saraswathy, Suja; Cha, Soonmee; Liu, Raymond; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess incidence and degree of regrowth in glioblastoma between surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate regrowth with presurgical imaging and survival, we examined images of 32 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who underwent MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) prior to surgery, after surgery, and prior to RT/temozolomide. Contrast enhancement (CE) in the pre-RT MR image was compared with postsurgical DWI to differentiate tumor growth from postsurgical infarct. MRSI and PWI parameters were analyzed prior to surgery and pre-RT. Postsurgical MRI indicated that 18 patients had gross total and 14 subtotal resections. Twenty-one patients showed reduced diffusion, and 25 patients showed new or increased CE. In eight patients (25%), the new CE was confined to areas of postsurgical reduced diffusion. In the other 17 patients (53%), new CE was found to be indicative of tumor growth or a combination of tumor growth and surgical injury. Higher perfusion and creatine within nonenhancing tumor in the presurgery MR were associated with subsequent tumor growth. High levels of choline and reduced diffusion in pre-RT CE suggested active metabolism and tumor cell proliferation. Median survival was 14.6 months in patients with interim tumor growth and 24 months in patients with no growth. Increased volume or new onset of CE between surgery and RT was attributed to tumor growth in 53% of patients and was associated with shorter survival. This suggests that reducing the time between surgery and adjuvant therapy may be important. The acquisition of metabolic and physiologic imaging data prior to adjuvant therapy may also be valuable in assessing regions of new CE and nonenhancing tumor. PMID:19229057

  5. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Postoperative Delirium after Major Surgery in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raats, Jelle W.; van Eijsden, Wilbert A.; Crolla, Rogier M. P. H.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2015-01-01

    Background Early identification of patients at risk for delirium is important, since adequate well timed interventions could prevent occurrence of delirium and related detrimental outcomes. The aim of this study is to evaluate prognostic factors for delirium, including factors describing frailty, in elderly patients undergoing major surgery. Methods We included patients of 65 years and older, who underwent elective surgery from March 2013 to November 2014. Patients had surgery for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) or colorectal cancer. Delirium was scored prospectively using the Delirium Observation Screening Scale. Pre- and peri-operative predictors of delirium were analyzed using regression analysis. Outcomes after delirium included adverse events, length of hospital stay, discharge destination and mortality. Results We included 232 patients. 51 (22%) underwent surgery for AAA and 181 (78%) for colorectal cancer. Postoperative delirium occurred in 35 patients (15%). Predictors of postoperative delirium included: delirium in medical history (Odds Ratio 12 [95% Confidence Interval 2.7–50]), advancing age (Odds Ratio 2.0 [95% Confidence Interval 1.1–3.8]) per 10 years, and ASA-score ≥3 (Odds Ratio 2.6 [95% Confidence Interval 1.1–5.9]). Occurrence of delirium was related to an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay and mortality. Conclusion Postoperative delirium is a frequent complication after major surgery in elderly patients and is related to an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay, and mortality. A delirium in the medical history, advanced age, and ASA-score may assist in defining patients at increased risk for delirium. Further attention to prevention of delirium is essential in elderly patients undergoing major surgery. PMID:26291459

  6. Effectiveness of a videotaped behavioral intervention in reducing anxiety in emergency oral surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Robertson, C; Gatchel, R J; Fowler, C

    1991-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a videotaped behavioral treatment program in reducing dental anxiety in emergency oral surgery patients. It compared a videotaped placebo program and a no-treatment control condition. Anxiety, measured for two periods during the study (an anticipatory phase just before oral surgery and a post oral surgery phase), was evaluated by means of self-report, physiological, and behavioral observation measures. Results revealed significant treatment group as well as Group X Sex interaction effects for the heart rate index of physiological arousal. Results also revealed that the treatment program was reported by subjects to be significantly more helpful than the placebo program. Overall, these results suggest that a short, videotaped behavioral intervention can have a positive effect on the oral surgery patient, and that the sex of the subject may be an important variable to be incorporated in evaluating the effectiveness of this type of treatment program. PMID:1878612

  7. Controversies in the surgery of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Church, James M

    2016-07-01

    Dominantly inherited syndromes of colorectal cancer predisposition are characterized by multifocal neoplasia with an early age of onset. The risk of colorectal cancer is high in affected patients and care of the patients is based on the aims of cancer prevention and cancer cure. At the same time, quality of life should be disturbed as little as possible. Because patients are generally young, the stakes are high. Injudicious decision-making can have unfortunate effects on patients and families. In this article the controversial aspects of surgery in familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome are discussed. Specifically the controversies in familial adenomatous polyposis include the timing and the type of surgery while for Lynch syndrome discussion revolves about prophylactic surgery, primary, secondary and tertiary. PMID:26869170

  8. Effects of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine on Postoperative Pain in Highly Nicotine-Dependent Patients After Thoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xingzhi; Zhang, Ping; Lu, Sufen; Zhang, Zongwang; Yu, Ailan; Liu, Donghua; Wu, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on pain in highly nicotine-dependent patients after thoracic surgery. Highly nicotine-dependent men underwent thoracic surgery and received postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with sufentanil. In dexmedetomidine group (experimental group, n = 46), dexmedetomidine was given at a loading dose of 1 μg/kg for 10 minutes, followed by continuous infusion at 0.5 μg/kg/h until 30 minutes before the end of surgery. The saline group (control group, n = 48) received the same volume of saline. General anesthesia was administered via a combination of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics. If necessary, patients were administered a loading dose of sufentanil by an anesthesiologist immediately after surgery (0 hours). Patient-controlled analgesia was started when the patient's resting numerical rating scale (NRS) score was less than 4. Resting and coughing NRS scores and sufentanil dosage were recorded 0, 1, 4 hours, and every 4 hours until 48 hours after surgery. Dosages of other rescue analgesics were converted to the sufentanil dosage. Surgical data, adverse effects, and degree of satisfaction were obtained. Cumulative sufentanil dosage, resting NRS, and coughing NRS in the first 24 hours after surgery and heart rate were lower in the experimental compared with the control group (P <0.05). No patient experienced sedation or respiratory depression. Frequency of nausea and vomiting and degree of satisfaction were similar in both groups. Intraoperative dexmedetomidine was associated with reduced resting and coughing NRS scores and a sufentanil-sparing effect during the first 24 hours after thoracic surgery. PMID:27258524

  9. Changes of Vision-Related Quality of Life in Retinal Detachment Patients after Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bijun; Sun, Qian; Xu, Xian; Miao, Yuyu; Zou, Haidong

    2015-01-01

    Rhegmatenous retinal detachment (RRD) is one of the most serious complications after phacoemulsification combined with intraocular lens implantation surgery. It has been reported that vision-related quality of life (VRQoL), as well as visual acuity rapidly decreased when RRD developed. However, little is known of the VRQoL in those RRD patients after anatomical retinal re-attachment, especially whether or not the VRQoL is higher than that before cataract surgery. In this prospective case series study, we use the Chinese-version low vision quality of life questionnaire (CLVQOL) to assess the changes of VRQoL in age-related cataract patients who suffered from RRD after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (phaco-IOL) implantation. All participants were asked to complete questionnaires in face- to-face interviews one day before and two weeks after cataract surgery, as well as one day before and three months after RRD surgery. A total of 10,127 consecutive age-related cataract patients were followed up to one year after phaco-IOL implantation; among these patients, 17 were diagnosed as RRD. The total CLVQOL scores and subscale scores except “Mobility” decreased significantly when RRD developed. After retinal surgery, only the score of “General vision and lighting” in the CLVQOL questionnaires improved when compared to the scores two weeks after cataract surgery, although the best corrected visual acuity of all patients significantly raised up. However, the mean CLVQOL scores and subscale scores were still considerably higher than the level prior to cataract surgery. Our study suggests that cataract patients at high risk of postoperative RRD should not deny the opportunity to undergo phaco-IOL implantation, even though potential VRQoL impairment induced by RRD exists. PMID:25764367

  10. The anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy on patients awaiting ambulatory surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ni, Cheng-Hua; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Chang, Ming-Li; Yu, Lee-Fen; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if aromatherapy could reduce preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients. A total of 109 preoperative patients were randomly assigned to experimental (bergamot essential oil) and control (water vapor) conditions and their responses to the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and vital signs were monitored. Patients were stratified by previous surgical experience, but that did not influence the results. All those exposed to bergamot essential oil aromatherapy showed a greater reduction in preoperative anxiety than those in the control groups. Aromatherapy may be a useful part of a holistic approach to reducing preoperative anxiety before ambulatory surgery. PMID:24454517